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Sample records for open globe injury

  1. Occupational open globe injuries.

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    Vasu, U; Vasnaik, A; Battu, R R; Kurian, M; George, S

    2001-03-01

    Occupational ocular trauma is an important cause of acquired monocular blindness in a rapidly industrialising country like India. Knowledge of the epidemiology of occupational eye injuries is essential to formulate viable industrial safety measures. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with occupational open globe injuries between 1994 and 1998. We documented the circumstances of the injuries, their clinical findings and the use of appropriate protective eyewear at the time of the injury. The visual acuity 6 months after the injury was the final outcome measure. In this study period we examined 43 patients with open globe injuries sustained at the work place. Thirty-four (79.1%) patients were young males. The iron and steel industry accounted for 19 (44.2%) cases while 8 (18.6%) patients each were from the agricultural, mining and other small scale industrial sectors. At the time of the injury, 33 (76.7%) were not wearing the recommended protective eyewear and 6 (13.9%) were under the influence of alcohol. The injuries were mild in 6 (13.9%), moderate in 18 (41.9%) and severe in 19 (44.2%) patients. At the end of 6 months, 2 (4.7%) patients had a visual acuity of 6/12 or better, 4 (9.3%) had a visual acuity of 6/18 to 6/60 and 29 (67.4.%) had a vision of eyewear and alcohol-free environment at the work place is likely to reduce the incidence of severe occupational open globe injuries.

  2. EYE TRAUMA. OPEN GLOBE INJURY MANAGEMENT

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    Mojca Globočnik Petrovič

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ocular trauma is important cause of blindness. Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology allows us to use a standardized eye injury terminology which permits an unambigous interpretation. The Eye Injury Registry enables the analysis of medical, epidemyologic and social data.The most frequent ocular injury ocular contusion has a relatively good prognosis. An adequate primary ocular repair and correct timing of pars plana vitrectomy are very important in open globe injury management. There still exist some controversial issues concerning the role of posterior segment surgery in open globe injuries. These include timing of surgery, prophylactic scleral buckle placement and a proper use of systemic and intravitreal antibiotics.Conclusions. With adequate primary ocular repair, the use of systemic, intravitreal antibiotics, scleral buckling and proper timing for pars plana vitrectomy the prognosis for ocular trauma cases can be better.

  3. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic effect of open globe injury

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    Mei-Lin Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze clinical characteristics and postoperative outcomes after open globe injury. METHODS: Demographic characteristics(age, gender, eye trauma, profession, cause of injury and injured part, as well as complications and prognosis were analyzed in 152 cases(152 eyesof open globe injury. RESULTS: Patients with open globe injury had an average age of 40.45±38.32 years old with a 5.9:1 male-to-female gender ratio. The left-to-right eye ratio was 1.27:1. Most patients were workers, farmers, or retired. The most common etiologies were scratches, boxing, and falls. Zone Ⅲ was the most commonly injured part. Iridoptosis or iris incarceration, retinal detachment, vitreal prolapse, hyphema or hypopyon, and vitreous hemorrhage were the most common complications. Visual acuity improved in 86 cases postoperatively but ophthalmectomy was still required in 25 eyes. CONCLUSION: Vision can be improved after surgery in open globe injury. However, patients are usually seriously injured and improvement is minimal, thereby resulting in a great loss to patients and society.

  4. Epidemiologic characteristics and outcomes of open globe injury in Shanghai

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    Yong-Rong Ji

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the epidemiologic characteristics and outcomes of open globe injury in Shanghai. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted for 148 unilateral open globe injury cases presenting to a tertiary referral hospital of Shanghai. Electronic medical records were reviewed and phone surveys were conducted to collect and analyze 1 background of patient; 2 setting of injury and clinical signs at presentation; 3 treatment procedure and outcome; 4 quality of life after injury. RESULTS: There were more male patients (77.03% than females (22.97%, more temporary habitants (79.05% than residents (20.95%. The subjects in this study presented a significantly lower constitutional status of education than that of the whole Shanghai population (P<0.001. Occupational injury was the first cause of injuries (39.86%, followed by home accident (20.27%, road accident (16.89%, violent behavior (16.89% and outdoor injury (6.08%. The 143 subjects (96.62% were not wearing spectacles at the time of injury. Of all patients, 77 subjects (52.03% had the outcome of no vision (including enucleation. The classification and regression tree (CART prognosis presents 59.58% sensitivity to predict visual survival correctly and 80.19% specificity to predict no vision correctly. The patients whose injured eye had no vision reported more reduction of life quality. CONCLUSION: We found that male subject, temporary habitants, low educational status and no eyewear are risk factors of open globe injury in Shanghai. Occupational injury is the leading cause. CART analysis presents a certain agreement to the actual visual outcome. The injury imposes negative impact on quality of life especially in no vision cases. The education of eye protection may help to avoid the injury.

  5. Microbial cultures in open globe injuries in southern India.

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    Gupta, Arvind; Srinivasan, Renuka; Kaliaperumal, Subashini; Setia, Sajita

    2007-07-01

    To determine the risk factors leading to positive intraocular culture in patients with open globe injury. A prospective interventional study involving 110 eyes of 110 patients of more than 15 years of age, presenting with open globe injury, was undertaken. Emergency repair of the injured globe was done. Prolapsed intraocular tissue or aqueous humour was sent for microbial work up before repair. In endophthalmitis cases intravitreal antibiotics were given according to the antimicrobial sensitivity. Chi-square and logistic regression analysis were used to determine the risk factors. Fifty-six patients showed microbial contamination. Bacteria were cultured in 42 patients and fungi in 14 patients. Nineteen patients developed endophthalmitis, of which 18 patients showed microbial growth initially. In univariate analysis, initial visual acuity (8 mm, P 72 h, P 8 mm, P = 0.013) were associated with increased risk of positive microbial culture. Six patients had intraocular foreign body but were culture negative. Age, gender, site of injury and presence of cataract did not significantly affect the culture positivity. Microbial contamination is a risk factor for the development for endophthalmitis. Despite the high frequency of microbial contamination, it develops only in few cases. Systemic antibiotics, virulence of the organism and host factors play a role in the manifestation of endophthalmitis. Prophylaxis with intraocular antibiotics should be strongly considered in cases with poor vision at presentation, larger corneoscleral laceration, delayed surgical intervention and uveal tissue or vitreous prolapse.

  6. Pediatric open globe injury: A review of the literature

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    Xintong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Open globe injury (OGI is a severe form of eye trauma estimated at 2-3.8/100,000 in the United States. Most pediatric cases occur at home and are the result of sharp object penetration. The aim of this article is to review the epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of this condition by conducting a systematic literature search with inclusion of all case series on pediatric OGI published between 1996 and 2015. Diagnosis of OGI is based on patient history and clinical examination supplemented with imaging, especially computed tomography when indicated. Few prospective studies exist for the management of OGI in pediatric patients, but adult recommendations are often followed with success. The main goals of surgical management are to repair the open globe and remove intraocular foreign bodies. Systemic antibiotics are recommended as medical prophylaxis against globe infection, or endophthalmitis. Other complications are similar to those seen in adults, with the added focus of amblyopia therapy in children. Severe vision decline is most likely due to traumatic cataracts. The ocular trauma score, a system devised to predict final visual acuity (VA in adults, has proven to be of prognostic value in pediatric OGI as well. Factors indicating poor visual prognosis are young age, poor initial VA, posterior eye involvement, long wound length, globe rupture, lens involvement, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and endophthalmitis. A thorough understanding of OGI and the key differences in epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and prognosis between adults and children is critical to timely prevention of posttraumatic vision loss early in life.

  7. Open globe injury in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia - A 10-year review

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    Madhusudhan A/L Paramananda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the aetiology of open globe injuries at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia over a period of 10y and the prognostic factors for visual outcome.METHODS:Retrospective review of medical records of open globe injury cases that presented from January 2000 to December 2009. Classification of open globe injury was based on the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology (BETT. Records were obtained with hospital permission via the in-house electronic patient management system, and the case notes of all patients with a diagnosis of open globe injury were scrutinised. Patients with prior ocular trauma, pre-existing ocular conditions affecting the visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, central vision or corneal thickness, as well as those with a history of previous intraocular or refractive surgery were excluded. Analysis of data was with SPSS version 20.0. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between prognostic factors and visual outcome.RESULTS: This study involved 220 patients (n=222 eyes. The most common place of injury was the home (51.8%, followed by the workplace (23.4%. Among children aged less than 16y of age, domestic-related injury was the predominant cause (54.6%, while in those aged 16y and above, occupational injuries were the most common cause (40.0%. Most eyes (76.5% had an initial visual acuity worse than 3/60, and in half of these, the visual acuity improved. The visual outcome was found to be significantly associated with the initial visual acuity (P<0.005, posterior extent of wound (P<0.001, length of wound (P<0.001, presence of hyphaema (P<0.001 and presence of vitreous prolapse ((P<0.005.CONCLUSION:The most common causes of open globe injury are domestic accidents and occupational injuries. Significant prognostic factors for final visual outcome in patients with open globe injury are initial visual acuity, posterior extent and length of wound, presence of hyphaema and presence of vitreous

  8. Open globe injuries in patients seen at Groote Schuur Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... Gender, age, education level and employment status of patients with .... injuries occurred included the home (28%), the workplace (21%), recreation (11%) .... documented 3-month VAs may therefore be biased. Conclusion.

  9. Multidetector CT (MD-CT) in the diagnosis of uncertain open globe injuries

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    Hoffstetter, P.; Schreyer, A.G.; Jung, E.M.; Heiss, P.; Zorger, N. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schreyer, C.I.; Framme, C. [Klink und Poliklinik fuer Augenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the significance of multislice CT for the diagnosis of uncertain penetrating globe injuries. Materials and Methods: Based on a retrospective chart review between 2002 and 2007, we identified 59 patients presenting with severe ocular trauma with uncertain rupture of the globe due to massive subconjunctival and/or anterior chamber hemorrhage. The IOP (intraocular pressure) was within normal range in all patients. High resolution multidetector CT (MD-CT) scans (16 slice scans) with axial and coronar reconstructions were performed in all patients. The affected eye was examined for signs of penetrating injury such as abnormal eye shape, scleral irregularities, lens dislocation or intravitreal hemorrhages. Four experienced radiologists read the CT scans independently. Beside the diagnosis, the relevant morphological criteria and the optimal plane orientation (axial or coronar) were specified. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Additionally the interobserver variability was determined by applying the Cohen's kappa test. Surgical sclera inspections were performed in all cases as a standard of reference. The evaluations of the CT examination were compared with the surgery reports. Results: 59 patients were evaluated (42 men, 17 women). The mean age was 29 years (range 7-91). In 17 patients a rupture of the globe was diagnosed during surgery. 12 of these 17 penetrating injuries (70.6%) were classified correctly by MDCT, 5 of the 17 (29.4%) were not detectable. 42 patients did not have an open globe injury. 41 of these patients were diagnosed correctly negative by MDCT, and one patient was classified false positive. This results in a sensitivity of 70% with a specificity of 98%. There was high inter-rater agreement with kappa values between 0.89-0.96. Most discrepancies were caused by wrong negative findings. The most frequent morphologic criteria for open globe injury were the deformation (n

  10. Demographic Characteristics and Clinical Outcome of Work-related Open Globe Injuries in the Most Industrialised Region of Turkey

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    Sertaç Argun Kıvanç

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes of work-related open globe injuries in the most industrialized region of Turkey. Materials and Methods: The demographic and medical records of patients with work-related open globe injuries who presented to the ophthalmology or emergency departments with an official occupational accident report were retrospectively reviewed. Visual acuity categories were defined according to the World Health Organization. The injury types and zones of the open globes were classified according to Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System. Results: Among 479 patients with work-related eye injuries in 5 years, there were 102 eyes of 101 patients with open globe injuries (21%. The mean age of the patients was 34.5±8.9 years with a mean follow-up of 12.5±12.6 months. The injuries peaked in June in the hour between 12:00 and 13:00. Eighty-six percent presented to emergency services within 12 hours after the injury. Twenty-two percent of the patients had been wearing protective eyewear at the time of injury. The open globe injuries were penetrating in 51%, intraocular foreign body in 40%, rupture in 7% and perforation in 2% of the eyes. The most frequent finding was traumatic cataract. Final visual acuity of 33.3% of patients was below 3/60. Seventy-eight percent of patients that had visual acuity worse than 6/18 at presentation had visual acuity of 6/18 or better at final visit. Sixty-three percent of eyes which had injuries involving all 3 zones resulted in phthisis bulbi, enucleation or evisceration. Conclusion: Work-related open globe injuries may have severe consequences such as visual impairment and blindness among the young male working population in industrialized areas. Nearly half of the occupational open globe injuries resulted in visual impairment and blindness.

  11. Open-globe injuries: the experience at Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru.

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    Hooi, S H; Hooi, S T

    2003-08-01

    Between 1st January 1999 and 31st December 2000, 152 patients (156 eyes) with open-globe injuries were treated in the Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru. The majority were male (88.2%), Malay (63.2%), from the Johor Bahru district (51.3%) and aged between 21 and 30 years (23.7%). Most injuries were workplace-related (41.4%). Lens injury, retinal detachment, endophthalmitis, intraocular foreign bodies and phthisis occurred in 40.4%, 15.4%, 14.7%, 12.2% and 11.5% of eyes respectively. A favourable visual outcome occurred in 55.4% of eyes. Prognostic factors for visual outcome include presenting visual acuity, relative afferent pupillary defect, wound location, lens injury, retinal detachment and endophthalmitis.

  12. Open globe injury with an interesting intra-ocular foreign body

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    Gill, Ekjyot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cases of penetrating ocular trauma due to osseous material are limited, so reported incidents are valuable in determining outcomes and proper treatment courses.Case description: We report a case of an open globe injury of the left eye with an intraocular foreign body occurring after a firework exploded in the hand of a 22-year-old man. The patient presented with light perception vision in the injured eye with a full-thickness limbal laceration and dense hyphema obscuring fundoscopy. CT scan revealed a hyperdense foreign body juxtaposed to the lens. Immediate surgical intervention to repair the globe rupture revealed a defect in the anterior capsule and small, white objects in the posterior chamber that were promptly removed. Pathologic investigation determined these fragments to be cortical bone likely from the patient’s phalanges. Results and discussion: There was no evidence of endophthalmitis or keratitis from time of injury to the five-month follow-up, suggesting that the risk of infection may be low and therefore it may be reasonable to manage these injuries with a period of observation.

  13. Predictive value of ocular trauma score in open globe combat eye injuries

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    Islam, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of final visual outcome in ocular injuries is of paramount importance and various prognostic models have been proposed to predict final visual outcome. The objective of this study was to validate the predictive value of ocular trauma score (OTS) in patients with combat related open globe injuries and to evaluate the factors affecting the final visual outcome. Methods: Data of 93 patients admitted in AFIO Rawalpindi between Jan 2010 to June 2014 with combat related open globe ocular injuries was analysed. Initial and final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was categorized as No Light Perception (NLP), Light Perception (LP) to Hand Movement (HM), 1/200-19/200, 20/200-20/50, and =20/40. OTS was calculated for each eye by assigning numerical raw points to six variables and then scores were stratified into five OTS categories. Results: Mean age of study population was 28.77 ± 8.37 years. Presenting visual acuity was <20/200 (6/60) in 103 (96.23%) eyes. However, final BCVA of =20/40 (6/12) was achieved in 18 (16.82%) eyes, while 72 (67.28%) eyes had final BCVA of <20/200 (6/60). Final visual outcome in our study were similar to those in OTS study, except for NLP in category 1 (81% vs. 74%) and =20/40 in category 3 (30% vs. 41%). The OTS model predicted visual survival (LP or better) with a sensitivity of 94.80% and predicted no vision (NLP) with a specificity of 100%. Conclusion: OTS is a reliable tool for assessment of ocular injuries and predicting final visual outcome at the outset. (author)

  14. Impact of surgeon subspecialty training on surgical outcomes in open globe injuries

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    Han IC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ian C Han,1 Sidharth Puri,1 Jiangxia Wang,2 Shameema Sikder1 1Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether subspecialty training of the initial treating surgeon affects visual acuity and surgical outcomes in patients with open globe injuries.Design: This study is a single-institution, retrospective case series.Methods: The charts of adult patients with open globe injuries requiring surgical repair at the Wilmer Eye Institute between July 1, 2007 and July 1, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings at presentation were recorded, and details of initial repair and follow-up surgeries were analyzed. Differences in visual acuity and surgical outcomes were compared based on subspecialty training of the initial surgeon.Results: The charts of 282 adult patients were analyzed, and 193 eyes had at least 6 months of follow-up for analysis. Eighty-six eyes (44.6% required follow-up surgery within the first year, and 39 eyes (20.2% were enucleated. Eyes initially treated by a vitreoretinal (VR surgeon were 2.3 times (P=0.003 more likely to improve by one Ocular Trauma Score (OTS visual acuity category and 1.9 times (P=0.027 more likely to have at least one more follow-up surgery at 6 months compared to eyes treated by non-VR surgeons. Patients with more anterior injuries treated by a VR surgeon were more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category compared to those treated by non-VR surgeons (P=0.004 and 0.016 for Zones I and II, respectively. There was no difference in visual acuity outcomes for eyes with posterior injuries (P=0.515 for Zone III.Conclusion: Eyes initially treated by a VR surgeon are more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category than those initially treated by a non-VR surgeon. However, patients initially treated by a VR surgeon also undergo more

  15. PREDICTING PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF OCULAR TRAUMA SCORE (OTS IN AN OPEN GLOBE INJURY IN TERTIARY EYE CARE HOSPITAL

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    Rahul

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To evaluate the prognostic value of OTS in open globe injuries. MATERIAL METHOD : Retrospective analysis of 77 eyes with open globe injuries was done from 01/07/2013 to 31/12/2014. Patients were assigned raw score sum based on initial V/A, and ocular findings then classified into 5 categories for predicting final visual outcome based on ocular Trauma score (OTS. RESULT : We estimated final V/A in 77 cases of open globe injuries (64.93% had raw sc ore between 65.91 (category 3, 4 Six months after the injury, 42.85% patients of categories 1 (raw score 0 - 44 achieved V/A of PL/HM as compared to 17% in OTS study. 16 patients with raw compared to OTS study. We reported comparable visual outcome with OT S study except in category 1 & 2. CONCLUSION: OTS score is valuable in triage, patient counseling and decision making for the management of ocular trauma. We recommend that OTS should be used routinely for open globe injuries as it is a simple guide

  16. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China.

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    Bingsheng Lou

    Full Text Available To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury.A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014.A total of 153 (30.6% of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9% and intravitreal injection (42.0%. Cephalosporins (53.8% and vancomycin (42.0% were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%, and aminoglycosides (13.4%. Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7% replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4% (p = 0.001, Fisher's exact test.Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis.

  17. Tilt, Decentration, and Internal Higher-Order Aberrations of Sutured Posterior-Chamber Intraocular Lenses in Patients with Open Globe Injuries

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    Xiangjia Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the tilt, decentration, and internal higher-order aberrations (HOAs of sutured posterior-chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs in patients with open globe injuries. Methods. 46 consecutive patients (47 eyes who underwent transsclerally sutured IOL implantation were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Nineteen eyes had a history of open globe injury. The tilt and decentration of the IOLs and the visual quality were measured 1 month after surgery. Results. The horizontal tilt and decentration of the IOLs in the open-globe-injury group were significantly higher than those in the control group (both P<0.05. In the open-globe-injury group, the horizontal decentration was significantly greater in the limbus-sclera-involved group (n=11 than in the only-cornea-involved group (n=8, P=0.040. The internal coma, 3rd-order, and total HOA values at pupil sizes of 4 mm (P=0.006 and 6 mm (P=0.013 were significantly higher in the open-globe-injury group than in the controls. Consequently, the optical quality data for the modulation transfer function and the Strehl ratio (all P<0.05 were significantly poorer in the open-globe-injury group. Conclusions. Open globe injuries damage the structural integrity of the eyeball, resulting in more-misaligned sutured IOLs and poorer visual quality.

  18. Comparison of the clinical presentation and visual outcome in open globe injuries in adults and children over 30 months.

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    Gupta, Arvind; Srinivasan, Renuka; Babu, K Ramesh; Setia, Sajita

    2010-01-01

    To compare the clinical presentation and final visual outcome of open globe injuries in children and adults in a referral hospital over a 30-month period. This is an institutional-based prospective study of open globe injuries cases presenting in the emergency department between July 2003 and December 2005. Patients were divided in 2 groups: group 1, children (2-15 years), and group 2, adults (>15 years). All the patients were admitted and emergency surgical interventions were undertaken. The clinical features at presentation and the final visual acuity are compared. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Ninety and 84 patients were included in group 1 and group 2, respectively. The most common places of injuries were home or while playing outdoor games in group 1 (67%) and workplace in group 2 (53.5%). The presenting features were significantly more grave in group 2. These included poor presenting visual acuity (p=0.012), vitreous prolapse (p=0.002), presence of relative afferent pupillary defect (p=0.001), and incidence of endophthalmitis (p=0.004). Time interval between injury and surgical intervention (p=0.018) was better in group 2. Other features, such as presence of hyphema, uveal tissue prolapse, cataract, intraocular foreign body, and length or location of laceration were similar in both groups. The final visual outcome was similar in the groups (p = 0.21), with approximately half of the patients achieving vision of 20/60 or better in each group. The majority of injuries in children and adults occurred in their homes or workplaces, respectively. Although the clinical presentations of open globe injuries were significantly more grave in adults than in children, the final visual outcomes were similar.

  19. Randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for the prevention of endophthalmitis after open globe injury at Groote Schuur Hospital.

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    Du Toit, N; Mustak, S; Cook, C

    2017-07-01

    Most post-traumatic acute infectious endophthalmitis occur within a week of open globe trauma, necessitating early antibiotic prophylaxis. There are few randomised studies that demonstrate the benefits of prophylactic antibiotics. This randomised controlled non-inferiority trial was aimed at determining the incidence of post-traumatic endophthalmitis using established intravenous/oral prophylaxis and comparing this to the incidence using oral antibiotics only. All adult patients admitted with open globe injury were included. Those with proven endophthalmitis, high-risk features, who underwent primary evisceration and those allergic to the trial antibiotics were excluded. Patients were randomised to receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin or oral ciprofloxacin and oral cefuroxime for 3 days from admission. Acute endophthalmitis was the primary outcome. Patients completed the study if they were followed up for 6 weeks post injury. Three hundred patients were enrolled, with 150 in each arm. There were 99 exclusions. Seven patients developed endophthalmitis despite prophylaxis-2.0% (three cases) in the intravenous and oral arm, compared with 2.7% (four cases) in the oral-only arm-this difference was not statistically significant ( p=0.703). The incidence of endophthalmitis with prophylaxis was 2-3%. Selected patients with open globe injuries (without high-risk features) may receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin, or oral cefuroxime and oral ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis against acute endophthalmitis-the latter regimen has the advantage of shortening patients' hospital stays and reducing costs. Non-inferiority study-design limitations should be taken into account, however. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. VRPI Temporal Progression of Closed Globe Injury from Blast Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    significant increases in VEGF have been reported in many ocular disorders including diabetic retinopathy , diffuse macular edema, retinal vein...Open globe injury is often readily identifiable and typically undergoes urgent surgical repair. However, closed globe injury may not be detected ...including shrapnel or debris to the eye, is easily identified and rapidly treated. Closed globe trauma may not be detected right away, and little is

  1. Prognostic factors for open globe injuries and correlation of Ocular Trauma Score at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore

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    Rupesh Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the factors influencing final vision outcome after surgical repair of open globe injuries and to correlate the Ocular trauma score. Materials and Methods: Retrospective case analysis of patients with open globe injuries at a tertiary referral eye care centre in Singapore was performed. Pre-operative factors affecting final vision outcome in patients with open globe injury and correlation of ocular trauma score in our study with international ocular trauma scoring system was performed. Results: Case records of 172 eyes with open globe injury were analyzed. Mean age was 36. 67 years. Mean follow up was 12.26 m. Males were pre-dominantly affected. Initial visual acuity was ≥20/40, 20/50 < 20/200, 20/200- CF, HM- PL and NLP in 24 (14%, 39 (22.7%, 16 (9.3%, 66 (38.4% and 27 (15.7% eyes respectively. Final visual acuity was ≤20/40, 20/50 < 20/200, 20/200- 1/200, HM- PL and NLP in 76 (44.2%, 28 (16.3%, 11 (6.4%, 30 (17.4% and 27 (15.7% eyes respectively. Ocular trauma score in our study correlates with international ocular trauma scoring system. Conclusion: The present study showed pre-operative variables such as mode of injury, pre-operative visual acuity, traumatic cataract, hyphaema, relative afferent papillary defect, vitreous lossand vitreous hemorrhage to be adversely affecting the final vision outcome. Our study showed a good synchrony with international ocular trauma score (OTS and based on this study we were able to validate application of OTS in Singapore population. Recognizing these factors can help the surgeon in evidence based counseling.

  2. Evaluation of Occupational Closed Globe Eye Injuries

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    Berna Akova-Budak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate closed glob injuries related to occupational accidents of patients who had official occupational accident records. Material and Method: The medical records of patients with ocular injuries who referred to Department of Ophthalmology or emergency of Uludag University, School of Medicine between January 2010 and December 2013 with official occupational accident report were retrospectively reviewed. The patients with closed globe injuries following trauma were included. Age, sex, the injured eye, the cause of the trauma, whether the precautions were taken or not by the patient, the damage due to trauma were recorded. Results: According to the official records, 108 patients referred to our clinic with closed globe injury related to occupational accident. One hundred twenty eyes of 108 patients ( 2 females, 106 males were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 33±8.6 years. The most frequent cause of injury was foreign bodies on the ocular surface followed by blunt trauma. The mean age of the patients injured with foreign bodies was found to be significantly lower than the patients injured with blunt objects (p=0.039. Thirteen patients reported that they had used preventive equipment. Discussion: It is of utmost importance that the awareness of the workers should be raised and they should be educated about the use of preventive equipment to prevent the occupational eye injuries. The education of particularly the younger patients about the occupational injuries when they begin to work may decrease the rate of occupational accident related eye injuries.

  3. Emergent risk factors associated with eyeball loss and ambulatory vision loss after globe injuries.

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    Hyun Lee, Seung; Ahn, Jae Kyoun

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate risk factors associated with eyeball loss and ambulatory vision loss on emergent examination of patients with ocular trauma. We reviewed the medical records of 1,875 patients hospitalized in a single tertiary referral center between January 2003 and December 2007. Emergent examinations included a history of trauma, elapsed time between injury and hospital arrival, visible intraocular tissues, and initial visual acuity (VA) using a penlight. The main outcome measures were ocular survival and ambulatory vision survival (>20/200) at 1 year after trauma using univariate and multivariate regression analysis. The ocular trauma scores were significantly higher in open globe injuries than in closed globe injuries (p eyeball loss. Elapsed time more than 12 hours and visible intraocular tissues were the significant risk factors associated with ambulatory vision loss. The most powerful predictor of eyeball loss and ambulatory vision loss was eyeball rupture. In closed globe injuries, there were no significant risk factors of eyeball loss, whereas initial vision less than LP and the presence of relative afferent pupillary defect were the significant risk factors associated with ambulatory vision loss. An initial VA less than LP using a penlight, a history of golf ball injury, and elapsed time more than 12 hours between ocular trauma and hospital arrival were associated with eyeball loss and ambulatory vision loss. Physicians should bear these factors in mind so that they can more effectively counsel patients with such injuries.

  4. The Globe opens its doors to the public

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Globe of Science and Innovation has quickly become the most recognisable landmark on the CERN skyline. Since construction was completed last summer, the Globe's distinctive spherical shape has greeted and intrigued visitors and employees on arrival at CERN.

  5. “Universe of Particles” opens in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Carolyn Lee

    2010-01-01

    CERN’s brand new permanent exhibition provides a high-tech experience with virtual interactive stations and pieces of actual detectors to intrigue the general public about some of the world’s most sophisticated physics tools and experiments.   Universe of Particles exhibition will open on 1 July in the Globe of Science and Technology. Upon entering the dark interior of the Globe, one has a sense of emerging into a portal to the outer universe. Large projections that fill the walls and a 6 m large diameter circle screen in the middle of the ground where space swirls with stars and planets, as well as particle collisions from the LHC experiments. Questions such as where do we come from? What are the laws of Nature? Why did antimatter and matter not destroy each other just after the Big Bang? Will we find particles that make up the mysterious dark matter or the Higgs particle? are linked to the research being done at the LHC. Visitors are invited to explore the unique spherica...

  6. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF CLOSED GLOBE INJURIES WITH HYPHAEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Philip

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Eye injuries still remain one of the most common causes of unilateral blindness worldwide. In addition to the physical and psychological trauma to the patient, the direct and indirect costs to the society are enormous. Blunt eye injuries commonly result in traumatic hyphaema and are not an infrequent cause of presentation to the emergency units of many eye clinics. Aims of this study were- 1. To study the cause, clinical presentation, complications and visual outcome of closed globe injury with hyphaema. 2. To know the association between mode of injuries and associated lesions and visual outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study Design and Statistical Analysis- A descriptive case series study was conducted at Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Thiruvananthapuram for a period of one year, from October 2010 to September 2011, in all patients coming to the institute with hyphaema due to closed globe injury and willing to participate in the study. Patients with pre-existing ocular diseases were excluded. Data were analysed using computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 10. Data are expressed in its frequency and percentage. To elucidate the associations and comparisons between different parameters, Chi square ( 2 test was used as a nonparametric test. For all statistical evaluations, a two-tailed probability of value, 6/60 either maintained that vision or improved. Only 10% of the study population had corneal blood staining. Majority of those who had initial hyphaema <1/3 rd , had normal initial intraocular pressure. Of the total 36 patients who had initial hyphaema less than 1/3 rd , 29 (80.6% had normal intraocular pressure on presentation. Of the 36 patients with initial hyphaema <1/3 rd , 28 (77.8% had normal intraocular pressure at 3 rd day. Those who had lenticular and posterior segment injury had poor visual outcome. In our study, initially only 15% had vision better than 6/12, but at the end of 180

  7. Openwebglobe - AN Open Source Sdk for Creating Large-Scale Virtual Globes on a Webgl Basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, B.; Christen, M.; Nebiker, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the OpenWebGlobe project (www.openwebglobe.org) and the OpenWebGlobe SDK (Software Development Kit) - an open source virtual globe environment using WebGL. Unlike other (web-based) 3d geovisualisation technologies and toolkits, the OpenWebGlobe SDK not only supports the content authoring and web visualization aspects, but also the data processing functionality for generating multi-terabyte terrain, image, map and 3d point cloud data sets in high-performance and cloud-based parallel computing environments. The OpenWebGlobe architecture is described and the paper outlines the processing and the viewer functionality provided by the OpenWebGlobe SDK. It then discusses the generation and updating of a global 3d base map using OpenStreetMap data and finally presents two show cases employing the technology a) for implementing an interactive national 3d geoportal incorporating high resolution national geodata sets and b) for implementing a 3d geoinformation service supporting the real-time incorporation of 3d point cloud data.

  8. The CinéGlobe film festival opens at CERN and the Forum Meyrin theatre

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of CinéGlobe, the international festival of short films and science documentaries, will be held from 16 to 20 February 2010. It is being organised by the club Open Your Eyes Films, CERN and the culture office of the city of Meyrin. For five days, 80 films from amongst the 700 submissions will be shown at the Globe of Science and Innovation and in the Forum Meyrin theatre. On Saturday, 20 February 2010, a jury composed of film professionals and public figures will award a Golden CinéGlobe for the best film in each category, along with an audience award, at a ceremony in the Globe of Science and Innovation. The festival programme is available for download. See you at the movies!

  9. Traumatic Globe Subluxation and Intracranial Injury Caused by Bicycle Brake Handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroy, Ceren; Cibik, Cansu; Yazici, Bulent

    2016-09-01

    Penetration of a bicycle brake handle into the orbit is a rare and serious type of trauma. Globe subluxation due to such trauma has not been previously reported. A 10-year-old girl presented after falling from a bicycle, which resulted in the handbrake penetrating her right upper eyelid. On examination, the globe was subluxated anteriorly, there was no light perception, and the pupilla was fixed and dilated. Radiologic studies revealed orbitonasal fractures, hemorrhage, emphysema in the orbit and cranium, and rupture of the extraocular muscles. The globe was replaced into the orbit with the help of lateral cantholysis and orbital septotomy. During 22 months of follow-up, the globe remained intact, but total loss of vision, blepharoptosis, and extraocular motility restriction persisted. This case and previous reports show that bicycle brake handles can cause severe, penetrating orbital and cerebral traumas that can result in vision loss or fatality. Brake handles should be designed to protect bicyclists from such injuries.

  10. Globe Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Honda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 46-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with severe left eye pain and decreased vision after tripping and striking the left side of his head on the corner of his wooden nightstand. The patient arrived as an inter-facility transfer for a suspected globe rupture with a protective eye covering in place; thus, further physical examination of the eye was not performed by the emergency physician in order to avoid further leakage of aqueous humor. Significant findings: The patient’s computed tomography (CT head demonstrated a deformed left globe, concerning for ruptured globe. The patient had hyperdense material in the posterior segment (see green arrow, consistent with vitreous hemorrhage. CT findings that are consistent with globe rupture may include a collapsed globe, intraocular air, or foreign bodies. Discussion: A globe rupture is a full-thickness defect in the cornea, sclera, or both.1 It is an ophthalmologic emergency. Globe ruptures are almost always secondary to direct perforation via a penetrating mechanism; however, it can occur due to blunt injury if the force generated creates sufficient intraocular pressure to tear the sclera.2 Globes most commonly rupture at the insertions of the intraocular muscles or at the limbus. They are associated with a high rate of concomitant orbital floor fractures.2,3 Possible physical examination findings include a shallow anterior chamber on slit-lamp exam, hyphema, and an irregular “teardrop” pupil. Additionally, a positive Seidel sign, which is performed by instilling fluorescein in the eye and then examining for a dark stream of aqueous humor, is indicative of a globe rupture.4 CT is often used to assess for globe rupture; finds of a foreign body, intraocular air, abnormal contour or volume of the globe, or disruption of the sclera suggest globe rupture.2 The sensitivity of CT scan for diagnosis of globe rupture is only 75%; thus, high clinical

  11. Ganga hospital open injury score in management of open injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Sabapathy, S R; Dheenadhayalan, J; Sundararajan, S R; Venkatramani, H; Devendra, A; Ramesh, P; Srikanth, K P

    2015-02-01

    Open injuries of the limbs offer challenges in management as there are still many grey zones in decision making regarding salvage, timing and type of reconstruction. As a result, there is still an unacceptable rate of secondary amputations which lead to tremendous waste of resources and psychological devastation of the patient and his family. Gustilo Anderson's classification was a major milestone in grading the severity of injury but however suffers from the disadvantages of imprecise definition, a poor interobserver correlation, inability to address the issue of salvage and inclusion of a wide spectrum of injuries in Type IIIb category. Numerous scores such as Mangled Extremity Severity Score, the Predictive Salvage Index, the Limb Salvage Index, Hannover Fracture Scale-97 etc have been proposed but all have the disadvantage of retrospective evaluation, inadequate sample sizes and poor sensitivity and specificity to amputation, especially in IIIb injuries. The Ganga Hospital Open Injury Score (GHOIS) was proposed in 2004 and is designed to specifically address the outcome in IIIb injuries of the tibia without vascular deficit. It evaluates the severity of injury to the three components of the limb--the skin, the bone and the musculotendinous structures separately on a grade from 0 to 5. Seven comorbid factors which influence the treatment and the outcome are included in the score with two marks each. The application of the total score and the individual tissue scores in management of IIIB injuries is discussed. The total score was shown to predict salvage when the value was 14 or less; amputation when the score was 17 and more. A grey zone of 15 and 16 is provided where the decision making had to be made on a case to case basis. The additional value of GHOIS was its ability to guide the timing and type of reconstruction. A skin score of more than 3 always required a flap and hence it indicated the need for an orthoplastic approach from the index procedure. Bone

  12. Traumatic Globe Subluxation and Intracranial Injury Caused by Bicycle Brake Handle

    OpenAIRE

    Poroy; Cibik; Yazici

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Penetration of a bicycle brake handle into the orbit is a rare and serious type of trauma. Globe subluxation due to such trauma has not been previously reported. Case Presentation A 10-year-old girl presented after falling from a bicycle, which resulted in the handbrake penetrating her right upper eyelid. On examination, the globe was subluxated anteriorly, there was no light perception, and the pupilla was fixed and ...

  13. Airbag Related Ocular Injuries: A Short Case Series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Ophthalmology, Guinness Eye Centre, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba, PMB 12003, Lagos, Nigeria ... Type of injury was grouped as either open globe or .... An assessment of closed globe injury RE and severe.

  14. Open extensor tendon injuries: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillo, Dominic; Rayan, Ghazi M

    2012-01-01

    To report the epidemiology, mechanism, anatomical location, distribution, and severity of open extensor tendon injuries in the digits, hand, and forearm as well as the frequency of associated injuries to surrounding bone and soft tissue. Retrospective chart review was conducted for patients who had operative repair of open digital extensor tendon injuries in all zones within an 11-year period. Data was grouped according to patient characteristics, zone of injury, mechanism of injury, and presence of associated injury. Statistical analysis was used to determine the presence of relevant associations. Eighty-six patients with 125 severed tendons and 105 injured digits were available for chart reviews. Patients were predominantly males (83%) with a mean age of 34.2 years and the dominant extremity was most often injured (60%). The thumb was the most commonly injured (25.7%), followed by middle finger (24.8), whereas small finger was least affected (10.5%). Sharp laceration was the most common mechanism of injury (60%), and most of these occurred at or proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joints. Most saw injuries occurred distal to the metacarpophalangeal joint. Zone V was the most commonly affected in the fingers (27%) while zone VT was the most commonly affected in the thumb (69%). Associated injuries to bone and soft tissue occurred in 46.7% of all injuries with saw and crush/avulsions being predictive of fractures and damage to the underlying joint capsule. The extensor mechanism is anatomically complex, and open injuries to the dorsum of the hand, wrist, and forearm, especially of crushing nature and those inflicted by saws, must be thoroughly evaluated. Associated injuries should be ruled out in order to customize surgical treatment and optimize outcome.

  15. Information flows around the globe: predicting opening gaps from overnight foreign stock price patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gooijer, J.G.; Diks, C.G.H.; Gatarek, L.T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a forecasting exercise of close-to-open returns on major global stock indices, based on price patterns from foreign markets that have become available overnight. As the close-to-open gap is a scalar response variable to a functional variable, it is natural to focus on functional

  16. Information Flows around the Globe: Predicting Opening Gaps from Overnight Foreign Stock Price Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. de Gooijer (Jan); C.G.H. Diks (Cees); L. Gatarek (Lukasz)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes a forecasting exercise of close-to-open returns on major global stock indices, based on price patterns from foreign markets that have become available overnight. As the close-to-open gap is a scalar response variable to a functional variable, it is natural to focus

  17. Information flows around the globe: predicting opening gaps from overnight foreign stock price patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gooijer, J.G.; Diks, C.G.H.; Gatarek, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a forecasting exercise of close-to-open returns on major global stock indices, based on high-frequency price patterns that have become available in foreign markets overnight. Generally speaking, out-ofsample forecast performance depends on the forecast method as well as the

  18. Quality Models in Online and Open Education around the Globe: State of the Art and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiannilsson, Ebba; Williams, Keith; Camilleri, Anthony F.; Brown, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report is written for: (1) institutional leaders responsible for quality in online, open and flexible higher education; (2) faculty wanting to have an overview of the field; (3) newcomers that want to develop quality schemes; (4) policy makers in governments, agencies and organisations; and (5) major educational stakeholders in the…

  19. Branch retinal artery occlusion post-penetrating globe injury with intraocular foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Manish; Chaudhary, Pranita; Jain, Ashish

    2018-01-01

    Intraocular foreign body (IOFB) in cases of penetrating eye injury accounts for an important indication of vitreoretinal intervention following ocular trauma. Vascular occlusion as a complication of IOFB is rare. Here we present a case of a 34-year-old male with post-traumatic cataract and an intraocular metallic foreign body (IOFB) lodged in the superficial layers of the retina inferotemporal to the disc, causing an inferotemporal branch retinal artery occlusion. The case was managed by lensectomy with pars plana vitrectomy and IOFB removal followed by a second procedure of secondary IOL implantation. Final best-corrected visual acuity improved to 6/24. This case highlights an unusual sequelae following penetrating ocular trauma.

  20. Branch retinal artery occlusion post-penetrating globe injury with intraocular foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Nagpal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraocular foreign body (IOFB in cases of penetrating eye injury accounts for an important indication of vitreoretinal intervention following ocular trauma. Vascular occlusion as a complication of IOFB is rare. Here we present a case of a 34-year-old male with post-traumatic cataract and an intraocular metallic foreign body (IOFB lodged in the superficial layers of the retina inferotemporal to the disc, causing an inferotemporal branch retinal artery occlusion. The case was managed by lensectomy with pars plana vitrectomy and IOFB removal followed by a second procedure of secondary IOL implantation. Final best-corrected visual acuity improved to 6/24. This case highlights an unusual sequelae following penetrating ocular trauma.

  1. management of open achilles tendon injury: primary repair and early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is attributable to increase in both competitive and recreational sports. In most of the literature written on Achilles tendon injuries there were rarely any information about open Achilles tendon ... The most common aetiology was motorbike spoke.

  2. World Wind: NASA's Virtual Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, P.

    2007-12-01

    Virtual globes have set the standard for information exchange. Once you've experienced the visually rich and highly compelling nature of data delivered via virtual globes with their highly engaging context of 3D, it's hard to go back to a flat 2D world. Just as the sawbones of not-too-long-ago have given way to sophisticated surgical operating theater, today's medium for information exchange is just beginning to leap from the staid chalkboards and remote libraries to fingertip navigable 3D worlds. How we harness this technology to serve a world inundated with information will describe the quality of our future. Our instincts for discovery and entertainment urge us on. There's so much we could know if the world's knowledge was presented to us in its natural context. Virtual globes are almost magical in their ability to reveal natural wonders. Anyone flying along a chain of volcanoes, a mid-ocean ridge or deep ocean trench, while simultaneously seeing the different depths to the history of earthquakes in those areas, will be delighted to sense Earth's dynamic nature in a way that would otherwise take several paragraphs of "boring" text. The sophisticated concepts related to global climate change would be far more comprehensible when experienced via a virtual globe. There is a large universe of public and private geospatial data sets that virtual globes can bring to light. The benefit derived from access to this data within virtual globes represents a significant return on investment for government, industry, the general public, and especially in the realm of education. Data access remains a key issue. Just as the highway infrastructure allows unimpeded access from point A to point B, an open standards-based infrastructure for data access allows virtual globes to exchange data in the most efficient manner possible. This data can be either free or proprietary. The Open Geospatial Consortium is providing the leadership necessary for this open standards-based data access

  3. GLOBE Program's Data and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarsadeghi, N.; Overoye, D.; Lewis, C.; Butler, D. M.; Ramapriyan, H.

    2016-12-01

    "The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program is an international science and education program that provides students and the public worldwide with the opportunity to participate in data collection and the scientific process, and contribute meaningfully to our understanding of the Earth system and global environment" (www.globe.gov ). GLOBE Program has a rich community of students, teachers, scientists, trainers, country coordinators, and alumni across the world, technologically spanning both high- and low-end users. There are 117 GLOBE participating countries from around the world. GLOBE's Science data protocols and educational material span atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, soil (pedosphere), and Earth as a System scientific areas (http://www.globe.gov/do-globe/globe-teachers-guide). GLOBE's Data and Information System (DIS), when first introduced in 1995, was a cutting edge system that was well-received and innovative for its time. However, internet-based technologies have changed dramatically since then. Projects to modernize and evolve the GLOBE DIS started in 2010, resulting in today's GLOBE DIS. The current GLOBE DIS is now built upon the latest information technologies and is engaging and supporting the user community with advanced tools and services to further the goals of the GLOBE Program. GLOBE DIS consists of over 20 years of observation and training data, a rich set of software systems and applications for data entry, visualization, and analysis, as well as tools for training users in various science data protocols and enabling collaborations among members of the international user community. We present the existing GLOBE DIS, application technologies, and lessons learned for their operations, development, sustaining engineering, and data management practices. Examples of GLOBE DIS technologies include Liferay System for integrated user and content management, a Postgress/PostGIS database, Ruby on Rails for Data

  4. Urban Utopias at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Since 19 May, the ground floor of the Globe has been housing a contemporary art exhibition. Meyrin's Contemporary Art Fund Committee has given six artists free rein to think up projects for the area surrounding the Globe, which is still a blank canvas. The exhibition entitled 'Urban Utopias', which explores the question 'How to experience the town?', consists of preparatory sketches and models of the works proposed by the artists. The projects on display include a metal ring symbolising the LHC accelerator, a statue consisting of pieces of broken wooden furniture, metal and bamboo, three metres in height, and even a projection of a computer-generated design for a ziggurat adjoining the Globe. Urban Utopias 19 May to 18 June, open Wednesday to Sunday from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday until 9 p.m. Entrance free.

  5. Evolving Capabilities for Virtual Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, A.

    2006-12-01

    Though thin-client spatial visualization software like Google Earth and NASA World Wind enjoy widespread popularity, a common criticism is their general lack of analytical functionality. This concern, however, is rapidly being addressed; standard and advanced geographic information system (GIS) capabilities are being developed for virtual globes--though not centralized into a single implementation or software package. The innovation is mostly originating from the user community. Three such capabilities relevant to the earth science, education, and emergency management communities are modeling dynamic spatial phenomena, real-time data collection and visualization, and multi-input collaborative databases. Modeling dynamic spatial phenomena has been facilitated through joining virtual globe geometry definitions--like KML--to relational databases. Real-time data collection uses short scripts to transform user-contributed data into a format usable by virtual globe software. Similarly, collaborative data collection for virtual globes has become possible by dynamically referencing online, multi-person spreadsheets. Examples of these functions include mapping flows within a karst watershed, real-time disaster assessment and visualization, and a collaborative geyser eruption spatial decision support system. Virtual globe applications will continue to evolve further analytical capabilities, more temporal data handling, and from nano to intergalactic scales. This progression opens education and research avenues in all scientific disciplines.

  6. Combat ocular trauma and systemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Eric D; Colyer, Marcus H

    2008-11-01

    To review the recent literature regarding combat ocular trauma during hostilities in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, describe the classification of combat ocular trauma, and offer strategies that may assist in the management of eye injuries. Several recent publications have highlighted features of combat ocular trauma from Operation Iraqi Freedom. The most common cause of today's combat ocular injuries is unconventional fragmentary munitions causing significant blast injuries. These explosive munitions cause high rates of concomitant nonocular injuries such as traumatic brain injury, amputation, and other organ injuries. The most frequent ocular injuries include open-globe and adnexal lacerations. The extreme severity of combat-related open-globe injuries leads to high rates of primary enucleation and retained intraocular foreign bodies. Visual outcomes of intraocular foreign body injuries are similar to other series despite delayed removal, and no cases of endophthalmitis have occurred. Despite these advances, however, significant vision loss persists in cases of perforating globe injuries as well as open and closed-globe trauma involving the posterior segment. This review summarizes the recent literature describing ocular and systemic injuries sustained during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. An emphasis on classification of ocular injuries as well as a discussion of main outcome measures and complications is discussed.

  7. The Globe laid bare

    CERN Multimedia

    Fortunati, Lucien

    2015-01-01

    If you’re at CERN at the moment, you will certainly have noticed the work under way on the Globe. The structure, which has been in pride of place opposite the Laboratory for over ten years, has never been so completely laid bare. But, as we explained in a previous article (see here), it is all for a good cause. The Globe is built entirely from wood and certain parts of it need to be replaced.

  8. Visual and anatomic outcomes of golf ball-related ocular injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S J; Park, K H; Heo, J W; Woo, S J

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the characteristics and prognoses of golf ball-related ocular injuries (GROIs) using standardized terminology, classification, and scoring systems. Twenty-two GROI patients were assessed using the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology, Ocular Trauma Classification Group (OTCG) classification, and Ocular Trauma Score. Globe preservation and final visual acuity (FVA) were assessed according to the injury severity categorical designation. Fourteen patients were injured on golf courses and eight on driving ranges. Nine patients (40.9%) had open-globe injuries (five ruptures (22.7%), four penetrating injuries (18.2%)). All rupture cases required enucleation, whereas penetrating injury cases did not (the FVA ranged from 20/100 to no light perception). In open-globe injuries, wearing glasses protected against rupture (P=0.008). Thirteen patients sustained closed-globe injuries that were accompanied by lens subluxation (38.5%), choroidal rupture (30.8%), macular commotio retinae (38.5%), and traumatic optic neuropathy (7.7%). Twelve (54.5%) patients had orbital wall fractures. The mean number of related surgeries required was 1.5±1.7 across all patients. Eyes with GROIs had devastating FVA and globe preservation status, especially those with open-globe injuries. Observing golf rules and improving driving-range facilities are essential for preventing GROIs. Protective eyewear may reduce ocular damage from GROIs, especially globe rupture.

  9. The Globe is back!

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The Globe of Science and Innovation reopened its doors to the public on Tuesday, 19 April 2016, after almost a year of extensive renovations.    Follow the Globe renovations from start to finish, and learn more about this unique structure. (Video: Christoph M. Madsen) It took eleven months of civil-engineering work to restore one of the best-known symbols of CERN, the Globe of Science and Innovation (or the Globe for short). An inauguration ceremony was held on 18 April 2016, attended by representatives of the Swiss Confederation, the local authorities, the media and CERN management. “The Globe has become an essential tool for CERN and a part of the landscape of international Geneva. It is a point of reference for CERN’s neighbours,” said Charlotte Warakaulle, CERN Director for International Relations, in her speech during the ceremony. The ambitious renovation project was needed to replace the arcs that form the outer spherical stru...

  10. The Globe laid bare

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    If you’re at CERN at the moment, you will certainly have noticed the work under way on the Globe. The structure, which has been in pride of place opposite the Laboratory for over ten years, has never been so completely laid bare. But, as we explained in a previous article (see here), it is all for a good cause. The Globe is built entirely from wood and certain parts of it need to be replaced.   The Globe after the removal of all the sun baffles. Image: Lucien Fortunati. Picture the general structure of the Globe. In simple terms, the building consists of two spheres, one inside the other. The inner sphere houses the Universe of Particles exhibition and the conference room and is connected to the outer sphere by two access ramps. “Each of these two spheres is made up of eighteen large supporting arcs,” explains Amaya Martínez García of the GS department, who is supervising the Globe renovation project. “These eighteen arcs are ...

  11. The Globe reopens its doors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2016-01-01

    After a year of work, the newly renovated Globe of Science and Innovation will open its doors again at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 19 April. The “Universe of Particles” exhibition has been updated and will be open to the public, free of charge, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday (except during official CERN closures). The Globe’s programme of lectures and events for the general public will restart at the end of April. What’s on at the Globe in April and May: - 28 April at 6.30 p.m.: Theatre – “Curie_Meitner_Lamarr_indivisible”, a play that pays tribute to the lives of three exceptional women in the field of science and technology (in English). Reservations: http://indico.cern.ch/e/cmli - 10 May at 8.30 p.m.: Lecture – “Le modèle du CERN et les grands défis mondiaux” (“The CERN model and the key global challenges”) by Michel Spiro (in French with simultaneous ...

  12. Open reduction and internal fixation: Screw injury - Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF is a standard surgical procedure in jaw trauma and in orthognathic surgery. Insertion of screws is a significant risk for accidental tooth root injury with varying outcomes. Contrary evidences are found in literature due to a variety of study designs. This study was undertaken to address the lacunae and possibly estimate the difference in occurrence of tooth damage during or after ORIF between trauma and planned osteotomies. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the data of ORIF in either trauma or orthognathic surgery fulfilling inclusion and exclusion criteria were collected and analyzed. Results: There were 1632 patients fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria and formed the study group, of which 663 were in orthognathic surgery, of whom 210 had bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. In the trauma group, 358 patients had fractures involving both jaws whereas 272 had maxilla alone and 339 had mandibular fractures alone. On comparing the outcome, of the 9073 screws studied, 93.40% were not involved in any contact with the teeth, 6.3% were in category of potential hits (near apices or the root surfaces, and only 0.28% had evidence of root damage with the screws. It is observed that molar and premolar had a significant difference in terms of the type of surgery (P ≤ 0.05 whereas canine (P = 0.75 and incisor (P = 0.67 showed no statistical difference. Conclusion: ORIF when used as mentioned is a safe way for the management of fractures. The incidence of root injury is not uncommon but can be avoided with careful planning and execution.

  13. Displaying Annotations for Digitised Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gede, Mátyás; Farbinger, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Thanks to the efforts of the various globe digitising projects, nowadays there are plenty of old globes that can be examined as 3D models on the computer screen. These globes usually contain a lot of interesting details that an average observer would not entirely discover for the first time. The authors developed a website that can display annotations for such digitised globes. These annotations help observers of the globe to discover all the important, interesting details. Annotations consist of a plain text title, a HTML formatted descriptive text and a corresponding polygon and are stored in KML format. The website is powered by the Cesium virtual globe engine.

  14. Use of Ganga Hospital Open Injury Severity Scoring for determination of salvage versus amputation in open type IIIB injuries of lower limbs in children-An analysis of 52 type IIIB open fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatadass, K; Grandhi, Tarani Sai Prasanth; Rajasekaran, S

    2017-11-01

    Open injuries in children are rare compared to adults. In children with major open injuries, there is no specific scoring system to guide when to amputate or salvage the limb. The use of available adult scoring systems may lead to errors in management. The role of Ganga Hospital Open Injury Severity Scoring (GHOISS) for open injuries in adults is well established and its applicability for pediatric open injuries has not been studied. This study was done to analyse the usefulness of GHOISS in pediatric open injuries and to compare it with MESS(Mangled Extremity Severity Score). All children (0-18 years) who were admitted with Open type IIIB injuries of lower limbs between January 2008 and March 2015 were included. MESS and GHOISS were calculated for all the patients. There were 50 children with 52 type IIIB Open injuries of which 39 had open tibial fractures and 13 had open femur fractures. Out of 52 type IIIB open injuries, 48 were salvaged and 4 were amputated. A MESS score of 7 and above had sensitivity of 25% for amputation while GHOISS of 17 and above was found to be more accurate for determining amputation with sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 93.75%. GHOISS is a reliable predictor of injury severity in type IIIB open fractures in children and can be used as a guide for decision-making. The use of MESS score in children has a lower predictive value compared to GHOISS in deciding amputation versus salvage. A GHOISS of 17 or more has the highest sensitivity and specificity to predict amputation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Open-label study of donepezil in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanic, C A; Bayley, M T; VanReekum, R; Simard, M

    2001-07-01

    To determine preliminarily whether donepezil will improve memory, behavior, and global function after chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixteen-week open-label study. Outpatient TBI rehabilitation program. Four patients with chronic, severe TBI. Donepezil 5mg daily for 8 weeks followed by 10mg daily for 4 weeks. Memory measures included the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), the Complex Figure Test (CFT), items from the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT), and a semantic fluency task. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) evaluated behavior and affect. Function was assessed by using the FIM instrument and a clinical global impression of change. On the RAVLT, the mean scores for learning and short- and long-term recall improved by 0.4, 1.04, and.83 standard deviations (SDs) above baseline, respectively. On the CFT, the mean scores for short-term recall and long-term recall improved by 1.56 and 1.38 SDs above baseline, respectively. A positive trend was observed on the RBMT and on the NPI subscales. Donepezil may improve some aspects of memory and behavior in persons with chronic TBI. Randomized clinical trials are required to support these preliminary findings. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  16. Short-film Festival at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Get out your diaries and prepare to be star-struck as the Globe of Science and Innovation meets the silver screen! The CERN "Open Your Eyes Films" film-making club is organising a festival of short films entitled CinéGlobe from Thursday 8 to Saturday 10 November. On the Thursday and Friday, you’ll be able to watch 47 short films free of charge in the Globe of Science and Innovation at various times of the day. The short films to be screened come from 21 different countries and have been selected from among 1400 entrees! All film genres will be represented : comedy, drama, animation, documentaries, experimental films, etc. Members of the public will even be able to vote for their favourite film: the audience’s favourite will be awarded a "Coup de coeur" award. An awards ceremony to honour the films that have received most votes will be held on Friday evening in the Globe of Science and Innovation. The Golden CinéGlobe for bes...

  17. Rock the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Created in 2005, the Swiss rock band "Wind of Change" is now candidate for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 with a new song " Night & Light " with the music video filmed at CERN.   With over 20 gigs under their belt and two albums already released, the five members of the band (Alex Büchi, vocals; Arthur Spierer, drums; David Gantner, bass; Romain Mage and Yannick Gaudy, guitar) continue to excite audiences. For their latest composition "Night & Light", the group filmed their music video in the Globe of Science and Innovation. Winning the Eurovision contest would be a springboard in their artistic career for these young musicians. The selection results will be available December 11, 2010.      

  18. Treatment outcomes of open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2013-12-01

    The main causes of death in patients with open pelviperineal injuries are uncontrollable bleeding and pelvic sepsis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the management outcomes of open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries. We retrospectively studied 15 cases with open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries (urethral and anal canal laceration) admitted between August 2006 and September 2010. Mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, associated injuries, hemodynamic status on arrival, resuscitation and transfusion requirements, operative techniques, intra- and postoperative complications, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded in a computerised database for further evaluation and analysis. The male to female ratio was 12:3 with an average age of 38.6 years (ranged, 11 to 65 years). The average packed red blood cell units used were 8 units (ranged, 4 to 21 units). All patients were initially transferred to the operating room for colostomy, radical debridement and fixation of the pelvic fracture by an external fixator. One patient had acute renal failure, which improved with medical treatment and 2 patients (13.3%) died, one with type III anteroposterior compression fracture due to hemorrhagic shock and the other due to septicemia. Open pelvic fractures with extensive perineal injuries are associated with high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, including reanimation, colostomy, cystostomy, vigorous and repeated irrigation and debridement, and fixation by an external fixator can improve the outcomes and reduce the mortality rate.

  19. Long-term outcome of high-energy open Lisfranc injuries: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithyananth, Manasseh; Boopalan, Palapattu R J V C; Titus, Vijay T K; Sundararaj, Gabriel D; Lee, Vernon N

    2011-03-01

    The outcome of open Lisfranc injuries has been reported infrequently. Should these injuries be managed as closed injuries and is their outcome different? We undertook a retrospective study of high-energy, open Lisfranc injuries treated between 1999 and 2005. The types of dislocation, the associated injuries to the same foot, the radiologic and functional outcome, and the complications were studied. There were 22 patients. Five patients died. One had amputation. Of the remaining 16 patients, 13 men were followed up at a mean of 56 months (range, 29-88 months). The average age was 36 years (range, 7-55 years). According to the modified Hardcastle classification, type B2 injury was the commonest. Ten patients had additional forefoot or midfoot injury. All patients were treated with debridement, open reduction, and multiple Kirschner (K) wire fixation. All injuries were Gustilo Anderson type IIIa or IIIb. Nine patients had split skin graft for soft tissue cover. Mean time taken for wound healing was 16 days (range, 10-30 days). Ten patients (77%) had fracture comminution. Eight patients had anatomic reduction, whereas five had nonanatomic reduction. Ten of 13 (77%) patients had at least one spontaneous tarsometatarsal joint fusion. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 82 (range, 59-100). Nonanatomic reduction, osteomyelitis, deformity of toes, planus foot, and mild discomfort on prolonged walking were the unfavorable outcomes present. In open Lisfranc injuries, multiple K wire fixation should be considered especially in the presence of comminution and soft tissue loss. Although anatomic reduction is always not obtained, the treatment principles should include adequate debridement, maintaining alignment with multiple K wires, and obtaining early soft tissue cover. There is a high incidence of fusion across tarsometatarsal joints. Copyright © 2011 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  20. Live broadcast from the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    La tête au carréTuesday, 17 June 2008 between 2.00 and 3.00 p.m.“La tête au carré”, a France Inter radio programme devoted to science, will set up its sound booth at CERN for a special broadcast on the LHC.The journalist Mathieu Vidard will interview the following guests: - Pierre Van Hove, an experimental physicist working on CMS. He is a CNRS research scientist from the Institut Hubert Curien in Strasbourg, France.- Abdelhak Djouadi is a theoretical physicist. He is a research director at the CNRS’s Laboratoire de physique théorique at Orsay, France and holder of the CNRS silver medal.- Magali Gruwe, one of the engineers in charge of LHC operations at CERN.» To take part in this live broadcast, which is open to the public, come to the Globe at 1:30 p.m. The number of places is limited.» No specialist knowledge required.» See the programme's homepage

  1. 2009 events in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Globe of Science and Innovation 1st floor - Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva Mini-Einstein: physics for totsWednesdays from 14:30 to 15:30 January 2009: 14, 21, 28 and February 2009: 11, 18, 25 CERN is offering a series of workshops designed to teach the ABC of physics to the very young. Games and hands-on activities based on notions such as weight and waves will stimulate the children’s curiosity and initiate them into the world of science. Workshop in French for accompanied 4-to-6-year-olds. Free of charge, please book on +41 (0)22 767 76 76 Interactive exhibition Superconductivity... magical attraction Special opening from Tuesday, 13 January, to Saturday, 31 January 2009 Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. Following the success at the end of last year, the exhibition "Superconductivity... magical attraction" will be extended until the end of January. The phenomenon of sup...

  2. Surgical management of bile duct injuries following open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, A.; Aman, Z.; Khan, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the management of bile duct injuries following open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The descriptive case series was conducted from July 2002 to June 2008 at Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar, Pakistan. A total of 32 patients who sustained extra hepatic bile duct injuries during open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included. Patients having hepatobiliary malignancy or those managed through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and stenting were excluded. Patients were thoroughly investigated including to reach a final diagnosis, and were followed up for 02 years. Results: The mean age of patients was 45.4+9-2.7 years with a female preponderance (M:F=1:9.7). The time of presentation was up to 03 months after initial surgery. Seven (21.87%) patients sustained bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, while 25 (78.13%) sustained injury during open procedure. Abdominal ultrasound scan was performed in 29 (90.63%) cases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 14 (43.75%) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in 26 (81.25%) cases. Eleven (34.37%) patients had common bile duct leak, 9 (28.13%) had common hepatic duct injury, 9 (28.13%) had CBD strictures and 3 (09.37%) had injury to the biliary tree at porta hepatis level. Operative procedures performed included Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy in 19 (59.38%) cases, choledochoduodenostomy in 7 (21.88%) cases, Roux-en-Y portoentrostomy and primary repair in 3 (09.37%) cases each. Postoperative morbidity included recurrent cholangitis 9 (28.12%), wound infection 4 (12.50%) and bile leakage 2 (06.25%). Hospital stay ranged 08-16 days. Hospital mortality rate was 03.13%, (n=1). Conclusion: The most frequent site of bile duct injury during open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was the common bile duct, and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was the procedure of choice by experienced surgeons for the management of such injuries

  3. Age peculiarities of postraumatic repair of open fractures in case of combined radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shantyr', V.I.; Korzh, A.A.; Frenkel', L.A.; Kazitskij, V.M.; Lan'ko, A.I.; Yakovenko, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results of investigation of recovery in rabbit soft tissues (skin, muscle tissue) and in bones following bone fractures and whole-body X-irradiation are presented. Heavier damages developed in connective tissue in adolescent than in adult rabbits in conditions of combined radiation injuries. Normalization of connective tissue in skin and muscles was observed by 90 day in adolescent rabbits, where as connective tissue remained inferior in adult animals. Bone tissue recovery remained unfinished by 90 day in adolescent and adult rabbits in conditions of combined radiation injuries. The main reason for slowing-down of recovery of damaged tissues in case of open fracture is radiation injury in the irradiated organism

  4. Around the Globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Presents a report by Rigmor Sterner (Lulea University of Technology) on the 10th annual European Distance Education Network (EDEN) conference (June 10-13, 2001, Stockholm, Sweden). EDEN is a non-governmental educational association whose aim is to foster the development of open and distance learning and distance education. (AEF)

  5. Wet-Bulb-Globe Temperature Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hour Min Pressure Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT...Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F...Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F deg F deg

  6. Effectiveness of Alveolar Opening in Patients with Acute Lung Injury and Concomitant Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Marchenkov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the efficiency of a lung opening maneuver in patients with acute lung injury (ALI and concomitant pneumothorax, who were on biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation (BIPAP and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation. Subject and methods. Seventy-three patients with acute lung injury and concomitant pneumoth-orax resulting from blunt chest trauma were examined. Their condition was an APACHE II of 18—24 scores. After elimination of pneumothorax, an open lung maneuver was made using different modes of lung support 3—5 times daily. Results. The study has shown that BIPAP used in patients with ALI and concomitant pneumothorax reduces the time of pleural cavity drainage, which allows the lung opening maneuver to be applied earlier. The employment of the latter in patients with ALI and pneumothorax permits a prompter recovery of lung function during different types of respiratory support, which is attended by reductions in the number of complications, artificial ventilation, and mortality. When the lung opening maneuver is combined with BIPAP, its efficiency considerably increases. Key words: acute lung injury, pneumothorax, BIPAP, lung opening maneuver.

  7. GLOBE Goes GO with Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, R. A.; Low, R.

    2016-12-01

    The GLOBE Mosquito Larvae protocol and a new citizen science initiative, GLOBE Observers (GO), were both launched in Summer 2016. While the GLOBE Mosquito Larvae Protocol and associated educational materials target K-16 student inquiry and research, the GO protocol version is simplified to enable citizen scientists of all ages from all walks of life to participate. GO allows citizen scientists to collect and submit environmental data through an easy-to-use smart phone app available for both Apple and Android mobile devices. GO mosquito asks for photos of larvae mosquito genus or species, location, and type of water source (e.g., container or pond) where the larvae were found. To initiate the new mosquito GLOBE/GO opportunities, workshops have been held in Barbuda, Thailand, West Indies, US Gulf Coast, New York City, and at the GLOBE Annual Meeting in Colorado. Through these venues, the protocols have been refined and a field campaign has been initiated so that GO and GLOBE citizen scientists (K-16 students and all others) can contribute data. Quality assurance measures are taken through the online training required to participate and the validation of identification by other citizen sciences and mosquito experts. Furthermore, initial research is underway to develop optical recognition software starting with the species that carry the Zika virus (Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus). With this launch, we plan to move forward by providing opportunities throughout the world to engage people in meaningful environmental and public health data collection and to promote citizen scientists to become agents of change in their communities.

  8. Open Access Platforms in Spinal Cord Injury: Existing Clinical Trial Data to Predict and Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John L K; Geisler, Fred; Ramer, Leanne; Plunet, Ward; Cragg, Jacquelyn J

    2017-05-01

    Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by extensive heterogeneity, resulting in uncertain prognosis. Reliable prediction of recovery in the acute phase benefits patients and their families directly, as well as improves the likelihood of detecting efficacy in clinical trials. This issue of heterogeneity is not unique to SCI. In fields such as traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, one approach to understand variability in recovery has been to make clinical trial data widely available to the greater research community. We contend that the SCI community should adopt a similar approach in providing open access clinical trial data.

  9. Compartment Syndrome following Open Femoral Fracture with an Isolated Femoral Vein Injury Treated with Acute Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Walmsley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency and its diagnosis is more difficult in obtunded or insensate patients. We present the case of a 34-year-old woman who sustained a Gustilo-Anderson grade III open midshaft femur fracture with an isolated femoral vein injury treated with direct repair. She developed lower leg compartment syndrome at 48 hours postoperatively, necessitating fasciotomies. She was subsequently found to have a DVT in her femoral vein at the level of the repair and was started on therapeutic anticoagulation. This case highlights the importance of recognition of isolated venous injuries in a trauma setting as a risk factor for developing compartment syndrome.

  10. Green light for a permanent exhibition in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A donation to the Foundation for the Globe of Science and Innovation by ROLEX S.A. marks the first step towards the planned expansion of the Globe’s infrastructure. The Globe: a CERN emblem.Visible from miles away by day and by night, the Globe, the wooden sphere offered to CERN by the Swiss Confederation in 2004, has become one of the symbols of the Organization. Since being opened to the public in September 2005, the Globe has served as a venue for lectures, exhibitions, press and VIP events and workshops for schoolchildren and as a stage for theatre performances on scientific themes. With a view to turning the Globe into a flagship venue for events for the general public, and for interactions between CERN and its public and private partners, two projects are planned for the near future. CERN is receiving support for these ventures from the Foundation for the Globe. Established at the end of 2007, the Foundation’s mission is to ...

  11. Globes, Maps, Photographs: Geographic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Paul D.; And Others

    This compilation of reprinted articles that originally appeared in the Journal of Geography from September 1969 through the May 1970 issues, is intended to help teachers use globes, maps, and photographs with skill and understanding. The articles were designed with several objectives in mind: 1) to provide information regarding the design,…

  12. [Accuracy and relevance of CT volumetry in open ocular injuries with intraocular foreign bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneschg, O A; Volek, E; Lohinai, Z; Resch, M D; Papp, A; Korom, C; Karlinger, K; Németh, J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the volume of intraocular foreign bodies (IOFB) using computed tomography (CT) volumetry as a prognostic factor for clinical outcome in open ocular injuries. This study compared the volume of 11 IOFBs more than 5 mm(3) in size based on CT volumetry with the real size determined by in vitro measurement. A retrospective evaluation of clinical data, visual acuity, complications and relation of size of IOFBs with clinical outcome in 33 patients (mean age 41.0 ± 13.5 years) with open ocular injuries treated at our department between January 2005 and December 2010 was carried out. No significant differences were found between pairwise in vitro measurement and CT volumetric size (p = 0.07). All patients were surgically treated by pars plana vitrectomy. The mean follow-up time was 7.6± 6.2 months and the mean preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.063 ± 0.16 (logMAR 1.2 ± 0.79). Postoperatively, a mean BCVA of 0.25 ± 0.2 (logMAR 0.6 ± 0.69) could be achieved. Clinical outcomes were significantly better in injuries with small IOFBs measuring volumetry is an accurate method for measurement of IOFBs. Exact data about the size and measurement of volume are also an important factor for the prognosis of clinical outcome in open ocular injuries with IOFBs and CT volumetry can also provide important information about the localization of IOFBs.

  13. Heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related injuries: An open cohort study among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caamaño-Isorna, Francisco; Moure-Rodríguez, Lucía; Doallo, Sonia; Corral, Montserrat; Rodriguez Holguín, Socorro; Cadaveira, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effects of Heavy Episodic Drinking (HED) on the incidence of alcohol-related injuries among university students in Spain, taking sex into consideration. We carried out an open cohort study among college students in Spain (992 women and 371 men). HED and alcohol-related injuries were measured by question 3rd and 9th of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test to every participant at the ages of 18, 20, 22, 24 and 27. For data analysis we used a Multilevel Logistic Regression for repeated measures adjusting for alcohol and cannabis use. The incidence rate of alcohol-related injuries was 0.028year -1 for females and 0.036year -1 for males. The multivariate analysis showed that among females a high frequency of HED and use of cannabis are risk factors for alcohol-related injuries (Odds Ratio [OR]=2.64 and OR=3.68), while being more than 23 is a protective factor (OR=0.34). For males, bivariate analysis also showed HED like risk factor (OR=4.69 and OR=2.51). Finally, the population attributable fraction for HED among females was 37.12%. HED leads to an increase of alcohol-related injuries in both sexes and being over 23 years old acts as a protective factor among women. Our results suggest that about one third of alcohol-related injuries among women could be avoided by removing HED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Topical Ketamine 10% for Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: An Open-Label Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, Joseph; Minori, Joshua; Abad, Hasan; Lee, Ray; Gittler, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Topical ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, has been shown to be effective in certain neuropathic pain syndromes. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of topical ketamine in spinal cord injury patients with neuropathic pain. An open label trial enrolled five subjects at an outpatient rehabilitation hospital with traumatic spinal cord injuries who had neuropathic pain at or below the level of injury. Subjects applied topical ketamine 10% three times a day for a two-week duration. Subjects recorded their numerical pain score-ranging from 0 to 10, with 0 representing "no pain, 5 representing "moderate pain," and 10 being described as "worst possible pain"-in a journal at the time of application of topical ketamine and one hour after application. Using a numerical pain scale allows for something as subjective as pain to be given an objective quantification. Subjects also recorded any occurrence of adverse events and level of satisfaction. All five subjects had a decrease in their numerical pain scale by the end of two weeks, ranging from 14% to 63%. The duration ranged from one hour in one subject to the next application in other subjects. There were no adverse effects. Overall, four out of the five subjects stated they were satisfied. Topical ketamine 10% is an effective neuropathic pain medicine in patients with spinal cord injuries; however, further studies need to be done with a placebo and larger sample size. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  15. Surgical results of open-door laminoplasty for cervical cord injury without fracture or dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Kenichiro; Oda, Takenori; Kobashi, Masumi; Yamamura, Mitsuyoshi; Tsukamoto, Yasunori; Suzuki, Shozo; Fujita, Satoru; Mori, Shigeki; Fujiwara, Keiju

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of spinal cord decompression surgery for cervical spinal cord injury without fracture or dislocation of the spinal column. Twenty-nine patients treated by expansive open-door laminoplasty are the subjects to this study. Severity of neurological deficit was assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system. Therapeutic outcome was evaluated by the recovery rate of JOA score. Seventeen patients were treated by surgically during the acute phase (within three months after injury), and the remaining 12 were in chronic phase (after 3 months). The recovery rate showed no significant difference between the two groups (46.9% vs. 34.0%). In 16 patients, the lesion responsible for spinal cord damage was recognized as a change of the intramedullary signal intensity on MRI, which was most frequently located at C3/4 level. In 7 out of the 16 patients, the most stenotic level agreed with recognized cord injury on MRI, and in the remaining 9 patients, it did not. The recovery rate showed no significant difference between the two groups (57.3% vs. 31.1%). Even if the neurological dysfunction has been present more than 3 months and spontaneous improvement reaches plateau, or spinal cord injury level recognized as a signal intensity change on MRI is not stenotic, there is still some possibility for improving the neurological function through surgery. (author)

  16. Voices from Around the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Schreiber

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available JSAA has been seeking to provide an opportunity for Student Affairs professionals and higher education scholars from around the globe to share their research and experiences of student services and student affairs programmes from their respective regional and institutional contexts. This has been given a specific platform with the guest-edited issue “Voices from Around the Globe” which is the result of a collaboration with the International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS, and particularly with the guest editors, Kathleen Callahan and Chinedu Mba.

  17. Open Treatment of Blunt Injuries of Supra-Aortic Branches: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladojevic, Milos; Markovic, Miroslav; Ilic, Nikola; Pejkic, Sinisa; Banzic, Igor; Djoric, Predrag; Koncar, Igor; Tomic, Ivan; Davidovic, Lazar

    2016-02-01

    Blunt injuries of the supra-aortic branches are rare entity, and majority of patients die before arrival at the hospital. Those who arrive alive require complex and fast procedure that requires sternotomy. We report 3 successfully managed cases. We report 3 patients with injury of supra-aortic branches. One was treated urgently due to longitudinal rupture on the posterior wall of innominate artery after car accident, and another 2 had chronic false aneurysm located at the very orifice of the right subclavian and left common carotid artery. In first and second patient bypass grafting with a hand-made, Y-shaped, 8-mm Dacron graft from the ascending aorta to the right common carotid and proximal right subclavian artery were performed, whereas in last 1 bypass grafting from the ascending aorta to the cervical part of the left common carotid artery was performed. In our facility, there were no possibilities for any endovascular treatment. When endovascular technology is not available, open surgical repair of blunt injuries of supra-aortic vessels can be performed without complications. No matter to that, endovascular and hybrid procedures should be considered whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. "Big Science: the LHC in Pictures" in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    An exhibition of spectacular photographs of the LHC and its experiments is about to open in the Globe. The LHC and its four experiments are not only huge in size but also uniquely beautiful, as the exhibition "Big Science: the LHC in Pictures" in the Globe of Science and Innovation will show. The exhibition features around thirty spectacular photographs measuring 4.5 metres high and 2.5 metres wide. These giant pictures reflecting the immense scale of the LHC and the mysteries of the Universe it is designed to uncover fill the Globe with shape and colour. The exhibition, which will open on 4 March, is divided into six different themes: CERN, the LHC and the four experiments ATLAS, LHCb, CMS and ALICE. Facts about all these subjects will be available at information points and in an explanatory booklet accompanying the exhibition (which visitors will be able to buy if they wish to take it home with them). Globe of Science and Innovatio...

  19. Work-related ocular injuries in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyo Nyo Min

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To describe the epidemiology of work-related ocular injuries and its visual outcome in tertiary hospital in southern Malaysia. METHODS:Retrospective review of medical records of patients diagnosed as work-related ocular injuries who attended to the eye casualty of Hospital Sultan Ismail in Johor Bahru, Malaysia from Jan. 2011 to Dec. 2013. Data for clinical presentation, types of injuries, use of eye protective device(EPDand visual outcome were collected using a standardized proforma.RESULTS: A total of 935 ocular injuries attended to Hospital Sultan Ismail during 3y period. Among them 440 cases were work-related ocular injuries and included in the study. There was significant male preponderance(98.19%and commonest age group affected was 21 to 30y(45%. The most common type of injury was superficial injuries(70.91%, followed by chemical(11.13%, open globe(8.41%, closed globe(6.83%and thermal(2.72%. Although Malays are commonly involved in work-related ocular injury accounted for 78.47%, two-thirds of open globe injuries were seen in foreign workers. Only 59 patients(13.41%reported that they wore EPD at the time of incident. Generally, 89.86%(n=399had good vision, 5.45%(n=24had moderate vision and 3.86%(n=17poor vision. Visual outcome related to specific types of injuries showed that poor outcome was higher in open globe injuries groups compared with closed globe injuries \\〖odd ratio(OR=3.33, 95% confidence interval(CI=0.68 to 16.33\\〗. Overall hospital attendance rate of work-related ocular trauma ranged from 20.7 to 51.9 per 1000 new cases and decline of approximately 1.5% per year(PCONCLUSION: Work-related ocular trauma is important cause of ocular morbidity in working forces particularly young men. Malay males between 21 to 40y have higher risk. Majority of work-related ocular trauma seen in our hospital are generally of superficial injuries and potentially preventable. This study indicates they need to improve safety measures to

  20. Virtual Globes, where we were, are and will be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.; Worden, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Ten years ago, Google Earth was new, and the first "Virtual Globes" session was held at AGU. Only a few of us realized the potential of this technology at the time, but the idea quickly caught on. At that time a virtual globe came in two flavors, first a complex GIS system that was utterly impenetrable for the public, or a more accessible version with limited functionality and layers that was available on a desktop computer with a good internet connection. Google Earth's use of the Keyhole Markup Language opened the door for scientists and the public to share data and visualizations across disciplines and revolutionized how everyone uses geographic data. In the following 10 years, KML became more advanced, virtual globes moved to mobile and handheld platforms, and the Google Earth engine allowed for more complex data sharing among scientists. Virtual globe images went from a rare commodity to being everywhere in our lives, from weather forecasts, in our cars, on our smart-phones and shape how we receive and process data. This is a fantastic tool for education and with newer technologies can reach the the remote corners of the world and developing countries. New and emerging technologies allow for augmented reality to be merged with the globes, and for real-time data integration with sensors built into mobile devices or add-ons. This presentation will follow the history of virtual globes in the geosciences, show how robust technologies can be used in the field and classroom today, and make some suggestions for the future.

  1. Severe ocular injuries in Greek children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mela, Ephigenia K; Georgakopoulos, Constantinos D; Georgalis, Athanasios; Koliopoulos, John X; Gartaganis, Sotirios P

    2003-02-01

    To determine the epidemiological characteristics of severe eye injuries in childhood, in a mixed urban and rural Greek setting. Retrospective analysis of 95 cases (103 eyes) of eye injuries in children younger than 17 years of age admitted to the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Patras, Greece, during a five-year period. The data were analyzed with respect to age, sex, type, cause and mode of injury, method of management, duration of hospitalization and final visual deficit. The average age was 9.8 years and males were involved in 80% of the cases. The most common type of eye injury was mechanical closed-globe injury (71.8%). Mechanical open-globe injuries were found in 21.3% of the eyes, while burns comprised 6.7% of the injuries. Most injuries were agent-related, with blows and falls being responsible most often. Multiple operations were part of the treatment in 11.6% of the eyes; 14.5% of the eyes were blinded and 15.5% had significant final visual acuity loss. These hospital-based data suggest that there is a need for health education of both parents and children, since some injuries in children could easily have been prevented.

  2. The Globe: Exhibitions and Events

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Globe of Science and Innovation Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva Conference Nano materials: small dimensions, big opportunities Thursday 22 November at 8.00 p.m. Christoph Renner, Professor of Physics and Deputy Director of MaNEP*Information technologies have developed at an incredible pace over the past sixty years. Mobile phones, MP3 players and other modern gizmos are infinitely more powerful than the first computers, which took up whole rooms! The main driving force behind this evolutionary process has been the boom in the miniaturisation of electronic components. The latest technological innovations have led to a new range of tools being developed, allowing matter to be visualised, manipulated and characterised at the smallest possible scales, molecule by molecule and even atom by atom. At these scales, the behaviour of matter is altered as the conventional properties of mass are gradually taken over by quantum effects with which we are quite unfamiliar in our everyday li...

  3. Virtual Globe Games for Geographic Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Ahlqvist

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Virtual, online maps and globes allow for volunteered geographic information to capitalize on users as sensors and generate unprecedented access to information resources and services. These new "Web 2.0" applications will probably dominate development and use of virtual globes and maps in the near future. We present an experimental platform that integrates an existing virtual globe interface with added functionality as follows; an interactive layer on top of the existing map that support real time creation and manipulation of spatial interaction objects. These objects, together with the existing information delivered through the virtual globe, form a game board that can be used for educational purposes.

  4. The GLOBE Program: Partnerships in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Kennedy, T.; Lemone, M.; Blurton, C.

    2004-12-01

    The GLOBE Program is a worldwide science and education partnership endeavor designed to increase scientific understanding of Earth as a system, support improved student achievement in science and math, and enhance environmental awareness through inquiry-based learning activities. GLOBE began on the premise that teachers and their students would partner with scientists to collect and analyze environmental data using specific protocols in five study areas - atmosphere, soils, hydrology, land cover, and phenology. As the GLOBE network grew, additional partnerships flourished making GLOBE an unprecedented collaboration of individuals worldwide - primary, secondary, and tertiary students, teachers and teacher educators, scientists, government officials, and others - to improve K-12 education. Since its inception in 1994, more than one million students in over 14,000 schools around the world have taken part in The GLOBE Program. The GLOBE Web site (http://www.globe.gov) is the repository for over 11 million student-collected data measurements easily accessible to students and scientists worldwide. Utilizing the advantages of the Internet for information sharing and communication, GLOBE has created an international community. GLOBE enriches students by giving them the knowledge and skills that they will need to become informed citizens and responsible decision-makers in an increasingly complex world. Understanding that all members of a community must support change if it is to be sustainable, GLOBE actively encourages the development of GLOBE Learning Communities (GLCs) which are designed to get diverse stakeholder groups involved in a local or regional environmental issue. Central to the GLC is the engagement of local schools. GLCs go beyond individual teachers implementing GLOBE in the isolation of their classrooms. Instead, the GLC brings multiple teachers and grade levels together to examine environmental issues encouraging the participation of a broad range of

  5. Traumatic eye ball luxation: A stepwise approach to globe salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himika Gupta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial trauma is often associated with orbital and ocular injuries. We report a case of a 21-year-old male with motor vehicular accident, orbital roof blow-in fracture, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak, and left sided globe luxation with corneal abrasion and complete conjunctival denuding. The patient was managed by a multispeciality team and the eyeball was protected by amniotic membrane graft (AMG biological dressing with novel use of inverted sterile metallic bowl as mechanical protection till the patient stabilized. During surgery, eyeball was reposited and ocular surface was reconstructed using amniotic membrane and symblepharon ring. Surgical correction and plating of the facial fractures and dural repair with autologus tensor fascia lata was done. Post surgery ocular surface was intact, ocular motility was well preserved and the globe was prephthisical. Traumatic eyeball luxation is a rare, but dramatic presentation which may occur in a blow in fracture when the intra orbital volume reduces and expels the eye ball out of the socket. This may be associated with extra ocular muscle rupture or optic nerve avulsion. The visual prognosis is nil in majority cases. However, the management is targeted towards globe preservation in view of psychological benefit and ease of cosmetic or prosthetic rehabilitation. Knowing the mechanism of luxation helps to plan the management. A stepwise approach for globe salvage is recommended. Team efforts to take care of various morbidities with special steps to safeguard the eye help to optimize outcomes. Keywords: Traumatic eyeball luxation, Blow in orbital fractures, Amniotic membrane graft for ocular surface, Globe reposition

  6. Managing eye injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Mutie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on what you found during the eye examination, classify the injury as a non-mechanical injury (chemical or thermal injury, a non-globe injury (orbital or adnexal injury or as a mechanical globe injury. In the case of mechanical globe injuries, it is important to classify the injury according to the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology System (BETTS and write it down in the patient’s notes; this will help to ensure that everyone involved in caring for the patient will have a consistent understanding of the type of injury. The resulting uniformity of terminology also helps with research, making it possible to compare data and do audits of injuries – which is essential for prevention.

  7. Presenting CineGlobe Estival! | 6 - 10 July

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Join CineGlobe under a projected starry sky for a film festival and games with a neuroscience twist.   The 6th edition of the CineGlobe International Film Festival at CERN will take place during the first week of July 2016 (on the Globe grounds at CERN, from Wednesday 6 to Friday 8 July) and then during the Nuit de la Science (at the Museum of the History of Science, on July 9 and 10). The festival will include an open-air cinema, film projections in the Globe of Science and Innovation at CERN, the interactive Emotional Circus (carnival-inspired games played with just the participant’s brainwaves) and a special sci-fi edition of the 48 Hour Film Project. The full program will target people of all ages with fun and informative activities such as children’s films in the Minima Cinema, and a workshop on the creation of a pinhole camera with an empty Tetra-Pak milk carton. Practical information: Entry is free. All films in English and French. Onsite food trucks at the G...

  8. Literatur zu Gast im Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Der deutsche Schriftsteller Thomas LEHR liest am 23. März 2006 aus seinem Roman '42', einem philosophischen Abenteuerroman über die Suche nach der Zeit, erzählt in einer funkelnden und souveränen Sprache. Eine Welt von vernichtender Schönheit und bizarren Schrecken wartet auf eine Besuchergruppe, die in der Nähe von Genf die unterirdischen Anlagen des Forschungszentrums für Teilchenphysik CERN besichtigt. Als sie um 12:47:42 wieder ans Tageslicht tritt, scheint ganz Europa in einen Dornröschenschlaf gefallen. Allein die 70 Besucher können sich noch bewegen. Monate und Jahre verharrt die Welt wie in einer riesigen dreidimensionalen Fotografie, bis ein wiederum schockierendes Ereignis die 'Chronifizierten' aus ihren physikalischen Spekulationen und seltsamen Lebensformen reisst. Zu dieser literarischen Veranstaltung im 'Globe of Science and Innovation' laden gemeinsam das Generalkonsulat der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in Genf und CERN ein. Vor Beginn der Lesung wird eine Führung in deutscher Sprac...

  9. Sustainability debate at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    Eco-neighbourhoods, solar panels, recycled heat: these were just some of the innovative ecological projects presented at the panel discussion organised by the Commune of Meyrin at the Globe on Thursday 21 June. CERN is closely involved with several of the projects.   CERN has an important role to play in sustainable development, and in Meyrin it has an excellent local partner. This was perhaps the key message, from CERN’s point of view, to come out of Thursday’s event. It particularly highlighted the proposed plan to use part of the “waste” heat going to the cooling towers at Point 1 to contribute to heating Meyrin’s new ecological housing project, Les Vergers. Some of CERN’s other high-profile contributions to sustainable development, such as the solar panels using CERN vacuum technology on the airport roof, were also presented. The video below presents some of the main ideas and actors in the CERN-Meyrin partnership. Please note that t...

  10. 2008 events in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Globe of Science and Innovation 1st floor - Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva Interactive exhibition Superconductivity—magical attraction From Tuesday, 28 October, to Saturday, 13 December 2008 Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. The phenomenon of superconductivity was discovered a century ago. The first step was taken in 1907 when helium was liquefied for the first time. The capability to cool materials down to temperatures of -269°C (4.2K), made it possible to study the new phenomenon of superconductivity. The properties of this amazing discovery are already being used in a variety of applications in such areas as medical imaging, energy transportation, storage, magnetic levitation and transportation, and electronics. Come and find out how superconductivity has been used for the magnets of CERN’s new accelerator, and test the feeling of levitation for yourself! Free entry - No specialist knowledge required. Fête de ...

  11. 2008 events in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Globe of Science and Innovation 1st floor - Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva Interactive exhibitionSuperconductivity—magical attraction From Tuesday, 28 October, to Saturday, 13 December 2008 Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. The phenomenon of superconductivity was discovered a century ago. The first step was taken in 1907 when helium was liquefied for the first time. The capability to cool materials down to temperatures of -269°C (4.2K), made it possible to study the new phenomenon of superconductivity. The properties of this amazing discovery are already being used in a variety of applications in such areas as medical imaging, energy transportation, storage, magnetic levitation and transportation, and electronics. Come and find out how superconductivity has been used for the magnets of CERN’s new accelerator, and test the feeling of levitation for yourself! Free entry - No specialist knowledge required. In mathema...

  12. The Globe: Exhibitions and Events

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The LHC, accelerator of scienceCERN is soon to commission the world’s most powerful accelerator, the LHC (Large Hadron Collider), which will provide us with new insights into the Universe and how it evolved. This series of lectures is all about understanding the scientific and technological challenges of this phenomenal project and assessing its innovations through their everyday applications. Come and take a sneak preview of the LHC! Thursday 29 November, 8:00 p.m. Share: leading-edge technology at the service of society Jean-Marie Le Goff, physicist and head of technology transfer at CERN The technologies used by the LHC are already finding applications in other scientific fields, such as medicine, climatology, metrology and computer science. Through its ground-breaking technologies, particle physics benefits society as a whole.>>>> Lectures are free and require no specialist knowledge. In French.>>> By reservation only: tel. +41 (0)22 767 76 76 http://globe.web.cern.c...

  13. On stage at the Globe

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The Globe's first season this year is to be rounded off with two shows that are in perfect keeping with the centenary of the death of Jules Verne and Albert Einstein's theory of relativity. 'Signé Jules Verne' (Signed Jules Verne) The Miméscope company, which has already thrilled audiences at CERN with shows such as the 'Oracle of Delphi' and, more recently, 'Point de Suspension', returns with an interactive show entitled 'Signé Jules Verne'. Imagine a slightly crazy machine, which rolls along on wheels, floats, flies or moves in any other way you like, as long as it works on scientific principles. This is the task that Jules Verne sets his audience. Experiments, models, drawings, blueprints, he's interested in them all. In its typical style, Miméscope has created a world of enchantment that combines theatre, choreography, music and lighting effects in a show that evolves as a function of its audience. Performances at 3.00 p.m. on 4, 7, 10 and 11 December An interactive show for the general public...

  14. Teacher Preparation with GLOBE and NASA Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajkowski, K. P.; Templin, M.; Struble, J.; Mierzwiak, S.; Hedley, M. L.; Padgett, D.

    2017-12-01

    The GLOBE Program has been a working with teachers and students for over 20 years. Pre-service education students can be a target audience as well. Mission EARTH is a NASA funded project through the NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) from the Science Mission Directorate. A goal of Mission EARTH is to improve student understanding of Earth System Science and to engage the next generation of scientists and global citizens. This presentation will discuss Weather and Climate courses offered at both the University of Toledo and Tennessee State University for pre-service education students. Students engaged in atmospheric observations through the GLOBE protocols and developed research projects to study El Nino. Undergraduate students helped K-12 students take GLOBE observations as well by partnering with in-service GLOBE teachers affiliated with these GLOBE partnerships.

  15. Sew it up! A Western Trauma Association multi-institutional study of enteric injury management in the postinjury open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlew, Clay Cothren; Moore, Ernest E; Cuschieri, Joseph; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Codner, Panna; Crowell, Kody; Nirula, Ram; Haan, James; Rowell, Susan E; Kato, Catherine M; MacNew, Heather; Ochsner, M Gage; Harrison, Paul B; Fusco, Cynthia; Sauaia, Angela; Kaups, Krista L

    2011-02-01

    Use of damage control surgery techniques has reduced mortality in critically injured patients but at the cost of the open abdomen. With the option of delayed definitive management of enteric injuries, the question of intestinal repair/anastomosis or definitive stoma creation has been posed with no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes on the basis of management of enteric injuries in patients relegated to the postinjury open abdomen. Patients requiring an open abdomen after trauma from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007 were reviewed. Type of bowel repair was categorized as immediate repair, immediate anastomosis, delayed anastomosis, stoma and a combination. Logistic regression was used to determine independent effect of risk factors on leak development. During the 6-year study period, 204 patients suffered enteric injuries and were managed with an open abdomen. The majority was men (77%) sustaining blunt trauma (66%) with a mean age of 37.1 years±1.2 years and median Injury Severity Score of 27 (interquartile range=20-41). Injury patterns included 81 (40%) small bowel, 37 (18%) colonic, and 86 (42%) combined injuries. Enteric injuries were managed with immediate repair (58), immediate anastomosis (15), delayed anastomosis (96), stoma (10), and a combination (22); three patients died before definitive repair. Sixty-one patients suffered intra-abdominal complications: 35 (17%) abscesses, 15 (7%) leaks, and 11 (5%) enterocutaneous fistulas. The majority of patients with leaks had a delayed anastomosis; one patient had a right colon repair. Leak rate increased as one progresses toward the left colon (small bowel anastomoses, 3% leak rate; right colon, 3%; transverse colon, 20%; left colon, 45%). There were no differences in emergency department physiology, injury severity, transfusions, crystalloids, or demographic characteristics between patients with and without leak. Leak cases had higher 12-hour heart rate (148 vs. 125, p=0

  16. Globe : Fête de la science 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    FROM 8 TO 13 OCTOBER 2007 Globe of Science and Innovation - Route de Meyrin, 1211 Geneva >>> "Expo NANO. Technology takes on a new dimension". Open on the Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. and on the Wednesday and Saturday from 10.00 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. >>> Conference/Debate on the LHC "The LHC: an accelerator of science". Thursday 11 October from 8.00 p.m. to 10 p.m. CERN will soon commission the world’s most powerful accelerator, the LHC. This machine, the latest and greatest in a long line of CERN accelerators, is designed to provide answers to the remaining unsolved mysteries surrounding the building blocks of matter. Speakers : Jean-Philippe Tock, Jean-Pierre Revol, Daniel Denegri, Richard Jacobsson and Laurent Chevalier Free entrance. Please book by calling + 41 (0)22 767 76 76 >>> "Poussière d’étoiles" workshop: Saturday 13 October from 10 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. The "Poussière d’étoiles...

  17. Efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation with a miniplate and hollow screw in the treatment of Lisfranc injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Baoliang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate efficacy of open reduction and internal fixation with the miniplate and hollow screw in the treatment of Lisfranc injury. Methods: Ten cases of Lisfranc injury treated by open reduction, miniplate and hollow screw in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. There were 6 males and 4 females with age ranging from 25 to 45 years (mean 32 years. Among them, one case was classified as Type A, six Type B and three Type C. Injury mechanism included road traffic accidents (3 cases, fall from height (5 cases and hit by heavy object (2 cases. All injuries were closed without cerebral trauma or other complicated injuries. The time interval between injury and operation was 6e10 days (average 6.6 days. Postoperatively, the foot function was assessed using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Scales. Healing time and complications were observed. Results: All patients were followed up for 18e24 months (average 20 months. Anatomic reduction was achieved in all patients on images. There was statistical significance between preoperative score (7.89 ± 0.34 and score at postoperative 8 weeks (0.67 ± 0.13. According to the AOFAS score, 5 cases were defined as excellent, 3 cases as good and 2 cases as fair. During follow-up, there was no wound infection or complications except for osteoarthritis in 2 cases. Healing time ranged from 3 to 6 months with an average of 3.6 months. Conclusion: Anatomical reduction of Lisfranc injury can be achieved by open reduction and internal fixation with the miniplate and hollow screw. Normal structure of Lisfranc joint is regained to a great extent; injured ligaments were also repaired. Therefore, this method offers excellent curative effect and can avoid postoperative complications and improve the patients' quality of life.

  18. The globe and orbit in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornreich, L; Konen, O; Lilos, P; Laron, Z

    2011-09-01

    Patients with LS have an inborn growth hormone resistance, resulting in failure to generate IGF-1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the size of the eye and orbit in LS. We retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging of the brain in 9 patients with LS for the following parameters: axial diameter of the globe, interzygomatic distance, perpendicular distance from the interzygomatic line to margins of the globe, medial-to-lateral diameter of the orbit at the anterior orbital rim, distance from the anterior orbital rim to the anterior globe, maximal distance between the medial walls of the orbits, lateral orbital wall angle, lateral orbital wall length, and mediolateral thickness of the intraorbital fat in the most cranial image of the orbit. All measurements were made bilaterally. Twenty patients referred for MR imaging for unrelated reasons served as control subjects. Compared with the control group, the patients with LS had a significantly smaller maximal globe diameter and shallower but wider orbits due to a shorter lateral wall, a smaller medial distance between the orbits, and a larger angle of the orbit. The ratio between the most anterior orbital diameter and the globe was greater than that in controls. The position of the globe was more anterior in relation to the interzygomatic line. Shallow and wide orbits and small globes relative to orbital size are seen in LS and may be secondary to IGF-1 deficiency.

  19. A massive open online course for teaching physiotherapy students and physiotherapists about spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, L A; Glinsky, J V; Lowe, R; Lowe, T

    2014-12-01

    A descriptive audit. To audit the participation and satisfaction in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) for teaching physiotherapy students and physiotherapists about spinal cord injuries. Global and online. A 5-week MOOC about the physiotherapy management of spinal cord injuries was hosted by Physiopedia and run in partnership with the International Spinal Cord Society. The MOOC was based on the physiotherapy-specific module of www.elearnSCI.org, and also involved extra readings, activities and online discussion through a closed Facebook group. Participation and satisfaction was quantified through a pre- and post-MOOC knowledge assessment and an online course evaluation. Participation was also gauged through Facebook activity and internet-based usage statistics. Three thousand five hundred and twenty-three people from 108 countries registered for the MOOC and 2527 joined the Facebook group. One thousand one hundred and twenty-one completed the pre- and post-MOOC knowledge assessments, with more completing one or the other. The median (interquartile range) results for those who completed the pre and post-MOOC knowledge assessments were 70% (60-80%) and 90% (80-95%), respectively. One thousand and twenty-nine completed the online course evaluation, with more than 80% agreeing or strongly agreeing with 12 of the 13 positive statements posed to them about the course. Most participants who completed the MOOC performed well on the post-MOOC knowledge assessment and enjoyed the learning experience. However, these results may be biased if those who did not complete the MOOC were dissatisfied and/or did not sit the post-MOOC knowledge assessment.

  20. Le CERN s'offre un Globe pour séduire le public et les entreprises

    CERN Multimedia

    Tesnier, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    The Globe will be open for the public during 2005; a trip that goes from infinitely small to infinitely large will be explained to the visitors at the first floor; exhibitions, conferences and seminars will be also held there and the Globe will be also used for exchanges between CERN and the Industry

  1. Clinical profile and visual outcome of ocular injuries in a rural area of western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Somen; Nandwani, Rupali; Gogri, Pratik; Misra, Neeta

    2013-01-01

    Ocular trauma is a major cause of visual impairment and morbidity worldwide. To identify the various type of ocular injury in a rural area, determine the presence of any associated visual damage and assess the final visual outcome after treatment. Hospital-based, prospective study conducted over a period of two years. A total of 60 patients of ocular trauma were included. Ocular injuries were more commonly seen in adult (55 per cent) patients who were associated with agricultural work (43.33 per cent). They were more common in male patients (71.67 per cent). Closed globe injury (68.33 per cent) was more common than open globe injury (31.67 per cent). Both in open and closed globe injuries, the commonest object causing injury was a wooden stick. Just 26.7 per cent of the patients had a visual acuity better than 6/60 at presentation; while after completed treatment at two months follow-up, 68.3 per cent had best corrected visual acuity better than 6/60. Agricultural trauma is an important cause of monocular blindness in rural India. The visual outcome depends upon the site and size of the injury and the extent of the ocular damage.

  2. A New Look for the Globe Gardens

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Designs to develop the grounds of the Globe of Science and Innovation have recently been unveiled. The plan is to extend the visitor activities on offer, transforming the area into a public arena for scientific exploration.   Design for the new Globe Gardens. © Jencks Squared and Groupe H. After months of conceptual development, plans to develop the site around the Globe are taking shape. The innovative designs were drawn up for CERN by a unique collaboration consisting of landscape architects Charles and Lily Jencks, and "Groupe H", a group of architects headed by Globe designer Hervé Dessimoz. They comprise new venues, covered walkways, a café and gift shop, a separate VIP entrance and a physics-inspired garden for visitors. The landscape itself becomes a feature – dramatically altered to create a cosmic garden formed by shaped mounds, ponds, and a natural amphitheatre for public events. “The new exhibition in the G...

  3. Evaluation of Vacuum Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Injury in Open Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Manish; Gill, S P S; Sheopaltan, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Pulkesh; Dinesh; Sigh, Jasveer; Rastogi, Prateek; Mishra, L N

    2016-04-01

    The application of controlled levels of negative or sub atmospheric pressure for a prolonged period of time on a wound had shown to accelerate removal of excess fluid and promote hyperaemia, which eventually promote wound healing. The study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the effectiveness of Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) therapy for soft tissue injury in open musculoskeletal trauma. Twenty cases of complex musculoskeletal wound involving different parts of body were included in this progressive randomized study. In patients, aggressive debridement was done before the application of VAC therapy. Controlled negative pressure was uniformly applied to the wound. Dressings were changed after every 4 to 5 days. The evaluation of results included healing rate of the wound, eradication of infection, complication rate, and number of secondary procedures. VAC therapy over the wound was administered for an average of 20.4 days ±6.72 days (range 14 to 42 days). There was decrease in wound size attained by VAC therapy ranged from 2.6 to 24.4cm(2), with an average reduction of 10.55 cm(2). Three wounds were infected at the start of VAC therapy. However, all patients were cleared of bacterial infection by the end of VAC therapy. VAC therapy using negative pressure promote Wound healing by increasing local capillary perfusion and increased rate of granulation tissue formation, decreases the duration of wound healing and requires fewer painful dressing change.

  4. Friday Programme for CineGlobe 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Workshops, apero with filmmakers and short-films inspired by science were the menu of the festival through the day. At night the CineGlobe DOME shown with the 360 degree projections shot-films; among them the avant-premiere of "Phantom of the Universe" - a movie that explains Dark Matter, directed by Joao Pequenao. Meanwhile at the Globe, the audience could enjoy the projections of the sequence of " The Invisible Photograph" .

  5. Detailed Globes Enhance Education and Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Orbis World Globes creates inflatable globes-Earthballs-in many sizes that depict Earth as it is seen from space, complete with atmospheric cloud cover. Orbis designs and produces the most visually authentic replicas of Earth ever created, and NASA took notice of Orbis globes and employed a 16-inch diameter EarthBall for an educational film it made aboard the STS-45 shuttle mission. Orbis later collaborated with NASA to create two 16-foot diameter world globes for display at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, using more detailed satellite imagery. The satellite image now printed on all Orbis globes displays 1-kilometer resolution and is 21,600 by 43,200 pixels in size, and Orbis globes are otherwise meteorologically accurate, though the cloud cover has been slightly reduced in order for most of the landforms to be visible. Orbis also developed the exclusive NightGlow Cities feature, enabling EarthBalls to display the world's cities as they appear as the Earth revolves from daylight into night. Orbis inflatable globes are available in sizes from 1 to 100 feet in diameter, with the most common being the standard 16-inch and 1-meter diameter EarthBalls. Applications include educational uses from preschools to universities, games, and for a variety of display purposes at conferences, trade shows, festivals, concerts, and parades. A 16-foot diameter Orbis globe was exhibited at the United Nations' World Urban Forum, in Vancouver, Canada; the Space 2006 conference, in San Jose, California; and the X-Prize Cup Personal Spaceflight Exposition in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

  6. Globe : September- December 2007 Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Expo NANO Technology takes on a new dimension Come and take a plunge into the world of the infinitesimally small to find out all about nanotechnologies, their numerous applications and the ethical concerns they raise. An exhibition jointly organised by the CCSTI Centres of Grenoble and Bordeaux and the Paris Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie. Interactive exhibition in French, English and Spanish, 
open from 19 September to 8 December 2007. Opening hours: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. andSaturdays from 10 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. School visits may be arranged outside these times upon request. No specialist knowledge required. 
Open to adults and children aged 9 and above. Discovery Mondays At October’s Discovery Monday, in parallel with the "Nanotechnologies" exhibition, we invite you to come and be amazed by our questions of scale. From the infinitely large Universe to the infinitesimally small elementary ...

  7. A massive open online course (MOOC) can be used to teach physiotherapy students about spinal cord injuries: a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Mohammad S; Shofiqul Islam, Md.; Glinsky, Joanne V; Lowe, Rachael; Lowe, Tony; Harvey, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Question: Does a massive open online course (MOOC) based around an online learning module about spinal cord injuries improve knowledge or confidence among physiotherapy students more than if physiotherapy students are left to work through the online learning module at their own pace. Which method of presenting the content leads to greater satisfaction among the students? Study design: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty-ei...

  8. Open lung approach vs acute respiratory distress syndrome network ventilation in experimental acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, P M; Güldner, A; Carvalho, A R; Kasper, M; Pelosi, P; Uhlig, S; Koch, T; Gama de Abreu, M

    2011-09-01

    Setting and strategies of mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute lung injury (ALI) remains controversial. This study compares the effects between lung-protective mechanical ventilation according to the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network recommendations (ARDSnet) and the open lung approach (OLA) on pulmonary function and inflammatory response. Eighteen juvenile pigs were anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. ALI was induced by surfactant washout. Animals were randomly assigned to mechanical ventilation according to the ARDSnet protocol or the OLA (n=9 per group). Gas exchange, haemodynamics, pulmonary blood flow (PBF) distribution, and respiratory mechanics were measured at intervals and the lungs were removed after 6 h of mechanical ventilation for further analysis. PEEP and mean airway pressure were higher in the OLA than in the ARDSnet group [15 cmH(2)O, range 14-18 cmH(2)O, compared with 12 cmH(2)O; 20.5 (sd 2.3) compared with 18 (1.4) cmH(2)O by the end of the experiment, respectively], and OLA was associated with improved oxygenation compared with the ARDSnet group after 6 h. OLA showed more alveolar overdistension, especially in gravitationally non-dependent regions, while the ARDSnet group was associated with more intra-alveolar haemorrhage. Inflammatory mediators and markers of lung parenchymal stress did not differ significantly between groups. The PBF shifted from ventral to dorsal during OLA compared with ARDSnet protocol [-0.02 (-0.09 to -0.01) compared with -0.08 (-0.12 to -0.06), dorsal-ventral gradients after 6 h, respectively]. According to the OLA, mechanical ventilation improved oxygenation and redistributed pulmonary perfusion when compared with the ARDSnet protocol, without differences in lung inflammatory response.

  9. The Globe gets a new skin

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    The Globe of Science and Innovation will be closed to the public from 4 May until the end of March 2016 for large-scale maintenance work. The renovation project, which is set to last about ten months, aims to overhaul the general building infrastructure and, above all, to replace a number of ageing components.   The Globe, during its assembly at CERN in 2004. Originally designed by Genevan architects Thomas Büchi and Hervé Dessimoz for the Swiss national “Expo 2002” exhibition in Neuchâtel, the Globe of Science and Innovation quickly became a symbol of CERN. In 2004, when it was relocated to its present site, the Globe acted as the venue hosting official delegations at the Laboratory’s 50th anniversary celebrations. Ten years on, thanks especially to the permanent exhibition Universe of Particles, the Globe has become THE venue for meetings and interactions between CERN and the general public, and is destined to continue in that ve...

  10. This autumn at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    WORKSHOPS Mini-Einsteins: physics for tots Wednesdays 27 September, 18 and 25 October, 15, 22 and 29 November and 6 December at 2.30 p.m., duration 1 hour. Workshops for accompanied 4-to-6-year-olds and groups. Free of charge, please book at: + 41 (0)22 767 76 76 Gravity for budding astronomers Saturdays 30 September, 21 and 28 October, 11, 18 and 25 November and 2 December at 2.30 p.m., duration 1 hour. Workshops for 12-to-14-year-olds, open to individuals and groups. Free of charge, please book at: + 41 (0)22 767 76 76. All workshops are in French.

  11. This autumn at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    WORKSHOPS Mini-Einsteins: physics for tots Wednesdays 20 and 27 September, 18 and 25 October, 15, 22 and 29 November and 6 December at 2.30 p.m., duration 1 hour. CERN is offering a series of workshops designed to teach the ABC of physics to the very young. Games and hands-on activities based on notions such as weight and waves will stimulate the children's curiosity and initiate them into the world of science. Workshops for accompanied 4-to-6-year-olds and groups. Free of charge, please book at +41 (0)22 767 76 76 Gravity for budding astronomers Saturdays 23 and 30 September, 21 and 28 October, 11, 18 and 25 November and 2 December at 2.30 p.m., duration 1 hour. Which is heavier and falls faster, a hammer or a feather? And why do objects fall in the first place? How to read a map of the sky? The answers to these and other questions are provided through a series of fun experiments. Workshops for 12-to-14-year-olds, open to individuals and groups Free of charge, please book at +41 (0)22 767 76...

  12. Orbital Blowout Fracture with Complete Dislocation of the Globe into the Maxillary Sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joy Mh; Fries, Fabian N; Hendrix, Philipp; Brinker, Titus; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-29

    This rare case report describes the diagnosis and treatment of an isolated left-sided orbital floor fracture with a complete dislocation of the globe into the maxillary sinus and briefly discusses the indications of surgery and recovery for orbital floor fractures in general. Complete herniation of the globe through an orbital blow-out fracture is uncommon. However, the current case illustrates that such an occurrence should be in the differential diagnosis and should be considered, especially following high speed/impact injuries involving a foreign object. In these rare cases, surgical intervention is required.

  13. Aerial drone misadventure: A novel case of trauma resulting in ocular globe rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza E. Moskowitz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to present the novel findings of a drone causing such a traumatic ocular injury and provide recommendations for how it might be prevented. Observations: We report on a recent case where a child presented to our Emergency Department after incurring a blow to the face by the propeller of a remote controlled drone. The patient suffered significant trauma including rupture of the right globe. Conclusions: As drone sales continue to rise, it is important that physicians be prepared to treat the potential injuries that may result from using these devices. Furthermore, in an attempt to reduce the number of visits associated with remote controlled drones, physicians should be prepared to provide advice as to how patients can reduce the risks of injury. Importance: We hope that the framework and recommendations below will help physicians decrease adverse outcomes related to this unusual injury pattern. Keywords: Drone, Trauma, Globe injury, Globe rupture, Ocular trauma, Corneal trauma, Scleral trauma

  14. CinéGlobe invites you to participate in a poster design competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Neal David Hartman

    2013-01-01

    For its 2014 publicity campaign, CinéGlobe invites CERN people to participate in a poster design competition.  The entries are now on display on the Pas Perdus in the main building, and the CERNois are invited to vote for their favourites.    CinéGlobe is the international festival of short films inspired by science that takes place every two years at CERN, in the Globe of Science and Innovation. From 18 to 23 March 2014, CERN will host the fourth edition of the festival. The mission of the CinéGlobe Film Festival is to challenge the commonly perceived divisions between science and art by demonstrating that they are both essential to interpreting our world. Open to short film creators from around the world, the CinéGlobe festival is truly international, the first three editions having attracted more than 4,000 entries from more than 100 countries around the globe.  In addition to screening...

  15. The Globe of Innovation takes shape

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 18 May, the central vortex of the CERN Globe of Innovation was put into place more than 22 metres above the ground. The central vortex of the Globe of Innovation is a crown measuring 6.15 metres in diameter and 4.5 meters in height. Having been lifted by a crane to a height of over 22 metres, the vortex is placed on a support structure which will be removed once the 36 arcs providing the building's structure have been secured in place. Resting some 22 metres above the ground, the central vortex of the Globe of Innovation is now ready to support the 36 wooden arcs which will provide the building's structure. Work to reassemble the former Palais de l'Equilibre, which was first erected in Neuchâtel for the EXPO.02 exhibition, began on 18 May. The sphere, measuring 40 metres in diameter, has now been renamed the Globe of Innovation. A detachment from the Swiss army is carrying out the work, which will be completed in time for the Organization's official fiftieth anniversary celebrations. The building will be...

  16. Children's drawings exhibited in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Elizabeth Roe

    2010-01-01

    "Draw Me A Physicist" has been a success. Members of the public visiting the exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation have praised the scientific and creative balance the children of neighbouring France and the Canton of Geneva have obtained through their visit to CERN.   The Draw Me a Physicist exhibition in the Globe For a six-month period 9 to 11-year olds from the Pays de Gex, Meyrin, Satigny and Vernier have been able to enjoy a balance between science and art, through drawing and defining their interpretations of a physicist. In May, eight pairs of drawings from each participating class were selected by the schools to be displayed on the second floor of the Globe. Since the images have been put up, the viewers have enjoyed the contrast between the "before" pictures of vibrant Albert Einsteins to the "after" pictures of casual people sitting in an office. The large room in the Globe has been transformed from a hollow shell int...

  17. Science Outreach in Virtual Globes; Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    The popularity of projects such as 'Crisis in Darfur' and the IPY (International Polar Year) network link show the potential of using the rich functionality of Virtual Globes for science outreach purposes. However, the structure of outreach projects in Virtual Globes varies widely. Consider an analogy: If you pick up a science journal you immediately know where to find the contents page and what the title and cover story are meant to communicate. That is because journals have a well defined set of norms that they follow in terms of layout and design. Currently, science projects presented in virtual globes have, at best, weakly defined norms, there are little common structural elements beyond those imposed by the constraints of the virtual globe system. This is not a criticism of the science community, it is to be expected since norms take time to develop for any new technology. An example of the development of norms are pages on the web: when they first started appearing structure was unguided but over the last few years structural elements such as a left hand side navigation system and a bread crumb trail near the header have become common. In this paper I shall describe the developing norms of structure I have observed in one area of virtual globe development; Google Earth science outreach projects. These norms include text introductions, video introductions, use of folders and overlay presentation. I shall go on to examine how best to use these norms to build a clear and engaging outreach project and describe some cartographic best practices that we should also consider adopting as norms. I also will briefly explain why I think norms in science outreach aid creativity rather than limiting it despite the counter intuitive nature of this concept.

  18. Management of acute open tendo-achilles injuries in Indian lavatory pans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Sasanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the Tendo-achilles are common but rarely do they present directly to plastic surgeons. Eighteen patients with acute tendo-achilles injury due to fall in the lndian type of lavatory pan came directly to the emergency department of Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata and subsequently were treated in the Department of Plastic Surgery. Direct repair with prolene or stainless steel (SS wires with or without flap cover were performed for management. Exercises were started 1 month later with gradual increase in activity. Complications were minor and temporary in nature. Long term results in the form of performing previous activities were excellent.

  19. Individualism–Collectivism in Hofstede and GLOBE

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Brewer; Sunil Venaik

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the Individualism–Collectivism (I-C) dimension of national culture in the Hofstede and GLOBE models. We identify major contradictions between the two culture models, which result in contradictory relationships with external variables such as economic prosperity. We critically evaluate the content validity of the items used to measure this construct in both models. Based on our analysis, we suggest that Hofstede's Individualism–Collectivism index be relabelled as Self-orien...

  20. Global Land One-kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE) v.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBE is a project to develop the best available 30-arc-second (nominally 1 kilometer) global digital elevation data set. This version of GLOBE contains data from 11...

  1. Doxorubicin induced myocardial injury is exacerbated following ischaemic stress via opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharanei, M.; Hussain, A. [Department of Biomolecular and Sport Sciences, Coventry University, Cox Street, Coventry, CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Janneh, O. [Department of Biomolecular and Sport Sciences, Coventry University, Cox Street, Coventry, CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Pharmacology Research Laboratories, 70, Pembroke Place, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool. L69 3GF (United Kingdom); Maddock, H.L., E-mail: h.maddock@coventry.ac.uk [Department of Biomolecular and Sport Sciences, Coventry University, Cox Street, Coventry, CV1 5FB (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    Chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin are known to cause or exacerbate cardiovascular cell death when an underlying heart condition is present. However, the mechanism of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity is unclear. Here we assess the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin in conditions of myocardial ischaemia reperfusion and the mechanistic basis of protection, in particular the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in such protection. The effects of doxorubicin (1 μM) ± cyclosporine A (CsA, 0.2 μM; inhibits mPTP) were investigated in isolated male Sprague–Dawley rats using Langendorff heart and papillary muscle contraction models subjected to simulated ischaemia and reperfusion injury. Isolated rat cardiac myocytes were used in an oxidative stress model to study the effects of drug treatment on mPTP by confocal microscopy. Western blot analysis evaluated the effects of drug treatment on p-Akt and p-Erk 1/2 levels. Langendorff and the isometric contraction models showed a detrimental effect of doxorubicin throughout reperfusion/reoxygenation as well as increased p-Akt and p-Erk levels. Interestingly, CsA not only reversed the detrimental effects of doxorubicin, but also reduced p-Akt and p-Erk levels. In the sustained oxidative stress assay to study mPTP opening, doxorubicin decreased the time taken to depolarization and hypercontracture, but these effects were delayed in the presence of CsA. Collectively, our data suggest for the first that doxorubicin exacerbates myocardial injury in an ischaemia reperfusion model. If the inhibition of mPTP ameliorates the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin, then more selective inhibitors of mPTP should be further investigated for their utility in patients receiving doxorubicin. - Highlights: ► Doxorubicin exacerbates myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury. ► Co-treatment with CsA protects against doxorubicin induced myocardial injury. ► CsA delays doxorubicin induced mPTP opening in laser

  2. Doxorubicin induced myocardial injury is exacerbated following ischaemic stress via opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharanei, M.; Hussain, A.; Janneh, O.; Maddock, H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin are known to cause or exacerbate cardiovascular cell death when an underlying heart condition is present. However, the mechanism of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity is unclear. Here we assess the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin in conditions of myocardial ischaemia reperfusion and the mechanistic basis of protection, in particular the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in such protection. The effects of doxorubicin (1 μM) ± cyclosporine A (CsA, 0.2 μM; inhibits mPTP) were investigated in isolated male Sprague–Dawley rats using Langendorff heart and papillary muscle contraction models subjected to simulated ischaemia and reperfusion injury. Isolated rat cardiac myocytes were used in an oxidative stress model to study the effects of drug treatment on mPTP by confocal microscopy. Western blot analysis evaluated the effects of drug treatment on p-Akt and p-Erk 1/2 levels. Langendorff and the isometric contraction models showed a detrimental effect of doxorubicin throughout reperfusion/reoxygenation as well as increased p-Akt and p-Erk levels. Interestingly, CsA not only reversed the detrimental effects of doxorubicin, but also reduced p-Akt and p-Erk levels. In the sustained oxidative stress assay to study mPTP opening, doxorubicin decreased the time taken to depolarization and hypercontracture, but these effects were delayed in the presence of CsA. Collectively, our data suggest for the first that doxorubicin exacerbates myocardial injury in an ischaemia reperfusion model. If the inhibition of mPTP ameliorates the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin, then more selective inhibitors of mPTP should be further investigated for their utility in patients receiving doxorubicin. - Highlights: ► Doxorubicin exacerbates myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury. ► Co-treatment with CsA protects against doxorubicin induced myocardial injury. ► CsA delays doxorubicin induced mPTP opening in laser

  3. Visualization on the Day Night Year Globe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Božić, Mirjana; Vušković, Leposava; Popović, Svetozar; Popović, Jelena; Marković-Topalović, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    The story about a properly oriented outdoor globe in the hands and minds of Eratosthenes, Jefferson, Milanković and science educators is presented. Having the same orientation in space as the Earth, the Day Night Year Globe (DING) shows in real time the pattern of illumination of the Earth’s surface and its diurnal and seasonal variations. It is an ideal object for the visualization of knowledge and increase in knowledge about: the form of the Earth, Earth’s rotation, Earth’s revolution around the Sun, the length of seasons, solstices, equinoxes, the longitude problem, the distribution of the Sun’s radiation over the Earth, the impact of this radiation on Earth’s climate, and how to use it efficiently. By attaching a movable vane to the poles, or adding pins around the equator to read time, DING becomes a spherical/globe-shaped sundial. So, the DING is simultaneously useful for teaching physics, geophysics, astronomy, use of solar energy and promoting an inquiry-based learning environment for students and the public. (paper)

  4. A new mural for the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A 53 metre long and 6 metre high mural has graced the ramp of the Globe since 21 June. Containing life-size photos of the CMS experiment and an event in the ATLAS detector, its visual impact cannot fail to rouse visitors' curiosity.   The new mural installed in the Globe Visitors ascending from the ground-floor to the first floor of the Globe are now greeted by a huge visual record of what's going on below ground at CERN and is no longer accessible on guided tours of the Laboratory. "The mural contains full-scale photos that give you a real feel of how the CMS detector is constructed and of the degree of precision of the particle tracks in the ATLAS event", explains Rolf Landua, Head of the Education Group, who came up with the project in conjunction with Bernard Pellequer. Several people were instrumental in bringing the project to life. The collage of 250 photographs of the CMS detector was retouched and assembled by Maximilien Brice, CERN's photographer, with the assistance o...

  5. A key component of the Globe arrives

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre arrived at CERN last week. Renamed the Globe of Innovation, this elegant wooden sphere will be inaugurated in October 2004. The convoy transporting the first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre, the keystone of the famous wooden globe, arrived at CERN on the night of 28th August in the middle of a violent storm and dramatic flashes of lightning. Erected in Neuchâtel last year for the EXPO.02 exhibition, the Palais de l'Equilibre was a gift to the Laboratory from the Swiss Confederation (see Bulletin 25/2003). The gift of the structure and 4 million Swiss francs, together with help from the Swiss army for the reassembly work, received the final approval of the Swiss Federal Council on 20th August 2003. Renamed the Globe of Innovation, the 27-metre-high sphere measuring 40 metres in diameter will house the Laboratory's new exhibition centre in 2005. The keystone, known as the "central vertex", is a crown measuring 6.5 m in diameter and 4.5 m high, located a...

  6. The Citizen-Scientist as Data Collector: GLOBE at Night, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Ward, D.; Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Gallagher, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-12-01

    An innovative program to realize light pollution education on two continents via Internet 2-based videoconferencing was begun 4 years ago by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Bilingual science teachers and their students in Arizona and Chile recorded the brightness of the night sky by matching its appearance toward the constellation Orion with one of 6 stellar maps of limiting magnitude. Students from both hemispheres would report their findings via videoconferences. In the last year the program has evolved in collaboration with UCAR and other partners into an international, user-friendly, web-based science event open to anyone in the world, known as GLOBE at Night. GLOBE at Night uses the same design to observe and record the visible stars toward Orion, as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. The inaugural event occurred over 11 nights last March, when 18,000 citizen- scientists made over 4,500 observations from 96 countries. Analysis of the GLOBE at Night data set found that the brighter skies corresponded to areas with higher population density, and that most observations were taken in a location with some light pollution. The data also tended to confirm that satellite data is reliable in assessing light pollution. This session will describe our program to incorporate more technology into the GLOBE at Night program. Citizen-scientists will use sky quality meters (visible light photometers), calibrated digital photography, and GPS as a means to measure and map more accurately the brightness of the sky at selected urban and rural sites. This extension of the program is designed to aid further in teaching about the impact of artificial lighting on local environments and the ongoing loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource. We will also describe how detailed maps of selected urban areas can be used to assess lighting design, safety considerations and energy usage. Given the widespread interest in the inaugural GLOBE at Night

  7. GLOBE-koolide õpilased assisteerivad NASA teadlasi / Imbi Henno

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Henno, Imbi

    2004-01-01

    GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit Environment) on õpilastele suunatud uurimuslikku ja praktilist tegevust pakkuv haridus- ja teadusprogramm. Õpilased teevad keskkonnavaatlusi ja mõõtmisi, saadavad oma tulemused interneti kaudu GLOBE'i andmebaasi ja kasutavad andmebaase koolitöös. Suvel toimus USA-s Boulderis GLOBE'i 10. tegevusaastale pühendatud konverents

  8. Oral 2-hydroxyoleic acid inhibits reflex hypersensitivity and open-field-induced anxiety after spared nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Martin, G; Galan-Arriero, I; Ferrer-Donato, A; Busquets, X; Gomez-Soriano, J; Escribá, P V; Taylor, J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, fatty acids have been shown to modulate sensory function in animal models of neuropathic pain. In this study, the antinociceptive effect of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA) was assessed following spared nerve injury (SNI) with reflex and cerebrally mediated behavioural responses. Initial antinociceptive behavioural screening of daily administration of 2-OHOA (400 mg/kg, p.o.) was assessed in Wistar rats by measuring hindlimb reflex hypersensitivity to von Frey and thermal plate stimulation up to 7 days after SNI, while its modulatory effect on lumbar spinal dorsal horn microglia reactivity was assessed with OX-42 immunohistochemistry. In vitro the effect of 2-OHOA (120 μM) on cyclooxygenase protein expression (COX-2/COX-1 ratio) in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage cells was tested with Western blot analysis. Finally, the effects of 2-OHOA treatment on the place escape aversion paradigm (PEAP) and the open-field-induced anxiety test were tested at 21 days following nerve injury compared with vehicle-treated sham and pregabalin-SNI (30 mg/kg, p.o.) control groups. Oral 2-OHOA significantly reduced ipsilateral mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity up to 7 days after SNI. Additionally 2-OHOA decreased the COX-2/COX-1 ratio in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage cells and OX-42 expression within the ipsilateral lumbar spinal dorsal horn 7 days after SNI. 2-OHOA significantly restored inner-zone exploration in the open-field test compared with the vehicle-treated sham group at 21 days after SNI. Oral administration of the modified omega 9 fatty acid, 2-OHOA, mediates antinociception and prevents open-field-induced anxiety in the SNI model in Wistar rats, which is mediated by an inhibition of spinal dorsal horn microglia activation. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  9. The new Globe car park: for visitors and the CERN community

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    With twice as many parking spaces as the existing car park by the flagpoles and the same conditions of use (see here), the new Globe car park will be open for use from Monday 5 May.   The new Globe car park: the blue spaces are reserved for P+R pass holders. The new car park, which will be inaugurated on Monday 28 April by CERN’s Director-General in the presence of officials representing the Canton of Geneva and the sub-prefecture of the Ain, will better cater to the needs of CERN’s many visitors. The large number of spaces (around 100) reserved for P+R users will encourage the use of public transport, which will be particularly important at peak times. From autumn 2014, the Globe car park will completely replace the flagpole car park, where the new Esplanade des Particules will be built.

  10. Results from the Prototype GLOBE at Night Worldwide Light Pollution Observation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, S. M.; Isbell, D.; Orellana, D.; Blurton, C.; Henderson, S.

    2006-06-01

    Students, families, and educators worldwide participated in GLOBE at Night - an international event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Participation was open to anyone - anywhere in the world - who could get outside and look skyward during the week of March 22-29, 2006. Our goal was 5000 observations from around the world in this prototype program.The hands-on learning activities associated with the program were designed to extend the traditional classroom and school day with a week of nighttime observations involving teachers, students and their families. By locating specific constellations in the sky, students from around the world learned how the lights in their community contribute to light pollution. Students explored the different light sources in their community learning the relationship between science, technology and society, and they reported their observations online through a central database allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis. The observations made during GLOBE at Night helped students and scientists together assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world as well as the level of energy wastage associated with poorly-shielded lights.For more information, visit http://www.globe.gov/globeatnight.GLOBE at Night is a collaboration between The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS) in Chile , Windows to the Universe, and Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI).

  11. And the winner of the Golden CinéGlobe is…

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Three years after the first CinéGlobe festival, the CERN film club has just organised a second international festival of short films and science documentaries, attended by a host of film-makers and film fans alike. Six special prizes were awarded.   One of the Golden CinéGlobe awards The second Golden CinéGlobe award ceremony was held in the Globe on the evening of Saturday, 20 February. Now something of a magnet for local fans of short films and science documentaries, the CinéGlobe festival has become one of the most successful events organised by a CERN club. "Organising the festival has been a gratifying experience as many people have taken part in and enjoyed the event", says Quentin King, vice-chairman of the CERN film club, Open Your Eyes Films. "Time was our worst enemy. It took us a year to bring the project to fruition but we could have done with another year to refine some of the details". The 18 screenings...

  12. Clinical analysis of firework-related ocular injuries during Spring Festival 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuan; Yi-qiao, Xing; Yan-ning, Yang; Ming, Ai; An-huai, Yang; Lian-hong, Zhou

    2010-03-01

    To document the clinical features, management and visual outcome of fireworks-related ocular injuries during the Spring Festival. A retrospective analysis of all patients with fireworks-related ocular injuries attending the Department of Ophthalmology in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from January 20 to February 10, 2009. Age, gender, laterality, type of fireworks, location of incident, initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), diagnosis, management, and final BCVA at last follow-up were documented. Relevant clinical features and visual outcome were evaluated. We observed 25 eyes in 24 patients. Injuries were more frequent in children (ten, 41.7%), males (19, 79.2%), and as open globe injury (15, 62.5%). The most common pyrotechnical products causing accidents were firecrackers (12, 50%). Rural residents had significantly higher rates of injury compared to urban residents (P = 0.023). Of 25 eyes, the most common injuries were corneal/scleral/corneoscleral open globe trauma (15, 60%), traumatic cataract (14, 56%), vitreous hemorrhage (seven, 28%) and retinal detachment (seven, 28%). Most eyes (23, 92%) received surgical intervention, including one (4%) eye enucleation. Vitrectomy was the most surgical treatment. After management, visual outcomes showed statistically significant improvement (P = 0.008). Initial BCVA correlated strongly with final BCVA (P = 0.010). Fireworks-related ocular injuries occur mainly in children, males and rural settings, are frequently severe and visually devastating. Therefore, preventive measures should be strengthened, including public education and legal restriction on the sale and use of fireworks.

  13. The assessment of neural injury following open heart surgery by physiological tremor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Adám; Hejjel, László; Ajtay, Zénó; Kellényi, Lóránd; Solymos, Andor; Bártfai, Imre; Kovács, Norbert; Lenkey, Zsófia; Cziráki, Attila; Szabados, Sándor

    2013-02-21

    The appearance of post-operative cognitive dysfunction as a result of open heart surgery has been proven by several studies. Focal and/or sporadic neuron damage emerging in the central nervous system may not only appear as cognitive dysfunction, but might strongly influence features of physiological tremor. We investigated 110 patients (age: 34-73 years; 76 male, 34 female; 51 coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 25 valve replacement, 25 combined open heart surgery, 9 off-pump CABG) before surgery and after open-heart surgery on the 3(rd) to 5(th) post-operative day. The assessment of the physiological tremor analysis was performed with our newly developed equipment based on the Analog Devices ADXL 320 JPC integrated accelerometer chip. Recordings were stored on a PC and spectral analysis was performed by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). We compared power integrals in the 1-4 Hz, 4-8 Hz and 8-12 Hz frequency ranges and these were statistically assessed by the Wilcoxon rank correlation test. We found significant changes in the power spectrum of physiological tremor. The spectrum in the 8-12 Hz range (neuronal oscillation) decreased and a shift was recognised to the lower spectrum (p open heart surgery.

  14. CT classification and clinical significance of rupture globe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao Jinzhong; Zhang Guixiang

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss CT appearances of the rupture globe, and CT classifications and their clinical significance. Materials and methods: Forty-nine rupture globes were verified; 79% patents were scanned within 24 hours. Axial plane scanning were done with 3 mm slice and 256 x 256 matrix. Bone and soft tissue conditions were adjusted to analyse the bone and globe structures. Results: CT showed that globe circle rupture in one point of 32%, two points of 20%, and multiple points of 28%. Thickening of globe circle was as follows: 5 mm in 10 globes, 6 mm in 24, and 7 mm in 9.20% injured globes were enlarged and 32% were contracted. 14 anterior chambers deepened more than 4 mm. 83% rupture globes also had intraglobe hemorrhage and 48% foreign bodies. 28% injured globes had exophthalmus, and 75% had injured parasinuses or orbits, or brain trauma. Conclusion: The authors classified the rupture globe into three types. Type III showed unrepaired that should ablate the injured globes, whereas type I and II had to repair and to debride

  15. Assessing the accuracy of globe thermometer method in predicting outdoor mean radiant temperature under Malaysia tropical microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrit, N. G.; Alghoul, M. A.; Sopian, K.; Lahimer, A. A.; Elayeb, O. K.

    2017-11-01

    Assessing outdoor human thermal comfort and urban climate quality require experimental investigation of microclimatic conditions and their variations in open urban spaces. For this, it is essential to provide quantitative information on air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and mean radiant temperature. These parameters can be quantified directly except mean radiant temperature (Tmrt). The most accurate method to quantify Tmrt is integral radiation measurements (3-D shortwave and long-wave) which require using expensive radiometer instruments. To overcome this limitation the well-known globe thermometer method was suggested to calculate Tmrt. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of using indoor globe thermometer method in predicting outdoor mean radiant temperature under Malaysia tropical microclimate. Globe thermometer method using small and large sizes of black-painted copper globes (50mm, 150mm) were used to estimate Tmrt and compare it with the reference Tmrt estimated by integral radiation method. The results revealed that the globe thermometer method considerably overestimated Tmrt during the middle of the day and slightly underestimated it in the morning and late evening. The difference between the two methods was obvious when the amount of incoming solar radiation was high. The results also showed that the effect of globe size on the estimated Tmrt is mostly small. Though, the estimated Tmrt by the small globe showed a relatively large amount of scattering caused by rapid changes in radiation and wind speed.

  16. Profile of ocular injury in pediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanishk Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the clinical profile of ocular injuries in children in a tertiary care center in Northern India.METHODS: This was a hospital based descriptive study. All children of ocular injuries up to 16y of age were included. Data regarding the socio-economic status, medical/surgical treatment, and condition at discharge were recorded. Follow-up to 3mo was done in the study. Initial and final visual acuity was recorded. Ocular Trauma Classification Group guidelines and Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology were used for the definitions and classifications of ocular trauma. Socio-economic status grading is done according to modified B.G. Prasad classification and Kuppuswamy's socio-economic scale.RESULTS: Out of 42 children, male to female ratio was 3.6:1.Maximum number(50%of injuries occurred between 11-16y of age. Most of the children(59.52%belonged to lower socio-economic class and were from arural background. Ocular injuries occurred at home in 20(47.61%children followed by 6(14.28%each in school, playground, and street. Open globe injuries were seen in 19(45.24%children and 23(54.75%children had closed globe injuries. Injuries by wooden stick, stone, firework, fall, toy were 12(28.57%, 5(11.90%, 3(7.14%, 3(7.14%, and 2(4.76%. Seventeen(40.47%children required medical management and 25(59.53%were treated surgically.CONCLUSION:Male children in rural regions and of lower socio-economic background were more prone to ocular injuries. Children were more risk of ocular injuries at home. Wooden sticks and stone were the commonest cause of ocular injuries. Ocular morbidity and poor visual outcome were seen more in open globe injuries. Further population-based studies are required to reinforce findings of present study. Based on this, a long term strategy can be planned to prevent ocular injuries in children in this region.

  17. Outcome of 28 open pilon fractures with injury severity-based fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoff, Jonathan R; Saifi, Comron; Goodspeed, David C; Reid, J Spence

    2015-04-01

    Open pilon fracture management and treatment poses a significant challenge to orthopedic surgeons. The purpose of this study was to determine patient outcomes for open pilon fractures based on wound complication and infection rates, as well as subjective outcome instruments. This was a retrospective consecutive case series of 28 fractures with Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA)-type 43-B and 43-C open pilon fractures. Mean length of follow-up was 36 months and minimum of 1 year. Ten fractures were Gustilo and Anderson grade IIIB, and the remaining fractures were grades I-IIIA. Patients were initially treated with spanning external fixation and staged wound debridement followed by osteosynthesis of the articular surface. Metaphyseal fixation was by either plate fixation or Ilizarov frame. The primary outcome was the incidence of deep tissue infection requiring surgery. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of other complications (nonunion, malunion, amputation) and functional outcomes (Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment Questionnaire and AAOS Foot and Ankle Questionnaire). Four patients developed deep tissue infections, three in the internal fixation group and one in the Ilizarov group, and all were treated successfully with staged debridement. There were two delayed unions required bone grafting, and infection-free union was ultimately achieved in all fractures. Two patients underwent arthrodesis secondary to post-traumatic arthritis, while no patients experienced malunions or amputations. The use of staged wound debridement in conjunction with either plate fixation or Ilizarov frame achieves low rates of wound infection and stable fixation after anatomic joint reconstruction for OTA-type 43-B and 43-C open pilon fractures.

  18. New cropping designs for globe artichoke industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Paolo Mauro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A two-year experiment was carried-out in order to evaluate the effects of two plant arrangements (single vs. twin rows and four plant densities (1.0 -1.2 -1.4 and 1.8 plant m–2 on the agronomical behaviour and head characteristics of three globe artichoke genotypes (Violetto di Sicilia, Harmony F1 and Madrigal F1. The change of the cultivation format toward a high density stand significantly increase yield and yield synchronicity. The twin rows plant arrangement, although reduced total yield, increased the yield synchronicity. Moreover, the cultivation of seed-propagated genotypes (Harmony F1 and Madrigal F1 allowed extending significantly the availability of the heads across the year. On the basis of our results, we can assert that the implementation of a specific scheduling cultivation, based on higher density stands, twin rows plant arrangement and the integration of the traditional early genotypes with the new seed-propagated cultivars, is a promising way to match the requirements of a globe artichoke industrial crop, and to predispose a better mechanization of the cultural practices.

  19. Globe hosts launch of new processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Launch of the quadecore processor chip at the Globe. On 14 November, in a series of major media events around the world, the chip-maker Intel launched its new 'quadcore' processor. For the regions of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, the day-long launch event took place in CERN's Globe of Science and Innovation, with over 30 journalists in attendance, coming from as far away as Johannesburg and Dubai. CERN was a significant choice for the event: the first tests of this new generation of processor in Europe had been made at CERN over the preceding months, as part of CERN openlab, a research partnership with leading IT companies such as Intel, HP and Oracle. The event also provided the opportunity for the journalists to visit ATLAS and the CERN Computer Centre. The strategy of putting multiple processor cores on the same chip, which has been pursued by Intel and other chip-makers in the last few years, represents an important departure from the more traditional improvements in the sheer speed of such chips. ...

  20. Planning and Management of Real-Time Geospatialuas Missions Within a Virtual Globe Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebiker, S.; Eugster, H.; Flückiger, K.; Christen, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a hardware and software framework supporting all phases of typical monitoring and mapping missions with mini and micro UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The developed solution combines state-of-the art collaborative virtual globe technologies with advanced geospatial imaging techniques and wireless data link technologies supporting the combined and highly reliable transmission of digital video, high-resolution still imagery and mission control data over extended operational ranges. The framework enables the planning, simulation, control and real-time monitoring of UAS missions in application areas such as monitoring of forest fires, agronomical research, border patrol or pipeline inspection. The geospatial components of the project are based on the Virtual Globe Technology i3D OpenWebGlobe of the Institute of Geomatics Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW). i3D OpenWebGlobe is a high-performance 3D geovisualisation engine supporting the web-based streaming of very large amounts of terrain and POI data.

  1. A massive open online course (MOOC can be used to teach physiotherapy students about spinal cord injuries: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Question: Does a massive open online course (MOOC based around an online learning module about spinal cord injuries improve knowledge or confidence among physiotherapy students more than if physiotherapy students are left to work through the online learning module at their own pace. Which method of presenting the content leads to greater satisfaction among the students? Study design: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty-eight physiotherapy students in Bangladesh. Intervention: Participants randomised to the control group were instructed to work at their own pace over a 5-week period through a physiotherapy-specific online learning module available at www.elearnSCI.org. Experimental participants were enrolled in a 5-week MOOC. The MOOC involved completing the same online learning module but experimental participants’ progress through the module was guided each week and they were provided with the opportunity to engage in online discussion through Facebook. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was knowledge, and the secondary outcomes were perceived confidence to treat people with spinal cord injuries and satisfaction with the learning experience. Results: The mean between-group difference for knowledge was 0.7 points (95% CI –1.3 to 2.6 on a 0 to 20-point scale. The equivalent results for perceived confidence and satisfaction with the learning experience were 0.4 points (95% CI –1.0 to 1.8 and 0.0 points (95% CI –1.1 to 1.2 on a 0 to 10-point scale. Conclusion: The MOOC was no better for students than working at their own pace through an online learning module for increasing knowledge, confidence or satisfaction. However, students in the MOOC group highlighted positive aspects of the course that were unique to their group, such as interacting with students from other countries through the MOOC Facebook group. Trial registration: ACTRN12614000422628. [Hossain MS, Islam

  2. Aerial drone misadventure: A novel case of trauma resulting in ocular globe rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Eliza E; Siegel-Richman, Yonaton M; Hertner, George; Schroeppel, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present the novel findings of a drone causing such a traumatic ocular injury and provide recommendations for how it might be prevented. We report on a recent case where a child presented to our Emergency Department after incurring a blow to the face by the propeller of a remote controlled drone. The patient suffered significant trauma including rupture of the right globe. As drone sales continue to rise, it is important that physicians be prepared to treat the potential injuries that may result from using these devices. Furthermore, in an attempt to reduce the number of visits associated with remote controlled drones, physicians should be prepared to provide advice as to how patients can reduce the risks of injury. We hope that the framework and recommendations below will help physicians decrease adverse outcomes related to this unusual injury pattern.

  3. Crowd-Sourcing with K-12 citizen scientists: The Continuing Evolution of the GLOBE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T.; Wegner, K.; Andersen, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Twenty years ago, the Internet was still in its infancy, citizen science was a relatively unknown term, and the idea of a global citizen science database was unheard of. Then the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program was proposed and this all changed. GLOBE was one of the first K-12 citizen science programs on a global scale. An initial large scale ramp-up of the program was followed by the establishment of a network of partners in countries and within the U.S. Now in the 21st century, the program has over 50 protocols in atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and pedosphere, almost 140 million measurements in the database, a visualization system, collaborations with NASA satellite mission scientists (GPM, SMAP) and other scientists, as well as research projects by GLOBE students. As technology changed over the past two decades, it was integrated into the program's outreach efforts to existing and new members with the result that the program now has a strong social media presence. In 2016, a new app was launched which opened up GLOBE and data entry to citizen scientists of all ages. The app is aimed at fresh audiences, beyond the traditional GLOBE K-12 community. Groups targeted included: scouting organizations, museums, 4H, science learning centers, retirement communities, etc. to broaden participation in the program and increase the number of data available to students and scientists. Through the 20 years of GLOBE, lessons have been learned about changing the management of this type of large-scale program, the use of technology to enhance and improve the experience for members, and increasing community involvement in the program.

  4. Critique of Sew it Up! A Western Trauma Association Multi-Institutional Study of Enteric Injury Management in the Postinjury Open Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Abdurraheim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of damage control surgery techniques has reduced mortality in critically injured patients but at the cost of the open abdomen. With the option of delayed definitive management of enteric injuries, the question of intestinal repair/anastomosis or definitive stoma creation has been posed with no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes on the basis of management of enteric injuries in patients relegated to the postinjury open abdomen.Methods: Patients requiring an open abdomen after trauma from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007 were reviewed. Type of bowel repair was categorized as immediate repair, immediate anastomosis, delayed anastomosis, stoma and a combination. Logistic regression was used to determine independent effect of risk factors on leak development.Results: During the 6-year study period, 204 patients suffered enteric injuries and were managed with an open abdomen. The majority was men (77% sustaining blunt trauma (66% with a mean age of 37.1 years±1.2 years and median Injury Severity Score of 27 (interquartile range=20-41. Injury patterns included 81 (40% small bowel, 37 (18% colonic, and 86 (42% combined injuries. Enteric injuries were managed with immediate repair (58, immediate anastomosis (15, delayed anastomosis (96, stoma (10, and a combination (22; three patients died before definitive repair. Sixty-one patients suffered intra-abdominal complications: 35 (17% abscesses, 15 (7% leaks, and 11 (5% enterocutaneous fistulas. The majority of patients with leaks had a delayed anastomosis; one patient had a right colon repair. Leak rate increased as one progresses toward the left colon (small bowel anastomoses, 3% leak rate; right colon, 3%; transverse colon, 20%; left colon, 45%. There were no differences in emergency department physiology, injury severity, transfusions, crystalloids, or demographic characteristics between patients with and without leak. Leak cases had higher 12-hour

  5. Adaptive Support Ventilation May Deliver Unwanted Respiratory Rate-Tidal Volume Combinations in Patients with Acute Lung Injury Ventilated According to an Open Lung Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongelmans, Dave A.; Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: With adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate and tidal volume (V(T)) are a function of the Otis least work of breathing formula. We hypothesized that adaptive support ventilation in an open lung ventilator strategy would deliver higher V(T)s to patients with acute lung injury.

  6. Positive pressure ventilation with the open lung concept optimizes gas exchange and reduces ventilator-induced lung injury in newborn piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kaam, Anton H.; de Jaegere, Anne; Haitsma, Jack J.; van Aalderen, Wim M.; Kok, Joke H.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that high-frequency oscillatory ventilation using the open lung concept (OLC resulted in superior gas exchange and a reduction in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We hypothesized that these beneficial effects could also be achieved by applying the OLC during

  7. Physikshow is a hit in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Students from the University of Bonn put on three highly successful performances of their "Physikshow", a theatrical journey into the world of particles.   All you need is a bit of imagination and stage management for even the most abstract of physics to become entertaining and intelligible, a principle demonstrated by 20 students from the University of Bonn and their teachers who gave three performances of their "Physikshow" in the Globe of Science and Innovation. The students quickly won over their audience using an array of amazing experiments and wacky sketches to illustrate the world of particles, the principle of forces and the evolution of the cosmos. More than 370 pupils from local secondary schools in France and the Cantons of Geneva and Vaud travelled to CERN for the two performances specially reserved for schools. The audience for the public performance numbered no fewer than 250. Physikshow was first performed in 2002 and has evolved over the years th...

  8. Spontaneous globe luxation associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashok Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous globe luxation is a rarely reported condition which can lead to complications like optic neuropathy. Common causes are thyroid eye disease, shallow orbit and floppy eyelid syndrome. We report a case of spontaneous globe luxation with the onset and severity associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous globe luxation associated with COPD.

  9. A massive open online course (MOOC) can be used to teach physiotherapy students about spinal cord injuries: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad S; Shofiqul Islam, Md; Glinsky, Joanne V; Lowe, Rachael; Lowe, Tony; Harvey, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Does a massive open online course (MOOC) based around an online learning module about spinal cord injuries improve knowledge or confidence among physiotherapy students more than if physiotherapy students are left to work through the online learning module at their own pace. Which method of presenting the content leads to greater satisfaction among the students? Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Forty-eight physiotherapy students in Bangladesh. Participants randomised to the control group were instructed to work at their own pace over a 5-week period through a physiotherapy-specific online learning module available at www.elearnSCI.org. Experimental participants were enrolled in a 5-week MOOC. The MOOC involved completing the same online learning module but experimental participants' progress through the module was guided each week and they were provided with the opportunity to engage in online discussion through Facebook. The primary outcome was knowledge, and the secondary outcomes were perceived confidence to treat people with spinal cord injuries and satisfaction with the learning experience. The mean between-group difference for knowledge was 0.7 points (95% CI -1.3 to 2.6) on a 0 to 20-point scale. The equivalent results for perceived confidence and satisfaction with the learning experience were 0.4 points (95% CI -1.0 to 1.8) and 0.0 points (95% CI -1.1 to 1.2) on a 0 to 10-point scale. The MOOC was no better for students than working at their own pace through an online learning module for increasing knowledge, confidence or satisfaction. However, students in the MOOC group highlighted positive aspects of the course that were unique to their group, such as interacting with students from other countries through the MOOC Facebook group. ACTRN12614000422628. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Linking blast physics to biological outcomes in mild traumatic brain injury: Narrative review and preliminary report of an open-field blast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hailong; Cui, Jiankun; Simonyi, Agnes; Johnson, Catherine E; Hubler, Graham K; DePalma, Ralph G; Gu, Zezong

    2018-03-15

    Blast exposures are associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and blast-induced TBIs are common injuries affecting military personnel. Department of Defense and Veterans Administration (DoD/VA) reports for TBI indicated that the vast majority (82.3%) has been mild TBI (mTBI)/concussion. mTBI and associated posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been called "the invisible injury" of the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. These injuries induce varying degrees of neuropathological alterations and, in some cases, chronic cognitive, behavioral and neurological disorders. Appropriate animal models of blast-induced TBI will not only assist the understanding of physical characteristics of the blast, but also help to address the potential mechanisms. This report provides a brief overview of physical principles of blast, injury mechanisms related to blast exposure, current blast animal models, and the neurological behavioral and neuropathological findings related to blast injury in experimental settings. We describe relationships between blast peak pressures and the observed injuries. We also report preliminary use of a highly reproducible and intensity-graded blast murine model carried out in open-field with explosives, and describe physical and pathological findings in this experimental model. Our results indicate close relationships between blast intensities and neuropathology and behavioral deficits, particularly at low level blast intensities relevant to mTBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Corneal and Corneoscleral Injury in Combat Ocular Trauma from Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Anton; Ryan, Denise S; Ludlow, Spencer; Coggin, Andrew; Weichel, Eric D; Stutzman, Richard D; Bower, Kraig S; Colyer, Marcus H

    2017-03-01

    To examine the incidence and the etiology of corneal and corneoscleral injuries in the setting of combat ocular trauma, and to determine what effect these injuries have on overall visual impairment from combat ocular trauma. Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series, analyzing U.S. service members who were evacuated to the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC). Primary outcome measures were types of corneal injuries, length of follow-up at WRAMC, globe survival, and anatomical causes of blindness. Secondary outcome measures included surgical procedures performed, use of eye protection, source of injury, and visual outcomes. Between 2001 and 2011, there were 184 eyes of 134 patients with corneal or corneoscleral injuries. The average age was 26 years (range, 18-50); 99.3% were male, 31.9% had documented use of eye protection. The average follow-up was 428.2 days (3-2,421). There were 98 right-eye and 86 left-eye injuries. There were 169 open-globe and 15 closed-globe injuries with corneal lacerations occurring in 73 eyes with injuries to Zone I. Most injuries were attributable to an intraocular foreign body (IOFB; 48%), followed by penetrating (19.6%) and perforating (16.3%) injuries. The most common presenting visual acuity was hand motion/light perception (45.7%), yet, at the end of the study, visual acuity improved to 20/40 or better (40.8%). The majority of injuries in eyes with visual acuity worse than 20/200 involved the cornea and retina (58%). Injuries solely to the cornea accounted for only 19% of all injuries sustained. Ocular injuries in military combat have led to significant damage to ocular structures with a wide range of visual outcomes. The authors describe corneal and corneoscleral injuries in combat ocular trauma by classifying injuries by the anatomical site involved and identifying the main source of decreased visual acuity. In combat ocular trauma, corneal or corneoscleral injuries are not the sole etiology for poor

  12. Interactive Visualization and Analysis of Geospatial Data Sets - TrikeND-iGlobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, Uwe; Hogan, Patrick; Chandola, Varun

    2013-04-01

    The visualization of scientific datasets is becoming an ever-increasing challenge as advances in computing technologies have enabled scientists to build high resolution climate models that have produced petabytes of climate data. To interrogate and analyze these large datasets in real-time is a task that pushes the boundaries of computing hardware and software. But integration of climate datasets with geospatial data requires considerable amount of effort and close familiarity of various data formats and projection systems, which has prevented widespread utilization outside of climate community. TrikeND-iGlobe is a sophisticated software tool that bridges this gap, allows easy integration of climate datasets with geospatial datasets and provides sophisticated visualization and analysis capabilities. The objective for TrikeND-iGlobe is the continued building of an open source 4D virtual globe application using NASA World Wind technology that integrates analysis of climate model outputs with remote sensing observations as well as demographic and environmental data sets. This will facilitate a better understanding of global and regional phenomenon, and the impact analysis of climate extreme events. The critical aim is real-time interactive interrogation. At the data centric level the primary aim is to enable the user to interact with the data in real-time for the purpose of analysis - locally or remotely. TrikeND-iGlobe provides the basis for the incorporation of modular tools that provide extended interactions with the data, including sub-setting, aggregation, re-shaping, time series analysis methods and animation to produce publication-quality imagery. TrikeND-iGlobe may be run locally or can be accessed via a web interface supported by high-performance visualization compute nodes placed close to the data. It supports visualizing heterogeneous data formats: traditional geospatial datasets along with scientific data sets with geographic coordinates (NetCDF, HDF, etc

  13. The power of Virtual Globes for valorising cultural heritage and enabling sustainable tourism: NASA World Wind applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, M.; Hogan, P.; Minghini, M.; Zamboni, G.

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by the visionary idea of Digital Earth, as well as from the tremendous improvements in geo-technologies, use of virtual globes has been changing the way people approach to geographic information on the Web. Unlike the traditional 2D-visualization typical of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), virtual globes offer multi-dimensional, fully-realistic content visualization which allows for a much richer user experience. This research investigates the potential for using virtual globes to foster tourism and enhance cultural heritage. The paper first outlines the state of the art for existing virtual globes, pointing out some possible categorizations according to license type, platform-dependence, application type, default layers, functionalities and freedom of customization. Based on this analysis, the NASA World Wind virtual globe is the preferred tool for promoting tourism and cultural heritage. This is because its open source nature allows unlimited customization (in terms of both data and functionalities), and its Java core supports platform-independence. Relevant tourism-oriented World Wind-based applications, dealing with both the Web promotion of historical cartography and the setup of a participatory Web platform exploiting crowd-sourced data, are described. Finally, the paper presents a project focusing on the promotion of the Via Regina area (crossing the border between Italy and Switzerland) through an ad hoc World Wind customization. World Wind can thus be considered an ideal virtual globe for tourism applications, as it can be shaped to increase awareness of cultural history and, in turn, enhance touristic experience.

  14. Hand safety for specialty crop production workers: a pilot study investigating frequencies of minor open-wound hand injuries and presence of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, M L; Nummer, B

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the presence of minor open-wound hand injuries in addition to Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, coliforms, and Escherichia coli on the hands of farm workers who hand-harvest fruit crops in Utah. Data collection was conducted on four farms without USDA Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) certification and on two farms with GAP certification. This study identified essential safety issues that need to be addressed for improving the effectiveness of safety training for migrant farm workers. Farms that have a food safety audit program in place are less likely to have farm workers exposed to pathogenic bacteria and open-wound injuries to their hands. High frequency of S. aureus may indicate a potentially higher risk for wound infection within this worker population. This could lead to infections that are resistant to the antibiotics commonly used to treat ordinary staph infections, resulting in greater work loss time and medical expenses for these workers. Higher frequencies of bacterial presence on workers' hands on non-certified farms indicate a need to identify essential practices to improve worker hygiene habits and on-farm management practices to promote healthy hygiene. Open-wound injuries to migrant farm workers during hand-harvesting could create additional health problems with the possibility of infection and the spread of diseases. Continued research is needed to understand workers' acceptance of these injuries and barriers to personal protection.

  15. Design of a 3D-printed, open-source wrist-driven orthosis for individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Portnova

    Full Text Available Assistive technology, such as wrist-driven orthoses (WDOs, can be used by individuals with spinal cord injury to improve hand function. A lack of innovation and challenges in obtaining WDOs have limited their use. These orthoses can be heavy and uncomfortable for users and also time-consuming for orthotists to fabricate. The goal of this research was to design a WDO with user (N = 3 and orthotist (N = 6 feedback to improve the accessibility, customizability, and function of WDOs by harnessing advancements in 3D-printing. The 3D-printed WDO reduced hands-on assembly time to approximately 1.5 hours and the material costs to $15 compared to current fabrication methods. Varying improvements in users' hand function were observed during functional tests, such as the Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test. For example, one participant's ability on the small object task improved by 29 seconds with the WDO, while another participant took 25 seconds longer to complete this task with the WDO. Two users had a significant increase in grasp strength with the WDO (13-122% increase, while the other participant was able to perform a pinching grasp for the first time. The WDO designs are available open-source to increase accessibility and encourage future innovation.

  16. Urine and serum microRNA-1 as novel biomarkers for myocardial injury in open-heart surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian; Mao, Anqiong; Wang, Xiaobin; Duan, Xiaoxia; Yao, Yi; Zhang, Chunxiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA-1 (miR-1) is a cardio-specific/enriched microRNA. Our recent studies have revealed that serum and urine miR-1 could be a novel sensitive biomarker for acute myocardial infarction. Open-heart surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are often accompanied with surgery injury and CPB-associated injury on the hearts. However, the association of miR-1 and these intra-operative and post-operative cardiac injures is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that urine and serum miR-1 might be a novel biomarker for myocardial injuries in open-heart surgeries with CPB. Serum and urine miR-1 levels in 20 patients with elective mitral valve surgery were measured at pre-surgery, pre-CPB, 60 min post-CBP, and 24h post-CBP. Serum cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) was used as a positive control biomarker for cardiac injury. Compared with these in pre-operative and pre-CPB groups, the levels of miR-1 in serum and urine from patients after open-heart surgeries and CPB were significant increased at all observed time points. A similar pattern of serum cTnI levels and their strong positive correlation with miR-1 levels were identified in these patients. The results suggest that serum and urine miR-1 may be a novel sensitive biomarker for myocardial injury in open-heart surgeries with CPB.

  17. Exhibition at CERN's Globe of Science and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Here we see pictures of displays at one of the exhibitions held at the Globe of Science and Innovation taken in September 2006. Located opposite the main CERN site, the Globe houses many public exhibitions throughout the year covering many topics from astronomy to particle physics.

  18. Stress -induced biosynthesis of dicaffeoylquinic acids in globe artichoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moglia, A.; Lanteri, S.; Comino, C.; Acquadro, A.; Vos, de C.H.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leaf extracts from globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) have been widely used in medicine as hepatoprotectant and choleretic agents. Globe artichoke leaves represent a natural source of phenolic acids with dicaffeoylquinic acids, such as cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid), along

  19. Using the GLOBE Program To Enhance Classroom Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Linda K.; Tomlin, James

    The Wright State University Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Franchise has developed a project to fill the need for direct, strong connections linking science, mathematics and technology to classroom curriculum and students' learning of integrated, relevant content. GLOBE is an international project that involves…

  20. Closed-loop mechanical ventilation for lung injury: a novel physiological-feedback mode following the principles of the open lung concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiberger, David; Pickerodt, Philipp A; Pomprapa, Anake; Tjarks, Onno; Kork, Felix; Boemke, Willehad; Francis, Roland C E; Leonhardt, Steffen; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2018-06-01

    Adherence to low tidal volume (V T ) ventilation and selected positive end-expiratory pressures are low during mechanical ventilation for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Using a pig model of severe lung injury, we tested the feasibility and physiological responses to a novel fully closed-loop mechanical ventilation algorithm based on the "open lung" concept. Lung injury was induced by surfactant washout in pigs (n = 8). Animals were ventilated following the principles of the "open lung approach" (OLA) using a fully closed-loop physiological feedback algorithm for mechanical ventilation. Standard gas exchange, respiratory- and hemodynamic parameters were measured. Electrical impedance tomography was used to quantify regional ventilation distribution during mechanical ventilation. Automatized mechanical ventilation provided strict adherence to low V T -ventilation for 6 h in severely lung injured pigs. Using the "open lung" approach, tidal volume delivery required low lung distending pressures, increased recruitment and ventilation of dorsal lung regions and improved arterial blood oxygenation. Physiological feedback closed-loop mechanical ventilation according to the principles of the open lung concept is feasible and provides low tidal volume ventilation without human intervention. Of importance, the "open lung approach"-ventilation improved gas exchange and reduced lung driving pressures by opening atelectasis and shifting of ventilation to dorsal lung regions.

  1. Public outreach: les spectacles du Globe

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Shows at the Globe of Science and Innovation in connection with the exhibition «A des années-lumière» Wednesday 8 November 2006, 2.30 p.m. (in French): 'Cooking with the stars' Professor BEUZ and his assistant Mr POZZONI, a clown double-act, will introduce children to the cosmos, the formation of the universe and the creation of stars and the solar system. On the menu: eggs, biscuits, a 'comet' sausage, giant onions, noodles, 'primordial' soup, instant pudding, fruit and vegetables. A spicy and scholarly recipe that will satisfy little gourmets and budding astronomers alike. This event is a version of the comedy 'How to make the Universe' specially adapted for children. For young children (7 years and upwards) Free admittance, by reservation only: + 41(0)22 767 76 76 Thursday 9 and Friday 10 November 2006, 8.00 p.m. (in French): 'How to make the Universe' At the end of a meal, Professor BEUZ and his assistant Mr POZZONI tell us the story of how the universe was formed, from the Big Bang to the arriv...

  2. Around the Globe with Buzz Aldrin

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Buzz Aldrin! The news caused a sensation: his arrival was imminent. The man who, 40 years ago, first step foot on the moon, was to do the same at CERN.   Buzz Aldrin dumps the pilot beams from the LHC. Visiting the Globe on 1 March to endorse General Motors’ (GM) new ecological programme, Buzz Aldrin took advantage of the occasion to take a whistle-stop tour of the Organisation. “CERN is dealing with things going very fast underground; I’m dealing with things going fast – not that fast though! – up in orbit,” he said. Accompanied by his wife Lois and singer Katie Melua - also invited by GM to perform at the private event - Buzz began his visit with a short introduction to CERN at the Universe of Particles exhibit. He then met with Andrzej Siemko, group leader of the LHC machine protection, at the SM-18 super conducting magnet test facility. The astronaut’s last stop was at the CCC, where the LHC team had somethi...

  3. Virtual Globes: Serving Science and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Qureshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Globes reached the mass market in 2005. They created multi-million dollar businesses in a very short time by providing novel ways to explore data geographically. We use the term “Virtual Globes” as the common denominator for technologies offering capabilities to annotate, edit and publish geographic information to a world-wide audience and to visualize information provided by the public and private sectors, as well as by citizens who volunteer new data. Unfortunately, but not surprising for a new trend or paradigm, overlapping terms such as “Virtual Globes”, “Digital Earth”, “Geospatial Web”, “Geoportal” or software specific terms are used heterogeneously. We analyze the terminologies and trends in scientific publications and ask whether these developments serve science and society. While usage can be answered quantitatively, the authors reason from the literature studied that these developments serve to educate the masses and may help to democratize geographic information by extending the producer base. We believe that we can contribute to a better distinction between software centered terms and the generic concept as such. The power of the visual, coupled with the potential of spatial analysis and modeling for public and private purposes raises new issues of reliability, standards, privacy and best practice. This is increasingly addressed in scientific literature but the required body of knowledge is still in its infancy.

  4. Thursday Programme of CineGlobe Festival 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Cugini, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The CineGlobe Programme on Thursday 26th March 2015 counted with two short-films inspired by science sessions, two workshops on the 360 degree dome, and a special evening show in collaboration with the Mapping Festival, to celebrate the UNESCO Year of Light. The evening open with Diego Blas, CERN theorist, talking about Light, Einstein and the LHC to celebrate the UNESCO International Year of Light. Followed by a performance by the artist YRO_EILE_18. The artist Yro presents Eile, a live installation performance where light, sound, and cinema converge to tell a timeless story. EILE is a live cinema performance, in which yro makes live sound and images with a camera, some microphones and small objects like stones, balls, bits of paper and string.These materials allow him to create videos and sound, which aesthetics are close to abstract cinema and object theater assembled, sampled and grinded . The process is part of the staging itself as well as the film that results. Indescribable Eile is lived as an experie...

  5. Crash and Burn: Ocular Injuries due to Fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravija; Mukherjee, Bipasha

    2016-01-01

    To identify the patterns of ocular injury and to determine ocular morbidity resulting from the use of firecrackers. A prospective observational study of all patients presenting with ocular trauma consequent to fireworks usage in a tertiary eye care center in South India over a one-month period around the autumn festival of Diwali. We also reviewed the published literature from around the world reporting ocular injuries due to firecrackers. 49 patients were included in the study, out of which the vast majority (40/81%) were males. The mean age was 17 years. Almost an equal number of bystanders (24/48.9%) was affected as compared to people handling the fireworks (25/51%). 13 (26.53%) patients had open-globe injury whereas 33 (67.34%) patients had closed-globe injury. Twenty-two (44.8%) patients underwent surgical intervention. Eighteen (36.7%) patients had final vision less then 20/40 (range = 20/50 to No Perception of Light) with eight patients having no perception of light in the affected eye. Unregulated use of firecrackers can lead to significant ocular morbidity, mainly involving children, young males, and even innocent bystanders. A combination of public awareness and appropriate legislative laws should be formulated regarding the use of fireworks to decrease the load of needless blindness on society.

  6. Six-year clinical study of firework-related eye injuries in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yichun; Tang, Xin; Kong, Baohuan; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the demographic data, clinical characteristics, management and prognosis of patients with firework-related eye injuries. A retrospective review was performed of patients with eye injuries related to fireworks referred to TianJin Eye Hospital in North China from 2008 to 2013. Demographic information, clinical features, management and visual outcome were analysed and prognosis factors were evaluated. Ninety-nine patients (86 men) with 118 eye injuries were enrolled in the study. The average age of the patients was 32.0±20.5 years; 70/99 (70.7%) were aged >20 years. Eighty-one of the patients had been lighting the fireworks while the rest were bystanders. The main ophthalmic manifestations were hyphaema, vitreous haemorrhage, corneal/sclera/corneoscleral open globe injury, eyelid laceration, traumatic cataract, retinal/choroid detachment, endophthalmitis and intraocular foreign body (IOFB). Ninety patients required surgical intervention including repair of open globe injury, vitrectomy, cataract extraction and enucleation. 56/118 eyes (47.5%) received multiple operations. After treatment, final best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) significantly improved (p=0.015). Some factors were significantly correlated with better final BCVA, including initial BCVA (p=0.036), closed globe injury (p=0.031), absence of endophthalmitis (p=0.014), absence of IOFB (p=0.024) and absence of retinal detachment (p=0.046). Firework-related eye injuries mainly occur in adult men and result in severe visual damage. The most common clinical manifestations are hyphaema and vitreous haemorrhage. Better initial BCVA and closed globe injury have a better visual result while endophthalmitis, IOFB and retinal detachment have a negative visual outcome. Improved eye protection, along with enhanced public education and legal ban on fireworks, could reduce the incidence of eye injuries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  7. N-Acetylcysteine for Nonsuicidal Self-Injurious Behavior in Adolescents: An Open-Label Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathryn R; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Westlund Schreiner, Melinda; Carstedt, Patricia; Marka, Nicholas; Nelson, Katharine; Miller, Michael J; Reigstad, Kristina; Westervelt, Ana; Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Eberly, Lynn E

    2018-03-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common in adolescents and young adults, and few evidence-based treatments are available for this significant problem. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a widely available nutritional supplement that has been studied in some psychiatric disorders relevant to NSSI including mood and addictive disorders. This pilot study tested the use of NAC as a potential treatment for NSSI in youth. Thirty-five female adolescents and young adults with NSSI aged 13-21 years were enrolled in this study that had an open-label, single-arm study design. All participants were given oral NAC as follows: 600 mg twice daily (weeks 1-2), 1200 mg twice daily (weeks 3-4), and 1800 mg twice daily (weeks 5-8). Patients were seen every 2 weeks throughout the trial, at which time youth reported the frequency of NSSI episodes. Levels of depression, impulsivity, and global psychopathology were measured at baseline and at the end of the trial using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Barratt Impulsivity Scale, and Symptoms Checklist-90 (SCL-90). About two-thirds of the enrolled female youth completed the trial (24/35). NAC was generally well tolerated in this sample. NAC treatment was associated with a significant decrease in NSSI frequency at visit 6 and visit 8 compared to baseline. We also found that depression scores and global psychopathology scores (but not impulsivity scores) decreased after NAC treatment. Decrease in NSSI was not correlated with decrease in BDI-II or SCL-90 scores, suggesting these might be independent effects. We provide preliminary evidence that NAC may have promise as a potential treatment option for adolescents with NSSI. The current results require follow-up with a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to confirm efficacy.

  8. Adjusting tidal volume to stress index in an open lung condition optimizes ventilation and prevents overdistension in an experimental model of lung injury and reduced chest wall compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Suárez-Sipmann, Fernando; Gutierrez, Andrea; Tusman, Gerardo; Carbonell, Jose; García, Marisa; Piqueras, Laura; Compañ, Desamparados; Flores, Susanie; Soro, Marina; Llombart, Alicia; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-13

    The stress index (SI), a parameter derived from the shape of the pressure-time curve, can identify injurious mechanical ventilation. We tested the hypothesis that adjusting tidal volume (VT) to a non-injurious SI in an open lung condition avoids hypoventilation while preventing overdistension in an experimental model of combined lung injury and low chest-wall compliance (Ccw). Lung injury was induced by repeated lung lavages using warm saline solution, and Ccw was reduced by controlled intra-abdominal air-insufflation in 22 anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated pigs. After injury animals were recruited and submitted to a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration trial to find the PEEP level resulting in maximum compliance. During a subsequent four hours of mechanical ventilation, VT was adjusted to keep a plateau pressure (Pplat) of 30 cmH2O (Pplat-group, n = 11) or to a SI between 0.95 and 1.05 (SI-group, n = 11). Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain a 'normal' PaCO2 (35 to 65 mmHg). SI, lung mechanics, arterial-blood gases haemodynamics pro-inflammatory cytokines and histopathology were analyzed. In addition Computed Tomography (CT) data were acquired at end expiration and end inspiration in six animals. PaCO2 was significantly higher in the Pplat-group (82 versus 53 mmHg, P = 0.01), with a resulting lower pH (7.19 versus 7.34, P = 0.01). We observed significant differences in VT (7.3 versus 5.4 mlKg(-1), P = 0.002) and Pplat values (30 versus 35 cmH2O, P = 0.001) between the Pplat-group and SI-group respectively. SI (1.03 versus 0.99, P = 0.42) and end-inspiratory transpulmonary pressure (PTP) (17 versus 18 cmH2O, P = 0.42) were similar in the Pplat- and SI-groups respectively, without differences in overinflated lung areas at end- inspiration in both groups. Cytokines and histopathology showed no differences. Setting tidal volume to a non-injurious stress index in an open lung condition improves

  9. GIS Function Coupling for Virtual Globes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Virtual Globe (VG) systems such as Google Earth, NASA World Winds and Microsoft Virtual Earth provide captivating animated 3D visualizations and support user queries...

  10. Uurimuslik õpe GLOBE programmi näitel / Imbi Henno

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Henno, Imbi

    2005-01-01

    Artiklis tutvustatakse põhi- ja keskkooliõpilastele mõeldud uurimuslikku õpet ja praktilisi tegevusi pakkuvat keskkonnasuunitlusega ülemaailmset haridus- ja teadusprogrammi GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit Environment)

  11. The Globe of Science and Innovation at dawn

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    CERN's exhibition centre 'the Globe of Science and Innovation' is seen just after sunrise. This wooden building was given to CERN in 2004 as a gift from the Swiss Confederation to mark 50 years since the Organisation's foundation.

  12. Winter scene of the Globe of Science and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    patrice loiez

    2005-01-01

    CERN's Globe exhibition centre is shown on a Swiss winter day. This wooden building was given to CERN in 2004 as a gift from the Swiss Confederation to mark 50 years since the Organization's foundation.

  13. The Globe of Science and Innovation at night

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN's exhibition centre is seen lit up at night. This wooden building was given to CERN in 2004 as a gift from the Swiss Confederation to mark 50 years since the Organization's foundation.

  14. [Epidemiology of work-related eye injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zghal-Mokni, Imen; Nacef, Leila; Kaoueche, Mourad; Letaief, Imen; Bouguila, Hedi; Jeddi, Amel; Ayed, Saida

    2007-07-01

    Occupational injury represents 7,7 at 69,9% of the total ocular traumatisms. They can be a major source of visuel loss and blindness. The aim is to study the epidemiology of work-related ocular injuries: objects frequencies,works most exposed. We performed a prospective study that interest 78 patients having a work-related ocular traumatism during a 4 months period. They were admitted at ocular emergeney All patients underwent an ophtalmologic examination completed with orbital radiography and echography. A medical and/or chirurgical appropriate treatment was institued. Occupationnal injury frequency was 9% of the whole ocular traumatisms in the same period. The mean age was 31 years. 55% of cases were under 30 years. 91% were male. Most exposed works were industrial and mecanical sectors In 70,5% of cases work-related eye injuries were caused by projectile objects. Most common lesion was corneal superficial foreign body (58%). Open globe injury was noted in 8%. 95% of patients had no eye protection at the time of the accident. 13% were blind or unilateral partially sighted (according to the OMS classification). The authors discussed the importance and different prevention strategies to prevent the risk of blindness and socio-economical cost of occupationnal accidents. There is a need for systematic periodic sensibilization to reduce these accidents and blindness.

  15. Globalisation or Journay into the Second Discovery of the Globe

    OpenAIRE

    Rodin, Davor

    2003-01-01

    The author claims that the globe was discovered by courageous adventurers and visionaries who had trust in geographical utopia that the Earth was round so they plunged into the unknown in their wretched sailboats. This stage ended in foundation of huge colonial empires but, eventually, this kind of violent colonization failed. What has been left from the first discovery of the globe? The most important reminder is discovery of identities of the former colonized peoples as well as the identity...

  16. Eratosthenes' teachings with a globe in a school yard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Božić, Mirjana; Ducloy, Martial

    2008-01-01

    A globe, in a school or university yard, which simulates the Earth's orientation in space, could be a very useful and helpful device for teaching physics, geometry, astronomy and the history of science. It would be very useful for science education to utilize the forthcoming International Year of the Planet Earth 2008 and the International Year of Astronomy 2009 by installing globes in many school and university courtyards

  17. Bilateral Traumatic Globe Luxation with Optic Nerve Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Tok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document clinical findings and management of a patient with bilateral globe luxation and optic nerve transection. Materials and Methods: A 25-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with bilateral traumatic globe luxation following a motor vehicle accident. Results: Visual acuity testing showed no light perception. The right pupil was dilated and bilaterally did not react to light. The globes were bilaterally intact. A computed tomography scan revealed Le Fort type II fractures, bilateral optic nerve transection and disruption of all extraocular muscles. The globes of the patient were bilaterally reduced into the orbit. However, the patient developed phthisis bulbi in the right eye at month 3. Conclusion: Globe luxation presents a dramatic clinical picture, and may lead to the development of severe complications due to the concomitance of complete optic nerve dissection and multiple traumas. Even if the luxated globe is repositioned into the orbit, there is still an increased risk of the development of phthisis due to ischemia.

  18. Bilateral Traumatic Globe Luxation with Optic Nerve Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, Levent; Tok, Ozlem Yalcin; Argun, Tugba Cakmak; Yilmaz, Omer; Gunes, Alime; Unlu, Elif Nisa; Sezer, Sezgin; Ibisoglu, Seda; Argun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to document clinical findings and management of a patient with bilateral globe luxation and optic nerve transection. Materials and Methods A 25-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with bilateral traumatic globe luxation following a motor vehicle accident. Results Visual acuity testing showed no light perception. The right pupil was dilated and bilaterally did not react to light. The globes were bilaterally intact. A computed tomography scan revealed Le Fort type II fractures, bilateral optic nerve transection and disruption of all extraocular muscles. The globes of the patient were bilaterally reduced into the orbit. However, the patient developed phthisis bulbi in the right eye at month 3. Conclusion Globe luxation presents a dramatic clinical picture, and may lead to the development of severe complications due to the concomitance of complete optic nerve dissection and multiple traumas. Even if the luxated globe is repositioned into the orbit, there is still an increased risk of the development of phthisis due to ischemia. PMID:25606034

  19. Myocardium protection of cardiomyopeptide for injection against ischemia-reperfusion injury during open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Min; Zhang Baimin; Zhang Xiuhe; Jiang Yizhong; Li Huijun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the myocardium protection of cardiomyopeptide for injection against ischemia-reperfusion injury during open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods: Thirty patients scheduled for elective cardiac valvular replacement were divided into two groups. In treatment group (n=15), cardiomyopeptide for injection was used during CPB; but in control group (n=15), no cardiomyopeptide for injection was used. Blood samples were drawn from the radial artery at the following time points: before CPB (T0); at release of aortic declamping (T1); 30 min after aortic declamping (T2); 12 h after aortic declamping(T3); 24 h after aortic declamping (T4). The levels of creatine phosphokinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in plasma were measured. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was used to measure the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) in plasma. Ejection fraction (EF) was measured at the 7th day after operation. Results: The levels of CK-MB, cTnI, and TNF-α in plasma in two groups showed no difference before CPB (P>0.05). The levels of CK-MB and TNF-α in two groups were significantly increased 30 min after aortic declamping than release of aortic declamping (P<0.05). The levels of CK-MB and TNF-α in plasma in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group 30 min, 12 h and 24 h after aortic declamping (P<0.05). The plasma concentrations of cTnI in two groups were significantly increased at release of aortic declamping (P<0.05). The concentrations of cTnI in treatment group were significantly lower than those in control group at T1, T2, T3, T4 (P<0.05). EF in treatment group was significantly higher than that in control group at the 7th day after operation (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cardiomyopeptide for injection can protect myocardium and reduce the acute inflammatory response during CPB and improve heart function after operation. (authors)

  20. Adding left atrial appendage closure to open heart surgery provides protection from ischemic brain injury six years after surgery independently of atrial fibrillation history: the LAACS randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Hansen, Jesper; Holme, Susanne J V; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon; Carranza, Christian L; Greve, Anders M; Al-Farra, Gina; Riis, Robert G C; Nilsson, Brian; Clausen, Johan S R; Nørskov, Anne S; Kruuse, Christina R; Rostrup, Egill; Dominguez, Helena

    2018-05-23

    Open heart surgery is associated with high occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), subsequently increasing the risk of post-operative ischemic stroke. Concomitant with open heart surgery, a cardiac ablation procedure is commonly performed in patients with known AF, often followed by left atrial appendage closure with surgery (LAACS). However, the protective effect of LAACS on the risk of cerebral ischemia following cardiac surgery remains controversial. We have studied whether LAACS in addition to open heart surgery protects against post-operative ischemic brain injury regardless of a previous AF diagnosis. One hundred eighty-seven patients scheduled for open heart surgery were enrolled in a prospective, open-label clinical trial and randomized to concomitant LAACS vs. standard care. Randomization was stratified by usage of oral anticoagulation (OAC) planned to last at least 3 months after surgery. The primary endpoint was a composite of post-operative symptomatic ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or imaging findings of silent cerebral ischemic (SCI) lesions. During a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, 14 (16%) primary events occurred among patients receiving standard surgery vs. 5 (5%) in the group randomized to additional LAACS (hazard ratio 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-0.8, p = 0.02). In per protocol analysis (n = 141), 14 (18%) primary events occurred in the control group vs. 4 (6%) in the LAACS group (hazard ratio 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1-1.0, p = 0.05). In a real-world setting, LAACS in addition to elective open-heart surgery was associated with lower risk of post-operative ischemic brain injury. The protective effect was not conditional on AF/OAC status at baseline. LAACS study, clinicaltrials.gov NCT02378116 , March 4th 2015, retrospectively registered.

  1. Tactile Digital Video Globes: a New Way to Outreach Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteau, A.; Claustre, H.; Scheurle, C.; Jessin, T.; Fontana, C.

    2016-02-01

    One objective of the "Ocean Autonomous Observation" team of the Laboratory of Oceanography of Villefranche-sur-mer is to develop new means to outreach our science activities to various audiences. Besides the scientific community, this includes students and targets the general public, school pupils, and stakeholders. In this context, we have acquired a digital video globe with tactile capabilities and we will present here the various applications that we have been developing. A first type of products concerns the visualization of oceanic properties (SST, salinity, density, Chla, O2, NO3, irradiance) by diving from the surface (generally from satellite data) into the Ocean interior (through the use of global data bases, Argo, WOA). In second place, specific applications deal with surface animations allowing highlighting the seasonality of some properties (Chla, SST, ice cover, currents; based on satellite as well as modeling outputs). Finally, we show a variety of applications developed using the tactile functionality of the spherical display. In particular real-time vertical profiles acquired by Bio-Argo floats become directly accessible for the entire open ocean. Such a new tool plus its novel applications has been presented to school children, and to the wider public (at the so-called "fête de la science") as well as to potential sponsors of our science-outreach activities. Their feedback has always been highly positive and encouraging in terms of impact. From the scientists point of view, the use of this new support can easily compete with the classical PowerPoint, is much more attractive and fun and undeniably helps to outreach the various aspects of our pluridisciplinary science.

  2. How Cool was the Eclipse? Atmospheric Measurements and Citizen Science via NASA's GLOBE Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, K. L. K.; Riebeek Kohl, H.

    2017-12-01

    The solar eclipse of 2017 presented an extraordinary opportunity to engage the public in shared science activity across the entire United States. While a natural focus of the eclipse was on astronomy and heliophysics, there was also an opening for excellent connections to Earth science. Because of the excitement of the event, many people gathered for long periods before and after totality, a perfect opportunity for observations and data collection to explore the impact of the eclipse on the atmosphere. The data was collected via NASA's GLOBE Observer app, a subset of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment Program, a citizen science project which has been active for more than 20 years training teachers to collect many different types of environmental science data with their students. GLOBE Observer expands that audience to citizen scientists who might not be connected to a school, but are still interested in collecting data. In addition to the clouds observations that are normally part of GLOBE Observer, a special temporary protocol was added for the eclipse to include air temperature. Both types of measurements were collected at regular intervals for several hours before and after the point of maximum eclipse. By crowdsourcing data from all across the United States, on and off the path of totality, the hope was to be able to see patterns that wouldn't be apparent with fewer data points. In particular, there are few sources of detailed cloud data from the ground, including cloud type as well as overall cloud cover, especially as collected during a unique natural experiment such as an eclipse. This presentation will report preliminary results of the GLOBE Observer eclipse citizen science project, including participation totals and impact, data site distribution, as well as early analyses of both temperature and cloud data.

  3. VISUALIZATION OF VGI DATA THROUGH THE NEW NASA WEB WORLD WIND VIRTUAL GLOBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Brovelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available GeoWeb 2.0, laying the foundations of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI systems, has led to platforms where users can contribute to the geographic knowledge that is open to access. Moreover, as a result of the advancements in 3D visualization, virtual globes able to visualize geographic data even on browsers emerged. However the integration of VGI systems and virtual globes has not been fully realized. The study presented aims to visualize volunteered data in 3D, considering also the ease of use aspects for general public, using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS. The new Application Programming Interface (API of NASA, Web World Wind, written in JavaScript and based on Web Graphics Library (WebGL is cross-platform and cross-browser, so that the virtual globe created using this API can be accessible through any WebGL supported browser on different operating systems and devices, as a result not requiring any installation or configuration on the client-side, making the collected data more usable to users, which is not the case with the World Wind for Java as installation and configuration of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM is required. Furthermore, the data collected through various VGI platforms might be in different formats, stored in a traditional relational database or in a NoSQL database. The project developed aims to visualize and query data collected through Open Data Kit (ODK platform and a cross-platform application, where data is stored in a relational PostgreSQL and NoSQL CouchDB databases respectively.

  4. Visualization of Vgi Data Through the New NASA Web World Wind Virtual Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Kilsedar, C. E.; Zamboni, G.

    2016-06-01

    GeoWeb 2.0, laying the foundations of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) systems, has led to platforms where users can contribute to the geographic knowledge that is open to access. Moreover, as a result of the advancements in 3D visualization, virtual globes able to visualize geographic data even on browsers emerged. However the integration of VGI systems and virtual globes has not been fully realized. The study presented aims to visualize volunteered data in 3D, considering also the ease of use aspects for general public, using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). The new Application Programming Interface (API) of NASA, Web World Wind, written in JavaScript and based on Web Graphics Library (WebGL) is cross-platform and cross-browser, so that the virtual globe created using this API can be accessible through any WebGL supported browser on different operating systems and devices, as a result not requiring any installation or configuration on the client-side, making the collected data more usable to users, which is not the case with the World Wind for Java as installation and configuration of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) is required. Furthermore, the data collected through various VGI platforms might be in different formats, stored in a traditional relational database or in a NoSQL database. The project developed aims to visualize and query data collected through Open Data Kit (ODK) platform and a cross-platform application, where data is stored in a relational PostgreSQL and NoSQL CouchDB databases respectively.

  5. Incidence and severity of ocular and adnexal injuries during the Second Lebanon War among Israeli soldiers and civilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Adiel; Elhalel, Amir; Pikkel, Joseph; Krauss, Eli; Miller, Benjamin

    2011-12-01

    To analyze the incidence and severity of ocular and adnexal injuries in the Second Lebanon War among Israeli soldiers and civilians. Retrospective cohort study. All patients recorded in the Israeli National Trauma Registry during the Second Lebanon War (July-August, 2006). Retrieval of all data relevant to ocular and adnexal injuries sustained during the study period, and differentiation between those associated with combat/terrorist and other events. Analysis of data according to the severity of trauma , anatomical location of the injury, and whether the patients were military personnel or civilians. A total of 69 war-related ocular trauma patients (58 military personnel and 11 civilians) were registered during the 34 days of war. The injuries involved the anterior segment injury (n = 25), posterior segment (n = 29) and the periocular region (n = 15, all severe). Twenty-seven of the patients had open-globe injuries, of which 18 involved intraocular foreign bodies, and 27 patients had closed-globe injuries. The rate of ocular injuries was 7% among all registered wounded military personnel and 1.2% among all injured civilians. The incidence and severity of ocular and adnexal injuries among military personnel during the Second Lebanon War were consistent with previous reports from American sources of ocular injuries sustained in Iraq and Afghanistan. The rates of ocular injury associated with wartime events sustained by civilians has not been investigated before, and it was relatively low, probably as a result of stringent government-mandated building regulations for passive defense that are discussed.

  6. The relationship of the globe to the orbital rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Lauren A; Shadpour, Joseph M; Menghani, Ravi; Goldberg, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    To present a novel method for accurately characterizing the position of the globe relative to the orbital rim. The appearance and function of the eyelids are dependent on the underlying orbital bony architecture and globe position; however, no comprehensive language to describe these complex 3-dimensional relationships exists. Three-dimensional orbital reconstructions were generated from computed tomographic scans of 15 Occidental and 12 Oriental orbits without orbital pathologic disease. Globe and orbital rim anatomy were identified and outlined. Reference points were measured along 2 independent axes: (1) the distance between a plane defined by the corneal apex and the sagittal projection of the orbital rim and (2) the distance between the circumference of the globe and the coronal projection of the orbital rim. For Occidental orbits, the mean (SD) elevation of the sagittal projection of the orbital rim relative to the anterior projection of the globe was 4.6 (4.2) mm superiorly, 5.9 (3.0) mm nasally, 12.6 (3.7) mm inferiorly, and 20.6 (2.6) mm laterally. The mean (SD) radial distance between the coronal projection of the orbital rim and the circumference of the globe was 3.7 (2.1) mm superiorly, 7.6 (1.8) mm nasally, 6.6 (2.2) mm inferiorly, and 4.6 (2.3) mm laterally. For Oriental orbits, the mean (SD) elevation of the sagittal projection of the orbital rim relative to the anterior projection of the globe was 5.0 (4.5) mm superiorly, 6.8 (4.1) mm nasally, 11.1 (4.3) mm inferiorly, and 17.5 (3.3) mm laterally. The mean (SD) radial distance between the coronal projection of the orbital rim and the circumference of the globe was 2.1 (1.2) mm superiorly, 8.2 (2.0) mm nasally, 6.5 (1.9) mm inferiorly, and 4.5 (1.7) mm laterally. Comparison of Occidental and Oriental orbital rim and globe configurations revealed quantitative and qualitative differences. In addition to differences in soft-tissue anatomy, bony architectural variations may contribute substantially to

  7. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  8. Visualizing dynamic geosciences phenomena using an octree-based view-dependent LOD strategy within virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Huayi; Yang, Chaowei; Wong, David W.; Xie, Jibo

    2011-09-01

    Geoscientists build dynamic models to simulate various natural phenomena for a better understanding of our planet. Interactive visualizations of these geoscience models and their outputs through virtual globes on the Internet can help the public understand the dynamic phenomena related to the Earth more intuitively. However, challenges arise when the volume of four-dimensional data (4D), 3D in space plus time, is huge for rendering. Datasets loaded from geographically distributed data servers require synchronization between ingesting and rendering data. Also the visualization capability of display clients varies significantly in such an online visualization environment; some may not have high-end graphic cards. To enhance the efficiency of visualizing dynamic volumetric data in virtual globes, this paper proposes a systematic framework, in which an octree-based multiresolution data structure is implemented to organize time series 3D geospatial data to be used in virtual globe environments. This framework includes a view-dependent continuous level of detail (LOD) strategy formulated as a synchronized part of the virtual globe rendering process. Through the octree-based data retrieval process, the LOD strategy enables the rendering of the 4D simulation at a consistent and acceptable frame rate. To demonstrate the capabilities of this framework, data of a simulated dust storm event are rendered in World Wind, an open source virtual globe. The rendering performances with and without the octree-based LOD strategy are compared. The experimental results show that using the proposed data structure and processing strategy significantly enhances the visualization performance when rendering dynamic geospatial phenomena in virtual globes.

  9. Pilot study of association of catechol-O-methyl transferase rs4680 genotypes with acute kidney injury and tubular stress after open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Christian; Kube, Johanna; Haase-Fielitz, Anja; Dittrich, Annemarie; Schanze, Denny; Zenker, Martin; Kuppe, Hermann; Hetzer, Roland; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mertens, Peter R; Haase, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To assess the association of genetic variants of catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotypes with acute kidney injury (AKI) and tubular stress after open heart surgery. We genotyped 195 patients for the COMT-Val158Met polymorphism and measured creatinine, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and midkine. We analyzed the association between such polymorphisms and these kidney-related variables. Nonsignificantly more COMT LL patients developed RIFLE-AKI compared with non-LL patients (p = 0.11). Compared with HL and HH patients, LL patients who developed AKI had lower increases in serum creatinine. COMT LL patients had less pronounced release of tubular stress biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin: p = 0.045, midkine: p = 0.072). COMT genotype may associate with different patterns of renal functional changes and tubular stress biomarker release response after open heart surgery.

  10. Improving predictive capabilities of environmental change with GLOBE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jessica Hill

    This dissertation addresses two applications of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) essential for predicting environmental changes. The first study focuses on whether NDVI can improve model simulations of evapotranspiration for temperate Northern (>35°) regions. The second study focuses on whether NDVI can detect phenological changes in start of season (SOS) for high Northern (>60°) environments. The overall objectives of this research were to (1) develop a methodology for utilizing GLOBE data in NDVI research; and (2) provide a critical analysis of NDVI as a long-term monitoring tool for environmental change. GLOBE is an international partnership network of K-12 students, teachers, and scientists working together to study and understand the global environment. The first study utilized data collected by one GLOBE school in Greenville, Pennsylvania and the second utilized phenology observations made by GLOBE students in Alaska. Results from the first study showed NDVI could predict transpiration periods for environments like Greenville, Pennsylvania. In phenological terms, these environments have three distinct periods (QI, QII, and QIII). QI reflects onset of the growing season (mid March--mid May) when vegetation is greening up (NDVI 0.60). Results from the second study showed that a climate threshold of 153 +/- 22 growing degree days was a better predictor of SOS for Fairbanks than a NDVI threshold applied to temporal AVHRR and MODIS datasets. Accumulated growing degree days captured the interannual variability of SOS better than the NDVI threshold and most closely resembled actual SOS observations made by GLOBE students. Overall, biweekly composites and effects of clouds, snow, and conifers limit the ability of NDVI to monitor phenological changes in Alaska. Both studies did show that GLOBE data provides an important source of input and validation information for NDVI research.

  11. Seeing Stars: A GLOBE at Night Campaign Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R. T.; Newhouse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The emphasis in the international citizen-science, star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few 100,000 citizen-scientists. What has done in the last year to contribute to its success? • To promote the campaign via popular social media, GLOBE at Night created Facebook and Twitter pages. • Videos have been created for 4 out of 8 Dark Skies Rangers activities. • Sky brightness measurements can be submitted in real time with smart phones or tablets using the new Web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. The location, date and time register automatically. • As a proto-type, an adopt-a-street program had people in Tucson take measurements every mile for the length of the street. Grid measurements canvassed the town, allowing for comparisons of light levels over time. • The increase to 2 campaigns in 2011 re-enforces these studies. In 2012, the campaign will be offered 4 times for 10 days a month: January 14-23, February 12-21, March 13-22 and April 11-20. • A new Web application (www.globeatnight.org/mapapp/) allows for mapping GLOBE at Night data points within a specified distance around a city or area of choice. The resulting maps are bookmarkable and shareable. • NOAO and Arizona Game and Fish Department started a project with GLOBE at Night data and bat telemetry to examine a dark skies corridor in Tucson where endangered bats fly. While providing these updates to the GLOBE at Night program, the presentation will highlight the education and outreach value of the program's resources and outcomes, lessons learned, successes and pitfalls in communicating awareness with the public and attracting young people to study science.

  12. Tool or Toy? Virtual Globes in Landscape Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. J. Sheppard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual globes, i.e., geobrowsers that integrate multi-scale and temporal data from various sources and are based on a globe metaphor, have developed into serious tools that practitioners and various stakeholders in landscape and community planning have started using. Although these tools originate from Geographic Information Systems (GIS, they have become a different, potentially interactive and public tool set, with their own specific limitations and new opportunities. Expectations regarding their utility as planning and community engagement tools are high, but are tempered by both technical limitations and ethical issues [1,2]. Two grassroots campaigns and a collaborative visioning process, the Kimberley Climate Adaptation Project case study (British Columbia, illustrate and broaden our understanding of the potential benefits and limitations associated with the use of virtual globes in participatory planning initiatives. Based on observations, questionnaires and in-depth interviews with stakeholders and community members using an interactive 3D model of regional climate change vulnerabilities, potential impacts, and possible adaptation and mitigation scenarios in Kimberley, the benefits and limitations of virtual globes as a tool for participatory landscape planning are discussed. The findings suggest that virtual globes can facilitate access to geospatial information, raise awareness, and provide a more representative virtual landscape than static visualizations. However, landscape is not equally representative at all scales, and not all types of users seem to benefit equally from the tool. The risks of misinterpretation can be managed by integrating the application and interpretation of virtual globes into face-to-face planning processes.

  13. Locally Motivated GLOBE Investigations - A Key to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburne, J. C.; Geery, W.

    2003-12-01

    The GLOBE program was set up to help students make a core set of environmental observations at or near their schools, report their data through the internet to share with other students and scientists, analyze their data both locally and globally, and use this knowledge to form a better understanding of their environment. While the GLOBE program has been successful promoting more meaningful data collection, many of the tools and much of the infrastructure available to schools to synthesize their observations are underused. Schools that integrate GLOBE protocols with locally motivated investigations are more likely to implement the higher-order analysis and synthesis components of the program. Indicators of a successful observational program are things like measurement persistence, high data quality, and regular data. Participation in community forums and student-based research projects are evidence of a successful integrated program. A locally motivated issue allows a school to mold their GLOBE investigations around a multi-faceted question that they have first-hand knowledge of, that is both relevant and engaging to their students, and that can be supported by local expertise. In contrast, many GLOBE investigations are designed around abstract, non-site specific, narrowly focused and externally analyzed questions that limit local involvement and motivation. The main focus of this presentation is a few case histories of successful local investigations that incorporated GLOBE soil and air temperature data-logger measurements. The main example is drawn from Mr. Geery's fifth grade class investigation of why temperature differences exist between a local river bottom area and the school, which is located several kilometers away and 100 meters higher.

  14. Globe at Night Citizen Science: Reaching for the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen-science is a rewardingly inclusive way to bring awareness to the public on the disappearance of the starry night sky, its cause and solutions. Globe at Night (GaN) encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of the night sky. During ten-days per month of moonless evenings, children and adults match the appearance of a specific constellation with 7 star maps of progressively fainter stars found at www.globeatnight.org. They then submit their choice of star map in-situ using the "webapp" on a smart device. In eleven years of the program, over 160,000 observations from 180 countries have been contributed to a light pollution map. The GaN (open) database is a source of research projects. For example, students conducted research to understand the lesser long-nosed bats' avoidance of city center at night. With its analytical tools, Fieldscope will be a conduit for comparing GaN to other databases. On-the-fly mapping enables citizen-scientists to see observations immediately. There are 4 ways of taking measurements. The online app for data reporting is in 26 languages. STEM activities for young children and problem-based learning activities for older students were created to experience real-life scenarios: role-playing sea turtles hatching (misdirected by lights on shore) or analyzing an ISS image of Houston to estimate the wasted energy, cost and carbon footprint. In-situ and on-line workshops have been given on using GaN, as well as the activities. Our Facebook page exists to encourage dialogue and bring cutting edge news. To entice interest, we had monthly newsletters and serial podcasts starring the Dark Skies Crusader. GaN has been part of special campaigns like with the National Park Service, the National Geographic BioBlitz and Tucson in 2011. We have built a community of practitioners in various ways worldwide and have metrics on behavioral changes. To maintain the community and create new partnerships, we have teamed with Sci

  15. Open trial of cimetidine in the prevention of upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage in patients with severe intracranial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouawad, E; Deloof, T; Genette, F; Vandesteene, A

    1983-01-01

    The present study evaluates the efficacy of Cimetidine in the prevention of clinically important gastro-intestinal haemorrhage in patients suffering from severe head injury. Fifty patients (39 males and 11 females) were included in the study. We excluded from the trial patients on anticoagulant therapy or concomitant non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents, pregnant and lactating women, and patients with previous histories of peptic ulcer disease.

  16. Mitigating Mosquito Disease Vectors with Citizen Science: a Review of the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper Pilot and Implications for Wide-scale Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek Kohl, H.; Low, R.; Boger, R. A.; Schwerin, T. G.; Janney, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    The spread of disease vectors, including mosquitoes, is an increasingly significant global environmental issue driven by a warming climate. In 2017, the GLOBE Observer Program launched a new citizen science initiative to map mosquito habitats using the free GLOBE Observer App for smart phones and tablets. The app guides people to identify mosquito larvae and breeding sites, and then once documented, to eliminate or treat the site to prevent further breeding. It also gives citizen scientists the option to identify the mosquito larvae species to determine whether it is one of three genera that potentially could transmit Zika, dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunya, and other diseases. This data is uploaded to an international database that is freely available to the public and science community. GLOBE Observer piloted the initiative with educators in the United States, Brazil, and Peru, and it is now open for global participation. This presentation will discuss lessons learned in the pilot phase as well as plans to implement the initiative worldwide in partnership with science museums and science centers. GLOBE Observer is the non-student citizen science arm of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program, a long-standing, international science and education program that provides students and citizen scientists with the opportunity to participate in data collection and the scientific process, and contribute meaningfully to our understanding of the Earth system and global environment. GLOBE Observer data collection also includes cloud cover and cloud type and land cover/land use (in late 2017).

  17. Ethics and Corporal Punishment within the Schools across the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajdev, Usha

    2012-01-01

    This paper contains cultural anthropological research on various discipline measures used within the classrooms in India, United Kingdom, China, Africa, and the United States. My recent visit to schools in India on study abroad programs prompted my desire to research across the globe different methods of classroom management discipline conducted…

  18. MSIs across the Globe: Laying the Foundation for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmark, Tyler; Gasman, Marybeth

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the role that Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) play in democratizing education in the USA and around the world, examining both the institutions and their larger context. We also put forth recommendations for reaching and empowering students attending MSIs and "students at the margins" across the globe.

  19. ATRF Earns Three Green Globes, Exceeds NIH Building Standards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer From project management and energy and water efficiency to emissions and the indoor environment, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) was built with sustainability in mind, exceeding the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) building standards and earning three Green Globes from the Green Building Initiative (GBI).

  20. The Globe. Neighbourhood Agenda 21: Going Local in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the philosophy underlying a project to promote local community involvement in neighborhood plans as a basis for a citywide Local Agenda 21 and the first stages of Go Local on a Better Environment (GLOBE) introduced to give the project a popular identify and communicate the environmental message. (LZ)

  1. Science and Math in the Library Media Center Using GLOBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Teresa L.; Levine, Elissa R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program which helps school library media specialists and science and math teachers bring earth science, math, information literacy, information technology, and student inquiry into the classroom. Discusses use of the Internet to create a global network to study the…

  2. Comparison of classical dermatoscopy and acrylic globe magnifier dermatoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Henrik F; Eefsen, Rikke Løvendahl; Weismann, Kaare

    2008-01-01

    Dermatoscopic asymmetry of melanocytic skin lesion is pivotal in most algorithms assessing the probability of melanoma. Larger lesions cannot be assessed by dermatoscopy and the Dermaphot in a single field of vision, but this can be performed using the acrylic globe magnifier. We examined the dia...

  3. Google Earth: A Virtual Globe for Elementary Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Judy; LaFontaine, Gus

    2009-01-01

    Originally called Earth Viewer in 2004, Google Earth was the first virtual globe easily available to the ordinary user of the Internet. Google Earth, at earth.google.com, is a free, 3-dimensional computer model of Earth, but that means more than just a large collection of pretty pictures. It allows the viewer to "fly" anywhere on Earth "to view…

  4. Teaching seismic methods using interactive 3D Earth globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeraratne, D. S.; Rogers, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Instructional techniques for study of seismology are greatly enhanced by three dimensional (3D) visualization. Seismic rays that pass through the Earth's interior are typically viewed in 2D slices of the Earth's interior. Here we present the use of a 3D Earth globe manufactured by Real World Globes. This globe displays a dry-erase high resolution glossy topography and bathymetry from the Smith and Sandwell data archives at its surface for interactive measurements and hands-on marking of many seismic observations such as earthquake locations, source-receiver distances, surface wave propagation, great circle paths, ocean circulation patterns, airplane trajectories, etc.. A new interactive feature (designed collaboratively with geoscientists) allows cut away and disassembly of sections of the exterior shell revealing a full cross section depicting the Earth's interior layers displayed to scale with a dry-erase work board. The interior panel spins to any azimuth and provides a depth measurement scale to allow exact measurements and marking of earthquake depths, true seismic ray path propagation, ray path bottoming depths, shadow zones, and diffraction patterns. A demo of this globe and example activities will be presented.

  5. Place-based Learning About Climate with Elementary GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatheway, B.; Gardiner, L. S.; Harte, T.; Stanitski, D.; Taylor, J.

    2017-12-01

    Place-based education - helping students make connections between themselves, their community, and their local environment - is an important tool to help young learners understand their regional climate and start to learn about climate and environmental change. Elementary GLOBE storybooks and learning activities allow opportunities for place-based education instructional strategies about climate. In particular, two modules in the Elementary GLOBE unit - Seasons and Climate - provide opportunities for students to explore their local climate and environment. The storybooks and activities also make connections to other parts of elementary curriculum, such as arts, geography, and math. Over the long term, place-based education can also encourage students to be stewards of their local environment. A strong sense of place may help students to see themselves as stakeholders in their community and its resilience. In places that are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate and environmental change and the economic, social, and environmental tradeoffs of community decisions, helping young students developing a sense of place and to see the connection between Earth science, local community, and their lives can have a lasting impact on how a community evolves for decades to come. Elementary GLOBE was designed to help elementary teachers (i.e., grades K-4) integrate Earth system science topics into their curriculum as they teach literacy skills to students. This suite of instructional materials includes seven modules. Each module contains a science-based storybook and learning activities that support the science content addressed in the storybooks. Elementary GLOBE modules feature air quality, climate, clouds, Earth system, seasons, soil, and water. New eBooks allow students to read stories on computers or tablets, with the option of listening to each story with an audio recording. A new Elementary GLOBE Teacher Implementation Guide, published in 2017, provides

  6. Determining Light Pollution of the Global Sky: GLOBE at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Ward, D.; Walker, C.; Russell, R.; Pompea, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-05-01

    GLOBE at Night is an international science event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the conventional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. This hands-on learning activity extended the traditional classroom and school day last March with a week of nighttime sky observations involving teachers, students and their families. The quality of the night sky for stellar observations is impacted by several factors including human activities. By observing cloud cover and locating specific constellations in the sky, students from around the world learned how the lights in their community contribute to light pollution, exploring the relationship between science, technology and their society. Students learned that light pollution impacts more than just the visibility of stars at night. Lights at night impact both the biology and ecology of many species in our environment. Students were able to participate in this global scientific campaign by submitting their observations through an online database, allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis by participating scientists. Students and their families learned how latitude and longitude coordinates provide a location system to map and analyze the observation data submitted from around the globe. The collected data is available online for use by students, teachers and scientists worldwide to assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world. This session will share how students and scientists across the globe can explore and analyze the results of this exciting campaign. GLOBE at Night is a collaborative effort sponsored by The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS), Windows to the Universe, and ESRI. The GLOBE Program is

  7. Light Pollution Awareness through Globe at Night & IYL2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2015-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) will be coordinating extensive activities to raise awareness of light pollution through running the Cosmic Light theme of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and by partnering in particular with the popular Globe at Night program.Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) is an international campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by having people measure night-sky brightness and submit observations in real-time with smart phone or later with a computer. In 2015, Globe at Night will run for 10-nights each month, an hour after sunset til before the Moon rises. Students can use the data to monitor levels of light pollution around the world, as well as understand light pollution's effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife, human health and our ability to enjoy a starry night sky.Since its inception in 2006, more than 115,000 measurements from 115 countries have been reported. The last 9 years of data can be explored with Globe at Night's interactive world map or with the 'map app' to view a particular area. A spreadsheet of the data is downloadable from any year. One can compare Globe at Night data with a variety of other databases to see, for example, how light pollution affects the foraging habits of bats.To encourage public participation in Globe at Night during IYL2015, each month will target an area of the world that habitually contributes during that time. Special concerns for how light pollution affects that area and solutions will be featured on the Globe at Night website (www.globeatnight.org), through its Facebook page, in its newsletter or in the 365DaysofAstronomy.org podcasts.Twice during IYL there will be a global Flash Mob event, one on Super Pi Day (March 14, 2015) and a second in mid-September, where the public will be invited to take night-sky brightness measurements en masse. In April, the International Dark-Sky Week hosted by the International Dark-Sky Association will be

  8. Prophylactic perioperative sodium bicarbonate to prevent acute kidney injury following open heart surgery: a multicenter double-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Haase

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence suggests a nephroprotective effect of urinary alkalinization in patients at risk of acute kidney injury. In this study, we tested whether prophylactic bicarbonate-based infusion reduces the incidence of acute kidney injury and tubular damage in patients undergoing open heart surgery.In a multicenter, double-blinded (patients, clinical and research personnel, randomized controlled trial we enrolled 350 adult patients undergoing open heart surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. At induction of anesthesia, patients received either 24 hours of intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate (5.1 mmol/kg or sodium chloride (5.1 mmol/kg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients developing acute kidney injury. Secondary endpoints included the magnitude of acute tubular damage as measured by urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, initiation of acute renal replacement therapy, and mortality. The study was stopped early under recommendation of the Data Safety and Monitoring Committee because interim analysis suggested likely lack of efficacy and possible harm. Groups were non-significantly different at baseline except that a greater proportion of patients in the sodium bicarbonate group (66/174 [38%] presented with preoperative chronic kidney disease compared to control (44/176 [25%]; p = 0.009. Sodium bicarbonate increased urinary pH (from 6.0 to 7.5, p<0.001. More patients receiving bicarbonate (83/174 [47.7%] developed acute kidney injury compared with control patients (64/176 [36.4%], odds ratio [OR] 1.60 [95% CI 1.04-2.45]; unadjusted p = 0.032. After multivariable adjustment, a non-significant unfavorable group difference affecting patients receiving sodium bicarbonate was found for the primary endpoint (OR 1.45 [0.90-2.33], p = 0.120]. A greater postoperative increase in urinary NGAL in patients receiving bicarbonate infusion was observed compared to control patients (p = 0

  9. Globes and Teaching Aids Manufactured by Jan Felkl Company for the Polish Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Taborska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jan Felkl company from Roztoky (Roztok near Prague manufactured globes in seventeen language versions, since 1861 also in Polish language. The company was active until 1952, but it ceased to manufacture Polish-language globes as early as in 1914. In the aftermath of the First World War, and with the development of printing business, the demand for Czech globes shrank. It is difficult to estimate the overall output of Polish- language globes manufactured by Felkl’s company throughout the 53 years it operated. From catalogues and the surviving globes we know that terrestrial globes in six sizes, folding globes in two sizes, celestial globes (probably in four sizes, as well as telluria, lunaria and planetaria were manufactured for the Polish market. It is difficult to decide how many editions of individual types of globes were issued. Polish names were compiled by Franciszek Waligórski (one globe and Mirosław Suchecki. Only 28 globes have survived to this day, including one celestial globe. Most of them are globes of an 8-inch diameter, approved by the Austrian ministries as teaching aids for schools. Nearly half of the surviving globes date from the years 1894–1914. Only ten items are in museums.

  10. Occupational Cow Horn Eye Injuries in Ibadan, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cow horn injury is an uncommon cause of penetrating eye injury with grave ... cattle‑related jobs, and they all had unilateral open‑globe injuries with corneoscleral lacerations. ... likely to be because men are at increased risk as cattle rearers.

  11. Sensor Webs and Virtual Globes: Enabling Understanding of Changes in a partially Glaciated Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavner, M.; Fatland, D. R.; Habermann, M.; Berner, L.; Hood, E.; Connor, C.; Galbraith, J.; Knuth, E.; O'Brien, W.

    2008-12-01

    The University of Alaska Southeast is currently implementing a sensor web identified as the SouthEast Alaska MOnitoring Network for Science, Telecommunications, Education, and Research (SEAMONSTER). SEAMONSTER is operating in the partially glaciated Mendenhall and Lemon Creek Watersheds, in the Juneau area, on the margins of the Juneau Icefield. These watersheds are studied for both 1. long term monitoring of changes, and 2. detection and analysis of transient events (such as glacier lake outburst floods). The heterogeneous sensors (meteorologic, dual frequency GPS, water quality, lake level, etc), power and bandwidth constraints, and competing time scales of interest require autonomous reactivity of the sensor web. They also present challenges for operational management of the sensor web. The harsh conditions on the glaciers provide additional operating constraints. The tight integration of the sensor web and virtual global enabling technology enhance the project in multiple ways. We are utilizing virtual globe infrastructures to enhance both sensor web management and data access. SEAMONSTER utilizes virtual globes for education and public outreach, sensor web management, data dissemination, and enabling collaboration. Using a PosgreSQL with GIS extensions database coupled to the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Geoserver, we generate near-real-time auto-updating geobrowser files of the data in multiple OGC standard formats (e.g KML, WCS). Additionally, embedding wiki pages in this database allows the development of a geospatially aware wiki describing the projects for better public outreach and education. In this presentation we will describe how we have implemented these technologies to date, the lessons learned, and our efforts towards greater OGC standard implementation. A major focus will be on demonstrating how geobrowsers and virtual globes have made this project possible.

  12. Five-year study of ocular injuries due to fireworks in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Archana; Bhala, Soniya; Arya, Sudesh K; Sood, Sunandan; Narang, Subina

    2013-08-01

    To study the demographic profile, cause, type and severity of ocular injuries, their complications and final visual outcome following fireworks around the time of Deepawali in India. Case records of patients who presented with firework-related injuries during 2005-2009 at the time of Deepawali were reviewed. Data with respect to demographic profile of patients, cause and time of injury, time of presentation and types of intervention were analyzed. Visual acuity at presentation and final follow-up, anterior and posterior segment findings, and any diagnostic and surgical interventions carried out were noted. One hundred and one patients presented with firework-related ocular injuries, of which 77.5 % were male. The mean age was 17.60 ± 11.9 years, with 54 % being ≤14 years of age. The mean time of presentation was 8.9 h. Seventeen patients had open globe injury (OGI) and 84 had closed globe injury (CGI). Fountains were the most common cause of CGI and bullet bombs were the most common cause of OGI. Mean log MAR visual acuity at presentation was 0.64 and 1.22 and at last follow-up was 0.09 and 0.58 for CGI and OGI, respectively (p Firework injuries were seen mostly in males and children. Poor visual outcome was associated with poor initial visual acuity, OGI, IOFB, retinal detachment and development of endophthalmitis, while most patients with CGI regained good vision.

  13. Adaptive support ventilation may deliver unwanted respiratory rate-tidal volume combinations in patients with acute lung injury ventilated according to an open lung concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongelmans, Dave A; Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P; Binnekade, Jan M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2011-05-01

    With adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate and tidal volume (V(T)) are a function of the Otis least work of breathing formula. We hypothesized that adaptive support ventilation in an open lung ventilator strategy would deliver higher V(T)s to patients with acute lung injury. Patients with acute lung injury were ventilated according to a local guideline advising the use of lower V(T) (6-8 ml/kg predicted body weight), high concentrations of positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers. Ventilation parameters were recorded when the ventilator was switched to adaptive support ventilation, and after recruitment maneuvers. If V(T) increased more than 8 ml/kg predicted body weight, airway pressure was limited to correct for the rise of V(T). Ten patients with a mean (±SD) Pao(2)/Fio(2) of 171 ± 86 mmHg were included. After a switch from pressure-controlled ventilation to adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate declined (from 31 ± 5 to 21 ± 6 breaths/min; difference = 10 breaths/min, 95% CI 3-17 breaths/min, P = 0.008) and V(T) increased (from 6.5 ± 0.8 to 9.0 ± 1.6 ml/kg predicted body weight; difference = 2.5 ml, 95% CI 0.4-4.6 ml/kg predicted body weight, P = 0.02). Pressure limitation corrected for the rise of V(T), but minute ventilation declined, forcing the user to switch back to pressure-controlled ventilation. Adaptive support ventilation, compared with pressure-controlled ventilation in an open lung strategy setting, delivers a lower respiratory rate-higher V(T) combination. Pressure limitation does correct for the rise of V(T), but leads to a decline in minute ventilation.

  14. Iliac artery reconstruction secondary to incidental injury in open hernia repair: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Doña-Jaimes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgeries performed worldwide by general surgeons. More than 750,000 inguinal hernia repairs are performed each year in the United States. Complications of inguinal or femoral hernia are relatively rare, depending on the clinical circumstances in which the patient is admitted to the operating room and the type of hernia. The complications are classified as: intraoperative, short term and long term. Arterial lesions are the rarest but most dangerous. Objective: To describe surgical techniques used to repair injuries to the external iliac artery during an inguinal hernia repair that is reproducible by general surgeons. Materials and methods: A case report of an intraoperative external iliac artery injury is presented in which is a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE graft was used over the length of the lesion. Different techniques may be used for revascularisation: autogenous vein graft, synthetic grafts, revascularisation with ipsilateral or contralateral internal iliac artery and femoro-femoral crossover graft. Conclusion: The surgical technique using PTFE grafts is effective for repairing arterial injuries and it results in timely revascularisation that promotes satisfactory progress. Resumen: Introducción: La plastia inguinal es una de las cirugías más frecuente realizadas a nivel mundial por cirujanos generales. En Estados Unidos más de 750,000 hernioplastias inguinales se realizan por año. Las complicaciones de una hernia inguinal o femoral son relativamente infrecuentes, depende de las circunstancias clínicas en las que se ingresa a quirófano y el tipo de la hernia. Las complicaciones se clasifican en: intraoperatoría, a corto plazo y a largo plazo. Las lesiones arteriales son las más raras pero más graves. Objetivo: Describir técnicas quirúrgicas para reparación de lesiones de la arteria iliaca durante una plastia inguinal y reproducible por cirujanos generales

  15. Estimating Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Using Standard Meteorological Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    The heat stress management program at the Department of Energy''s Savannah River Site (SRS) requires implementation of protective controls on outdoor work based on observed values of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). To ensure continued compliance with heat stress program requirements, a computer algorithm was developed which calculates an estimate of WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. In addition, scripts were developed to generate a calculation every 15 minutes and post the results to an Intranet web site

  16. The Globe of Science and Innovation's central vortex

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    The central vortex of the Globe of Science and Innovation is a crown measuring 6.15 m in diameter and 4.5 m in height. Having been lifted by a crane to a height of over 22 m, the vortex is placed on a support structure which will be removed once the 36 arcs providing the building's structure have been secured in place.

  17. Inauguration of the Globe of Science and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez; Michel Blanc

    2004-01-01

    The building formerly known as 'Palais de l'Equilibre' has been given to CERN by the Swiss Confederation to mark the Laboratory's 50th Anniversary. The impressive 28 m high, 40 m diameter sphere was built by a consortium of 11 Swiss companies who specialise in timber construction. The Globe is a symbol for sustainable development: it is constructed entirely from wood and its circular form represents planet Earth.

  18. A study on the force balance of an unbalanced globe valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sang Min; Cho, Taik Dong; Ko, Sung Ho; Lee, Ho Young

    2007-01-01

    A pneumatic control valve is a piping element that controls the volumetric flow rate and pressure of a fluid: it is necessary to analyze the characteristics of the forces with respect to the opening of the valve in order to evaluate its operating performance. The forces occurring during operation are: resisting force and actuator force, where the load resistance is mostly affected by the fluid pressure difference of the valve. In this study, a force balance equation derived from the equilibrium relationship between the resisting force and the actuator force of an unbalanced globe valve is proposed, and the force balance equations are used to model the dynamic equations of a pneumatic unbalanced globe valve installed in nuclear power plants. A CFD analysis is also carried out to evaluate the pressure distribution and forces acting on the top and bottom planes of the valve plug. The results of this analysis have been verified through experimentation. This study has shown that the fluid pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the valve, measured from the force balance equation of an unbalanced valve, should actually be examined with the fluid-pressure difference between the top and bottom side of the valve plug

  19. Effects of alternative cropping systems on globe artichoke qualitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Emanuela; Deligios, Paola A; Azara, Emanuela; Delogu, Giovanna; Ledda, Luigi

    2018-02-01

    Traditionally, globe artichoke cultivation in the Mediterranean basin is based on monoculture and on use of high amounts of nitrogen fertiliser. This raises issues regarding its compatibility with sustainable agriculture. We studied the effect of one typical conventional (CONV) and two alternative cropping systems [globe artichoke in sequence with French bean (NCV1), or in biannual rotation (NCV2) with cauliflower and with a leguminous cover crop in inter-row spaces] on yield, polyphenol and mineral content of globe artichoke heads over two consecutive growing seasons. NCV2 showed statistical differences in terms of fresh product yield with respect to the monoculture systems. In addition, the dihydroxycinnamic acids and dicaffeoylquinic acids of non-conventional samples were one-fold significantly higher than the conventional one. All the samples reported good mineral content, although NCV2 achieved a higher Fe content than conventional throughout the two seasons. After two and three dates of sampling, the CONV samples showed the highest levels of K content. In our study, an acceptable commercial yield and quality of 'Spinoso sardo' were achieved by shifting the common conventional agronomic management to more sustainable ones, by means of an accurate choice of cover crop species and rotations introduced in the systems. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Reincarnation platn of globe. Chikyu saisei keikaku ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, T. (Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-11-30

    The period of 200 years since the Industrial Revolution has taken for the occurence of global warming up problem, and it may require to face the problem comprehensively and for long period of 100 years unit to resolve it. This reincarnation plan of globe aims to reincarnate the changed global environment hereafter by using time of about 100 years, and proposes to make the comprehensive and long term actions to suppress and reduce exhaust gases resulting the greenhouse effect by the cooperation of all nations in the world. In the former 50 years, feasible countermeasures such as deepenung of scientific knowkedges, promotion of worldwide energy saving, introduction of clean energy, development of revolutional environmental technology, expansion of CO {sub 2} absorbing sources, and technological development of energy for the next generation will be executed continuously. In the latter 50 years, the gas exhausting amount resulting the green house effect will be reduced and suppressed from these results. Owing to these measures, the reduction of gas resulting the greenhouse effect which exceeds the expectation, can clean the globe after 100 years because the cleaning results will be incorporated into the natural circulation and the green globe will be reincarnated. 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Open dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the little finger subsequent to chronic radial collateral ligament injury: a case report of primary ligament reconstruction with a half-slip of the flexor digitorum superficialis: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kazuma; Hibino, Naohito; Kondo, Kenji; Yoshioka, Shinji; Terai, Tomoya; Henmi, Tatsuhiko; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Open dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint is relatively rare. We report a case of a 32-year-old man who had open dislocation of the PIP joint of the little finger while playing American football. He had a history of chronic radial collateral ligament injury. We reconstructed the radial collateral ligament with a half-slip of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon.

  2. Design of a Golf Swing Injury Detection and Evaluation open service platform with Ontology-oriented clustering case-based reasoning mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, people can easily use a smartphone to get wanted information and requested services. Hence, this study designs and proposes a Golf Swing Injury Detection and Evaluation open service platform with Ontology-oritened clustering case-based reasoning mechanism, which is called GoSIDE, based on Arduino and Open Service Gateway initative (OSGi). GoSIDE is a three-tier architecture, which is composed of Mobile Users, Application Servers and a Cloud-based Digital Convergence Server. A mobile user is with a smartphone and Kinect sensors to detect the user's Golf swing actions and to interact with iDTV. An application server is with Intelligent Golf Swing Posture Analysis Model (iGoSPAM) to check a user's Golf swing actions and to alter this user when he is with error actions. Cloud-based Digital Convergence Server is with Ontology-oriented Clustering Case-based Reasoning (CBR) for Quality of Experiences (OCC4QoE), which is designed to provide QoE services by QoE-based Ontology strategies, rules and events for this user. Furthermore, GoSIDE will automatically trigger OCC4QoE and deliver popular rules for a new user. Experiment results illustrate that GoSIDE can provide appropriate detections for Golfers. Finally, GoSIDE can be a reference model for researchers and engineers.

  3. Using Digital Globes to Explore the Deep Sea and Advance Public Literacy in Earth System Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Emery, Emery; Brickley, Annette; Spargo, Abbey; Patterson, Kathleen; Joyce, Katherine; Silva, Tim; Madin, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Digital globes are new technologies increasingly used in informal and formal education to display global datasets and show connections among Earth systems. But how effective are digital globes in advancing public literacy in Earth system science? We addressed this question by developing new content for digital globes with the intent to educate and…

  4. A web-system of virtual morphometric globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinsky, Igor; Garov, Andrei; Karachevtseva, Irina

    2017-04-01

    Virtual globes — programs implementing interactive three-dimensional (3D) models of planets — are increasingly used in geo- and planetary sciences. We develop a web-system of virtual morphometric globes. As the initial data, we used the following global digital elevation models (DEMs): (1) a DEM of the Earth extracted from SRTM30_PLUS database; (2) a DEM of Mars extracted from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) gridded data record archive; and (3) A DEM of the Moon extracted from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) gridded data record archive. From these DEMs, we derived global digital models of the following 16 local, nonlocal, and combined morphometric variables: horizontal curvature, vertical curvature, mean curvature, Gaussian curvature, minimal curvature, maximal curvature, unsphericity curvature, difference curvature, vertical excess curvature, horizontal excess curvature, ring curvature, accumulation curvature, catchment area, dispersive area, topographic index, and stream power index (definitions, formulae, and interpretations can be found elsewhere [1]). To calculate local morphometric variables, we applied a finite-difference method intended for spheroidal equal angular grids [1]. Digital models of a nonlocal and combined morphometric variables were derived by a method of Martz and de Jong adapted to spheroidal equal angular grids [1]. DEM processing was performed in the software LandLord [1]. The calculated morphometric models were integrated into the testing version of the system. The following main functions are implemented in the system: (1) selection of a celestial body; (2) selection of a morphometric variable; (3) 2D visualization of a calculated global morphometric model (a map in equirectangular projection); (4) 3D visualization of a calculated global morphometric model on the sphere surface (a globe by itself); (5) change of a globe scale (zooming); and (6) globe rotation by an arbitrary angle. The testing version of the system

  5. Investigation on Aerodynamic Noise Evaluation and Attenuation In a Globe Valve using CFD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Sreekala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise pollution will soon become the third greatest menace to the human environment after air and water pollution. Since noise is a by-product of energy conversion, there will be increasing noise as the demand for energy for transportation, power, food, and chemicals increases. In the field of control equipment, noise produced by valves has become a focal point of attention .In this paper aerodynamic noise evaluation of a globe valve was carried out  using a three dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic technique(CFD. The results obtained from numerical analysis are compared with the experimental measurements and are found   to be in good agreement. Reduction in sound pressure level was achieved by doubling the number of flow passages in the cage at full open condition and at the same operating conditions. Hence sound attenuation is established by changing the cage configuration with no change in total area of flow passage in the cage

  6. Characteristics of pellet injuries to the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kükner, A Sahap; Yilmaz, Turgut; Celebi, Serdal; Karslioğlu, Safak; Alagöz, Gürsoy; Serin, Didem; Acar, M Akif; Ozveren, M Faik

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the features of orbital injuries by pellets fired from the front. Retrospective, 4 cases of pellet injuries. Five orbits of 4 patients who sustained pellet injuries received from the front were reviewed retrospectively. The course of injury and results were assessed. Radiological examinations were reviewed. The patients were evaluated between December 1996 and June 2004. Five orbits of 4 patients sustained injuries caused by pellets fired from an anterior direction. The globe in the injured orbit was intact in 2 cases. Severe loss of vision was also present in these 2 globes due to optic nerve involvement. Final visual acuity was down to no light perception in 4 eyes and limited to light perception in 1 eye. The prognosis of orbital pellet injuries is, unfortunately, poor. A pellet passing through the floor of the orbit often causes double perforation of the globe and, once in the orbital aperture, it travels towards the apex as a result of the conical shape of the orbit and lodges in the optic canal or its entrance, severely damaging the optic nerve. Surgery or other treatments are usually unsuccessful. Even if the globe is intact, vision is usually severely impaired. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Astronomy Meets the Environmental Sciences: Using GLOBE at Night Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, D.; Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R. T.

    2011-09-01

    The GLOBE at Night database now contains over 52,000 observations from the five annual two-week campaigns. It can be used as a resource to explore various issues related to light pollution and our environment. Students can compare data over time to look for changes and trends. For example, they can compare the data to population density or with nighttime photography and spectroscopy of lights. The data can be used in a lighting survey, to search for dark sky oases or to monitor ordinance compliance. Students can study effects of light pollution on animals, plants, human health, safety, security, energy consumption, and cost. As an example, we used data from the GLOBE at Night project and telemetry tracking data of lesser long-nosed bats obtained by the Arizona Game and Fish Department to study the effects of light pollution on the flight paths of the bats between their day roosts and night foraging areas around the city of Tucson, AZ. With the visual limiting magnitude data from GLOBE at Night, we ran a compositional analysis with respect to the bats' flight paths to determine whether the bats were selecting for or against flight through regions of particular night sky brightness levels. We found that the bats selected for the regions in which the limiting sky magnitudes fell between the ranges of 2.8-3.0 to 3.6-3.8 and 4.4-4.6 to 5.0-5.2, suggesting that the lesser long-nosed bat can tolerate a fair degree of urbanization. We also compared this result to contour maps created with digital Sky Quality Meter (http://www.unihedron.com) data.

  8. Point-of-service, quantitative analysis of ascorbic acid in aqueous humor for evaluating anterior globe integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartia, Manas R.; Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron; Plucinski, Lisa; Zhou, Xiangfei; Kellner, David; Labriola, Leanne T.; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-11-01

    Limited training, high cost, and low equipment mobility leads to inaccuracies in decision making and is concerning with serious ocular injuries such as suspected ruptured globe or post-operative infections. Here, we present a novel point-of-service (POS) quantitative ascorbic acid (AA) assay with use of the OcuCheck Biosensor. The present work describes the development and clinical testing of the paper-based biosensor that measures the changes in electrical resistance of the enzyme-plated interdigitated electrodes to quantify the level of AA present in ocular fluid. We have demonstrated the proof-of-concept of the biosensor testing 16 clinical samples collected from aqueous humor of patients undergoing therapeutic anterior chamber paracentesis. Comparing with gold standard colorimetric assay for AA concentration, OcuCheck showed accuracy of >80%, sensitivity of >88% and specificity of >71%. At present, there are no FDA-approved POS tests that can directly measures AA concentration levels in ocular fluid. We envisage that the device can be realized as a handheld, battery powered instrument that will have high impact on glaucoma care and point-of-care diagnostics of penetrating ocular globe injuries.

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of 3D Mouse Behaviors and Motor Function in the Open-Field after Spinal Cord Injury Using Markerless Motion Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Alison L.; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C.; Basso, D. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study’s goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal’s silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal’s front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 pstudies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement methods, subjectivity and human error is reduced, potentially providing insights leading to breakthroughs in treating human disease. PMID:24058586

  10. Enhancing Science Teacher Training Using Water Resources and GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, James W.

    2002-01-01

    Heritage College, located on the Yakama Indian Reservation in south central Washington state, serves a multicultural, underserved, rural population and trains teachers to staff the disadvantaged school districts on and surrounding the reservation. In-service teachers and pre-service teachers in the area show strength in biology but have weak backgrounds in chemistry and mathematics. We are addressing this problem by providing a 2-year core of courses for 3 groups of 25 students (15 pre-service and 10 in-service teachers) using GLOBE to teach integrated physical science and mathematics. At the conclusion of the program, the students will qualify for science certification by Washington State. Water resources are the focal point of the curriculum because it is central to life in our desert area. The lack or excess of water, its uses, quality and distribution is being studied by using GIS, remote sensing and historical records. Students are learning the methodology to incorporate scientific protocols and data into all aspects of their future teaching curriculum. In addition, in each of the three years of the project, pre-service teachers attended a seminar series during the fall semester with presentations by collaborators from industry, agriculture, education and government agencies. Students used NASA educational materials in the presentations that they gave at the conclusion of the seminar series. All pre- and in-service teachers continue to have support via a local web site for Heritage College GLOBE participants.

  11. CinéGlobe presents: "One Day on Earth"

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The CinéGlobe International Film Festival is proud to announce that it will be hosting the Swiss edition of the Global Screening of “One Day on Earth”, the first film to be shot and then screened in every country in the world.   Founded in 2008, “One Day on Earth's” first media creation event occurred on 10.10.10. The collaboration was the first ever simultaneous filming event occuring in every country of the world. It created a unique geo-tagged video archive as well as a unique feature film. “One Day on Earth” showcases the amazing diversity, conflict, tragedy, and triumph that occurs in one day on our planet.  This Earth Day, April 22nd, CinéGlobe and CERN invite the public to a free global screening event of the first One Day on Earth Motion Picture. This unique film, created from over 3000 hours of footage, was shot by the One Day on Earth community in every country of the world on October...

  12. On filament structure and propagation within a commercial plasma globe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burin, M. J.; Simmons, G. G.; Ceja, H. G.; Zweben, S. J.; Nagy, A.; Brunkhorst, C.

    2015-01-01

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed yet not well understood. Here, we investigate the discharge properties of a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. We find that increasing voltage magnitude increases the number of filaments while leaving their individual structure basically unchanged, a result typical of dielectric barrier discharges. The frequency of the voltage also affects filament population but more significantly changes filament structure, with more diffuse filaments seen at lower frequencies. Voltage polarity is observed to be important, especially at lower frequencies, where for negative-gradient voltages the discharge is more diffuse, not filamentary. At late stages of the discharge circular structures appear and expand on the glass boundaries. We find no trend of discharge speed with respect to voltage variables, though this may be due to manufacturer sample-to-sample variation. Each voltage cycle the discharge expands outward at ∼10–15 km/s, a speed significantly higher than the estimated electron drift yet considerably lower than that observed for most streamers. We discuss the physics of these observations and their relation to similar discharges that can be found within nature and industry

  13. Whole-globe biomechanics using high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Andrew P; Ho, Leon C; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Tran, Huong; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Chan, Kevin; Sigal, Ian A

    2017-07-01

    The eye is a complex structure composed of several interconnected tissues acting together, across the whole globe, to resist deformation due to intraocular pressure (IOP). However, most work in the ocular biomechanics field only examines the response to IOP over smaller regions of the eye. We used high-field MRI to measure IOP induced ocular displacements and deformations over the whole globe. Seven sheep eyes were obtained from a local abattoir and imaged within 48 h using MRI at multiple levels of IOP. IOP was controlled with a gravity perfusion system and a cannula inserted into the anterior chamber. T2-weighted imaging was performed to the eyes serially at 0 mmHg, 10 mmHg, 20 mmHg and 40 mmHg of IOP using a 9.4 T MRI scanner. Manual morphometry was conducted using 3D visualization software to quantify IOP-induced effects at the globe scale (e.g. axial length and equatorial diameters) or optic nerve head scale (e.g. canal diameter, peripapillary sclera bowing). Measurement sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine measurement precision. High-field MRI revealed an outward bowing of the posterior sclera and anterior bulging of the cornea due to IOP elevation. Increments in IOP from 10 to 40 mmHg caused measurable increases in axial length in 6 of 7 eyes of 7.9 ± 5.7% (mean ± SD). Changes in equatorial diameter were minimal, 0.4 ± 1.2% between 10 and 40 mmHg, and in all cases less than the measurement sensitivity. The effects were nonlinear, with larger deformations at normal IOPs (10-20 mmHg) than at elevated IOPs (20-40 mmHg). IOP also caused measurable increases in the nasal-temporal scleral canal diameter of 13.4 ± 9.7% between 0 and 20 mmHg, but not in the superior-inferior diameter. This study demonstrates that high-field MRI can be used to visualize and measure simultaneously the effects of IOP over the whole globe, including the effects on axial length and equatorial diameter, posterior sclera displacement and bowing, and even

  14. The Opening of ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Protects H9c2 Cardiac Cells Against the High Glucose-Induced Injury and Inflammation by Inhibiting the ROS-TLR4-Necroptosis Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Liang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hyperglycemia activates multiple signaling molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3, a kinase promoting necroptosis, which mediate hyperglycemia-induced cardiac injury. This study explored whether inhibition of ROS-TLR4-necroptosis pathway contributed to the protection of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channel opening against high glucose-induced cardiac injury and inflammation. Methods: H9c2 cardiac cells were treated with 35 mM glucose (HG to establish a model of HG-induced insults. The expression of RIP3 and TLR4 were tested by western blot. Generation of ROS, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and secretion of inflammatory cytokines were measured as injury indexes. Results: HG increased the expression of TLR4 and RIP3. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1, an inhibitor of necroptosis or TAK-242 (an inhibitor of TLR4 co-treatment attenuated HG-induced up-regulation of RIP3. Diazoxide (DZ, a mitochondrial KATP channel opener or pinacidil (Pin, a non-selective KATP channel opener or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger pre-treatment blocked the up-regulation of TLR4 and RIP3. Furthermore, pre-treatment with DZ or Pin or NAC, or co-treatment with TAK-242 or Nec-1 attenuated HG-induced a decrease in cell viability, and increases in ROS generation, MMP loss and inflammatory cytokines secretion. However, 5-hydroxy decanoic acid (5-HD, a mitochondrial KATP channel blocker or glibenclamide (Gli, a non-selective KATP channel blocker pre-treatment did not aggravate HG-induced injury and inflammation. Conclusion: KATP channel opening protects H9c2 cells against HG-induced injury and inflammation by inhibiting ROS-TLR4-necroptosis pathway.

  15. Dismounted Complex Blast Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Romney C; Fleming, Mark; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Gordon, Wade T; Nanos, George P; Charlton, Michael T; Ficke, James R

    2012-01-01

    The severe Dismounted Complex Blast Injury (DCBI) is characterized by high-energy injuries to the bilateral lower extremities (usually proximal transfemoral amputations) and/or upper extremity (usually involving the non-dominant side), in addition to open pelvic injuries, genitourinary, and abdominal trauma. Initial resuscitation and multidisciplinary surgical management appear to be the keys to survival. Definitive treatment follows general principals of open wound management and includes decontamination through aggressive and frequent debridement, hemorrhage control, viable tissue preservation, and appropriate timing of wound closure. These devastating injuries are associated with paradoxically favorable survival rates, but associated injuries and higher amputation levels lead to more difficult reconstructive challenges.

  16. Linking the GLOBE Program With NASA and NSF Large-Scale Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmer, P. E.

    2005-12-01

    NASA and the NSF, the sponsoring Federal agencies for the GLOBE Program, are seeking the participation of science teams who are working at the cutting edge of Earth systems science in large integrated Earth systems science programs. Connecting the GLOBE concept and structure with NASA and NSF's leading Earth systems science programs will give GLOBE schools and students access to top scientists, and expose them to programs that have been designated as scientific priorities. Students, teachers, parents, and their communities will be able to see how scientists of many disciplines work together to learn about the Earth system. The GLOBE solicitation released by the NSF targets partnerships between GLOBE and NSF/NASA-funded integrated Earth systems science programs. This presentation will focus on the goals and requirements of the NSF solicitation. Proponents will be expected to provide ways for the GLOBE community to interact with a group of scientists from their science programs as part of a wider joint Earth systems science educational strategy (the sponsoring agencies', GLOBE's, and the proposing programs'). Teams proposing to this solicitation must demonstrate: - A focus on direct connections with major NSF Geosciences and/or Polar Programs and/or NASA Earth-Sun research programs that are related to Earth systems science; - A demonstrable benefit to GLOBE and to NSF Geosciences and/or Polar Programs or NASA Earth-Sun education goals (providing access to program researchers and data, working with GLOBE in setting up campaigns where possible, using tested GLOBE or non-GLOBE protocols to the greatest extent possible, actively participating in the wider GLOBE community including schools, among other goals); - An international component; - How the existing educational efforts of the large science program will coordinate with GLOBE; - An Earth systems science education focus, rather than a GLOBE protocol-support focus; - A rigorous evaluation and assessment component

  17. Providing services to trafficking survivors: Understanding practices across the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jordan J; Kynn, Jamie; Stylianou, Amanda M; Postmus, Judy L

    2018-01-01

    Human trafficking is a global issue, with survivors representing all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, religions, and countries. However, little research exists that identifies effective practices in supporting survivors of human trafficking. The research that does exist is Western-centric. To fill this gap in the literature, the goal of this research was to understand practices used throughout the globe with adult human trafficking survivors. A qualitative approach was utilized. Providers from 26 countries, across six different continents, were interviewed to allow for a comprehensive and multi-faceted understanding of practices in working with survivors. Participants identified utilizing an empowerment-based, survivor, and human life-centered approach to working with survivors, emphasized the importance of engaging in community level interventions, and highlighted the importance of government recognition of human trafficking. Findings provide information from the perspective of advocates on best practices in the field that can be used by agencies to enhance human trafficking programming.

  18. Events at the Globe of Science and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN is organising a series of lectures based on the exhibition À des années lumière... Thursday 7 December, 8.00 p.m. (in French) 'A look at Einstein and physics from the different perspectives of a physicist and an illustrator' John Ellis, CERN physicist, and Fiami, author of the comic book 'The Lives of Einstein' Come and explore physics with a comic book author who will present six vital episodes in the history of knowledge in the company of his hero, Albert Einstein. After this literary voyage of discovery, a CERN physicist will explain the issues facing physics today, more than a century after Einstein's miracle year. There will be a book signing session with Fiami at the end of the talk www.fiami.ch Lecture for the general public By reservation only: + 41 (0)22 767 76 76 Information on future meetings : www.cern.ch/globe

  19. An Optimization Method for Virtual Globe Ocean Surface Dynamic Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Wumeng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing visualization method in the virtual globe mainly uses the projection grid to organize the ocean grid. This special grid organization has the defects in reflecting the difference characteristics of different ocean areas. The method of global ocean visualization based on global discrete grid can make up the defect of the projection grid method by matching with the discrete space of the virtual globe, so it is more suitable for the virtual ocean surface simulation application.But the available global discrete grids method has many problems which limiting its application such as the low efficiency of rendering and loading, the need of repairing grid crevices. To this point, we propose an optimization for the global discrete grids method. At first, a GPU-oriented multi-scale grid model of ocean surface which develops on the foundation of global discrete grids was designed to organize and manage the ocean surface grids. Then, in order to achieve the wind-drive wave dynamic rendering, this paper proposes a dynamic wave rendering method based on the multi-scale ocean surface grid model to support real-time wind field updating. At the same time, considering the effect of repairing grid crevices on the system efficiency, this paper presents an efficient method for repairing ocean surface grid crevices based on the characteristics of ocean grid and GPU technology. At last, the feasibility and validity of the method are verified by the comparison experiment. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient, stable and fast, and can compensate for the lack of function of the existing methods, so the application range is more extensive.

  20. Unfolding Leonardo DA Vinci's Globe (ad 1504) to Reveal its Historical World Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, G. J.; Missinne, S. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports in detail on the image-based modelling and unwrapping approach used to create a two-dimensional projected map of an astonishing ostrich egg globe from AD 1504. This miniature egg globe is not only the oldest extant engraved globe, but it is also the oldest post-Columbian globe of the world and the first ever to depict Newfoundland and many other territories. The intention of digitally recording the surface geometry and colour of this unique artefact was to portray the original layout of the world map used by the Florentine Renaissance artist to make this globe. In addition, it was expected to substantiate iconographical details, which are hard to study at its scale of 1:80,000,000. The ostrich egg globe is the prototype of the Lenox Globe kept at the New York Public Library. The latter is very beneficial to examine how the egg globe looked like before being glued together at its equator. On the other hand, unfolding the map engraved in the ostrich egg halves enables a more detailed study of the remarkable details visible on both globes, since the engravings on the quasi-white egg surface are much easier to discern than those of the highly reflective red copper Lenox Globe. Finally, a detailed study of the unwrapped 3D surface is essential to learn more about the world vision of its creator and the incredible efforts that went into making this globe. Thanks to some particular pictographic details as well as the way in which the engravings are applied (by a left-handed person), the globe artist can be identified as Leonardo da Vinci.

  1. UNFOLDING LEONARDO DA VINCI’S GLOBE (AD 1504 TO REVEAL ITS HISTORICAL WORLD MAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Verhoeven

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports in detail on the image-based modelling and unwrapping approach used to create a two-dimensional projected map of an astonishing ostrich egg globe from AD 1504. This miniature egg globe is not only the oldest extant engraved globe, but it is also the oldest post-Columbian globe of the world and the first ever to depict Newfoundland and many other territories. The intention of digitally recording the surface geometry and colour of this unique artefact was to portray the original layout of the world map used by the Florentine Renaissance artist to make this globe. In addition, it was expected to substantiate iconographical details, which are hard to study at its scale of 1:80,000,000. The ostrich egg globe is the prototype of the Lenox Globe kept at the New York Public Library. The latter is very beneficial to examine how the egg globe looked like before being glued together at its equator. On the other hand, unfolding the map engraved in the ostrich egg halves enables a more detailed study of the remarkable details visible on both globes, since the engravings on the quasi-white egg surface are much easier to discern than those of the highly reflective red copper Lenox Globe. Finally, a detailed study of the unwrapped 3D surface is essential to learn more about the world vision of its creator and the incredible efforts that went into making this globe. Thanks to some particular pictographic details as well as the way in which the engravings are applied (by a left-handed person, the globe artist can be identified as Leonardo da Vinci.

  2. Open Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Paull

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 27-year-old male was transported to the emergency department by emergency medical services after crashing his motorcycle into a guardrail. Upon presentation he was alert, normotensive, and tachypneic. Significant findings: A large chest wound was clinically obvious. A chest radiograph performed after intubation showed subcutaneous emphysema, an anterior rib fracture, and a right-sided pneumothorax. He was then taken to the operating room for further management. Discussion: Thoracic injuries are responsible for one-quarter of all trauma-related deaths. Following rib fracture, pneumothorax is the second most common thoracic injury, occurring in 30% of patients with thoracic trauma. An open pneumothorax occurs when a chest wall injury results in direct communication between the atmosphere and pleura.1-2 It is estimated that open pneumothorax occurs in 80% of all penetrating chest wounds, with stab wounds being more common than gunshot wounds or impalement. Open pneumothoraces can lead to ventilatory insufficiency and rapid respiratory decompensation.2 Advanced Trauma Life Support recommends that the initial management of an open pneumothorax is placement of an occlusive dressing taped on three sides to create a ‘flutter-valve’ mechanism. This should then be followed by tube thoracostomy and repair of the chest wall defect.3 The placement of an occlusive dressing or initial wound closure without subsequent tube thoracostomy may result in the development of a tension pneumothorax.2 The patient was intubated and mechanical ventilation was initiated without complication. Due to the large size of the wound, an occlusive dressing was not placed in the emergency department and the patient was rapidly transported to the operating room for further management. In the operating room two chest tubes were placed. Operative findings included a right hemopneumothorax, multiple rib fractures, and a manubrial fracture. After

  3. CIneGlobe Festival 2015 - Opening Night with projection of Symmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    Swiss Avant-PremièreSymmetry, by Ruben Van Leer (documentary, 28’, EN/ST FR) followed by Symmetry Unravelled, by Juliette Stevens (documentary, 23’, EN/ST FR) in the presence of the directors. Symmetry is a dance & opera film, in which CERN researcher Lukas is thrown off balance, while working on the theory of everything and the smallest particle. Through Claron’s singing he rediscovers love, in an endless landscape. She takes him back to the moment before the big bang, when time didn’t exist; a love with no end… Symmetry Unravelled shows the making of process of Symmetry. It’s filmed deep under the ground inside CERN and it’s detectors and far above sea level on the endless Bolivian miniral landscape Uyuni. Collaborating artists and renowned physicists unravel the relationship between art and science.

  4. CFD analysis on the dynamic flow characteristics of the pilot-control globe valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Jin-yuan; Wei, Lin; Jin, Zhi-jiang; Wang, Jian-kai; Zhang, Han; Lu, An-le

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PCGV utilizes pressure difference to control the action of the valve core. • Three different opening processes with the same spring stiffness are analyzed. • Valve core’s displacements with different spring stiffness are analyzed. • The best design point of spring stiffness and inlet pressure is obtained. • The selection formula for the design of PCGV is generalized. - Abstract: The pilot-control globe valve (PCGV) is a new kind valve with simple structures and low driving energy consumption. It can utilize the pressure difference before and after the valve to control the action of the valve core. However, systematic theoretical research and numerical analysis are deficient at present. In this paper, the mathematical model of PCGV is established and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method is employed to numerically simulate its dynamic characteristics. Through the analysis of the internal flow field distribution, its working principle is verified. Then three different opening processes with the same spring stiffness are analyzed under different static inlet pressures, and the best design point is obtained by studying the characteristic curves of the valve core’s displacement. The relationship of static inlet pressure and the valve core’s displacement is summarized and the selection formula for the valve design is generalized which can reduce the various design work for further optimization and engineering applications of PCGV

  5. Quantitative evaluation of 3D mouse behaviors and motor function in the open-field after spinal cord injury using markerless motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Alison L; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C; Basso, D Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study's goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal's silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal's front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005) and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01) were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement methods

  6. Quantitative evaluation of 3D mouse behaviors and motor function in the open-field after spinal cord injury using markerless motion tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L Sheets

    Full Text Available Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI. Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study's goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz. Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal's silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal's front Center of Volume (CoV height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005 and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01 were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative

  7. Genetic mapping and annotation of genomic microsatellites isolated from globe artichoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acquadro, A.; Lanteri, S.; Scaglione, D.; Arens, P.F.P.; Vosman, B.; Portis, E.

    2009-01-01

    Cynara cardunculus includes three taxa, the globe artichoke (subsp. scolymus L. Hegi), the cultivated cardoon (var. altilis) and their progenitor, the wild cardoon (var. sylvestris). Globe artichoke is an important component of the Mediterranean rural economy, but its improvement through breeding

  8. A 3D Planetary Neocartographic Tool in Education: A Game on Virtual Moon and Mars Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, H.; Simonné-Dombóvári, E.; Gede, M.

    2012-03-01

    The paper describes the educational use of online virtual globes of Mars and the Moon. The game uses topographic globes of Mars (MOLA) and the Moon (LRO DTM) that includes IAU nomenclature + informal names. Students have to position the points described.

  9. GLOBE-al Impact through Diversity Bootcamps and Student Research Symposia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeault, J.; Murphy, T.; Johnson, J.; Sparrow, E. B.; Czajkowski, K. P.; Herron, S.; Falcon, P.

    2016-12-01

    Inclusion, diversity, underrepresented groups, underserved populations...the key words and phrases that represent the students, we, as science education professionals, want to reach and encourage to enter the geoscience pipeline. Wanting to do this is one thing and having the skills to succeed is very different. It is also one that the GLOBE Program, an international science and education program, is working on as a community. GLOBE encourages students from around the world to participate in authentic scientific research of the Earth system. Students use scientific protocols to explore their local environments, compare their findings with other GLOBE schools both in the U.S. and in other participating countries, and then share their findings via the GLOBE.gov website. In the last year, two initiatives, six face-to-face Student Research Symposia and two diversity-focused GLOBE Partner Bootcamps, set the GLOBE community of Partners, teachers and students on the path to being able to address this challenge. This presentation will include the framework for the student research symposia, the barriers the leadership team faced when recruiting and getting students there and the lessons learned. Agendas for the GLOBE Partner Bootcamps will be shared to demonstrate how facilitators supplemented a standard GLOBE Partner workshop to model a more inclusive environment, along with future improvements to the format.

  10. A Review of Global Learning & Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    review (Yoder et al., 2008) of the GPO performance, NASA continued the cooperative agreement with UCAR. Another external review ( Bybee et al., 2008) of...Submitted by the Program Office External Review Committee. Bybee , Rodger W. (Chair), 2008. NASA External Review of a GLOBE Proposal, The Globe

  11. Gender-Role Portrayals in Television Advertising Across the Globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Jörg; Prieler, Michael; Adam, Karoline

    Although there are numerous studies on gender-role portrayals in television advertising, comparative designs are clearly lacking. With content analytical data from a total of 13 Asian, American, and European countries, we study the stereotypical depiction of men and women in television advertisements. Our sample consists of 1755 ads collected in May 2014. Analyzing the gender of the primary character and voiceover, as well as the age, associated product categories, home- or work setting, and the working role of the primary character, we concluded that gender stereotypes in TV advertising can be found around the world. A multilevel model further showed that gender stereotypes were independent of a country's gender indices, including Hofstede's Masculinity Index, GLOBE's Gender Egalitarianism Index, the Gender-related Development Index, the Gender Inequality Index, and the Global Gender Gap Index. These findings suggest that gender stereotyping in television advertising does not depend on the gender equality prevalent in a country. The role of a specific culture in shaping gender stereotypes in television advertising is thus smaller than commonly thought.

  12. Do Interactive Globes and Games Help Students Learn Planetary Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coba, Filis; Burgin, Stephen; De Paor, Declan; Georgen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The popularity of animations and interactive visualizations in undergraduate science education might lead one to assume that these teaching aids enhance student learning. We tested this assumption for the case of the Google Earth virtual globe with a comparison of control and treatment student groups in a general education class of over 370 students at a large public university. Earth and Planetary Science course content was developed in two formats: using Keyhole Markup Language (KML) to create interactive tours in Google Earth (the treatment group) and Portable Document Format (PDF) for on-screen reading (the control group). The PDF documents contained identical text and images to the placemark balloons or "tour stops" in the Google Earth version. Some significant differences were noted between the two groups based on the immediate post-questionnaire with the KML students out-performing the PDF students, but not on the delayed measure. In a separate but related project, we undertake preliminary investigations into methods of teaching basic concepts in planetary mantle convection using numerical simulations. The goal of this project is to develop an interface with a two-dimensional finite element model that will allow students to vary parameters such as the temperatures assigned to the boundaries of the model domain, to help them actively explore important variables that control convection.

  13. Globe Event | Lecture by Cédric Villani | 21 May

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2013-01-01

    La naissance des idées - réflexions sur la nature et l’histoire de la mathématique et de la physique, by Cédric Villani.   Globe de la science et de l'innovation Route de Meyrin, 1211 Genève Tuesday 21 May 2013 at 6:00 p.m. The lecture will be in French - Interpreting available in English   Cédric Villani. In this lecture, Cédric Villani will explain what he considers to be the necessary “ingredients” for the birth of new ideas. Clearly a good brain is an essential factor, but that alone is not enough. The researcher must also have access to a wealth of literature, which is now greatly facilitated by the Internet. Motivation is another key component, although we do not really understand what incites it. Intellectual environment and constraints also drive creativity, as do perseverance and chance. An interesting idea has little chance of making a breakthrough w...

  14. NASA WEBWORLDWIND: MULTIDIMENSIONAL VIRTUAL GLOBE FOR GEO BIG DATA VISUALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Brovelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presented a web application created using the NASA WebWorldWind framework. The application is capable of visualizing n-dimensional data using a Voxel model. In this case study, we handled social media data and Call Detailed Records (CDR of telecommunication networks. These were retrieved from the "BigData Challenge 2015" of Telecom Italia. We focused on the visualization process for a suitable way to show this geo-data in a 3D environment, incorporating more than three dimensions. This engenders an interactive way to browse the data in their real context and understand them quickly. Users will be able to handle several varieties of data, import their dataset using a particular data structure, and then mash them up in the WebWorldWind virtual globe. A broad range of public use this tool for diverse purposes is possible, without much experience in the field, thanks to the intuitive user-interface of this web app.

  15. NASA Webworldwind: Multidimensional Virtual Globe for Geo Big Data Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Hogan, P.; Prestifilippo, G.; Zamboni, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we presented a web application created using the NASA WebWorldWind framework. The application is capable of visualizing n-dimensional data using a Voxel model. In this case study, we handled social media data and Call Detailed Records (CDR) of telecommunication networks. These were retrieved from the "BigData Challenge 2015" of Telecom Italia. We focused on the visualization process for a suitable way to show this geo-data in a 3D environment, incorporating more than three dimensions. This engenders an interactive way to browse the data in their real context and understand them quickly. Users will be able to handle several varieties of data, import their dataset using a particular data structure, and then mash them up in the WebWorldWind virtual globe. A broad range of public use this tool for diverse purposes is possible, without much experience in the field, thanks to the intuitive user-interface of this web app.

  16. Micropropagation of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iapichino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) is a perennial plant cultivated in the Mediterranean region and the Americas for its edible young flower heads. Although vegetative propagation by offshoots or by "ovoli" (underground dormant axillary buds) has been the primary method of propagation, the potential for the diffusion of diseases and the phenotypic variability can be very high. The propagation of this species by axillary shoot proliferation from in vitro-cultured meristems produces systemic pathogen-free plants and a higher multiplication rate as compared to that obtained by conventional agamic multiplication. Axillary shoot proliferation can be induced from excised shoot apices cultured on Murashige and Skoog agar solidified medium supplemented with various concentrations of cytokinins and auxins, depending on genotype. For the production of virus-free plants, meristems, 0.3-0.8 mm long are excised from shoot apices and surface sterilized. The transfer of artichoke microshoots to a medium lacking cytokinins or with low cytokinin concentration is critical for rooting. Adventitious roots develop within 3-5 weeks after transfer to root induction MS medium containing NAA or IAA at various concentrations. However, in vitro rooting frequency rate is dependent on the genotype and the protocol used. Acclimatization of in vitro microshoots having 3-4 roots is successfully accomplished; plantlets develop new roots in ex vitro conditions and continue to grow.

  17. Phenotypic variability in a population of globe artichoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Reolon da Costa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of variability is a prerequisite for genetic improvement in plants. Globe artichoke is a high nutritious vegetable with medical value, representing a profitable alternative for rural producers. This research was conducted with the aim of evaluating the phenotypic variability in a commercial cultivar of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus L established from seeds. Field plants were assessed when primary head reached commercial stage. An amount of 21 quantitative and 5 multicategoric characters were assessed. The quantitative data were submitted to multivariate analysis. For quantitative characters the distance between individuals varied from 3.0 to 50.9, revealing high intrapopulation variability. The greater relative contribution characters for genetic divergence were the primary head fresh mass (79.88% and bottom fresh mass (8.43%. This indicates the possibility of plant selection for head quality in this population. The clustering analysis through UPGMA method, based on quantitative characters, allowed the formation of five groups. For multicategoric traits, the similarity among individuals varied from 1.22% to 100%. Within the existing population variability, it was possible to select plants with superior quantitative traits desirable for in natura consumption, as primary head fresh weight and length, bottom fresh mass, bract basis length and width, as well as non-quantitative traits as round head shape, absence of thorn and presence of violet color in the head.

  18. Collaterals 2016: Translating the collaterome around the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeskind, David S; Woolf, Graham W; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2017-06-01

    Collaterals 2016 (third International Symposium on Collaterals to the Brain) was a multidisciplinary scientific conference focused on collateral circulation in acute ischemic stroke. Decisive challenges include generalizability of optimal triage and selection paradigms based on collateral status for definitive treatment of acute ischemic stroke, rapid dissemination of expert methods, and the urgent need to leverage networking opportunities for stroke science related to the hemodynamics of collaterals. The collaterome, or individual capacity to offset ischemia in the brain, and determination of a favorable collateral profile have become pivotal factors in consideration of the precision medicine of stroke decision-making. The conference convened over 50 invited faculty from around the world to connect on-site participants at a state-of-the-art facility with remote audiences in more than 22 countries and regions. The 2½-day program was structured into 40-min sessions devoted to key issues in translating the collaterome in acute stroke therapy across the globe. This unique forum of expertise emphasized the timely impact of collaterals on a monumental scale, encouraging maximal participation, rapid diffusion and added value of a diverse networking resource. The meeting format established a model geographical framework and innovative videoconferencing platform for future scientific conferences.

  19. Ash from huge Australian bushfires in 2009 circled the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2011-06-01

    On 7 February 2009, record high temperatures, low rainfall and humidity, and fast blowing winds caused sparks in the bush near the Australian city of Melbourne to ignite much of the southeastern region of the state of Victoria. In just a few days, more than 4500 square kilometers had burned and 173 people had died in what has been called the worst natural disaster in Australian history. The fires released so much smoke that daytime on 7 February was plunged into darkness in Melbourne. Indeed, soot particles and other aerosols are known to scatter and absorb solar radiation. However, airborne particles released by fires are typically thought to remain in the atmosphere close to their sources. In fact, climate models pay little attention to the scattering and absorbing effects of fire-borne aerosols because they are not believed to reach altitudes above 10 kilometers, in the stratosphere, where circulation patterns would distribute a plume of pollution around the globe, possibly leading to global cooling effects. Ash from volcanic plumes has long been considered the sole method by which aerosols and gases could be injected into the stratosphere from the Earth's surface. However, Australia's bushfires of 2009 showed otherwise. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2010JD015162, 2011)

  20. GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper: Geoscience and Public Health Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R.; Boger, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The global health crisis posed by vector-borne diseases is so great in scope that it is clearly insurmountable without the active help of tens-or hundreds- of thousands of individuals, working to identify and eradicate risk in communities around the world. Mobile devices equipped with data collection capabilities and visualization opportunities are lowering the barrier for participation in data collection efforts. The GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper (MHM) provides citizen scientists with an easy to use mobile platform to identify and locate mosquito breeding sites in their community. The app also supports the identification of vector taxa in the larvae development phase via a built-in key, which provides important information for scientists and public health officials tracking the rate of range expansion of invasive vector species and associated health threats. GO Mosquito is actively working with other citizen scientist programs across the world to ensure interoperability of data through standardization of metadata fields specific to vector monitoring, and through the development of APIs that allow for data exchange and shared data display through a UN-sponsored proof of concept project, Global Mosquito Alert. Avenues of application for mosquito vector data-both directly, by public health entities, and by modelers who employ remotely sensed environmental data to project mosquito population dynamics and epidemic disease will be featured.

  1. Luminosity declines in the Globe as it increases at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    A few weeks ago, the skylight at the top of the Globe was fitted with "smart glass". The new glazing will allow the intensity of the light in the auditorium to be adjusted, thus solving the problem of sunlight reflecting on the giant screen during the day.   The Globe skylight while "off": the smart glass remains opaque. Inaugurated in 2004, the Globe of Science and Innovation has become one of the Organization's key landmarks. Housing the permanent exhibition "The Universe of Particles" (which recently received a silver design award, as reported in the last issue of the Bulletin) and a multimedia auditorium, the Globe hosts many events every year. "The Globe has rapidly become an important communication tool for CERN," enthuses Bernard Pellequer, who is in charge of event planning for the venue. "This is particularly true for the first floor, which is equipped with a giant screen. Unfortunately, we soon...

  2. Eye globe abnormalities on MR and CT in adults: An anatomical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Pillay, Premilla; Koh, Lilian Hui; Goh, Kong Yong; Yu, Wai Yung

    2016-01-01

    Eye globe abnormalities can be readily detected on dedicated and non-dedicated CT and MR studies. A primary understanding of the globe anatomy is key to characterising both traumatic and non-traumatic globe abnormalities. The globe consists of three primary layers: the sclera (outer), uvea (middle), and retina (inner layer). The various pathological processes involving these layers are highlighted using case examples with fundoscopic correlation where appropriate. In the emergent setting, trauma can result in hemorrhage, retinal/choroidal detachment and globe rupture. Neoplasms and inflammatory/infective processes predominantly occur in the vascular middle layer. The radiologist has an important role in primary diagnosis contributing to appropriate ophthalmology referral, thereby preventing devastating consequences such as vision loss

  3. Eye globe abnormalities on MR and CT in adults: An anatomical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Pillay, Premilla [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Health System, Singapore (Singapore); Koh, Lilian Hui [National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Level 1, TTSH Medical Centre, Singapore (Singapore); Goh, Kong Yong [Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Yu, Wai Yung [Dept. of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-09-15

    Eye globe abnormalities can be readily detected on dedicated and non-dedicated CT and MR studies. A primary understanding of the globe anatomy is key to characterising both traumatic and non-traumatic globe abnormalities. The globe consists of three primary layers: the sclera (outer), uvea (middle), and retina (inner layer). The various pathological processes involving these layers are highlighted using case examples with fundoscopic correlation where appropriate. In the emergent setting, trauma can result in hemorrhage, retinal/choroidal detachment and globe rupture. Neoplasms and inflammatory/infective processes predominantly occur in the vascular middle layer. The radiologist has an important role in primary diagnosis contributing to appropriate ophthalmology referral, thereby preventing devastating consequences such as vision loss.

  4. Eye Globe Abnormalities on MR and CT in Adults: An Anatomical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Pillay, Premilla [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Health System, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Koh, Lilian Hui Li [National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Level 1, TTSH Medical Centre, Singapore 308433 (Singapore); Goh, Kong Yong [Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Dr. Goh Eye Neuro-Ophthalmic and Low Vision Specialist, Mount Elizabeth Novena Specialist Centre, Singapore 329563 (Singapore); Yu, Wai-Yung [Department of Neuroradiology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore 308433 (Singapore)

    2016-11-01

    Eye globe abnormalities can be readily detected on dedicated and non-dedicated CT and MR studies. A primary understanding of the globe anatomy is key to characterising both traumatic and non-traumatic globe abnormalities. The globe consists of three primary layers: the sclera (outer), uvea (middle), and retina (inner layer). The various pathological processes involving these layers are highlighted using case examples with fundoscopic correlation where appropriate. In the emergent setting, trauma can result in hemorrhage, retinal/choroidal detachment and globe rupture. Neoplasms and inflammatory/infective processes predominantly occur in the vascular middle layer. The radiologist has an important role in primary diagnosis contributing to appropriate ophthalmology referral, thereby preventing devastating consequences such as vision loss.

  5. Revision, uptake and coding issues related to the open access Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS versions 8, 9 and 10.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orchard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Katherine Rae1, John Brooks2, Martin Hägglund3, Lluis Til4, David Wales5, Tim Wood61Sports Medicine at Sydney University, Sydney NSW Australia; 2Rugby Football Union, Twickenham, England, UK; 3Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4FC Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 5Arsenal FC, Highbury, England, UK; 6Tennis Australia, Melbourne, Vic, AustraliaAbstract: The Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS is one of the world’s most commonly used systems for coding injury diagnoses in sports injury surveillance systems. Its major strengths are that it has wide usage, has codes specific to sports medicine and that it is free to use. Literature searches and stakeholder consultations were made to assess the uptake of OSICS and to develop new versions. OSICS was commonly used in the sports of football (soccer, Australian football, rugby union, cricket and tennis. It is referenced in international papers in three sports and used in four commercially available computerised injury management systems. Suggested injury categories for the major sports are presented. New versions OSICS 9 (three digit codes and OSICS 10.1 (four digit codes are presented. OSICS is a potentially helpful component of a comprehensive sports injury surveillance system, but many other components are required. Choices made in developing these components should ideally be agreed upon by groups of researchers in consensus statements.Keywords: sports injury classification, epidemiology, surveillance, coding

  6. Ocular injury in hurling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, T H

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. METHODS: Retrospective review of the case notes of 310 patients who attended Cork University Hospital or Waterford Regional Hospital between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2002 with ocular injuries sustained during a hurling match. A confidential questionnaire on reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear was completed by 130 players. RESULTS: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical INTERVENTION: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6\\/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3\\/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. CONCLUSIONS: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory.

  7. Revision, uptake and coding issues related to the open access Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) versions 8, 9 and 10.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, John; Rae, Katherine; Brooks, John; Hägglund, Martin; Til, Lluis; Wales, David; Wood, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) is one of the world’s most commonly used systems for coding injury diagnoses in sports injury surveillance systems. Its major strengths are that it has wide usage, has codes specific to sports medicine and that it is free to use. Literature searches and stakeholder consultations were made to assess the uptake of OSICS and to develop new versions. OSICS was commonly used in the sports of football (soccer), Australian football, rugby union, cricket and tennis. It is referenced in international papers in three sports and used in four commercially available computerised injury management systems. Suggested injury categories for the major sports are presented. New versions OSICS 9 (three digit codes) and OSICS 10.1 (four digit codes) are presented. OSICS is a potentially helpful component of a comprehensive sports injury surveillance system, but many other components are required. Choices made in developing these components should ideally be agreed upon by groups of researchers in consensus statements. PMID:24198559

  8. GLOBE Mission Earth: The evaluation of the first year's implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaktylou, N. E.; Hedley, M. L.; Darche, S.; Harris-Stefanakis, E.; Silberglitt, M. D.; Struble, J.; Bingham, P.; Czajkowski, K.

    2017-12-01

    Here we present the evaluation findings for the first year of implementation of the `Mission Earth' Program.`Mission Earth' proposes the systematic embedding of GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) resources and NASA assets into the curricula of schools along the K-12 continuum, leveraging existing partnerships and networks. The main goal of the program is to create developmentally appropriate, vertically-integrated K-12 materials and activities,, supported by high quality professional development and ongoing support, engaging teachers from all grades. Its team consists of 5 geographically distributed universities and research institutions that have developed a curriculum progression following research-based best practices, have conducted the year's trainings for selected cohorts of teachers. The evaluation is a continuous process over the program's five year duration to examine implementation and opportunities for improvement. A broad set of data collection tools include a diagnostic component (needs assessment for teachers, capacity assessment for the school environment) and an assessment of implementation component (surveys for teachers and trainers, pre- and post tests for students, classroom observations, teacher interviews, portfolios). The tools used are validated instruments or ones modified to serve the program needs. The patterns emerging from the data provided information on: i) the quality of the intervention as to its design and content, ii) the alignment with the needs of the participants, iii) the implementation phase, iii) changes in the content knowledge of the students and their attitudes toward science, iv) changes in the facility of teachers to teach science in their classrooms after the professional development and materials provided, v) challenges and facilitators of implementation. Based on findings the program evaluation identifies additions/adjustments to be adopted in the following year.

  9. Minimizing the Threat of Light Pollution on Observatories through Education: Globe at Night Citizen-Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; M, Pompea, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Citizen-science is a rewardingly inclusive way to bring awareness to the public on the disappearance of the starry night sky, its cause and solutions. Globe at Night (GaN) encourages citizen-scientists worldwide to record the brightness of the night sky. During ten-days per month of moonless evenings, children and adults match the appearance of a specified constellation with 7 star maps of progressively fainter stars found at www.globeatnight.org. They then submit their choice of star map in-situ with the “webapp” by smart device to add to a light pollution map worldwide. In the eleven years of the program, over 170,000 observations from 180 countries have been contributed to the campaign.The Globe at Night (open) database is a source of research projects, even with other disciplines. For example, students conducted research to understand the lesser long-nosed bats’ avoidance of city center at night. On-the-fly mapping enables citizen-scientists to see contributed observations immediately. The 12 campaigns per year offer 4 ways of taking measurements. The online app for data submission is in 28 languages. STEM activities for young children and problem-based learning activities for older students were created to experience real-life scenarios: role-playing sea turtles hatching (misdirected by lights on shore) or analyzing an ISS image of Houston to estimate the wasted energy, cost and carbon footprint. In-situ and on-line workshops have been given on using GaN in all its capacities, as well as for the activities. Our Facebook page exists to encourage dialogue and bring cutting edge news. To entice interest, we had monthly newsletters and serial podcasts starring the Dark Skies Crusader. GaN has been part of special campaigns like with the National Park Service, the National Geographic BioBlitz and Tucson in 2011. Partnerships also include SciStarter (working with participants), Fieldscope (working with data analysis), and STARS4ALL (working with other light

  10. GLOBE Cornerstones: Advancing Student Research Worldwide through Virtual and Regional Symposia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeault, J.; Malmberg, J. S.; Murphy, T.; Darche, S.; Ruscher, P.; Jabot, M.; Odell, M. R. L.; Kennedy, T.

    2016-12-01

    The GLOBE Program, an international science and education program, encourages students from around the world to participate in authentic scientific research of the Earth system. Students use scientific protocols to explore their local environments, compare their findings with other GLOBE schools both in the U.S. and in other participating countries, and then share their findings via the GLOBE.gov website. In order to facilitate this scientific communication, GLOBE held an international virtual science fair in 2016. The science fair included 105 research projects submitted from GLOBE students in various countries, 37 mentoring scientists, and 24 judges. Mentors and judges were members of the GLOBE International STEM Professionals Network and located around the world. On a national level, NSF funded six face-to-face U.S. regional student research symposia where 164 students presented 67 research projects to scientists for review. The 1.5 day events included student activities, teacher professional development, tours of NASA centers, and opportunities for students to engage with scientists to discover both traditional and non-traditional STEM career pathways. To support teachers, the leadership team offered and archived webinars on science practices; from field investigation basics to creating a poster and GLOBE partners provided guidance along the way. This presentation will include the framework for the regional and international science symposia , the scoring rubrics and evaluation, recruitment of judges and mentors, and lessons learned.

  11. Opening the doors: building brand awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Judith; McCartney, Rob

    2006-01-01

    In search of a credible and cost-effective way to promote Mount Sinai Hospital (Mount Sinai) and educate a broad public, Mount Sinai opened its doors wide to The Globe and Mail (The Globe). The result was a three-part national feature series that told Mount Sinai's compelling story, provided third-party credibility and confirmed the value of proactive media relations. The series engaged our staff, energized our volunteers and reached both stakeholders and the general public on an emotional level. It also generated the more than dollars 6 million worth of equivalent advertising space it would have required for Mount Sinai to reach this national audience.

  12. Global Warming and the Arctic in 3D: A Virtual Globe for Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Globes provide a new way to capture and inform the public's interest in environmental change. As an example, a recent Google Earth presentation conveyed 'key findings' from the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA, 2004) to middle school students during the 2006 INSTAAR/NSIDC Open House at the University of Colorado. The 20-minute demonstration to 180 eighth graders began with an introduction and a view of the Arctic from space, zooming into the North American Arctic, then to a placemark for the first key finding, 'Arctic climate is now warming rapidly and much larger changes are projected'. An embedded link then opened a custom web page, with brief explanatory text, along with an ACIA graphic illustrating the rise in Arctic temperature, global CO2 concentrations, and carbon emissions for the last millennium. The demo continued with an interactive tour of other key findings (Reduced Sea Ice, Changes for Animals, Melting Glaciers, Coastal Erosion, Changes in Vegetation, Melting Permafrost, and others). Each placemark was located somewhat arbitrarily (which may be a concern for some audiences), but the points represented the messages in a geographic sense and enabled a smooth visual tour of the northern latitudes. Each placemark was linked to custom web pages with photos and concise take-home messages. The demo ended with navigation to Colorado, then Boulder, then the middle school that the students attended, all the while speaking to implications as they live their lives locally. The demo piqued the students' curiosity, and in this way better conveyed important messages about the Arctic and climate change. The use of geospatial visualizations for outreach and education appears to be in its infancy, with much potential.

  13. A Software Prototype For Accessing Large Climate Simulation Data Through Digital Globe Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Sorokine, A.

    2010-12-01

    The IPCC suite of global Earth system models produced terabytes of data for the CMIP3/AR4 archive and is expected to reach the petabyte scale by CMIP5/AR5. Dynamic downscaling of global models based on regional climate models can potentially lead to even larger data volumes. The model simulations for global or regional climate models like CCSM3 or WRF are typically run on supercomputers like the ORNL/DOE Jaguar and the results are stored on high performance storage systems. Access to these results from a user workstation is impeded by a number of factors such as enormous data size, limited bandwidth of standard office networks, data formats which are not fully supported by applications. So, a user-friendly interface for accessing and visualizing these results over standard Internet connection is required to facilitate collaborative work among geographically dispersed groups of scientists. To address this problem, we have developed a virtual globe based application which enables the scientists to query, visualize and analyze the results without the need of large data transfers to desktops and department-level servers. We have used open-source NASA WorldWind as a virtual globe platform and extended it with modules capable of visualizing model outputs stored in NetCDF format, while the data resides on the high-performance system. Based on the query placed by the scientist, our system initiates data processing routines on the high performance storage system to subset the data and reduce its size and then transfer it back to scientist's workstation through secure shell tunnel. The whole operation is kept totally transparent to the scientist and for the most part is controlled from a point-and-click GUI. The virtual globe also serves as a common platform for geospatial data, allowing smooth integration of the model simulation results with geographic data from other sources such as various web services or user-specific data in local files, if required. Also the system has

  14. Dark Skies Awareness through the GLOBE at Night Citizen-Science Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    The emphasis in the international citizen-science, star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few hundred thousand citizen-scientists during the annual 2-week campaign over the past 6 years. Provided is an overview, update and discussion of what steps can be taken to improve programs like GLOBE at Night.

  15. Implementing GLOBE in the New York City Metropolitan Area: Trials, Errors, and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludman, A.; Schmidt, P.; Borman, G.

    2003-12-01

    The Queens College GLOBE NY Metro Partnership was created to introduce GLOBE to more than 1.5 million students in southern NY State and provide continuing support for their teachers. In our first 18 months, we have trained 185 teachers from 82 schools and will triple these numbers this year. Teachers and administrators are attracted to GLOBE by its scientific rigor, the authentic research it offers students, and its fit with NYS standards. They are also eager to interact with our science faculty. Early difficulties included problems with the "standard" 5-day GLOBE training format and misconceptions that protocols are not suitable for urban settings and that preparing for the NYS Regents exams leaves no room for GLOBE. We held information meetings for school districts and for Queens high schools before our first workshop. These identified the most committed schools, energetic teachers, and potential implementation problems. Creative participants at these meetings countered the misconceptions and suggested solutions to the problems better than any outsider could, and generated an atmosphere leading to nearly 100% recruitment. The following stratagems have worked well: a close working relationship with the NYC Dept of Education, BOCES, and other environmental educators; affiliations with government agencies and community environmental groups; two bribes (giving a GLOBE instrument kit and GPS unit to each school that we train and awarding graduate or professional development credits for GLOBE training); a user-friendly training format (an initial 3-day workshop followed by two optional days for hydrology and land use); lending seldom-used items (e.g. soil auger) when needed; building a sense of GLOBE community with a graduation "ceremony", local website (www.qc.edu/qcglobe) and newsletter, phone and email helplines, and annual pedagogy and student research conferences. We also urge that three teachers be trained from each school in order to build local GLOBE support

  16. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the Numbers — Infographic Five Steps to Safer Champagne Celebrations Eye Injuries at Home Leer en Español: ... that can splatter hot grease or oil. Opening champagne bottles during a celebration. Drilling or hammering screws ...

  17. PRISM II: an open-label study to assess effectiveness of dextromethorphan/quinidine for pseudobulbar affect in patients with dementia, stroke or traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M; Alexander, David N; Cutler, Andrew J; D'Amico, Stephen; Doody, Rachelle S; Sauve, William; Zorowitz, Richard D; Davis, Charles S; Shin, Paul; Ledon, Fred; Yonan, Charles; Formella, Andrea E; Siffert, Joao

    2016-06-09

    Phase 3 trials supporting dextromethorphan/quinidine (DM/Q) use as a treatment for pseudobulbar affect (PBA) were conducted in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or multiple sclerosis (MS). The PRISM II study provides additional DM/Q experience with PBA secondary to dementia, stroke, or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants in this open-label, multicenter, 90-day trial received DM/Q 20/10 mg twice daily. The primary outcome was the Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), assessing change in PBA episode frequency and severity. The CNS-LS final visit score was compared to baseline (primary analysis) and to the response in a previously conducted placebo-controlled trial with DM/Q in patients with ALS or MS. Secondary outcomes included change in PBA episode count and Clinical Global Impression of Change with respect to PBA as rated by a clinician (CGI-C) and by the patient or caregiver (PGI-C). The study enrolled 367 participants with PBA secondary to dementia, stroke, or TBI. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) CNS-LS score improved significantly from 20.4 (4.4) at baseline to 12.8 (5.0) at Day 90/Final Visit (change, -7.7 [6.1]; P < .001, 95 % CI: -8.4, -7.0). This magnitude of improvement was consistent with DM/Q improvement in the earlier phase-3, placebo-controlled trial (mean [95 % CI] change from baseline, -8.2 [-9.4, -7.0]) and numerically exceeds the improvement seen with placebo in that study (-5.7 [-6.8, -4.7]). Reduction in PBA episode count was 72.3 % at Day 90/Final Visit compared with baseline (P < .001). Scores on CGI-C and PGI-C showed that 76.6 and 72.4 % of participants, respectively, were "much" or "very much" improved with respect to PBA. The most frequently occurring adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea (5.4 %), headache (4.1 %), urinary tract infection (2.7 %), and dizziness (2.5 %); 9.8 % had AEs that led to discontinuation. Serious AEs were reported in 6.3 %; however, none were considered treatment

  18. Lawn mower injuries as a cause of serious visual acuity impairment - Case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielska, Monika; Winiarczyk, Mateusz; Bieliński, Paweł; Mackiewicz, Jerzy

    2017-05-11

    [b]Abstract Objective.[/b] The aim of the study is to present four cases of lawn mowers injuries as a cause of serious visual acuity impairment. [b]Materials and Method[/b]. A retrospective study of four patients admitted in 2013-2015 to the Department of Vitreoretinal Surgery in Lublin with severe open or closed globe injury, one with an intraocular foreign body (IOFB). The presence of eye protective equipment was assessed, as well as visual acuity, eye tissue condition before and after treatment, and applied therapy. In all cases an improvement was achieved in local conditions. The intraocular foreign body was removed, wounds sutured and damaged tissues placed in position. All eyeballs were saved. In three cases, visual acuity was improved to a usable level. Three patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy, one with IOFB removal from the vitreous cavity. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Lawn mower induced eye injuries are a significant cause of serious visual acuity impairment or blindness. The presented study shows that lawn mower eye injuries are still a therapeutic, social and economic problem, yet are very preventable with proper eye protection and patients' education. Current prevention strategies are inadequate, and therefore should be updated.

  19. Measuring Magnetic Declination With Compass, GPS and Virtual Globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Using virtual globe (VG) imagery to determine geographic bearing and a compass to determine magnetic bearing yielded acceptable experimental magnetic declination values for large linear physical features at 13 sites in the western continental United States. The geographic bearing of each feature was determined from measurements involving the latitude/longitude coordinate system associated with the VG image (from World Wind or Google Earth). The corresponding magnetic bearing was measured on the ground at the feature with a hand-bearing compass calibrated in 1-degree subdivisions. A sequence of GPS trackpoints, recorded while traveling along the feature either in an automobile or on foot, unambiguously identified the pertinent portion of the feature (a straight segment of a road, for example) when plotted on the VG image. For each physical feature located on a VG image, its geographic bearing was determined directly using on-screen measurement tools available with the VG program or by hand using ruler/protractor methods with printed copies of the VG image. An independent (no use of VG) geographic bearing was also extracted from the slope of a straight-line fit to a latitude/longitude plot of each feature's GPS coordinates, a value that was the same (to within the inherent uncertainty of the data) as the VG-determined bearing, thus validating this procedure for finding geographic bearings. Differences between the VG bearings and the magnetic bearings yielded experimental magnetic declination values within one degree (8 within 0.5 degree) of expected values. From the point of view of physics and geophysics pedagogy, this project affords students a simple magnetism/geodesy field experiment requiring only a good compass and a GPS receiver with memory and a data port. The novel and straightforward data analysis with VG software yields reliable experimental values for an important abstract geophysical quantity, magnetic declination. Just as the compass has long provided

  20. Adding left atrial appendage closure to open heart surgery provides protection from ischemic brain injury six years after surgery independently of atrial fibrillation history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park-Hansen, Jesper; Holme, Susanne J V; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Open heart surgery is associated with high occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF), subsequently increasing the risk of post-operative ischemic stroke. Concomitant with open heart surgery, a cardiac ablation procedure is commonly performed in patients with known AF, often followed by l...

  1. Ülevaade GLOBE'i programmi tööst Eestis / Imbi Henno

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Henno, Imbi

    2001-01-01

    GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit Environment) on üldhariduskoolidele mõeldud keskkonnasuunitlusega haridus- ja teadusprogramm, mis ühendab lapsi, õpetajaid ja teadlasi kogu maailmast

  2. Accumulation of cynaropicrin in globe artichoke and localization ofenzymes involved in its biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eljounaidi, K.; Comino, C.; Moglia, A.; Cankar, K.; Genre, A.; Hehn, A.; Bourgaud, F.; Beekwilder, J.; Lanteri, S.

    2015-01-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) belongs to the Asteraceae family, in which one ofthe most biologically significant class of secondary metabolites are sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). Inglobe artichoke the principal STL is the cynaropicrin, which contributes to approximately 80% of

  3. The New Report of Artichoke latent virus (ArLV) From Globe Artichoke in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    ERKAN, Semih; GÜMÜŞ, Mustafa; DUMAN, İbrahim; PAYLAN, İsmail Can; ERGÜN, Müge

    2014-01-01

    n recent years, some of artichoke growers in Aegean region of Turkey stated that globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. subsp. scolymus (L.) Hayek) plants in their fields have showed virus-like symptoms. So, in order to identify viruses

  4. GLOBE Observer: A new tool to bring science activities and measurements home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek Kohl, H.; Murphy, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program is an international science and education program that provides students and the public worldwide with the opportunity to participate in data collection and the scientific process, and contribute meaningfully to our understanding of the Earth system and global environment. For more than 20 years, GLOBE-trained teachers have been leading environmental data collection and student research in the classroom. In 2016, GLOBE expanded to invite data collection from citizen scientists of all ages through a simple smart phone app. The app makes it possible for students to take GLOBE data (environmental observations) outside of school with their families. It enables a museum, park, youth organization, or other informal institution to provide a simple take-home activity that will keep patrons engaged in environmental science from home. This presentation will provide a demonstration of the app and will provide examples of its use in informal settings.

  5. Prediction models and development of an easy to use open-access tool for measuring lung function of individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Gabi; de Groot, Sonja; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Perret, Claudio; Michel, Franz; Hopman, Maria T. E.

    Objective: To develop statistical models to predict lung function and respiratory muscle strength from personal and lesion characteristics of individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury. Design: Cross-sectional, multi-centre cohort study. Subjects: A total of 440 individuals with traumatic,

  6. GLOBE and the Earth SySTEM Model in Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabot, M.; Moore, J.; Dorofy, P.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will share the growing body of work linking ArcMap and GLOBE and the Earth SySTEM approach in the development of preservice teachers. Our work is linking the power of ArcMap with the vast database of GLOBE in a unique way that links the power of geospatial technologies in shaping the planning for and delivery of science instruction in the P-5 classroom.

  7. Turning Content into Conversation: How The GLOBE Program is Growing its Brand Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerin, R.; Randolph, J. G.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Malmberg, J.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Wegner, K.

    2012-12-01

    Social Media is now a ubiquitous way for individuals, corporations, governments and communities to communicate. However, the same does not hold quite as true for the science community as many science educators, thought leaders and science programs are either reluctant or unable to build and cultivate a meaningful social media strategy. This presentation will show how The GLOBE Program uses social media to disseminate messages, build a meaningful and engaged following and grow a brand on an international scale using a proprietary Inside-Out strategy that leverages social media platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube and Blogs to significantly increase influencers on a worldwide scale. In addition, this poster presentation will be interactive, so viewers will be able to touch and feel the social experience. Moreover, GLOBE representatives will be on hand to talk viewers through how they can implement a social media strategy that will allow them to turn their content into meaningful conversation. About The GLOBE Program: GLOBE is a science and education program that connects a network of students, teachers and scientists from around the world to better understand, sustain and improve Earth's environment at local, regional and global scales. By engaging students in hands-on learning of Earth system science, GLOBE is an innovative way for teachers to get students of all ages excited about scientific discovery locally and globally. To date, more than 23 million measurements have been contributed to the GLOBE database, creating meaningful, standardized, global research-quality data sets that can be used in support of student and professional scientific research. Since beginning operations in 1995, over 58,000 trained teachers and 1.5 million students in 112 countries have participated in GLOBE. For more information or to become involved, visit www.globe.gov.

  8. Investigating the role of urban development in the conventional environmental Kuznets curve: evidence from the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katircioglu, Setareh; Katircioglu, Salih; Kilinc, Ceyhun C

    2018-03-19

    We investigated the role of urbanization in the conventional environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) of the globe. The overall population and rural population were also considered for control purposes. Based on our findings, we suggest that the conventional EKC of the globe is not an inverted U-shape but becomes downward sloping when urban development is added and inverted U-shapes when the overall population and rural population volumes are added.

  9. The isolation and mapping of a novel hydroxycinnamoyltransferase in the globe artichoke chlorogenic acid pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourgaud Frédéric

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leaves of globe artichoke and cultivated cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L. have significant pharmaceutical properties, which mainly result from their high content of polyphenolic compounds such as monocaffeoylquinic and dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQ, and a range of flavonoid compounds. Results Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HQT encoding genes have been isolated from both globe artichoke and cultivated cardoon (GenBank accessions DQ915589 and DQ915590, respectively using CODEHOP and PCR-RACE. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that their sequences belong to one of the major acyltransferase groups (anthranilate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase. The heterologous expression of globe artichoke HQT in E. coli showed that this enzyme can catalyze the esterification of quinic acid with caffeoyl-CoA or p-coumaroyl-CoA to generate, respectively, chlorogenic acid (CGA and p-coumaroyl quinate. Real time PCR experiments demonstrated an increase in the expression level of HQT in UV-C treated leaves, and established a correlation between the synthesis of phenolic acids and protection against damage due to abiotic stress. The HQT gene, together with a gene encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT previously isolated from globe artichoke, have been incorporated within the developing globe artichoke linkage maps. Conclusion A novel acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of CGA in globe artichoke has been isolated, characterized and mapped. This is a good basis for our effort to understand the genetic basis of phenylpropanoid (PP biosynthesis in C. cardunculus.

  10. The isolation and mapping of a novel hydroxycinnamoyltransferase in the globe artichoke chlorogenic acid pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino, Cinzia; Hehn, Alain; Moglia, Andrea; Menin, Barbara; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Lanteri, Sergio; Portis, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    Background The leaves of globe artichoke and cultivated cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L.) have significant pharmaceutical properties, which mainly result from their high content of polyphenolic compounds such as monocaffeoylquinic and dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQ), and a range of flavonoid compounds. Results Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HQT) encoding genes have been isolated from both globe artichoke and cultivated cardoon (GenBank accessions DQ915589 and DQ915590, respectively) using CODEHOP and PCR-RACE. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that their sequences belong to one of the major acyltransferase groups (anthranilate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase). The heterologous expression of globe artichoke HQT in E. coli showed that this enzyme can catalyze the esterification of quinic acid with caffeoyl-CoA or p-coumaroyl-CoA to generate, respectively, chlorogenic acid (CGA) and p-coumaroyl quinate. Real time PCR experiments demonstrated an increase in the expression level of HQT in UV-C treated leaves, and established a correlation between the synthesis of phenolic acids and protection against damage due to abiotic stress. The HQT gene, together with a gene encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) previously isolated from globe artichoke, have been incorporated within the developing globe artichoke linkage maps. Conclusion A novel acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of CGA in globe artichoke has been isolated, characterized and mapped. This is a good basis for our effort to understand the genetic basis of phenylpropanoid (PP) biosynthesis in C. cardunculus. PMID:19292932

  11. Dacitic ash-flow sheet near Superior and Globe, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.

    1961-01-01

    Remnants of a dacitic ash-flow sheet near Globe, Miama, and Superia, Arizona cover about 100 square miles; before erosion the area covered by the sheet was at least 400 square miles and perhaps as much as 1,500 square miles. Its maximum thickness is about 2,000 feet, its average thickness is about 500 feet, and its original volume was at least 40 cubic miles. It was erupted on an eroded surface with considerable relief. The main part of the deposit was thought by early workers to be a lava flow. Even after the distinctive character of welded tuffs and related rocks was discovered, the nature and origin of this deposit remained dubious because textures did not correspond to those in other welded tuff bodies. Yet a lava flow as silicic as this dacite would be viscous instead of spreading out as an extensive sheet. The purpose of this investigation has been to study the deposit, resolve the inconsistencies, and deduce its origin and history. Five stratigraphic zones are distinguished according to differences in the groundmass. From bottom to top the zones are basal tuff, vitrophyre, brown zone, gray zone, and white zone. The three upper zones are distinguished by colors on fresh surfaces, for each weathers to a similar shade of light reddish brown. Nonwelded basal tuff grades upward into the vitrophyre, which is a highly welded tuff. The brown and gray zones consist of highly welded tuff with a lithoidal groundmass. Degree of welding decreases progressively upward through the gray and the white zones, and the upper white zone is nonwelded. Textures are clearly outlined in the lower part of the brown zone, but upward they become more diffuse because of increasing devitrification. In the white zone, original textures are essentially obliterated, and the groundmass consists of spherulites and microcrystalline intergrowths. The chief groundmass minerals are cristobalite and sanidine, with lesser quartz and plagioclase. Phenocrysts comprise about 40 percent of the rock

  12. Revision, uptake and coding issues related to the open access Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) versions 8, 9 and 10.1

    OpenAIRE

    Orchard, John; Rae, Katherine; Brooks, John; H?gglund, Martin; Til, Lluis; Wales, David; Wood, Tim

    2010-01-01

    John Orchard1, Katherine Rae1, John Brooks2, Martin Hägglund3, Lluis Til4, David Wales5, Tim Wood61Sports Medicine at Sydney University, Sydney NSW Australia; 2Rugby Football Union, Twickenham, England, UK; 3Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4FC Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 5Arsenal FC, Highbury, England, UK; 6Tennis Australia, Melbourne, Vic, AustraliaAbstract: The Orchard Sports Injury Classification Sys...

  13. Dagik Earth: A Digital Globe Project for Classrooms, Science Museums, and Research Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, A.; Tsugawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    Digital globe system is a powerful tool to make the audiences understand phenomena on the Earth and planets in intuitive way. Geo-cosmos of Miraikan, Japan uses 6-m spherical LED, and is one of the largest systems of digital globe. Science on a Sphere (SOS) by NOAA is a digital globe system that is most widely used in science museums around the world. These systems are so expensive that the usage of the digital globes is mainly limited to large-scale science museums. Dagik Earth is a digital globe project that promotes educational programs using digital globe with low cost. It aims to be used especially in classrooms. The cost for the digital globe of Dagik Earth is from several US dollars if PC and PC projector are available. It uses white spheres, such as balloons and balance balls, as the screen. The software is provided by the project with free of charge for the educational usage. The software runs on devices of Windows, Mac and iOS. There are English and Chinese language versions of the PC software besides Japanese version. The number of the registered users of Dagik Earth is about 1,400 in Japan. About 60% of them belongs to schools, 30% to universities and research institutes, and 8% to science museums. In schools, it is used in classes by teachers, and science activities by students. Several teachers have used the system for five years and more. In a students' activity, Dagik Earth contents on the typhoon, solar eclipse, and satellite launch were created and presented in a school festival. This is a good example of the usage of Dagik Earth for STEM education. In the presentation, the system and activity of Dagik Earth will be presented, and the future expansion of the project will be discussed.

  14. Globe Browsing: Contextualized Spatio-Temporal Planetary Surface Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, Karl; Axelsson, Emil; Broberg, Erik; Emmart, Carter; Ljung, Patric; Bock, Alexander; Ynnerman, Anders

    2017-08-29

    Results of planetary mapping are often shared openly for use in scientific research and mission planning. In its raw format, however, the data is not accessible to non-experts due to the difficulty in grasping the context and the intricate acquisition process. We present work on tailoring and integration of multiple data processing and visualization methods to interactively contextualize geospatial surface data of celestial bodies for use in science communication. As our approach handles dynamic data sources, streamed from online repositories, we are significantly shortening the time between discovery and dissemination of data and results. We describe the image acquisition pipeline, the pre-processing steps to derive a 2.5D terrain, and a chunked level-of-detail, out-of-core rendering approach to enable interactive exploration of global maps and high-resolution digital terrain models. The results are demonstrated for three different celestial bodies. The first case addresses high-resolution map data on the surface of Mars. A second case is showing dynamic processes, such as concurrent weather conditions on Earth that require temporal datasets. As a final example we use data from the New Horizons spacecraft which acquired images during a single flyby of Pluto. We visualize the acquisition process as well as the resulting surface data. Our work has been implemented in the OpenSpace software [8], which enables interactive presentations in a range of environments such as immersive dome theaters, interactive touch tables, and virtual reality headsets.

  15. Surfing-related ocular injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; McDonald, H R; Rubsamen, P E; Luttrull, J K; Drouilhet, J H; Frambach, D A; Boyer, D S; Lambrou, F H; Hendrick, A; Weiss, J N; Engstrom, R E; Ing, M

    1998-01-01

    This report evaluates the clinical characteristics of surfing-related ocular trauma to learn the nature of such injuries and propose possible preventive measures. The authors reviewed 11 cases of surfing-related eye injuries caused by direct trauma from the surfboard, studying their mechanism of injury, the associated ocular complications, and the anatomic and visual outcomes of surgical repair. Surfing-related ocular injuries occurred exclusively in young males (mean age, 24.8 years; range, 14-37 years). The mechanism of injury most frequently responsible was impact with the sharp nose of the surfboard following a fall. Serious posterior segment complications were observed in all 11 patients, with nine patients suffering ruptured globes. Despite immediate medical attention, five patients did not recover ambulatory levels of visual acuity (>5/200). Surfing-related ocular trauma presenting to the retinal specialist typically leaves the patient with a permanent visual disability. Important factors contributing to these high-velocity injuries include the sharply pointed nose of the surfboard and the leash keeping the surfer in close proximity to the board following a fall. A simple modification in surfboard design such as blunting the sharp nose of the surfboard, or appropriate protective guards fitted over the surfboard nose, should lessen the severity of such injuries.

  16. Observations of El Niño impacts using in situ GLOBE protocols and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, M. M.; Destaerke, D.

    2015-12-01

    The El Niño phenomenon is a periodic ocean condition that occurs every two to ten years in the central and east-central equatorial Pacific Ocean. It alters the normal patterns of ocean circulation, surface temperature, and evaporation, causing noticeable and often severe changes in weather conditions in many areas of the world. El Niño is the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and usually reaches its peak between December and February time period. El Niño and its worldwide consequences are studied by the school network of the GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) which brings together students, teachers, and scientists in support of student research and validation of international Earth science research projects. Since the start of the GLOBE Program over 20 years ago, GLOBE classrooms utilize carefully developed daily, weekly, or seasonally protocols such as maximum, minimum and current temperatures, rainfall, soil moisture, and others, to measure changes in the environment. The data collected by the students is entered in an online GLOBE database. In addition to the student-contributed data, automated stations also collect and send measurements to the GLOBE database.Students compare their data with global data acquired by satellites to help validate the satellite data. With a potentially historic-level El Niño event thought to be on the horizon--possibly one of the strongest in 50 years—we will propose an emphasis on measurements from GLOBE schools that will support studies and satellite observations of El Niño. We plan to provide the schools with additional satellite data sets such as ocean temperature measurements from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), sea surface elevation measurements from Jason-2 and 3 (after it launches), and others to be identified. We wish to address and support the following educational objectives: - Demonstrate how El Niño affects local precipitation and temperature across the globe, - Link teachers

  17. An Unusual Ocular Injury Following Facial Trauma: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report a case of an unusual ocular injury following a road traffic accident. Materials and Methods: A case report of a sixty – year – old female patient seen by the authors. The literature on ocular injures following facial trauma is reviewed. Results: An eye globe initially confirmed missing from its socket on clinical ...

  18. Does the Zone of Injury in Combat-Related Type III Open Tibia Fractures Preclude the Use of Local Soft Tissue Coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Wilkins; 2002:415 462. 2. Bagg MR, Levin LS. Moderators’summary: wound management (session II). J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2006;14:S73 S74. 3. Adams WP Jr...Joint Surg Am. 1993;75: 778 789. 34. Cole JD, Ansel LJ, Schwartzberg R. A sequential protocol for manage- ment of severe open tibial fractures. Clin

  19. Pict'Earth: A new Method of Virtual Globe Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J.; Long, S.; Riallant, D.; Hronusov, V.

    2007-12-01

    Georeferenced aerial imagery facilitates and enhances Earth science investigations. The realized value of imagery as a tool is measured from the spatial, temporal and radiometric resolution of the imagery. Currently, there is an need for a system which facilitates the rapid acquisition and distribution of high-resolution aerial earth images of localized areas. The Pict'Earth group has developed an apparatus and software algorithms which facilitate such tasks. Hardware includes a small radio-controlled model airplane (RC UAV); Light smartphones with high resolution cameras (Nokia NSeries Devices); and a GPS connected to the smartphone via the bluetooth protocol, or GPS-equipped phone. Software includes python code which controls the functions of the smartphone and GPS to acquire data in-flight; Online Virtual Globe applications including Google Earth, AJAX/Web2.0 technologies and services; APIs and libraries for developers, all of which are based on open XML-based GIS data standards. This new process for acquisition and distribution of high-resolution aerial earth images includes the following stages: Perform Survey over area of interest (AOI) with the RC UAV (Mobile Liveprocessing). In real-time our software collects images from the smartphone camera and positional data (latitude, longitude, altitude and heading) from the GPS. The software then calculates the earth footprint (geoprint) of each image and creates KML files which incorporate the georeferenced images and tracks of UAV. Optionally, it is possible to send the data in- flight via SMS/MMS (text and multimedia messages), or cellular internet networks via FTP. In Post processing the images are filtered, transformed, and assembled into a orthorectified image mosaic. The final mosaic is then cut into tiles and uploaded as a user ready product to web servers in kml format for use in Virtual Globes and other GIS applications. The obtained images and resultant data have high spatial resolution, can be updated in

  20. Two-point resistance of a resistor network embedded on a globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Zhong; Essam, J W; Wu, F Y

    2014-07-01

    We consider the problem of two-point resistance in an (m-1) × n resistor network embedded on a globe, a geometry topologically equivalent to an m × n cobweb with its boundary collapsed into one single point. We deduce a concise formula for the resistance between any two nodes on the globe using a method of direct summation pioneered by one of us [Z.-Z. Tan, L. Zhou, and J. H. Yang, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46, 195202 (2013)]. This method is contrasted with the Laplacian matrix approach formulated also by one of us [F. Y. Wu, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37, 6653 (2004)], which is difficult to apply to the geometry of a globe. Our analysis gives the result in the form of a single summation.

  1. Heavenly Networks. Celestial Maps and Globes in Circulation between Artisans, Mathematicians, and Noblemen in Renaissance Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the iconography on a set of star charts by Albrecht Dürer (1515), and celestial globes by Caspar Vopel (1536) and Christoph Schissler (1575). The iconography on these instruments is conditioned by strong traditions which include not only the imagery on globes and planispheres (star charts), but also ancient literature about the constellations. Where this iconography departs from those traditions, the change had to do with humanism in the sixteenth century. This "humanistic" dimension is interwoven with other concerns that involve both "social" and "technical" motivations. The interplay of these three dimensions illustrates how the iconography on celestial charts and globes expresses some features of the shared knowledge and shared culture between artisans, mathematicians, and nobles in Renaissance Europe.

  2. The Significance of Ongoing Teacher Support in Earth Science Education Programs: Evidence from the GLOBE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, B.; Korbak, C.; Shear, L.

    2003-12-01

    The GLOBE program provides a rich context for examining issues concerning implementation of inquiry-oriented, scientist-driven educational programs, because the program has both a history of collecting evaluation data on implementation and mechanisms for capturing program activity as it occurs. In this paper, researchers from SRI International's evaluation team explore the different roles that regional partners play in preparing and supporting teachers to implement the GLOBE Program, an international inquiry-based Earth science education initiative that has trained over 14,000 teachers worldwide. GLOBE program evaluation results show the program can be effective in increasing students' inquiry skills, but that the program is also hard for teachers to implement (Means et al., 2001; Penuel et al., 2002). An analysis of GLOBE's regional partner organizations, which are tasked with preparing teachers to implement its data collection and reporting protocols with students, shows that some partners are more successful than others. This paper reports findings from a quantitative analysis of the relationship between data reporting and partner support activities and from case studies of two such regional partners focused on analyzing what makes them successful. The first analysis examined associations between partner training and support activities and data reporting. For this analysis, we used data from the GLOBE Student Data Archive matched with survey data collected from a large sample of GLOBE teachers as part of SRI's Year 5 evaluation of GLOBE. Our analyses point to the central importance of mentoring and material support to teachers. We found that incentives, mentoring, and other on-site support to teachers have a statistically significant association with higher data reporting levels. We also found that at present, teachers access these supports less often than they access listservs and e-mail communication with teachers after GLOBE training. As a follow-up to this

  3. OceanGLOBE: an Outdoor Research and Environmental Education Program for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R. B.; Hamner, W. M.

    2006-12-01

    OceanGLOBE is an outdoor environmental research and education program for upper elementary, middle and high school students, supplemented by online instructional materials that are available without charge to any educator. OceanGLOBE was piloted in 1995 with support from a National Science Foundation Teacher Enhancement project, "Leadership in Marine Science" (award no.ESI-9454413 to UCLA). Continuing support by a second NSF Teacher Enhancement project (award no. ESI-9819424 to UCLA) and by COSEE-West (NSF awards OCE-215506 to UCLA and OCE-0215497 to USC) has enabled OceanGLOBE to expand to a growing number of schools and to provide an increasingly robust collection of marine science instructional materials on its website, http://www.msc.ucla.edu/oceanglobe/ OceanGLOBE provides a mechanism for students to conduct inquiry-based, hands-on marine science research, providing experiences that anchor the national and state science content standards learned in the classroom. Students regularly collect environmental and biological data from a beach site over an extended period of time. In the classroom they organize, graph and analyze their data, which can lead to a variety of student-created science products. Beach research is supported by instructional marine science materials on the OceanGLOBE website. These online materials also can be used in the classroom independent of the field component. Annotated PowerPoint slide shows explain research protocols and provide marine science content. Field guides and photographs of marine organisms (with emphasis on the Southern California Bight) and a growing collection of classroom investigations (applicable to any ocean location) support the science content presented in the beach research program and slide shows. In summary, OceanGLOBE is a comprehensive learning package grounded in hands-on, outdoor marine science research project in which students are the principal investigators. By doing scientific work repetitively over an

  4. Engaging the Public in the Citizen Science GLOBE at Night Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    The emphasis in the international star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few 100,000 citizen-scientists. What steps can be taken to improve it? To promote the campaign via popular social media, GLOBE at Night created Facebook and Twitter pages. To increase participation in the 2011 campaign, children and adults submitted their sky brightness measurements in real time with smart phones or tablets using the web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time register automatically. For those without smart mobile devices, user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page were reconfigured to determine latitude and longitude more easily and accurately. To increase the robustness of the data, 2 new approaches were taken. GLOBE at Night prototyped an "Adopt a Street” program in Tucson. The aim was for people to adopt different major or semi-major streets and take measurements every mile or so for the length of the street. The grid of measurements would canvas the town, allowing for comparisons of light levels over time (hours, days, years) or search for dark sky oases or light polluted areas. The increase to 2 campaigns in 2011 re-enforces these studies. The intent is to offer the program year-round for seasonal studies. The data can also be used to compare with datasets on wildlife, health, and energy consumption. Recently, NOAO and the Arizona Game and Fish Department have started a project with GLOBE at Night data and bat telemetry to examine a dark skies corridor in Tucson where the endangered bats fly. In our presentation, results of our efforts are discussed.

  5. A study on the impact of the GLOBE program on students' attitudes regarding environmental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfready, Gary Martin

    A key objective in environmental curricula should be to instill responsible and concerned attitudes toward environmental issues. This can be accomplished through the application of innovative programs which emphasize the development of the affective domain of learning. The development of personal attitudes is one form of evidence that the affective domain is being addressed. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment) on the attitudes of students toward environmental issues. Three hundred and five middle and high school level students from four states were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward selected environmental statements. Results demonstrated that attitudes toward environmental issues of GLOBE students were significantly greater than non-GLOBE students. Additional analysis demonstrated that regardless of grade levels, gender, racial and ethnicity backgrounds, depth of GLOBE involvement, and degree of teachers' GLOBE experiences, GLOBE students display similar levels of attitudes toward environmental issues. Establishment of a reliable Likert scale measurement instrument was accomplished. Permission to use an existing survey was obtained. Additional items were added to increase validity. Establishment of reliability was accomplished through a Guttman split half analysis of the piloted instrument. Through the use of factor analysis, four categories or sub-groupings of attitudes were determined to exist. Reliability was established for the factors. These sub-groupings were identified as personal commitment to environmental protection, awareness of avenues for action, loci of control, and students' perception of teachers' abilities to present environmental topics. These categories were a part of the analysis of four hypotheses.

  6. The GLOBE Program in Alabama: A Mentoring Approach to State-wide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    Established in 1997, the GLOBE in Alabama (GIA) partnership has trained more than 1,000 teachers in almost 500 schools - over 25% of the total number of K-12 schools in Alabama. Over those five years, GIA has strived to achieve recognition of GLOBE as the "glue" to Alabama's new education program, the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). In 2003, GIA trained over 370 AMSTI K-8 teachers at two AMSTI hub sites in north Alabama. As the AMSTI program grows with the addition of future hub sites (eleven are planned), GIA must ready itself to train thousands of AMSTI teachers during the two-week summer professional development institutes that are part of AMSTI. A key component of AMSTI is a mentoring program conducted by math and science specialists - classroom educators loaned to the AMSTI hub sites by the school systems each hub site serves. The AMSTI mentoring program mirrors the GIA mentoring model begun in 1999 that originally funded regional GLOBE master teachers to provide technical assistance, feedback, and coaching for other GLOBE teachers. In schools where GIA mentor teachers were working, nearly a 100% increase in GLOBE student data reporting was noted. The GIA mentors now work within the hub site framework to ensure implementation of GLOBE as an integrated part of AMSTI. With the continued support of the State of Alabama, GIA will establish a network of mentors who work with the AMSTI hub site specialists in providing support for all AMSTI teachers. GIA is administered by the National Space Science and Technology Center, a partnership between NASA and the State of Alabama's seven research universities. Operational funding for GIA has been provided by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Earth System Science Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, the Alabama State Department of Education, and Legacy. GIA has been able to build on these

  7. The Citizen-Scientist as Data Collector: GLOBE at Night, Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D. L.; Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Walker, C.; Pompea, S. M.; Gallagher, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-12-01

    GLOBE at Night is an international science event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the conventional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. This hands-on learning activity extended the traditional classroom and school day through 11 nights last March, when 18,000 citizen-scientists made over 4,500 observations from 96 countries. Utilizing the international networking capabilities of The GLOBE Program, GLOBE at Night was designed to make data collection and input user-friendly. Citizen-scientists were able to participate in this global scientific campaign by submitting their observations through an online database, allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis by participating scientists. The data collected is available online in a variety of formats for use by students, teachers and scientists worldwide to assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world. Using the online analysis tools provided by ESRI, participants were able to compare the observed data with population density and nighttime lighting datasets (DMSP Earth at Night). This comparison allowed correlations between observed data patterns and commonly used indices of population density and energy usage. This session will share our results and demonstrate how students and scientists across the globe can explore and analyze the results of this exciting campaign. We will discuss how the project team planned and executed the project in such a way that non-astronomers were able to make valid and useful contributions. We will also discuss lessons learned and best practices based on the 2006 campaign. GLOBE at Night is a collaborative effort sponsored by The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS

  8. Yrityksen näkyvyyden lisääminen sosiaalisessa mediassa, Case Globe Hope

    OpenAIRE

    Asikainen, Miisa

    2016-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli selvittää, kuinka lisätään näkyvyyttä jo olemassa olevan yrityksen sosiaalisen median kanavien aktivoimisella. Työn toimeksianto tuli suomalaiselta Globe Hope –nimiseltä design-alan yritykseltä. Globe Hope valmistaa tuotteensa kierrätys- sekä ylijäämämateriaaleista. Sosiaalisen median markkinoinnin tutkimus sekä opinnäytetyöntekijän opinnot muotimarkkinoinnin parissa toimivat työn pohjana. Työn tavoite oli selvittää erilaisia keinoja kasvattaa näkyvyyttä sosiaa...

  9. Writing education around the globe: introduction and call for a new global analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, S.; Rijlaarsdam, G.

    This paper presents a special issue on writing around the globe. Researchers from across the world describe writing practices in their country using a wide variety of methodology. The paper show that while there are many similarities in writing instruction from one country to the next, there are

  10. Revitalizing Indigenous Languages, Cultures, and Histories in Montana, across the United States and around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carjuzaa, Jioanna

    2017-01-01

    Many educators have sung the praises of Indian Education for All, Montana's constitutional mandate, and heard the successes of Montana's Indigenous language revitalization efforts which reverberate around the globe. Teaching Indigenous languages is especially, challenging since there are limited numbers of fluent speakers and scarce resources…

  11. WYSIWYG GEOPROCESSING: COUPLING SENSOR WEB AND GEOPROCESSING SERVICES IN VIRTUAL GLOBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose to advance the scientific understanding and applications of geospatial data by coupling Sensor Web and Geoprocessing Services in Virtual Globes for higher-education teaching and research. The vision is the concept of "What You See is What You Get" geoprocessing, shortly known as WYSIWYG geoprocessing. Virtual Globes offer tremendous opportunities, such as providing a learning tool to help educational users and researchers digest global-scale geospatial information about the world, and acting as WYSIWYG platforms, where domain experts can see what their fingertips act in an interactive three-dimensional virtual environment. In the meantime, Sensor Web and Web Service technologies make a large amount of Earth observing sensors and geoprocessing functionalities easily accessible to educational users and researchers like their local resources. Coupling Sensor Web and geoprocessing Services in Virtual Globes will bring a virtual learning and research environment to the desktops of students and professors, empowering them with WYSIWYG geoprocessing capabilities. The implementation combines the visualization and communication power of Virtual Globes with the on-demand data collection and analysis functionalities of Sensor Web and geoprocessing services, to help students and researchers investigate various scientific problems in an environment with natural and intuitive user experiences. The work will contribute to the scientific and educational activities of geoinformatic communities in that they will have a platform that are easily accessible and help themselves perceive world space and perform live geoscientific processes.

  12. GlobeLand30 as an alternative fine-scale global land cover map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jokar Arsanjani, Jamal; Tayyebi, A.; Vaz, E.

    2016-01-01

    land cover information such as developing countries. In this study, we look at GlobeLand30 of 2010 for Iran in order to find out the accuracy of this dataset as well as its implications. By having looked at 6 selected study sites around larger cities representing dissimilar eco-regions covering rural...

  13. The Pale Blue Dot: Utilizing Real World Globes in High School and Undergraduate Oceanography Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. B.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience classrooms have benefitted greatly from the use of interactive, dry-erasable globes to supplement instruction on topics that require three-dimensional visualization, such as seismic wave propagation and the large-scale movements of tectonic plates. Indeed, research by Bamford (2013) demonstrates that using three-dimensional visualization to illustrate complex processes enhances student comprehension. While some geoscience courses tend to bake-in lessons on visualization, other disciplines of earth science that require three-dimensional visualization, such as oceanography, tend to rely on students' prior spatial abilities. In addition to spatial intelligence, education on the three-dimensional structure of the ocean requires knowledge of the external processes govern the behavior of the ocean, as well as the vertical and lateral distribution of water properties around the globe. Presented here are two oceanographic activities that utilize RealWorldGlobes' dry-erase globes to supplement traditional oceanography lessons on thermohaline and surface ocean circulation. While simultaneously promoting basic plotting techniques, mathematical calculations, and unit conversions, these activities touch on the processes that govern global ocean circulation, the principles of radiocarbon dating, and the various patterns exhibited by surface ocean currents. These activities challenge students to recognize inherent patterns within their data and synthesize explanations for their occurrence. Spatial visualization and critical thinking are integral to any geoscience education, and the combination of these abilities with engaging hands-on activities has the potential to greatly enhance oceanography education in both secondary and postsecondary settings

  14. Cross-border transfer of knowledge: Cultural lessons from project GLOBE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javidan, Mansour; Stahl, Günther K.; Brodbeck, Felix; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Distant cross-border business is on the rise. It necessitates effective transfer of knowledge across geographic and cultural borders. In this article we present the key results from the GLOBE study of 62 cultures and apply them to a real-life case of a North European business school designing and

  15. Examining the Structure of Vocational Interests in Turkey in the Context of the Personal Globe Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardarli, Bade; Özyürek, Ragip; Wilkins-Yel, Kerrie G.; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2017-01-01

    The structural validity of the Personal Globe Inventory-Short (PGI-S: Tracey in J Vocat Behavi 76:1-15, 2010) was examined in a Turkish sample of high school and university students. The PGI-S measures eight basic interest scales, Holland's ("Making vocational choice," Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1997) six types, Prediger's ("J…

  16. A VIRTUAL GLOBE-BASED MULTI-RESOLUTION TIN SURFACE MODELING AND VISUALIZETION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The integration and visualization of geospatial data on a virtual globe play an significant role in understanding and analysis of the Earth surface processes. However, the current virtual globes always sacrifice the accuracy to ensure the efficiency for global data processing and visualization, which devalue their functionality for scientific applications. In this article, we propose a high-accuracy multi-resolution TIN pyramid construction and visualization method for virtual globe. Firstly, we introduce the cartographic principles to formulize the level of detail (LOD generation so that the TIN model in each layer is controlled with a data quality standard. A maximum z-tolerance algorithm is then used to iteratively construct the multi-resolution TIN pyramid. Moreover, the extracted landscape features are incorporated into each-layer TIN, thus preserving the topological structure of terrain surface at different levels. In the proposed framework, a virtual node (VN-based approach is developed to seamlessly partition and discretize each triangulation layer into tiles, which can be organized and stored with a global quad-tree index. Finally, the real time out-of-core spherical terrain rendering is realized on a virtual globe system VirtualWorld1.0. The experimental results showed that the proposed method can achieve an high-fidelity terrain representation, while produce a high quality underlying data that satisfies the demand for scientific analysis.

  17. Construction of a reference molecular linkage map of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portis, E; Mauromicale, G; Mauro, R; Acquadro, A; Scaglione, D; Lanteri, S

    2009-12-01

    The genome organization of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus), unlike other species belonging to Asteraceae (=Compositae) family (i.e. sunflower, lettuce and chicory), remains largely unexplored. The species is highly heterozygous and suffers marked inbreeding depression when forced to self-fertilize. Thus a two-way pseudo-testcross represents the optimal strategy for linkage analysis. Here, we report linkage maps based on the progeny of a cross between globe artichoke (C. cardunculus var. scolymus) and cultivated cardoon (C. cardunculus var. altilis). The population was genotyped using a variety of PCR-based marker platforms, resulting in the identification of 708 testcross markers suitable for map construction. The male map consisted of 177 loci arranged in 17 major linkage groups, spanning 1,015.5 cM, while female map was built with 326 loci arranged into 20 major linkage groups, spanning 1,486.8 cM. The presence of 84 loci shared between these maps and those previously developed from a cross within globe artichoke allowed for map alignment and the definition of 17 homologous linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid number of the species. This will provide a favourable property for QTL scanning; furthermore, as 25 mapped markers (8%) correspond to coding regions, it has an additional value as functional map and might represent an important genetic tool for candidate gene studies in globe artichoke.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of PEG-Fractionated UV-C Stress-Response Proteins in Globe Artichoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falvo, S.; Acquadro, A.; Albo, A.G.; America, A.H.P.; Lanteri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to UV stress by producing antioxidant molecules and by altering their metabolism through the regulation of specific gene family members. Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus L.-Compositae family) is an attractive model species for studying the protein networks involved in

  19. Report on the 2016 conference Tax Treaty Case Law Around the Globe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, Mart; Jallai, Ave-Geidi

    2016-01-01

    Each year the international conference Tax Treaty Case Law Around the Globe provides a forum to discuss with outstanding experts of the relevant jurisdictions the most important and interesting tax treaty cases which recently have been decided all over the world. This article provides a report on

  20. Design, Development, and Maintenance of the GLOBE Program Website and Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Renate; Matsumoto, Clifford

    2004-01-01

    This is a 1-year (Fy 03) proposal to design and develop enhancements, implement improved efficiency and reliability, and provide responsive maintenance for the operational GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Program website and database. This proposal is renewable, with a 5% annual inflation factor providing an approximate cost for the out years.

  1. Globe Artichoke Callus as an Alternative System for the Production of Dicaffeoylquinic Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moglia, A.; Menin, B.; Comino, C.; Lanteri, S.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Globe artichoke leaves are highly rich in phenolic acids, in particular chlorogenic acid and dicaffeoylquinic acids. The latter are of particular interest since they can exert a stronger antioxidant activity, due to the presence of two adjacent hydroxyl groups on each of their phenolic rings. Plant

  2. In Vitro Callogenesis and Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Globe Artichoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menin, B.; Moglia, A.; Comino, C.; Lanteri, S.; Herpen, van T.W.J.M.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Micropropagation techniques have been widely applied in globe artichoke (C. cardunculus L. var. scolymus), however, efficient protocols for the establishment of in vitro callogenesis and organogenesis, a pre-requisite for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation, have not been set up so far. We

  3. Stress energy of elastic globe in curved space and a slip-out force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    The energy of stresses in an elastic globe in the flat space and in curved space is expressed through scalar invariants of the curved space. This energy creates an additional force acting on elastic bodies in a gravitational field. 4 refs

  4. Education for Autonomy and Open-Mindedness in Diverse Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, democracies across the globe have seen an increase in the popularity and power of authoritarian, nationalist politicians, groups, and policies. In this climate, the proper role of education in liberal democratic society, and in particular its role in promoting characteristics like autonomy and open-mindedness, is contested. This…

  5. The Use of the Nelder-Mead Method in Determining Projection Parameters for Globe Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gede, M.

    2009-04-01

    A photo of a terrestrial or celestial globe can be handled as a map. The only hard issue is its projection: the so-called Tilted Perspective Projection which, if the optical axis of the photo intersects the globe's centre, is simplified to the Vertical Near-Side Perspective Projection. When georeferencing such a photo, the exact parameters of the projections are also needed. These parameters depend on the position of the viewpoint of the camera. Several hundreds of globe photos had to be georeferenced during the Virtual Globes Museum project, which made necessary to automatize the calculation of the projection parameters. The author developed a program for this task which uses the Nelder-Mead Method in order to find the optimum parameters when a set of control points are given as input. The Nelder-Mead method is a numerical algorithm for minimizing a function in a many-dimensional space. The function in the present application is the average error of the control points calculated from the actual values of parameters. The parameters are the geographical coordinates of the projection centre, the image coordinates of the same point, the rotation of the projection, the height of the perspective point and the scale of the photo (calculated in pixels/km). The program reads the Global Mappers Ground Control Point (.GCP) file format as input and creates projection description files (.PRJ) for the same software. The initial values of the geographical coordinates of the projection centre are calculated as the average of the control points, while the other parameters are set to experimental values which represent the most common circumstances of taking a globe photograph. The algorithm runs until the change of the parameters sinks below a pre-defined limit. The minimum search can be refined by using the previous result parameter set as new initial values. This paper introduces the calculation mechanism and examples of the usage. Other possible other usages of the method are

  6. An Arduino Based Citizen Science Soil Moisture Sensor in Support of SMAP and GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podest, E.; Das, N. N.; Rajasekaran, E.; Jeyaram, R.; Lohrli, C.; Hovhannesian, H.; Fairbanks, G.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen science allows individuals anywhere in the world to engage in science by collecting environmental variables. One of the longest running platforms for the collection of in situ variables is the GLOBE program, which is international in scope and encourages students and citizen scientists alike to collect in situ measurements. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission, which has been acquiring global soil moisture measurements every 3 days of the top 5 cm of the soil since 2015, has partnered with the GLOBE program to engage students from around the world to collect in situ soil moisture and help validate SMAP measurements. The current GLOBE SMAP soil moisture protocol consists in collecting a soil sample, weighing, drying and weighing it again in order to determine the amount of water in the soil. Preparation and soil sample collection can take up to 20 minutes and drying can take up to 3 days. We have hence developed a soil moisture measurement device based on Arduino- microcontrollers along with off-the-shelf and homemade sensors that are accurate, robust, inexpensive and quick and easy to use so that they can be implemented by the GLOBE community and citizen scientists alike. In addition, we have developed a phone app, which interfaces with the Arduino, displays the soil moisture value and send the measurement to the GLOBE database. This talk will discuss building, calibration and validation of the soil moisture measuring device and assessing the quality of the measurements collected. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. NCIPC's contribution to global injury and violence prevention: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Reshma R; Roehler, Douglas R; Degutis, Linda C

    2012-09-01

    Injuries and violence impact millions across the globe each year. For the past 20 years, the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has assembled the largest cadre of injury and violence prevention experts in the world to reduce the burden of injuries and violence domestically and to inform global injury and violence prevention efforts. This article focuses on NCIPC's global injury and violence prevention work that involves: increasing awareness of the preventability of injury and violence, partnerships to promote injury research and best practices; establishing standards and guidance for data collection; building capacity through training and mentoring; and supporting evidence-based strategies. To decrease the global burden, the authors propose priority setting to maximize the development and sustainability of financial and human resources for injury and violence prevention. The authors call for increased capacity and resources for global injury and violence prevention. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Open your eyes and vote!

    CERN Multimedia

    Rebecca Leam

    The CERN film-making club is organizing the second edition of the CinéGlobe International Short Film Festival and everyone is invited to attend a series of selection screenings in November to vote on which they like and think should be publicly shown in the Globe and at the Forum Meyrin in February 2010.   This year over 700 short films were submitted for three competitions: the majority for the general fiction category for films up to ten minutes in length, and others for science fiction (20 minutes) and science documentary (30 minutes). “In 2007 we had just one competition open to films from any genre. We decided to add the science related competitions to the second edition to make a stronger link with CERN as a physics lab,” explained Quentin King, Chairman of the Selection Committee and member of CERN’s film-making club, Open Your Eyes Films. “The entries are extremely diverse and touch on almost every aspect of life. The creativity of short...

  9. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  10. Golf Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Golf Injuries Golf looks like an easy game to ... WHAT TYPES OF INJURIES ARE MOST COMMON IN GOLF? Acute injuries are usually the result of a ...

  11. Ischemic Retinopathy and Neovascular Proliferation Secondary to Severe Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Coban-Karatas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case with severe head trauma and perforating globe injury in one eye and ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation in the other eye. A 37-year-old male was brought to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident with severe maxillofacial trauma. Ophthalmic examination revealed hematoma of the left eyelids as well as traumatic rupture and disorganization of the left globe. On the right eye, anterior segment and fundoscopic examination were normal. Primary globe repair was performed. At postoperative one-month visit, the right eye revealed no pathology of the optic disc and macula but severe neovascularization in the temporal peripheral retina. The patient was diagnosed as ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation due to head trauma.

  12. SPINE INJURY IN MULAGO HOSPITAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the best outcome in patients with Cervical Spine injury ICSI}. ... which indicates the likely level and pattern of injury ... All trauma patients with altered level ... from arrival In hospital to review bya clinician. ... one ofthe 29 patierns had an op-en mouth view taken. .... Domeier, H_ M. Time reliability of pre-hospital c inical.

  13. Globe at Night: From IYA2009 to the International Year of Light 2015 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance Elaine; Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2015-08-01

    Citizen-science is a rewardingly inclusive way to bring awareness to the public on important issues like the disappearing starry night sky, its cause and solutions. Citizen-science can also provide meaningful, hands-on “science process” experiences for students. One program that does both is Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org), an international campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by having people measure night-sky brightness and submit observations via a “web app” on any smart device or computer. Additionally, 2 native mobile apps - Loss of the Night for iPhone & Android, and Dark Sky Meter for iPhone - support Globe at Night.Since 2006, more than 125,000 vetted measurements from 115 countries have been reported. For 2015 the campaign is offered as a 10-day observation window each month when the Moon is not up. To facilitate Globe at Night as an international project, the web app and other materials are in many languages. (See www.globeatnight.org/downloads.)Students and the general public can use the data to monitor levels of light pollution around the world, as well as understand light pollution’s effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife, human health and our ability to enjoy a starry night sky. Projects have compared Globe at Night data with ground-truthing using meters for energy audits as well as with data on birds and bats, population density, satellite data and trends over time. Globe at Night tackles grand challenges and everyday problems. It provides resources for formal and informal educators to engage learners of all ages. It has 9 years of experience in best practices for data management, design, collection, visualization, interpretation, etc. It has externally evaluated its program, workshops, lesson plans and accompanying kit to explore reasons for participation, skills developed, impact of experiences and perceived outcomes. Three recent papers (Birriel et al. 2014; Kyba et al. 2013; 2015) verify the

  14. Citizen Scientist Contributions to Observations Benefiting the Earth through the GLOBE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Riebeek Kohl, H.; Murphy, A.; Butler, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen science has proliferated recently due to widespread use of the internet and mobile devices, but it has a long history (i.e., the Christmas Bird Count). Since the mid-1990s, the GLOBE Program has engaged participants at a global scale. Though initially focused on teachers and students in formal education settings, it quickly attracted interest from the public as well. In 2016, GLOBE formally launched an initiative to widely engage citizen scientists in its 117 countries through release of a mobile app called GLOBE Observer (GO). GO seeks to increase the number and distribution of participants by providing a simple, engaging - and fun - interface to collect and report data. Observations featured in the app are a carefully selected subset of 50+ GLOBE measurement protocols. They must leverage app features, require little to no equipment besides the mobile device, and have scientists or other stakeholders ready to use the data. The app is designed to minimize barriers to participation, but for those who want to do or know more GLOBE also offers on-line training to turn observers into community members with recognized certification in a protocol area. First released was a cloud observation protocol, supporting validation of a variety of Earth imaging sensors. Second was a mosquito habitat mapping protocol, poised to greatly increase the amount and distribution of local data to validate disease forecast models based on remotely sensed conditions, with additional focus on eliminating disease-carrying mosquito breeding sites. Next in development is a land cover protocol to obtain ground truth imagery for the Landsat science team. The app is also being leveraged for quick development of a short-term eclipse mini-app, to be used on August 21st only during the North American eclipse. This app is designed to make it easy for large numbers of people observing the eclipse, throughout North America, to take and record high time resolution observations of cloud cover and

  15. The psychological process of reintegration following a nine month/260 day solo sailboat circumnavigation of the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, Anders; Leon, Gloria R; Venables, Noah C

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this case report is on the psychological reintegration process following the achievement of a highly challenging long-duration and solitary endeavor. The participant was a 29 year old male who successfully circumnavigated the globe during a 260 day solo sailing expedition. We assessed the psychological aftermath in terms of stability and change in personality characteristics and personal beliefs prior to, and at 180 and 360 days after the completion of the journey. Overall, the personality configuration reflected adaptive personality functioning. A belief in an internal locus of control was consistent throughout, as were perceptions of personal growth as a result of the circumnavigation experience. NEO PI-R Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, and Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (Tri-PM) Boldness scores remained stable. Positive personality change was reflected by an elevation in Conscientiousness; negative change by a decline in Agreeableness and an increase in Tri-PM Disinhibition. While overall the participant exhibited positive change as a result of his journey, there were also some negative aspects of the reintegration phase in regard to interactions with other persons. This latter change may be related to the effects of isolation from usual social contacts over an extended period. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Globe1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine

    2010-01-01

    . This ground-breaking book re-thinks and re-invests in the notion of authenticity as a surplus of experiential meaning and feeling that derives from what we do at/in places. In "Re-investing Authenticity - Tourism, Place and Emotions" international scholars representing a wide range of disciplines, examine...... contemporary performances of authenticity in travel and tourism practices: from cultural place branding to individual pilgrim performances; from intensified experiences of imaginary crime scenes to the rhetorical features of the encounter with the traumatic; and, from photography performing memories of place...

  17. CineGlobe Film Festival, Wednesday programme with Science Story Telling Hackathon and Oculus Rift

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Besides the short-film competitions, the second day of 2015 CineGlobe included a Soirée Oculus Rift with the public launch of the “Storytelling Science” Hackathon. CineGlobe and Festival Tous Ecrans joined forces to launch the “Storytelling Science” hackathon, in collaboration with Tribeca Film Institute and LIFT Conference. The keynote speech was given by renowned filmmaker and transmedia creator Michel Reihlac, who spoke about the role of interactive and immersive storytelling techniques in cinematic narrative. By placing the viewer in the center of the story, these new technologies are profoundly changing the way we tell stories. Michel Reilhac designs innovative story based experiences, using digital platforms (cinema, tv, mobile, tablets, …) and real life events. His creative approach to storytelling ambitions to offer viewers/ participants a unique opportunity for an immersive, participatory and interactive experience. During the evening, Oculus Rift virtual reality headsets were available to...

  18. Use of GLOBE Observations to Derive a Landsat 8 Split Window Algorithm for Urban Heat Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerstrom, L.; Czajkowski, K. P.

    2017-12-01

    Surface temperature has been studied to investigate the warming of urban climates, also known as urban heat islands, which can impact urban planning, public health, pollution levels, and energy consumption. However, the full potential of remotely sensed images is limited when analyzing land surface temperature due to the daunting task of correcting for atmospheric effects. Landsat 8 has two thermal infrared sensors. With two bands in the infrared region, a split window algorithm (SWA), can be applied to correct for atmospheric effects. This project used in situ surface temperature measurements from NASA's ground observation program, the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), to derive the correcting coefficients for use in the SWA. The GLOBE database provided land surface temperature data that coincided with Landsat 8 overpasses. The land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 SWA can be used to analyze for urban heat island effect.

  19. Humane Orientation as a New Cultural Dimension of the GLOBE Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlösser, Oliver; Frese, Michael; Heintze, Anna-Maria

    2013-01-01

    We validate, extend, and empirically and theoretically criticize the cultural dimension of humane orientation of the project GLOBE (Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Program). Theoretically, humane orientation is not just a one-dimensionally positive concept about...... study used student samples from 25 countries that were either high or low in humane orientation (N = 876) and studied their relation to the traditional GLOBE scale and other cultural-level measures (agreeableness, religiosity, authoritarianism, and welfare state score). Findings revealed a strong...... correlation between humane orientation and agreeableness, welfare state score, and religiosity. Out-group humane orientation proved to be the more relevant subfacet of the original humane orientation construct, suggesting that future research on humane orientation should make use of this measure instead...

  20. A morphologically preserved multi-resolution TIN surface modeling and visualization method for virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xianwei; Xiong, Hanjiang; Gong, Jianya; Yue, Linwei

    2017-07-01

    Virtual globes play an important role in representing three-dimensional models of the Earth. To extend the functioning of a virtual globe beyond that of a "geobrowser", the accuracy of the geospatial data in the processing and representation should be of special concern for the scientific analysis and evaluation. In this study, we propose a method for the processing of large-scale terrain data for virtual globe visualization and analysis. The proposed method aims to construct a morphologically preserved multi-resolution triangulated irregular network (TIN) pyramid for virtual globes to accurately represent the landscape surface and simultaneously satisfy the demands of applications at different scales. By introducing cartographic principles, the TIN model in each layer is controlled with a data quality standard to formulize its level of detail generation. A point-additive algorithm is used to iteratively construct the multi-resolution TIN pyramid. The extracted landscape features are also incorporated to constrain the TIN structure, thus preserving the basic morphological shapes of the terrain surface at different levels. During the iterative construction process, the TIN in each layer is seamlessly partitioned based on a virtual node structure, and tiled with a global quadtree structure. Finally, an adaptive tessellation approach is adopted to eliminate terrain cracks in the real-time out-of-core spherical terrain rendering. The experiments undertaken in this study confirmed that the proposed method performs well in multi-resolution terrain representation, and produces high-quality underlying data that satisfy the demands of scientific analysis and evaluation.

  1. Hamlet's "Globe" and the Self as Performer in England and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shibuya, Yu

    2004-01-01

    In his paper, "Hamlet's 'Globe' and the Self as Performer in England and Japan," Yu Shibuya argues that Hamlet sees his life as a performance. Shibuya presents examples from Tsuneari Fukuda's Japanese translation to suggest that Fukuda makes choices that emphasize the theatrical side of Hamlet's character. If Hamlet perceives himself as an actor, then his definition of theater or an actor is ultimately a definition of himself. Shibuya uses the theme of self-definition to examine Kenneth Brana...

  2. Variation of Phenolic Content in Globe Artichoke in Relation to Biological, Technical and Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lombardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, globe artichoke production is prevailingly concentrated in the South and islands, where it provides an important contribution to the agricultural economy. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in this crop as a promising source of polyphenols, a heterogeneous class of secondary metabolites characterized by various healthy properties well-documented in literature. The phenolic fraction, present in the different artichoke plant parts, varies widely in relation to biotic and abiotic factors. Therefore, the present study aimed at evaluating the variation of phenolic content in globe artichoke in relation to biological, technical and environmental factors. Two field-experiments were carried out in Sicily (South Italy in two representative cultivation areas, in order to examine the effects of genotype, head fraction, season conditions, planting density and arrangement on the globe artichoke phenolic concentration. Both the total polyphenols and the individual phenolic compounds detected were notably genotype- dependent. Particularly, the high level of caffeoylquinic acids (chlorogenic acid, among others and apigenin 7- O-glucuronide, reported respectively by “Violetto di Sicilia” and “Romanesco clone C3”, could be used to encourage globe artichoke fresh consumption. Total polyphenols content also resulted more abundant in specific accumulation sites within the inflorescence, such as the floral stem and receptacle, and for most of genotypes it decreased during the second year in response to the different meteorological conditions. Additionally, total polyphenols content significantly and linearly increased as plant density increased from 1.0 to 1.8 plant m-2 and it significantly increased by 13% passing from single to twin rows plant arrangement.

  3. Variation of Phenolic Content in Globe Artichoke in Relation to Biological, Technical and Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mauromicale

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, globe artichoke production is prevailingly concentrated in the South and islands, where it provides an important contribution to the agricultural economy. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in this crop as a promising source of polyphenols, a heterogeneous class of secondary metabolites characterized by various healthy properties well-documented in literature. The phenolic fraction, present in the different artichoke plant parts, varies widely in relation to biotic and abiotic factors. Therefore, the present study aimed at evaluating the variation of phenolic content in globe artichoke in relation to biological, technical and environmental factors. Two field-experiments were carried out in Sicily (South Italy in two representative cultivation areas, in order to examine the effects of genotype, head fraction, season conditions, planting density and arrangement on the globe artichoke phenolic concentration. Both the total polyphenols and the individual phenolic compounds detected were notably genotype- dependent. Particularly, the high level of caffeoylquinic acids (chlorogenic acid, among others and apigenin 7- O-glucuronide, reported respectively by “Violetto di Sicilia” and “Romanesco clone C3”, could be used to encourage globe artichoke fresh consumption. Total polyphenols content also resulted more abundant in specific accumulation sites within the inflorescence, such as the floral stem and receptacle, and for most of genotypes it decreased during the second year in response to the different meteorological conditions. Additionally, total polyphenols content significantly and linearly increased as plant density increased from 1.0 to 1.8 plant m-2 and it significantly increased by 13% passing from single to twin rows plant arrangement.

  4. A flux-based assessment of the effects of ozone on foliar injury, photosynthesis, and yield of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Borlotto Nano Lingua di Fuoco) in open-top chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerosa, Giacomo; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Rossini, Micol; Panigada, Cinzia; Meroni, Michele; Colombo, Roberto; Faoro, Franco; Iriti, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    Stomatal ozone uptake, determined with the Jarvis' approach, was related to photosynthetic efficiency assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence and reflectance measurements in open-top chamber experiments on Phaseolus vulgaris. The effects of O 3 exposure were also evaluated in terms of visible and microscopical leaf injury and plant productivity. Results showed that microscopical leaf symptoms, assessed as cell death and H 2 O 2 accumulation, preceded by 3-4 days the appearance of visible symptoms. An effective dose of ozone stomatal flux for visible leaf damages was found around 1.33 mmol O 3 m -2 . Significant linear dose-response relationships were obtained between accumulated fluxes and optical indices (PRI, NDI, ΔF/F m ' ). The negative effects on photosynthesis reduced plant productivity, affecting the number of pods and seeds, but not seed weight. These results, besides contributing to the development of a flux-based ozone risk assessment for crops in Europe, highlight the potentiality of reflectance measurements for the early detection of ozone stress. - Ozone stomatal fluxes affect leaf cell viability, photosynthetic performance, optical properties and crop yield of bean.

  5. A flux-based assessment of the effects of ozone on foliar injury, photosynthesis, and yield of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Borlotto Nano Lingua di Fuoco) in open-top chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerosa, Giacomo [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, via dei Musei 41, 20125 Brescia (Italy); Marzuoli, Riccardo [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, via dei Musei 41, 20125 Brescia (Italy); Fondazione Lombardia per l' Ambiente, piazza Diaz 9, 20123 Milano (Italy); Rossini, Micol; Panigada, Cinzia; Meroni, Michele; Colombo, Roberto [Remote Sensing of Environmental Dynamics Lab., DISAT, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Faoro, Franco [Plant Pathology Institute, Universita di Milano, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy); Iriti, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.iriti@unimi.i [Plant Pathology Institute, Universita di Milano, via Celoria 2, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    Stomatal ozone uptake, determined with the Jarvis' approach, was related to photosynthetic efficiency assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence and reflectance measurements in open-top chamber experiments on Phaseolus vulgaris. The effects of O{sub 3} exposure were also evaluated in terms of visible and microscopical leaf injury and plant productivity. Results showed that microscopical leaf symptoms, assessed as cell death and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation, preceded by 3-4 days the appearance of visible symptoms. An effective dose of ozone stomatal flux for visible leaf damages was found around 1.33 mmol O{sub 3} m{sup -2}. Significant linear dose-response relationships were obtained between accumulated fluxes and optical indices (PRI, NDI, DELTAF/F{sub m}{sup '}). The negative effects on photosynthesis reduced plant productivity, affecting the number of pods and seeds, but not seed weight. These results, besides contributing to the development of a flux-based ozone risk assessment for crops in Europe, highlight the potentiality of reflectance measurements for the early detection of ozone stress. - Ozone stomatal fluxes affect leaf cell viability, photosynthetic performance, optical properties and crop yield of bean.

  6. Accumulation of cynaropicrin in globe artichoke and localization of enzymes involved in its biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljounaidi, K; Comino, C; Moglia, A; Cankar, K; Genre, A; Hehn, A; Bourgaud, F; Beekwilder, J; Lanteri, S

    2015-10-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) belongs to the Asteraceae family, in which one of the most biologically significant class of secondary metabolites are sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). In globe artichoke the principal STL is the cynaropicrin, which contributes to approximately 80% of its characteristic bitter taste. Cynaropicrin content was assessed in globe artichoke tissues and was observed to accumulate in leaves of different developmental stages. In the receptacle, a progressive decrease was observed during inflorescence development, while the STL could not be detected in the inflorescence bracts. Almost undetectable amounts were found in the roots and inflorescence stems at the commercial stage. Cynaropicrin content was found to correlate with expression of genes encoding CcGAS, CcGAO and CcCOS, which are involved in the STL biosynthesis. A more detailed study of leaf material revealed that cynaropicrin predominantly accumulates in the trichomes, and not in the apoplastic cavity fluids. Analysis of the promoter regions of CcGAO and CcCOS revealed the presence of L1-box motifs, which confers trichome-specific expression in Arabidopsis, suggesting that cynaropicrin is not only stored but also synthesized in trichomes. A transient expression of GFP fusion proteins was performed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants: the CcGAS fluorescence signal was located in the cytoplasm while the CcGAO and CcCOS localized to the endoplasmatic reticulum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Trampoline related injuries in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Varun; Kimmel, Lara A; Yu, Kathy; Gabbe, Belinda J; Liew, Susan M; Kamali Moaveni, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Trampoline-related injuries in adults are uncommon. Participation in trampolining is increasing following its admission as a sport in the Olympics and the opening of local recreational trampoline centres. The aim of this study was to assess the number and outcomes of adult trampoline-related orthopaedic injuries presenting to four trauma hospitals in Victoria. A cohort study was performed for the period 2007-2013. Adult patients registered by the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR) who had sustained a trampolining related injury were included in this study. Descriptive analyses were used to describe the patient population, the injuries sustained and their in-hospital and 6-month outcomes. There was an increase in trampolining injuries from 2007 (n=3) to 2012 (n=14) and 2013 (n=18). Overall, fifty patients with a median age of 25 (range 16-66) were identified. Thirty-five patients (70%) had lower limb injuries, 20 patients (40%) had spinal injuries and one patient had an upper limb injury. Thirty-nine patients (78%) required surgery. Fractures of the tibia (n=13), ankle fractures (n=12) and cervical spine injuries (n=7) were the most common injuries; all of which required surgery. Complications included death, spinal cord injuries, compartment syndrome and open fractures. At 6 months post injury, more than half (52%) of the patients had not achieved a good recovery, 32% had some form of persistent disability, 14% did not get back to work and overall physical health for the cohort was well below population norms for the SF-12. Adult trampoline-related injuries have increased in the last few years in this cohort identified through VOTOR. Lower limb and spinal injuries are most prevalent. Public awareness and education are important to reduce the risk for people participating in this activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Research Progress of Global Land Domain Service Computing:Take GlobeLand 30 as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Jun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Combining service-computing technology with domain requirements is one of the important development directions of geographic information under Internet+, which provides highly efficient technical means for information sharing and collaborative services. Using GlobeLand 30 as an example, this paper analyzes the basic problems of integrating land cover information processing and service computing, introduces the latest research progress in domain service modeling, online computing method and dynamic service technology, and the GlobeLand 30 information service platform. The paper also discusses the further development directions of GlobeLand 30 domain service computing.

  9. The International Globe at Night Citizen-Science Campaign: Shedding Light on Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    For 8 years now, the Globe at Night campaign has invited citizen-scientists worldwide to measure and record the brightness of their night sky by hunting for the faintest stars in a particular constellation. Students for science projects and scientists for research use the data to monitor levels of brightness or 'light pollution' around the world. They also use the Globe at Night data to understand light pollution's effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife and human health, as well as our ability to enjoy a starry night sky. The dates of the campaign for 2014 have been extended to every month during the year. Ten days each month (when the Moon is not up between 8pm and 10pm) are the recommended times to take measurements for the campaign. However, one can participate at other times and dates, as long as the Moon is not in the night sky and it is more than an hour after sunset or more than an hour before sunrise. New in 2014 will be an Android app that will allow you to input visual measurements anytime the Moon is not up. Also possibly included will be an iPhone app that will take sky brightness measurements. The campaign dates and the 5 easy steps to participating in the campaign are listed at www.globeatnight.org. You do not need to register. Once on the report page, you enter your location, date and time (automatic for a smart device). You find the constellation of the month in the night sky. (Help is on the website.) Then you choose which chart looks most like what you see toward the constellation. Choose the icon for how clear or cloudy it is and hit the submit button and you are done! The fifth step is returning later to the website to compare your observations on the world map to others from around the globe. Included on the Globe at Night website are many helpful resources and tools from finding the constellations used in the campaign, to understanding concepts like light pollution, to games that test your expertise in choosing 'limiting magnitudes

  10. GLOBE at Night: Raising Public Awareness and Involvement through Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R. T.

    2010-12-01

    With half of the world’s population now living in cities, many urban dwellers have never experienced the wonderment of pristinely dark skies and maybe never will. Light pollution is obscuring people’s long-standing natural heritage to view stars. The GLOBE at Night program (www.globeatnight.org) is an international citizen-science campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by encouraging everyone everywhere to measure local levels of night sky brightness and contribute observations online to a world map. In the last 5 years, GLOBE at Night has been the most productive public light pollution monitoring campaign, collecting over 52,000 observations in a two-week period annually. This year, during the moonless two weeks in March, the campaign set a record high of over 17,800 measurements from people in 86 countries. Foundational resources are available to facilitate the public’s participation in promoting dark skies awareness. The GLOBE at Night website explains clearly the simple-to-participate-in 5 step program and offers background information and interactive games on key concepts. The program has been expanded to include trainings of the general public, but especially educators in schools, museums and science centers, in unique ways. Education kits for dark skies awareness have been distributed at the training workshops. The kit includes material for a light shielding demonstration, a digital Sky Quality Meter and “Dark Skies Rangers” activities. The activities are on how unshielded light wastes energy, how light pollution affects wildlife and how you can participate in a citizen-science star-hunt like GLOBE at Night. In addition, projects are being developed for what to do with the data once it is taken. The GLOBE at Night data from different years can be compared to look for trends over time or with population density maps. The data can also be used to search for dark sky oases or to monitor lighting ordinance compliance. Most

  11. The w-categories associated with products of infinite-dimensional globes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, H.

    2000-11-01

    The results in this thesis are organised in four chapters. Chapter 1 is preliminary. We state the necessary definitions and results in w- complexes, atomic complexes and products of w-complexes. Some definitions are restated to meet the requirement for the following chapters. There is a new proof for the existence of 'natural homomorphism' (Theorem 1.3.6) and a new result for the decomposition of molecules in loop-free w-complexes (Theorem 1.4.13). In Chapter 2, we study the product of three infinite dimensional globes. The main result in this chapter is that a subcomplex in the product of three infinite dimensional globes is a molecule if and only if it is pairwise molecular (Theorem 2.1.6). The definition for pairwise molecular subcomplexes is given in section 1. One direction of the main theorem, molecules are necessarily pairwise molecular, is proved in section 2. Some properties of pairwise molecular subcomplexes are studied in section 3. These properties are the preparation for a more explicit description of pairwise molecular subcomplexes, which is given in section 4. The properties for the sources and targets of pairwise molecular subcomplexes are studied in section 5, where we prove that the class of pairwise molecular subcomplexes is closed under source and target operation; there are also algorithms to calculate the sources and targets of a pairwise molecular subcomplex. Section 6 deals with the composition of pairwise molecular subcomplexes. The proof of the main theorem is completed in section 7, where an algorithm for decomposing molecules into atoms is implied in the proof. The construction of molecules in the product of three infinite dimensional globes is studied in Chapter 3. The main result is that any molecule can be constructed inductively by a systematic approach. Section 1 gives another description for molecules in the product of three infinite dimensional globes which is the theoretical basis for the construction. Section 2 states the

  12. Esophagectomy - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lewis esophagectomy, Blunt esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - open; Cancer of the esophagus - esophagectomy - open ... lining of the esophagus that can lead to cancer ( Barrett esophagus ) Severe trauma Destroyed esophagus Severely damaged stomach

  13. Open access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Open access week Van 19 tot en met 25 oktober 2015 vond wereldwijd de Open Access Week plaats. Tijdens deze week werden er over de hele wereld evenementen georganiseerd waar open access een rol speelt. Ook in Nederland zijn er diverse symposia, workshops en debatten georganiseerd zoals het debat in

  14. New opening hours for the Reception foyer and the visitor facilities in Building 33

    CERN Document Server

    DSU Unit

    2008-01-01

    New hours for visitors Monday to FridayReception: 8:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.Microcosm: 8:15 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.Shop: 9:00 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Globe: 2:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. (on days the Globe is open)SaturdayReception: 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Microcosm: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Shop: 9:00 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Globe: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (on days the Globe is open) The new opening hours will be displayed on both sides of the entrance to Building 33. People working at CERN should note the modified closing times: Access times for CERN staff Monday to Friday:\tThe foyer in Building 33 opens at 8:00 a.m. and closes at 5:45 p.m. Saturday:\tThe foyer in Building 33 opens at 8:30 a.m. and closes at 5:15 p.m. Outside these hours, CERN staff must use the small entrance that opens directly onto the car park.

  15. [Two cases of severe eye and cranial injuries due to firework explosions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunte, J P; Trojaborg, N S; Nielsen, O A; Thygesen, J

    1999-12-20

    Two patients who sustained serious facial, cranial and eye trauma secondary to recreational fireworks injuries are reported. Initial assessment included axial and coronary computerized tomography, control of haemorrhage, debridement of wound and brain, and in one patient bilateral excenteration of the globe. Both patients suffered from intracranial haemorrhage, but both recovered without severe neurological sequelae.

  16. The Capabilities Approach: Fostering contexts for enhancing mental health and wellbeing across the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ross G; Imperiale, Maria Grazia; Perera, Em

    2016-05-05

    Concerted efforts have been made in recent years to achieve equity and equality in mental health for all people across the globe. This has led to the emergence of Global Mental Health as an area of study and practice. The momentum that this has created has contributed to the development, implementation and evaluation of services for priority mental disorders in many low- and middle-income countries.This paper discusses two related issues that may be serving to limit the success of mental health initiatives across the globe, and proposes potential solutions to these issues. First, there has been a lack of sophistication in determining what constitutes a 'good outcome' for people experiencing mental health difficulties. Even though health is defined and understood as a state of 'wellbeing' and not merely an absence of illness, mental health interventions tend to narrowly focus on reducing symptoms of mental illness. The need to also focus more broadly on enhancing subjective wellbeing is highlighted. The second limitation relates to the lack of an overarching theoretical framework guiding efforts to reduce inequalities and inequities in mental health across the globe. This paper discusses the potential impact that the Capabilities Approach (CA) could have for addressing both of these issues. As a framework for human development, the CA places emphasis on promoting wellbeing through enabling people to realise their capabilities and engage in behaviours that they subjectively value. The utilization of the CA to guide the development and implementation of mental health interventions can help Global Mental Health initiatives to identify sources of social inequality and structural violence that may impede freedom and individuals' opportunities to realise their capabilities.

  17. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work in certain jobs, you may need protection. The most common type of injury happens when something irritates the ...

  18. Ocular Injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2015-04-02

    Apr 2, 2015 ... KEYWORDS: Bangers, eye injuries, holidays, Nigeria ... antibiotic and cycloplegic eye drops, antibiotic ointment at night and .... Adeoti C. O, Bello T. O., Ashaye A. O. Blinding ... Can fireworks-related injuries to children during ...

  19. ACL Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while doing things like skiing, playing soccer or football, and jumping on a trampoline. When you injure ... severity of the injury, age, physical condition, medical history, and other injuries or illnesses. People who are ...

  20. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Knee Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Knee Injuries What's in ... can do to protect them. What's in a Knee? The knee is a joint , actually the largest ...

  1. Globe 2004 review : 8. biennial trade fair and conference on business and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Globe 2004 conference offered networking opportunities for those interested in critical environmental business and sustainability issues. More than 10,000 participants from 75 countries attended the conference which addressed issues associated with sustainability principles in the design and construction of buildings, urban transportation systems and energy and water systems. The conference and trade show highlighted innovative technologies regarding alternate energy sources; air quality management; climate change; energy-efficient vehicles; fuel cell technologies; green building products and technologies; industrial waste management; urban environmental management; solid waste management, recycling and sustainable construction; and, transportation technologies and solutions. figs

  2. Using Digital Globes to Explore the Deep Sea and Advance Public Literacy in Earth System Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Brickley, A.; Emery, M.; Spargo, A.; Patterson, K.; Joyce, K.; Silva, T.; Madin, K.

    2014-12-01

    Digital globes are new technologies increasingly used in both informal and formal education to display global datasets. By creating a narrative using multiple datasets, linkages between Earth systems - lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere - can be conveyed. But how effective are digital globes in advancing public literacy in Earth system science? We addressed this question in developing new content for digital globes that interweaves imagery obtained by deep-diving vehicles with global datasets, including a new dataset locating the world's known hydrothermal vents. Our two narratives, "Life Without Sunlight" (LWS) and "Smoke and Fire Underwater" (SFU), each focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) principles related to geology, biology, and exploration. We are preparing a summative evaluation for our content delivered on NOAA's Science on a Sphere as interactive presentations and as movies. We tested knowledge gained with respect to the STEM principles and the level of excitement generated by the virtual deep-sea exploration. We conducted a Post-test Only Design with quantitative data based on self-reporting on a Likert scale. A total of 75 adults and 48 youths responded to our questionnaire, distributed into test groups that saw either one of the two narratives delivered either as a movie or as an interactive presentation. Here, we report preliminary results for the youths, the majority (81%) of which live in towns with lower income and lower levels of educational attainment as compared to other towns in Massachusetts. For both narratives, there was knowledge gained for all 6 STEM principles and "Quite a Bit" of excitement. The mode in responses for knowledge gained was "Quite a Bit" for both the movie and the interactive presentation for 4 of the STEM principles (LWS geology, LWS biology, SFU geology, and SFU exploration) and "Some" for SFU biology. Only for LWS exploration was there a difference in mode between the

  3. Enriching science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2016-03-01

    This editorial provides a brief synthesis of the past, present, and future of School Psychology Quarterly, highlighting important contributions as an international resource to enrich, invigorate, enhance, and advance science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the globe. Information herein highlights (a) the value of high quality and timely reviews, (b) publishing manuscripts that address a breadth of important topics relevant to school psychology, and (c) the structure and contributions of the special topic sections featured in School Psychology Quarterly. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Lagochilascariasis leading to severe involvement of ocular globes, ears and meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Renata T R; Magliari, Maria E R; Vital Filho, José; Silva, Maria A L G; Lima, Carlos A da Conceição; Rocha, Antonio J; Silva, Carlos J; Rewin, Jonathan A; Nahas, Tatiana R; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2008-01-01

    A case report of a 31 year-old woman from Paraíba State (North-Eastern Brazil) that presented severe involvement of ocular globes, ears and meninges. Diagnosis was established after enucleation of her left eye, when adult worms were seen in the midst of a granulomatous inflammatory process. Her response to the initial treatment with levamisole and cambendazole was good, but there was a relapse after the fifth month of treatment even with maintenance doses of both medications. She later received ivermectin and albendazol and responded well.

  5. Failure analysis of globe control valves with spring-diaphragm actuator for nuclear power plant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.; Chen, W.W.H.; Wang, T.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the failure analysis of a globe control valve with spring-diaphragm actuator indicated that the diaphragm failed because the service loading is close to the strength of the diaphragm. The resulting impact force is significantly larger than the plug guide strength and that cause it to bulge out after the impact. To improve the valve performance, proper torque should be used to tighten the actuator diaphragm case fasteners. A stronger actuator diaphragm could be used to provide additional safety margin during operation. Stiffening the plug guide may avoid jamming the bushing

  6. Hamstring Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstring injury Overview A hamstring injury occurs when you strain or pull one of your hamstring muscles — the group of three muscles that run along ... You may be more likely to get a hamstring injury if you play soccer, basketball, football, tennis ...

  7. Orienteering injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering.

  8. Open Content in Open Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and rewards of sharing research content through a discussion of Open Context, a new open access data publication system for field sciences and museum collections. Open Context is the first data repository of its kind, allowing self-publication of research data, community commentary through tagging, and clear…

  9. Weak openness and almost openness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Rose

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Weak openness and almost openness for arbitrary functions between topological spaces are defined as duals to the weak continuity of Levine and the almost continuity of Husain respectively. Independence of these two openness conditions is noted and comparison is made between these and the almost openness of Singal and Singal. Some results dual to those known for weak continuity and almost continuity are obtained. Nearly almost openness is defined and used to obtain an improved link from weak continuity to almost continuity.

  10. Globe Event | Lecture by Hervé Dessimoz and Thomas Büchi | 14 May

    CERN Document Server

    Globe Info

    2013-01-01

    At the summit of Sustainable Development, by Hervé Dessimoz and Thomas Büchi.   Globe de la science et de l'innovation Route de Meyrin, 1211 Genève Tuesday 14 May 2013 at 8:30 p.m. The lecture will be in French Refuge du Goûter. Hervé Dessimoz and Thomas Büchi have been committed to sustainable development since the 2000s. They created the Palais de l’Équilibre at Expo.02. They designed an exhibition in conjunction with the Cité de la Science et de l’Industrie (Paris) to educate visitors about sustainable development. The pavilion was donated to CERN by the Swiss Confederation and rebuilt on the CERN site in 2004. It is now known as the Globe of Science and Innovation. The Refuge du Goûter, on the slopes of Mont Blanc, is the culmination of their research into sustainable development, with the aim of demonstrating that if we can construct a building at 3835 m which is a...

  11. Eyeball Position in Facial Approximation: Accuracy of Methods for Predicting Globe Positioning in Lateral View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zednikova Mala, Pavla; Veleminska, Jana

    2018-01-01

    This study measured the accuracy of traditional and validated newly proposed methods for globe positioning in lateral view. Eighty lateral head cephalograms of adult subjects from Central Europe were taken, and the actual and predicted dimensions were compared. The anteroposterior eyeball position was estimated as the most accurate method based on the proportion of the orbital height (SEE = 1.9 mm) and was followed by the "tangent to the iris method" showing SEE = 2.4 mm. The traditional "tangent to the cornea method" underestimated the eyeball projection by SEE = 5.8 mm. Concerning the superoinferior eyeball position, the results showed a deviation from a central to a more superior position by 0.3 mm, on average, and the traditional method of central positioning of the globe could not be rejected as inaccurate (SEE = 0.3 mm). Based on regression analyzes or proportionality of the orbital height, the SEE = 2.1 mm. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Minerals profile of two globe artichoke cultivars as affected by NPK fertilizer regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Sara; Pandino, Gaetano; Mauromicale, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    Globe artichoke is a proven source of various minerals (such as K, Fe and Zn) in the Mediterranean diet, but their content in response to fertilizer regime has not yet been investigated sufficiently. Thus, we monitored the effect of two contrasting nitrogen/phosphorus/potassium (NPK) fertilizer regimes (one balanced and the other excessive) on the minerals accumulation of 'Apollo' and 'Tema 2000' cultivars, grown in three Sicilian locations ('Landolina', 'Iannarello' and 'Zotto') - South Italy. Except for total nitrogen, the balanced fertilizer regime favoured the accumulation of both macro- and micro-minerals, but with a different extent depending especially on trial location. Particularly, plants grown at 'Iannarello' responded more strongly to the fertilizer regime with respect to K, P, Ca, Fe and Zn accumulation, as a result of its different soil characteristics than the other locations. Providing a balanced supply of nitrogen/phosphorus/potassium via fertilization can enhance the nutritive value of globe artichoke, but taking into account especially soil characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sustainable development and CERN’s role: Panel discussion at the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    On Thursday 21 June, on the occasion of the UN Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development, some ambitious ecological projects involving CERN and its technologies will be presented in an afternoon of lectures and discussions in the Globe. The event is an opportunity for people at CERN to discuss the Organization’s green credentials and their ecological impact on life in the local area.   “The Globe was seen as a metaphor for the planet and a symbol of sustainable development when it was known as the ‘Palace of Equilibrium’ at Expo02 in Switzerland. Now here at CERN, it is the perfect place to host a debate on the role of technology and innovation in this area," enthuses Bernard Pellequer, who is in charge of event planning for the venue. On the afternoon of 21 June, speakers will present several ambitious projects, such as the eco-neighbourhood “Les Vergers”, the Vernes lake in ...

  14. Heat balance model for a human body in the form of wet bulb globe temperature indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Mochida, Tohru; Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Kuwabara, Kohei; Horiba, Yosuke; Sawada, Shin-Ichi

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to expand the empirically derived wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index to a rational thermal index based on the heat balance for a human body. We derive the heat balance model in the same form as the WBGT for a human engaged in moderate intensity work with a metabolic heat production of 174W/m 2 while wearing typical vapor-permeable clothing under shady and sunny conditions. Two important relationships are revealed based on this derivation: (1) the natural wet bulb and black globe temperature coefficients in the WBGT coincide with the heat balance equation for a human body with a fixed skin wettedness of approximately 0.45 at a fixed skin temperature; and (2) the WBGT can be interpreted as the environmental potential to increase skin temperature rather than the heat storage rate of a human body. We propose an adjustment factor calculation method that supports the application of WBGT for humans dressed in various clothing types and working under various air velocity conditions. Concurrently, we note difficulties in adjusting the WBGT by using a single factor for humans wearing vapor-impermeable protective clothing. The WBGT for shady conditions does not need adjustment depending on the positive radiant field (i.e., when a radiant heat source exists), whereas that for the sunny condition requires adjustments because it underestimates heat stress, which may result in insufficient human protection measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic mapping and identification of QTL for earliness in the globe artichoke/cultivated cardoon complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portis, Ezio; Scaglione, Davide; Acquadro, Alberto; Mauromicale, Giovanni; Mauro, Rosario; Knapp, Steven J; Lanteri, Sergio

    2012-05-23

    The Asteraceae species Cynara cardunculus (2n = 2x = 34) includes the two fully cross-compatible domesticated taxa globe artichoke (var. scolymus L.) and cultivated cardoon (var. altilis DC). As both are out-pollinators and suffer from marked inbreeding depression, linkage analysis has focussed on the use of a two way pseudo-test cross approach. A set of 172 microsatellite (SSR) loci derived from expressed sequence tag DNA sequence were integrated into the reference C. cardunculus genetic maps, based on segregation among the F1 progeny of a cross between a globe artichoke and a cultivated cardoon. The resulting maps each detected 17 major linkage groups, corresponding to the species' haploid chromosome number. A consensus map based on 66 co-dominant shared loci (64 SSRs and two SNPs) assembled 694 loci, with a mean inter-marker spacing of 2.5 cM. When the maps were used to elucidate the pattern of inheritance of head production earliness, a key commercial trait, seven regions were shown to harbour relevant quantitative trait loci (QTL). Together, these QTL accounted for up to 74% of the overall phenotypic variance. The newly developed consensus as well as the parental genetic maps can accelerate the process of tagging and eventually isolating the genes underlying earliness in both the domesticated C. cardunculus forms. The largest single effect mapped to the same linkage group in each parental maps, and explained about one half of the phenotypic variance, thus representing a good candidate for marker assisted selection.

  16. Effect of nitrogen fertilisation on the overall quality of minimally processed globe artichoke heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Sara; Restuccia, Cristina; Muratore, Giuseppe; Barbagallo, Riccardo N; Licciardello, Fabio; Pandino, Gaetano; Scifò, Giovanna O; Mazzaglia, Agata; Ragonese, Francesca; Mauromicale, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Although nitrogen (N) fertilisation is essential for promoting crop yield, it may also affect the produce quality. Here, the influence of three N fertiliser rates (0 kg ha -1 as a control, 200 kg ha -1 and 400 kg ha -1 referred to as N 0 , N 200 and N 400 , respectively) on the overall quality of minimally processed globe artichoke heads was investigated during refrigerated storage for 12 days. Throughout the storage time, N fertilised samples had higher inulin contents than those unfertilised. In addition, the respiratory quotient of N 200 and N 400 samples was 2-fold and 2.5-fold lower than N 0 ones, whose values were close to the normal range for vegetables. All the samples reported good microbiological standards, although N 200 and N 400 achieved lower mesophilic and psychotropic counts than N 0 throughout the storage time. After 8 and 12 days of refrigerated storage, the N 200 samples showed the highest scores of positive sensory descriptors. A fertiliser level of 200 kg N ha -1 is suitable for obtaining minimally processed globe artichoke heads with good nutritional, sensory and microbiological quality, characterised by low endogenous oxidase activities. Proper packaging systems and procedures are, however, crucial for extending the product shelf-life and, thus, promoting its exportation on a wider scale. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Time Use and Physical Activity: A Shift Away from Movement across the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Technology linked with reduced physical activity (PA) in occupational work, home/domestic work, and travel and increased sedentary activities, especially television viewing, dominates the globe. Using detailed historical data on time allocation, occupational distributions, energy expenditures data by activity, and time-varying measures of metabolic equivalents of task (MET) for activities when available, we measure historical and current MET by four major PA domains (occupation, home production, travel, and active leisure) and sedentary time among adults (> 18 years). Trends by domain for the United States (1965–2009), the United Kingdom (1961–2005), Brazil (2002–2007), China (1991–2009), and India (2000–2005) are presented. We also project changes in energy expenditure by domain and sedentary time (excluding sleep and personal care) to 2020 and 2030 for each of these countries. The use of previously unexplored detailed time allocation and energy expenditures and other datasets represents a useful addition to our ability to document activity and inactivity globally. Given the potential impact on weight gain and other cardiometabolic health risks, the differential declines in MET of activity and increases in sedentary time across the globe represents a major threat to global health. PMID:22694051

  18. Detection of salmonella on globe fruits using pulse excited magnetoelastic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikle, Howard C.; Du, Songtao; Prorok, Barton C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a research project to investigate magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors actuated with a pulse excitation to measure the concentration of Salmonella Typhimurium of globe fruits. The ME biosensors are based on an acoustic wave resonator platform that is a freestanding (free-free) thin ribbon of magnetostrictive material with a lengthto- width ratio of 5:1. A biorecognition probe coated on the surface of the resonator platform binds with a targeted pathogen, i.e. E2 phage that binds with S. Typhimurium. The biosensor was actuated to vibrate longitudinally such that the resonant frequency depended primarily on the length of sensor and its overall mass. A pulsed excitation and measurement system was used to actuate micron scale ME biosensors to vibrate. The biosensor responds in a ring-down manner, a damped decay of the resonance amplitude, from which the resonant frequency was measured. An increase in mass due to the binding of the target pathogen resulted in a decrease in the resonant frequency. The pulsed excitation and measurement system that was developed under this effort and the characterization of its performance on the measurement of Salmonella concentrations on globe fruits is described.

  19. GlobeLand30 shows little cropland area loss but greater fragmentation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiangyi; Hu, Qiong; van Vliet, Jasper; Verburg, Peter H.; Wu, Wenbin

    2018-04-01

    Understanding of cropland dynamics in a large geographical extent is mostly based on observations of area change, while the changes in landscape pattern are hardly assessed. The total amount of cropland in China has remained relatively stable in recent years, which might suggest there was little change. In this analysis, we combine the number of cropland patches (NP) with the total cropland area (TA) for a more comprehensive characterization of cropland change in China. We use GlobeLand30-a global land cover dataset with a 30 m resolution for the years 2000 and 2010-and characterize changes in TA and NP for each county as increase, stable, or decrease. This characterization shows that 703 out of 2420 counties experienced both cropland loss and increased fragmentation. The predominant cropland loss in these areas, especially in the North China Plain, is converted to artificial land. Another 212 are characterized by the opposite developments: an increase in cropland and decreased fragmentation. These counties, are mainly characterized by a conversion of forest areas and grassland areas. It suggests that the cropland conservation policy in China effectively protected the total cropland area in overall, but the consequences in terms of fragmentation might be underestimated. Counties with no obvious change in both indicators, measuring 279 counties, are mainly located in the Southeast. Our results are further compared with local level case studies: the fair consistency indicates alternatives of applying GlobeLand30 for analyzing landscape changes across scales and for cross-site comparisons.

  20. Coming of spring in Europe and on Day Night Year Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković-Topalović, Tatjana; Božić, Mirjana; Stojićević, Goran

    2014-05-01

    Day and night cycles, change of seasons, secular variations of climate on Earth are phenomena that depend on insolation of the Earth, its internal rotation and the orientation of its axis with respect to the Sun. For teaching about these phenomena, we have been using, since 2011, the outdoor globe that has the same orientation in space as the Earth. We call it Day Night Year Globe (DING). It was erected in the Center for advanced education of teachers in Šabac, Serbia [1]. Such globes were also erected in the Weizmann Institute in Israel, near the Max Valier Observatory in Italy, in the courtyard of the Tre University in Rome, in the Science Park in Zurich. During 2010 and 2011, the High Medical School took part and coordinated the realization of the Greenwave project [2] in the Šabac region. Twenty-two teachers, in seven primary schools, inspired and instructed their students to observe how exactly spring arrives and moves across Europe. Their task was to measure on daily basis: wind speed, temperature and rain precipitation. They also recorded sightings of species (barn swallow and frog spawns), common to all European countries, and of local species, which act as early indicators of the arrival of spring. The scientific contribution of the Šabac team consisted of correlating these observations and observations of changes of illumination on DING. During one sunny day, students observe the mapping of Earth's daily rotation onto DING. By observing the circle of illumination, day by day, students see how the inclination of this circle changes during the year. At the spring equinox the circle of illumination lies along the meridian. Our idea was that participants in other country could incorporate observations on DING, or a hands-on globe with two-rotation axes, properly oriented. We tried to induce interest for this idea to the authors and leaders of the Greenwave project. In Milanković's theory of the climate change of Earth, the orientation of Earth's axis with

  1. Globe of Natural Hazard - A new assessment tool for risk managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    A large number of tropical cyclones and the earthquake in Sichuan made 2008 one of the most devastating years on record. Throughout the world, more than 220,000 people died as a result of natural catastrophes this year. Overall losses totaled some US 200bn (2007: US 82bn). Insured losses in 2008 rose to US 45bn, about 50% higher than in the previous year. Mainly driven by high losses from weather-related natural catastrophes, 2008 was - on the basis of figures adjusted for inflation - even the third most expensive year on record for the insurance industry, exceeded only by the hurricane year of 2005 and by 1995, the year of the Kobe earthquake. Munich Re, a worldwide operating reinsurance company, is a world leader in terms of investigating risks from natural hazards of all kinds. 2008 has again shown the insurance industry how important it is to analyse risks like natural hazards and climate change in all their facets and to manage the insurance business accordingly. An excellent example of the wealth of knowledge Munich Re has developed in natural hazard assessment is the DVD "Globe of Natural Hazards". It combines the geoscientific data and findings Munich Re has accumulated over a period of 35 years. First devised as a wall-map in 1978, the product has established itself as a standard work for the identification, exposure assessment and risk management of natural hazards. Over 80,000 copies of the CD-ROM version of 2000 have been provided to clients - a mark achieved by no other service product in Munich Re's history. Since the beginning of 2009, the fully updated fourth-generation version has been available. The bilingual DVD (German and English) shows natural hazards and climate effects at a glance: the global maps are presented on a 3D globe, underlaid with satellite images. The hazard complexes of hail, tornado and winter storms have been completely revised and flood incorporated as a new hazard. Users can intuitively home in on and enlarge any location on

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  4. Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy after Eye Injuries: An Overexpression of Growth Factors and Cytokines Leading to a Retinal Keloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Morescalchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eye injury is a significant disabling worldwide health problem. Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy (PVR is a common complication that develops in up to 40–60% of patients with an open-globe injury. Our knowledge about the pathogenesis of PVR has improved in the last decades. It seems that the introduction of immune cells into the vitreous, like in penetrating ocular trauma, triggers the production of growth factors and cytokines that come in contact with intra-retinal cells, like Müller cells and RPE cells. Growth factors and cytokines drive the cellular responses leading to PVR’s development. Knowledge of the pathobiological and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in posttraumatic PVR is increasing the possibilities of management, and it is hoped that in the future our treatment strategies will evolve, in particular adopting a multidrug approach, and become even more effective in vision recovery. This paper reviews the current literature and clinical trial data on the pathogenesis of PVR and its correlation with ocular trauma and describes the biochemical/molecular events that will be fundamental for the development of novel treatment strategies. This literature review included PubMed articles published from 1979 through 2013. Only studies written in English were included.

  5. Globes from global data: Charting international research networks with the GRASS GIS r.out.polycones add-on module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Many Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) tools have been created for the various application fields within geoscience. While FOSS allows re-implementation of functionalities in new environments by access to the original codebase, the easiest approach to build new software solutions for new problems is the combination or merging of existing software tools. Such mash-ups are implemented by embedding and encapsulating FOSS tools within each another, effectively focusing the use of the embedded software to the specific role it needs to perform in the given scenario, while ignoring all its other capabilities. GRASS GIS is a powerful and established FOSS GIS for raster, vector and volume data processing while the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) are a suite of powerful Open Source mapping tools, which exceed the mapping capabilities of GRASS GIS. This poster reports on the new GRASS GIS add-on module r.out.polycones. It enables users to utilize non-continuous projections for map production within the GRASS production environment. This is implemented on the software level by encapsulating a subset of GMT mapping capabilities into a GRASS GIS (Version 6.x) add-on module. The module was developed at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) to provide custom global maps of scientific collaboration networks, such as the DataCite consortium, the registration agency for Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for research data. The GRASS GIS add-on module can be used for global mapping of raster data into a variety of non continuous sinosoidal projections, allowing the creation of printable biangles (gores) to be used for globe making. Due to the well structured modular nature of GRASS modules, technical follow-up work will focus on API-level Python-based integration in GRASS 7 [1]. Based on this, GMT based mapping capabilities in GRASS will be extended beyond non-continuous sinosoidal maps and advanced from raster-layers to content GRASS display monitors. References

  6. Closed chamber globe stabilization and needle capsulorhexis using irrigation hand piece of bimanual irrigation and aspiration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Harminder K

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prerequisites for a good capsulorhexis include a deep, well maintained anterior chamber, globe stabilization and globe manipulation. This helps to achieve a capsulorhexis of optimal size, shape and obtain the best possible position for a red glow under retroillumination. We report the use of irrigation handpiece of bimanual irrigation aspiration system to stabilize the globe, maintain a deep anterior chamber and manipulate the globe to a position of optimal red reflex during needle capsulorhexis in phacoemulsification. Methods Two side ports are made with 20 G MVR 'V' lance knife (Alcon, USA. The irrigation handpiece with irrigation on is introduced into the anterior chamber through one side port and the 26-G cystitome (made from 26-G needle is introduced through the other. The capsolurhexis is completed with the needle. Results Needle capsulorhexis with this technique was used in 30 cases of uncomplicated immature senile cataracts. 10 cases were done under peribulbar anaesthesia and 20 under topical anaesthesia. A complete capsulorhexis was achieved in all cases. Conclusion The irrigating handpiece maintains deep anterior chamber, stabilizes the globe, facilitates pupillary dilatation, and helps in maintaining the eye in the position with optimal red reflex during needle capsulorhexis. This technique is a safe and effective way to perform needle capsulorhexis.

  7. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS OF HEAD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Shamrao Sarawade

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study aims to record the prevalence and pattern of various ophthalmic manifestations in patients of head injury and to attempt a correlation between the ocular signs, neurological signs and final outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Hundred and twenty patients with head injury having ocular findings, presenting from December 2014 to July 2016, were taken for study. Detailed ophthalmological examination of the patients was carried out and the results of the study are depicted in the form of percentages, graphs and charts. RESULTS The most common cause of head injury found in our study was road traffic accident. The commonest eye finding was oedema and ecchymosis of eyelids. Prime causal factors affecting visual acuity found in our study were corneal tear, globe rupture, optic nerve injury and avulsion of eyeball. CONCLUSION Head injuries with ocular manifestations occur in younger age group. Road traffic accident was the most common cause. Males have to work outside their home for their jobs more than that of females. So they are more prone to accidents. Oedema and ecchymosis of eyelids constitute the most common ocular finding. Patients with mild ocular injuries pointed towards good visual prognosis. Most of them had mild head injury and hence good prognosis in terms of survival of the patient. The patients with severe ocular injuries like corneal tear, globe rupture and optic nerve injury showed poor visual prognosis.

  8. Open hardware for open science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the open source software movement, the Open Hardware Repository was created to enable hardware developers to share the results of their R&D activities. The recently published CERN Open Hardware Licence offers the legal framework to support this knowledge and technology exchange.   Two years ago, a group of electronics designers led by Javier Serrano, a CERN engineer, working in experimental physics laboratories created the Open Hardware Repository (OHR). This project was initiated in order to facilitate the exchange of hardware designs across the community in line with the ideals of “open science”. The main objectives include avoiding duplication of effort by sharing results across different teams that might be working on the same need. “For hardware developers, the advantages of open hardware are numerous. For example, it is a great learning tool for technologies some developers would not otherwise master, and it avoids unnecessary work if someone ha...

  9. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  10. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  11. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Chesbrough, Henry; Moedas, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Open innovation is now a widely used concept in academia, business, and policy making. This article describes the state of open innovation at the intersection of research, practice, and policy. It discusses some key trends (e.g., digital transformation), challenges (e.g., uncertainty...

  12. Open Science & Open Data Global Sprint 2016 | 2–3 June 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Achintya Rao

    2016-01-01

    Join us as we learn to collaboratively build projects transforming science on the web! Thursday 2 June 2016 8.00 a.m. – Friday 3 June 20.00 p.m. CERN (3179-R-E06) This two-day sprint event brings together researchers, coders, librarians and the public from around the globe to hack on open science and open data projects in their communities. This year, we have four tracks you can contribute to: tools, citizen science, curriculum and open data. CERN is hosting three projects: Everware Open Cosmics CrowdAI   You can also participate in any of the other mozsprint projects for 2016. For more information, please visit: https://indico.cern.ch/event/535760/

  13. THE REPRESENTATION OF EGYPTIAN PEOPLE’S VOICE IN THE JAKARTA GLOBE NEWS PHOTOGRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fini Fitriani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: As a product of mass media, news photograph is an image which provides the viewers with a valuable source of information and news story. All events captured in photographs turn into a news photo. Besides covering the news with fact, news photographs do not only have surface meanings, but also deeper meanings to be interpreted by each viewer. The phenomenon of demonstration, particularly the massive demonstration in Egypt in 2011, offers a good chance to discover how visual messages have been presented to guide interpretation of foreign news events. Principally, demonstration is an expression of the people’s voices, and thus, their voices are related closely with their demands, grievances and wishes related to the new government. Here, the photographs are able to portray and reflect the people’s voices through the compositions and contents (meanings involved in the photos. This study is aimed at discovering the portrayal of the voice of the people (the protesters in the news photographs of the Indonesian online newspaper, The Jakarta Globe. The data consist of 15 news photographs taken from The Jakarta Globe online newspaper published in January – October 2011. The study employs qualitative method framed with semiotic analysis using Roland Barthes’ theory of orders of signification and photographic message. The results of the study show that The Jakarta Globe visually constructs this event (demonstration by focusing on the human action (the protesters. Thus, the voice of the people is portrayed in the photo subjects (the protesters and the included objects of the photo. Meanwhile, the technical aspects of the photos play a meaningful role in emerging the portrayal of the people’s voice. There are four voices revealed by the people in the 15 photographs, namely the voice of freedom, the voice of peace, the voice of justice and the voice of human rights. The photo text including headlines and captions also interact with

  14. The subscapularis: anatomy, injury, and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David A.; Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Miller, Bruce [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The subscapularis is the largest and most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles and fulfills an important role in glenohumeral movement and stability. The spectrum and implications of subscapularis muscle or tendon injury differ from injury to other rotator cuff components because of its unique structure and function. Diagnosing subscapularis injury is clinically difficult and assessment of subscapularis integrity may be limited during arthroscopy or open surgery. Diagnostic imaging plays an important part in diagnosing and evaluating the extent of subscapularis injury. The radiologist should be aware of the anatomy of the subscapularis, the variations in muscle or tendon injury, and the potential implications for treatment and prognosis. (orig.)

  15. The subscapularis: anatomy, injury, and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David A.; Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A.; Miller, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The subscapularis is the largest and most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles and fulfills an important role in glenohumeral movement and stability. The spectrum and implications of subscapularis muscle or tendon injury differ from injury to other rotator cuff components because of its unique structure and function. Diagnosing subscapularis injury is clinically difficult and assessment of subscapularis integrity may be limited during arthroscopy or open surgery. Diagnostic imaging plays an important part in diagnosing and evaluating the extent of subscapularis injury. The radiologist should be aware of the anatomy of the subscapularis, the variations in muscle or tendon injury, and the potential implications for treatment and prognosis. (orig.)

  16. Paragliding injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-01-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during st...

  17. IDP camp evolvement analysis in Darfur using VHSR optical satellite image time series and scientific visualization on virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Dirk; Lang, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of transferable, object-based image analysis algorithms for dwelling extraction in a camp for internally displaced people (IDP) in Darfur, Sudan along with innovative means for scientific visualisation of the results. Three very high spatial resolution satellite images (QuickBird: 2002, 2004, 2008) were used for: (1) extracting different types of dwellings and (2) calculating and visualizing added-value products such as dwelling density and camp structure. The results were visualized on virtual globes (Google Earth and ArcGIS Explorer) revealing the analysis results (analytical 3D views,) transformed into the third dimension (z-value). Data formats depend on virtual globe software including KML/KMZ (keyhole mark-up language) and ESRI 3D shapefiles streamed as ArcGIS Server-based globe service. In addition, means for improving overall performance of automated dwelling structures using grid computing techniques are discussed using examples from a similar study.

  18. [Injuries of the duodenum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, M P; Urakcheev, Sh K; Shlosser, K V

    2012-01-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 69 patients with injuries of the duodenum were analyzed. The most frequent causes of the injury were stab-incised wound of the abdomen (43 patients), gunshot wounds (2 patients), closed injury of the abdomen. Postoperative complications developed in 18 (26%) cases. Lethality was 20.3% (14 patients died). Injuries caused by the closed trauma were considerably more severe than those caused by wounds of the duodenum; lethality was 37.5% and 11.1% respectively. The authors discuss questions of the special diagnostics and surgical strategy for open and closed injuries of the duodenum. Causes of the development of unfavorable outcomes were pyo-septic complications associated with progressing retroperitoneal phlegmons, peritonitis, development of traumatic pancreatitis, incompetent sutures of the duodenum with a formed duodenal fistula. Therefore, the effective prophylactics of incompetent sutures of the duodenum is its decompression with aspiration of the duodenal contents as well as decreased secretion by means of drainage of the bile excreting ducts and medicamental suppression of synthesis of the digestion enzymes of the pancreas and duodenum using Octreatid which allowed considerable decrease of the number of postoperative complications.

  19. Paragliding injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger-Franke, M; Siebert, C H; Pförringer, W

    1991-06-01

    Regulations controlling the sport of paragliding were issued in April 1987 by the German Department of Transportation. The growing popularity of this sport has led to a steady increase in the number of associated injuries. This study presents the incidence, localization and degree of injuries associated with paragliding documented in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The 283 injuries suffered by 218 paragliders were documented in the period 1987-1989: 181 occurred during landing, 28 during starting procedures and nine during flight. The mean patient age was 29.6 years. There were 34.9% spinal injuries, 13.4% upper extremity injuries and 41.3% lower limb injuries. Over half of these injuries were treated surgically and in 54 instances permanent disability remained. In paragliding the lower extremities are at greatest risk of injury during landing. Proper equipment, especially sturdy footwear, exact training in landing techniques as well as improved instruction in procedures during aborted or crash landings is required to reduce the frequency of these injuries.

  20. Occupational health crossing borders part 2: Comparison of 18 occupational health systems across the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radon, Katja; Ehrenstein, Vera; Nowak, Dennis; Bigaignon-Cantineau, Janine; Gonzalez, Maria; Vellore, Arun Dev; Zamora, Veronica Enzina; Gupta, Neeraj; Huang, Lirong; Kandkers, Salamat; Lanza, Ana María Menchú; Garcia, Leila Posenato; Patsis, Keti Stylianos; Rojas, Ana Maria Sanchez; Shoma, Ashraf; Verbeek, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Occupational health and safety (OHS) is considered one of the most important factors for a sustainable development; however, it is often considered a luxury by decision-makers. This article compares OHS systems of 18 countries at different stages of development. In an international summer school, structure of the national OHS system, definition of occupational accidents and diseases, procedures for compensation claims, outcome (expressed as incidence of occupational accidents) and training opportunities were presented. National OHS systems ranged from non-existent to systems implemented almost 200 years ago. Priorities, incidence of occupational accidents and training opportunities varied. Common problems included the lack of OHS service for small enterprises and in rural areas. International training programs like this summer school might enhance the exchange about OHS opportunities around the globe and contribute to improved workers health. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  2. GIS-project: geodynamic globe for global monitoring of geological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryakhovsky, V.; Rundquist, D.; Gatinsky, Yu.; Chesalova, E.

    2003-04-01

    A multilayer geodynamic globe at the scale 1:10,000,000 was created at the end of the nineties in the GIS Center of the Vernadsky Museum. A special soft-and-hardware complex was elaborated for its visualization with a set of multitarget object directed databases. The globe includes separate thematic covers represented by digital sets of spatial geological, geochemical, and geophysical information (maps, schemes, profiles, stratigraphic columns, arranged databases etc.). At present the largest databases included in the globe program are connected with petrochemical and isotopic data on magmatic rocks of the World Ocean and with the large and supperlarge mineral deposits. Software by the Environmental Scientific Research Institute (ESRI), USA as well as ArcScan vectrorizator were used for covers digitizing and database adaptation (ARC/INFO 7.0, 8.0). All layers of the geoinformational project were obtained by scanning of separate objects and their transfer to the real geographic co-ordinates of an equiintermediate conic projection. Then the covers were projected on plane degree-system geographic co-ordinates. Some attributive databases were formed for each thematic layer, and in the last stage all covers were combined into the single information system. Separate digital covers represent mathematical descriptions of geological objects and relations between them, such as Earth's altimetry, active fault systems, seismicity etc. Some grounds of the cartographic generalization were taken into consideration in time of covers compilation with projection and co-ordinate systems precisely answered a given scale. The globe allows us to carry out in the interactive regime the formation of coordinated with each other object-oriented databases and thematic covers directly connected with them. They can be spread for all the Earth and the near-Earth space, and for the most well known parts of divergent and convergent boundaries of the lithosphere plates. Such covers and time series

  3. The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign: Empowering Students to Measure, Investigate, and Understand Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaro, J.; Andersen, T.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Wegner, K.; Tessendorf, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) is a two-year campaign focused on empowering students to measure, investigate, and understand the climate system in their local community and around the world. Schools can participate in the campaign via three mechanisms: climate foundations, intensive observing periods (IOPs), and research investigations. Participation in the first year of the SCRC focused on increasing student understanding and awareness of climate. Students in 49 countries participated by joining a quarterly webinar, completing the online climate learning activity, collecting and entering data during IOPs, or completing an online join survey. The year also included a video competition with the theme of Earth Day 2012, as well as a virtual student conference in conjunction with The GLOBE Program's From Learning to Research Project. As the SCRC continues into its second year, the goal is for students to increase their understanding of and ability to conduct scientific research focused on climate. Furthermore, year two of the SCRC seeks to improve students' global awareness by encouraging collaborations among students, teachers and scientists focused on understanding the Earth as a system. In addition to the continuation of activities from year one, year two will have even more webinars offered, two competitions, the introduction of two new IOPs, and a culminating virtual student conference. It is anticipated that this virtual conference will showcase research by students who are enthusiastic and dedicated to understanding climate and mitigating impacts of climate change in their communities. This presentation will highlight examples of how the SCRC is engaging students all over the world in hands-on and locally relevant climate research.

  4. Survey of Fertility Preservation Options Available to Patients With Cancer Around the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra S. Rashedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Oncofertility focuses on providing fertility and endocrine-sparing options to patients who undergo life-preserving but gonadotoxic cancer treatment. The resources needed to meet patient demand often are fragmented along disciplinary lines. We quantify assets and gaps in oncofertility care on a global scale. Methods: Survey-based questionnaires were provided to 191 members of the Oncofertility Consortium Global Partners Network, a National Institutes of Health–funded organization. Responses were analyzed to measure trends and regional subtleties about patient oncofertility experiences and to analyze barriers to care at sites that provide oncofertility services. Results: Sixty-three responses were received (response rate, 25%, and 40 were analyzed from oncofertility centers in 28 countries. Thirty of 40 survey results (75% showed that formal referral processes and psychological care are provided to patients at the majority of sites. Fourteen of 23 respondents (61% stated that some fertility preservation services are not offered because of cultural and legal barriers. The growth of oncofertility and its capacity to improve the lives of cancer survivors around the globe relies on concentrated efforts to increase awareness, promote collaboration, share best practices, and advocate for research funding. Conclusion: This survey reveals global and regional successes and challenges and provides insight into what is needed to advance the field and make the discussion of fertility preservation and endocrine health a standard component of the cancer treatment plan. As the field of oncofertility continues to develop around the globe, regular assessment of both international and regional barriers to quality care must continue to guide process improvements.

  5. Ontology and diversity of transcript-associated microsatellites mined from a globe artichoke EST database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Davide; Acquadro, Alberto; Portis, Ezio; Taylor, Christopher A; Lanteri, Sergio; Knapp, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Background The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus L.) is a significant crop in the Mediterranean basin. Despite its commercial importance and its both dietary and pharmaceutical value, knowledge of its genetics and genomics remains scant. Microsatellite markers have become a key tool in genetic and genomic analysis, and we have exploited recently acquired EST (expressed sequence tag) sequence data (Composite Genome Project - CGP) to develop an extensive set of microsatellite markers. Results A unigene assembly was created from over 36,000 globe artichoke EST sequences, containing 6,621 contigs and 12,434 singletons. Over 12,000 of these unigenes were functionally assigned on the basis of homology with Arabidopsis thaliana reference proteins. A total of 4,219 perfect repeats, located within 3,308 unigenes was identified and the gene ontology (GO) analysis highlighted some GO term's enrichments among different classes of microsatellites with respect to their position. Sufficient flanking sequence was available to enable the design of primers to amplify 2,311 of these microsatellites, and a set of 300 was tested against a DNA panel derived from 28 C. cardunculus genotypes. Consistent amplification and polymorphism was obtained from 236 of these assays. Their polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.04 to 0.90 (mean 0.66). Between 176 and 198 of the assays were informative in at least one of the three available mapping populations. Conclusion EST-based microsatellites have provided a large set of de novo genetic markers, which show significant amounts of polymorphism both between and within the three taxa of C. cardunculus. They are thus well suited as assays for phylogenetic analysis, the construction of genetic maps, marker-assisted breeding, transcript mapping and other genomic applications in the species. PMID:19785740

  6. Regulatory categories of probiotics across the globe: A review representing existing and recommended categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are friendly live microorganisms (in most cases, bacteria that are similar to beneficial micro-organisms found in the human gut, whenever consumed, have potential to confer benefit to the health of consumers by maintaining, or improving their intestinal microbial flora and are available to consumers mainly in the form of dietary supplements and foods. All-time high interest in the field of probiotics is due to emerging probiotic industry. Probiotics are available in foods and dietary supplements, even as pharmaceutical formulations (capsules, tablets and powders and in some other forms as well, but their claims of health benefits may challenge the traditional border between food and medicine. A number of probiotic products have been already introduced into the international market as food supplements, dietary supplements, natural health products, functional foods and many more other categories; as a result, the position of regulatory system for probiotics within existing categories become vague and quite unclear. Common terminology for probiotic products has become a necessity to achieve adequate regulatory control for discussion of probiotic-related issues among government, producers and consumers. The lack of a consistent terminology across the globe leads to legal uncertainty and confusion instead of being a direct obstacle for development of a mature market. This article will explain differences in regulatory categorizations across the globe; discuss the terms like food and drugs with a close relationship to probiotics, the problems associated with unsatisfactorily approached categorization as well as suggestive consolidations for the new categorization which will demarcate probiotics into categories explaining their nutritive claims, health claims or both.

  7. Using Online Citizen Science to Assess Giant Kelp Abundances Across the Globe with Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, J.; Cavanaugh, K. C.; Haupt, A. J.; Trouille, L.; Rosenthal, I.; Bell, T. W.; Rassweiler, A.; Pérez-Matus, A.; Assis, J.

    2017-12-01

    Global scale long-term data sets that document the patterns and variability of human impacts on marine ecosystems are rare. This lack is particularly glaring for underwater species - even moreso for ecologically important ones. Here we demonstrate how online Citizen Science combined with Landsat satellite imagery can help build a picture of change in the dynamics of giant kelp, an important coastal foundation species around the globe, from the 1984 to the present. Giant kelp canopy is visible from Landsat images, but these images defy easy machine classification. To get useful data, images must be processed by hand. While academic researchers have applied this method successfully at sub-regional scales, unlocking the value of the full global dataset has not been possible until given the massive effort required. Here we present Floating Forests (http://floatingforests.org), an international collaboration between kelp forest researchers and the citizen science organization Zooniverse. Floating Forests provides an interface that allows citizen scientists to identify canopy cover of giant kelp on Landsat images, enabling us to scale up the dataset to the globe. We discuss lessons learned from the initial version of the project launched in 2014, a prototype of an image processing pipeline to bring Landsat imagery to citizen science platforms, methods of assessing accuracy of citizen scientists, and preliminary data from our relaunch of the project. Through this project we have developed generalizable tools to facilitate citizen science-based analysis of Landsat and other satellite and aerial imagery. We hope that this create a powerful dataset to unlock our understanding of how global change has altered these critically important species in the sea.

  8. Oculocardiac reflex elicited by orbital floor fracture and inferior globe displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau M. Pham

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions and importance: The oculocardiac reflex can precipitate marked bradycardia and hypotension in the setting of trauma with significant orbital and maxillofacial injury. Prompt identification and management with vagolytic agents or definitive surgical intervention may prevent morbidity or mortality.

  9. Open Bibliography

    OpenAIRE

    Murray-Rust, Peter; Pollock, Rufus; MacGillivray, Mark; O'Steen, Ben; Waites, William

    2011-01-01

    Poster presented at the VSMF Symposium held at the Unilever Centre on 2011-01-17. More research is published currently than can be understood or followed by a researcher without the aid of a computer. We need Open shareable information on research publications, an Open Bibliography, to build the services that enable researchers to explore their field and discover the research they need. Producers of bibliographic data such as libraries, publishers, universities, scholars or social referenc...

  10. Open IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germonprez, Matt; Crowston, Kevin; Avital, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The collective intelligence and collective action of “open” communities have produced a variety of complex knowledge goods and radical social change. The Information Systems (IS) community has invested significant effort into researching open communities and the ecosystems in which they operate...... therefore seeks to stimulate a thoughtful and dynamic discussion around the proposition that becoming a more open community will enhance the IS discipline’s scholarly inquiry and global impact....

  11. Sports injury of the pediatric musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Karen; Strouse, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Sports related injuries are common in children and adolescents, with a reported incidence of around one in ten children each year. Boys incur more and severer sports injuries than girls, and chance for injury is greater with contact or jumping sports. Sports injuries seen in children under 10-years of age are non-specific, including contusions, mild sprains, and extremity fractures, usually Salter fractures of the physes (growth plate) or plastic fractures. In the very young athlete, sports injury of the ligaments or muscle is rare as are spine or head injuries. With growth and adolescence, the intensity of sports involvement increases. Pre-pubertal children still have open physes that are prone to injury, both acute or due to stress from a repetitive activity. In addition to injury of the physes of the long bones, injuries to the physes of apophyses are common. Ligamentous injury is uncommon before physeal closure, but can occur. After the physes fuse, ligamentous injury is seen with patterns similar to adults. This review will include a description of sports related injuries seen in children and adolescents. We will concentrate on injuries that are specific for the growing skeleton, with a brief mention of those seen after fusion of the physes.

  12. Gallbladder removal - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystectomy - open; Gallbladder - open cholecystectomy; Cholecystitis - open cholecystectomy; Gallstones - open cholecystectomy ... a medical instrument called a laparoscope ( laparoscopic ... Open gallbladder surgery is used when laparoscopic surgery cannot ...

  13. Whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard; Peter, Jason

    2005-10-01

    Whiplash injuries are very common and usually are associated with rear-end collisions. However, a whiplash injury can be caused by any event that results in hyperextension and flexion of the cervical spine. These injuries are of serious concern to all consumers due to escalating cost of diagnosis, treatment, insurance, and litigation. Most acute whiplash injury cases respond well to conservative treatments, which result in resolution of symptoms usually within weeks to a few months after the injury occurred. Chronic whiplash injuries often are harder to diagnose and treat and often result in poor outcomes. Current research shows that various structures in the cervical spine receive nociceptive innervation and potentially may be the cause of chronic pain symptoms. One potential pain generator showing promise is the facet or zygapophyseal joints. Various researchers have proven that these joints are injured during whiplash injuries and that diagnosis and temporary pain relief can be obtained with facet joint injections. The initial evaluation of any patient should follow an organized and stepwise approach, and more serious causes of neck pain must first be ruled out through the history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing. Treatment regimens should be evidence-based, focusing on treatments that have proven to be effective in treating acute and chronic whiplash injuries.

  14. Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trauma can happen at home, school, play or sports. Most common injuries are scratches to the cornea or blunt trauma. Approved and tested eye and face protection is essential to prevent injuries. Sports such as hockey, baseball, racquet ball, squash, and ...

  15. Rowing Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornton, Jane S; Vinther, Anders; Wilson, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    understanding in pre-participation screening, training load, emerging concepts surrounding back and rib injury, and relative energy deficiency in sport. Through a better understanding of the nature of the sport and mechanisms of injury, physicians and other healthcare providers will be better equipped to treat...

  16. Trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nysted, M; Drogset, J O

    2006-12-01

    To describe the mechanism, location and types of injury for all patients treated for trampoline-associated injuries at St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway, from March 2001to October 2004. Patients were identified from a National Injury Surveillance System. All patients were asked to complete a standard questionnaire at their first visit at the hospital. Most data were recorded prospectively, but data on the mechanism of injury, the number of participants on the trampoline at the time of injury, adult supervision and whether the activity occurred at school or in another organised setting were collected retrospectively. A total of 556 patients, 56% male and 44% female, were included. The mean age of patients was 11 (range 1-62) years. 77% of the injuries occurred on the body of the trampoline, including falls on to the mat, collisions with another jumper, falls on to the frame or the springs, and performing a somersault, whereas 22% of the people fell off the trampoline. In 74% of the cases, more than two people were on the trampoline, with as many as nine trampolinists noted at the time of injury. For children Trampolining can cause serious injuries, especially in the neck and elbow areas of young children. The use of a trampoline is a high-risk activity. However, a ban is not supported. The importance of having safety guidelines for the use of trampolines is emphasised.

  17. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  18. Sequelas pós-intubação e traqueostomia cirúrgica aberta: devemos sempre fazer a istmectomia? Postintubation injuries and open surgical tracheostomy: should we always perform isthmectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Garcia de Lima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência da equipe cirúrgica (cirurgia geral ou cirurgia torácica e da técnica operatória utilizada (com ou sem istmectomia sobre a incidência de injúrias pós-intubação nas vias aéreas em pacientes traqueostomizados. MÉTODOS: Foram prospectivamente incluídos neste estudo 164 pacientes admitidos na unidade de terapia intensiva para adultos do Hospital Estadual Sumaré e que ficaram sob intubação traqueal por mais de 24 h, no período entre 1º de janeiro e 31 de agosto de 2007. Quando foi necessária a realização de traqueostomia, os pacientes foram aleatorizados para as equipes de cirurgia geral e torácica. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos à traqueoscopia flexível para a decanulação e/ou a avaliação tardia da via aérea. RESULTADOS: Dos 164 pacientes no estudo, 90 (54,88% faleceram (sem relação com o procedimento, 67 (40,85% completaram o seguimento e 7 (4,27% tiveram seguimento parcial. Dos 67 pacientes com seguimento completo, 32 foram traqueostomizados (21 pela equipe de cirurgia geral e 11 pela equipe de cirurgia torácica. A istmectomia foi realizada em 22 pacientes (11 pela equipe de cirurgia geral e 11 pela equipe de cirurgia torácica. Não houve diferença entre o índice de complicações estomais quando se comparou as equipes, mas sim quando se comparou as técnicas (com e sem istmectomia. CONCLUSÕES: A não realização da istmectomia paralelamente à traqueostomia faz com que o cirurgião realize o óstio traqueal mais distalmente do que supõe. Nestes casos, houve um maior índice de complicações do estoma traqueal.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of the surgical team (general surgery or thoracic surgery and the surgical technique (with or without isthmectomy on the incidence of postintubation injuries in the airways of tracheostomized patients. METHODS: Between January 1st and August 31st, 2007, 164 patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit and tracheally intubated

  19. Technical Challenges and Lessons from the Migration of the GLOBE Data and Information System to Utilize Cloud Computing Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. F.; Memarsadeghi, N.; Overoye, D.; Littlefield, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Data and Information System supports an international science and education program with capabilities to accept local environment observations, archive, display and visualize them along with global satellite observations. Since its inception twenty years ago, the Web and database system has been upgraded periodically to accommodate the changes in technology and the steady growth of GLOBE's education community and collection of observations. Recently, near the end-of-life of the system hardware, new commercial computer platform options were explored and a decision made to utilize Cloud services. Now the GLOBE DIS has been fully deployed and maintained using Amazon Cloud services for over two years now. This paper reviews the early risks, actual challenges, and some unexpected findings as a result of the GLOBE DIS migration. We describe the plans, cost drivers and estimates, highlight adjustments that were made and suggest improvements. We present the trade studies for provisioning, for load balancing, networks, processing , storage, as well as production, staging and backup systems. We outline the migration team's skills and required level of effort for transition, and resulting changes in the overall maintenance and operations activities. Examples include incremental adjustments to processing capacity and frequency of backups, and efforts previously expended on hardware maintenance that were refocused onto application-specific enhancements.

  20. 25 October 2017- Austrian, German and Swiss Science Foundations signing the guest book in the Globe of Science and Innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    Austrian, German and Swiss Science Foundations in Globe: Professor Klement Tockner, Präsident, Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung, Austria; Professor Peter, Strohschneider, Präsident, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Germany; Professor Matthias Egger, Präsident, Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung, Switzerland

  1. The Costa Rica GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Project as a Learning Science Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Rojas, María Dolores; Zuñiga, Ana Lourdes Acuña; Ugalde, Emmanuel Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    GLOBE is a global educational program for elementary and high school levels, and its main purpose in Costa Rica is to develop scientific thinking and interest for science in high school students through hydrology research projects that allow them to relate science with environmental issues in their communities. Youth between 12 and 17 years old…

  2. The Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Digital Interactive Globe System Integrated into an Earth Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design and implement a digital interactive globe system (DIGS), by integrating low-cost equipment to make DIGS cost-effective. DIGS includes a data processing unit, a wireless control unit, an image-capturing unit, a laser emission unit, and a three-dimensional hemispheric body-imaging screen. A quasi-experimental study…

  3. Technical Challenges and Lessons from the Migration of the GLOBE Data and Information System to Utilize Cloud Computing Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, John F.; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Overoye, David; Littlefield, Brain

    2017-01-01

    The Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Data and Information System supports an international science and education program with capabilities to accept local environment observations, archive, display and visualize them along with global satellite observations. Since its inception twenty years ago, the Web and database system has been upgraded periodically to accommodate the changes in technology and the steady growth of GLOBEs education community and collection of observations. Recently, near the end-of-life of the system hardware, new commercial computer platform options were explored and a decision made to utilize Cloud services. Now the GLOBE DIS has been fully deployed and maintained using Amazon Cloud services for over two years now. This paper reviews the early risks, actual challenges, and some unexpected findings as a result of the GLOBE DIS migration. We describe the plans, cost drivers and estimates, highlight adjustments that were made and suggest improvements. We present the trade studies for provisioning, for load balancing, networks, processing, storage, as well as production, staging and backup systems. We outline the migration teams skills and required level of effort for transition, and resulting changes in the overall maintenance and operations activities. Examples include incremental adjustments to processing capacity and frequency of backups, and efforts previously expended on hardware maintenance that were refocused onto application-specific enhancements.

  4. Injury - kidney and ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, Post-renal failure - injury; Kidney obstruction - injury Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Molitoris BA. Acute kidney injury. In: Goldman ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  6. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Repetitive Stress Injuries What's ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  7. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in open innovation (OI) as a field of research has grown exponentially since the phrase was coined by Chesbrough in his 2003 book, with numerous articles, special issues, books, and conference sessions. Various reviews of the literature have summarized prior work, offered new frameworks......, and identified opportunities for future research. Here we summarize these opportunities, which include more research on outbound OI, the role of open innovation in services, and network forms of collaboration such as consortia, communities, ecosystems, and platforms. Research should also examine the use of OI...... by small, new, and not-for-profit organizations, as well as the linkage of individual actions and motivations to open innovation. Other opportunities include better measuring the costs, benefits, antecedents, mediators and moderators of the effects of OI on performance, and understanding why and how OI...

  8. Badminton injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøner, K; Schmidt, S A; Nielsen, A B; Yde, J; Jakobsen, B W; Møller-Madsen, B; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    In a one year period, from 1 January 1986 to 31 December 1986, 4303 patients with sports injuries were treated at Aarhus Amtssygehus and Aarhus Kommunehospital. The mean age was 21.6 years (range 7-72 years) and 2830 were men. Two hundred and seventeen badminton injuries occurred in 208 patients (136 men) with a mean age of 29.6 years (range 7-57 years), constituting 4.1 percent of all sport injuries in Aarhus. Joints and ligaments were injured in 58.5 percent of the patients, most frequently located in the lower limb and significantly more often among patients younger than 30 years of age. Muscle injury occurred in 19.8 percent of the patients. This type of injury was significantly more frequent among patients older than 30 years of age. Most injuries were minor. However, 6.8 percent of the patients were hospitalized and 30.9 percent received additional treatment by a physician. As the risk of injury varies with age, attempts to plan training individually and to institute prophylactic measures should be made. PMID:2078802

  9. Wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT)--its history and its limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Grahame M

    2008-01-01

    Wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) is nowadays the most widely used index of heat stress, yet many users appear to be unaware of its history and its limitations. HISTORY OF WBGT: WBGT was invented and first used during the 1950s as one element in a successful campaign to control serious outbreaks of heat illness in training camps of the United States Army and Marine Corps. Control measures based on air temperature and humidity, and applied to all trainees alike, had proved effective but had entailed excessive compliance costs in the form of lost training time. New control measures introduced in 1956 further reduced heat illness and also lost fewer training hours. Crucial innovations were (1) replacing the temperature and humidity measurements with WBGT, which additionally responds to sun and wind, (2) using epidemiologic analyses of casualty records to identify hazardous levels of WBGT and vulnerable trainees, and (3) protecting the most vulnerable trainees by suspending drill at lower levels of WBGT, and by improving their heat tolerance in special conditioning platoons. This campaign has considerable relevance to the prevention of heat illness in sport. LIMITATIONS OF WBGT: WBGT's most serious limitation is that environments at a given level of the index are more stressful when the evaporation of sweat is restricted (by high humidity or low air movement) than when evaporation is free. As with all indices that integrate elements of the thermal environment, interpretation of the observed levels of WBGT requires careful evaluation of people's activity, clothing, and many other factors, all of which can introduce large errors into any predictions of adverse effects. Moreover, the accuracy of WBGT is being eroded by measurement errors associated with the omission of the globe temperature, with non-standard instrumentation, and with unsatisfactory calibration procedures. Because of the above limitations WBGT can provide only a general guide to the likelihood of adverse

  10. The effect of low dose rocuronium on globe position, muscle relaxation and ventilation in dogs: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Ulrike; Mosing, Martina; Moens, Yves P S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate globe position, muscle relaxation and changes in ventilatory parameters after intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg rocuronium. Prospective clinical study. Sixteen dogs of different breeds, with a body weight of 22.1 +/- 13 kg and age of 5.6 +/- 2.8 years (mean +/- SD), were anesthetized for a short ophthalmic examination requiring central position of the globe. All dogs were premedicated with 0.005 mg/kg medetomidine and 0.1 mg/kg methadone IV. Anesthesia was induced with propofol to effect and maintained with 10 mg/kg/h propofol by continuous rate infusion. Following endotracheal intubation all dogs breathed 100% oxygen via an anesthetic circle system. Neuromuscular function was assessed with an acceleromyograph (TOF-Guard, Organon Teknika NV, Turnhout, Belgium) and by stimulation of the nervus peroneus superficialis. The ventilation parameters were measured using spirometry and capnography. After baseline measurements 0.1 mg/kg rocuronium was administered IV. Minute volume (MV), tidal volume (Vt), respiratory rate (RR), end expiratory carbon dioxide concentration (PE'CO(2)) and maximal depression of the response of the first twitch (T1) of train-of-four (TOF) stimulation and train-of-four ratio (TOFR) was measured. The change in the position of the globe was recorded. T1 decreased to 61 +/- 18% and the TOF ratio to 45 +/- 21% of baseline values. Both parameters returned to baseline after 9 min. There was no significant reduction in MV, TV and RR and no increase in PE'CO(2). The globe rotated to a central position of 45 +/- 7.7 s after administration of rocuronium and remained there for 23 +/- 10.8 min in all dogs. Rocuronium administered intravenously at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg to dogs causes a central position of the globe but minimal impairment of ventilation parameters.

  11. Trial-by-fire transformation: an interview with Globe Metallurgical's Arden C. Sims. Interview by Bruce Rayner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, A C

    1992-01-01

    Globe Metallurgical Inc., a $115 million supplier of specialty metals, is best known as the first small company to win the Baldrige Award in 1988. But there is much more to this gutsy little company than total quality. During the 1980s, Globe transformed itself from a rust-belt has-been on the verge of bankruptcy into a high-technology, high-quality industry leader. Along the way, the company went private in a management-led leveraged buyout, embraced flexible work teams, adopted a high-value-added, niche marketing strategy, and took its business global. Leading the way in Globe's reinvention was Chief Executive Arden C. Sims, the slow-talking son of a West Virginian coal miner. When he joined the company in 1984, Sims had no experience in the new managerial techniques. He was a product of the old school of management: cut costs and trim operations to regain competitiveness. But he soon discovered that old-style management was not enough to battle offshore competitors, an unproductive work force, rising costs, and outdated production technology. He was forced to go looking for new ideas and practices. In a succession of learning experiences, Sims attended a seminar on total quality in 1985, paving the way for the company's quality program; he discovered the power of flexible work teams when management was forced to run the furnaces during a year-long strike; he organized an LBO, allowing him to change the work order even more dramatically; and he took the company global and into highly profitable niche markets by severing a long-standing relationship with Globe's sales and marketing representative. As a result of these and other changes, Globe leads the specialty metals industry in virtually all performance measures.

  12. Pattern of Eye Injuries in Children in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of Eye Injuries in Children in Benin City, Nigeria. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Majority of the eye injuries were lacerations (50%). ... It is also important to educate parents and caregivers on the likely risk of injury that ...

  13. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  14. Tablet and Face-to-Face Hybrid Professional Development: Providing Earth Systems Science Educators Authentic Research Opportunities through The GLOBE Program at Purdue University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Smith, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program (www.globe.gov). GLOBE's vision promotes and supports students, teachers and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based authentic science investigations of the environment and the Earth system working in close partnership with NASA, NOAA and NSF Earth System Science Projects (ESSP's) in study and research about the dynamics of Earth's environment. GLOBE Partners conduct face-to-face Professional Development in more than 110 countries, providing authentic scientific research experience in five investigation areas: atmosphere, earth as a system, hydrology, land cover, and soil. This presentation will provide a sample for a new framework of Professional Development that was implemented in July 2013 at Purdue University lead by Mr. Steven Smith who has tested GLOBE training materials for future training. The presentation will demonstrate how institutions can provide educators authentic scientific research opportunities through various components, including: - Carrying out authentic research investigations - Learning how to enter their authentic research data into the GLOBE database and visualize it on the GLOBE website - Learn how to access to NASA's Earth System Science resources via GLOBE's new online 'e-Training Program' - Exploring the connections of their soil protocol measurements and the history of the soil in their area through iPad soils app - LIDAR data exposure, Hydrology data exposure

  15. Isolation and mapping of a C3'H gene (CYP98A49) from globe artichoke, and its expression upon UV-C stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moglia, A.; Comino, C.; Portis, E.; Acquadro, A.; Vos, de C.H.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Lanteri, S.

    2009-01-01

    Globe artichoke represents a natural source of phenolic compounds with dicaffeoylquinic acids along with their biosynthetic precursor chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid) as the predominant molecules. We report the isolation and characterization of a full-length cDNA and promoter of a globe

  16. The Open

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saitya Brata Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Open darkness and light, remembrance and oblivion, coming into existence and disappearing in death play their originary co-belonging, or co-figuration. Existence belongs to this opening and is exposed to its coming to presence: it is on the basis of this originary opening, this originary historical which is revealed to this mortal being called ‘man,’ on the basis of this revelation, man founds something like politics and history. There thus comes into existence out of this freedom, out of this “play space”2, this field called ‘polis’3 where there takes place war and festival, where historical revolutions tear apart history, brings ruptures and discontinuities in the very mode of his existence, where man seeks the foundation of his own foundation (which is his metaphysical task , where occurs the dialectics of negativity between man and man, where man puts at stake his own death, his own dissolution, and by the power of his own dissolution stands in relation to the total world that he seeks to dominate. This means that man’s attempts to metaphysically found his own political and historical existence must presuppose a far more originary non-foundation, the differentiating revealing of the open, the ungrounded spacing play, or playing space of natality and mortality.

  17. Open data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodum, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Everyone wants open data, but the road towards it can be both difficult and long. Implementation of data portals and ICT solutions for support of the data infrastructure can be initiated from the central government through legislation, regulation and public procurement. This is what you would call...

  18. Open Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Museums around the world hold enormous troves of public domain artworks. In digitized form, they can be powerful tools for research and learning, as well as building blocks, in the hands of students, teachers, scholars, developers, and creative people. By opening up their digitized assets for reuse...

  19. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dallas, TX: American Red Cross; 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  20. Chilling injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ahar

    2013-12-18

    Dec 18, 2013 ... ROS avoidance genes play pivotal role in defense mechanism against chilling injury derived oxidative stress. ... Low temperature storage is a postharvest technology ..... crops is highly dependent on ethylene production and.

  1. Injury Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Power Saws for 2001 05/15/2002 Nail Gun Related Injuries and Deaths Home Maintenance & Construction 05/ ... Information (FOIA) Inspector General No Fear Act Data USA.gov Report an Unsafe Product Contact Us: 800- ...

  2. Electrical injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 134. Price LA, Loiacono LA. Electrical and lightning injury. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical ...

  3. Ear Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of different injuries can affect the outer ear. Cauliflower ear (subperichondrial hematoma) A blunt blow to the ... to a deformed ear. This deformity, called a cauliflower ear, is common among wrestlers, boxers, and rugby ...

  4. Monitoring start of season in Alaska with GLOBE, AVHRR, and MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jessica; Dubayah, Ralph; Sparrow, Elena; Levine, Elissa

    2008-03-01

    This work evaluates whether continuity between Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is achievable for monitoring phenological changes in Alaska. This work also evaluates whether NDVI can detect changes in start of the growing season (SOS) in this region. Six quadratic regression models with NDVI as a function of accumulated growing degree days (AGDD) were developed from 2001 through 2004 AVHRR and MODIS NDVI data sets for urban, mixed, and forested land covers. Model parameters determined NDVI values for start of the observational period as well as peak and length of the growing season. NDVI values for start of the growing season were determined from the model equations and field observations of SOS made by GLOBE students and researchers at University of Alaska Fairbanks. AGDD was computed from daily air temperature. AVHRR and MODIS models were significantly different from one another with differences in the start of the observational season as well as start, peak, and length of the growing season. Furthermore, AGDD for SOS was significantly lower during the 1990s than the 1980s. NDVI values at SOS did not detect this change. There are limitations with using NDVI to monitor phenological changes in these regions because of snow, the large extent of conifers, and clouds, which restrict the composite period. In addition, differing processing and spectral characteristics restrict continuity between AVHRR and MODIS NDVI data sets.

  5. Solar Radiation Received by Slopes Using COMS Imagery, a Physically Based Radiation Model, and GLOBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Yeom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study mapped the solar radiation received by slopes for all of Korea, including areas that are not measured by ground station measurements, through using satellites and topographical data. When estimating insolation with satellite, we used a physical model to measure the amount of hourly based solar surface insolation. Furthermore, we also considered the effects of topography using the Global Land One-Kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE digital elevation model (DEM for the actual amount of incident solar radiation according to solar geometry. The surface insolation mapping, by integrating a physical model with the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS Meteorological Imager (MI image, was performed through a comparative analysis with ground-based observation data (pyranometer. Original and topographically corrected solar radiation maps were created and their characteristics analyzed. Both the original and the topographically corrected solar energy resource maps captured the temporal variations in atmospheric conditions, such as the movement of seasonal rain fronts during summer. In contrast, although the original solar radiation map had a low insolation value over mountain areas with a high rate of cloudiness, the topographically corrected solar radiation map provided a better description of the actual surface geometric characteristics.

  6. ELF Transients and Q-bursts Detected Around the Globe: First results from Palmer Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Q. A.; Moore, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    We present the first analysis of data from the recently deployed broadband ELF (5-500 Hz) B-field receiver at Palmer Station, Antarctica together with observations at similar receivers located at Sondrestromfjord, Greenland and Arrival Heights, Antarctica. Such remote locations afford the unique opportunity to record signals that are essentially unperturbed by power line noise. As a result, using this multi-site global network of ELF/VLF receivers, we are able to easily detect a particular type of ELF transient that propagates around the world multiple times, known as the Q-burst. The Q-burst is characterized by a large increase in amplitude above the background at the Schumann Resonance modes and is believed to result from especially powerful cloud-to-ground lightning discharges. These powerful lightning discharges are likely responsible for a significant level of energetic coupling between the troposphere, the ionosphere, and the magnetosphere. The ELF and VLF waves excited by the lightning discharge propagate to great distances in the earth-ionosphere waveguide, and in fact propagate around the Earth multiple times. By measuring the received waveform at multiple distant sites around the globe, we can pinpoint the source lightning location, compare the changes in field strength and spectrum as a function of distance from the source, and evaluate modal propagation effects in the VLF range (that are not apparent in the ELF range).

  7. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  8. The genome-wide identification and transcriptional levels of DNA methyltransferases and demethylases in globe artichoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoglio, Silvia; Moglia, Andrea; Acquadro, Alberto; Comino, Cinzia; Portis, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    Changes to the cytosine methylation status of DNA, driven by the activity of C5 methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases, exert an important influence over development, transposon movement, gene expression and imprinting. Three groups of C5-MTase enzymes have been identified in plants, namely MET (methyltransferase 1), CMT (chromomethyltransferases) and DRM (domains rearranged methyltransferases). Here the repertoire of genes encoding C5-MTase and demethylase by the globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) is described, based on sequence homology, a phylogenetic analysis and a characterization of their functional domains. A total of ten genes encoding C5-MTase (one MET, five CMTs and four DRMs) and five demethylases was identified. An analysis of their predicted product's protein structure suggested an extensive level of conservation has been retained by the C5-MTases. Transcriptional profiling based on quantitative real time PCR revealed a number of differences between the genes encoding maintenance and de novo methyltransferases, sometimes in a tissue- or development-dependent manner, which implied a degree of functional specialization.

  9. The genome-wide identification and transcriptional levels of DNA methyltransferases and demethylases in globe artichoke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gianoglio

    Full Text Available Changes to the cytosine methylation status of DNA, driven by the activity of C5 methyltransferases (C5-MTases and demethylases, exert an important influence over development, transposon movement, gene expression and imprinting. Three groups of C5-MTase enzymes have been identified in plants, namely MET (methyltransferase 1, CMT (chromomethyltransferases and DRM (domains rearranged methyltransferases. Here the repertoire of genes encoding C5-MTase and demethylase by the globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus is described, based on sequence homology, a phylogenetic analysis and a characterization of their functional domains. A total of ten genes encoding C5-MTase (one MET, five CMTs and four DRMs and five demethylases was identified. An analysis of their predicted product's protein structure suggested an extensive level of conservation has been retained by the C5-MTases. Transcriptional profiling based on quantitative real time PCR revealed a number of differences between the genes encoding maintenance and de novo methyltransferases, sometimes in a tissue- or development-dependent manner, which implied a degree of functional specialization.

  10. Polishers around the globe: an overview on the market of large astronomical mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhring, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical mirrors are key elements in modern optical telescopes, their dimensions are usually large and their specifications are demanding. Only a limited number of skilled companies respectively institutions around the world are able to master the challenge to polish an individual astronomical mirror, especially in dimensions above one meter. This paper presents an overview on the corresponding market including a listing of polishers around the globe. Therefore valuable information is provided to the astronomical community: Polishers may use the information as a global competitor database, astronomers and project managers may get more transparency on potential suppliers, and suppliers of polishing equipment may learn about unknown potential customers in other parts of the world. An evaluation of the historical market demand on large monolithic astronomical mirrors is presented. It concluded that this is still a niche market with a typical mean rate of 1-2 mirrors per year. Polishing of such mirrors is an enabling technology with impact on the development of technical know-how, public relation, visibility and reputation of the supplier. Within a corresponding technical discussion different polishing technologies are described. In addition it is demonstrated that strategic aspects and political considerations are influencing the selection of the optical finisher.

  11. Dietary fibre: eating habits and knowledge in different regions of the globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória Szűcs

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fibre (DF is an important component in a healthy diet and its consumption constitutes one tool that can be used to lower risk factors for many diseases. Because DF has so many health benefits, this study aimed at comparing the eating habits and attitudes towards labelling as well as the knowledge about fibre rich foods and their health effects in three countries situated in different parts of the globe (Argentina, Portugal and Hungary. For that, a descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on a convenience non-probabilistic sample of 1525 participants, by questionnaire survey. The results showed that the ingestion of DF was below the recommended dosages in the three countries, and people in general do not care much about the nutritional information in the food labels or the contents in DF. Internet appeared as a very important media that people use to get information about DF or healthy eating, while hospitals and health centre seem to fail somewhat on their educational role. Finally, in general, the respondents showed a moderate level of knowledge about the nature and sources of DF but a better knowledge about its effects on human health, being this similar among the countries at study.

  12. Web GIS in practice VII: stereoscopic 3-D solutions for online maps and virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Maged N.K.; Robinson, Larry R.

    2009-01-01

    Because our pupils are about 6.5 cm apart, each eye views a scene from a different angle and sends a unique image to the visual cortex, which then merges the images from both eyes into a single picture. The slight difference between the right and left images allows the brain to properly perceive the 'third dimension' or depth in a scene (stereopsis). However, when a person views a conventional 2-D (two-dimensional) image representation of a 3-D (three-dimensional) scene on a conventional computer screen, each eye receives essentially the same information. Depth in such cases can only be approximately inferred from visual clues in the image, such as perspective, as only one image is offered to both eyes. The goal of stereoscopic 3-D displays is to project a slightly different image into each eye to achieve a much truer and realistic perception of depth, of different scene planes, and of object relief. This paper presents a brief review of a number of stereoscopic 3-D hardware and software solutions for creating and displaying online maps and virtual globes (such as Google Earth) in "true 3D", with costs ranging from almost free to multi-thousand pounds sterling. A practical account is also given of the experience of the USGS BRD UMESC (United States Geological Survey's Biological Resources Division, Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center) in setting up a low-cost, full-colour stereoscopic 3-D system.

  13. Phenotyping, Genotyping, and Selections within Italian Local Landraces of Romanesco Globe Artichoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Crinò

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ten Italian globe artichoke clones belonging to the Romanesco typology were characterized in the western coastal area of Italy (Cerveteri, Rome, using a combination of morphological (UPOV descriptors, biochemical (HPLC analysis, and molecular (AFLP, ISSR, and SSR markers traits. Significant differences among clones were found for many of the quantitative and qualitative morphological traits. Multivariate analyses (Principal Component Analysis showed that, of the 47 morphological descriptors assessed, four (i.e., plant height, central flower-head weight, earliness, and total flower-head weight presented a clear grouping of the clones. Biochemical analyses showed that the clones significantly differed in the polyphenolic profiles of the flower-head, with the suggestion that some of these, such as S2, S3, S5, and S18, are more suitable for the fresh market. The clones, clustered by a UPGMA dendrogram based on 393 polymorphic AFLP and ISSR loci, showed that the clones were genetically separated from each other. This highlights the importance of characterizing, evaluating, and conserving autochthonous germplasm for future plant breeding activities. Overall, these studies resulted in the identification of two new clones, selected on the basis of flower-head morphology and earliness. These clones, named Michelangelo and Raffaello, are registered on the Italian National Register of Varieties (DM n. 6135, 3/29/2013 G.U. 91, 18 April 2013.

  14. Policy Entrepreneurs and Change Strategies: Lessons from Sixteen Case Studies of Water Transitions around the Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Meijerink

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the role of policy entrepreneurs in realizing water policy transitions. The central questions are to what extent have policy entrepreneurs played a role in realizing major change in water policies, who are these policy entrepreneurs, and what strategies have they used to bring about change? The policy science literature suggests that policy entrepreneurs have an "arsenal" of possible strategies for achieving change. Based on a comparative analysis of water policy changes in 15 countries around the globe and the European Union, we investigate which strategies have in practice been used by policy entrepreneurs, to what effect, and which lessons for managing water transitions we can draw from this. The comparative case analysis shows that individuals play complementary roles; hence, entrepreneurship in water management is often collective entrepreneurship. Strategies of coalition building, the manipulation of decision making forums, and the strategic framing of issues and windows are crucial to understanding water policy change, which suggests that the management of water policy transitions is a highly political game. We conclude by listing recommendations for those who would like to direct water policy change.

  15. Thermal stress analysis and operational characteristics of a bellows-seal globe valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Su; Kim, Youn Jae

    2005-01-01

    Because of design and manufacturing costs, it is important to predict an expected life of bellows with component stresses of bellows as its design factors and material characteristics. In this study, numerical analyses are carried out to elucidate the thermal and flow characteristics with 0.1 m (4 inch) bellows-seal globe valve for high temperature (max. 600 .deg. C) and for high pressure (max. 104 kgf/cm 2 , 10.2 MPa) conditions. Using commercial codes, FLUENT, which uses FVM and SIMPLE algorithm, and ANSYS, which uses FEM, the pressure and temperature fields are calculated and the results are graphically depicted. In addition, when bellows have an axial displacement, thermal stress affecting bellows life is studied. The pressure and temperature values obtained from the flow analyses are adopted as the boundary conditions for thermal stress analyses. As the result of this study, we get the reasonable coefficients for valve and thermal stress for bellows, compared with existing coefficients and calculated values

  16. Cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  17. Open Source, Open Access, Open Review, Open Data. Initiativen zu mehr Offenheit in der digitalen Welt

    OpenAIRE

    Herb, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the principles of openess, open access and open availability of information based on the examples of open access to scientific information, open government data, open geographical data and open source software.

  18. Open areas and open access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The main objective of the two open areas in the present ISABELLE design has been to provide flexibility with respect to the size and shape of experimental equipment that would eventually be installed there. No permanent building would be installed initially. One possibility would be to enclose each experiment in a temporary structure that would provide weatherproofing and shielding; another possibility would be to erect a permanent building at a later time, when experience has made the needs clearer than they are at present. The secondary objective of the design of open areas has been to keep initial costs as low as practicable. Another objective might be added, however, which we indicate by the term ''open access.'' This note will explore this idea and some design concepts based on it. In the ISABELLE 1977 summer workshop there was considerable discussion of the importance of techniques for inserting large pieces of experimental equipment quickly and removing them with equal ease and speed. Since enclosed halls have certain restrictions in this respect, open areas may be helpful in providing this feature. If the mechanical and electrical aspects could be handled quickly, one might even attempt to reduce the time spent on bureaucratic procedures in order to expedite the introduction of new experiments and new ideas in these areas

  19. OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tullney, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Präsentationsfolien zum Vortrag „OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data“ in der Session „Ausgestaltung eines wissenschaftsadäquaten APC-Marktes: Grundsätze, Finanzierungsansätze und Management“ der Open-Access-Tage 2015 in Zürich (https://www.open-access.net/community/open-access-tage/open-access-tage-2015-zuerich/programm/#c1974)

  20. Opening remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    1993-11-01

    In his opening remarks Mr. David R. Kyd briefly described the IAEA mission. Then he outlined main aim of the seminar which is bring together journalists, educators, officials and other specialists to let them hear and put questions to experts on various aspects of nuclear energy and techniques. Further he analyzed problems and prospects of energy development in Asia and particularly in China, including environmental considerations. The final part of the remarks was devoted comparative evaluation of different energy production technologies

  1. Opening address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianko, L.

    1993-01-01

    This short talk was the opening remarks to the attendees at this conference, presented by the Scientific Secretary, IWG-LMNPP, of the IAEA. This meeting is an effort to aid research on problems related to the general area of nuclear plant aging and life management. In particular it addresses fracture properties of reactor materials and components, both as installed, and at end of service condition. A major concern is relating measurements made on laboratory samples to properties displayed by actual reactor components

  2. Open Access Scholarly Publications as OER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the rationale, common practices, challenges, and some personal anecdotes from a journal editor on the production, use, and re-use of peer-reviewed scholarly articles as open educational resources (OER. The scholarly and professional discourse related to open educational resources has largely focused on open learning objects, courseware, and textbooks. However, especially in graduate education, articles published in scholarly journals are often a major component of the course content in formal education. In addition, open access journal articles are critical to expanding access to knowledge by scholars in the developing world and in fostering citizen science, by which everyone has access to the latest academic information and research results. In this article, I highlight some of the challenges, economic models, and evidence for quality of open access journal content and look at new affordances provided by the Net for enhanced functionality, access, and distribution.In the 17 years since I graduated with a doctorate degree, the climate and acceptance of open access publishing has almost reversed itself. I recall a conversation with my PhD supervisor in which he argued that publishing online was not a viable option as the product would not have permanency, scholarly recognition, or the prestige of a paper publication. His comments reflect the confusion between online resources and those described as open access, but as well illustrate the change in academic acceptance and use of open access products during the past decade. The evolution from paper to online production and consumption is a disruptive technology in which much lower cost and increased accessibility of online work opens the product to a completely new group of potential users. In the case of OER these consumers are primarily students, but certainly access to scholars from all parts of the globe and the availability to support citizen science (Silvertown, 2009

  3. The Past and Future Trends of Heat Stress Based On Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index in Outdoor Environment of Tehran City, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Mohraz, Majid; Ghahri, Asghar; Karimi, Mehrdad; Golbabaei, Farideh

    2016-06-01

    The workers who are working in the open and warm environments are at risk of health effects of climate and heat changes. It is expected that the risk is increase with global warming. This study aimed to investigate the changes of Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index in the past and to predict their trend of future changes in Tehran, capital of Iran. The meteorological data recorded in Tehran, Iran during the statistical period between 1961 and 2009 were obtained from the Iran Meteorological Organization and based on them, WBGT index was calculated and processed using Man-Kendall correlation test. The results of Man-Kendall correlation test showed that the trend of changes of annual mean WBGT during the statistical period under study (1961-2009) has been significantly increasing. In addition, the result of proposed predictive model estimated that an increase of about 1.55 degree in WBGT index will be seen over 40 years from 2009 to 2050 in Tehran. Climate change in Tehran has had an effect on person's exposure to heat stresses consistent with global warming.

  4. Study of self-pollination and capitula characteristics in globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus Hayek L. under different irrigation regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouraei, Sina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the drought effects on capitula characteristics and self-pollination of globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus Hayek L., the randomized complete block design was carried out with three irrigation regimes (20 %, 50 % and 80 % depletion of soil available water and six replicates. The artichoke is mostly open-pollinated, however, after covering the buds and isolation of flowers to prevent cross pollination, 1.79 % self-pollination was observed and this amount was not affected by different irrigation regimes. In stress conditions (50 % and 80 % water depletion as well as non-stress condition (20 % water depletion, plants with respectively one and two medium capitula and without small capitula had most relative frequencies in the population and drought stress increased these relative frequencies by reducing the number of medium and small capitula in plants. In addition, Capitula size and dry weight were significantly affected by water stress. Water shortage induced severe decrease in length and dry weight of all capitula including large, medium and small, although capitula width was less affected by water deficit and only slight decline in medium (12.5 % and small capitula (23.7 % was observed under severe stress condition.

  5. Chest Injuries Associated with Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Although there have been significant advances in management, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. Extracranial injuries, especially chest injuries increase mortality in patients with TBI in both short.

  6. Ascending aortic injuries following blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiumei; Hong, Jenny; Lowery, Robert; Goldstein, Steven; Wang, Zuyue; Lindsay, Joseph; Hill, Peter C; Corso, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and the management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries have undergone significant changes due to new technology and improved prehospital care. Most of the discussions have focused on descending aortic injuries. In this review, we discuss the recent management of ascending aortic injuries. We found 5 cohort studies on traumatic aortic injuries and 11 case reports describing ascending aortic injuries between 1998 to the present through Medline research. Among case reports, 78.9% of cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents (MVA). 42.1% of patients underwent emergent open repair and the operative mortality was 12.5%. 36.8% underwent delayed repair. Associated injuries occurred in 84.2% of patients. Aortic valve injury was concurrent in 26.3% of patients. The incidence of ascending aortic injury ranged 1.9-20% in cohort studies. Traumatic injuries to the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon among survivors following blunt trauma. Aortography has been replaced by computed tomography and echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Open repair, either emergent or delayed, remains the treatment of choice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in ...

  8. Complete chloroplast genome of the multifunctional crop globe artichoke and comparison with other Asteraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, Pasquale L; De Paola, Domenico; Danzi, Donatella; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    With over 20,000 species, Asteraceae is the second largest plant family. High-throughput sequencing of nuclear and chloroplast genomes has allowed for a better understanding of the evolutionary relationships within large plant families. Here, the globe artichoke chloroplast (cp) genome was obtained by a combination of whole-genome and BAC clone high-throughput sequencing. The artichoke cp genome is 152,529 bp in length, consisting of two single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 25,155 bp, representing the longest IRs found in the Asteraceae family so far. The large (LSC) and the small (SSC) single-copy regions span 83,578 bp and 18,641 bp, respectively. The artichoke cp sequence was compared to the other eight Asteraceae complete cp genomes available, revealing an IR expansion at the SSC/IR boundary. This expansion consists of 17 bp of the ndhF gene generating an overlap between the ndhF and ycf1 genes. A total of 127 cp simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) were identified in the artichoke cp genome, potentially suitable for future population studies in the Cynara genus. Parsimony-informative regions were evaluated and allowed to place a Cynara species within the Asteraceae family tree. The eight most informative coding regions were also considered and tested for "specific barcode" purpose in the Asteraceae family. Our results highlight the usefulness of cp genome sequencing in exploring plant genome diversity and retrieving reliable molecular resources for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies, as well as for specific barcodes in plants.

  9. Introduction to Juries and Mixed Tribunals across the Globe: New Developments, Common Challenges and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S. Marder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to the special issue describes the goals of the conference on Juries and Mixed Tribunals across the Globe, and identifies themes that emerged as jury scholars from all over the world examined different forms of lay participation in legal decision-making. The introduction focuses on common challenges that different systems of lay participation face, including the selection of impartial fact finders and the presentation of complex cases to lay citizens. The introduction and special issue articles also highlight new developments and innovative practices to address these challenges, including some tools, like decision trees, that remain highly controversial. The introduction closes by emphasizing the enduring political importance of citizen participation in law. La introducción a este número especial describe los objetivos de la conferencia sobre jurados y tribunales mixtos en el mundo, e identifica los temas que surgieron cuando académicos de todo el mundo especializados en jurados analizaron diferentes formas de participación de legos en la toma de decisiones jurídicas. La introducción se centra en los desafíos comunes a los que se enfrentan los diferentes sistemas de participación de legos, incluyendo la selección de jurados imparciales y la presentación de casos complejos a ciudadanos profanos en la materia. La introducción y el número especial también destacan nuevos desarrollos y prácticas innovadoras para afrontar estos retos, incluyendo algunas herramientas, como los árboles de decisiones, que todavía son muy controvertidas. La introducción finaliza, haciendo hincapié en la importancia política duradera de la participación ciudadana en el derecho. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2785708

  10. Relation between Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature and Thermal Work Limit Indices with Body Core Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jalali

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heat stress in casting and smelting industries can cause adverse health effects on employees who working in such industries. The present study was set to assess the correlation and agreement of heat stress indices, including wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT, and thermal work limit (TWL, and the deep body temperature indices in workers of several casting and smelting industries located in the vicinity of Tehran, Iran. In This cross-sectional study 40 workers randomly selected and were examined. WBGT and TWL were the indices used for assessing heat stress, and the tympanic temperature and the oral temperature were measured as the heat strain indices. The correlation and agreement of indices were measured using SPSS vs.16. The results of the assessment of WBGT, TWL, the tympanic temperature, and oral temperature showed that 80, 17.5, 40, and 32.5 percent of workers exposed to heat stress higher than permissible limits proposed by standard bodies. Moreover, the present study showed that the significant correlation coefficient between heat stress and heat strain indices was in the range of 0.844- 0.869. Further, there was observed a good agreement between TWL and heat strain indices. The agreement between TWL and the oral temperature was 0.63 (P-value≤ 0.001 and between TWL and tympanic temperature was 0.612 (P-value≤ 0.001. However, the agreement between WBGT and heat strain indices was not satisfactory. These values were 0.154 (P-value ≥ 0.068 and 0.215 (P-value≥ 0.028 for the oral temperature and the tympanic temperature, respectively. The TWL index had a better agreement than WBGT with heat strain indices so TWL index is the better choice for assessing the heat stress in casting and metal smelting industries.

  11. GLOBE at Night: a Worldwide Citizen-Science Program to Increase Awareness of Light Pollution by Measuring Night Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The emphasis in the international citizen-science, star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few 100,000 citizen-scientists. What has contributed to its success? Foundational resources are available to facilitate the public's participation in promoting dark skies awareness. The GLOBE at Night website explains clearly the simple-to-participate-in 5 step program and offers background information and interactive games on key concepts. To promote the campaign via popular social media, GLOBE at Night created Facebook and Twitter pages. The program has been expanded to include trainings of the general public, but especially educators in schools, museums and science centers, in unique ways. Education kits for dark skies awareness have been distributed at the training workshops. The kit includes material for a light shielding demonstration, a digital Sky Quality Meter and "Dark Skies Rangers" activities. The activities are on how unshielded light wastes energy, how light pollution affects wildlife and how one can participate in a citizen-science star-hunt like GLOBE at Night. To increase participation in the 2011 campaign, children and adults submitted their sky brightness measurements in real time with smart phones or tablets using the web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. With smart phones and tablets, the location, date and time register automatically. For those without smart mobile devices, user-friendly tools on the GLOBE at Night report page were reconfigured to determine latitude and longitude more easily and accurately. As a proto-type for taking multiple measurements, people in Tucson found it easy to adopt a street and take measurements every mile for the length of the street. The grid of measurements

  12. Proposal for the award of a contract for the wood construction work for the Globe of Innovation project

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the wood construction work for the Globe of Innovation project. A call for tenders (IT-3260/ST/GIR) was sent on 31 October 2003 to twelve firms in one Member State. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders from four firms and one consortium. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with CIB (CH), the lowest bidder, for the wood construction work for the Globe of Innovation project for an estimated amount not exceeding 820 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH - 100%.

  13. Open areas and open access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    One objective of the two open areas in the present ISABELLE design is to provide flexibility with respect to the size and shape of experimental equipment that would eventually be installed there. No permanent building would be installed initially. A second objective of the design of open areas is to keep initial costs as low as practicable. Another objective is open access. This note explores this idea and some design concepts based on it. It would permit inserting large pieces of experimental equipment quickly and removing them with equal ease and speed. Entire experiments would be moved in a single piece (or a few) by building them on movable platforms with capacities of up to about 1000 tons per platform. Most experiments could be built on a single platform or on a few. The shielding must also be moved. It must also be organized into a small number of large units. A scheme using large tanks filled with water is described. It is important to make the equipment on a given platform as complete and self-contained as possible, with a minimum of interconnections for power, coolant, controls, data transmission, etc. 5 figures

  14. Opening remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southwood, Richard

    1987-01-01

    General opening remarks to a conference on the effects of low-level radiation on man, exploring particularly areas where disagreements have most frequently been voiced. The author comments on two approaches: a) the study, stepwise of putative cause and effect chains, using models which are tested by comparing calculated and observed effects. b) the epidemiological approach by extensive correlative study of cause, correlations and effect. Attention is drawn to the confidence to be accorded to any quantitative theory supported by both approaches, and the need for further analysis if the approaches give different indications. (U.K.)

  15. Open University

    CERN Multimedia

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  16. Opening lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    The opening lecture on the results of fifty years in the nuclear energy field, deals with the main principles underlying the CEA policy concerning the fission nuclear energy transformation, i.e. the design of a nuclear industry that is a safe, high-performance and reliable source of electric power, the development of an adaptive power generation tool with the capacity to progress according to new constraints, and the necessary anticipation for preparing to the effects of the next 50 year technological leaps

  17. Upcoming opening of CERN's new Mobility Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On 29 February, CERN’s brand new Mobility Centre opened in the Globe car park. The Centre has been created to cater to the transport needs of everyone at CERN, to simplify procedures and to centralise all the transport services on offer: the rental of CERN bikes and cars, the CERN car-sharing scheme and SIXT car rental.   From 29 February onwards, the Mobility Centre in the Globe car park will be the place to go for all your duty travel needs: rental of CERN cars (with or without the CERN logo), SIXT car rental, CERN bike rental, distribution of cards allowing the use of CERN’s self-service bike- and car-sharing schemes. That same day, the premises currently housing the Car Pool in Building 130 will become the CERN garage, responsible for: upkeep and repairs on CERN bikes, minor maintenance work on CERN vehicles (e.g. replacing windscreen wipers, bulbs and fuses, refilling windscreen washer fluid, pumping up tyres, etc.), arranging and following up the repair and maintenan...

  18. Spaceflight-Induced Visual Impairment and Globe Deformations in Astronauts Are Linked to Orbital Cerebrospinal Fluid Volume Increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Noam; Bagci, Ahmet M

    2018-01-01

    Most of the astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS) develop visual impairment and ocular structural changes that are not fully reversible upon return to earth. Current understanding assumes that the so-called visual impairments/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome is caused by cephalad vascular fluid shift. This study assesses the roles of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in VIIP. Seventeen astronauts, 9 who flew a short-duration mission on the space shuttle (14.1 days [SD 1.6]) and 7 who flew a long-duration mission on the ISS (188 days [SD 22]) underwent MRI of the brain and orbits to assess the pre-to-post spaceflight changes in four categories: VIIP severity measures: globe flattening and nerve protrusion; orbital and ventricular CSF volumes; cortical gray and white matter volumes; and MR-derived ICP (MRICP). Significant pre-to-post-flight increase in globe flattening and optic nerve protrusion occurred only in the long-duration cohort (0.031 [SD 0.019] vs -0.001 [SD 0.006], and 0.025 [SD 0.013] vs 0.001 [SD 0.006]; p < 0.00002 respectively). The increased globe deformations were associated with significant increases in orbital and ventricular CSF volumes, but not with increased tissue vascular fluid content. Additionally, a moderate increase in MRICP of 6 mmHg was observed in only two ISS astronauts with large ocular structure changes. These findings are evidence for the primary role of CSF and a lesser role for intracranial cephalad fluid-shift in the formation of VIIP. VIIP is caused by a prolonged increase in orbital CSF spaces that compress the globes' posterior pole, even without a large increase in ICP.

  19. Visitors at the information point opposite the CERN reception building, learn more about the Globe of Innovation project.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Work to reassemble the former Palais de l'Equilibre, which was first erected in Neuchâtel for the EXPO.02 exhibition, began on 18 May. The sphere, measuring 40 metres in diameter, has now been renamed the Globe of Innovation. A detachment from the Swiss army is carrying out the work, which will be completed in time for the Organization's official fiftieth anniversary celebrations.

  20. Virtual Globes and Glacier Research: Integrating research, collaboration, logistics, data archival, and outreach into a single tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, M.

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Globes are a paradigm shift in the way earth sciences are conducted. With these tools, nearly all aspects of earth science can be integrated from field science, to remote sensing, to remote collaborations, to logistical planning, to data archival/retrieval, to PDF paper retriebal, to education and outreach. Here we present an example of how VGs can be fully exploited for field sciences, using research at McCall Glacier, in Arctic Alaska.

  1. Open-refrigerated retail display case temperature profile and its impact on product quality and microbiota of stored baby spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open-refrigerated display cabinets are widely used in supermarkets and grocery chains around the globe. However, the temperature conditions in these display cases are variable which may impact product quality and safety. Therefore, we investigated the quality and microbiological populations of bagge...

  2. The Costa Rica GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) Project as a Learning Science Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Rojas, María Dolores; Zuñiga, Ana Lourdes Acuña; Ugalde, Emmanuel Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    GLOBE is a global educational program for elementary and high school levels, and its main purpose in Costa Rica is to develop scientific thinking and interest for science in high school students through hydrology research projects that allow them to relate science with environmental issues in their communities. Youth between 12 and 17 years old from public schools participate in science clubs outside of their regular school schedule. A comparison study was performed between different groups, in order to assess GLOBE's applicability as a learning science atmosphere and the motivation and interest it generates in students toward science. Internationally applied scales were used as tools for measuring such indicators, adapted to the Costa Rican context. The results provide evidence statistically significant that the students perceive the GLOBE atmosphere as an enriched environment for science learning in comparison with the traditional science class. Moreover, students feel more confident, motivated and interested in science than their peers who do not participate in the project. However, the results were not statistically significant in this last respect.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  6. Dealing with Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Dealing With Sports Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Dealing With Sports Injuries ... a long way toward preventing injuries. Types of Sports Injuries Common reasons why teens get injured playing ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  10. A case of perforating injury of eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perforating globe injury is the leading cause of monocular blindness and vision loss. A 58-year-old male was injured by acupuncture needle during acupuncture treatment for his cerebral infarction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of perforating injury of the eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture. The patient was hospitalized due to diagnosis of perforating ocular injury, traumatic cataract, and corneal and iris perforating injury. Moreover, he had to accept treatments of phacoemulsification, anterior vitrectomy along with intraocular lens implantation in the sulcus to improve his visual acuity. As acupuncture therapy has been widely performed for various diseases and achieved highly approval, the aim of this report is to remind acupuncturists operating accurately to avoid unnecessary injury during the treatment process, or the cure can also become the weapon.

  11. A case of perforating injury of eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang, Han; Yichun, Kong

    2016-04-01

    Perforating globe injury is the leading cause of monocular blindness and vision loss. A 58-year-old male was injured by acupuncture needle during acupuncture treatment for his cerebral infarction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of perforating injury of the eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture. The patient was hospitalized due to diagnosis of perforating ocular injury, traumatic cataract, and corneal and iris perforating injury. Moreover, he had to accept treatments of phacoemulsification, anterior vitrectomy along with intraocular lens implantation in the sulcus to improve his visual acuity. As acupuncture therapy has been widely performed for various diseases and achieved highly approval, the aim of this report is to remind acupuncturists operating accurately to avoid unnecessary injury during the treatment process, or the cure can also become the weapon.

  12. ATLAS OpenData and OpenKey: using low tech computational tools for students training in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez Pineda, Arturos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    One of the big challenges in High Energy Physics development is the fact that many potential -and very valuable- students and young researchers live in countries where internet access and computational infrastructure are poor compared to institutions already participating. In order to accelerate the process, the ATLAS Open Data project releases useful and meaningful data and tools using standard and easy-to-deploy computational means, such as custom and light Linux Virtual Machines, open source technologies, web and desktop applications. The ATLAS Open Key, a simple USB pen, allows transporting all those resources around the globe. As simple as it sounds, this approach is helping to train students that are now PhD candidates and to integrate HEP educational programs at Master level in universities where did not exist before. The software tools and resources used will be presented, as well as results and stories, ideas and next steps of the ATLAS Open Data project.

  13. Fingertip Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Fingertip Injury Email to a friend * required fields ...

  14. Musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigirey, V

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about musculoskeletal injuries and the diagnosis of osseous tumors. The use of the radiology, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance contribute to detect the localization of the osseous lesions as well as the density (lytic, sclerotic, mixed) and the benign and malignant tumors.

  15. Traumatic Mitral Valve and Pericardial Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar Shaikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injury after blunt trauma is common but underreported. Common cardiac trauma after the blunt chest injury (BCI is cardiac contusion; it is very rare to have cardiac valve injury. The mitral valve injury during chest trauma occurs when extreme pressure is applied at early systole during the isovolumic contraction between the closure of the mitral valve and the opening of the aortic valve. Traumatic mitral valve injury can involve valve leaflet, chordae tendineae, or papillary muscles. For the diagnosis of mitral valve injury, a high index of suspicion is required, as in polytrauma patients, other obvious severe injuries will divert the attention of the treating physician. Clinical picture of patients with mitral valve injury may vary from none to cardiogenic shock. The echocardiogram is the main diagnostic modality of mitral valve injuries. Patient’s clinical condition will dictate the timing and type of surgery or medical therapy. We report a case of mitral valve and pericardial injury in a polytrauma patient, successfully treated in our intensive care unit.

  16. The miRNAome of globe artichoke: conserved and novel micro RNAs and target analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paola Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant microRNAs (miRNAs are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of several processes, including the response to biotic and abiotic stress, often contributing to the adaptive response of the plant to adverse conditions. In addition to conserved miRNAs, found in a wide range of plant species a number of novel species-specific miRNAs, displaying lower levels of expression can be found. Due to low abundance, non conserved miRNAs are difficult to identify and isolate using conventional approaches. Conversely, deep-sequencing of small RNA (sRNA libraries can detect even poorly expressed miRNAs. No miRNAs from globe artichoke have been described to date. We analyzed the miRNAome from artichoke by deep sequencing four sRNA libraries obtained from NaCl stressed and control leaves and roots. Results Conserved and novel miRNAs were discovered using accepted criteria. The expression level of selected miRNAs was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. Targets were predicted and validated for their cleavage site. A total of 122 artichoke miRNAs were identified, 98 (25 families of which were conserved with other plant species, and 24 were novel. Some miRNAs were differentially expressed according to tissue or condition, magnitude of variation after salt stress being more pronounced in roots. Target function was predicted by comparison to Arabidopsis proteins; the 43 targets (23 for novel miRNAs identified included transcription factors and other genes, most of which involved in the response to various stresses. An unusual cleaved transcript was detected for miR393 target, transport inhibitor response 1. Conclusions The miRNAome from artichoke, including novel miRNAs, was unveiled, providing useful information on the expression in different organs and conditions. New target genes were identified. We suggest that the generation of secondary short-interfering RNAs from miR393 target can be a general rule in the plant

  17. Drug-related police encounters across the globe: How do they compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caitlin E; Barratt, Monica J; Ferris, Jason A; Maier, Larissa J; Winstock, Adam R

    2018-06-01

    Drug law enforcement subsumes the majority of drug policy expenditure across the globe. Fuelled by knowledge that much of this investment is ineffective or counter-productive there have been increasing calls for cross-national comparisons to identify where policing approaches differ and what types of approaches may be more effective. Yet, to date cross-national comparison of drug law enforcement has proven a methodologically hazardous affair. Using a new drug policing module added to the 2017 Global Drug Survey, this study seeks to provide the first cross-national comparison of the incidence, nature and intensity of illicit drug-related police encounters amongst people who use drugs. The Global Drug Survey was administered in late 2016. Across 26 countries including Australia, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Switzerland, the UK and the USA a total of 45,942 people who had recently used drugs completed the drug policing module. Key variables assessed included the incidence and frequency of drug-related police encounters in the last 12 months that involved: a) being stopped and searched; b) encountering a drug detection dog; c) being given a caution or warning; d) being charged and arrested; and e) paying a bribe. Multi-level models were used to control for pre-existing national differences in drug use prevalence and non-drug specific policing (including the total number of police personnel in each country). Drug-related police encounters were most commonly reported in Italy and Scotland. Conversely, police encounters were most likely to lead to arrest in Norway, Finland and Sweden. The type and locations of encounters further differed across countries, with for example stop and search most reported in Greece and Colombia, and encounters with drug detection dogs most reported in Scotland, Italy, UK and Australia. Multi-level models showed that the incidence of reported policing encounters continued to differ significantly across countries after controlling for pre

  18. Free the Globe. (Spanish Title: Liberar al Globo Terráqueo.) Soltar o Globo Terrestre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2014-07-01

    The parallel globe is an old device, very simple and ingenious that, when systematically employed in astronomy classes, becomes a teaching tool with great potential. Properly oriented according to the local meridian, this instrument allows us to follow the shadows in any region of the Earth that is illuminated by the Sun, as well as offering a clear view of the terminator, the line that divides the day and the night on our planet. With knowledge of the shadows, it is possible to estimate the latitude of a site and to infer local solar time anywhere in the planet's sunlit hemisphere. Furthermore, by using the parallel globe we may understand simply the existence of regions in which objects sometimes do not cast shadows, and also other regions which, on the contrary, sometimes become "long-shadow" countries. In this work, we first review the device and the basics of its assembly and operation. In the second part, we describe in detail some activities targeted to facilitate its use in the classroom, which our research group has been developing during teacher training workshops. El globo terráqueo paralelo es un dispositivo antiguo, muy simple e ingenioso que empleado en forma sistemática en las clases de astronomía se convierte en una herramienta didáctica de gran potencialidad. Orientado adecuadamente de acuerdo al meridiano local, este instrumento permite seguir las sombras en cualquier región de la Tierra que esté iluminada por el Sol, además de ofrecer una visualización clara del terminador, la línea en rápido movimiento que divide el día de la noche en nuestro planeta. Con el conocimiento de las sombras, es posible estimar la latitud de un sitio e inferir la hora solar local en cualquier lugar del hemisferio iluminado del planeta. Además, mediante el empleo del globo terráqueo paralelo se puede comprender de manera simple que existan regiones donde los objetos a veces no proyectan sombras y otras, por el contrario, que a veces se convierten en "pa

  19. Opening keynote

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, B.

    1997-01-01

    In his opening address, the former premier of Ontario summarized the background of the Macdonald Committee which was appointed by his government after it became increasingly apparent that the infrastructure of Hydro Ontario was far bigger than the province and the economy could afford, and that the service that had once given Ontario tremendous competitive advantage, in the form of relatively cheap electric power, had become unsustainable in an era of economic downturn and zero inflation. He stated that the debate about Hydro is part of a broader issue, and it is no longer possible to manage our electricity system as if we were a self-enclosed universe. He predicted that the North American electricity grid will become increasingly interdependent, and that Hydro will have to develop competitive price structures, both to hold its domestic market share and to compete for export sales. He outlined the most pressing issues for Hydro as being debt reduction, while pursuing internal changes to make the organization more efficient. Organizational changes such as the creation of Ontario Hydro International, Ontario Hydro Research, separation of generation operations from the grid, and establishment of separate price and efficiency targets for the autonomous organizations within the utility family, were moves in the right direction. Equally important is to make sure that however Hydro might develop in the future, it is going to be fair to customers, and that the billions of dollars invested in Hydro by Ontario taxpayers over the years, are safeguarded

  20. Openness initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: open-quotes Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?close quotes To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts