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Sample records for open clinical trial

  1. Open-access clinical trial registries: the Italian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosconi Paola

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citizens, patients and their representatives are increasingly insisting on working with health professionals to organize and discuss research protocols. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommended setting up a public clinical trial registry where anyone can find key information about a trial. Around the world, governments have, in fact, now begun to legislate mandatory disclosure of all clinical trials. The aims of the present survey were to assess the availability of clinical trial registries for Italian citizens and to examine the transparency of the data items reported. Methods The availability of open-access clinical trial registries was surveyed on a sample of 182 websites, including research institutes and centers of excellence (IRCCS-teaching hospitals, hospitals and associations. For each registry we downloaded a sample of two trials to assess the correspondence of the data items reported. Results from the Italian and international registries were compared. Results Fifteen percent of the sample had an open-access registry of clinical trials. Comparison of the data items available, in terms of completeness and transparency, from institutional and international registries indicated wide variability. Conclusions Italian citizens, patients and their associations have scant access to local registries of clinical trials, and international registries are generally more informative. On the European level, advocacy and lobby actions are needed among citizens and patients to boost the diffusion of open-access clinical trial registries without language barriers, thereby facilitating participation, access to information, and the coordination of clinical research.

  2. Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open appendicectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Gorm; Petersen, O B; Wara, P;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopy in patients with a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis has not gained wide acceptance, and its use remains controversial. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open appendicectomy, 583 of 828 consecutive patients consented to participate...

  3. OpenTrials: towards a collaborative open database of all available information on all clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldacre, Ben; Gray, Jonathan

    2016-04-08

    OpenTrials is a collaborative and open database for all available structured data and documents on all clinical trials, threaded together by individual trial. With a versatile and expandable data schema, it is initially designed to host and match the following documents and data for each trial: registry entries; links, abstracts, or texts of academic journal papers; portions of regulatory documents describing individual trials; structured data on methods and results extracted by systematic reviewers or other researchers; clinical study reports; and additional documents such as blank consent forms, blank case report forms, and protocols. The intention is to create an open, freely re-usable index of all such information and to increase discoverability, facilitate research, identify inconsistent data, enable audits on the availability and completeness of this information, support advocacy for better data and drive up standards around open data in evidence-based medicine. The project has phase I funding. This will allow us to create a practical data schema and populate the database initially through web-scraping, basic record linkage techniques, crowd-sourced curation around selected drug areas, and import of existing sources of structured and documents. It will also allow us to create user-friendly web interfaces onto the data and conduct user engagement workshops to optimise the database and interface designs. Where other projects have set out to manually and perfectly curate a narrow range of information on a smaller number of trials, we aim to use a broader range of techniques and attempt to match a very large quantity of information on all trials. We are currently seeking feedback and additional sources of structured data.

  4. What an open source clinical trial community can learn from hackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adam G.; Day, Richard O.; Mandl, Kenneth D.; Coiera, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Summary Open sharing of clinical trial data has been proposed as a way to address the gap between the production of clinical evidence and the decision-making of physicians. Since a similar gap has already been addressed in the software industry by the open source software movement, we examine how the social and technical principles of the movement can be used to guide the growth of an open source clinical trial community. PMID:22553248

  5. Targeting targeted agents: open issues for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannarelli Diana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of solid tumors had entered the market in the last 5 years, with a great impact upon both the scientific community and the society. Many randomized phase III trials conducted in recent years with new targeted agents, despite previous data coming from preclinical research and from phase II trials were often promising, have produced disappointingly negative results. Some other trials have actually met their primary endpoint, demonstrating a statistically significant result favouring the experimental treatment. Unfortunately, with a few relevant exceptions, this advantage is often small, if not negligible, in absolute terms. The difference between statistical significance and clinical relevance should always be considered when translating clinical trials' results in the practice. The reason why this 'revolution' did not significantly impact on cancer treatment to displace chemotherapy from the patient' bedside is in part due to complicated, and in many cases, unknown, mechanisms of action of such drugs; indeed, the traditional way the clinical investigators were used to test the efficacy of 'older' chemotherapeutics, has become 'out of date' from the methodological perspective. As these drugs should be theoretically tailored upon featured bio-markers expressed by the patients, the clinical trial design should follow new rules based upon stronger hypotheses than those developed so far. Indeed, the early phases of basic and clinical drug development are crucial in the correct process which is able to correctly identify the target (when present. Targeted trial designs can result in easier studies, with less, better selected, and supported by stronger proofs of response evidences, patients, in order to not waste time and resources.

  6. DO CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL POPULATIONS TRULY REPRESENT CANCER PATIENTS? A COMPARISON OF OPEN CLINICAL TRIALS TO THE CANCER GENOME ATLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geifman, Nophar; Butte, Atul J

    2016-01-01

    Open clinical trial data offer many opportunities for the scientific community to independently verify published results, evaluate new hypotheses and conduct meta-analyses. These data provide a springboard for scientific advances in precision medicine but the question arises as to how representative clinical trials data are of cancer patients overall. Here we present the integrative analysis of data from several cancer clinical trials and compare these to patient-level data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Comparison of cancer type-specific survival rates reveals that these are overall lower in trial subjects. This effect, at least to some extent, can be explained by the more advanced stages of cancer of trial subjects. This analysis also reveals that for stage IV cancer, colorectal cancer patients have a better chance of survival than breast cancer patients. On the other hand, for all other stages, breast cancer patients have better survival than colorectal cancer patients. Comparison of survival in different stages of disease between the two datasets reveals that subjects with stage IV cancer from the trials dataset have a lower chance of survival than matching stage IV subjects from TCGA. One likely explanation for this observation is that stage IV trial subjects have lower survival rates since their cancer is less likely to respond to treatment. To conclude, we present here a newly available clinical trials dataset which allowed for the integration of patient-level data from many cancer clinical trials. Our comprehensive analysis reveals that cancer-related clinical trials are not representative of general cancer patient populations, mostly due to their focus on the more advanced stages of the disease. These and other limitations of clinical trials data should, perhaps, be taken into consideration in medical research and in the field of precision medicine.

  7. Laparoscopic vs open incisional hernia repair a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. Eker (Hasan); B.M. Hansson; M. Buunen (Mark); I.M.C. Janssen (Ignace); R.E.G.J.M. Pierik (Robert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap); J. Jeekel (Hans); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Incisional hernia is the most frequent surgical complication after laparotomy. Up to 30% of all patients undergoing laparotomy develop an incisional hernia. Objective: To compare laparoscopic vs open ventral incisional hernia repairwith regard to postoperative pain and

  8. Laparoscopic vs open incisional hernia repair a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. Eker (Hasan); B.M. Hansson; M. Buunen (Mark); I.M.C. Janssen (Ignace); R.E.G.J.M. Pierik (Robert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.J. Bonjer (Jaap); J. Jeekel (Hans); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractImportance: Incisional hernia is the most frequent surgical complication after laparotomy. Up to 30% of all patients undergoing laparotomy develop an incisional hernia. Objective: To compare laparoscopic vs open ventral incisional hernia repairwith regard to postoperative pain and nausea

  9. Supporting open access to clinical trial data for researchers: The Duke Clinical Research Institute-Bristol-Myers Squibb Supporting Open Access to Researchers Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencina, Michael J; Louzao, Darcy M; McCourt, Brian J; Adams, Monique R; Tayyabkhan, Rehbar H; Ronco, Peter; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-02-01

    There are growing calls for sponsors to increase transparency by providing access to clinical trial data. In response, Bristol-Myers Squibb and the Duke Clinical Research Institute have collaborated on a new initiative, Supporting Open Access to Researchers. The aim is to facilitate open sharing of Bristol-Myers Squibb trial data with interested researchers. Key features of the Supporting Open Access to Researchers data sharing model include an independent review committee that ensures expert consideration of each proposal, stringent data deidentification/anonymization and protection of patient privacy, requirement of prespecified statistical analysis plans, and independent review of manuscripts before submission for publication. We believe that these approaches will promote open science by allowing investigators to verify trial results as well as to pursue interesting secondary uses of trial data without compromising scientific integrity.

  10. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  11. Open-source mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in low-resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Joris; Omondi Onyango, Kevin; Midamba, Brian; Groosman, Nele; Hooper, Norman; Spector, Jonathan; Pillai, Goonaseelan (Colin); Ogutu, Bernhards

    2017-01-01

    Background Governments, universities and pan-African research networks are building durable infrastructure and capabilities for biomedical research in Africa. This offers the opportunity to adopt from the outset innovative approaches and technologies that would be challenging to retrofit into fully established research infrastructures such as those regularly found in high-income countries. In this context we piloted the use of a novel mobile digital health platform, designed specifically for low-resource environments, to support high-quality data collection in a clinical research study. Objective Our primary aim was to assess the feasibility of a using a mobile digital platform for clinical trial data collection in a low-resource setting. Secondarily, we sought to explore the potential benefits of such an approach. Methods The investigative site was a research institute in Nairobi, Kenya. We integrated an open-source platform for mobile data collection commonly used in the developing world with an open-source, standard platform for electronic data capture in clinical trials. The integration was developed using common data standards (Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model), maximising the potential to extend the approach to other platforms. The system was deployed in a pharmacokinetic study involving healthy human volunteers. Results The electronic data collection platform successfully supported conduct of the study. Multidisciplinary users reported high levels of satisfaction with the mobile application and highlighted substantial advantages when compared with traditional paper record systems. The new system also demonstrated a potential for expediting data quality review. Discussion and Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of using a mobile digital platform for clinical research data collection in low-resource settings. Sustainable scientific capabilities and infrastructure are essential to attract and

  12. Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open repair of the perforated peptic ulcer: The LAMA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta); J.A. Halm (Jens); W.A. Bemelman (Willem); A.C. van der Ham (Arie); E. van der Harst (Erwin); H.I. Oei (Hok); J.F. Smulders; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Laparoscopic surgery has become popular during the last decade, mainly because it is associated with fewer postoperative complications than the conventional open approach. It remains unclear, however, if this benefit is observed after laparoscopic correction of perforated

  13. Randomized Clinical Trial of Laparoscopic Versus Open Repair of the Perforated Peptic Ulcer: The LAMA Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff; J.A. Halm; W.A. Bemelman; A.C. van der Ham; E. van der Harst; H.I. Oei; J.F. Smulders; E.W. Steyerberg; J.F. Lange

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become popular during the last decade, mainly because it is associated with fewer postoperative complications than the conventional open approach. It remains unclear, however, if this benefit is observed after laparoscopic correction of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). The goa

  14. Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open repair of the perforated peptic ulcer: The LAMA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.O.E. Bertleff (Marietta); J.A. Halm (Jens); W.A. Bemelman (Willem); A.C. van der Ham (Arie); E. van der Harst (Erwin); H.I. Oei (Hok); J.F. Smulders; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Laparoscopic surgery has become popular during the last decade, mainly because it is associated with fewer postoperative complications than the conventional open approach. It remains unclear, however, if this benefit is observed after laparoscopic correction of perforated pep

  15. Randomized Clinical Trial of Laparoscopic Versus Open Repair of the Perforated Peptic Ulcer: The LAMA Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertleff, M.J.O.E.; Halm, J.A.; Bemelman, W.A.; van der Ham, A.C.; van der Harst, E.; Oei, H.I.; Smulders, J.F.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Lange, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become popular during the last decade, mainly because it is associated with fewer postoperative complications than the conventional open approach. It remains unclear, however, if this benefit is observed after laparoscopic correction of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). The

  16. Outcomes of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for cerebral palsy: an open label uncontrolled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Liem Thanh; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Vu, Chinh Duy; Ngo, Doan V; Bui, Anh V

    2017-04-12

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising method for improving motor function of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of this study is to assess the safety and effectiveness of autologous bone marrow mononuclear stem cell transplantation in patients with cerebral palsy related to oxygen deprivation. An open label uncontrolled clinical trial was carried out at Vinmec International Hospital. The intervention consisted of two administrations of stem cells, the first at baseline and the second 3 months later. Improvement was monitored at 3 months and 6 months after the first administration of stem cells, using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Modified Ashworth Score which measures muscle tone. No severe complications were recorded during the study. After transplantation, 12 patients encountered fever without infections and 9 patients experienced vomiting which was easily managed with medications. Gross motor function was markedly improved 3 months or 6 months after stem cell transplantation than at baseline. The post-transplantation GMFM-88 total score, each of its domains and the GMFM-66 percentile were all significantly higher (p-value  0.05). Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation appears to be a safe and effective therapy for patients with cerebral palsy. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02569775 . Retrospectively registered on October 15, 2015.

  17. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... analysis. RESULTS: By July 2008, 27 hospitals from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Denmark, South Korea and Canada had included 739 patients. The intra-operative conversion rate in the laparoscopic group was 17%. Distribution of age, location of the tumor and radiotherapy were equal...

  18. 'PACE-Gate': When clinical trial evidence meets open data access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Keith J

    2017-08-01

    Science is not always plain sailing and sometimes the voyage is across an angry sea. A recent clinical trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (the PACE trial) has whipped up a storm of controversy. Patients claim the lead authors overstated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy by lowering the thresholds they used to determine improvement. In this extraordinary case, patients discovered that the treatments tested had much lower efficacy after an information tribunal ordered the release of data from the PACE trial to a patient who had requested access using a freedom of information request.

  19. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study ...

  20. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buunen, M; Bonjer, H J; Hop, W C J;

    2009-01-01

    clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...

  1. What Are Clinical Trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Clinical ... conducted all the time. The Different Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials related to drugs are classified into ...

  2. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  3. Open and Closed Endotracheal Suctioning and Arterial Blood Gas Values: A Single-Blind Crossover Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Faraji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This study was aimed at comparing the effects of the open and closed suctioning techniques on the arterial blood gas values in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Methods. In a clinical trial, we recruited 42 patients after open-heart surgery in an educational hospital. Each patient randomly underwent both open and closed suctioning. ABGs, PaO2, SaO2, PaCO2, were analyzed before and one, five, and fifteen minutes after each suctioning episode. Results. At first the pressure of oxygen in arterial blood increased; however, this increase in the open technique was greater than that of the closed system (P<0.001. The pressure of oxygen decreased five and fifteen minutes after both suctioning techniques (P<0.05. The trends of carbon dioxide variations after the open and closed techniques were upward and downward, respectively. Moreover, the decrease in the level of oxygen saturation five and fifteen minutes after the open suctioning was greater than that of the closed suctioning technique (P<0.05.  Conclusion. Arterial blood gas disturbances in the closed suctioning technique were less than those of the open technique. Therefore, to eliminate the unwanted effects of endotracheal suctioning on the arterial blood gases, the closed suctioning technique is recommended.

  4. Arnica montana gel in osteoarthritis of the knee: an open, multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuesel, Otto; Weber, Michel; Suter, Andy

    2002-01-01

    This open multicenter trial investigated the safety and efficacy of an Arnica montana fresh plant gel, applied twice daily, in 26 men and 53 women with mild to moderate osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. After 3 and 6 weeks, significant decreases in median total scores on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were evident in the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations (both P < .0001). Scores on the pain, stiffness, and function subscales also showed significant reductions at these timepoints. The overall local adverse-event rate of 7.6% included only one allergic reaction. Sixty-nine patients (87%) rated the tolerability of the gel as "good" or "fairly good," and 76% would use it again. Topical application of Arnica montana gel for 6 weeks was a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment of mild to moderate OA of the knee.

  5. Multicenter, open-label, exploratory clinical trial with Rhodiola rosea extract in patients suffering from burnout symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Siegfried Kasper,1 Angelika Dienel2 1Universitätsklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Medizinische Universität Wien, Wien, Austria; 2Dr Willmar Schwabe GmbH & Co. KG, Karlsruhe, Germany Purpose: This study is the first clinical trial aiming to explore the clinical outcomes in burnout patients treated with Rhodiola rosea. The reported capacity of R. rosea to strengthen the organism against stress and its good tolerability offer a promising approach in the treatment of stress-related burnout. The aim of the treatment was to increase stress resistance, thus addressing the source rather than the symptoms of the syndrome and preventing subsequent diseases associated with a history of burnout. The objective of the trial was to provide the exploratory data required for planning future randomized trials in burnout patients in order to investigate the clinical outcomes of treatment with R. rosea dry extract in this target group.Methods: The study was planned as an exploratory, open-label, multicenter, single-arm trial. A wide range of rating scales were assessed and evaluated in an exploratory data analysis to generate hypotheses regarding clinical courses and to provide a basis for the planning of subsequent studies. A total of 118 outpatients were enrolled. A daily dose of 400 mg R. rosea extract (WS® 1375, Rosalin was administered over 12 weeks. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the German version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Burnout Screening Scales I and II, Sheehan Disability Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Number Connection Test, Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire, Numerical Analogue Scales for different stress symptoms and impairment of sexual life, Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Clinical Global Impression Scales. Results: The majority of the outcome measures showed clear improvement over time. Several parameters had already improved after 1 week of treatment and continued to improve further up to

  6. Multicenter, open-label, exploratory clinical trial with Rhodiola rosea extract in patients suffering from burnout symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Dienel, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study is the first clinical trial aiming to explore the clinical outcomes in burnout patients treated with Rhodiola rosea. The reported capacity of R. rosea to strengthen the organism against stress and its good tolerability offer a promising approach in the treatment of stress-related burnout. The aim of the treatment was to increase stress resistance, thus addressing the source rather than the symptoms of the syndrome and preventing subsequent diseases associated with a history of burnout. The objective of the trial was to provide the exploratory data required for planning future randomized trials in burnout patients in order to investigate the clinical outcomes of treatment with R. rosea dry extract in this target group. Methods The study was planned as an exploratory, open-label, multicenter, single-arm trial. A wide range of rating scales were assessed and evaluated in an exploratory data analysis to generate hypotheses regarding clinical courses and to provide a basis for the planning of subsequent studies. A total of 118 outpatients were enrolled. A daily dose of 400 mg R. rosea extract (WS® 1375, Rosalin) was administered over 12 weeks. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the German version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Burnout Screening Scales I and II, Sheehan Disability Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Number Connection Test, Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire, Numerical Analogue Scales for different stress symptoms and impairment of sexual life, Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Clinical Global Impression Scales. Results The majority of the outcome measures showed clear improvement over time. Several parameters had already improved after 1 week of treatment and continued to improve further up to the end of the study. The incidence of adverse events was low with 0.015 events per observation day. Discussion The trial reported here was the first to investigate clinical outcomes in patients suffering from burnout

  7. Multicenter, open-label, exploratory clinical trial with Rhodiola rosea extract in patients suffering from burnout symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Dienel, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    This study is the first clinical trial aiming to explore the clinical outcomes in burnout patients treated with Rhodiola rosea. The reported capacity of R. rosea to strengthen the organism against stress and its good tolerability offer a promising approach in the treatment of stress-related burnout. The aim of the treatment was to increase stress resistance, thus addressing the source rather than the symptoms of the syndrome and preventing subsequent diseases associated with a history of burnout. The objective of the trial was to provide the exploratory data required for planning future randomized trials in burnout patients in order to investigate the clinical outcomes of treatment with R. rosea dry extract in this target group. The study was planned as an exploratory, open-label, multicenter, single-arm trial. A wide range of rating scales were assessed and evaluated in an exploratory data analysis to generate hypotheses regarding clinical courses and to provide a basis for the planning of subsequent studies. A total of 118 outpatients were enrolled. A daily dose of 400 mg R. rosea extract (WS(®) 1375, Rosalin) was administered over 12 weeks. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the German version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Burnout Screening Scales I and II, Sheehan Disability Scale, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Number Connection Test, Multidimensional Mood State Questionnaire, Numerical Analogue Scales for different stress symptoms and impairment of sexual life, Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, and the Clinical Global Impression Scales. The majority of the outcome measures showed clear improvement over time. Several parameters had already improved after 1 week of treatment and continued to improve further up to the end of the study. The incidence of adverse events was low with 0.015 events per observation day. The trial reported here was the first to investigate clinical outcomes in patients suffering from burnout symptoms when treated with R

  8. Electronic data capture for registries and clinical trials in orthopaedic surgery: open source versus commercial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jatin; Rajgor, Dimple; Pradhan, Shreyasee; McCready, Mariana; Zaveri, Amrapali; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-10-01

    Collection and analysis of clinical data can help orthopaedic surgeons to practice evidence based medicine. Spreadsheets and offline relational databases are prevalent, but not flexible, secure, workflow friendly and do not support the generation of standardized and interoperable data. Additionally these data collection applications usually do not follow a structured and planned approach which may result in failure to achieve the intended goal. Our purposes are (1) to provide a brief overview of EDC systems, their types, and related pros and cons as well as to describe commonly used EDC platforms and their features; and (2) describe simple steps involved in designing a registry/clinical study in DADOS P, an open source EDC system. WHERE ARE WE NOW?: Electronic data capture systems aimed at addressing these issues are widely being adopted at an institutional/national/international level but are lacking at an individual level. A wide array of features, relative pros and cons and different business models cause confusion and indecision among orthopaedic surgeons interested in implementing EDC systems. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: To answer clinical questions and actively participate in clinical studies, orthopaedic surgeons should collect data in parallel to their clinical activities. Adopting a simple, user-friendly, and robust EDC system can facilitate the data collection process. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Conducting a balanced evaluation of available options and comparing them with intended goals and requirements can help orthopaedic surgeons to make an informed choice.

  9. Efficacy of beta-carotene topical application in melasma: An open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar H

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available b-carotene, a structural analogue of vitamin A, works as an agonist of this vitamin, by reversibly sticking the chemical mechanism of melanogenesis by saturating the nuclear receptors of melanocytes and/or binding protein. To study the safety and efficacy of b-carotene lotion on topical application in melasma, clinically diagnosed 31 adults (26F and 5M with melasma were included in this trial. All of them applied b-carotene lotion daily, morning and evening to the affected areas. Twenty six of them completed regular 8 weeks treatment. Nine of them continued same treatment for 16 more weeks. All cases were evaluated clinically using melasma intensity (MPi index (Grade I, II, III and size of the lesion. Clinical photograph was taken for each case at 0 week, 8′h week and 24th week. Initial 8 weeks treatment revealed that the single case with grade-I pigmentation included in this study recovered completely. Two out of 13 cases with grade-II pigmentation, showed no change, in 10 cases, pigmentation became lighter to grade-I (76. 9% and one case recovered completely. Out of 12 grade-III cases, one did not show any change, 10(83. 3% converted to grade-II and one to grade-I. At the end of 24 weeks, all the nine cases (2 grade-II and 7 grade III showed further clearing of the pigmentation to the next lower grade. Side-effects like mild erythema and local irritation were observed in two cases each, who were advised to discontinue treatment as per the protocol. In conclusion, topical application of b-carotene lotion appears to bean effective and safe for melosma. Longer duration of application is associated with better result.

  10. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Information Treatment Types of Treatment Clinical Trials Clinical Trials Clinical Trials SHARE: Print Glossary Taking part in a clinical ... for cancer are based on previous clinical trials. Clinical Trial Service: LLS provides personalized clinical trial navigation when ...

  11. Efficacy of beta-carotene topical application in melasma - An open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar H

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Beta-carotene, a structural analogue of vitamin A, works as an agonist of this vitamin, by reversibly sticking the chemical mechanism of melanogenesis by saturating the nuclear receptors of melanocytes and /or binding protein. To study the safety and efficacy of Beta-carotene lotion on topical application in melasma, clinically diagnosed 31 adults (26Fand 5M with melasma were included in this trial. All of them applied Beta-carotene lotion daily, morning and evening to the affected areas. Twenty six of them, completed regular 8 weeks treatment. Nine of them continued same treatment for 16 more weeks. All cases were evaluated clinically using melasma intensity (MPI index (Grade I, II, III and size of the lesion. Clinical photograph was taken for each case at 0 week, 8th week and 24th week. Initial 8 weeks treatment revealed that the single case with grade-I pigmentation included in this study recovered completely. Two out of 13 cases with grade-II pigmentation, showed no change, in 10 cases, pigmentation became lighter to grade-I (76.9% and one case recovered completely. Out of 12 grade-III cases, one did not show any change, 10(83.3% converted to grade-II and one to grade-I. At the end of 24 weeks, all the nine cases (2 grade-II and 7 grade-III showed further clearing of the pigmentation to the next lower grade. Side effects like mild erythemo and local irritation were observed in two cases each, who were advised to discontinue treatment as per the protocol. In control group, out of 12 (two with grade -II, six in grade - II, and four in grade-III cases 11 showed no improvement, only one case with grade-II melasma revealed reduction of pigmentation to grade-I. One case developed local irritation. In conclusion, topical application of Beta-carotene lotion appears to be an effective and safe for melasma. Longer duration of application is associated with better result.

  12. The effect of laser and botulinum toxin in the treatment of myofascial pain and mouth opening: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, Bethânia Molin Giaretta; Magro, Alessandra Kuhn Dall; Souza-Silva, Bianca Núbia; Matos, Felipe de Souza; De Carli, João Paulo; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Magro, Eduardo Dall

    2016-06-01

    This study conducted a randomized clinical trial in 15 patients, who sought care at the Dental Clinic of the University of Passo Fundo, in order to compare the use of low-level laser and botulinum toxin in the treatment of myofascial pain and whether they alter the mouth opening of patients with temporomandibular disorder. The patients were divided into two groups: the Laser group received low-level GaAlAs laser, 100mW of power at a wavelength of 830nm in continuous light emission; and the Toxin group received 30U of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the first session, and 15U after fifteen days. The assessments were performed by measuring pain with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and mouth opening with a digital caliper. Data were submitted to Student's t test at 5% significance level. Regarding pain symptoms, the results indicate that groups treated with laser and toxin registered 7U in VAS, at day 5 the scores were 4.75 and 4.86U, respectively. The laser worked faster (day 12) at 2.75U, and the group treated with BTX-A registered 2.86U at day 30. Both therapies investigated were effective in reducing pain, but the effect of low-level laser was faster than the use of BTX-A. Both treatments showed no statistically significant improvement in mouth opening.

  13. OxMaR: open source free software for online minimization and randomization for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Minimization is a valuable method for allocating participants between the control and experimental arms of clinical studies. The use of minimization reduces differences that might arise by chance between the study arms in the distribution of patient characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age. However, unlike randomization, minimization requires real time assessment of each new participant with respect to the preceding distribution of relevant participant characteristics within the different arms of the study. For multi-site studies, this necessitates centralized computational analysis that is shared between all study locations. Unfortunately, there is no suitable freely available open source or free software that can be used for this purpose. OxMaR was developed to enable researchers in any location to use minimization for patient allocation and to access the minimization algorithm using any device that can connect to the internet such as a desktop computer, tablet or mobile phone. The software is complete in itself and requires no special packages or libraries to be installed. It is simple to set up and run over the internet using online facilities which are very low cost or even free to the user. Importantly, it provides real time information on allocation to the study lead or administrator and generates real time distributed backups with each allocation. OxMaR can readily be modified and customised and can also be used for standard randomization. It has been extensively tested and has been used successfully in a low budget multi-centre study. Hitherto, the logistical difficulties involved in minimization have precluded its use in many small studies and this software should allow more widespread use of minimization which should lead to studies with better matched control and experimental arms. OxMaR should be particularly valuable in low resource settings.

  14. OxMaR: open source free software for online minimization and randomization for clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A O'Callaghan

    Full Text Available Minimization is a valuable method for allocating participants between the control and experimental arms of clinical studies. The use of minimization reduces differences that might arise by chance between the study arms in the distribution of patient characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age. However, unlike randomization, minimization requires real time assessment of each new participant with respect to the preceding distribution of relevant participant characteristics within the different arms of the study. For multi-site studies, this necessitates centralized computational analysis that is shared between all study locations. Unfortunately, there is no suitable freely available open source or free software that can be used for this purpose. OxMaR was developed to enable researchers in any location to use minimization for patient allocation and to access the minimization algorithm using any device that can connect to the internet such as a desktop computer, tablet or mobile phone. The software is complete in itself and requires no special packages or libraries to be installed. It is simple to set up and run over the internet using online facilities which are very low cost or even free to the user. Importantly, it provides real time information on allocation to the study lead or administrator and generates real time distributed backups with each allocation. OxMaR can readily be modified and customised and can also be used for standard randomization. It has been extensively tested and has been used successfully in a low budget multi-centre study. Hitherto, the logistical difficulties involved in minimization have precluded its use in many small studies and this software should allow more widespread use of minimization which should lead to studies with better matched control and experimental arms. OxMaR should be particularly valuable in low resource settings.

  15. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Publications Data Sharing and Other Resources Research Clinical Trials & Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links ... health care providers, and researchers. Find NICHD-Supported Clinical Trials Use this link to find a list of ...

  16. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  17. An Open Letter to the Cancer Community Regarding Community Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is in the process of combining its two community-based research networks to create a single network that builds on the strengths of the Community Clinical Oncology Program/Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Prog

  18. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health Information > Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people ... vision research in the United States. Basics of Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are ...

  19. Clinical trial results of a modified gore excluder endograft: comparison with open repair and original device design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curci, John A; Fillinger, Mark F; Naslund, Thomas C; Rubin, Brian G

    2007-05-01

    A multicenter phase II clinical trial of aneurysm treatment was performed with the modified Gore Excluder bifurcated endoprosthesis (m-EBE, n = 193) and compared with previously reported results from the same group of the original unmodified device (EBE, n = 253) or standard open aneurysm exclusion (control, n = 99). Graft modifications were primarily related to the proximal attachment site and included an increase in the length of the external expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and modifications of the anchor configuration. Preprocedural characteristics, periprocedural clinical events, and postprocedural clinical and radiographic follow-up at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistics. Device placement was successful in all cases, and there were no aneurysm ruptures in any group. Survival to 2 years was similar in all groups. Early major adverse events with the m-EBE were similar to those with the EBE (14.5% vs. 14%, P = 0.9) and markedly reduced compared to the control group (60.6%, P EBE (2% vs. 6% with the EBE, P EBE compared to the EBE during 14- to 28-month follow-up (15.6% vs. 24.9%, P = 0.037), in part due to the difference in reinterventions. The safety and efficacy of the m-EBE are statistically similar to the original device, although there was a reduction in major late adverse events between the two iterations of the endograft. This difference appears to be related to increased operator experience and changing treatment algorithms. Compared with open aneurysm repair, endoluminal repair with the m-EBE offers advantages in the reduction of early major adverse events while maintaining similar survival and rupture-free outcomes in the intermediate term.

  20. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and her initial results. Nueva Esperanza Para Las Enfermedades Del Corazón 09/23/2014 Milena tuvo un ... Story 09/23/2014 Nueva Esperanza Para Las Enfermedades Del Corazón 09/23/2014 Children and Clinical ...

  1. COMBINED THERAPY OF VIRAL DIARRHEA IN CHILDREN: FIRST RESULTS OF AN OPEN COMPARATIVE RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL OF INTERFERON EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Gorelov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an interim statistical analysis of the open multicenter randomized clinical trial, whose goal was to evaluate the efficiency and safety of immunomodulatory therapy of acute intestinal infections of viral etiology in children. Patients and methods: at this stage 28 children aged 6 months to 6 years with a clinically diagnosed viral diarrhea were included in the study. Children were randomly assigned to two groups: basic, where for the treatment was used the suppository preparation of recombinant human interferon alpha-2b in combination with taurine, and a control group, where the patients admitted the drug as the recombinant human interferon alpha-2b in combination with a complex immunoglobulin preparation. The dynamics of the relief of individual viral diarrhea symptoms was assessed within 5 days after the patient was included in the study. Results: the analysis of the data revealed no significant differences in the efficiency of the investigated drugs, this fact suggests the equivalence of the produced therapeutic effect. The use of the preparation containing recombinant human interferon alpha-2b in combination with taurine, reduces the level of a drug load on the child’s organism without loss of the treatment efficiency.Key words: recombinant human interferon alpha-2b, taurine, an acute intestinal infection of viral etiology, treatment, children.

  2. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan ...

  3. Ringer’s lactate, but not hydroxyethyl starch, prolongs the food intolerance time after major abdominal surgery; an open-labelled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuhong; He, Rui; Ying, Xiaojiang; Hahn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background: The infusion of large amounts of Ringers lactate prolongs the functional gastrointestinal recovery time and increases the number of complications after open abdominal surgery. We performed an open-labelled clinical trial to determine whether hydroxyethyl starch or Ringers lactate exerts these adverse effects when the surgery is performed by laparoscopy. Methods: Eighty-eight patients scheduled for major abdominal cancer surgery (83% by laparoscopy) received a first-line fluid trea...

  4. Perioperative glutamine supplementation restores disturbed renal arginine synthesis after open aortic surgery: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Saskia J H; Buijs, Nikki; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Oosterink, Efraim; Schierbeek, Henk; Beishuizen, Albertus; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Wisselink, Willem; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative renal failure is a common complication after open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The amino acid arginine is formed in the kidneys from its precursor citrulline, and citrulline is formed from glutamine in the intestines. Arginine enhances the function of the immune and cardiovascular systems, which is important for recovery after surgery. We hypothesized that renal arginine production is diminished after ischemia-reperfusion injury caused by clamping of the aorta during open abdominal aortic surgery and that parenteral glutamine supplementation might compensate for this impaired arginine synthesis. This open-label clinical trial randomized patients who underwent clamping of the aorta during open abdominal aortic surgery to receive a perioperative supplement of intravenous alanyl-glutamine (0.5 g·kg(-1)·day(-1); group A, n = 5) or no supplement (group B, n = 5). One day after surgery, stable isotopes and tracer methods were used to analyze the metabolism and conversion of glutamine, citrulline, and arginine. Whole body plasma flux of glutamine, citrulline, and arginine was significantly higher in group A than in group B (glutamine: 391 ± 34 vs. 258 ± 19 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), citrulline: 5.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), and arginine: 50 ± 4 vs. 26 ± 2 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1), P glutamine (4.8 ± 0.7 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), citrulline from arginine (2.3 ± 0.3 vs. 0.96 ± 0.1 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), and arginine from glutamine (7.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 0.2 μmol·kg(-1)·h(-1)), respectively (P arginine is severely reduced after clamping during aortic surgery. This study shows that an intravenous supplement of glutamine increases the production of citrulline and arginine and compensates for the inhibitory effect of ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  5. Informed Consent (Clinical Trials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Cancer Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer ...

  6. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  7. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to This Site Terms and Conditions Disclaimer ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ... of human participants conducted around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ...

  8. Combined gemcitabine and S-1 chemotherapy for treating unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a randomized open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Zheng-Yun; Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Guan, Jiao; Tong, Da-Nian; Zhou, Guang-Wen

    2016-05-03

    Although the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine (GEM) is considered the standard first-line chemotherapy against unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC), its efficacy is discouraging. The present randomized open-label clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the GEM plus S-1 (GEM-S-1) combination against unresectable HC. Twenty-five patients per group were randomly assigned to receive GEM, S-1 or GEM-S-1. Neutropenia (56%) and leukopenia (40%) were the most common chemotherapy-related toxicities in the GEM-S-1 group. Median overall survival (OS) in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups was 11, 10 and 6 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved OS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.68; 95%CI, 0.50-0.90; P=0.008). Median progression-free survival (PFS) times in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups were 4.90, 3.70 and 1.60 months, respectively. GEM plus S-1 significantly improved PFS compared to S-1 monotherapy (OR=0.50; 95%CI, 0.27-0.91; P=0.024). Response rates were 36%, 24% and 8% in the GEM-S-1, GEM and S-1 groups, respectively. A statistically significant difference was found in response rates between the gemcitabine-S-1 and S-1 groups (36% vs 8%, P=0.017). Patients with CA19-9S-1 provides a better OS, PFS and response rate than S-1 monotherapy, but it did not significantly differ from GEM monotherapy. (ChiCTR-TRC-14004733).

  9. Cervical radiculopathy: Study protocol of a randomised clinical trial evaluating the effect of mobilisations and exercises targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen [NCT01500044

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langevin Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical radiculopathy is a common form of neck pain and has been shown to lead to severe disability. Clinical rehabilitation approaches for cervical radiculopathies commonly include exercise and manual therapy interventions targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, but evidence regarding their effectiveness is scarce. The primary objective of this randomised clinical trial is to compare, in terms of pain and disability, a rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen to a conventional rehabilitation program, for patients presenting acute or subacute cervical radiculopathies. The hypothesis is that the rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen will be significantly more effective in reducing pain and disability than the conventional rehabilitation program. Methods/Design This study is a double-blind (participants and evaluators blinded randomised clinical trial that will allow the comparison of patients with a cervical radiculopathy randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive a 4-week rehabilitation program targeting the opening of intervertebral foramen, and the second group will receive a 4-week conventional rehabilitation program. Thirty-six subjects with cervical radiculopathy will be recruited from participating medical and physiotherapy clinics and will be evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 4-week program and four weeks following the end of the program. The primary outcome measure will be the validated Neck Disability Index questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures will include the short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, a numerical pain rating scale, cervicothoracic mobility and patients' perceived global rating of change. During the 4-week rehabilitation program, each participant will take part in eight physiotherapy treatment sessions (2 session/week and will perform a home exercise program. A

  10. Clinical trials: innovation, progress and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin GS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Greg S MartinDepartment of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAThe Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials began in 2009 with the goal of being an authoritative, open access source for international, peer-reviewed publications in the field of human research and clinical trials. Since then, the Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials has published approximately 30 high-quality articles on original research, innovative reviews, and critical commentaries. These articles have spanned many aspects of clinical trials wonderfully, including trial design and management; legal, ethical and regulatory issues of clinical trials; subject participation and retention in clinical trials; and data collection and data management.

  11. Ethics approval in applications for open-access clinical trial data: An analysis of researcher statements to clinicalstudydatarequest.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Derek; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2017-01-01

    Although there are a number of online platforms for patient-level clinical trial data sharing from industry sponsors, they are not very harmonized regarding the role of local ethics approval in the research proposal review process. The first and largest of these platforms is ClinicalStudyDataRequest.com (CSDR), which includes over three thousand trials from thirteen sponsors including GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, Roche, Sanofi, and Bayer. CSDR asks applicants to state whether they have received ethics approval for their research proposal, but in most cases does not require that they submit evidence of approval. However, the website does require that applicants without ethical approval state the reason it was not required. In order to examine the perspectives of researchers on this topic, we coded every response to that question received by CSDR between June 2014 and February 2017. Of 111 applicants who stated they were exempt from ethics approval, 63% mentioned de-identification, 57% mentioned the use of existing data, 33% referred to local or jurisdictional regulations, and 20% referred to the approvals obtained by the original study. We conclude by examining the experience of CSDR within the broader context of the access mechanisms and policies currently being used by other data sharing platforms, and discuss how our findings might be used to help clinical trial data providers design clear and informative access documents.

  12. A Novel Open C-shaped Molar Band for Orthodontic Applications:Mechanical Characterizations and Clinical Trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shan; GUO Yang; WANG Peijun; FU Wei; XU Shiqian; ZHANG Bin

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the retention properties of the novel ‘C’-shaped molar bands at a laboratory level. Resin-modiifed glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) was used as a luting agent for the novel C-shaped molar band. The mechanical properties of the band were examined and the retention performance was characterized in the mesial, distal and vertical directions. A clinical trial was conducted using a spilt-mouth design on 50 patients. The novel C-shaped molar bands fit most molars without a repeated try-in process.The use of both nano-HA coating and RMGIC enhanced the tensile (8.00 ± 1.8 MPa) and shear strengths (27.17 ± 8.6 MPa) of the molar bands, leading to high retention in vertical, mesial and distal directions (p < 0.001). In clinical trials, the C-shaped molar bands had a failure rate (15%) comparable to that of traditional bands, and 93% of the failed bands demonstrated an adhesive remnant index score of 0, corroborating the observation that no luting agent residue remained on the tooth surface in most cases. The novel C-shaped molar bands appear to be a promising appliance that requires further clinical investigations, and may be used effectively in orthodontics.

  13. Comparison of the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin in acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media: A randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To compare the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin for the treatment of mild to moderate cases of acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media (AECSOM. Materials and Methods : Adult patients diagnosed with AECSOM were screened and patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomized to receive either cefpodoxime 200 mg twice daily or ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily orally for 7 days. The primary outcome of this randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial (Registration Number - CTRI/2011/10/002079 was clinical success rate at day 14 visit and the secondary outcome was incidence of adverse events (AEs. Forty-six patients were enrolled: 23 in the cefpodoxime group and 23 in the ciprofloxacin group. Results : The clinical success rates were 95.6% in the cefpodoxime group versus 90.9% in the ciprofloxacin group. These rates are comparable, but no statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. Few mild and self-limiting AEs were observed and the tolerability of both the drugs was also good. Conclusion : The results of this randomized, open-labeled phase IV clinical trial showed that a 7-day course of cefpodoxime is therapeutically comparable to ciprofloxacin in terms of both clinical effectiveness and safety for the treatment of patients with AECSOM.

  14. EFFICACY OF JOSHANDA ZEEQUNNAFAS AND HABBE HINDI ZEEQI IN ZEEQUNNAFAS (BRONCHIAL ASTHMA - AN OBSERVATIONAL OPEN CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juned Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bronchial asthma is a major public health concern, affecting 100-150 million people worldwide and accounts for an estimated 1,80,000 deaths per year. Its incidence is swiftly escalating in India. Unani medicine is augment with many single and compound drugs, which own potential effects to cure the disease, but these formulations are not proof scientifically. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of Joshanda Zeequnnafas and Habbe Hindi Zeeqi in the treatment of Zeequnnafas to provide safe and effective treatment for asthma. Methods: The clinical trial to assess the efficacy of Joshanda Zeequnnafas and Habbe Hindi Zeeqi in the management of asthma. 50 patients were screened and out of them 30 patients were selected for study. Joshanda Zeequnnafas and Habbe Hindi Zeeqi were administered orally 50 ml (as decoction twice a day and 125 mg (as tablet form twice a day for 45 days. Subjective and objective parameters follow up before and after treatment on 0, 15th, 30th, and 45th day of the treatment. In subjective parameter, paroxysmal dyspnoea and wheeze was analysed using paired proportion test. Objective parameter was assessed by the help of Spirometry in terms of ESR, Eosinophilia, FEV1, FEV1/FVC% and PEF and student paired t test was applied to get the results. Safety parameters included complete blood count, SGOT, SGPT, Blood urea, S. Creatinine, RBS, and Urine routine and microscopic; and were assessed on student paired t test. Results: The overall result was highly significant in terms of subjective and objective parameters specially FEV1and PEF (P0.178, 0.785, and 0.220 respectively. Conclusion: The study results suggest that the trials formulations are quite effective in the management of Zeequnnafas. No adverse effects were noted during the complete course of the study trial. Hence it infers that trial drugs are safe, and effective in the treatment of Zeequnnafas (bronchial asthma.

  15. [Open clinical trial with oral acyclovir for the prophylaxis of disease by Cytomegalovirus in low risk liver transplant recipients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J; Montero, J L; Gavilán, F; Costán, G; Herrero, C; Cárdenas, M; Sánchez-Guijo, P; Torre-Cisneros, J

    1999-10-01

    Checking the first 70 low risk liver transplantation performed in our hospital, who did not receive prophylaxis for Cytomegalovirus, we found that the incidence of Cytomegalovirus-infection and Cytomegalovirus-disease were 47% and 16% respectively. For this reason we started a prospective, open clinical study, to address the safety of acyclovir prophylaxis in low-risk liver transplant patients. Seventy patients did not receive acyclovir. Fifty patients received oral acyclovir during 3 months (800-3,200 mg/day). The occurrence of Cytomegalovirus infection was not modified (40%) but Cytomegalovirus disease decreased dramatically (4%, p Varicela-zoster symptomatic disease in this group of patients.

  16. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  17. Randomized single-blind clinical trial of intradermal methylene blue on pain reduction after open diathermy haemorrhoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, H-L; Tan, K-Y

    2014-08-01

    Open haemorrhoidectomy has been associated with considerable postoperative pain and discomfort. Perianal intradermal injection of methylene blue has been shown to ablate perianal nerve endings and may bring about temporary pain relief after haemorrhoidectomy. We hypothesized that the administration of intradermal methylene blue would reduce postoperative pain during the initial period after surgery. A randomized, prospective, single-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Patients were randomized to intradermal injection at haemorrhoidectomy of either 4 ml 1% methylene blue and 16 ml 0.5% marcaine or of 16 ml 0.5% marcaine and 4 ml saline prior to surgical dissection. Patients were asked to fill in a pain diary with a visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measure was pain score and analgesic use. Secondary outcomes were complications. There were 37 patients in the methylene blue arm and 30 patients in the placebo arm. There were no statistically significant differences in the sex, type of haemorrhoid, number of haemorrhoids excised, duration of surgery or hospital stay. The mean pain scores were significantly lower and the use of paracetamol was also significantly less in the methylene blue group during the first three postoperative days. The risk ratio of acute urinary retention occurring when methylene blue was not used was 2.320 (95% CI 1.754-3.067). Other complication rates were not significantly different. Perianal intradermal injection of methylene blue was useful in reducing the initial postoperative pain of open haemorrhoidectomy. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may ... Institutes of Health | U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Customer Support | Accessibility | Copyright | Privacy | Viewers and Players

  19. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  20. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or prevent a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may compare existing ...

  1. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  2. Long-Term Effects of Goshajinkigan in Prevention of Diabetic Complications: A Randomized Open-Labeled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This clinical trial was designed to investigate whether goshajinkigan reduces the onset of diabetic complications or not. Materials and Methods. A total of 332 type 2 diabetic mellitus patients were registered from 9 clinical centers from March 2000 to August 2007. Patients were randomly assigned to take goshajinkigan extract powder, 2.5 grams for 3 times a day or no kampo therapy, additionally to the regular treatment. The primary endpoints were the onset of macrovascular diseases or progression of nephropathy or retinopathy. Statistical analysis was performed by the intention-to-treat method. Results. After 5 years of observation, 116 patients were submitted to analysis. Among them, no macrovascular events were observed in both groups. Although 43 participants had upstaging of retinopathy or nephropathy in total, there was no significant difference between goshajinkigan group and control group. Deterioration of ankle reflex was suppressed in goshajinkigan group. Also glycated hemoglobin, and fasting plasma glucose were decreased in the goshajinkigan group. Conclusion. Although the power of analysis was too low to demonstrate any effects of goshajinkigan on the progression of macrovascular diseases, retinopathy or nephropathy, goshajinkigan may be beneficial for diabetic neuropathy and glycemic control.

  3. Effect of comorbid tics on a clinically meaningful response to 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, David S; Shapira, Nathan A; Murphy, Tanya K; Mann, Giselle D; Ward, Herbert E; Goodman, Wayne K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, there are limited published data evaluating the effects of tics on serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) monotherapy responses in treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). One retrospective case-controlled analysis of OCD patients treated with SRI monotherapy showed lesser improvement in OCD symptoms in patients with tics than those without. However, more recently there were preliminary reports of OCD subjects treated with SRI monotherapy which did not demonstrate poorer response in subjects with tics or Tourette's Syndrome (TS). The specific aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of comorbid chronic tics affected "clinically meaningful improvement" [McDougle, C.J., Goodman, W.K., Leckman, J.F., Barr, L.C., Heninger, G.R., Price, L.H., 1993. The efficacy of fluvoxamine in obsessive-compulsive disorder: effects of comorbid chronic tic disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 13, 354-358] of OCD in an 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine monotherapy. Seventy-four adult subjects (13 patients with comorbid chronic tics and 61 patients without tics) with a primary DSM-IV OCD diagnosis were treated with up to 40mg fluoxetine for 8 weeks and had at least one post-baseline evaluation. The results indicate that there was a significant response by time in both fluoxetine-with-tic subjects and fluoxetine-without-tic subjects. Additionally, there were 3 (23.0%) OCD subjects with tics who had clinically meaningful improvement versus 16 (26.2%) OCD subjects without tics that demonstrated similar levels of improvement. These findings indicate that OCD patients with or without chronic tic disorders did not have a differential response to an 8-week open-label trial of fluoxetine. Limitations include the relatively low number of tic subjects and the open-label nature of the study. Additional data are needed on how comorbid tics may affect SRI treatment response in OCD.

  4. Clinical Trial Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Am I Protected? Mark Bowden / iStock Ethical guidelines The goal of clinical research is to develop knowledge that improves human ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in peer-reviewed scientific ...

  5. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...... of reasons but in particular, to determine whether biomarkers are useful in identifying those individuals most likely to receive clinically important benefits from an intervention; and to determine whether biomarkers are useful for identifying individuals at earlier stages of OA in order to institute...... both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials...

  6. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...... and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials...... that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA....

  7. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. Objective The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. Methods This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Results Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one

  8. Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion via MAST Quadrant retractor versus open surgery: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-li; L(U) Fei-zhou; JIANG Jian-yuan; MA Xin; XIA Xin-lei; WANG Li-xun

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years,a variety of minimally invasive lumbar surgery techniques have achieved desirable efficacy,but some dispute remains regarding the advantages over open surgery.This study aimed to compare minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion via MAST Quadrant retractor with open surgery in terms of perioperative factors,postoperative back muscle function,and 24-month postoperative follow-up results.Methods From September 2006 to June 2008,patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spine disease who were not responsive to conservative treatment were enrolled in this study.Patients were randomized to undergo either minimally invasive surgery (MIS,transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion via MAST Quadrant retractor,41 cases) or open surgery (improved transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion,38 cases).Results The MIS group had longer intraoperative fluoroscopy time than the open surgery group,and the open surgery group had significantly increased postoperative drainage volume and significantly prolonged postoperative recovery time compared with the MIS group (P <0.05 for all).MRI scanning showed that the T2 relaxation time in the multifidus muscle was significantly shorter in the MIS group than in the open surgery group at 3 months after surgery (P <0.01).Surface electromyography of the sacrospinalis muscle showed that the average discharge amplitude and frequency were significantly higher in the MIS group than in the open surgery group (P <0.01).The Oswestry disability index and visual analog scale scores were better at 3,6,12 and 24 months postoperatively than preoperatively in both groups.Both groups of patients met the imaging convergence criteria at the last follow-up.Conclusions MIS can effectively reduce sacrospinalis muscle injury compared with open surgery,which is conducive to early functional recovery.In the short term,MIS is superior to open surgery,but in the long term there is no significant difference between the two procedures.

  9. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available skip navigation Help Search home health topics A-Z Videos A-Z about us Customer Support NIH SeniorHealth Built with You in Mind Resize Text: A A A Change Contrast print sign up Share Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About ...

  10. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not know if you are taking the medicine or the placebo until the clinical trial is over. How do ... can already get by prescription ) or sugar pills ( placebos ) with the new medicine may last longer than Phases I and II ...

  11. Clonal Evolutionary Analysis during HER2 Blockade in HER2-Positive Inflammatory Breast Cancer: A Phase II Open-Label Clinical Trial of Afatinib +/- Vinorelbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ramona; Arpornwirat, Wichit; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Ganju, Vinod; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Sung-Bae; Dechaphunkul, Arunee; Maneechavakajorn, Jedzada; Spector, Neil; Yau, Thomas; Afrit, Mehdi; Ahmed, Slim Ben; Johnston, Stephen R.; Gibson, Neil; Herrero, Javier; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, aggressive form of breast cancer associated with HER2 amplification, with high risk of metastasis and an estimated median survival of 2.9 y. We performed an open-label, single-arm phase II clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01325428) to investigate the efficacy and safety of afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family inhibitor, alone and in combination with vinorelbine in patients with HER2-positive IBC. This trial included prospectively planned exome analysis before and after afatinib monotherapy. Methods and Findings HER2-positive IBC patients received afatinib 40 mg daily until progression, and thereafter afatinib 40 mg daily and intravenous vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 weekly. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit; secondary endpoints were objective response (OR), duration of OR, and progression-free survival (PFS). Of 26 patients treated with afatinib monotherapy, clinical benefit was achieved in 9 patients (35%), 0 of 7 trastuzumab-treated patients and 9 of 19 trastuzumab-naïve patients. Following disease progression, 10 patients received afatinib plus vinorelbine, and clinical benefit was achieved in 2 of 4 trastuzumab-treated and 0 of 6 trastuzumab-naïve patients. All patients had treatment-related adverse events (AEs). Whole-exome sequencing of tumour biopsies taken before treatment and following disease progression on afatinib monotherapy was performed to assess the mutational landscape of IBC and evolutionary trajectories during therapy. Compared to a cohort of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) patients with HER2-positive non-IBC, HER2-positive IBC patients had significantly higher mutational and neoantigenic burden, more frequent gain-of-function TP53 mutations and a recurrent 11q13.5 amplification overlapping PAK1. Planned exploratory analysis revealed that trastuzumab-naïve patients with tumours harbouring somatic activation of PI3K/Akt signalling had significantly shorter PFS compared to those without

  12. The impact of routine open nonsuction drainage on fluid accumulation after thyroid surgery: a prospective randomised clinical trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neary, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid drains following thyroid surgery are routinely used despite minimal supportive evidence. Our aim in this study is to determine the impact of routine open drainage of the thyroid bed postoperatively on ultrasound-determined fluid accumulation at 24 hours.

  13. Differential Effects of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors on Clinical Responses and Cerebral Blood Flow Changes in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A 12-Month, Randomized, and Open-Label Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Shimizu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The present study evaluated the differences in treatment outcomes and brain perfusion changes among 3 types of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs, i.e. donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine. Methods: This was a prospective, longitudinal, randomized, open-label, 3-arm (donepezil, rivastigmine, or galantamine, parallel-group, 12-month clinical trial carried out in 55 patients with AD. Results: At 6 months, the results of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and the Trail Making Test (TMT-Part A showed an improvement versus baseline in the donepezil treatment group. All groups showed a significant increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF, mainly in the frontal lobe. Significant rCBF reduction was observed in the temporal lobe and cingulate gyrus in all 3 groups. Conclusion: AchEI treatment prevents the progression of cognitive impairment and increases the relative rCBF in the frontal lobe.

  14. Ethics and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Duracinský, M

    1999-01-01

    The current reference guideline about ethics in clinical trials is the Declaration of Helsinki of human rights in medical research. Three major principles are emphasised: respect of the patient to accept or not to participate in a trial, the constraints and the presumed risks must be acceptable for patients included in a study, and vulnerable subjects should not participate in studies. The investigator is responsible for obtaining a free and well-informed consent from patients before their inclusion in a study. Where possible, a new drug should always first be compared to placebo in order to prove its superiority. Else, a small-sized trial comparing a new drug versus a reference treatment can lead to an erroneous conclusion of absence of difference. Moreover, good results or improvement are obtained in at least 30% of cases with placebo, whatever the disease. The use of placebo is unethical in life-threatening diseases and when an effective proved drug exists. The use of placebo is ethical in severe diseases with no efficient drug, in some severe diseases even when an active reference treatment is available, and in all moderate and functional diseases. In order to detect flawed studies, most journals now ask for any manuscript submitted and reporting results of a randomised clinical trial to join a checklist in order to verify the quality of the trial. Finally, it remains the responsibility of the doctor to decide whether or not a protocol is ethical, to participate or not and to include patients or not.

  15. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs Patient Safety Informed Consent Children's Assent Scientific Review Ending Trials Early Deciding to Take Part ...

  16. Factors Influencing the Placebo Effect in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: An Analysis of Two Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Kawamura

    Full Text Available To explore factors related to the placebo effect in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG or ocular hypertension (OH.This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with POAG and patients with OH who were treated with placebo. The patients' data were extracted from two randomized, double-masked, parallel, multicenter clinical trials (trial 1 and trial 2 in Japan. We explored the baseline factors that were associated with the intraocular pressure (IOP-lowering effect of placebo ophthalmic solution after 4 weeks of instillation treatment at two time points by using multivariable models. The time points were Hour 0 (between 08:30 and 10:30 before instillation and Hour 2 (within 1.5 to 2.5 h after instillation and by 12:30 at the baseline date and after 4 weeks. The changes in IOP from baseline to 4 weeks at the two time points were evaluated for the IOP-lowering effect induced by placebo instillation.Of the 330 patients included in the two trials, 89 patients were eligible for the analysis. The results of the multivariable analysis for Hour 0 indicated a high IOP at the baseline date (coefficient: 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.02 to 0.46, P = 0.03, and the magnitude of the IOP fluctuation at the baseline date (coefficient: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.90, P = 0.001 was associated with the IOP-lowering effect after 4 weeks. With respect to Hour 2, the trial type was associated with the IOP-lowering effect (coefficient: -1.15, 95% CI: -2.14 to -0.16, P = 0.02.A large fluctuation in IOP during the day is associated with the IOP-lowering effect induced by placebo in patients with POAG or OH. This finding would be helpful to researchers when designing studies related to glaucoma in the early stages of clinical development of drugs.

  17. Five-year extension of a clinical trial comparing the EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device and trabeculectomy in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Leo; Lafuma, Antoine; Aguadé, Anne-Sophie; Berdeaux, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of the EX-PRESS(®) glaucoma filtration device and trabeculectomy in primary open-angle glaucoma up to five years after surgery. Patients from a previously reported randomized, open-label, parallel-arm clinical trial in which 78 patients received either the EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device or underwent a trabeculectomy were followed for up to an additional four years (five total) beyond the original study (39 eyes per treatment group). Risk-benefit data were obtained for up to five years after glaucoma surgery. Outcome variables were intraocular pressures and intraocular pressure medications. Complete success was denoted by intraocular pressure values ≤ 18 mmHg without medication. The EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device controlled intraocular pressure more effectively without medication for more patients from year 1 (86.8% versus 61.5%, P = 0.01) to year 3 (66.7% versus 41.0%, P = 0.02) than trabeculectomy. At year 1, only 12.8% of patients required intraocular pressure medication after EX-PRESS implantation, compared with 35.9% after trabeculectomy. The proportions became closer at year 5 (41% versus 53.9%). The responder rate was higher with EX-PRESS and time to failure was longer. In addition, surgical interventions for complications were fewer after EX-PRESS implantation. This five-year analysis confirmed and extended the results reported after one year. Compared with trabeculectomy, EX-PRESS provided better intraocular pressure control in the first three years, and patients required fewer intraocular pressure medications and fewer surgical interventions during the five-year study period. For patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, the EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device, implanted under a superficial scleral flap, produced significantly higher success rates than trabeculectomy. EX-PRESS is an effective device for long-term treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma.

  18. Urate levels predict survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Analysis of the expanded Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS clinical trials database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Nicholson, Katharine; Chan, James; Shui, Amy; Schoenfeld, David; Sherman, Alexander; Berry, James; Cudkowicz, Merit; Atassi, Nazem

    2017-08-31

    Urate has been identified as a predictor of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) survival in some but not all studies. Here we leverage the recent expansion of the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) database to study the association between urate levels and ALS survival. Pooled data of 1,736 ALS participants from the PRO-ACT database were analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate associations between urate levels at trial entry and survival. After adjustment for potential confounders (i.e., creatinine and body mass index), there was an 11% reduction in risk of reaching a survival endpoint during the study with each 1-mg/dL increase in uric acid levels (adjusted hazard ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.82-0.97, P < 0.01). Our pooled analysis provides further support for urate as a prognostic factor for survival in ALS and confirms the utility of the PRO-ACT database as a powerful resource for ALS epidemiological research. Muscle Nerve 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: 4'-Thio-ara-C, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate; ABT-089, AD-237, AF-37702, alvocidib hydrochloride, apricitabine, armodafinil, atrasentan, AVE-5883, avian influenza vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Banoxantrone, BIBF-1120; CD34+ cells, certolizumab pegol, CHIR-258, cilansetron, CoFactor, CX-3543, cystemustine; D-003, dexloxiglumide, DMXB-anabaseine; Ecogramostim, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, etravirine; Fenretinide, fingolimod hydrochloride, fospropofol disodium; Gaboxadol, gestodene, glutamine; Human insulin, hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide, indacaterol, ispronicline, istradefylline; Labradimil, lamifiban, lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal cisplatin, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-517717; Manidipine hydrochloride/delapril hydrochloride, maraviroc, MBP(82-98), MD-0727, MDX-214, melanotan I, MMR vaccine; Nacystelyn, nalfurafine hydrochloride, nibentan, nilotinib, NK-105; OBI-1, oblimersen sodium, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, oregovomab; Pexelizumab, PG-116800, PG-CPT, PHA-794428, prasugrel; RC-3095, rDNA insulin, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhEndostatin, rhenium Re-186 etidronate, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin; Sarcosine, SGLU1, SGN-40, succinobucol; TAU, teduglutide, telatinib, tesofensine, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TKA-731, tolvaptan, trabectedin; Vaccimel, vatalanib succinate, velafermin, vildagliptin, vinflunine; XP-19986; YM-155.

  20. An Open Label Clinical Trial of a Multi-Ingredient Anti-Aging Moisturizer Designed to Improve the Appearance of Facial Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, James H; Jiang, Lily; Kononov, Tatiana; Fox, Theresa

    2015-07-01

    An open label clinical trial was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer designed to improve the appearance of facial skin. Parameters studied included fine lines and wrinkles, clarity/brightness, visual roughness, tactile roughness, evenness of skin tone (redness), evenness of skin tone (hyperpigmentation) and overall appearance. Thirty-seven female subjects, ages 35-60 years completed the study. Effective ingredients incorporated into the facial anti-aging moisturizer include: Astragalus membranaceus root extract, a peptide blend including palmitoyl tripeptide-38, standardized rosemary leaf extract (ursolic acid), tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate (THD ascorbate) and ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10). Subjects were instructed to apply the moisturizer twice daily, once in the morning and once in the evening. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of product usage. Clinical evaluations were conducted at each visit. A self-assessment questionnaire was conducted at week 4, week 8, and week 12. The self-assessment questionnaire included product efficacy inquiries and product aesthetic inquiries. Digital photography was conducted at baseline, week 8, and week 12. After 8 weeks of twice daily use, clinical evaluation results show that the multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer produced a statistically significant improvement in the scores of all clinical grading parameters assessed compared to baseline. A greater statistically significant improvement was seen at 12 weeks. At week 12, there was a statistically significant percentage of favorable results versus unfavorable results in all product efficacy and product aesthetic self-assessment questionnaire results. Digital photography supported the clinical grading and self-assessment questionnaire results. Additionally, the multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer is judged to be mild and well tolerated. Several tolerability parameters were assessed at all time

  1. Effects of Lactobacillus salivarius-containing tablets on caries risk factors: a randomized open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Tetsuyo; Suzuki, Nao; Yoneda, Masahiro; Hirofuji, Takao

    2014-09-02

    To evaluate the effects of the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus salivarius on caries risk factors. The study was performed in 64 healthy volunteers to evaluate the effects of L. salivarius-containing tablets on caries risk factors. The participants were divided randomly into four groups, and took tablets containing L. salivarius WB21, L. salivarius TI 2711, Ovalgen® DC (antibody against glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus mutans), or xylitol. Levels of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli, amount of salivary flow, salivary pH, and salivary buffering capacity were assessed before and after taking the tablets. Subsequently, a short-term administration trial using L. salivarius WB21-containing tablets was performed in eight healthy volunteers. The participants took L. salivarius WB21-containing tablets (2.0 × 10(9) colony forming units/day) for 2 weeks, and the numbers of mutans streptococci in saliva were counted. The levels of mutans streptococci seemed to decrease in the L. salivarius WB21, TI 2711, and Ovalgen® DC groups compared to the xylitol group, with no significant differences between the groups. Lactobacilli levels significantly increased in the L. salivarius WB21 and TI 2711 groups compared to the other groups. Concerning salivary flow and salivary pH, no significant differences were observed between the groups. The salivary buffering capacity significantly increased in the L. salivarius TI 2711 group (P = 0.003) and Ovalgen® DC group (P = 0.002) compared to the xylitol group. The short-term administration trial showed that the L. salivarius WB21-containing tablets significantly decreased the number of mutans streptococci (P = 0.039). L. salivarius-containing tablets were suggested to increase resistance to caries risk factors. UMIN000013160 (registration date: February 14, 2014).

  2. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment, screening, diagnostic, prevention, and supportive care trials. Treatment Trials In treatment trials, researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, ...

  3. Once-daily dose regimen of ribavirin is interchangeable with a twice-daily dose regimen: randomized open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balk JM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jiska M Balk,1 Guido RMM Haenen,1 Özgür M Koc,2 Ron Peters,3 Aalt Bast,1 Wim JF van der Vijgh,1 Ger H Koek,4 1Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, 3DSM Resolve, Geleen, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The combination of ribavirin (RBV and pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN is effective in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. Reducing the frequency of RBV intake from twice to once a day will improve compliance and opens up the opportunity to combine RBV with new and more specific direct-acting agents in one pill. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of RBV in a once-daily to twice-daily regimen. The secondary aim was to determine tolerability as well as the severity and differences in side effects of both treatment regimens. Methods: In this randomized open-label crossover study, twelve patients with chronic type 1 hepatitis C infection and weighing more than 75 kg were treated with 180 µg of PEG-IFN weekly and 1,200 mg RBV daily for 24 weeks. The patients received RBV dosed as 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks followed by RBV dosed as 600 mg twice-daily for 12 weeks, or vice versa. In addition to the pharmacokinetic profile, the hematological profile and side effects were recorded. The RBV concentrations in plasma were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Eight of twelve patients completed the study. Neither the time taken for RBV to reach peak plasma concentration nor the AUC0-last (adjusted for difference in dose was significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, the once-daily regimen did not give more side effects than the twice-daily regimen (P>0

  4. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chih-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, parallel-group comparison study of ezetimibe 10 mg added to ongoing statin compared with doubling the dose of ongoing statin. Adult Taiwanese hypercholesterolemic patients not at optimal LDL-C levels with previous statin treatment were randomized (N = 83 to ongoing statin + ezetimibe (simvastatin, atorvastatin or pravastatin + ezetimibe at doses of 20/10, 10/10 or 20/10 mg or doubling the dose of ongoing statin (simvastatin 40 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg or pravastatin 40 mg for 8 weeks. Percent change in total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides, and specified safety parameters were assessed at 4 and 8 weeks. Results At 8 weeks, patients treated with statin + ezetimibe experienced significantly greater reductions compared with doubling the statin dose in LDL-C (26.2% vs 17.9%, p = 0.0026 and total cholesterol (20.8% vs 12.2%, p = 0.0003. Percentage of patients achieving treatment goal was greater for statin + ezetimibe (58.6% vs doubling statin (41.2%, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.1675. The safety and tolerability profiles were similar between treatments. Conclusion Ezetimibe added to ongoing statin therapy resulted in significantly greater lipid-lowering compared with doubling the dose of statin in Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Studies to assess clinical outcome benefit are ongoing. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00652327

  5. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  6. Efficacy of Gum Chewing on Bowel Movement After Open Colectomy for Left-Sided Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takaaki; Masaki, Tadahiko; Kogawa, Koji; Matsuoka, Hiroyoshi; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    Prolonged intestinal paralysis can be a problem after gastrointestinal surgery. Several systematic reviews and meta-analyses have suggested the efficacy of gum chewing for the prevention of postoperative ileus. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of gum chewing for the recovery of bowel function after surgery for left-sided colorectal cancer and to determine the physiological mechanism underlying the effect of gum chewing on bowel function. This was a single-center, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, prospective randomized trial. The study was conducted at a general hospital in Japan. Forty-eight patients with left-sided colorectal cancer were included. The patients were randomly assigned to a gum group (N = 25) and a control group (N = 23). Four patients in the gum group and 1 in the control group were subsequently excluded because of difficulties in continuing the trial, resulting in the analysis of 21 and 22 patients in the respective groups. Patients in the gum group chewed commercial gum 3 times a day for ≥5 minutes each time from postoperative day 1 to the first day of food intake. The time to first flatus and first bowel movement after the operation were recorded, and the colonic transit time was measured. Gut hormones (gastrin, des-acyl ghrelin, motilin, and serotonin) were measured preoperatively, perioperatively, and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10. Gum chewing did not significantly shorten the time to the first flatus (53 ± 2 vs. 49 ± 26 hours; p = 0.481; gum vs. control group), time to first bowel movement (94 ± 44 vs. 109 ± 34 hours; p = 0.234), or the colonic transit time (88 ± 28 vs. 88 ± 21 hours; p = 0.968). However, gum chewing significantly increased the serum levels of des-acyl ghrelin and gastrin. The main limitation was a greater rate of complications than anticipated, which limited the significance of the findings. Gum chewing changed the serum levels of des-acyl ghrelin and gastrin, but we were unable to

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usually, trial participants must show signs of the disease or condition before they can join this type of trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, ...

  8. Comparative study of amrutbhallataka and glucosamine sulphate in osteoarthritis: Six months open label randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinikumar Raut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: AmrutBhallatak (ABFN02, a ′rasayana′ drug from Ayurveda is indicated in degenerative diseases and arthritis. Objective: To evaluate safety and efficacy of ABFN02 in osteoarthritis (OA and compare it with Glucosamine sulphate (GS Materials and Methods: This was a r andomized open comparative study. Ambulant OPD patients of OA knees (n = 112 were enrolled for 24 weeks. Tablets (750mg each of GS and ABFN02 were matched. Three groups of patients: (A GS, one tablet × twice/day × 24 weeks. (B ABFN02, incremental pulse dosage (one tablet x twice/day × two weeks, two tablets × twice/day × two weeks, three tablets × twice/day × two weeks, two such cycles of drug and non-drug phases alternately for six weeks each (C ABFN02 continuous dosage akin to GS. Pain visual analogue score (Pain-VAS and Western Ontario and Mc-Master University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures were Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ, paracetamol consumption, 50 feet walking, physician and patient global assessment, knee stiffness, knee status, urinary CTX II, serum TNFa-SRI, SRII and MRI knee in randomly selected patients. Results: ABFNO2 and GS demonstrated, adherence to treatment 87.75% and 74.3%, reduction in Pain-VAS at rest 61.05% and 57.1%, reduction in pain-VAS on activity 57.4% and 59.8%, WOMAC score drop 62.8% and 59.1% respectively. Secondary outcome measures were comparable in all groups. Safety measures were also comparable. No serious adverse events reported. However, asymptomatic reversible rise in liver enzymes was noted in the ABFNO2 group. Conclusions: ABFN02 has significant activity in OA; the formulation needs further investigation.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  10. A randomized clinical trial of living donor nephrectomy : a plea for a differentiated appraisal of mini-open muscle splitting incision and hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, H.S.; Nijboer, W.N.; Niesing, J.; Krikke, C.; Seelen, M.A.; van Son, W.J.; van Wijhe, M.; Groen, H.; Van der Heide, J.J.; Ploeg, R.J.

    A randomized controlled trial was designed to compare various outcome variables of the retroperitoneal mini-open muscle splitting incision (MSI) technique and the transperitoneal hand-assisted laparoscopic technique (HAL) in performing living donor nephrectomies. Fifty living kidney donors were

  11. An open-label, randomized clinical trial to assess the immunomodulatory activity of a novel oligosaccharide compound in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karriem H. Ali

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rice Bran Arabinoxylan Compound (RBAC is a nutritional supplement produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of hemicellulose B derived from rice bran. Several in vitro studies and clinical reports have shown RBAC to possess promising immunomodulating effects, specifically with respect to natural killer cell and cytokine activity. The concept of a true immunomodulator is an agent possessing a broad range of activity dependent upon the existing state of health and immunity in the individual host. The present study investigated the immunomodulatory effect of RBAC in a healthy adult human population over 60 days by assessing changes in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC and cytokines and growth factors. Subjects participated in a two-group, randomized intervention, where one group (n=10 consumed 1 gram/day and the other (n=10 consumed 3 gram/day. Safety and tolerability of RBAC were assessed with total bilirubin, total protein, creatinine, and liver function tests.Results: We found that both groups had similar responses for NKCC, cytokines, and growth factors. The NKCC peaked at 1 week, whereas interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukins-1α, -1β, -8, and -10, and epidermal growth factor peaked at 30 days. All subjects tolerated the supplement without any adverse reactions.Conclusions: Our results showed transient, bi-directional, immune marker effects consistent with true, multifactorial immunomodulation rather than simply immunostimulation or immunosuppression. Given our findings, the immunomodulatory activity of RBAC merits studyFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(7:265-279 in conditions where the immune system is functionally compromised (e.g., otherwise-healthy smokers and HIV/AIDS or cancer patients. RBAC may not only help to destroy tumor cells and viruses directly, but also increase the activity of immune cells, thereby optimizing the immune system, especially NKCC, which can increase the chance and speed of host

  12. Recombinant fusion ESAT6-CFP10 immunogen as a skin test reagent for tuberculosis diagnosis: an open-label, randomized, two-centre phase 2a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Xu, M; Qin, C; Xia, L; Xiong, Y; Xi, X; Fan, X; Gu, J; Pu, J; Wu, Q; Lu, S; Wang, G

    2016-10-01

    We sought to assess the accuracy and safety of the ESAT6-CFP10 reagent in diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) disease. An open-label, randomized phase 2a trial was conducted in 56 healthy adults and 88 TB patients at one medical centre and one teaching hospital in China. All participants received 0.1, 0.5, 1 or 2 μg ESAT6-CFP10 in their right forearm. Moreover, 56 healthy volunteers and 56 patients were given tuberculin-purified protein derivative (TB-PPD) in their left forearm. The remaining 32 patients were administered placebo. The main outcome measure was induration diameter. An enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay was conducted before the skin test. The ESAT6-CFP10 test caused a higher positivity rate than placebo (81.2% (26/32) vs. 3.1% (1/32); p skin test appears to be a safe and promising tool; further testing will confirm its efficacy in identifying TB disease. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  14. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer ... Trials Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs ...

  15. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  16. An open-label clinical trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of corifollitropin alfa combined with hCG in adult men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc G; Stegmann, Barbara J; Shankar, R Ravi; Guan, Yanfen; Tzontcheva, Anjela; McCrary Sisk, Christine; Behre, Hermann M

    2017-03-07

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) in men results in insufficient testicular function and deficiencies in testosterone and spermatogenesis. Combinations of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (recFSH) have been successful in the treatment of HH. Corifollitropin alfa is a long-acting FSH-analog with demonstrated action in women seeking infertility care. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of corifollitropin alfa combined with hCG to increase testicular volume and induce spermatogenesis in men with HH. This was a Phase III, multi-center, open-label, single-arm trial of corifollitropin alfa in azoospermic men aged 18 to 50 years with HH. After 16 weeks of pretreatment of 23 subjects with hCG alone, 18 subjects with normalized testosterone (T) levels who remained azoospermic entered the 52-week combined treatment phase with hCG twice-weekly and 150 μg corifollitropin alfa every other week. The increase in testicular volume (primary efficacy endpoint) and induction of spermatogenesis resulting in a sperm count ≥1 × 10(6)/mL (key secondary efficacy endpoint) during 52 weeks of combined treatment were assessed. Safety was evaluated by the presence of anti-corifollitropin alfa antibodies and the occurrence of adverse events (AEs). Mean (±SD) testicular volume increased from 8.6 (±6.09) mL to 17.8 (±8.93) mL (geometric mean fold increase, 2.30 [95% CI: 2.03, 2.62]); 14 (77.8%) subjects reached a sperm count ≥1 × 10(6)/mL. No subject developed confirmed anti-corifollitropin alfa antibodies during the trial. Treatment was generally well tolerated. Corifollitropin alfa 150 μg administrated every other week combined with twice-weekly hCG for 52 weeks increased testicular volume significantly, and induced spermatogenesis in >75% of men with HH who had remained azoospermic after hCG treatment alone. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01709331 .

  17. Simplified antibiotic regimens for treatment of clinical severe infection in the outpatient setting when referral is not possible for young infants in Pakistan (Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial [SATT]): a randomised, open-label, equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Fatima; Nisar, Imran; Tikmani, Shiyam S; Baloch, Benazir; Shakoor, Sadia; Jehan, Fyezah; Ahmed, Imran; Cousens, Simon; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2017-02-01

    Parenteral antibiotic therapy for young infants (aged 0-59 days) with suspected sepsis is sometimes not available or feasible in countries with high neonatal mortality. Outpatient treatment could save lives in such settings. We aimed to assess the equivalence of two simplified antibiotic regimens, comprising fewer injections and oral rather than parenteral administration, compared with a reference treatment for young infants with clinical severe infection. We undertook the Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trial (SATT), a three-arm, randomised, open-label, equivalence trial in five communities in Karachi, Pakistan. We enrolled young infants (aged 0-59 days) who either presented at a primary health-care clinic or were identified by a community health worker with signs of clinical severe infection. We included infants who were not critically ill and whose family refused admission. We randomly assigned infants to either intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 7 days (reference); oral amoxicillin twice daily and intramuscular gentamicin once a day for 7 days; or intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin once a day for 2 days followed by oral amoxicillin twice daily for 5 days. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 7 days of enrolment and the primary analysis was per protocol. We judged experimental treatments as efficacious as the reference if the upper bound of the 95% CI for the difference in treatment failure was less than 5·0. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027429. Between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 26, 2013, 2780 infants were deemed eligible for the trial, of whom 2453 (88%) were enrolled. Because of inadequate clinical follow-up or treatment adherence, 2251 infants were included in the per-protocol analysis. 820 infants (747 per protocol) were assigned the reference treatment of procaine benzylpenicillin and gentamicin, 816 (751 per protocol) were allocated amoxicillin and gentamicin, and

  18. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, researchers study ways to reduce the risk of getting a disease or a specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  19. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Grignolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI is a public-private partnership created in 2007 between the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA and Duke University for the purpose of identifying practices that will increase the quality and efficiency of clinical trials. The initiative was generated from the realization that the clinical trials system in the United States has been suffering as a result of increasingly longer study start-up times, slowing enrollment of patients into trials, increasing clinical trial costs, and declining investigator interest in participating in clinical trials. Although CTTI was created to address a crisis for US clinical research, it seeks to identify practice improvements that can be applied internationally, and is therefore engaging international collaborators with international efforts that have similar objectives. CTTI's approach is to involve all sectors in the selection, conduct, and interpretation of its projects; to keep the dialogue open across sectors; to provide evidence that can influence regulatory guidance, and to attempt to create a "level playing field" when recommending change. The hope is that a broad and diverse data-driven discussion of the important issues in clinical trials will lead to meaningful change for the benefit of all concerned, and importantly for patients.

  20. Effectiveness of Digital Medicines to Improve Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Uncontrolled Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes: Prospective, Open-Label, Cluster-Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Juan; Raja, Praveen; Kim, Yoona; Savage, George; Osterberg, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus are major modifiable risk factors for cardiac, cerebrovascular, and kidney diseases. Reasons for poor disease control include nonadherence, lack of patient engagement, and therapeutic inertia. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact on clinic-measured blood pressure (BP) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) using a digital medicine offering (DMO) that measures medication ingestion adherence, physical activity, and rest using digital medicines (medication taken with ingestible sensor), wearable sensor patches, and a mobile device app. Methods Participants with elevated systolic BP (SBP ≥140 mm Hg) and HbA1c (≥7%) failing antihypertensive (≥2 medications) and oral diabetes therapy were enrolled in this three-arm, 12-week, cluster-randomized study. Participants used DMO (includes digital medicines, the wearable sensor patch, and the mobile device app) for 4 or 12 weeks or received usual care based on site randomization. Providers in the DMO arms could review the DMO data via a Web portal. In all three arms, providers were instructed to make medical decisions (medication titration, adherence counseling, education, and lifestyle coaching) on all available clinical information at each visit. Primary outcome was change in SBP at week 4. Other outcomes included change in SBP and HbA1c at week 12, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at weeks 4 and 12, as well as proportion of patients at BP goal (<140/90 mm Hg) at weeks 4 and 12, medical decisions, and medication adherence patterns. Results Final analysis included 109 participants (12 sites; age: mean 58.7, SD years; female: 49.5%, 54/109; Hispanic: 45.9%, 50/109; income ≤ US $20,000: 56.9%, 62/109; and ≤ high school education: 52.3%, 57/109). The DMO groups had 80 participants (7 sites) and usual care had 29 participants (5 sites). At week 4, DMO resulted in a statistically greater SBP reduction than

  1. [Critical reading of clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptel, F; Cucherat, M; Blumen-Ohana, E; Denis, P

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials are playing an increasingly crucial role in modern evidence based medicine, allowing for rigorous scientific evaluation of treatment strategies and validation of patient care. The results of clinical trials often form the rational basis from which physicians draw information used to adapt their therapeutic practices. Critical reading and analysis of trials involves the assessment of whether the available data provide enough credible evidence that the treatment will result in a clinically significant and relevant improvement. Evaluating the quality of a clinical trial is a process that draws upon sometimes complex methodological and statistical concepts, with which the reader should nonetheless be familiar in order to come to impartial conclusions regarding the raw data presented in the clinical trials. The goal of the current article is to review the methodological and statistical concepts required for the design and interpretation of clinical trials, so as to allow for a critical analysis of publications or presentations of clinical trials. The first section describes the major methodological principles of clinical trial design required for a rigorous evaluation of the treatment benefit, as well as the various pitfalls or biases that could lead to erroneous conclusions. The second section briefly describes the main statistical tests used in clinical trials, as well as certain situations that may increase the risk of false positive findings (type 1 error), such as multiple, subgroup, intermediate and non-inferiority analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Phases of Clinical Trials Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Surgery Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell Transplant Precision ...

  3. A guide to clinical trials for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000823.htm A guide to clinical trials for cancer To use ... trial and where to find one. What is a Clinical Trial for Cancer? Clinical trials for cancer ...

  4. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials In screening trials, researchers study ways of finding a disease before symptoms occur. These methods, often called screening tests, can include imaging tests ...

  5. An open randomized active-controlled clinical trial with low-dose SKA cytokines versus DMARDs evaluating low disease activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Martin LS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available LS Martin-Martin,1 F Giovannangeli,2 E Bizzi,2 U Massafra,2 E Ballanti,2 M Cassol,3 A Migliore2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, 2Operative Unit of Rheumatology, 3Department of Internal Medicine, San Pietro Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Rome, Italy Background: Biologic agents are currently the strongest immunosuppressive drugs able to induce remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the objectives of the medical scientific community now is how to maintain remission or low disease activity (LDA. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of low-dose sequential kinetic activation (SKA IL-4, IL-10, and anti-IL-1 antibodies (10 fg/mL in patients affected by RA in maintaining LDA or remission obtained after biological therapy. Method: This is a randomized, open, active-controlled, prospective, Phase IV trial. Disease activity score (DAS28, clinical disease activity index, simplified disease activity index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels, global health assessment, and pain visual analog scale were evaluated at baseline visit and then every 3 months together with an assessment of side effects till 12 months. Thirty-nine RA patients were enrolled and randomized to continue disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs therapy or to receive a combination of SKA low-dose cytokines formulated in concentration of 10 fg/mL orally administered at a dose of 20 drops/d for 12 consecutive months. Results: The rate of maintenance of LDA at 12 months was superior in the group treated with low-dose cytokines compared with patients treated with DMARDs, 66.7% and 42.1%, respectively; however, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. No side effects were reported in both groups. Conclusion: This is the first study using a combination of three low-dose cytokines in RA, after data published on psoriasis. These data suggest that the use of a combination of low-dose SKA

  6. Phacoemulsification versus phacoemulsification with micro-bypass stent implantation in primary open-angle glaucoma: randomized double-masked clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fea, Antonio M

    2010-03-01

    To compare phacoemulsification alone and phacoemulsification with micro-bypass stent implantation in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma. Instituto di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Clinica Oculistica, Universita' di Torino, Torino, Italy. In this prospective double-masked randomized clinical trial, patients had phacoemulsification alone (control group) or phacoemulsification with iStent implantation (combined group). Primary outcomes were intraocular pressure (IOP) and reduction in medication use over 15 months and IOP after a 1-month washout of ocular hypotensive agents (ie, 16 months postoperatively). The baseline IOP was similar between groups (combined group: 17.9 mm Hg +/- 2.6 [SD]; control group: 17.3 +/- 3.0 mm Hg) (P = .512). Three patients in the control group were lost to follow-up. The mean IOP was 14.8 +/- 1.2 mm Hg in the combined group and 15.7 +/- 1.1 mm Hg in the control group at 15 months and 16.6 +/- 3.1 mm Hg and 19.2 +/- 3.5 mm Hg, respectively, after washout; the IOP was statistically significantly lower in the combined group than in the control group at both time points (P = .031 and P = .042, respectively). At 15 months, the mean number of medications was lower in the combined group than in the control group (0.4 +/- 0.7 and 1.3 +/- 1.0, respectively; P = .007), as was the proportion of patients on ocular hypotensive medication (33% and 76%, respectively). Phacoemulsification with stent implantation was more effective in controlling IOP than phacoemulsification alone; the safety profiles were similar. Copyright 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Classic high lateral tension and triangular resection methods to prevent dog ear and elongation scar in patients undergoing abdominoplasty: A comparative open-label clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abdali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most common operations in the plastic surgery curse is abdominoplasty. Several methods were recommended for achieving better results. In the present study, efficacy of a new method compared with classical high lateral tension on preventing dog ear and elongation scar was evaluated. Materials and Methods: in an open-label, randomized clinical trial, seventy patients who were candidates for abdominoplasty were selected and randomly divided into two groups. The first group was operated by classic high lateral method and the second group was operated by a new method concentrating on changing incision line and angle. Dog ear prevention, length of scar, improvement, and postoperative complications were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD length of scar in treated patients with classical and new abdominoplasty surgical methods was 53.68 ± 6.34 and 41.71 ± 1.78 cm, respectively, and the length of scar in the group treated with the new method was significantly shorter (P < 0.001. The mean ± SD distance between two anterior superior iliac spine in group treated by new method was significantly decreased after surgery (31.3 ± 1.3 cm compared to before intervention (36.7 ± 3.9 cm (P < 0.01. Conclusion: The new method is more likely to be successful in patients with high lateral tension abdominoplasty. However, according to the lack of similar studies in this regard and the fact that this method was introduced for the first time, it is recommended that further studies in this area are needed and patients in term of complications after surgery need a longer period of follow-up.

  8. First-in-man open clinical trial of a combined rdESAT-6 and rCFP-10 tuberculosis specific skin test reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstedt, Winnie; Tingskov, Pernille N; Thierry-Carstensen, Birgit;

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculin is still the only available skin test reagent for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infection. The product has a remarkable sensitivity, but poor specificity. Previous studies, including two human phase I clinical trials, have indicated that rdESAT-6 has a potential as an improved skin test...

  9. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  10. First-in-man open clinical trial of a combined rdESAT-6 and rCFP-10 tuberculosis specific skin test reagent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Bergstedt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculin is still the only available skin test reagent for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infection. The product has a remarkable sensitivity, but poor specificity. Previous studies, including two human phase I clinical trials, have indicated that rdESAT-6 has a potential as an improved skin test reagent. Animal studies have shown that the sensitivity may be increased by inclusion of the genetically related CFP-10 antigen in the preparation without loosing specificity. METHODOLOGY: In this study a Lactococcus fermented, recombinant skin test reagent consisting of a 1ratio1 wt/wt of rdESAT-6 and CFP-10 was manufactured according to GMP standards and tested for the first time in 42 healthy adult volunteers. The two doses of 0.01 microg or 0.1 microg were injected intradermally by the Mantoux technique with 6 or 12 weeks interval. No serious adverse events and only mild adverse reactions were reported. The reagent elicited a positive skin test reaction after the first injection in one participant, who most likely was latently infected with M. tuberculosis as indicated by an appreciable IFN gamma response just below the Quantiferon(R cut-off level at the screening visit. None of the remaining participants in the four groups had any skin test reactions and sensitisation by the reagent could therefore be excluded. CONCLUSION: The investigational skin test reagent rdESAT-6 and CFP-10 appeared safe and non-sensitising in this first-in-man clinical trial in human volunteers and can now be tested in larger clinical trials involving individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection or active TB disease. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00793702.

  11. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease or prevent a disease from returning. Supportive Care Trials In supportive care trials, researchers look for ways to make life ... groups, and various types of social interventions. Supportive care interventions are not intended to treat or cure ...

  12. Effectiveness of antipsychotics in first-episode schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder on response and remission : An open randomized clinical trial (EUFEST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boter, Han; Peuskens, Joseph; Libiger, Jan; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang; Davidson, Michael; Galderisi, Silvana; Kahn, Rene S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Predefined response and remission criteria may hold more clinical relevance than mean scores on rating scales. We compared the effectiveness of low doses of haloperidol and regular doses of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) on >= 50% response and remission. Methods: In an open rand

  13. Social media in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape.

  14. First-in-man open clinical trial of a combined rdESAT-6 and rCFP-10 tuberculosis specific skin test reagent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstedt, Winnie; Tingskov, Pernille N; Thierry-Carstensen, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculin is still the only available skin test reagent for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infection. The product has a remarkable sensitivity, but poor specificity. Previous studies, including two human phase I clinical trials, have indicated that rdESAT-6 has a potential as an improved skin test...... reagent. Animal studies have shown that the sensitivity may be increased by inclusion of the genetically related CFP-10 antigen in the preparation without loosing specificity....

  15. First-in-man open clinical trial of a combined rdESAT-6 and rCFP-10 tuberculosis specific skin test reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Winnie; Tingskov, Pernille N; Thierry-Carstensen, Birgit; Hoff, Søren T; Aggerbeck, Henrik; Thomsen, Vibeke O; Andersen, Peter; Andersen, Aase B

    2010-06-25

    Tuberculin is still the only available skin test reagent for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infection. The product has a remarkable sensitivity, but poor specificity. Previous studies, including two human phase I clinical trials, have indicated that rdESAT-6 has a potential as an improved skin test reagent. Animal studies have shown that the sensitivity may be increased by inclusion of the genetically related CFP-10 antigen in the preparation without loosing specificity. In this study a Lactococcus fermented, recombinant skin test reagent consisting of a 1ratio1 wt/wt of rdESAT-6 and CFP-10 was manufactured according to GMP standards and tested for the first time in 42 healthy adult volunteers. The two doses of 0.01 microg or 0.1 microg were injected intradermally by the Mantoux technique with 6 or 12 weeks interval. No serious adverse events and only mild adverse reactions were reported. The reagent elicited a positive skin test reaction after the first injection in one participant, who most likely was latently infected with M. tuberculosis as indicated by an appreciable IFN gamma response just below the Quantiferon(R) cut-off level at the screening visit. None of the remaining participants in the four groups had any skin test reactions and sensitisation by the reagent could therefore be excluded. The investigational skin test reagent rdESAT-6 and CFP-10 appeared safe and non-sensitising in this first-in-man clinical trial in human volunteers and can now be tested in larger clinical trials involving individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection or active TB disease. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00793702.

  16. Usability of a novel disposable autoinjector device for ixekizumab: results from a qualitative study and an open-label clinical trial, including patient-reported experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callis Duffin, Kristina; Bukhalo, Michael; Bobonich, Margaret A; Shrom, David; Zhao, Fangyi; Kershner, James R; Gill, Anne; Pangallo, Beth; Shuler, Catherine L; Bagel, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Background Most biologic therapies for psoriasis are delivered via subcutaneous injection. Ixekizumab, an anti-interleukin 17A monoclonal antibody approved for patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, is delivered subcutaneously via prefilled syringe or autoinjector. Here we report the results of an ixekizumab autoinjector usability study as well as the patient-reported experience with the autoinjector in a clinical trial. Methods The usability study enrolled 49 subjects (patients with a range of autoimmune conditions or their caregivers). Subjects were randomized to a trained or untrained group and were evaluated for their ability to perform an injection successfully when provided the device and the instructions for use. In the clinical trial, 102 subjects (patients with psoriasis or their caregivers) used the autoinjector to deliver injections of ixekizumab (80 mg every 2 weeks after a starting dose of 160 mg). At weeks 0, 4, and 8, subjects completed the subcutaneous administration assessment questionnaire, which assesses the ease of use and confidence with using an injection device. Results In the usability study, all subjects in the untrained arm performed successful injections, while two subjects in the trained arm had an injection failure. These incidences were not consistent with any pattern of issues with the device or the instructions for use. In the clinical trial, there were two injection failures of 674 total self-injections performed over 12 weeks. At the first use of the device, 95% of subjects either agreed or strongly agreed that the device was “overall easy to use”, and they felt “confident the dose was complete” according to the subcutaneous administration assessment questionnaire. Conclusion The ixekizumab autoinjector was used successfully by patients and caregivers with or without training. Subjects using the autoinjector in a clinical trial felt it was easy to use and felt confident while using it. PMID:27785115

  17. Designing clinical trials for amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) study design leads to one of the highest levels of evidence, and is a preferred study design over cohort studies, because randomization reduces bias and maximizes the chance that even unknown confounding factors will be balanced between treatment groups. Recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies in amblyopia can be taken together to formulate an evidence-based approach to amblyopia treatment, which is presented in this review. When designing future clinical studies of amblyopia treatment, issues such as regression to the mean, sample size and trial duration must be considered, since each may impact study results and conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Data fraud in clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephen L; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality. PMID:25729561

  19. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to obtain preliminary data on whether the drug works in people who have a certain disease or condition. These trials also continue to study safety, including short-term side effects. This phase ...

  20. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or ... specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  1. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, J N; Losina, E; Lohmander, L S

    2015-01-01

    To highlight methodological challenges in the design and conduct of randomized trials of surgical interventions and to propose strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper focuses on three broad areas: enrollment; intervention; and assessment including implications for analysis. For eac...

  2. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... new tests that could identify a disease in its early stages. Usually, trial participants must show signs ... often healthy people (20 to 80), to judge its safety and side effects, and to find the ...

  3. Open-label phase II clinical trial in 75 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma receiving daily dose of tableted liver cancer vaccine, hepcortespenlisimut-L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarakanovskaya MG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Marina G Tarakanovskaya,1 Jigjidsuren Chinburen,2 Purev Batchuluun,2 Chogsom Munkhzaya,2 Genden Purevsuren,2 Dorjiin Dandii,3 Tsogkhuu Hulan,3 Dandii Oyungerel,4 Galyna A Kutsyna,5 Alan A Reid,6 Vika Borisova,6 Allen I Bain,7 Vichai Jirathitikal,7 Aldar S Bourinbaiar6–8 1Ekomed LLC, 2National Cancer Center, 3Monserum LLC, 4National Center for Public Health, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 5Department of Infectious Diseases, Luhansk State Medical University, Luhansk, Ukraine; 6Immunitor China Ltd, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Immunitor Inc, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 8Immunitor LLC, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Background: An increasing number of studies is now devoted to immunotherapy of cancer. We evaluated the clinical benefit of hepcortespenlisimut-L (Hepko-V5 [formerly known as V5]—an oral therapeutic vaccine designated by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA as an orphan drug for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. V5 was initially developed by us in 2002 to treat hepatitis B or C viral infections and liver cirrhosis.Methods: The outcome of open-label Phase II trial of daily dose of V5 pill was analyzed retrospectively. Over a period of 5 years, 75 patients with advanced HCC were enrolled, consisting of 29 (38.7% females and 46 (61.3% males with a median age of 60 years (mean 61.6±8.1 years. Out of these, 23 (30.7% had hepatitis B and 34 (45.3% had hepatitis C infections, including 9 (12% with dual infection, 4 (5.3% negative for both viruses, and 5 (6.7% without established viral diagnosis. Most patients (94.7% had underlying liver cirrhosis of varying severity.Results: After a median of 2 months of treatment, 50 out of 75 patients had experienced a decline in serum levels of the tumor marker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP (66.7%; P=0.006 by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Baseline median AFP levels were 245.2 IU/mL (mean 4,233; range 7.2–92,407; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1,186–7,280 and post-treatment values were 102.3 IU

  4. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  5. Inept media trials of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian media in general, with the exception of a few domain expert journalists, have failed to comprehend the complexities involved in the clinical trial process. In the run up to the deadline-based coverage of a story, a majority of them fall short in conveying the right perspective to readers, but nevertheless they have been successful in sensationalizing an event in this arena. Possibly by unintended misrepresentation, or mostly out of ignorance of the nuances involved in the clinical trials process, the media has done more harm than good, and got away with it. On the other side, the industry has been reluctant to engage with the media in a meaningful dialog for too long now. It bears not only the consequences of damage to its professional reputation following such reportage, but also the repercussions of unnecessary clampdowns by the regulators. Science journalism in India has yet to rise as a profession.

  6. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  7. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research and Discovery Stories of Discovery R&D Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data ... about some of NCI's major research initiatives R&D Resources Tools and data sets for researchers Research ...

  8. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer ... Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell Transplant Precision Medicine Side Effects Clinical Trials Information ...

  9. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  10. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  11. Usability of a novel disposable autoinjector device for ixekizumab: results from a qualitative study and an open-label clinical trial, including patient-reported experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callis Duffin K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kristina Callis Duffin,1 Michael Bukhalo,2 Margaret A Bobonich,3 David Shrom,4 Fangyi Zhao,4 James R Kershner,4 Anne Gill,4 Beth Pangallo,4 Catherine L Shuler,4 Jerry Bagel5 1Department of Dermatology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Arlington Dermatology, Arlington Heights, IL, 3CWRU Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH, 4Lilly Research Labs, Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN, 5Psoriasis Treatment Center of Central New Jersey, East Windsor, NJ, USA Background: Most biologic therapies for psoriasis are delivered via subcutaneous injection. Ixekizumab, an anti-interleukin 17A monoclonal antibody approved for patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, is delivered subcutaneously via prefilled syringe or autoinjector. Here we report the results of an ixekizumab autoinjector usability study as well as the patient-reported experience with the autoinjector in a clinical trial. Methods: The usability study enrolled 49 subjects (patients with a range of autoimmune conditions or their caregivers. Subjects were randomized to a trained or untrained group and were evaluated for their ability to perform an injection successfully when provided the device and the instructions for use. In the clinical trial, 102 subjects (patients with psoriasis or their caregivers used the autoinjector to deliver injections of ixekizumab (80 mg every 2 weeks after a starting dose of 160 mg. At weeks 0, 4, and 8, subjects completed the subcutaneous administration assessment questionnaire, which assesses the ease of use and confidence with using an injection device. Results: In the usability study, all subjects in the untrained arm performed successful injections, while two subjects in the trained arm had an injection failure. These incidences were not consistent with any pattern of issues with the device or the instructions for use. In the clinical trial, there were two

  12. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  13. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.;

    2015-01-01

    The risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) substantially increases following joint injury. Research efforts should focus on investigating the efficacy of preventative strategies in high quality randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of these OARSI RCT recommendations is to inform...

  14. Early Open-Lung Ventilation Improves Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Left Cardiac Dysfunction Undergoing Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzan, Douglas W.; Gomes, Walter José; Rocco, Isadora S.; Viceconte, Marcela; Nasrala, Mara L. S.; Pauletti, Hayanne O.; Moreira, Rita Simone L.; Hossne Jr, Nelson A.; Arena, Ross; Guizilini, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare pulmonary function, functional capacity and clinical outcomes amongst three groups of patients with left ventricular dysfunction following off-pump coronary artery bypass, namely: 1) conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV); 2) late open lung strategy (L-OLS); and 3) early open lung strategy (E-OLS). Methods Sixty-one patients were randomized into 3 groups: 1) CMV (n=21); 2) L-OLS (n=20) initiated after intensive care unit arrival; and 3) E-OLS (n=20) initiated after intubation. Spirometry was performed at bedside on preoperative and postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 5. Partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and pulmonary shunt fraction were evaluated preoperatively and on POD1. The 6-minute walk test was applied on the day before the operation and on POD5. Results Both the open lung groups demonstrated higher forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second on PODs 1, 3 and 5 when compared to the CMV group (P<0.05). The 6-minute walk test distance was more preserved, shunt fraction was lower, and PaO2 was higher in both open-lung groups (P<0.05). Open-lung groups had shorter intubation time and hospital stay and also fewer respiratory events (P<0.05). Key measures were significantly more favorable in the E-OLS group compared to the L-OLS group. Conclusion Both OLSs (L-OLS and E-OLS) were able to promote higher preservation of pulmonary function, greater recovery of functional capacity and better clinical outcomes following off-pump coronary artery bypass when compared to conventional mechanical ventilation. However, in this group of patients with reduced left ventricular function, initiation of the OLS intra-operatively was found to be more beneficial and optimal when compared to OLS initiation after intensive care unit arrival. PMID:27982344

  15. The effect of foot reflexology on physiologic parameters and mechanical ventilation weaning time in patients undergoing open-heart surgery: A clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Kavei, Parastoo; Moradian, Seyyed Tayyeb; Saeid, Yaser

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of foot reflexology on physiological parameters and mechanical ventilation weaning time in patients undergoing open-heart surgery. This was a double blind three-group randomized controlled trial. Totally, 96 patients were recruited and randomly allocated to the experimental, placebo, and the control groups. Study groups respectively received foot reflexology, simple surface touching, and the routine care of the study setting. Physiological parameters (pulse rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, mean arterial pressure, percutaneous oxygen saturation) and weaning time were measured. The study groups did not differ significantly in terms of physiological parameters (P value > 0.05). However, the length of weaning time in the experimental group was significantly shorter than the placebo and the control groups (P value reflexology in shortening the length of weaning time.

  16. Efficacy and safety of Tofacitinib in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis resistant to conventional therapy: Preliminary results of an open-label clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Luchikhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, which are associated with the use of biological anti-rheumatic drugs, the problemof effective treatment of RA is not still solved. Inclusion of new methods in treatment strategies, in particular the so-called «small molecules», i.e. synthetic compounds acting on intracellular signaling pathways, such as Tofacitinib (TOFA approved for use in rheumatologic practice, is very important.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of therapy with TOFA in combination with synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (s-DMARDs, primarily methotrexate (MTX in in patients with active RA in real clinical practice.Subjects and methods. This ongoing open-label trial is a part of the scientific program «Russian Investigation of Methotrexate and Biologics in Early Active Inflammatory Arthritis» (REMARCA that explores the possibility of adapting the «treat-to-target» strategy in real prac-tice in Russia. The study included RA patients with moderate to high disease activity despite treatment with MTX or other DMARDs. A total of 41 patients with RA were included (8 males, 33 females; mean age 52.6±14.2 years, disease duration 47.2±49.7 months, 82.9% RF+ and 80.5% anti-CCP+,DAS28-ESR 5.45±0.95, SDAI 30.2±12.2. All the patients had previously received s-DMARDs; 12 (29.3% patients also had biological DMARDs (1 to 4 biologics. Oral TOFA 5 mg in combination with MTX or leflunomide was administered twice daily to 40 and 1 patients, respectively, with the possibility of increasing the dose up to 10 mg BID. To date, 37 and 12 patients received TOFA for 3 and 6 months, respectively.Results. TOFA was used as a second-line drug (after s-DMARDs failure in 29 (70.7%, as a third line drug (after s-DMARDs and biologics failure in 12 (29.3% patients. The dose was escalated to 10 mg BID in 13 (31.2% patients, on the average, 11.2±1.7 weeks after treatment initiation. TOFA was not

  17. Lanreotide Autogel in the Treatment of Idiopathic Refractory Diarrhea: Results of an Exploratory, Controlled, Before and After, Open-label, Multicenter, Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisschops, Raf; De Ruyter, Vincent; Demolin, Gauthier; Baert, Didier; Moreels, Tom; Pattyn, Piet; Verhelst, Hans; Lepoutre, Luc; Arts, Joris; Caenepeel, Philip; Ooghe, Patrick; Codden, Thierry; Maisonobe, Pascal; Petrens, Elke; Tack, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Chronic idiopathic diarrhea is the passage of loose stools >3 times daily, or a stool weight >200 g/d, persisting for >4 weeks without clear clinical cause. Patients refractory to standard anti-diarrhetics have limited treatment options. Somatostatin analogues have the ability to reduce gastrointestinal secretions and motility. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of lanreotide Autogel(*) 120 mg in chronic idiopathic diarrhea. Other anti-diarrhetics were not allowed during the study and were stopped at screening. Patients received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg at baseline and day 28. Stool frequency and consistency (Bristol Stool Scale) were recorded; quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey and irritable bowel syndrome QoL questionnaires; adverse events were monitored. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with a reduction of ≥50% or normalization to a mean of ≤3 stools/d at day 28. Thirty-three patients with >3 stools/d at baseline were included; mean (SD) age was 55.2 (16.4) years. Fourteen patients (42.4%) had a response to lanreotide Autogel at day 28 and 17 (51.5%) at day 56. Mean (SD) number of stools decreased significantly from 5.7 (2.2) at baseline to 3.7 (2.2) at day 56 overall (n = 32; P < 0.001). Significant and clinically meaningful improvements in disease-specific QoL were found in the overall populations. No new safety signals emerged. Lanreotide Autogel 120 mg decreased symptoms in these patients with chronic idiopathic refractory diarrhea, and meaningfully improved QoL. These finding have to be confirmed in further clinical trials. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00891371; Eudract CT 2009-009356-20. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SMi's Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    The Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe meeting, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of clinical trials and recommendations on how to best conduct a trial. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the state of affairs of trials in Europe, conducting trials in emerging markets, strategies for improving trials, trial design options, peri-approval and pediatric trials, and the role of key players, such as physicians. Company perspectives from Pfizer Inc and Nycomed are also included.

  19. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  20. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  1. Clinical trials. A pending subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Extremera, B; Jiménez-López, P; Mediavilla-García, J D

    2017-07-31

    Clinical trials are essential tools for the progress of clinical medicine in its diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Since the first trial in 1948, which related tobacco use with lung cancer, there have been more than 150,000 clinical trials to date in various areas (paediatrics, cardiology, oncology, endocrinology, etc.). This article highlights the importance for all physicians to participate, over the course of their professional career, in a clinical trial, due to the inherent benefits for patients, the progress of medicine and for curricular prestige. The authors have created a synthesis of their experience with clinical trials on hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease over the course of almost 3 decades. Furthermore, a brief reference has been made to the characteristics of a phase I unit, as well as to a number of research studies currently underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  2. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A B; Smith, G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many reflux patients remain symptomatic on a standard dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Alginates decrease the number of reflux events by forming a raft on top of the stomach content and thus offer a supplemental mechanism of action to acid suppression. AIM: To assess the efficacy...... of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. METHODS: This was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using......: In patients with residual reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment, adding an alginate offers additional decrease in the burden of reflux symptoms (EudraCT/IND Number: 2011-005486-21)....

  3. Medical coding in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deven Babre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  4. [Reading a clinical trial report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, J F; Chassany, O

    2000-04-15

    To improve medical knowledge by reading clinical trial reports it is necessary to check for the respect of the methodological rules, and to analyze and criticize the results. A control group and a randomisation are always necessary. Double blind assessment, sample size calculation, intention to treat analysis, a unique primary end point are also important. The conclusions of the trial are valid only for the population included and the clinical signification of the results, depending on the control treatment, has to be evaluated. Respect of the reading rules is necessary to assess the reliability of the conclusions, in order to promote evidence-based practice.

  5. Innovations in clinical trials informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ron; Vyas, Hiten; Dudhal, Nilesh; Doherty, Neil F; Coombs, Crispin R; Hepworth, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper will investigate innovations in information management for use in clinical trials. The application typifies a complex, adaptive, distributed and information-rich environment for which continuous innovation is necessary. Organisational innovation is highlighted as well as the technical innovations in workflow processes and their representation as an integrated set of web services. Benefits realization uncovers further innovations in the business strand of the work undertaken. Following the description of the development of this information management system, the semantic web is postulated as a possible solution to tame the complexity related to information management issues found within clinical trials support systems.

  6. International, open-label, noncomparative, clinical trial of micafungin alone and in combination for treatment of newly diagnosed and refractory candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, L; Kontoyiannis, D; Raffalli, J; Mullane, K M; Vazquez, J; Anaissie, E J; Lipton, J; Jacobs, P; van Rensburg, J H Jansen; Rex, J H; Lau, W; Facklam, D; Buell, D N

    2005-10-01

    Candida spp. are the fourth leading cause of bloodstream infections, and non-albicans species are increasing in importance. Micafungin is a new echinocandin antifungal agent with excellent in vitro activity against Candida spp. Pediatric, neonatal, and adult patients with new or refractory candidemia were enrolled into this open-label, noncomparative, international study. The initial dose of micafungin was 50 mg/d (1 mg/kg for patients <40 kg) for infections due to C. albicans and 100 mg/d (2 mg/kg for patients <40 kg) for infections due to other species. Dose escalation was allowed. Maximum length of therapy was 42 days. A total of 126 patients were evaluable (received at least five doses of micafungin). Success (complete or partial response) was seen in 83.3% patients overall. Success rates for treatment of infections caused by the most common Candida spp. were as follows: C. albicans 85.1%, C. glabrata 93.8%, C. parapsilosis 86.4%, and C. tropicalis 83.3%. Serious adverse events related to micafungin were uncommon. Micafungin shows promise as a safe and effective agent for the treatment of newly diagnosed and refractory cases of candidemia. Large-scale, randomized, controlled trials are warranted.

  7. Clinical effectiveness and safety of escitalopram and desvenlafaxine in patients of depression with anxiety: a randomized, open-label controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Nabakumar; Ghosal, Malay Kumar; Gupta, Anupam; Sil, Amrita; Chakraborty, Sushmita; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are effective in treating anxiety disorders associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). This randomized, controlled, parallel-group, open-label, phase 4 trial (CTRI/2012/08/002895) was undertaken to compare the effectiveness and safety of desvenlafaxine versus escitalopram, a standard antidepressant. Effectiveness was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). Response to treatment was assessed by ≥50% decrease of baseline scores (responder rate). Safety and tolerability was evaluated by changes in routine laboratory parameters, vital signs, and adverse events reported by the subject and/or observed by the clinician. Responder rates for both HAM-A and HAM-D scores at 8 weeks were better in the escitalopram group compared to the desvenlafaxine group (HAM-A 76.92% vs. 71.05%; HAM-D 79.48% vs 73.68%) but the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.59 and P = 0.61). Within group changes of both scores, from baseline to subsequent visits in both treatment arms were statistically significant (P desvenlafaxine was comparable to escitalopram, but escitalopram was better tolerated.

  8. Clinical Trials in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States and Puerto Rico.

  9. Glossary of Clinical Trials Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institutes of Health grant numbers. (See also Secondary IDs data element on ClinicalTrials.gov.) OUTCOME MEASURE A planned ... and Secondary Outcome Measure . (See also Primary and Secondary Outcome Measures data element and Outcome Measure results data element on ...

  10. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting ...

  11. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting ...

  12. Novel ocular antihypertensive compounds in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available June Chen1, Stephen A Runyan1, Michael R Robinson21Department of Biological Sciences, 2Ophthalmology Clinical Research, Allergan, Inc, Irvine, CA, USAIntroduction: Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease characterized by progressive optic nerve injury and visual field defects. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is the most widely recognized risk factor for the onset and progression of open-angle glaucoma, and IOP-lowering medications comprise the primary treatment strategy. IOP elevation in glaucoma is associated with diminished or obstructed aqueous humor outflow. Pharmacotherapy reduces IOP by suppressing aqueous inflow and/or increasing aqueous outflow.Purpose: This review focuses on novel non-FDA approved ocular antihypertensive compounds being investigated for IOP reduction in ocular hypertensive and glaucoma patients in active clinical trials within approximately the past 2 years.Methods: The mode of IOP reduction, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of these new agents were assessed. Relevant drug efficacy and safety trials were identified from searches of various scientific literature databases and clinical trial registries. Compounds with no specified drug class, insufficient background information, reformulations, and fixed-combinations of marketed drugs were not considered.Results: The investigational agents identified comprise those that act on the same targets of established drug classes approved by the FDA (ie, prostaglandin analogs and β-adrenergic blockers as well as agents belonging to novel drug classes with unique mechanisms of action. Novel targets and compounds evaluated in clinical trials include an actin polymerization inhibitor (ie, latrunculin, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitors, adenosine receptor analogs, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a serotonin receptor antagonist.Conclusion: The clinical value of novel compounds for the treatment of glaucoma will depend

  13. Cognitive behavior therapy-based psychoeducational groups for adults with ADHD and their significant others (PEGASUS): an open clinical feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvikoski, T; Waaler, E; Lindström, T; Bölte, S; Jokinen, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a new psychoeducative intervention program (PEGASUS) for adults with ADHD and their significant others in a psychiatric outpatient context. At three outpatient psychiatric clinics, adults with ADHD and their significant others took part in PEGASUS, a psychoeducational program based on theories from cognitive behavioral therapy, neuropsychology, and cross-disciplinary evidence regarding ADHD. In total, 108 adults were allocated to treatment (51 with ADHD and their 57 significant others). Feasibility was evaluated regarding suitability of the intervention at a psychiatric outpatient clinic and treatment completion. Preliminary efficacy was evaluated per protocol from baseline to post-intervention (n = 41 adults with ADHD and 40 significant others). In a feasibility analysis, the intervention was judged to be a suitable treatment option for 94.5 % of all individuals with a primary diagnosis of ADHD at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. In total, 43 out of 51 allocated individuals with ADHD (84.3 %) completed the intervention. The corresponding figures for their significant others were 42 out of 57 (73.7 %). Knowledge about ADHD increased, and both the quality of relationships and psychological well-being improved from baseline to post-intervention in all participants. The significant others reported a reduction in the subjective burden of care, such as worry and guilt. The objective burden of care (such as financial problems) did not change. The findings support the potential value of psychoeducation for adults with ADHD and their significant others. An ongoing randomized controlled trial will generate further evidence concerning the PEGASUS program.

  14. Key considerations for conducting Chinese medicine clinical trials in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Shergis Johannah L; Parker Shefton; Coyle Meaghan E; Zhang Anthony L; Xue Charlie C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Conducting clinical trials of Chinese medicines (CM) in hospitals presents challenges for researchers. The success of hospital-based CM clinical trials may be influenced by the protocol design, including the maintenance of CM theory in compliance with scientific rigour and hospital guidelines and justified treatment approaches with results that can translate into clinical practice. Other influences include personnel and resources such as a dedicated team open to CM with an establishe...

  15. An open pilot study of zonisamide augmentation in major depressive patients not responding to a low dose trial with duloxetine: preliminary results on tolerability and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuti Marzia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multiple antidepressant options, major depressive disorder (MDD still faces high non-response rates, eventually requiring anticonvulsant augmentation strategies too. The aim of this study was to explore such a potential role for zonisamide. Methods A total of 40 MDD outpatients diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria entered a 24 week open trial receiving duloxetine 60 mg/day for the first 12 weeks and subsequently (weeks 12 to 24 augmentation with zonisamide 75 mg/day if they did not respond to the initial monotherapy. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed using the Hamilton Scales for Anxiety and Depression (a 12 week score ≥50% vs baseline defined 'non-response', the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects and the Young Mania Rating Scale. Results At week 12, 15 patients out of 39 (38.5% were responders, and 1 had dropped out; remarkably, 14 patients out of 24 (58.3% had achieved response by week 24. Poor concentration and general malaise were associated with non-response both at week 12 and 24 (P = 0.001, while loss of libido and reduced energy were prominent among final timepoint non-responders. Patients receiving zonisamide also experienced weight reduction (2.09 ± 12.14 kg; P = 0.001 independently of the outcome. Conclusions Although only a preliminary study due to strong methodological limitations, and thus requiring confirmation by further controlled investigations, the current results indicate zonisamide may be a potential augmentation option for some depressed patients receiving low doses of duloxetine.

  16. Reforms speed initiation of NCI-sponsored clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The process of opening a cancer clinical trial for patient accrual often takes years, and research has shown that trials which are slow to register patients often fail to finish. Following a thorough review, NCI’s Operational Efficiency Working Group prod

  17. Clinical trials on AIDS start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 6-month clinical trial in the Philippines sought to determine the efficacy of coconut oil and of "monolaurin," a coconut oil byproduct, in killing HIV by breaking down its coating. This research is based on the theory that medium-chain fatty acids, like monolaurin, can have this effect on certain viruses. The trial involves 12 women and 3 men in the early stage of HIV infection. 10 patients will take different doses of monolaurin, and 5 will consume coconut oil. It is hypothesized that the regimen will lead to higher CD4 counts and a lower viral load. The trial was almost abandoned because it received only lukewarm approval from the Health Secretary.

  18. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  19. Comparison of the Effect of PRP, PRF and Induced Bleeding in the Revascularization of Teeth with Necrotic Pulp and Open Apex: A Triple Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Johns, Dexton Antony; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Sekar, Mahalaxmi; Chandrasekaran, Rathinavel; Karthikeyan, Shanmugavel; Renganathan, Senthil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Treatment of a tooth with necrotic pulp and open apex is a special challenge to the clinicians. Apexification with calcium hydroxide and MTA barrier technique fails to induce continued root maturation which makes the tooth susceptible to root fracture. Hence, an ideal outcome for such a tooth should be regeneration of pulp like tissue into the root canal capable of continuing normal root maturation. This study aims to compare the effect of Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF), induced bleeding technique and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) in the revascularization of tooth with necrotic pulp and open apex. The main objectives of the study were to: (a) Radiographically evaluate the continuation of root development, increase in the dentin wall thickness and narrowing of canal space, apical closure and resolution of the periapical lesion; and to (b) To clinically evaluate the response to pulp sensibility testing and response to percussion and palpation tests. Sixty patients (6 to 28 years) with necrotic immature permanent tooth were randomly categorised into three groups after the root canal disinfection procedure. PRF as scaffolding material (Group A: n=20), revascularization with conventional induced bleeding technique (Group B: n=20), and PRP as the biomaterial (Group C: n=20). The primary outcome variable was measured using Periapical Index (PAI) (for periapical healing), Chen and Chen index (for apical responses), Schei's ruler (for root lengthening and root thickening) and other clinical parameters. The Chi-square test was used to interpret the data among the three groups at the end of 12 months for the variables root lengthening and lateral wall thickness. ANOVA test was performed to compare the mean of the PAI scores of the three groups at preoperative stage and 12 months. If statistically significant, Bonferroni test was done to compare the outcome among the three groups. The significant level was set at pPRF and induced bleeding technique with respect to periapical wound

  20. Artemether-Lumefantrine versus Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children Aged Less than 15 Years in Guinea-Bissau - An Open-Label Non-Inferiority Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursing, Johan; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was introduced for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Guinea-Bissau in 2008. Malaria then resurged and recurrent malaria after treatment with AL and stock-outs of AL were common. This study therefore aimed to assess the efficacy of AL and identify...... an alternative second line antimalarial. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) was chosen as it has been shown to be safe and efficacious and to reduce the incidence of recurrent malaria. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a multicentre randomised open-label non-inferiority clinical trial, AL or DP were given over 3 days.......022. In a modified intention to treat analysis in which treatment failures day 0 and reinfections were also considered as treatment failures adequate clinical and parasitological responses were 94% and 97% (OR 0.42 [95% CI, 0.13-1.38], p = 0.15). Parasite clearance and symptom resolution were similar with both...

  1. Key considerations for conducting Chinese medicine clinical trials in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shergis Johannah L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Conducting clinical trials of Chinese medicines (CM in hospitals presents challenges for researchers. The success of hospital-based CM clinical trials may be influenced by the protocol design, including the maintenance of CM theory in compliance with scientific rigour and hospital guidelines and justified treatment approaches with results that can translate into clinical practice. Other influences include personnel and resources such as a dedicated team open to CM with an established research culture and the ability to maximise participant recruitment. This article identifies the key challenges and limitations of conducting CM clinical trials in Australian hospitals.

  2. The ethics of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  3. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo iStock Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new ...

  4. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  5. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  6. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information – ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) – study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Moschetti, Ivan; Cinquini, Michela; Sala, Valeria; Compagnoni, Anna; Duca, Piergiorgio; Deligant, Christian; Manfrini, Roberto; Clivio, Luca; Satolli, Roberto; Addis, Antonio; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dri, Pietro; Liberati, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Background In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. Design All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two) and a classical design (group one and two versus group three). The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics. Trial registration ISRCTN27453314 PMID:18637189

  7. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  8. Laparoscopic versus open gastrectomy for gastric cancer, a multicenter prospectively randomized controlled trial (LOGICA-trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Leonie; Brenkman, Hylke J F; Seesing, Maarten F J; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Luyer, Misha D P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; van Lanschot, Jan J B; de Steur, Wobbe O; Hartgrink, Henk H; Stoot, Jan H M B; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Spillenaar Bilgen, Ernst J; Rütter, Jeroen E; Kouwenhoven, Ewout A; van Det, Marc J; van der Peet, Donald L; Daams, Freek; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J; van Stel, Henk F; Lacle, Miangela M; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2015-07-29

    For gastric cancer patients, surgical resection with en-bloc lymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of curative treatment. Open gastrectomy has long been the preferred surgical approach worldwide. However, this procedure is associated with considerable morbidity. Several meta-analyses have shown an advantage in short-term outcomes of laparoscopic gastrectomy compared to open procedures, with similar oncologic outcomes. However, it remains unclear whether the results of these Asian studies can be extrapolated to the Western population. In this trial from the Netherlands, patients with resectable gastric cancer will be randomized to laparoscopic or open gastrectomy. The study is a non-blinded, multicenter, prospectively randomized controlled superiority trial. Patients (≥18 years) with histologically proven, surgically resectable (cT1-4a, N0-3b, M0) gastric adenocarcinoma and European Clinical Oncology Group performance status 0, 1 or 2 are eligible to participate in the study after obtaining informed consent. Patients (n = 210) will be included in one of the ten participating Dutch centers and are randomized to either laparoscopic or open gastrectomy. The primary outcome is postoperative hospital stay (days). Secondary outcome parameters include postoperative morbidity and mortality, oncologic outcomes, readmissions, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In this randomized controlled trial laparoscopic and open gastrectomy are compared in patients with resectable gastric cancer. It is expected that laparoscopic gastrectomy will result in a faster recovery of the patient and a shorter hospital stay. Secondly, it is expected that laparoscopic gastrectomy will be associated with a lower postoperative morbidity, less readmissions, higher cost-effectiveness, better postoperative quality of life, but with similar mortality and oncologic outcomes, compared to open gastrectomy. The study started on 1 December 2014. Inclusion and follow-up will take 3 and 5

  9. A randomized trial of laparoscopic versus open surgery for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonjer, H Jaap; Deijen, Charlotte L; Abis, Gabor A;

    2015-01-01

    (locoregional recurrence) and survival after laparoscopic and open resection of rectal cancer. METHODS: In this international trial conducted in 30 hospitals, we randomly assigned patients with a solitary adenocarcinoma of the rectum within 15 cm of the anal verge, not invading adjacent tissues, and without...... of locoregional recurrence and disease-free and overall survival similar to those for open surgery. (Funded by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Europe and others; COLOR II ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00297791.)....

  10. Eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with an antiseptic soap and nasal mupirocin among colonized patients – an open uncontrolled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf Günter

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of the study was to determine the clinical efficacy of a new antiseptic liquid soap (Stellisept® scrub, based on the combination of undecylenamidopropyltrimonium methosulphate (4% and phenoxyethanol (2%, for eradication of MRSA among colonized patients who do not receive antibiotic therapy. Methods Over two years 50 MRSA patients in 6 hospitals were observed. Treatment was defined as the daily application of Stellisept scrub for the antiseptic body and hair wash (at least 60 s in combination with nasal mupirocin. A treatment cycle was a minimum of 5 days treatment. Screening was carried out at least 48 h after the treatment cycle was finished, with 24 h between each of the requested three or more samplings, which included the nasopharynx, groin, axilla, perineum and other MRSA-positive skin areas. Results Fifteen cases were retrospectively excluded (lack of outcome documentation, concomitant antibiotic therapy, open wounds. All 35 patients had colonization with MRSA before antiseptic treatment on the skin, in the groin (80%, the axilla (25.7%, the perineum (20% or other skin areas (14.3%. Colonization at more than one skin sites was found in 34.3%. Nasal colonization was found in 21 of 28 patients (75%, 7 patients were without nasal screening prior to the antiseptic treatment. After one treatment cycle MRSA was eradicated in 25 patients (71.4%, after a second cycle the total eradication rate was 91.4%, after a third cycle the rate increased to 94.2%. No patient discontinued the antiseptic treatment due to dermal intolerance of the product. Conclusions Progressive eradication of MRSA carriage was observed with the antiseptic soap and mupirocin. The eradication rate was not biased by concomitant antibiotic treatment, screening during treatment or lack of evidence for colonization in contrast to other studies with other preparations.

  11. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were......, in particular with respect to collaboration with the trial sponsor and to analytic pitfalls. The advantages of creating screening databases in conjunction with a given clinical trial are described; and finally, the potential for posttrial database studies to become a platform for training young scientists...

  12. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  13. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information - ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) - study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Moschetti, Ivan; Cinquini, Michela; Sala, Valeria; Compagnoni, Anna; Duca, Piergiorgio; Deligant, Christian; Manfrini, Roberto; Clivio, Luca; Satolli, Roberto; Addis, Antonio; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dri, Pietro; Liberati, Alessandro

    2008-07-17

    In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two) and a classical design (group one and two versus group three). The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics.

  14. An open label randomized multicentre phase IIIb trial comparing parenteral substitution versus best supportive nutritional care in subjects with pancreatic adenocarcinoma receiving 5-FU plus oxaliplatin as 2nd or higher line chemotherapy regarding clinical benefit - PANUSCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rötzer Ingeborg

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is an extremely aggressive malignancy. Subjects are afflicted with a variety of disconcerting symptoms, including profound cachexia. Recent data indicate that the outcome of oncological patients suffering from cancer cachexia could be improved by parenteral nutrition and that parenteral nutrition results in an improvement of quality of life and in prolonged survival. Currently, there is no recommendation of routine use of parenteral nutrition. Furthermore, there is no clear recommendation for 2nd line therapy (or higher for pancreatic adenocarcinoma but often asked for. Methods/Design PANUSCO is an open label, controlled, prospective, randomized, multicentre phase IIIb trial with two parallel arms. All patients will be treated with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin on an outpatient basis at the study sites. Additionally, all patients will receive best supportive nutritional care (BSNC. In the experimental group BSNC will be expanded with parenteral nutrition (PN. In contrast, patients in the control group obtain solely BSNC. Parenteral nutrition will be applied overnight and at home by experienced medical staff. A total of 120 patients are planned to be enrolled. Primary endpoint is the comparison of the treatment groups with respect to event-free survival (EFS, defined as the time from randomization till time to development of an event defined as either an impairment (change from baseline of at least ten points in EORTC QLQ-C30, functional domain total score or withdrawal due to fulfilling the special defined stopping criteria for chemotherapy as well as for nutritional intervention (NI or death from any cause (whichever occurs first. Discussion The aim of this clinical trial is to evaluate whether parenteral nutrition in combination with defined 2nd line or higher chemotherapy has an impact on quality of life for patients suffering from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Trial registration Current

  15. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in chronic neck pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. 77 with chronic neck pain who scored > 40 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) were randomized to a nine week Iyengar yoga program with weekly 90-minute classes or to a self-care/exercise program. The primary outcome measure was change of mean pain at rest (VAS) from baseline to week ten. Secondary outcomes included pain at motion, functional disabilit...

  16. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  17. Clinical and cost-effectiveness analysis of an open label, single-centre, randomised trial of spinal cord stimulation (SCS versus percutaneous myocardial laser revascularisation (PMR in patients with refractory angina pectoris: The SPiRiT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan SN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with refractory angina have significant morbidity. This study aimed to compare two of the treatment options, Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS and Percutaneous Myocardial Laser Revascularisation (PMR in terms of clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods Eligible patients were randomised to PMR or SCS and followed up for exercise tolerance time (ETT, Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS classification and the quality of life measures SF-36, Seattle Angina Questionnaire and the EuroQoL at 3, 12 and 24 months. Utilities were calculated using the EQ-5D and these and costs were compared between groups. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER per QALY for SCS compared to PMR was also calculated. Results At 24 months post-randomisation, patients that had SCS and PMR had similar ETT (mean difference 0.05, 95% CI -2.08, 2.18, p = 0.96 and there was no difference in CCS classification or quality of life outcomes. The difference in overall mean costs when comparing SCS to PMR was GBP5,520 (95% CI GBP1,966 to GBP8,613; p Conclusion Outcomes after SCS did not differ appreciably from those after PMR, with the former procedure being less cost-effective as currently applied. Larger studies could clarify which patients would most benefit from SCS, potentially increasing cost-effectiveness. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN09648950

  18. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...

  19. Bayesian adaptive methods for clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, Scott M; Muller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Already popular in the analysis of medical device trials, adaptive Bayesian designs are increasingly being used in drug development for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, from Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis to obesity, diabetes, hepatitis C, and HIV. Written by leading pioneers of Bayesian clinical trial designs, Bayesian Adaptive Methods for Clinical Trials explores the growing role of Bayesian thinking in the rapidly changing world of clinical trial analysis. The book first summarizes the current state of clinical trial design and analysis and introduces the main ideas and potential benefits of a Bayesian alternative. It then gives an overview of basic Bayesian methodological and computational tools needed for Bayesian clinical trials. With a focus on Bayesian designs that achieve good power and Type I error, the next chapters present Bayesian tools useful in early (Phase I) and middle (Phase II) clinical trials as well as two recent Bayesian adaptive Phase II studies: the BATTLE and ISP...

  20. The state of infectious diseases clinical trials: a systematic review of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Neela D; Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Horton, John R; Chiswell, Karen; Tasneem, Asba; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of clinical trials informing specific questions faced by infectious diseases (ID) specialists. The ClinicalTrials.gov registry offers an opportunity to evaluate the ID clinical trials portfolio. We examined 40,970 interventional trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007-2010, focusing on study conditions and interventions to identify ID-related trials. Relevance to ID was manually confirmed for each programmatically identified trial, yielding 3570 ID trials and 37,400 non-ID trials for analysis. The number of ID trials was similar to the number of trials identified as belonging to cardiovascular medicine (n = 3437) or mental health (n = 3695) specialties. Slightly over half of ID trials were treatment-oriented trials (53%, vs. 77% for non-ID trials) followed by prevention (38%, vs. 8% in non-ID trials). ID trials tended to be larger than those of other specialties, with a median enrollment of 125 subjects (interquartile range [IQR], 45-400) vs. 60 (IQR, 30-160) for non-ID trials. Most ID studies are randomized (73%) but nonblinded (56%). Industry was the funding source in 51% of ID trials vs. 10% that were primarily NIH-funded. HIV-AIDS trials constitute the largest subset of ID trials (n = 815 [23%]), followed by influenza vaccine (n = 375 [11%]), and hepatitis C (n = 339 [9%]) trials. Relative to U.S. and global mortality rates, HIV-AIDS and hepatitis C virus trials are over-represented, whereas lower respiratory tract infection trials are under-represented in this large sample of ID clinical trials. This work is the first to characterize ID clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, providing a framework to discuss prioritization, methodology, and policy.

  1. [Profile of clinical trials enrolling Brazilian children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jean Mendes de Lucena; Lima, Elisangela da Costa; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Ventura, Miriam; Coelho, Helena Lutescia Luna

    2017-06-12

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical trials with medicines enrolling Brazilian children and adolescents, registered in the databases of Clinical Trials and the Brazilian Clinical Trials Network (ReBEC) from 1994 to 2014. Only 462 clinical trials enrolled Brazilian children and adolescents. There was an increase in registrations beginning in 2003, with an important drop in 2011. Among these trials, 35.5% were hosted in Brazil. The international clinical trials were mostly conducted by North American companies. In both cases, multinational industry was the principal source of funding. The clinical trials were predominantly phase III with injectable and solid oral pharmaceutical forms of antiviral drugs. Domestic clinical trials showed wider variation in the pharmaceutical forms and higher percentage of liquid formulations, when compared to the international trials. In addition to heavy external dependence for conducting clinical trials, the study emphasized the challenge for pediatric care in Brazil, which presents epidemiological peculiarities in an environment prone to the use of unlicensed medicines for children.

  2. Estimating Statistical Power for Open Enrollment Group Treatment Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.; Saavedra, Lissette M.; Hien, Denise A.; Fals-Stewart, William

    2010-01-01

    Modeling turnover in group membership has been identified as a key barrier contributing to a disconnect between the manner in which behavioral treatment is conducted (open enrollment groups) and the designs of substance abuse treatment trials (closed enrollment groups, individual therapy). Latent class pattern mixture models (LCPMM) are an emerging tool for modeling data from open enrollment groups with membership turnover in recently proposed treatment trials. The current article illustrates an approach to conducting power analyses for open enrollment designs based on Monte Carlo simulation of LCPMM models using parameters derived from published data from an RCT comparing Seeking Safety to a Community Care condition for women presenting with comorbid PTSD and substance use disorders. The example addresses discrepancies between the analysis framework assumed in power analyses of many recently-proposed open enrollment trials and the proposed use of LCPMM for data analysis. PMID:20832971

  3. Atomoxetine Open-Label Trial in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Atomoxetine (originally named tomoxetine, a new therapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD marketed by Eli Lilly, was compared to methylphenidate in a prospective, randomized, open-label study for 10 weeks duration, at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Carolinas Medical Center, and Lilly Research Laboratories.

  4. Uncertainty and the ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic explication is offered of equipoise and uncertainty in clinical trials. In order to be useful in the justification of clinical trials, equipoise has to be interpreted in terms of overlapping probability distributions of possible treatment outcomes, rather than point estimates representing expectation values. Uncertainty about treatment outcomes is shown to be a necessary but insufficient condition for the ethical defensibility of clinical trials. Additional requirements are proposed for the nature of that uncertainty. The indecisiveness of our criteria for cautious decision-making under uncertainty creates the leeway that makes clinical trials defensible.

  5. [Situation analysis for drug clinical trial institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Ying; Wu, Ping; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Drug clinical trial is an important link in the chain of new drug research and development. The results of drug discovery and development directly depend on the extent of standardization of clinical trials. Therefore, improving the quality of drug clinical trials is of great importance, and drug clinical trial institutions play a crucial role in the quality management of drug clinical trials. After years of development, the overall level of drug clinical trials has advanced rapidly in China, and a large number of clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine have also been carried out. However, there is still a big gap between our country and developed countries. Therefore, for the construction and management of Chinese drug clinical trial institutions, there is still a long way to go. This study aims to analyze the current development of drug clinical trial institutions in China and explore the existing problems from three aspects, including current situations of institutional organization and management, regional and professional distributions, and quality control. And some suggestions are put forward finally, including support of traditional Chinese medicine, introduction of drug-risk management system, and construction of information management.

  6. Does bright light have an anxiolytic effect? - an open trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kripke Daniel F

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this open trial was to examine the influence of acute bright light exposure on anxiety in older and young adults. Methods This study was ancillary to a complex 5-day laboratory experiment testing phase-responses to light at all times of the day. On 3 consecutive days, participants were exposed to bright light (3,000 lux for 3 hours. The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Form Y1 was administered 5 minutes before and 20 minutes after each treatment. Mean state anxiety before and after treatment were analyzed by age, sex, and time ANOVA. To avoid floor effects, only participants with baseline STAI levels of ≥ 25 were included. Results A significant anxiolytic effect of bright light was found for the mean data, as well as for each of the three days. No significant main effect of age, sex, or interaction of these factors with STAI change were found. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant (albeit modest anxiolytic effects following acute bright light exposure in low anxiety adults. Further randomized, controlled trials in clinically anxious individuals are needed.

  7. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    OpenAIRE

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. Methods The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, p...

  8. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    OpenAIRE

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Gutierrez Miguelez, Cristina; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. Methods The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type,...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of Co-Crystal of Tramadol-Celecoxib: findings from a 4-way randomized open-label Phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Sebastián; Lahjou, Mounia; Vaqué, Anna; Sust, Mariano; Escriche, Marisol; Soler, Lluis; Sans, Artur; Sicard, Eric; Gascón, Neus; Encina, Gregorio; Plata-Salamán, Carlos

    2017-09-09

    We compared the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of Co-Crystal of Tramadol-Celecoxib (CTC) versus each reference product (alone and in open combination) after single (first dose) and multiple dosing. Healthy adults aged 18-50 years received, under fasted conditions, 15 twice-daily doses of the following treatments (separated by ≥14-day wash-out): 200 mg immediate-release (IR) CTC (equivalent to 88 mg tramadol and 112 mg celecoxib; Treatment-1); 100 mg IR tramadol (Treatment-2), 100 mg celecoxib (Treatment-3); and 100 mg IR tramadol and 100 mg celecoxib (Treatment-4). Treatment sequence was assigned by computer-generated randomization. PK parameters were calculated using non-compartmental analysis. Parameters for CTC were adjusted according to reference product dose. Thirty subjects (20 males, mean age 35 years) were included. Multiple-dose tramadol PK parameters for Treatments-1, -2 and -4, respectively, were 551, 632 and 661 ng ml(-1) (mean maximum plasma concentration [Cmax ]); 4796, 4990 and 5284 ng h ml(-1) (area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval at steady state); and 3.0, 2.0 and 2.0 h (median time to Cmax at steady state). For Treatments-1, -3 and -4, multiple-dose celecoxib PK parameters were 445, 536 and 396 ng ml(-1) ; 2803, 3366 and 2897 ng h ml(-1) ; and 2.0, 2.0 and 3.0 h. Single-dose findings were consistent with multiple-dose data. Types of adverse events were consistent with known reference product safety profiles. After single (first dose) and multiple dosing, PK parameters of each active pharmaceutical ingredient in CTC were modified by co-crystallization compared with reference products alone or in open combination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive behavior therapy-based psychoeducational groups for adults with ADHD and their significant others (PEGASUS): an open clinical feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hirvikoski, T.; Waaler, E.; Lindström, T; Bölte, S.; Jokinen, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a new psychoeducative intervention program (PEGASUS) for adults with ADHD and their significant others in a psychiatric outpatient context. At three outpatient psychiatric clinics, adults with ADHD and their significant others took part in PEGASUS, a psychoeducational program based on theories from cognitive behavioral therapy, neuropsychology, and cross-disciplinary evidence regarding ADHD. In total, 108 adul...

  11. [Effect of Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus (Gynophilus) in restoring the vaginal flora by female patients with bacterial vaginosis--randomized, open clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, S; Dobrevski-Vacheva, R

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal probiotics can increase the clinical and microbiological efficacy of the therapeutic regimens used for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. The Aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the application of Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus (Gynophilus--probiotic species Lcr 35) in restoring the vaginal flora and prevention of relapses by female patients with anaerobic vaginal infection undergoing conventional (nitroimidazole) local and main therapy. In the study were included 60 women with established Amsel/Nugent bacterial vaginosis who were randomized in two groups. The first group patients (n-30 beginning/n-25 controls) underwent a 5 day treatment with two daily peroral doses of metronidazole 500 mg, with local application of metronidazole ovules 1000 mg at the 1st and the 3rd day (M+M). In the second group (n-30 beginning/n-26 controls) the therapeutic regimen was the same as in the first group, with additional 7 day treatment with Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus - Lcr 35. (Gynophilus) vaginal ovules, two daily doses (M+M+G). 30% to 40% was the difference/enhance of the clinical efficacy according to the clinical indicators when Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus - Lcr 35 was added to the standard nitroimidazole therapy. Concerning the main clinical indicator: Amsel criteria, the improvement after the therapy in the first group (M+M) was 60% (n-15) and in the second group (M+M+G) 88.5% (n-23). According to the microbiological indicators the improvement in the first group (M+M) based on the vaginal flora evaluation (Nugent score) was 60% (n-15) and in the second group, after the addition of Lcr 35 it was 88.5% (n-23). The application of Gynophilus after conventional 5-nitroimidazole treatment for bacterial vaginosis increased the clinical and microbiological efficacy of the therapy by 25% - 30%. The microbial balance in the vaginal ecosystem was restored in the majority of patients (88%), which is a prerequisite for low percentage of bacterial

  12. Trial analytics--a tool for clinical trial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anindya; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged timelines and large expenses associated with clinical trials have prompted a new focus on improving the operational efficiency of clinical trials by use of Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS) in order to improve managerial control in trial conduct. However, current CTMS systems are not able to meet the expectations due to various shortcomings like inability of timely reporting and trend visualization within/beyond an organization. To overcome these shortcomings of CTMS, clinical researchers can apply a business intelligence (BI) framework to create Clinical Research Intelligence (CLRI) for optimization of data collection and analytics. This paper proposes the usage of an innovative and collaborative visualization tool (CTA) as CTMS "add-on" to help overwhelm these deficiencies of traditional CTMS, with suitable examples.

  13. Data monitoring committees for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Susan S; Culbertson, Richard; Gillen, Daniel L; Goodman, Steven; Schrandt, Suzanne; Zirkle, Maryan

    2015-10-01

    In any clinical trial, it is essential to monitor the accumulating data to be sure that the trial continues to be safe for participants and that the trial is being conducted properly. Data monitoring committees, independent expert panels who undertake regular reviews of the data as the trial progresses, serve an important role in safeguarding the interests of research participants and ensuring trial integrity in many trials. Many pragmatic clinical trials, which aim to inform healthcare decisions by comparing alternate interventions in heterogeneous healthcare delivery settings, will warrant review by an independent data monitoring committee due to their potential impact on clinical practice. However, the very features that make a trial "pragmatic" may pose challenges in terms of which aspects of a trial to monitor and when it is appropriate for a data monitoring committee to intervene. Using the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary tool that draws distinctions between pragmatic and explanatory clinical trials, we review characteristics of pragmatic clinical trials that may have implications for data monitoring committees and interim monitoring plans. These include broad eligibility criteria, a focus on subjective patient-centered outcomes, and in some cases a lack of standardized follow-up procedures across study sites. Additionally, protocol adherence is often purposefully not addressed in pragmatic trials in order to accurately represent the clinical practice setting and maintain practicability of implementation; there are differing viewpoints as to whether adherence should be assessed and acted upon by data monitoring committees in these trials. Some other issues not specifically related to the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary criteria may also merit special consideration in pragmatic trials. Thresholds for early termination of a pragmatic clinical trial might be controversial. The distinguishing features of pragmatic clinical

  14. Clinical Trials.Gov: A Topical Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vibha; Cahan, Amos; Ghosh, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov was established as a web-based registry for clinical trials of human participants in 2000. Mandatory registration started in 2008. Given more than a decade of registered trials, it's important to understand the "topic" areas and their evolution over time from this resource. This information may help in identifying current knowledge gaps. We use dynamic topic model (DTM) methods to discover topics and their evolution over last 17 years. Our model suggests that there are disease or organ specific trials such as 'Cardiovascular disorders', Heart & Brain conditions', or 'Breast & Prostate cancer' as well as trials registered for general health. General health trials are less likely to be FDA regulated, but both health and pain management, as well as surgical, heart, and brain trials have upward trend in recent years while advanced cancer trials have downward trended. Our model derives unique insights from metadata associated with each topic area.

  15. Why are clinical trials necessary in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Poongothai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials are emerging as an important activity in India as it is an essential component of the drug discovery and development program to which India is committed. The only robust way to evaluate a new medicine is by doing properly designed clinical trials. In addition to advancing science, clinical trials offer myriad benefits to the participants. The recent hue that created in India about clinical trials is probably an exaggeration of facts. However, these points to the need for ensuring proper compliance with the regulatory norms and proper training of concerned personnel in good clinical practice (GCP. This will ensure that India continues to reap the benefits of clinical trials and also become a world leader in this field.

  16. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick I Okonta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  17. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonta, Patrick I

    2014-05-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  18. Effect of minoxidil topical foam on frontotemporal and vertex androgenetic alopecia in men: a 104-week open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanti, V; Hillmann, K; Kottner, J; Stroux, A; Canfield, D; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2016-07-01

    Topical minoxidil formulations have been shown to be effective in treating androgenetic alopecia (AGA) for 12 months. Efficacy and safety in both frontotemporal and vertex regions over longer application periods have not been studied so far. To evaluate the effect of 5% minoxidil topical foam (5% MTF) in the frontotemporal and vertex areas in patients with moderate AGA over 104 weeks. An 80-week, open-label extension phase was performed, following a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men with AGA grade IIIvertex to VI. Group 1 (n = 22) received ongoing 5% MTF for 104 weeks, Group 2 (n = 23) received placebo topical foam (plaTF) until week 24, followed by 5% MTF until week 104 during the extension phase. Frontotemporal and vertex target area non-vellus hair counts (f-TAHC, v-TAHC) and cumulative hair width (f-TAHW, v-TAHW) were assessed at baseline and at weeks 24, 52, 76 and 104. In Group 1, f-TAHW and f-TAHC showed a statistically significant increase from baseline to week 52 and week 76, respectively, returning to values comparable to baseline at week 104. No significant differences were found between baseline and week 104 in v-TAHC in Group 1 as well as f-TAHC, v-TAHC, f-TAHW and v-TAHW values in Group 2. 5% MTF is effective in stabilizing hair density, hair width and scalp coverage in both frontotemporal and vertex areas over an application period of 104 weeks, while showing a good safety and tolerability profile with a low rate of irritant contact dermatitis. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D McMahon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH guidance on good clinical practice (GCP, arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe.

  20. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alex D McMahon; Conway, David I; MacDonald, Tom M; McInnes, Gordon T

    2009-01-01

    Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidance on good clinical practice (GCP), arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe.

  1. Therapeutic hotline. Effectiveness of the association of cetirizine and topical steroids in lichen planus pilaris--an open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, Roberto; Rossi, Alfredo; Di Prima, Tiziana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Lichen planus is considered a T cell-mediated immunological disease. Even mast cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Keratinocytes of the basal layer of the skin and/or the hair follicle may represent the "target/victim" of an immune aggression, determining the destruction of the hair follicle and thus scarring alopecia. Therefore, there is a compelling urgency for effective treatment of this potentially disfiguring dermatosis. Our data provide a further therapeutic opportunity: the use of an antihistaminic drug--cetirizine (CTZ)--in an "anti-inflammatory" regimen. We propose the use of CTZ at the dosage of 30 mg/daily. Twenty-one patients affected by lichen planus pilaris (LPP) of the scalp have been treated. Topical application of steroids has been coadministered in all cases during the therapy. Clinical effects, in the sense of stabilization with cessation of the inflammation (erythema, follicular hyperkeratosis, loss of anagen hair), were achieved in all patients but three. One patient developed cardiac arrhythmia after 3 months of successful treatment and dropped out. Our cases indicate that a combined therapy of topical steroid with CTZ can be a safe and effective choice even in severe cases of lichen planus pilaris, so often refractory to the therapy. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Function: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuri Seyed Kazem

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevention of pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft is attended as a very important issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of pulmonary rehabilitation before surgery for reducing the risk of pulmonary complications after surgery. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients undergoing heart surgery were randomly divided into two groups A and B. Chest physiotherapy was performed before and after surgery on group A patients however it was done on group B’s, only after surgery. Effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were compared between two groups, using spirometry and arterial blood gas (ABG. Results: Thirty nine males (65% and 21 females (35% with mean age of 8.10 ± 9.56 were analyzed.The mean differences were statistically significant for predicted forced vital capacity (FVC (CI95%:1.3 to 8.7 and Predicted Peak Flow indices (PEF (CI 95%: 1.9 to 9.4 of spirometry indicator,PCO2 index (of ABG parameter (CI 95%: 1.4 to 8.9 and mean oxygen saturation (mean Spo2 (CI 95%: 0.6 to 1.7 of ABG index in two groups. Conclusion: The performance of pulmonary rehabilitation program before surgery is recommended, as it may result in the reduction of complications of heart surgery.

  3. Construction of ethics in clinical research: clinical trials registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Caramori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific development that has been achieved through decades finds in clinical research a great possibility of translating findings to human health application. Evidence given by clinical trials allows everyone to have access to the best health services. However, the millionaire world of pharmaceutical industries has stained clinical research with doubt and improbability. Study results (fruits of controlled clinical trials and scientific publications (selective, manipulated and with wrong conclusions led to an inappropriate clinical practice, favoring the involved economic aspect. In 2005, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE, supported by the World Association of Medical Editors, started demanding as a requisite for publication that all clinical trials be registered at the database ClinicalTrials.gov. In 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO created the International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP, which gathers several registry centers from all over the world, and required that all researchers and pharmaceutical industries register clinical trials. Such obligatory registration has progressed and will extend to all scientific journals indexed in all worldwide databases. Registration of clinical trials means another step of clinical research towards transparency, ethics and impartiality, resulting in real evidence to the forthcoming changes in clinical practice as well as in the health situation.

  4. Varied acceptance of clinical trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1989-12-01

    The subject of varied acceptance of clinical trial results is discussed in the context of review of trials with which I have been involved and my subjective evaluation of their impact on the practice of clinical medicine. My experience goes back to 1949 and a World Health Organization trial of hyperimmune gamma globulin against rabies. This was followed by a large trial of secondary prevention of poliomyelitis. I participated in the planning and initiation of the first chronic disease trial, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP). The latter lasted for 15 years and its ramifications continue to this day. My next trial was the Coronary Drug Project (CDP), a complex trial with more than 8,000 patients. The trials of aspirin and aspirin combined with persantine (the CDPA, AMIS, PARIS I, and PARIS II) followed. My last three trials were a trial of photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy (DRS), a six-country trial of the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine (IMPACT), and a study involving two diagnostic procedures for pulmonary embolism (PIOPED). When one considers, in retrospect, the plethora of trials one is struck by the uniform absence of a priori considerations of the impact on medical practice, or likely lack thereof, of possible outcomes.

  5. Acute Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n(s) being investigated Acute Stroke MedDRA Classification E.1.3Condition being s... General Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical conditio

  6. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process. PMID:26288464

  7. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process.

  8. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process.

  9. Terminating a long-term clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Long-term clinical trials often include more than one active treatment group. These may be discontinued independently if found to be ineffective or possibly harmful. Certain subgroups of patients may be discovered, in the course of a clinical trial, who do not respond satisfactorily and are, therefore, excluded during the course of a trial. Yet another kind of termination comes when we have a therapeutic breakthrough or when hope has to be abandoned for demonstrating beneficial effects for one, several, or all treatments included in a trial. Examples from the authors' experience are presented, as are successful and unsuccessful techniques in managing terminations of various types.

  10. Construction of ethics in clinical research: clinical trials registration

    OpenAIRE

    C. A. Caramori

    2007-01-01

    Scientific development that has been achieved through decades finds in clinical research a great possibility of translating findings to human health application. Evidence given by clinical trials allows everyone to have access to the best health services. However, the millionaire world of pharmaceutical industries has stained clinical research with doubt and improbability. Study results (fruits of controlled clinical trials) and scientific publications (selective, manipulated and with wrong c...

  11. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1 Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2 Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3 Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4 Partner influence on use, (5 Retention and continuation and (6 Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  12. Sharing clinical trial data on patient level: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Franz; Slattery, Jim; Groves, Trish; Lang, Thomas; Benjamini, Yoav; Day, Simon; Bauer, Peter; Posch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In recent months one of the most controversially discussed topics among regulatory agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, journal editors, and academia has been the sharing of patient-level clinical trial data. Several projects have been started such as the European Medicines Agency´s (EMA) "proactive publication of clinical trial data", the BMJ open data campaign, or the AllTrials initiative. The executive director of the EMA, Dr. Guido Rasi, has recently announced that clinical trial data on patient level will be published from 2014 onwards (although it has since been delayed). The EMA draft policy on proactive access to clinical trial data was published at the end of June 2013 and open for public consultation until the end of September 2013. These initiatives will change the landscape of drug development and publication of medical research. They provide unprecedented opportunities for research and research synthesis, but pose new challenges for regulatory authorities, sponsors, scientific journals, and the public. Besides these general aspects, data sharing also entails intricate biostatistical questions such as problems of multiplicity. An important issue in this respect is the interpretation of multiple statistical analyses, both prospective and retrospective. Expertise in biostatistics is needed to assess the interpretation of such multiple analyses, for example, in the context of regulatory decision-making by optimizing procedural guidance and sophisticated analysis methods. © 2014 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Registration of interventional studies is necessary according to the Declaration of Helsinki but implementation has been a challenge for many journals. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (Acta) requires registration for studies conducted after January 1(st) 2010. We aimed to assess...... registered when it could be verified that patient enrolment was started after registration in a trial registry. RESULTS: We identified 200 RCTs. Dates for patient enrolment were not specified in 51 (25.5%). The proportion of correctly registered trials increased significantly from 17.1% (19/111) for trials...

  14. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  15. Acute Schizophrenia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nter, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial of Three Fixed Doses of OPC-34712 in the Treatment of Adults With Acute...2 in the Treatment of Adults With Acute Schizophrenia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number331-10-231 A.5.2US ... Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...ition or disease under investigation E.1.2Version 14.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001064 E.1.2Term Acute

  16. Acute Schizophrenia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2, and 1 mg/day) in the Treatment of Adults With Acute Schizophrenia A.3.1Title ...of the trial for lay people, in easily understood, i.e. non-technical, language Efficacy Study of OPC-34712 in Adults With Acute...e Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...nder investigation E.1.2Version 14.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001064 E.1.2Term Acute schizo

  17. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  18. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials of rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G K; Hinman, R S; Zeni, J; Risberg, M A; Snyder-Mackler, L; Bennell, K L

    2015-05-01

    A Task Force of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has previously published a set of guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Limited material available on clinical trials of rehabilitation in people with OA has prompted OARSI to establish a separate Task Force to elaborate guidelines encompassing special issues relating to rehabilitation of OA. The Task Force identified three main categories of rehabilitation clinical trials. The categories included non-operative rehabilitation trials, post-operative rehabilitation trials, and trials examining the effectiveness of devices (e.g., assistive devices, bracing, physical agents, electrical stimulation, etc.) that are used in rehabilitation of people with OA. In addition, the Task Force identified two main categories of outcomes in rehabilitation clinical trials, which include outcomes related to symptoms and function, and outcomes related to disease modification. The guidelines for rehabilitation clinical trials provided in this report encompass these main categories. The report provides guidelines for conducting and reporting on randomized clinical trials. The topics include considerations for entering patients into trials, issues related to conducting trials, considerations for selecting outcome measures, and recommendations for statistical analyses and reporting of results. The focus of the report is on rehabilitation trials for hip, knee and hand OA, however, we believe the content is broad enough that it could be applied to rehabilitation trials for other regions as well.

  19. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-11-20

    Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in - hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors.

  20. Acute pancreatitis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lot Trial of Indomethacin in Acute Pancreatitis Ensayo piloto controlado y aleatorizado con indometacina en ....1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...n criteria Patients ages 18 or above admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of Acute pancreatitis (AP) based

  1. Acute Rhinosinusitis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available edical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Rhinosinu....2.3Trial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria 1. Adult male and female outpatients aged ≥ 18 - 75 years 2. Acute

  2. Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders What are clinical trials? Clinical trials are research studies involving people, which ...

  3. Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All Past Issues / Fall ... in was reviewed by an IRB. Find a Clinical Trial Near You Health research takes place at hospitals, ...

  4. International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The mission of the WHO Intemational Clinical Trials Registry Platform is to ensure that a complete view of research is accessible to all those involved in health care decision making.This will improve research transparency and will ultimately strengthen tha validity and value of the scientific evidence base.The registration of all interventional trials is a scientific, ethical and moral responsibility.

  5. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations...

  6. Monitoring clinical trials: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Síle F; Henley, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures involved in planning, conducting and reporting monitoring activities for large Clinical Trials of Investigational Medicinal Products (CTIMPs), focusing on those conducted in resource-limited settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The New Math of Clinical Trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer Couzin

    2004-01-01

    ... altering them as they run to take into account accumulating results. Although Bayesian designs are now widely used in everything from astrophysics to ecology, they've been slower to catch on in medical research, particularly clinical trials...

  8. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... Manufacturers Association, on the basis of a survey of its members ... from this information. The US database, on the other hand, clearly identifies 172 ... workforce involved in clinical trials outside the public sector. This figure ...

  10. Characteristics of clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, Robert M; Zarin, Deborah A; Kramer, Judith M; Sherman, Rachel E; Aberle, Laura H; Tasneem, Asba

    2012-05-02

    Recent reports highlight gaps between guidelines-based treatment recommendations and evidence from clinical trials that supports those recommendations. Strengthened reporting requirements for studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov enable a comprehensive evaluation of the national trials portfolio. To examine fundamental characteristics of interventional clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. A data set comprising 96,346 clinical studies from ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded on September 27, 2010, and entered into a relational database to analyze aggregate data. Interventional trials were identified and analyses were focused on 3 clinical specialties-cardiovascular, mental health, and oncology-that together encompass the largest number of disability-adjusted life-years lost in the United States. Characteristics of registered clinical trials as reported data elements in the trial registry; how those characteristics have changed over time; differences in characteristics as a function of clinical specialty; and factors associated with use of randomization, blinding, and data monitoring committees (DMCs). The number of registered interventional clinical trials increased from 28,881 (October 2004-September 2007) to 40,970 (October 2007-September 2010), and the number of missing data elements has generally declined. Most interventional trials registered between 2007 and 2010 were small, with 62% enrolling 100 or fewer participants. Many clinical trials were single-center (66%; 24,788/37,520) and funded by organizations other than industry or the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (47%; 17,592/37,520). Heterogeneity in the reported methods by clinical specialty; sponsor type; and the reported use of DMCs, randomization, and blinding was evident. For example, reported use of DMCs was less common in industry-sponsored vs NIH-sponsored trials (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.11; 95% CI, 0.09-0.14), earlier-phase vs phase 3 trials (adjusted OR, 0

  11. Acute Gout | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Gou...t E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Gout E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - M...n the trial (if it is different from the expected normal treatment of that condition) Acute gout is a self l

  12. Randomized clinical trials in HEPATOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Nikolova, D; Gluud, C

    1999-01-01

    . Quality was assessed by means of a validated 5-point scale and separate quality components associated with empirical evidence of bias. Only 26% of all RCTs reported sample size calculations, 52% adequate generation of the allocation sequence, 34% adequate allocation concealment and 34% double......, single-center trials, and trials with no external funding. Quality did not improve with time and was not associated with country of origin. The main conclusions are that the quality of RCTs in HEPATOLOGY needs improvement and that the probability of high quality increased with the number of centers...

  13. Clinical Trials and their Impact on Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Cuevas Pérez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Today there are countless examples that illustrate the nature of technoscience, including biotechnology and pharmacology. The clinical trial is the appropriate methodology used by clinical pharmacology to test the efficacy and safety of a treatment or intervention in humans. It constitutes the cornerstone of research. Once the preclinical research is completed, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the Cuban Pharmaceutical and Biotechnological Industry is precisely the clinical evaluation. Therefore, this work aims to provide a reflection on the most significant aspects of clinical trials and their impact on society.

  14. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, an...

  15. Developments in statistical evaluation of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Oud, Johan; Ghidey, Wendimagegn

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various ways of approaching and interpreting the data produced by clinical trial studies, with a special emphasis on the essential role that biostatistics plays in clinical trials. Over the past few decades the role of statistics in the evaluation and interpretation of clinical data has become of paramount importance. As a result the standards of clinical study design, conduct and interpretation have undergone substantial improvement. The book includes 18 carefully reviewed chapters on recent developments in clinical trials and their statistical evaluation, with each chapter providing one or more examples involving typical data sets, enabling readers to apply the proposed procedures. The chapters employ a uniform style to enhance comparability between the approaches.

  16. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichert, Stina; Juliusson, Gunnar; Johansson, Åsa; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Teige, Ingrid; Wickenberg, Anna Teige; Frendeus, Björn; Korsgren, Magnus; Hansson, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Background Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial. Methods and findings In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29. Conclusions The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369. PMID:28158311

  17. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  18. Current status and perspectives of interventional clinical trials for glioblastoma - analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Minniti, Giuseppe; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Mathier, Etienne; Soldatovic, Ivan; Jeremic, Branislav; Ghadjar, Pirus; Elicin, Olgun; Lössl, Kristina; Aebersold, Daniel M; Belka, Claus; Herrmann, Evelyn; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2017-01-03

    The records of 208.777 (100%) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on the 19th of February 2016. Phase II and III trials including patients with glioblastoma were selected for further classification and analysis. Based on the disease settings, trials were classified into three groups: newly diagnosed glioblastoma, recurrent disease and trials with no differentiation according to disease setting. Furthermore, we categorized trials according to the experimental interventions, the primary sponsor, the source of financial support and trial design elements. Trends were evaluated using the autoregressive integrated moving average model. Two hundred sixteen (0.1%) trials were selected for further analysis. Academic centers (investigator initiated trials) were recorded as primary sponsors in 56.9% of trials, followed by industry 25.9%. Industry was the leading source of monetary support for the selected trials in 44.4%, followed by 25% of trials with primarily academic financial support. The number of newly initiated trials between 2005 and 2015 shows a positive trend, mainly through an increase in phase II trials, whereas phase III trials show a negative trend. The vast majority of trials evaluate forms of different systemic treatments (91.2%). In total, one hundred different molecular entities or biologicals were identified. Of those, 60% were involving drugs specifically designed for central nervous system malignancies. Trials that specifically address radiotherapy, surgery, imaging and other therapeutic or diagnostic methods appear to be rare. Current research in glioblastoma is mainly driven or sponsored by industry, academic medical oncologists and neuro-oncologists, with the majority of trials evaluating forms of systemic therapies. Few trials reach phase III. Imaging, radiation therapy and surgical procedures are underrepresented in current trials portfolios. Optimization in research portfolio for glioblastoma is needed.

  19. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mankoff, David A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lieberman, Frank S; Buatti, John M; Mountz, James M; Erickson, Bradley J; Fennessy, Fiona M M; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M; Gillies, Robert J; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-01-15

    As anticancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. Although traditional, anatomic CT, and MRI examinations are useful in many settings, increasing evidence suggests that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biologic and physiologic questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies.

  20. Public information about clinical trials and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plétan, Yannick; Zannad, Faïez; Jaillon, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Be it to restore the confused image of clinical research in relation to the lay public, or to develop new ways of accruing healthy volunteers or patients for clinical trials, there is a need to draft some guidance on how best to provide information on research. Although the French legal and regulatory armamentarium in this area is essentially liberal, there is currently little-justified reluctance among study sponsors to advertise publicly. A group of academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers, assembled for a workshop, together with regulators, journalists, representatives from ethics committees, social security, patient and health consumer groups and other French institutional bodies, has suggested the following series of recommendations: there is no need for additional legal or regulatory constraints; sponsors should be aware of and make use of direct public information on trials; a 'good practice charter' on public communication about clinical trials should be developed; all professionals should be involved in this communication platform; communication in the patient's immediate vicinity should be preferred (primary-care physician, local press); clinical databases and websites accessible to professionals, but also to patients and non-professionals, should be developed; genuine instruction on clinical trials for physicians and health professionals unfamiliar with such trials should be developed and disseminated; media groups should receive at least some training in the fundamentals of clinical research.

  1. Acute cough | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute cough Akuter Husten E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acu...igation E.1.2Version 17.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10066522 E.1.2Term Acute cough E.1.2System...igible for inclusion in this trial must fulfill all of the following criteria:1. Acute cough with symptoms l...based on medical history and physical examination7. CS score of at least 50 mm on a 100 mm VAS at V1 8. Acute...te cough Akuter Husten E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - Respiratory Tract Dis

  2. Artemether-Lumefantrine versus Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for Treatment of Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children Aged Less than 15 Years in Guinea-Bissau - An Open-Label Non-Inferiority Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursing, Johan; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was introduced for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Guinea-Bissau in 2008. Malaria then resurged and recurrent malaria after treatment with AL and stock-outs of AL were common. This study therefore aimed to assess the efficacy of AL and identify an al...... treatments. CONCLUSIONS: Both treatments achieved the WHO recommended efficacy for antimalarials about to be adopted as policy. DP was not inferior to AL for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Guinea-Bissau. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01704508....

  3. [Clinical trials: principles of the method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulker, J P

    2000-04-15

    Comparative judgement, which is seminal to any kind of science performing measurements, has been applied to clinical reasoning for many centuries. The need for systematizing the observational methods used in medicine in order to draw more reliable inferences about the effects of therapies has been active all along the 19th century. This has resulted in controlled studies which yielded important advances in clinical and therapeutic knowledge, although their designs were not fully satisfactory. Clinical trials have gained their status of "hard science", methodology allowing causal inference, by the end of the 1940s after having adopted the statistical theories developed in the 1930s by Fisher for experimental design in agronomy. A long way has been run since the first controlled randomized trial. However, half a century later, modern clinical trial remains essentially a controlled randomized prospective study using methods to limit potential biases and to establish statistical significance.

  4. [Ethical implications of clinical trials in Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadly, Ali

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials are necessary for medical advancement. They must respect legal obligations. Ethical questions related to protection of the human being's rights are yielded by these trials. Joining research to medical core is problematical in consideration of patient's consent to clinical trial. Exclusion by the Tunisian law of persons under age, pregnant or breast-feeding women from medical experimentation in the aim of protecting them against clinical research adverse events or abuses is ethically questionable since it deprives them from a possible medical progress. So why not to involve them in clinical research when there is an expected benefit, after bringing them protection as vulnerable persons like we should do for instance for the elderly, handicapped persons or prisoners. Legal creation of research ethics committees is important for the respect of experimentation rules on human beings.

  5. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Gambles, M; Leese, B; Atkin, K; Brown, J; Mason, S; Tovey, P

    2004-10-01

    To investigate how South Asian patients conceptualise the notion of clinical trials and to identify key processes that impact on trial participation and the extent to which communication difficulties, perceptions of risk and attitudes to authority influence these decisions. Also to identify whether 'South Asian' patients are homogeneous in these issues, and which factors differ between different South Asian subgroups and finally how professionals regard the involvement of South Asian patients and their views on strategies to increase participation. A review of the literature on minority ethnic participation in clinical trials was followed by three qualitative interview studies. Interviews were taped and transcribed (and translated if required) and subjected to framework analysis. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals; 60 South Asian lay people who had not taken part in a trial and 15 South Asian trial participants. Motivations for trial participation were identified as follows: to help society, to improve own health or that of family and friends, out of obligation to the doctor and to increase scientific knowledge. Deterrents were concerns about drug side-effects, busy lifestyles, language, previous bad experiences, mistrust and feelings of not belonging to British society. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials and, overall, the younger respondents were more knowledgeable than the older ones. Problems are more likely to be associated with service delivery. Lack of being approached was a common response. Lay-reported factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials include age, language, social class, feeling of not belonging/mistrust, culture and religion. Awareness of clinical trials varied between each group. There are more similarities than differences in attitudes towards clinical trial participation between the South Asian and the general population

  6. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials.

  7. Clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, A; Jefferson, L; Baker, P; Cook, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to review the role of clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery. A total of two electronic databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched from inception to September 2013 with no language restrictions. Articles related to randomised controlled trials (RCTs), research networks and orthopaedic research, were identified and reviewed. The usefulness of trainee-led research collaborations is reported and our knowledge of current clinical trial infrastructure further supplements the review. Searching yielded 818 titles and abstracts, of which 12 were suitable for this review. Results are summarised and presented narratively under the following headings: 1) identifying clinically relevant research questions; 2) education and training; 3) conduct of multicentre RCTs and 4) dissemination and adoption of trial results. This review confirms growing international awareness of the important role research networks play in supporting trials in orthopaedic surgery. Multidisciplinary collaboration and adequate investment in trial infrastructure are crucial for successful delivery of RCTs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:169-74. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. The AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service (ACTIS): a decade of providing clinical trials information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Deborah G; Dutcher, Gale A; Toigo, Theresa A; Bates, Ruthann; Temple, Freda; Cadden, Cynthia G

    2002-01-01

    The AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service (ACTIS) is a central resource for information about federally and privately funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials. Sponsored by four components of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ACTIS has been a key part of U.S. HIV/AIDS information and education services since 1989. ACTIS offers a toll-free telephone service, through which trained information specialists can provide callers with information about AIDS clinical trials in English or Spanish, and a website that provides access to clinical trials databases and a variety of educational resources. Future priorities include the development of new resources to target diverse and underserved populations. In addition, research needs to be conducted on the use of telephone services vs. Web-based information exchange to ensure the broadest possible dissemination of up-to-date information on HIV infection and clinical trials.

  9. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Isolates in a Phase 3 Open-Label Clinical Trial for Complicated Intra-Abdominal and Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Ceftazidime-Nonsusceptible Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gregory G; Bradford, Patricia A; Newell, Paul; Wardman, Angela

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam was evaluated against 341 Gram-negative isolates from 333 patients in a randomized, phase 3 clinical trial of patients with complicated urinary tract or intra-abdominal infections caused by ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens (NCT01644643). Ceftazidime-avibactam MIC90 values against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including several class B or D enzyme producers that avibactam does not inhibit) were 1 and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Overall, the ceftazidime-avibactam activity against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible isolates was comparable to the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam previously reported against ceftazidime-susceptible isolates. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01644643.).

  10. Regulatory compliance requirements for an open source electronic image trial management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Colin; Moore, Steve; Clark, Ken; Maffitt, David; Perry, John; Handzel, Toni; Prior, Fred

    2010-01-01

    There is a global need for software to manage imaging based clinical trials to speed basic research and drug development. Such a system must comply with regulatory requirements. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has regulations regarding software development process controls and data provenance tracking. A key unanswered problem is the identification of which data changes are significant given a workflow model for image trial management. We report on the results of our study of provenance tracking requirements and define an architecture and software development process that meets U.S. regulatory requirements using open source software components.

  11. Efficacy and safety of a nano-emulsion gel formulation of adapalene 0.1% and clindamycin 1% combination in acne vulgaris: A randomized, open label, active-controlled, multicentric, phase IV clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is a very common skin disease with a significant detrimental effect on the quality of life of the patients. Aims: To assess the comparative efficacy and safety of a nano-emulsion gel formulation of adapalene and clindamycin combination with its conventional formulation in the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face. It was a prospective, randomized, open label, active-controlled, multicentric, clinical trial. Methods: Eligible patients suffering from acne vulgaris of the face were randomized to receive once-daily treatment with a nano-emulsion gel or conventional gel formulation of adapalene 0.1% and clindamycin (as phosphate 1% combination for 12 weeks. Total, inflammatory and noninflammatory lesion counts, with grading of acne severity were carried out on a monthly basis. Safety assessments were done to determine the comparative local and systemic tolerability. Two-tailed significance testing was carried out with appropriate statistical tests, and P-values < 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: 209/212 patients enrolled in the study were eligible for efficacy and safety assessments in both nano-emulsion gel (118/119 patients and conventional gel (91/93 patients groups. Significantly better reductions in total (79.7% vs. 62.7%, inflammatory (88.7% vs. 71.4% and noninflammatory (74.9% vs. 58.4% lesions were reported with the nano-emulsion gel as compared to the conventional gel (P < 0.001 for all. Mean acne severity score also reduced significantly more with the nano-emulsion formulation (1.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.0; P < 0.001 than the comparator. Significantly lower incidence and lesser intensity of adverse events like local irritation (4.2% vs. 19.8%; P < 0.05 and erythema (0.8% vs. 9.9%; P < 0.05 were recorded with the nano-emulsion gel. Conclusions: The nano-emulsion gel formulation of adapalene and clindamycin combination appears to be more efficacious and better tolerated than the conventional formulation

  12. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored.

  13. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  14. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Bernstein, Anke; Feucht, Matthias J;

    2016-01-01

    clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical......-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which...... is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG....

  15. Clinical Research Methodology 3: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Imrey, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Randomized assignment of treatment excludes reverse causation and selection bias and, in sufficiently large studies, effectively prevents confounding. Well-implemented blinding prevents measurement bias. Studies that include these protections are called randomized, blinded clinical trials and, when conducted with sufficient numbers of patients, provide the most valid results. Although conceptually straightforward, design of clinical trials requires thoughtful trade-offs among competing approaches-all of which influence the number of patients required, enrollment time, internal and external validity, ability to evaluate interactions among treatments, and cost.

  16. Clinical Trials in Male Hormonal Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieschlag E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers.

  17. Effects of a 250-mL enema containing sodium phosphate on electrolyte concentrations in healthy volunteers: An open-label, randomized, controlled, two-period, crossover clinical trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sédaba, Belén; Azanza, Josh R.; Campanero, Miguel A.; Garcia-Quetglas, Emilio; Muñoz, Maria Josh; Marco, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Background: Enemas are used by individuals with constipation and are often required before certain medical diagnostic procedures and surgical interventions. However, abnormalities in serum electrolyte concentrations have been associated with enema use. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the changes in serum electrolyte concentrations (phosphorus, calcium, sodium, and potassium) and urinary phosphorus elimination after the administration of a sodium phosphate enema. Methods: Healthy volunteers aged 35 to 70 years were eligible for this open-label, randomized, controlled, 2-period, crossover clinical trial at the Clinical Research Unit of the University Hospital of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. The study comprised 2 one-day periods separated by a 7-day washout. All subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to 1 of 2 study sequences: (1) a single dose of Enema Casen® 250 mL in the first period followed by no treatment (control) in the second period, or (2) no treatment in the first period followed by a single dose of the study drug in the second period. The sequence of treatment was assigned using a randomization table that was prepared before the beginning of the study. Serum concentrations of phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and calcium were measured in both periods. Urinary phosphorus elimination was measured for 12 hours after enema administration (Ae0–12) in a subset of the subjects in the second period. Adverse events (AEs) were monitored by the investigators throughout the study. Normal ranges for the electrolytes were as follows: phosphorus, 2.5 to 5 mg/dL; calcium, 8.5 to 10.5 mg/dL; sodium, 135 to 145 mEq/L; and potassium, 3.5 to 5 mEq/L. Results: Twenty-four subjects (12 men, 12 women; mean [SD] age, 47.8 [9.6] years [range, 36–68 years]) participated in the study. All of the subjects were white and none were smokers. Twelve hours after enema administration, mean serum phosphorus and sodium concentrations increased by a mean of 1.18 mg

  18. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton;

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...

  19. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton;

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding and k...

  20. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  1. Stepped Care for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An Open Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliam, Christina M.; Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Whiting, Sara E.; Tolin, David F.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness and treatment costs associated with a stepped care protocol of exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). In the current open trial, patients (N = 14) began with self-directed EX/RP and minimal therapist guidance over the course of six weeks (Step 1). During this phase of treatment, no therapist-directed exposures were conducted. Those who did not respond optimally to Step 1 went on to Step 2, which consisted of 15 ...

  2. Open versus laparoscopically-assisted oesophagectomy for cancer: a multicentre randomised controlled phase III trial - the MIRO trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Msika Simon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Open transthoracic oesophagectomy is the standard treatment for infracarinal resectable oesophageal carcinomas, although it is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates of 2 to 10% and 30 to 50%, respectively, for both the abdominal and thoracic approaches. The worldwide popularity of laparoscopic techniques is based on promising results, including lower postoperative morbidity rates, which are related to the reduced postoperative trauma. We hypothesise that the laparoscopic abdominal approach (laparoscopic gastric mobilisation in oesophageal cancer surgery will decrease the major postoperative complication rate due to the reduced surgical trauma. Methods/Design The MIRO trial is an open, controlled, prospective, randomised multicentre phase III trial. Patients in study arm A will receive laparoscopic-assisted oesophagectomy, i.e., a transthoracic oesophagectomy with two-field lymphadenectomy and laparoscopic gastric mobilisation. Patients in study arm B will receive the same procedure, but with the conventional open abdominal approach. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the major postoperative 30-day morbidity. Secondary objectives are to assess the overall 30-day morbidity, 30-day mortality, 30-day pulmonary morbidity, disease-free survival, overall survival as well as quality of life and to perform medico-economic analysis. A total of 200 patients will be enrolled, and two safety analyses will be performed using 25 and 50 patients included in arm A. Discussion Postoperative morbidity remains high after oesophageal cancer surgery, especially due to major pulmonary complications, which are responsible for 50% of the postoperative deaths. This study represents the first randomised controlled phase III trial to evaluate the benefits of the minimally invasive approach with respect to the postoperative course and oncological outcomes in oesophageal cancer surgery. Trial Registration NCT00937456 (ClinicalTrials.gov

  3. Clobazam: uncontrolled and standard controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, T A; Amin, M M

    1979-01-01

    1 In an uncontrolled clinical trial, carried out in 11 psychiatric patients with the clinical diagnoses of anxiety neurosis and depressive neurosis, clobazam, a new benzodiazepine preparation, in the dosage range 10-60 mg daily produced statistically significant improvement in the total and both factor scores of the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A). The lowest mean total HAM-A scores occurred with a mean clobazam dosage of 48 mg daily. 2 Results of the uncontrolled clinical trial were further substantiated in a standard-controlled clinical study in which no statistically significant difference between the therapeutic effectiveness of clobazam and diazepam could be revealed. The lowest mean total HAM-A scores occurred with a mean clobazam dosage of 49 mg daily. There was a lower incidence of adverse effects reported in patients receiving clobazam than in those taking the control drug (diazepam).

  4. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  5. Information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viergever Roderik F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on blinding is part of the data that should be provided upon registration of a trial at a clinical trials registry. Reporting of blinding is often absent or of low quality in published articles of clinical trials. This study researched the presence and quality of information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials and highlights the important role of data-recording formats at clinical trial registries in ensuring high-quality registration.

  6. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  7. Models for patients' recruitment in clinical trials and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijoule, Guillaume; Savy, Stéphanie; Savy, Nicolas

    2012-07-20

    Taking a decision on the feasibility and estimating the duration of patients' recruitment in a clinical trial are very important but very hard questions to answer, mainly because of the huge variability of the system. The more elaborated works on this topic are those of Anisimov and co-authors, where they investigate modelling of the enrolment period by using Gamma-Poisson processes, which allows to develop statistical tools that can help the manager of the clinical trial to answer these questions and thus help him to plan the trial. The main idea is to consider an ongoing study at an intermediate time, denoted t(1). Data collected on [0,t(1)] allow to calibrate the parameters of the model, which are then used to make predictions on what will happen after t(1). This method allows us to estimate the probability of ending the trial on time and give possible corrective actions to the trial manager especially regarding how many centres have to be open to finish on time. In this paper, we investigate a Pareto-Poisson model, which we compare with the Gamma-Poisson one. We will discuss the accuracy of the estimation of the parameters and compare the models on a set of real case data. We make the comparison on various criteria : the expected recruitment duration, the quality of fitting to the data and its sensitivity to parameter errors. We discuss the influence of the centres opening dates on the estimation of the duration. This is a very important question to deal with in the setting of our data set. In fact, these dates are not known. For this discussion, we consider a uniformly distributed approach. Finally, we study the sensitivity of the expected duration of the trial with respect to the parameters of the model : we calculate to what extent an error on the estimation of the parameters generates an error in the prediction of the duration.

  8. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Kraus, V B; Cicuttini, F; Doherty, M; Dreiser, R-L; Henrotin, Y; Jiang, G-L; Mandl, L; Martel-Pelletier, J; Nelson, A E; Neogi, T; Pelletier, J-P; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R; Simon, L S; Wang, S

    2015-05-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a very frequent disease, but yet understudied. However, a lot of works have been published in the past 10 years, and much has been done to better understand its clinical course and structural progression. Despite this new knowledge, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in hand OA. The last OARSI recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA dates back to 2006. The present recommendations aimed at updating previous recommendations, by incorporating new data. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide evidence-based guidance on the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials in hand OA, where published evidence is available, supplemented by expert opinion, where evidence is lacking, to perform clinical trials in hand OA, both for symptom and for structure-modification. They indicate core outcome measurement sets for studies in hand OA, and list the methods and instruments that should be used to measure symptoms or structure. For both symptom- and structure-modification, at least pain, physical function, patient global assessment, HR-QoL, joint activity and hand strength should be assessed. In addition, for structure-modification trials, structural progression should be measured by radiographic changes. We also provide a research agenda listing many unsolved issues that seem to most urgently need to be addressed from the perspective of performing "good" clinical trials in hand OA. These updated OARSI recommendations should allow for better standardizing the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA in the next future.

  9. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  10. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2013-04-01

    The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy.

  11. Sequential monitoring of response-adaptive randomized clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hongjian; 10.1214/10-AOS796

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials are complex and usually involve multiple objectives such as controlling type I error rate, increasing power to detect treatment difference, assigning more patients to better treatment, and more. In literature, both response-adaptive randomization (RAR) procedures (by changing randomization procedure sequentially) and sequential monitoring (by changing analysis procedure sequentially) have been proposed to achieve these objectives to some degree. In this paper, we propose to sequentially monitor response-adaptive randomized clinical trial and study it's properties. We prove that the sequential test statistics of the new procedure converge to a Brownian motion in distribution. Further, we show that the sequential test statistics asymptotically satisfy the canonical joint distribution defined in Jennison and Turnbull (\\citeyearJT00). Therefore, type I error and other objectives can be achieved theoretically by selecting appropriate boundaries. These results open a door to sequentially monitor res...

  12. Analysis of opioid consumption in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Inconsistent trial design and analysis is a key reason that few advances in postoperative pain management have been made from clinical trials analyzing opioid consumption data. This study aimed to compare four different approaches to analyze opioid consumption data. A repeated time-to-event (RTTE...... of potency was obtained with a RTTE model accounting for both morphine effects and time-varying covariates on opioid consumption. An RTTE analysis approach proved better suited for demonstrating efficacy of opioid sparing analgesics than traditional statistical tests as a lower sample size was required due...

  13. Guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials for spinal cord injury as developed by the ICCP panel: clinical trial design

    OpenAIRE

    Lammertse, D; Tuszynski, MH; Steeves, JD; Curt, A; Fawcett, JW; Rask, C; Ditunno, JF; Fehlings, MG; Guest, JD; Ellaway, PH; Kleitman, N; Blight, AR; Dobkin, BH; Grossman, R.; Katoh, H.

    2006-01-01

    The International Campaign for Cures of Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis established a panel tasked with reviewing the methodology for clinical trials for spinal cord injury (SCI), and making recommendations on the conduct of future trials. This is the fourth of four papers. Here, we examine the phases of a clinical trial program, the elements, types, and protocols for valid clinical trial design. The most rigorous and valid SCI clinical trial would be a prospective double-blind randomized contro...

  14. Acute Heart Failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Heart Failure MedDRA Classification E.1.3...in one hour of admission to ICU.3. Signed informed consent E.4Principal exclusion criteria 1. Age less than 18 years.2. Acute...y with Trimetazidine in Acute heart failure: an open pilot randomized trial (The METTA – PRAGUE 10 Trial) A....e ConcernedCzech Republic - SUKL A.2EudraCT number2007-002893-76 A.3Full title of the trial MEtabolic Therap

  15. Analysis of regulatory-ethical framework of clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević-Georgiev Andrijana; Krajnović Dušanka; Milovanović Srđan; Ignjatović Svetlana; Đurić Dušan; Marinković Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Every clinical trial has to meet all ethical criteria in addition to the scientific ones. The basic ethical principles in the clinical trials are the following: nonmaleficence, beneficence, respect for autonomy and the principle of justice. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical cases with the outcomes leading to the changes in regulatory­ethical framework related to the clinical trials, as well as the outcomes of key clinical trials that influenced the in...

  16. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.......Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends....

  17. Randomization in substance abuse clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolson Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A well designed randomized clinical trial rates as the highest level of evidence for a particular intervention's efficacy. Randomization, a fundamental feature of clinical trials design, is a process invoking the use of probability to assign treatment interventions to patients. In general, randomization techniques pursue the goal of providing objectivity to the assignment of treatments, while at the same time balancing for treatment assignment totals and covariate distributions. Numerous randomization techniques, each with varying properties of randomness and balance, are suggested in the statistical literature. This paper reviews common randomization techniques often used in substance abuse research and an application from a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA-funded clinical trial in substance abuse is used to illustrate several choices an investigator faces when designing a clinical trial. Results Comparisons and contrasts of randomization schemes are provided with respect to deterministic and balancing properties. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulation is used to explore the balancing nature of randomization techniques for moderately sized clinical trials. Results demonstrate large treatment imbalance for complete randomization with less imbalance for the urn or adaptive scheme. The urn and adaptive randomization methods display smaller treatment imbalance as demonstrated by the low variability of treatment allocation imbalance. For all randomization schemes, covariate imbalance between treatment arms was small with little variation between adaptive schemes, stratified schemes and unstratified schemes given that sample sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion We develop this paper with the goal of reminding substance abuse researchers of the broad array of randomization options available for clinical trial designs. There may be too quick a tendency for substance abuse researchers to implement the fashionable urn

  18. Privacy and confidentiality in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Deven; Greene, Sarah M; Miner, Caroline S; Staman, Karen L; Welch, Mary Jane; Rubel, Alan

    2015-10-01

    With pragmatic clinical trials, an opportunity exists to answer important questions about the relative risks, burdens, and benefits of therapeutic interventions. However, concerns about protecting the privacy of this information are significant and must be balanced with the imperative to learn from the data gathered in routine clinical practice. Traditional privacy protections for research uses of identifiable information rely disproportionately on informed consent or authorizations, based on a presumption that this is necessary to fulfill ethical principles of respect for persons. But frequently, the ideal of informed consent is not realized in its implementation. Moreover, the principle of respect for persons—which encompasses their interests in health information privacy—can be honored through other mechanisms. Data anonymization also plays a role in protecting privacy but is not suitable for all research, particularly pragmatic clinical trials. In this article, we explore both the ethical foundation and regulatory framework intended to protect privacy in pragmatic clinical trials. We then review examples of novel approaches to respecting persons in research that may have the added benefit of honoring patient privacy considerations.

  19. Clinical trials integrity: a CRO perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, J E

    2001-01-01

    When contract research organizations (CROs) were first formed, pharmaceutical companies outsourced to them only certain aspects of the conduct of their clinical trials. At first CROs were highly specialized entities, providing, for example, either biostatistical advice, clinical research associates who monitored investigational sites for regulatory compliance, or regulatory support. Gradually, full service CROs emerged, offering a full range of services for clinical trials, including the selection of investigators and investigational sites, assistance with patient recruitment, safety surveillance and reporting, site audits, and data management and biostatistics. This evolving relationship between CROs and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries has resulted in CROs assuming more and more of the regulatory and ethical risks and responsibilities inherent in the conduct of clinical trials. In this full service role, CROs, unlike sponsors, are not interested in the outcome of study, but like sponsors, are subject to heavy regulation by the federal government, must follow applicable state laws, must respect international guidelines, and are obliged to follow their own operating procedures. Moreover, they are judged by the industry on the basis of the scope and quality of services provided, including the degree of adherence to the research protocol, regulatory requirements, and timelines; the quality of the professional working relationships with investigators and institutions, both academic and community-based; and the validity of the data. Further, CROs are subject to comprehensive audits by sponsoring companies, FDA, and other regulatory authorities. For all these reasons, CROs are being tasked with strict vigilance of all stages of the clinical trial process to ensure that the laws, regulations, and industry standards designed for the protection of human subjects and data integrity are maintained.

  20. Registration of clinical trials: Is it really needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer Aslam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Withholding findings of clinical trials for publication or presentation to the regulatory authorities is a major concern. We aimed to address the importance of clinical trial registration and whether it is needed or not. Discussion: For ethical conduct of clinical trial, registration is an important but debatable issue due to proprietary interest of the pharmaceutical industry. Over the years, investigating agencies uncovered several instances of misconduct during the clinical trial. The International committee of medical journal editors requires registration of trial methodology, but does not require registration of trial results; however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments does require researchers to register results. Conclusion: Prospective registration of clinical trial is mandatory for more transparent research and sustaining the validity of evidence based practice and availability of reliable data. Clinical trials registration has the potential to contribute substantially to improve clinical trial transparency and reducing publication bias and selective reporting.

  1. How do researchers decide early clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grankvist, Hannah; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Launch of clinical investigation represents a substantial escalation in commitment to a particular clinical translation trajectory; it also exposes human subjects to poorly understood interventions. Despite these high stakes, there is little to guide decision-makers on the scientific and ethical evaluation of early phase trials. In this article, we review policies and consensus statements on human protections, drug regulation, and research design surrounding trial launch, and conclude that decision-making is largely left to the discretion of research teams and sponsors. We then review what is currently understood about how research teams exercise this discretion, and close by laying out a research agenda for characterizing the way investigators, sponsors, and reviewers approach decision-making in early phase research.

  2. FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Updates FDA Encourages More Participation, Diversity in Clinical Trials Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... while research is conducted. back to top Do clinical trials have possible risks and benefits? Yes. Sometimes patients ...

  3. ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Clinical Trials.gov Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents “...a ... help with a clinical trial: Visit www.clinicaltrials.gov Brought to you by the National Library of ...

  4. Ivermectin--clinical trials and treatment schedules in onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K R; Neu, D C

    1990-01-01

    Initial clinical trials with ivermectin were performed in patients with both roundworm infestation and onchocerciasis. Obvious clinical safety allowed for rapid progression through 5-30-50-100-150-200 mcg/kg in infected patients. Initial studies showed some effect at 50 mcg/kg; subsequent double-blind controlled studies, either with placebo or diethylcarbamazine (DEC), confirmed the efficacy of ivermectin as well as further defining its safety profile. Absence of adverse eye findings or serious systemic reactions justified the further open trials. Studies of patients treated at 6, 12, or 18 month intervals showed a long lasting effect of ivermectin in reducing skin microfilaria counts. Phase III studies confirmed safety and efficacy and further refined the dose to 150 mcg/kg every 12 months. Large trials in Liberia and other countries in West Africa, and subsequently under Onchocerciasis Control Program (OCP), included approximately 120,000 persons carefully followed during which few patients with serious adverse experiences were reported. These extensive field trials confirmed the relative safety allowing for broad distribution of ivermectin in programs not able to provide physician monitoring.

  5. Differences Between Clinical Trials of Medical Devices and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-jun; LIU Wei

    2014-01-01

    How to design clinical trials for medical devices is a problem plaguing the industry today. As there are many differences in clinical trials of medical devices and drugs. This paper describes the differences of the two points from the perspectivs of defi-nition of medical devices and drugs, scope, phasing, subjects and design of clinical trials in details, aiming to help the related personnel make scientific decisions while conduct-ing clinical trial design for medical devices.

  6. To fail or not to fail : clinical trials in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, Gijs Willem Eduard

    2008-01-01

    To fail or not to fail – Clinical trials in depression investigates the causes of the high failure rate of clinical trials in depression research. Apart from the difficulties in the search for new antidepressants during drug discovery, faulty clinical trial designs hinder their evaluation during dru

  7. Safety of Recombinant Fusion Protein ESAT6-CFP10 as a Skin Test Reagent for Tuberculosis Diagnosis: an Open-Label, Randomized, Single-Center Phase I Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Xu, Miao; Zhou, Lijun; Xiong, Yanqing; Xia, Lu; Fan, Xiaoyong; Gu, Jun; Pu, Jiang; Lu, Shuihua; Wang, Guozhi

    2016-09-01

    This trial was conducted to explore the safety of recombinant fusion protein ESAT6-CFP10 as a skin test reagent for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers were recruited and randomized into four groups (groups A to D) to study four increasing doses of ESAT6-CFP10. All subjects in each dose group received an intradermal injection of reagent (0.1 ml) via the Mantoux technique. Then, the vital signs of all subjects were monitored, and skin reactions around injection sites and adverse events were recorded at different detection time points after the skin test. No serious adverse events were observed in this study. A total of 3 subjects had unexpected events. One subject in group A developed subcutaneous hemorrhage 24 h after the skin test, one subject in group B was found with red spots 15 min after the skin test, and another subject in group A showed abnormity during a chest X-ray after the skin test without affecting her health. One of three adverse events (red spots) was probably related to the recombinant ESAT6-CFP10 reagent. A single dose of 1, 5, 10, or 20 μg/ml of recombinant ESAT6-CFP10 as a skin test reagent for M. tuberculosis infection diagnosis is well tolerated and safe in China. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01999231.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. [Ethical aspects of randomized clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, E; Sorrentino, D; Trevisi, A

    1997-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials represent the final, essential link between basic medical research and human health. However, their conduction presents very complex ethical problems, since the patient is the actual target of the experiment. Proper randomization, informed consent, and preliminary disclosure of results create deep ethical conflicts between the role of caretaker and that of impartial observer, both played by the same doctor. The dilemma reproduces the conflict between two different ethics. One is based on the inalienable individual rights stemming from the concept of man as an end in himself and not a means to an end. The other, derived from utilitarian philosophies, is based on the benefit for society as a whole. If we agree that randomized clinical trials represent the best method to test the validity of a new treatment, there is no easy solution. The dilemma could be solved by separating the role of the family doctor, committed to the best treatment possible for his patient, from the role of the scientist, committed to the progress of science and humanity. The former is involved in the treatment of individual patients, the latter in clinical and scientific experiments of a therapeutic nature. The patient may trade his rights to the best possible cure for the safety and the efficiency guaranteed by the scientific institution conducting the trial. Trials on relevant issues--expected to produce important results and impeccably designed scientifically--could be endowed with the ethics of science per se and this could be considered equivalent to the individual rights waived by the patient.

  9. Assessing the remedy: the case for contracts in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah J L

    2011-04-01

    Current orthodoxy in research ethics assumes that subjects of clinical trials reserve rights to withdraw at any time and without giving any reason. This view sees the right to withdraw as a simple extension of the right to refuse to participate all together. In this paper, however, I suggest that subjects should assume some responsibilities for the internal validity of the trial at consent and that these responsibilities should be captured by contract. This would allow the researcher to impose a penalty on the subject if he were to withdraw without good reason and on a whim. This proposal still leaves open the possibility of withdrawing without penalty when it is in the subject's best interests to do so. Giving researchers recourse to legal remedy may now be necessary to protect the science, as existing methods used to increase retention are inadequate for one reason or another.

  10. Clinical Trials and Treatment of ATL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Tsukasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ATL is a distinct peripheral T-lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1. The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subtype-classification into four categories, acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types, defined by organ involvement, and LDH and calcium values. In case of acute, lymphoma, or unfavorable chronic subtypes (aggressive ATL, intensive chemotherapy like the LSG15 regimen (VCAP-AMP-VECP is usually recommended if outside of clinical trials, based on the results of a phase 3 trial. In case of favorable chronic or smoldering ATL (indolent ATL, watchful waiting until disease progression has been recommended, although the long-term prognosis was inferior to those of, for instance, chronic lymphoid leukemia. Retrospective analysis suggested that the combination of interferon alpha and zidovudine was apparently promising for the treatment of ATL, especially for types with leukemic manifestation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is also promising for the treatment of aggressive ATL possibly reflecting graft versus ATL effect. Several new agent trials for ATL are ongoing and in preparation, including a defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 monoclonal antibody, IL2-fused with diphtheria toxin, histone deacetylase inhibitors, a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor, a proteasome inhibitor, and lenalidomide.

  11. A matched crossover design for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laura J; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2007-09-01

    Two design principles are used frequently in clinical trials: 1) A subject is "matched" or "paired" with a similar subject to reduce the chance that other variables obscure the primary comparison of interest. 2) A subject serves as his/her own control by "crossing over" from one treatment to another during the course of an experiment. There are situations in which it may be advantageous to use the two design principles - crossing over and matching - simultaneously. That is, it may be advantageous to conduct a "paired crossover design," in which each subject, while paired with a similar subject, crosses over and receives each experimental treatment. In this paper, we describe two clinical trials conducted by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Asthma Clinical Research Network that used a paired 2x2 crossover design. The Beta Adrenergic Response by GEnotype (BARGE) Study compared the effects of regular use of inhaled albuterol on mildly asthmatic patients with different genotypes at the 16th position of the beta-agonist receptor gene. The Smoking Modulates Outcomes of Glucocorticoid (SMOG) Therapy in Asthma Study evaluated the hypothesis that smoking reduces the response to inhaled corticosteroids. For such paired crossover designs, the primary parameter of interest is typically the treatment-by-pairing interaction term. In evaluating the relative efficiency of the paired 2x2 crossover design to two independent crossover designs with respect to this interaction term, we show that the paired 2x2 crossover design is more efficient if the correlations between the paired members on the same treatments are greater than their correlations on different treatments. This condition should hold in most circumstances, and therefore the paired crossover design deserves serious consideration for any clinical trial in which the crossing over and matching of subjects is deemed simultaneously beneficial.

  12. Clinical trials in Ayurveda: Analysis of clinical trial registry of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Kannan; Sivaramakrishnan, Gowri

    Ayurveda is one of the complementary and alternative systems of medicine requiring generation of high quality evidence for rational practice. Evidence can be generated from study designs and the present study is an attempt to critically assess the registered studies in the field of Ayurveda from clinical trial registry of India. We found low number of trials conducted with more focus required on the quality of these studies to contribute to high quality evidence.

  13. Recommendations for Self-Report Outcome Measures in Vulvodynia Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukall, Caroline F; Bergeron, Sophie; Brown, Candace; Bachmann, Gloria; Wesselmann, Ursula

    2017-08-01

    Vulvodynia (idiopathic chronic vulvar pain) is a prevalent condition associated with significant and negative impacts in many areas of function. Despite the increased research interest in vulvodynia in recent years, recommendations for outcome measures for use in clinical trials are missing. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was to provide recommendations for outcome measures for vulvodynia clinical trials so that consistent measures are used across trials to facilitate between-study comparisons and the conduct of large multicenter trials, and to improve measurement of the multiple dimensions of vulvodynia. Given that provoked vestibulodynia (PVD)-characterized by provoked pain localized to the vaginal opening-is the most common subtype of vulvodynia and the current main focus of clinical trials, this paper focused on recommended outcome measures in PVD clinical trials. The framework used to guide the selection of outcome measures was based on the one proposed by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT). The IMMPACT framework provided a well-suited guideline for outcome measure recommendations in PVD clinical trials. However, given the provoked presentation of PVD and the significant impact it has on sexuality, modifications to some of the IMMPACT recommendations were made and specific additional measures were suggested. Measures that are specific to vulvovaginal pain are ideal for adoption in PVD clinical trials, and many such measures currently exist that allow the relevant IMMPACT domains to be captured.

  14. The efficacy of preventive parasternal single injection of bupivacaine on intubation time, blood gas parameters, narcotic requirement, and pain relief after open heart surgery: A randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Saeidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postsurgical pain usually results in some complications in the patients. This study has tried to investigate the effects of parasternal single injection of bupivacaine on postoperative pulmonary and pain consequences in patients after open heart surgery. Methods: : In a prospective double blind clinical study, 100 consenting patients undergoing elective open heart surgery were randomized into two groups. In case group, bupivacaine was injected at both sides of sternum, immediately before sternal closure. In the control group, no intervention was performed. Then, the patients were investigated regarding intubation period, length of ICU stay, arterial blood gas (ABG parameters, morphine requirement, and their severity of postoperative pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS device. Results: No differences were found between the two groups regarding to age, sex, pump time, operation time, and body mass index and preoperative cardiac ejection fraction. Mean intubation length in case group was much shorter than that in control group. Mean PaO 2 in case group was lower in different checking times in postoperative period. The patients in the case group needed less morphine compared to those in the control group during the 24-hour observation period in the ICU. Finally, mean VAS scores of pain in case group were significantly lower than those in control group at 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Conclusions: Patients′ pain relief by parasternal single injection of bupivacaine in early postoperative period can facilitate earlier ventilator weaning and tracheal extubation after open heart surgery as well as achieving lower pain scores and narcotic requirements.

  15. [PDCA Applied in Special Rectification of Medical Instrument Clinical Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Qu, Xintao; Yu, Xiuchun

    2015-09-01

    PDCA cycle was applied in special rectification activities for medical instrument clinical trial, with quality criteria of implementation made. Completed medical instrument clinical trial from January 2011 to December 2012 was believed as control group, from January 2013 to December 2014 as PDCA group, the scores of clinical trial and the score rate of items were compared and analyzed. Results show quality scores of clinical trial in PDCA group are higher than that in control group (51 vs. 81, P rectification activities with PDCA applied in our department are feasible and effective. It significantly improves implement quality of medical instrument clinical trial.

  16. Recent Clinical Trials in Osteoporosis: A Firm Foundation or Falling Short?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Barnard

    Full Text Available The global burden of osteoporotic fractures is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. We examined the ClinicalTrials.gov database to determine whether recently registered clinical trials addressed prevention and treatment in those at high risk for fracture. A dataset of 96,346 trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded on September 27, 2010. At the time of the dataset download, 40,970 interventional trials had been registered since October 1, 2007. The osteoporosis subset comprised 239 interventional trials (0.6%. Those trials evaluating orthopedic procedures were excluded. The primary purpose was treatment in 67.0%, prevention in 20.1%, supportive care in 5.8%, diagnostic in 2.2%, basic science in 3.1%, health services research in 0.9%, and screening in 0.9%. The majority of studies (61.1% included drug-related interventions. Most trials (56.9% enrolled only women, 38.9% of trials were open to both men and women, and 4.2% enrolled only men. Roughly one fifth (19.7% of trials excluded research participants older than 65 years, and 33.5% of trials excluded those older than 75 years. The funding sources were industry in 51.0%, the National Institutes of Health in 6.3%, and other in 42.7%. We found that most osteoporosis-related trials registered from October 2007 through September 2010 examined the efficacy and safety of drug treatment, and fewer trials examined prevention and non-drug interventions. Trials of interventions that are not required to be registered in ClinicalTrials.gov may be underrepresented. Few trials are specifically studying osteoporosis in men and older adults. Recently registered osteoporosis trials may not sufficiently address fracture prevention.

  17. Standard requirements for GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohmann, Christian; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Canham, Steve

    2011-01-01

    ). Unfortunately, no specific, practical and open standard for both GCP-compliant data management and the underlying IT-infrastructure is available to improve the situation. For that reason the "Working Group on Data Centres" of the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) has developed...... a standard specifying the requirements for high quality GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials....

  18. What is the impact of ethics on clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    Ethics has often been ignored or evaded in clinical trials, and the conditions under which global clinical trials are conducted make this problem likely to persist. Ethics can, however, have an impact at any of several stages of a trial when the individuals involved are committed. This editorial provides historical examples of ignoring, evading or, alternatively, using ethical help to improve clinical trials, and suggests that the actual role of ethics depends on the individuals involved.

  19. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical trial... Pharmaceutical Clinical Trial; (3) Medical Device Aspects of Clinical Research; (4) Adverse Event...

  20. Novel directions in HIV-1 vaccines revealed from clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Russell, Nina D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Considerable HIV-1 vaccine development efforts have been deployed over the past decade. Put into perspective, the results from efficacy trials and the identification of correlates of risk have opened large and unforeseen avenues for vaccine development. Recent findings The Thai efficacy trial, RV144, provided the first evidence that HIV-1 vaccine protection against HIV-1 acquisition could be achieved. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop inversely correlated with decreased risk of infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with risk. Further clinical trials will focus on testing new envelope subunit proteins formulated with adjuvants capable of inducing higher and more durable functional antibody responses (both binding and broadly neutralizing antibodies). Moreover, vector-based vaccine regimens that can induce cell-mediated immune responses in addition to humoral responses remain a priority. Summary Future efficacy trials will focus on prevention of HIV-1 transmission in heterosexual population in Africa and men who have sex with men in Asia. The recent successes leading to novel directions in HIV-1 vaccine development are a result of collaboration and commitment among vaccine manufacturers, funders, scientists and civil society stakeholders. Sustained and broad collaborative efforts are required to advance new vaccine strategies for higher levels of efficacy. PMID:23743791

  1. Use of crowdsourcing for cancer clinical trial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Amanda; Sablinski, Tomasz; Diefenbach, Michael; Foster, Marc; Greenberg, Alex; Holland, John; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Patient and physician awareness and acceptance of trials and patient ineligibility are major cancer clinical trial accrual barriers. Yet, trials are typically conceived and designed by small teams of researchers with limited patient input. We hypothesized that through crowdsourcing, the intellectual and creative capacity of a large number of researchers, clinicians, and patients could be harnessed to improve the clinical trial design process. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and utility of using an internet-based crowdsourcing platform to inform the design of a clinical trial exploring an antidiabetic drug, metformin, in prostate cancer. Over a six-week period, crowd-sourced input was collected from 60 physicians/researchers and 42 patients/advocates leading to several major (eg, eligibility) and minor modifications to the clinical trial protocol as originally designed. Crowdsourcing clinical trial design is feasible, adds value to the protocol development process, and may ultimately improve the efficiency of trial conduct.

  2. Globalization of clinical trials - where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melvin; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; S, Suresh-Kumar; Dkhar, Steven A; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2013-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed a greater transparency in clinical research with the advent of clinical trial registries. The aim of the study was to describe the trends in the globalization of clinical trials in the last five years. We performed an internet search using the WHO International clinical trials registry platform (WHO ICTRP) to identify the clinical trials conducted from January 2007 to December 31, 2011 among 25 countries. Among the 25 countries, the United States, Japan and Germany occupy the top positions in the total number of clinical trials conducted. Clinical trials in the US (36312) constituted 31.5% of the total number of trials performed during this period. However over a period of five years both US and Western Europe appear to show a decline, while the emerging countries show a rise in clinical trials registered. Among the emerging countries China, India and Republic of Korea are most active regions involved in clinical trials. Cancer, diabetes and respiratory diseases were most widely researched areas overall. Although the study confirms the transition in the clinical trials research towards emerging countries, the developed regions of the world still contribute to more than 70% of the trials registered worldwide.

  3. Rufinamide: Pharmacology, clinical trials, and role in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Hakimian, A; Anderson, G D; Miller, J W

    2006-11-01

    Rufinamide is a structurally novel compound with anticonvulsant activity that is undergoing evaluation through the European Medicines Agency and the American Food and Drug Administration. Its mechanism of action is thought to be inhibition of sodium-dependent action potentials in neurons, with possible membrane-stabilising effects. Absorption of the drug is significantly enhanced in the fed state. The drug is extensively metabolised by non-CYP450 systems with a half-life of 8-12 h. Most common adverse effects noted are somnolence, fatigue and tremor. Efficacy against partial seizures in adults and adolescents has been demonstrated in three randomised, placebo-controlled trials. Efficacy against seizures of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe, disabling childhood onset epilepsy syndrome, was shown in a single randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Efficacy against partial onset seizures in children has been suggested in an open-label trial. Should rufinamide become commercially available, reserving the drug as a second- or third-line agent should be considered.

  4. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  5. Real-time enrollment dashboard for multisite clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Mattingly

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: We have designed and implemented a visualization dashboard for managing multi-site clinical trial enrollment in two community acquired pneumonia studies. Information dashboards are useful for clinical trial management. They can be used in a standalone trial or can be included into a larger management system.

  6. The efficacy of milnacipran in panic disorder: an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Carolina; Seganfredo, Ana Carolina; Dornelles, Marina; Torres, Mariana; Paludo, Angela; Heldt, Elizeth; Manfro, Gisele G

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of milnacipran in the acute treatment of patients with panic disorder. Thirty-one patients who met Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia were included in the study. Patients were initially treated with milnacipran 25 mg twice daily and then 50 mg twice daily until the 10th week. The treatment outcome and panic disorder severity were determined by the Panic Disorder Severity Scale, Panic Inventory, Clinical Global Impression and Hamilton Anxiety Scale, all of which were applied during every evaluation interview. Quality of life (WHOQOL-bref) was evaluated at baseline and at the end of the study. Missing data were handled by using the last observation carried forward for all participants who had taken at least one dose of study medication. Intention-to-treat was used in the analyses. Pharmacological treatment resulted in a clinically and statistically significant mean reduction in all severity measures. Remission (Clinical Global Impression < or = 2) was obtained in 58.1% of the sample. Regarding WHOQOL, we found a significant improvement (P<0.05) across treatment in all the domains studied. Although results may be influenced by the open design of this pilot study and by the small sample size, our findings suggest that milnacipran may be effective for the treatment of panic disorder and justify further research.

  7. Interconnecting smartphone, image analysis server, and case report forms in clinical trials for automatic skin lesion tracking in clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Daniel; Doma, Aliaa; Gombert, Alexander; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Today, subject's medical data in controlled clinical trials is captured digitally in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). However, eCRFs only insufficiently support integration of subject's image data, although medical imaging is looming large in studies today. For bed-side image integration, we present a mobile application (App) that utilizes the smartphone-integrated camera. To ensure high image quality with this inexpensive consumer hardware, color reference cards are placed in the camera's field of view next to the lesion. The cards are used for automatic calibration of geometry, color, and contrast. In addition, a personalized code is read from the cards that allows subject identification. For data integration, the App is connected to an communication and image analysis server that also holds the code-study-subject relation. In a second system interconnection, web services are used to connect the smartphone with OpenClinica, an open-source, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved electronic data capture (EDC) system in clinical trials. Once the photographs have been securely stored on the server, they are released automatically from the mobile device. The workflow of the system is demonstrated by an ongoing clinical trial, in which photographic documentation is frequently performed to measure the effect of wound incision management systems. All 205 images, which have been collected in the study so far, have been correctly identified and successfully integrated into the corresponding subject's eCRF. Using this system, manual steps for the study personnel are reduced, and, therefore, errors, latency and costs decreased. Our approach also increases data security and privacy.

  8. 76 FR 51375 - Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dialogues in Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Diversifying Clinical Trials: Successful Strategies for Engaging Women and Minorities in Clinical Trials....

  9. ClinicalTrials.gov Turns 10! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials ClinicalTrials.gov Turns 10! Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... and whom to contact for more information. ClinicalTrials.gov's Helpful Features ClinicalTrials.gov has many helpful consumer ...

  10. [Clinical trials: vulnerability and ethical relativism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Research in human beings is an important chapter of medical ethics. In recent years, investigation has been taken over by profit driven corporations that must guarantee the medical and commercial application of results. This new model of investigation has generated conflicts of interest in doctor-patient, researcher-subject relationship. The inevitable debate and media reaction has led. These trials of controversial design to regions of the globe where the vulnerability of the populations continues to allow their undertaking. This article includes a historical perspective on experimentation in human beings and the conditions that led to its regulation: the Nuremberg CODE, followed by the Helsinky Declaration in its different versions, and the Belmont Report, that defend the subject according to the ethic of principles used in western medicine. There is then a review of the attempts to change international regulation to reintroduce clinical trials with placebo--which since 1996 is only permitted where there are no therapeutic or diagnostic methods--on populations that would otherwise have no access to treatment. This then leads on to the issue of double standards in medical investigation defended by many investigators and some official entities. The article concludes that it may be prudent to allow local ethical commissions to approve deviation from the established norm if such is necessary to resolve urgent questions of health in the country, but it is unacceptable that any such emergency is used as a reason to reduce the ethical prerequisites, in clinical trials. It also concludes that true urgency is in making available to all who need it the effective products already in existence. Furthermore, that the acceptance of ethical relativism can result in the exploitation of vulnerable third world populations for research programmes that cannot be undertaken in their sponsoring countries due to the ethical restrictions in place.

  11. Specification of phase I of new drugs' clinical tolerance trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-xin

    2008-01-01

    Phase I of clinical trials is the first stage of clinical pharmacology and body safety evaluation, including body tolerance test and pharmacokinetics test. The aim is providing evidence for dosage regimen and be the cornerstone of the preliminary assessment of efficacy and safety of phase II of clinical trials. This text discussed the technique and requirement of phase I of new drugs' clinical tolerance trials.

  12. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain. PMID:26958274

  13. Statistical reasoning in clinical trials: hypothesis testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelen, G D; Brown, C G; Ashton, J

    1988-01-01

    Hypothesis testing is based on certain statistical and mathematical principles that allow investigators to evaluate data by making decisions based on the probability or implausibility of observing the results obtained. However, classic hypothesis testing has its limitations, and probabilities mathematically calculated are inextricably linked to sample size. Furthermore, the meaning of the p value frequently is misconstrued as indicating that the findings are also of clinical significance. Finally, hypothesis testing allows for four possible outcomes, two of which are errors that can lead to erroneous adoption of certain hypotheses: 1. The null hypothesis is rejected when, in fact, it is false. 2. The null hypothesis is rejected when, in fact, it is true (type I or alpha error). 3. The null hypothesis is conceded when, in fact, it is true. 4. The null hypothesis is conceded when, in fact, it is false (type II or beta error). The implications of these errors, their relation to sample size, the interpretation of negative trials, and strategies related to the planning of clinical trials will be explored in a future article in this journal.

  14. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain.

  15. Subgroup identification from randomized clinical trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jared C; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ruberg, Stephen J

    2011-10-30

    We consider the problem of identifying a subgroup of patients who may have an enhanced treatment effect in a randomized clinical trial, and it is desirable that the subgroup be defined by a limited number of covariates. For this problem, the development of a standard, pre-determined strategy may help to avoid the well-known dangers of subgroup analysis. We present a method developed to find subgroups of enhanced treatment effect. This method, referred to as 'Virtual Twins', involves predicting response probabilities for treatment and control 'twins' for each subject. The difference in these probabilities is then used as the outcome in a classification or regression tree, which can potentially include any set of the covariates. We define a measure Q(Â) to be the difference between the treatment effect in estimated subgroup  and the marginal treatment effect. We present several methods developed to obtain an estimate of Q(Â), including estimation of Q(Â) using estimated probabilities in the original data, using estimated probabilities in newly simulated data, two cross-validation-based approaches, and a bootstrap-based bias-corrected approach. Results of a simulation study indicate that the Virtual Twins method noticeably outperforms logistic regression with forward selection when a true subgroup of enhanced treatment effect exists. Generally, large sample sizes or strong enhanced treatment effects are needed for subgroup estimation. As an illustration, we apply the proposed methods to data from a randomized clinical trial.

  16. Future clinical trials in DIPG: bringing epigenetics to the clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres E. Morales La Madrid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of major recent advances in DIPG molecular characterization, this body of knowledge has not yet translated into better treatments.To date,more than 250 clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as newer biologic agents,have failed to improve the dismal outcome when compared to palliative radiation alone.The biology of DIPG remained unknown until recently when the neurosurgical expertise along with the recognition by the scientific and clinical community of the importance of tissue sampling at diagnosis;ideally in the context of a clinical trial and by trained neurosurgical teams to maximize patient safety.These pre-treatment tumor samples,and others coming from tissue obtained post-mortem,have yielded new insights into DIPG molecular biology.We now know that DIPG comprises a heterogeneous disease with variable molecular phenotypes, different from adult high grade glioma,other non-pontine pediatric high grade gliomas and even between pontine gliomas.The discovery of histone H3.3 or H3.1 mutations has been an important step forward in understanding tumor formation,maintenance and progression.Pharmacologic reversal of DIPG histone demethylation therefore offers an important potential intervention strategy for the treatment of DIPG.To date,clinical trials of newly diagnosed or progressive DIPG with epigenetic modifiers have been unsuccessful.Whether this failure represents limited activity of the agents used,their CNS penetration,redundant pathways within the tumor,or the possibility that histone mutations are necessary only to initiate DIPGs but not maintain their growth,suggest that a great deal still needs to be elucidated in both the underlying biology of these pathways,and the drugs designed to target them.In this review, we discuss the role of both epigenetic and genetic mutations within DIPG and the development of treatment strategies directed against the unique abnormalities

  17. Rufinamide from clinical trials to clinical practice in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Trevor; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brown, Lawrence W; Flamini, Robert; Kerr, Michael; Kluger, Gerhard; Kothare, Sanjeev; Philip, Sunny; Harrison, Miranda; Narurkar, Milind

    2011-05-01

    Rufinamide is a triazole derivative structurally unrelated to other antiepileptic drugs that is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in patients aged ≥4 years. Originally granted orphan drug status, marketing authorisation was obtained on the basis of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 138 LGS patients. An open-label extension study subsequently demonstrated that rufinamide's efficacy and tolerability were maintained over the longer term (median duration of treatment, 432 days). Recently published reports from Europe and the United States have described the use of adjunctive rufinamide to treat LGS in clinical practice. These data complement the clinical trial results, by providing information on the efficacy and tolerability of rufinamide when used on an individualised basis in real-world practice, under less tightly restricted conditions in terms of patient population and dosing strategies. A comparison of the data reveals that a "lower and slower" dosing strategy tends to be adopted in clinical practice, in comparison with the clinical trial, which does not appear to compromise efficacy, but may provide improvements in tolerability. Individual case reports provide additional valuable information on how rufinamide is being used to treat different seizure types associated with LGS. Since clinical experience with rufinamide is currently at an early stage, there are still unanswered questions relating to its use, and it is likely that its place in the adjunctive treatment of LGS will evolve as further data emerge.

  18. Empowering natural clinical trial advocates: nurses and outreach workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschke, Diane B; Cassel, Kevin; Higuchi, Paula

    2007-03-01

    Cancer clinical trials are essential to advancing the prevention and treatment of cancer, yet adult participation rates in clinical trials remain abysmal. Despite the essential contributions of clinical trials to science and medicine, adult participation in clinical trials remains exceedingly low, with only 2%-4% of all adult patients with cancer in the U.S. participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials accrual rates in Hawai'i follow this national trend of less than 3% of eligible patients participating in trials. Recognizing the need to increase awareness about clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service-Pacific Region, through the Hawai'i Clinical Trials Education Coalition, has employed strategic dissemination plans to train and educate key target audiences, including registered nurses, nursing students, and community outreach workers about the availability of over 90 cancer clinical trials in Hawai'i. Previous research suggests that nurses often play a vital role in increasing a patient's understanding of clinical trials and may also act as a patient advocate in regards to participation in a clinical trial. A train-the-trainer model curriculum was developed using the Clinical Trials Education Series (CTES), a collection of multi-level resources designed by the National Cancer Institute, to educate various constituents about clinical trials. The training curriculum and workshop format is adapted based on both formal and informal needs assessments conducted with audiences prior to the planned training, yet key elements remain central to the training model. In addition, an interactive, internet-based case study was developed using local place names and cultural cues to allow training participants to engage in realistic and practical methods for locating and sharing information about clinical trials with patients and the public. This training model has been implemented in a variety of settings including three statewide nursing

  19. Respiratory Muscle Training in Patients Recovering Recent Open Cardiothoracic Surgery: A Randomized-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Crisafulli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and feasibility of an expiratory muscle training (EMT device (Respilift applied to patients recovering from recent open cardiothoracic surgery (CTS. Design. Prospective, double-blind, 14-day randomised-controlled trial. Participants and Setting. A total of 60 inpatients recovering from recent CTS and early admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Interventions. Chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a resistive load of 30 cm H2O for active group and chest physiotherapy plus EMT with a sham load for control group. Measures. Changes in maximal expiratory pressure (MEP were considered as primary outcome, while maximal inspiratory pressures (MIP, dynamic and static lung volumes, oxygenation, perceived symptoms of dyspnoea, thoracic pain, and well being (evaluated by visual analogic scale—VAS and general health status were considered secondary outcomes. Results. All outcomes recorded showed significant improvements in both groups; however, the change of MEP (+34.2 mmHg, and +26.1%, for absolute and % of predicted, resp. was significantly higher in active group. Also VAS dyspnoea improved faster and more significantly ( at day 12, and 14 in active group when compared with control. The drop-out rate was 6%, without differences between groups. Conclusions. In patients recovering from recent CTS, specific EMT by Respilift is feasible and effective. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01510275.

  20. Does Early Postsurgical Temozolomide Plus Concomitant Radiochemotherapy Regimen Have Any Benefit in Newly-diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients? A Multi-center,Randomized, Parallel, Open-label, Phase Ⅱ Clinical Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Mao; Yu Yao; Li-Wei Zhang; Yi-Cheng Lu; Zhong-Ping Chen; Jian-Min Zhang; Song-Tao Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background:The radiochemotherapy regimen concomitantly employing temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) 4 weeks after surgery,followed by 6 cycles of TMZ is a common treatment for glioblastoma (GBM).However,its median overall survival (OS) is only 14.6 months.This study was to explore the effectiveness and safety of early TMZ chemotherapy between surgery and chemoradiotherapy plus the standard concomitant radiochemotherapy regimen.Methods:A randomized,parallel group,open-label study of 99 newly diagnosed GBM patients was conducted at 1 0 independent Chinese neurosurgical departments from June 2008 to June 2012.Patients were treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy regimen plus early postsurgical temozolomide (early TMZ group) or standard concomitant radiochemotherapy regimen (control group).Overall response was assessed based on objective tumor assessments,administration ofcorticosteroid and neurological status test.Hematological,biochemical,laboratory,adverse event (AE),and neurological condition were measured for 24 months of follow-up.The primary efficacy endpoint of this study was overall survival (OS).The secondary endpoint was progression free survival (PFS).Results:The median OS time in the early TMZ group was 17.6 months,compared with 13.2 months in the control group (log-rank test P =0.021).In addition,the OS rate in the early TMZ group was higher at 6,12,and 18 months than in the control group,respectively (P <0.05).The median PFS time was 8.7 months in the early TMZ group and 10.4 months in the control group (log-rank test P =0.695).AEs occurred in 29 (55.8%) and 31(73.8%) patients respectively in early and control groups,including nausea (15.4% vs.33.3%),vomiting (7.7% vs.28.6%),fever (7.7% vs.11.9%),and headache (3.8% vs.23.8%).Only 30.8% and 33.3% were drug-related,respectively.Conclusions:Addition of TMZ chemotherapy in the early break of the standard concomitant radiochemotherapy regimen was well tolerated

  1. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  2. A novel clinical trial recruitment strategy for women's cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimel, B J; Lester, Jenny; Sabacan, Leah; Park, Diane; Bresee, Catherine; Dang, Catherine; Karlan, Beth

    2015-08-01

    To address a deficiency in clinical trial and research enrollment in gynecologic cancer studies, we launched a paper based patient research registry. To improve registry enrollment, we transitioned to an online registry and trial matching mechanism to aid women in accessing open studies. Utilizing a validated verification platform, we designed a web-based registry and trial matching mechanism for women over age 18. Participants completed a questionnaire to provide information for trial matching. A focus group of registry participants was held 9 months after the start of the study to evaluate barriers to participation. A total of 322 women were enrolled in the online registry over a 14 month period which was a 4.3 fold increase over the paper-based registry (p<0.0001). Two hundred and sixty three (82%) women were matched to at least one study. Fifteen percent (39/263) of those eligible for studies went on to enroll. The online enrollment rate to studies was not different from that observed in the paper-based registry (26/172, p=0.934), however, the web-based registry linked participants to subsequent studies 27% more rapidly (68 (+/-98) days vs. 93 (+/-81) days for the paper-based registry, p=0.017). Focus group participants identified areas for improvement. Web-based patient driven registry provides dramatic improvement in the number of participants enrolled and the time to trial linkage compared to a paper based registry at a single institution. Further studies of barriers to research participation are necessary to improve on this model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sponsorship and design characteristics of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumiantseva, Dina; Carini, Simona; Sim, Ida; Wagner, Todd H

    2013-03-01

    We examine the extent to which ClinicalTrials.gov is meeting its goal of providing oversight and transparency of clinical trials with human subjects. We analyzed the ClinicalTrials.gov database contents as of June 2011, comparing interventions, medical conditions, and trial characteristics by sponsor type. We also conducted a detailed analysis of incomplete data. Among trials with only government sponsorship (N=9252), 36% were observational and 64% interventional; in contrast, almost all (90%) industry-only sponsored trials were interventional. Industry-only sponsored interventional trials (N=30,036) were most likely to report a drug intervention (81%), followed by biologics (9%) and devices (8%). Government-only interventional trials (N=5886) were significantly more likely to test behavioral interventions (28%) and procedures (13%) than industry-only trials (pgov. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Clinical trials in allied medical fields: A cross-sectional analysis of World Health Organization International Clinical Trial Registry Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The number of clinical trials done in allied fields of medicine other than the allopathic system has lowered down, and furthermore focus is required regarding the methodological quality of these trials and more support from various organizations.

  5. The Effect of Aggressive Blood Pressure Control on the Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation: A Randomized, Open Label, Clinical Trial (Substrate Modification with Aggressive Blood Pressure Control: SMAC- AF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ratika; Wells, George A; Sapp, John L; Healey, Jeffrey S; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Greiss, Isabelle; Rivard, Léna; Roux, Jean-Francois; Gula, Lorne; Nault, Isabelle; Novak, Paul G; Birnie, David H; Ha, Andrew C; Wilton, Stephen B; Mangat, Iqwal; Gray, Christopher J; Gardner, Martin J; Tang, Anthony S L

    2017-02-22

    Background -Radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation has become an important therapy for AF, however recurrence rates remain high. We proposed to determine whether aggressive blood pressure (BP) lowering prevents recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation in patients with AF and a high symptom burden. Methods -We randomly assigned 184 patients with AF and a BP greater than 130/80 mmHg to aggressive BP (target <120/80 mm Hg) or standard BP treatment (target <140/90 mmHg) prior to their scheduled AF catheter ablation. The primary outcome was symptomatic recurrence of AF/atrial tachycardia/atrial flutter lasting greater than 30 seconds, determined 3 months beyond catheter ablation by a blinded endpoint evaluation. Results -The median follow-up was 14 months. At six months, the mean systolic BP in the aggressive BP treatment group was 123.2±13.2 versus 135.4±15.7mm Hg (p<0.001) in the standard treatment group. The primary outcome occurred in 106 patients, 54 (61.4%) in the aggressive BP treatment group, compared to 52 (61.2%) in the standard treatment group, (Hazard Ratio 0.94, 95% Confidence Interval 0.65-1.38, p=0.763). In the prespecified subgroup analysis of the influence of age, patients aged ≥ 61 years had a lower primary outcome event rate with aggressive BP (Hazard Ratio 0.58, 95% Confidence Interval (0.34, 0.97), p=0.013). There was a higher rate of hypotension requiring medication adjustment in the aggressive BP group (26% versus 0%). Conclusions -In this study, this duration of aggressive BP treatment did not reduce atrial arrhythmia recurrence after catheter ablation for AF, but resulted in more hypotension. Clinical Trial Registration -Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00438113.

  6. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of co-crystal of tramadol-celecoxib: Results of a four-way randomized open-label phase I clinical trial in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Sebastián; Lahjou, Mounia; Vaqué, Anna; Sust, Mariano; Encabo, Mercedes; Soler, Lluis; Sans, Artur; Sicard, Eric; Gascón, Neus; Encina, Gregorio; Plata-Salamán, Carlos

    2017-08-15

    Co-crystal of tramadol-celecoxib (CTC) is a novel co-crystal molecule containing two active pharmaceutical ingredients under development by Esteve (E-58425) and Mundipharma Research (MR308). This Phase I study compared single-dose pharmacokinetics (PK) of CTC with those of the individual reference products [immediate-release (IR) tramadol and celecoxib] alone and in open combination. Healthy adults aged 18-55 years were orally administered four treatments under fasted conditions (separated by 7-day wash-out period): 200 mg IR CTC (equivalent to 88 mg tramadol and 112 mg celecoxib; Treatment 1); 100 mg IR tramadol (Treatment 2); 100 mg celecoxib (Treatment 3); and 100 mg IR tramadol and 100 mg celecoxib (Treatment 4). Treatment sequence was assigned using computer-generated randomization. PK parameters were calculated using noncompartmental analysis with parameters for CTC adjusted according to reference product dose (100 mg). Thirty-six subjects (28 male, mean age 36 years) participated. Tramadol PK parameters for Treatments-1, -2 and -4, respectively, were 263, 346 and 349 ng ml(-1) (mean maximum plasma concentration); 3039, 2979 and 3119 ng h ml(-1) (mean cumulative area under the plasma concentration-time curve); and 2.7, 1.8 and 1.8 h (median time to maximum plasma concentration). For Treatments 1, 3 and 4, the respective celecoxib PK parameters were 313, 449 and 284 ng ml(-1) ; 2183, 3093 and 2856 ng h ml(-1) ; and 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 h. No unexpected adverse events were reported. PK parameters of each API in CTC were modified by co-crystallization compared with marketed formulations of tramadol, celecoxib, and their open combination. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Immune checkpoints in cancer clinical trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elad Sharon; Howard Streicher; Priscila Goncalves; Helen XChen

    2014-01-01

    Immunology-based therapy is rapidly developing into an effective treatment option for a surprising range of cancers. We have learned over the last decade that powerful immunologic effector cells may be blocked by inhibitory regulatory pathways controlled by specific molecules often called“immune checkpoints.” These checkpoints serve to control or turn off the immune response when it is no longer needed to prevent tissue injury and autoimmunity. Cancer cells have learned or evolved to use these mechanisms to evade immune control and elimination. The development of a new therapeutic class of drugs that inhibit these inhibitory pathways has recently emerged as a potent strategy in oncology. Three sets of agents have emerged in clinical trials exploiting this strategy. These agents are antibody-based therapies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death1 (PD-1), and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). These inhibitors of immune inhibition have demonstrated extensive activity as single agents and in combinations. Clinical responses have been seen in melanoma, renal cellcarcinoma, non-smal celllung cancer, and several other tumor types. Despite the autoimmune or inflammatory immune-mediated adverse effects which have been seen, the responses and overall survival benefits exhibited thus far warrant further clinical development.

  8. Clinical trials in branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandava Krishnan Panakanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy.

  9. Clinical Trials in Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panakanti, Tandava Krishnan; Chhablani, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept) compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular) of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26957837

  10. Mesh fixation methods in open inguinal hernia repair: a protocol for network meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Long; Tian, Jin-hui; Li, Lun; Wang, Quan; Yang, Ke-hu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) have been used to compare and evaluate different types of mesh fixation usually employed to repair open inguinal hernia. However, there is no consensus among surgeons on the best type of mesh fixation method to obtain optimal results. The choice often depends on surgeons’ personal preference. This study aims to compare different types of mesh fixation methods to repair open inguinal hernias and their role in the incidences of chronic groin pain, risk of hernia recurrence, complications, operative time, length of hospital stay and postoperative pain, using Bayesian network meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of RCTs. Methods and analysis A systematic search will be performed using PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and Chinese Journal Full-text Database, to include RCTs of different mesh fixation methods (or fixation vs no fixation) during open inguinal hernia repair. The risk of bias in included RCTs will be evaluated according to the Cochrane Handbook V.5.1.0. Standard pairwise meta-analysis, trial sequential analysis and Bayesian network meta-analysis will be performed to compare the efficacy of different mesh fixation methods. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval and patient consent are not required since this study is a meta-analysis based on published studies. The results of this network meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. Protocol registration number PROSPERO CRD42015023758. PMID:26586326

  11. Publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawdrey, David K; Hripcsak, George

    2013-02-01

    To measure the rate of non-publication and assess possible publication bias in clinical trials of electronic health records. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov to identify registered clinical trials of electronic health records and searched the biomedical literature and contacted trial investigators to determine whether the results of the trials were published. Publications were judged as positive, negative, or neutral according to the primary outcome. Seventy-six percent of trials had publications describing trial results; of these, 74% were positive, 21% were neutral, and 4% were negative (harmful). Of unpublished studies for which the investigator responded, 43% were positive, 57% were neutral, and none were negative; the lower rate of positive results was significant (pelectronic health record studies is similar to that in other biomedical studies. There appears to be a bias toward publication of positive trials in this domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Drug interactions in controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, S

    1982-12-01

    As much information as possible should be obtained in clinical trials to assess possible interactions between test drugs and concomitant medications prescribed for other medical indications. Side effect profiles were compared in patients taking buspirone, mean = 20 mg/day; diazepam, 20 mg/day; clorazepate, 23 mg/day; and placebo, with or without concomitant medications. Approximately 1,000 anxious patients were included in the analysis; 700 received buspirone. The use of a variety of common medications did not affect the side effect profile in the buspirone, clorazepate, and placebo groups, but did increase the incidence of side effects in the diazepam group. The increased incidence of sedation noted with diazepam and clorazepate, however, was not due to concomitant medication.

  13. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Cofield,Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment...

  14. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries

    OpenAIRE

    Lenio Souza Alvarenga; Elisabeth Nogueira Martins

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. METHODS: Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial pl...

  15. Perceptions of reimbursement for clinical trial participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Loza, Melissa; Vincent, Kathleen; Moench, Thomas; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2011-09-01

    A greater understanding of participant views regarding reimbursement will help investigators plan studies that have better potential for reaching target enrollment, maximize efficient recruitment, maintain scientific integrity, and enhance retention over time. As part of a clinical trial in the area of sexual health, healthy women's perceptions of reimbursement for research participation were investigated. Semi-structured, audio-recorded, qualitative interviews were conducted immediately upon women's completion of the clinical trial to enable a participant-driven understanding of perceptions about monetary reimbursement. Audio-recordings were transcribed and analyzed using framework analysis. Women (N = 30) had a mean age of 29.5 ± 5.7 years (range 22-45 years). Sixty-three percent of participants (n = 19) were non-Hispanic (white n = 13, black n = 4, and Asian n = 2), while the remaining were Hispanic (n = 11). Seventy-three percent (n = 22) reported previous participation in research. In general, women viewed reimbursement as a benefit to research participation, the amount of which should reflect time, the inconvenience to the research subject, and the potential for unknown risks in the short- and long-term. They believed reimbursement should take into account the degree of risk of the study, with investigations of experimental products offering greater reimbursement. Women believed that monetary reimbursement is unlikely to coerce an individual to volunteer for a study involving procedures or requirements that they found unacceptable. The results of this study can be used to provide guidance to those planning and evaluating reimbursement for research participation.

  16. Trial publication after registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Ross

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515, nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46% of trials were published, among which 96 (31% provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357 were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001, but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22. Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61% completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52% completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42% completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low

  17. Exploring Willingness to Participate in Clinical Trials by Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariera, Katrina L; Murphy, Sheila T; Meng, Jingbo; McLaughlin, Margaret L

    2016-09-07

    African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are disproportionately affected by cancer, yet underrepresented in cancer clinical trials. Because of this, it is important to understand how attitudes and beliefs about clinical trials vary by ethnicity. A national, random sample of 860 adults was given an online survey about attitudes toward clinical trials. We examined willingness to participate in clinical trials, attitudes toward clinical trials, trust in doctors, attitudes toward alternative and complementary medicine, and preferred information channels. Results indicate that African-American and Hispanic-American participants have more negative attitudes about clinical trials, more distrust toward doctors, more interest in complementary and alternative medicine, and less willingness to participate in clinical trials than white/non-Hispanics, although specific factors affecting willingness to participate vary. The channels people turn to for information on clinical trials also varied by ethnicity. These results help explain the ethnic disparities in cancer clinical trial enrollment by highlighting some potential underlying causes and drawing attention to areas of importance to these groups.

  18. Recruitment and Retention of Patients into Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Stacey; Conwit, Robin; Barsan, William; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    The emergency medicine and pre-hospital environments are unlike any other clinical environments and require special consideration to allow the successful implementation of clinical trials. This article reviews the specific issues involved in Emergency Medicine Clinical Trials (EMCT), and provides strategies from emergency medicine and non-emergency medicine trials to maximize recruitment and retention. While the evidence supporting some of these strategies is deficient, addressing recruitment and retention issues with specific strategies will help researchers deal with these issues in their funding applications and in turn develop the necessary infrastructure to participate in emergency medicine clinical trials. PMID:21040112

  19. The clinically-integrated randomized trial: proposed novel method for conducting large trials at low cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scardino Peter T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Randomized controlled trials provide the best method of determining which of two comparable treatments is preferable. Unfortunately, contemporary randomized trials have become increasingly expensive, complex and burdened by regulation, so much so that many trials are of doubtful feasibility. Discussion Here we present a proposal for a novel, streamlined approach to randomized trials: the "clinically-integrated randomized trial". The key aspect of our methodology is that the clinical experience of the patient and doctor is virtually indistinguishable whether or not the patient is randomized, primarily because outcome data are obtained from routine clinical data, or from short, web-based questionnaires. Integration of a randomized trial into routine clinical practice also implies that there should be an attempt to randomize every patient, a corollary of which is that eligibility criteria are minimized. The similar clinical experience of patients on- and off-study also entails that the marginal cost of putting an additional patient on trial is negligible. We propose examples of how the clinically-integrated randomized trial might be applied in four distinct areas of medicine: comparisons of surgical techniques, "me too" drugs, rare diseases and lifestyle interventions. Barriers to implementing clinically-integrated randomized trials are discussed. Conclusion The proposed clinically-integrated randomized trial may allow us to enlarge dramatically the number of clinical questions that can be addressed by randomization.

  20. [Acupuncture clinical trials published in high impact factor journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Liu, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2014-12-01

    Acupuncture clinical trials are designed to provide reliable evidence of clinical efficacy, and SCI papers is one of the high-quality clinical efficacy of acupuncture research. To analyze these papers published in high impact factor journals on acupuncture clinical trials, we can study clinical trials from design to implementation, the efficacy of prevention and cure, combined with international standard practices to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture. That is the core of acupuncture clinical trials, as well as a prerequisite for outstanding academic output. A scientific and complete acupuncture clinical trial should be topically novel, designed innovative, logically clear, linguistically refining, and the most important point lies in a great discovery and solving the pragmatic problem. All of these are critical points of papers to be published in high impact factor journal, and directly affect international evaluation and promotion of acupuncture.

  1. Single and Multiple Dose Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Safety of the Novel Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Enzyme Inhibitor Darapladib in Healthy Chinese Subjects: An Open Label Phase-1 Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoying Hu

    population.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02000804.

  2. Clinical trials of chemotherapy for falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, P; Olliaro, P

    1998-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum remains one of the World's most prevalent and devastating pathogens. Mainly for economic reasons, the parasite's ability to develop resistance to drugs has not been matched by the rate at which new compounds are developed. Even so, there are new drugs (or new combinations of old drugs) currently under investigation, or in the process of development (at the moment): Pyronaridine, a well-tolerated, synthetic drug that may have utility for multi-resistant falciparum malaria in many parts of the world; however,problems remain over the formulation of this drug (which is a major determinant of its bioavailability) and its eventual cost. Chlorproguanil-dapsone (lap dap) is being studied as a possible low-cost'successor' to pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine; the utility of chlorproguanil-dapsone as 'salvage' therapy for clinical cases of pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine failure has yet to be tested in clinical trials. Atovaquone-proguanil (malarone) has utility against multi-resistant parasites; however, it is likely to be expensive (but is currently being provided free-of-charge in certain areas of Africa). Artemether-benflumetol (coartemether) combines the advantages of artemether (a rapid reduction in parasite load) with a second drug that reduces the risk of recrudescence; the cost of this combination is unclear. Rectal artesunate is being studied as an intervention to reduce the proportion of children with falciparum malaria who deteriorate to severe disease; the formulation is appropriate for use in rural health centres.

  3. An open-label trial of risperidone and fluoxetine in children with autistic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desousa Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Various studies have shown the effectiveness of risperidone and fluoxetine in the management of behavioral problems in autism. Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare these two drugs in the management of behavioral problems in autism. Materials and Methods: Forty children with autism were divided into 2 groups in a 16-week open trial that compared these two drugs. Parents rated the children using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC and the Conners′ Parent Rating Scale - Revised (CPRS-R. The author rated the children using the Children′s Psychiatric Rating Scale and Clinical Global Impression (CGI Scale. Results: The risperidone group showed significant improvement in areas like irritability and hyperactivity, while the fluoxetine group showed significant improvement in speech deviance, social withdrawal and stereotypy. When the two drugs were compared, fluoxetine showed greater improvement in stereotypy, while both drugs showed improvement on the general autism scale; and on anger, hyperactivity and irritability scales. Conclusions : In this open trial, both drugs were well tolerated and appeared to be beneficial in the treatment of common behavioral problems in children with autism. Further controlled and double-blind studies in larger samples are warranted.

  4. Factors predicting publication of spinal cord injury trials registered on www.ClinicalTrials. gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasse, J Mason; Park, Sara; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-08-11

    Treatment options for spinal cord injuries are currently limited, but multiple clinical trials are underway for a variety of interventions, drugs, and devices. The Food and Drug Administration website www.ClinicalTrials.gov catalogues these trials and includes information on the status of the trial, date of initiation and completion, source of funding, and region. This investigation assesses the factors associated with publication and the publication rate of spinal cord injury trials. Retrospective analysis of publically available data on www.ClinicalTrials.gov. The www.ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for all trials on patients with spinal cord injury, and these trials were assessed for status, type of intervention, source of funding, and region. Multiple literature searches were performed on all completed trials to determine publication status. There were 626 studies identified concerning the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury, of which 250 (39.9%) were completed. Of these, only 119 (47.6%) were published. There was no significant difference in the rate of publication between regions (p> 0.16) or by study type (p> 0.29). However, trials that were funded by the NIH were more likely to be published than trials funded by industry (p= 0.01). The current publication rate of spinal cord injury trials is only 47.6%, though this rate is similar to the publication rate for trials in other fields. NIH-funded trials are significantly more likely to become published than industry-funded trials, which could indicate that some trials remain unpublished due to undesirable results. However, it is also likely that many trials on spinal cord injury yield negative results, as treatments are often ineffective.

  5. Long-term safety and seizure outcome in Japanese patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome receiving adjunctive rufinamide therapy: An open-label study following a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoko; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Shirasaka, Yukiyoshi; Takayama, Rumiko; Takano, Hiroki; Iyoda, Kuniaki

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the long-term safety and seizure outcome in Japanese patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) receiving adjunctive rufinamide therapy. We conducted an open-label extension study following a 12-week multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of adjunctive rufinamide therapy in Japanese patients with LGS. Fifty-four patients participated in the extension study. Seizure frequency was evaluated until 52 weeks after the start of the extension study. Adverse events (AEs) were evaluated throughout both studies. Of the 54 patients, 41 (75.9%) completed the extension study. The median duration of exposure to rufinamide was 818.0 days in all 54 patients, and 38 patients (70.4%) received rufinamide for 2 years or more. The median percent change in the frequency of tonic-atonic seizures relative to the frequency at the start of the double-blind study was -39.3% (12 weeks), -40.6% (24 weeks), -46.8% (32 weeks), -47.6% (40 weeks), and -36.1% (52 weeks). Reduction of total seizure frequency was also maintained until 52 weeks. Frequent treatment-related AEs were somnolence (20.4%), decreased appetite (16.7%), transient seizure aggravation including status epilepticus (13.0%), vomiting (11.1%), and constipation (11.1%). Adverse events were mild or moderate, except for transient seizure aggravation in three patients. Adverse events resulting in discontinuation of rufinamide were decreased appetite, drug eruption, and worsening of underlying autism. When clinically notable weight loss was defined as a decrease ≥ 7% relative to baseline, 22 patients (40.7%) experienced weight loss at least once during long-term observation, although weight loss was reported as an AE in only three patients. This study demonstrated a long-term benefit of rufinamide as adjunctive therapy for Japanese patients with LGS. Exacerbation of seizures and decreased appetite/weight loss should be monitored carefully. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B

  6. Effectiveness of a Therapeutic Summer Camp for Children with ADHD: Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, Julie; Wang, Pan Pan; Grizenko-Vida, Michael; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Harvey, William; Joober, Ridha; Grizenko, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-week therapeutic summer day camp for children with ADHD, which included a social skills training program and parent psychoeducation and training program. This was an open-label, nonrandomized Phase I Clinical Intervention Trial. Method: Parents completed the Weiss…

  7. Clinical randomized controlled trial of chemomechanical caries removal (Carisolv).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Chourio, M A; Zambrano, O; González, H; Quero, M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the chemomechanical caries-removal system (Carisolv) with high-speed excavation in cavitated occlusal caries of primary molars. Design and setting. The study was a randomized controlled, clinical trial in which the two techniques were compared in each subject. Participants were chosen from public schools, in Maracaibo County, Zulia State, Venezuela. The sample consisted of 80 primary molars selected from 40 children (mean age 7.7+/-0.7 years). Each patient had at least two contralateral primary molars with cavitated occlusal caries and approximately equal-size access to lesions. The outcome variables were: clinically complete caries removal, size of the opening of the cavity, volume of carious tissue removed, pain during caries removal, anaesthesia requested by the patient, caries-removal time, and behaviour and preference of patients. All treated molars were clinically caries free whichever caries-removal procedure was used. When Carisolv' was used the final cavity entrance sizes were smaller (Premoved was less (Premoval was three times longer (7.51+/-1.83 min, Premoval of occlusal dentinal caries in cavitated primary molars; it is more conservative of dental tissue and appeared to be more comfortable for most patients, although the clinical time spent is longer than when using high-speed excavation.

  8. Clinical trial designs for testing biomarker-based personalized therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tze Leung; Lavori, Philip W; Shih, Mei-Chiung I; Sikic, Branimir I

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in molecular therapeutics in the past decade have opened up new possibilities for treating cancer patients with personalized therapies, using biomarkers to determine which treatments are most likely to benefit them, but there are difficulties and unresolved issues in the development and validation of biomarker-based personalized therapies. We develop a new clinical trial design to address some of these issues. The goal is to capture the strengths of the frequentist and Bayesian approaches to address this problem in the recent literature and to circumvent their limitations. Methods We use generalized likelihood ratio tests of the intersection null and enriched strategy null hypotheses to derive a novel clinical trial design for the problem of advancing promising biomarker-guided strategies toward eventual validation. We also investigate the usefulness of adaptive randomization (AR) and futility stopping proposed in the recent literature. Results Simulation studies demonstrate the advantages of testing both the narrowly focused enriched strategy null hypothesis related to validating a proposed strategy and the intersection null hypothesis that can accommodate to a potentially successful strategy. AR and early termination of ineffective treatments offer increased probability of receiving the preferred treatment and better response rates for patients in the trial, at the expense of more complicated inference under small-to-moderate total sample sizes and some reduction in power. Limitations The binary response used in the development phase may not be a reliable indicator of treatment benefit on long-term clinical outcomes. In the proposed design, the biomarker-guided strategy (BGS) is not compared to ‘standard of care’, such as physician’s choice that may be informed by patient characteristics. Therefore, a positive result does not imply superiority of the BGS to ‘standard of care’. The proposed design and tests are valid asymptotically

  9. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  10. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  11. Metaanalysis vs large clinical trials: which should guide our management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scifres, Christina M; Iams, Jay D; Klebanoff, Mark; Macones, George A

    2009-05-01

    Large, randomized clinical trials have long been considered the gold standard to guide clinical care. Metaanalysis is a type of analysis in which results of a number of randomized clinical trials are combined and a summary measure of effect for a given treatment is ascertained. The clinician in practice often is faced with a dilemma regarding the type of evidence that should be used to guide clinical practice; for many clinical problems, there are both randomized controlled trials and metaanalyses available. The cases of calcium and aspirin therapy for the prevention of preeclampsia afford an opportunity to explore the benefits and limitations of each type of study to guide clinical practice. We conclude that, when available, large randomized clinical trials should be used to guide clinical practice.

  12. Compliance with results reporting at ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Chiswell, Karen; Peterson, Eric D; Tasneem, Asba; Topping, James; Califf, Robert M

    2015-03-12

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) mandates timely reporting of results of applicable clinical trials to ClinicalTrials.gov. We characterized the proportion of applicable clinical trials with publicly available results and determined independent factors associated with the reporting of results. Using an algorithm based on input from the National Library of Medicine, we identified trials that were likely to be subject to FDAAA provisions (highly likely applicable clinical trials, or HLACTs) from 2008 through 2013. We determined the proportion of HLACTs that reported results within the 12-month interval mandated by the FDAAA or at any time during the 5-year study period. We used regression models to examine characteristics associated with reporting at 12 months and throughout the 5-year study period. From all the trials at ClinicalTrials.gov, we identified 13,327 HLACTs that were terminated or completed from January 1, 2008, through August 31, 2012. Of these trials, 77.4% were classified as drug trials. A total of 36.9% of the trials were phase 2 studies, and 23.4% were phase 3 studies; 65.6% were funded by industry. Only 13.4% of trials reported summary results within 12 months after trial completion, whereas 38.3% reported results at any time up to September 27, 2013. Timely reporting was independently associated with factors such as FDA oversight, a later trial phase, and industry funding. A sample review suggested that 45% of industry-funded trials were not required to report results, as compared with 6% of trials funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and 9% of trials that were funded by other government or academic institutions. Despite ethical and legal obligations to disclose findings promptly, most HLACTs did not report results to ClinicalTrials.gov in a timely fashion during the study period. Industry-funded trials adhered to legal obligations more often than did trials funded by the NIH or other government or academic

  13. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS......:We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two......%). Heterogeneity was moderate (I(2) = 46%, p = 0.02) and unexplained by metaregression. INTERPRETATION:We provide empirical evidence for observer bias in randomized clinical trials with subjective measurement scale outcomes. A failure to blind assessors of outcomes in such trials results in a high risk...

  14. Simulating Clinical Trials With and Without Intracranial EEG Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenholz, Daniel M; Tharayil, Joseph J; Kuzniecky, Rubin; Karoly, Philippa; Theodore, William H; Cook, Mark J

    2017-06-01

    It is currently unknown if knowledge of clinically silent (electrographic) seizures improves the statistical efficiency of clinical trials. Using data obtained from 10 patients with chronically implanted subdural electrodes over an average of 1 year, a Monte Carlo bootstrapping simulation study was performed to estimate the statistical power of running a clinical trial based on A) patient reported seizures with intracranial EEG (icEEG) confirmation, B) all patient reported events, or C) all icEEG confirmed seizures. A "drug" was modeled as having 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% efficacy in 1000 simulated trials each. Outcomes were represented as percentage of trials that achieved pseizures (pseizure detection using chronically implanted icEEG improves statistical power of clinical trials. Newer invasive and noninvasive seizure detection devices may have the potential to provide greater statistical efficiency, accelerate drug discovery and lower trial costs.

  15. DIRECT trial. Diverticulitis recurrences or continuing symptoms: Operative versus conservative Treatment. A MULTICENTER RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Wall Bryan JM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persisting abdominal complaints are common after an episode of diverticulitis treated conservatively. Furthermore, some patients develop frequent recurrences. These two groups of patients suffer greatly from their disease, as shown by impaired health related quality of life and increased costs due to multiple specialist consultations, pain medication and productivity losses. Both conservative and operative management of patients with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or frequently recurring diverticulitis are applied. However, direct comparison by a randomised controlled trial is necessary to determine which is superior in relieving symptoms, optimising health related quality of life, minimising costs and preventing diverticulitis recurrences against acceptable morbidity and mortality associated with surgery or the occurrence of a complicated recurrence after conservative management. We, therefore, constructed a randomised clinical trial comparing these two treatment strategies. Methods/design The DIRECT trial is a multicenter randomised clinical trial. Patients (18-75 years presenting themselves with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or three or more recurrences within 2 years will be included and randomised. Patients randomised for conservative treatment are treated according to the current daily practice (antibiotics, analgetics and/or expectant management. Patients randomised for elective resection will undergo an elective resection of the affected colon segment. Preferably, a laparoscopic approach is used. The primary outcome is health related quality of life measured by the Gastro-intestinal Quality of Life Index, Short-Form 36, EQ-5D and a visual analogue scale for pain quantification. Secondary endpoints are morbidity, mortality and total costs. The total follow-up will be three years. Discussion Considering the high incidence and the

  16. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sanz-Ruiz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomized clinical trials and their limitations, discuss the key points in the design of future trials, and depict new directions of research in this fascinating field.

  17. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract...... knowledge gained by physicians in the process of clinical trials. These restrictions to knowledge-transfer between site and sponsor are further challenged if CRO partners are integrated in the trial process. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  18. A REVIEW ON CLINICAL TRIALS: WHY TO INTRODUCE ZERO PHASE

    OpenAIRE

    MANINDER KAUR; AMRITPAL SINGH

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of this study is to know clinical trials in nutshell and phase 0 clinical trial are to establish at the very earliest opportunity-before large numbers of patients have been accrued and exposed to potential drug-associated toxicity-whether an agent is modulating its target in a tumor, and consequently whether further clinical development is warranted. We review here the fundamental requirements of clinical studies conducted under an exploratory IND and address som...

  19. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; A Kent, Thomas; de Groot, John F

    2017-07-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  20. Reduction of claustrophobia with short-bore versus open magnetic resonance imaging: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Enders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Claustrophobia is a common problem precluding MR imaging. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether a short-bore or an open magnetic resonance (MR scanner is superior in alleviating claustrophobia. METHODS: Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent were obtained to compare short-bore versus open MR. From June 2008 to August 2009, 174 patients (139 women; mean age = 53.1 [SD 12.8] with an overall mean score of 2.4 (SD 0.7, range 0 to 4 on the Claustrophobia Questionnaire (CLQ and a clinical indication for imaging, were randomly assigned to receive evaluation by open or by short-bore MR. The primary outcomes were incomplete MR examinations due to a claustrophobic event. Follow-up was conducted 7 months after MR imaging. The primary analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat strategy. RESULTS: With 33 claustrophobic events in the short-bore group (39% [95% confidence interval [CI] 28% to 50% versus 23 in the open scanner group (26% [95% CI 18% to 37%]; P = 0.08 the difference was not significant. Patients with an event were in the examination room for 3.8 min (SD 4.4 in the short-bore and for 8.5 min (SD 7 in the open group (P = 0.004. This was due to an earlier occurrence of events in the short-bore group. The CLQ suffocation subscale was significantly associated with the occurrence of claustrophobic events (P = 0.003. New findings that explained symptoms were found in 69% of MR examinations and led to changes in medical treatment in 47% and surgery in 10% of patients. After 7 months, perceived claustrophobia increased in 32% of patients with events versus in only 11% of patients without events (P = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS: Even recent MR cannot prevent claustrophobia suggesting that further developments to create a more patient-centered MR scanner environment are needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806.

  1. Open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet: clinical results and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, P; Fossati, C; Stoppani, C; Evola, F R; De Girolamo, L

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results between open and arthroscopic Latarjet and perform a cost analysis of the two techniques. A systematic review of articles present in PubMed and MEDLINE was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Studies concerning post-operative outcomes following Latarjet procedures for chronic anterior shoulder instability were selected for analysis. The clinical and radiographic results as well as the costs of the open and arthroscopic techniques were evaluated. Twenty-three articles, describing a total of 1317 shoulders, met the inclusion criteria: 17 studies were related to open Latarjet, and 6 to the arthroscopic technique. Despite the heterogeneity of the evaluation scales, the clinical results seemed very satisfactory for both techniques. We detected a statistically significant difference in the percentage of bone graft healing in favour of the open technique (88.6 vs 77.6 %). Recurrent dislocation was more frequent following open surgery (3.3 % after open surgery vs 0.3 % after arthroscopy), but this finding was biased by the large difference in follow-up duration between the two techniques. The direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure were double in comparison to open surgery (€2335 vs €1040). A lack of data prevented evaluation of indirect costs and, therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis. The open and arthroscopic Latarjet techniques showed excellent and comparable clinical results. However, the much higher direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure do not seem, at present, to be justified by a benefit to the patient. III.

  2. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  3. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  4. Facilitating recruitment of patients with schizophrenia to a clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Bettina Ellen

    People with severe mental illness, such as schizophrenia have higher rates of mortality especially due to cardiovascular disease. We have established a clinical trial named “Coronary artery disease and schizophrenia”. However, patients with schizophrenia have cognitive disturbances, which make re...... recruitment of patients challenging. The purpose of this study is to understand which type of recruitment strategy is needed in clinical trials....

  5. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  6. Review on clinical trials of targeted treatments in malignant mesothelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor of the serosal surfaces with a poor prognosis. Advances in the understanding of tumor biology have led to the development of several targeted treatments, which have been evaluated in clinical trials. This article is a comprehensive review of all...... clinical trials evaluating the effect of targeted treatments in MM....

  7. Perspectives on randomized clinical trials : the case for albuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2008-01-01

    Large scale randomized clinical trials are needed to detect small but meaningful effects of new drugs. However, large scale randomized clinical trials are expensive undertakings and they are in imbalance with the scientific output. As a consequence there is a strong voice for more efficacious random

  8. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzGerald, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial.

  9. Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year. The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initia

  10. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  11. The application of disease management to clinical trial designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterman, Jared; Alter, David A

    2009-08-01

    The utilization of disease management (DM) as a minimum standard of care is believed to facilitate pronounced benefits in overall patient outcome and cost management. Randomized clinical trials remain the gold standard evaluative tool in clinical medicine. However, the extent to which contemporary cardiovascular clinical trials incorporate DM components into their treatment or control arms is unknown. Our study is the first to evaluate the extent to which clinical trials incorporate DM as a minimum standard of care for both the intervention and control groups. In total, 386 clinical trials published in 3 leading medical journals between 2003 and 2006 were evaluated. For each study, elements related to DM care, as defined using the American Heart Association Taxonomy, were abstracted and characterized. Our results demonstrate that while the application of DM has increased over time, only 3.4% of the clinical trials examined incorporated all 8 DM elements (and only 11% of such trials incorporated 4 DM elements). A significant association was found between study year and the inclusion of more than 3 elements of DM (chi(2) = 10.10 (3); p = 0.018). In addition, associations were found between study objective and DM criteria, as well as between cohort type and domains described. Our study serves as a baseline reference for the tracking of DM within, and its application to, randomized clinical trials. Moreover, our results underscore the need for broader implementation and evaluation of DM as a minimum care standard within clinical trial research.

  12. Open Source Clinical NLP - More than Any Single System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanz, James; Pakhomov, Serguei V; Xu, Hua; Wu, Stephen T; Chute, Christopher G; Liu, Hongfang

    2014-01-01

    The number of Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools and systems for processing clinical free-text has grown as interest and processing capability have surged. Unfortunately any two systems typically cannot simply interoperate, even when both are built upon a framework designed to facilitate the creation of pluggable components. We present two ongoing activities promoting open source clinical NLP. The Open Health Natural Language Processing (OHNLP) Consortium was originally founded to foster a collaborative community around clinical NLP, releasing UIMA-based open source software. OHNLP's mission currently includes maintaining a catalog of clinical NLP software and providing interfaces to simplify the interaction of NLP systems. Meanwhile, Apache cTAKES aims to integrate best-of-breed annotators, providing a world-class NLP system for accessing clinical information within free-text. These two activities are complementary. OHNLP promotes open source clinical NLP activities in the research community and Apache cTAKES bridges research to the health information technology (HIT) practice.

  13. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide to 2012 - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Samantha L; Alexander, Ian E; Edelstein, Michael L; Abedi, Mohammad R; Wixon, Jo

    2013-02-01

    To date, over 1800 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. Our database brings together global information on gene therapy clinical trials from official agency sources, published literature, conference presentations and posters kindly provided to us by individual investigators or trial sponsors. This review presents our analysis of clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. As of our June 2012 update, we have entries on 1843 trials undertaken in 31 countries. We have analysed the geographical distribution of trials, the disease indications (or other reasons) for trials, the proportions to which different vector types are used, and which genes have been transferred. Details of the analyses presented, and our searchable database are available on The Journal of Gene Medicine Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website at: http://www.wiley.co.uk/genmed/clinical. We also provide an overview of the progress being made in clinical trials of gene therapy approaches around the world and discuss the prospects for the future.

  14. Adult cancer clinical trials that fail to complete: an epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensland, Kristian D; McBride, Russell B; Latif, Asma; Wisnivesky, Juan; Hendricks, Ryan; Roper, Nitin; Boffetta, Paolo; Hall, Simon J; Oh, William K; Galsky, Matthew D

    2014-09-01

    The number and diversity of cancer therapeutics in the pipeline has increased over the past decade due to an enhanced understanding of cancer biology and the identification of novel therapeutic targets. At the same time, the cost of bringing new drugs to market and the regulatory burdens associated with clinical drug development have progressively increased. The finite number of eligible patients and limited financial resources available to evaluate promising new therapeutics represent rate-limiting factors in the effort to translate preclinical discoveries into the next generation of standard therapeutic approaches. Optimal use of resources requires understanding and ultimately addressing inefficiencies in the cancer clinical trials system. Prior analyses have demonstrated that a large proportion of trials initiated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Group system are never completed. While NCI Cooperative Group trials are important, they represent only a small proportion of all cancer clinical trials performed. Herein, we explore the problem of cancer clinical trials that fail to complete within the broader cancer clinical trials enterprise. Among 7776 phase II-III adult cancer clinical trials initiated between 2005-2011, we found a seven-year cumulative incidence of failure to complete of approximately 20% (95% confidence interval = 18% to 22%). Nearly 48000 patients were enrolled in trials that failed to complete. These trials likely contribute little to the scientific knowledge base, divert resources and patients from answering other critical questions, and represent a barrier to progress.

  15. Placebos used in clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guan D; We, Ding A; Chung, Leung P; Fai, Cheng K

    2008-06-01

    One of the important components in randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) is blinding. The gold standard of clinical trials is to achieve a double blind design. However, only a small number of randomized controlled trials in traditional Chinese medicine have been reported, most of them are of poor quality in methodology including placebo preparation and verification. The purpose of the article is to review the validity of placebo used in blinded clinical trials for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in recent years and related patents. We searched the Wanfang Database (total of 827 Chinese journals of medicine and/or pharmacy, from 1999 to 2005) and 598 full-length articles related to placebo clinical trials were found. 77 placebo blinded clinical trials for Chinese medicine were extracted by manual search from the 598 articles. After reviewing the 77 full-length articles, we found that nearly half of the clinical trials did not pay attention to the physical quality of the testing drug and placebo and whether they were of comparable physical quality. The rest provided very limited placebo information so that blinding assurance could not be assumed. Only 2 articles (2.6%) specifically validated the comparability between the testing drug and the placebo. Researchers in Chinese medicine commonly ignored the quality of the placebo in comparison to the test drug. This may be causing bias in the clinical trials. Quality specifications and evaluation of the placebo should deserve special attention to reduce bias in randomized controlled trials in TCM study.

  16. [Multi-national clinical trial in circulatory disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kihito

    2009-02-01

    As Japan becomes more integrated into the global market, pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) in Japan faces considerable challenges. While global simultaneous development including Asian countries has become a common strategy for multi-national pharmaceutical companies, Japan has been frequently set aside because of its provincial regulatory and clinical trial infrastructure. Meanwhile, many improvement programs in pharmaceutical area have been initiated in Japan. With this increased scrutiny, significant improvements in regulatory process, clinical trial costs, and site performance are anticipated over the next few years. RENAAL is the first multi-national clinical trial involving Japanese patients diabetic nephropathy associated with type II diabetes mellitus. In this article, issues which have been observed in the process of conducting multi-national clinical trial were discussed based on the experience with RENAAL. It is hoped that, as we gain more experiences in multi-national clinical trials, solutions for these issues are found in near future.

  17. Towards a framework of success factors for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonansegna, Erika; Salomo, Søren; Maier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry are the most critical part of the drug development process with respect to obtaining the market approval from the authorities. Clinical trials are highly expensive, time-consuming and often unsuccessful. While new product development (NPD) literature...... clinical trials reducing failures and increasing profits. The framework directs managerial focus on the most important factors for success and helps managers in decision-making of operational tasks. The framework can also be applied as a checklist for assessing the status of a clinical trial and later...... as a benchmarking tool to compare clinical trial processes. Dependencies among the identified factors seem to exist, thus a set of propositions, can be developed from the success factors and be the basis for future empirical testing....

  18. Towards a framework of success factors for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonansegna, Erika; Salomo, Søren; Maier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    of success factors. This paper creates the new framework by combining success factors from NPD literature and from empirical evidence collected through 11 semi-structured interviews with experts in clinical trials. The framework of success factors provides managerial guidelines for practitioners to optimize...... clinical trials reducing failures and increasing profits. The framework directs managerial focus on the most important factors for success and helps managers in decision-making of operational tasks. The framework can also be applied as a checklist for assessing the status of a clinical trial and later......Clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry are the most critical part of the drug development process with respect to obtaining the market approval from the authorities. Clinical trials are highly expensive, time-consuming and often unsuccessful. While new product development (NPD) literature...

  19. Clinical Trial: Marine Lipid Suppositories as Laxatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormarsson, Orri Thor; Geirsson, Thormodur; Bjornsson, Einar Stefan; Jonsson, Tomas; Moller, Pall; Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Stefansson, Einar

    2012-01-01

    Cod-liver oil and other marine products containing polyunsaturated fatty acids have anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-viral effects and may be useful in the treatment of various inflammatory and infectious diseases. We developed suppositories and ointment with 30% free fatty acid (FFA) extract from omega-3 fish oil. Our purpose was to evaluate the safety of marine lipid suppositories and ointment in healthy volunteers and to explore the laxative effect of the suppositories. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomized either to a study group administrating 30% FFA suppositories and applying 30% FFA ointment to the perianal region twice per day for two weeks, or to a control group using placebo suppositories and ointment in a double blinded manner. Results: No serious toxic effects or irritation were observed. In the study group 93% felt the urge to defecate after administration of the suppositories as compared to 37% in the control group (P = 0.001). Subsequently 90% in the study group defecated, compared to 33% in the control group (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The marine lipid suppositories and ointment were well tolerated with no significant toxic side effects observed during the study period. The suppositories have a distinct laxative effect and we aim to explore this effect in further clinical trials. PMID:23118720

  20. Clinical evidence for Japanese population based on prospective studies--linking clinical trials and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kojima, Sunao

    2009-10-01

    "Evidence-based medicine (EBM)" implies effective and high quality practice for patients based on well-grounded medical science. The success of clinical trials in Japan is essential to build original evidence specific for Japanese patients. Based on this concept, we have performed several large-scale clinical trials to provide EBM, including the Japanese Antiplatelets Myocardial Infarction Study [JAMIS; clinical improvement in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with antiplatelet therapy], the Japanese beta-Blockers and Calcium Antagonists Myocardial Infarction (JBCMI; comparison of the effects of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on cardiovascular events in post-AMI patients), a multicenter study for aggressive lipid-lowering strategy by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with AMI (MUSASHI; effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular events in patients with AMI), and the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD trial; efficacy of low-dose aspirin therapy for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients). The results of these prospective studies were directly linked with clinical practice. We have acquired the know-how of large-scale clinical trials; an important point is to have passion for "buildup evidence specific for the Japanese" and to recruit subjects for enrollment after explaining the significance of "clinical trials for the Japanese".

  1. Anaesthesiological strategies in elective craniotomy: randomized, equivalence, open trial – The NeuroMorfeo trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzzetti Stefano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have attempted to determine the "best" anaesthetic technique for neurosurgical procedures in patients without intracranial hypertension. So far, no study comparing intravenous (IA with volatile-based neuroanaesthesia (VA has been able to demonstrate major outcome differences nor a superiority of one of the two strategies in patients undergoing elective supratentorial neurosurgery. Therefore, current practice varies and includes the use of either volatile or intravenous anaesthetics in addition to narcotics. Actually the choice of the anaestesiological strategy depends only on the anaesthetists' preferences or institutional policies. This trial, named NeuroMorfeo, aims to assess the equivalence between volatile and intravenous anaesthetics for neurosurgical procedures. Methods/Design NeuroMorfeo is a multicenter, randomized, open label, controlled trial, based on an equivalence design. Patients aged between 18 and 75 years, scheduled for elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesion without signs of intracranial hypertension, in good physical state (ASA I-III and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS equal to 15, are randomly assigned to one of three anaesthesiological strategies (two VA arms, sevoflurane + fentanyl or sevoflurane + remifentanil, and one IA, propofol + remifentanil. The equivalence between intravenous and volatile-based neuroanaesthesia will be evaluated by comparing the intervals required to reach, after anaesthesia discontinuation, a modified Aldrete score ≥ 9 (primary end-point. Two statistical comparisons have been planned: 1 sevoflurane + fentanyl vs. propofol + remifentanil; 2 sevoflurane + remifentanil vs. propofol + remifentanil. Secondary end-points include: an assessment of neurovegetative stress based on (a measurement of urinary catecholamines and plasma and urinary cortisol and (b estimate of sympathetic/parasympathetic balance by power spectrum analyses of electrocardiographic tracings recorded

  2. Anaesthesiological strategies in elective craniotomy: randomized, equivalence, open trial – The NeuroMorfeo trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citerio, Giuseppe; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Latini, Roberto; Masson, Serge; Barlera, Simona; Guzzetti, Stefano; Pesenti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background Many studies have attempted to determine the "best" anaesthetic technique for neurosurgical procedures in patients without intracranial hypertension. So far, no study comparing intravenous (IA) with volatile-based neuroanaesthesia (VA) has been able to demonstrate major outcome differences nor a superiority of one of the two strategies in patients undergoing elective supratentorial neurosurgery. Therefore, current practice varies and includes the use of either volatile or intravenous anaesthetics in addition to narcotics. Actually the choice of the anaestesiological strategy depends only on the anaesthetists' preferences or institutional policies. This trial, named NeuroMorfeo, aims to assess the equivalence between volatile and intravenous anaesthetics for neurosurgical procedures. Methods/Design NeuroMorfeo is a multicenter, randomized, open label, controlled trial, based on an equivalence design. Patients aged between 18 and 75 years, scheduled for elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesion without signs of intracranial hypertension, in good physical state (ASA I-III) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, are randomly assigned to one of three anaesthesiological strategies (two VA arms, sevoflurane + fentanyl or sevoflurane + remifentanil, and one IA, propofol + remifentanil). The equivalence between intravenous and volatile-based neuroanaesthesia will be evaluated by comparing the intervals required to reach, after anaesthesia discontinuation, a modified Aldrete score ≥ 9 (primary end-point). Two statistical comparisons have been planned: 1) sevoflurane + fentanyl vs. propofol + remifentanil; 2) sevoflurane + remifentanil vs. propofol + remifentanil. Secondary end-points include: an assessment of neurovegetative stress based on (a) measurement of urinary catecholamines and plasma and urinary cortisol and (b) estimate of sympathetic/parasympathetic balance by power spectrum analyses of electrocardiographic tracings recorded during anaesthesia

  3. Physical therapy in Parkinson's disease: an open long-term rehabilitation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, M T; Grasso, A; Biancardi, L G; Squillante, M; Bonavita, V; Barone, P

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of prolonged physical therapy on disability in patients with Parkinson's disease. The study was designed as an open long-term trial over 20 weeks. Twenty slightly to moderately affected parkinsonian patients were included (Hoehn & Yahr stages: 1.5-3). A comprehensive rehabilitation program was applied three times a week in all patients. Pharmacological treatment was kept stable. Evaluations were performed at baseline, at the end of treatment and after 3 months. Following physical rehabilitation, there was a significant improvement in UPDRS (ADL and motor sections) scores, Self-assessment Parkinson's disease Disability Scale, Ten-Meter Walk test and Zung scale for depression. At 3-month follow-up clinical improvements were largely maintained. A sustained improvement of motor skills in PD patients can be achieved with a long-term comprehensive rehabilitation program.

  4. Patient reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyte, DG; Draper, H; Ives, J.; Liles, C; Gheorghe, A.; Calvert, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting) and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant) appears to be lacking. The purpose of this revie...

  5. The Brave New World of clinical cancer research: Adaptive biomarker-driven trials integrating clinical practice with clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A

    2015-05-01

    Clinical trials are the final links in the chains of knowledge and for determining the roles of therapeutic advances. Unfortunately, in an important sense they are the weakest links. This article describes two designs that are being explored today: platform trials and basket trials. Both are attempting to merge clinical research and clinical practice.

  6. Tools in a clinical information system supporting clinical trials at a Swiss University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Michael; Bucklar, Guido; Blaser, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Issues concerning inadequate source data of clinical trials rank second in the most common findings by regulatory authorities. The increasing use of electronic clinical information systems by healthcare providers offers an opportunity to facilitate and improve the conduct of clinical trials and the source documentation. We report on a number of tools implemented into the clinical information system of a university hospital to support clinical research. In 2011/2012, a set of tools was developed in the clinical information system of the University Hospital Zurich to support clinical research, including (1) a trial registry for documenting metadata on the clinical trials conducted at the hospital, (2) a patient-trial-assignment-tool to tag patients in the electronic medical charts as participants of specific trials, (3) medical record templates for the documentation of study visits and trial-related procedures, (4) online queries on trials and trial participants, (5) access to the electronic medical records for clinical monitors, (6) an alerting tool to notify of hospital admissions of trial participants, (7) queries to identify potentially eligible patients in the planning phase as trial feasibility checks and during the trial as recruitment support, and (8) order sets to facilitate the complete and accurate performance of study visit procedures. The number of approximately 100 new registrations per year in the voluntary trial registry in the clinical information system now matches the numbers of the existing mandatory trial registry of the hospital. Likewise, the yearly numbers of patients tagged as trial participants as well as the use of the standardized trial record templates increased to 2408 documented trial enrolments and 190 reports generated/month in the year 2013. Accounts for 32 clinical monitors have been established in the first 2 years monitoring a total of 49 trials in 16 clinical departments. A total of 15 months after adding the optional feature of

  7. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  8. Clinical research in surgical oncology: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amber S; Barnes, Alison; Scheer, Adena S; Martel, Guillaume; Moloo, Husein; Boushey, Robin P; Sabri, Elham; Auer, Rebecca C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a descriptive analysis of registered clinical trials in surgical oncology at ClinicalTrials.gov. Data was extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov using the following search engine criteria: "Cancer" as Condition, "Surgery OR Operation OR Resection" as Intervention, and Non-Industry sponsored. The search was limited to Canada and the United States and included trials registered from January 1, 2001 to January 1, 2011. Of 9,961 oncology trials, 1,049 (10.5%) included any type of surgical intervention. Of these trials, 125 (11.9%, 1.3% of all oncology trials) assessed a surgical variable, 773 (73.7%) assessed adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapies, and 151 (14.4%) were observational studies. Of the trials assessing adjuvant therapies, systemic treatment (362 trials, 46.8%) and multimodal therapy (129 trials, 16.7%) comprised a large focus. Of the 125 trials where surgery was the intervention, 59 trials (47.2%) focused on surgical techniques or devices, 45 trials (36.0%) studied invasive diagnostic methods, and 21 trials (16.8%) evaluated surgery versus no surgery. The majority of the 125 trials were nonrandomized (72, 57.6%). The number of registered surgical oncology trials is small in comparison to oncology trials as a whole. Clinical trials specifically designed to assess surgical interventions are vastly outnumbered by trials focusing on adjuvant therapies. Randomized surgical oncology trials account for <1% of all registered cancer trials. Barriers to the design and implementation of randomized trials in surgical oncology need to be clarified in order to facilitate higher-level evidence in surgical decision-making.

  9. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (plogistic regressions detected no negative correlation between placement in other countries when compared to Brazil. Trials involving subjects with less than 15 years of age, those with targeted recruitment of at least 1,000 subjects, and seven sponsors were identified as significant predictors of trial placement in Brazil. No clear direct competition between Brazil and other emerging countries was detected. South Korea showed the higher proportion of sites and ranked third in total number of trials, appearing as a major player in attractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  10. Statistical challenges for central monitoring in clinical trials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the complexity and costs of clinical trials have increased dramatically, especially in the area of new drug development. Risk-based monitoring (RBM) has been attracting attention as an efficient and effective trial monitoring approach, which can be applied irrespectively of the trial sponsor, i.e., academic institution or pharmaceutical company. In the RBM paradigm, it is expected that a statistical approach to central monitoring can help improve the effectiveness of on-site monitoring by prioritizing and guiding site visits according to central statistical data checks, as evidenced by examples of actual trial datasets. In this review, several statistical methods for central monitoring are presented. It is important to share knowledge about the role and performance capabilities of statistical methodology among clinical trial team members (i.e., sponsors, investigators, data managers, monitors, and biostatisticians) in order to adopt central statistical monitoring for assessing data quality in the actual clinical trial.

  11. Clinical trials in the development of biosimilars: future considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huneycutt BJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brenda J Huneycutt,1 Earl Gillespie,2 Gillian R Woollett1 1FDA Regulatory Strategy and Policy, Avalere Health, LLC, Washington, DC, 2Health Advances, LLC, Weston, MA, USA Abstract: A number of biosimilars have been approved in highly regulated markets throughout the world. Biosimilar development follows its own unique path – relying primarily on analytics to compare a potential biosimilar to its reference product and giving a reduced, confirmatory role to clinical trials. In addition, the ability to extrapolate data to support approval for indications without a clinical trial gives this abbreviated pathway potential significant value. In fact, so far, all the approved biosimilars in Europe received approval for all the reference product's indications. However, this is not the case in other regions. Regulatory agencies of the highly regulated markets agree in general on many principles underlying biosimilar product development and approval, but differ in important aspects as reflected by the data burdens and approval decisions for four classes of products explored in this paper – somatropins, filgrastims, epoetins, and infliximabs. These case studies also highlight some biosimilar sponsor latitude as reflected in the varying clinical data packages submitted to the same regulatory agency for biosimilars to the same reference product. There also exists biosimilar sponsor latitude in deciding whether to use the biosimilar pathway at all or seek approval through the stand-alone biologics regulatory pathway. This, of course, is a commercial decision based on the weights each biosimilar sponsor gives to the various risks and benefits for each option, for each product, and for each market. Further, it remains an open question whether a single, biosimilar development plan for global commercialization can be used to satisfy each regulatory agency. Keywords: somatropin, filgrastim, epoetin, infliximab

  12. An open trial in the NHS of Blues Begone: a new home based computerized CBT program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, David G; Bennett, Mary; Wellman, Nigel

    2009-10-01

    Computer based treatment for depression and anxiety has been available for several years and has demonstrated useful clinical effects. Most existing computerized CBT products in the UK that are designed to treat depression and co-morbid anxiety require patients to visit a clinic and require staff input to manage the process. Such intervention adds to the costs and bottlenecks in delivering a clinically effective treatment with mass availability. Internet treatment options are becoming more readily available, although data to support use are not yet strong, and most still require human assessment and telephone support. Blues Begone is a new computerized CBT program that has been designed to be used at home with minimal human support. This pilot project provides data from an open trial of Blues Begone with both primary and secondary care patients. One hundred patients started Blues Begone, 58 completed the program, 72% (n = 42) of completers achieved reliable change and (n = 36) 62% achieved both reliable and clinically significant change, and may be considered to have recovered by the end of the program. These data provide the first demonstration of the potential viability of Blues Begone as a home based computerized treatment for depression and anxiety.

  13. New generation of breast cancer clinical trials implementing molecular profiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Zardavas; Martine Piccart-Gebhart

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of molecular profiling technologies in oncology deepens our knowledge for the molecular landscapes of cancer diagnoses, identifying aberrations that could be linked with specific therapeutic vulnerabilities. In particular, there is an increasing list of molecularly targeted anticancer agents undergoing clinical development that aim to block specific molecular aberrations. This leads to a paradigm shift, with an increasing list of specific aberrations dictating the treatment of patients with cancer. This paradigm shift impacts the field of clinical trials, since the classical approach of having clinico-pathological disease characteristics dictating the patients' enrolment in oncology trials shifts towards the implementation of molecular profiling as pre-screening step. In order to facilitate the successful clinical development of these new anticancer drugs within specific molecular niches of cancer diagnoses, there have been developed new, innovative trial designs that could be classified as follows: i) longitudinal cohort studies that implement (or not) "nested" downstream trials, 2) studies that assess the clinical utility of molecular profiling, 3) "master" protocol trials, iv) "basket" trials, v) trials following an adaptive design. In the present article, we review these innovative study designs, providing representative examples from each category and we discuss the challenges that still need to be addressed in this era of new generation oncology trials implementing molecular profiling. Emphasis is put on the field of breast cancer clinical trials.

  14. Key Concepts of Clinical Trials: A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umscheid, Craig A.; Margolis, David J.; Grossman, Craig E.

    2012-01-01

    The recent focus of federal funding on comparative effectiveness research underscores the importance of clinical trials in the practice of evidence-based medicine and health care reform. The impact of clinical trials not only extends to the individual patient by establishing a broader selection of effective therapies, but also to society as a whole by enhancing the value of health care provided. However, clinical trials also have the potential to pose unknown risks to their participants, and biased knowledge extracted from flawed clinical trials may lead to the inadvertent harm of patients. Although conducting a well-designed clinical trial may appear straightforward, it is founded on rigorous methodology and oversight governed by key ethical principles. In this review, we provide an overview of the ethical foundations of trial design, trial oversight, and the process of obtaining approval of a therapeutic, from its pre-clinical phase to post-marketing surveillance. This narrative review is based on a course in clinical trials developed by one of the authors (DJM), and is supplemented by a PubMed search predating January 2011 using the keywords “randomized controlled trial,” “patient/clinical research,” “ethics,” “phase IV,” “data and safety monitoring board,” and “surrogate endpoint.” With an understanding of the key principles in designing and implementing clinical trials, health care providers can partner with the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory bodies to effectively compare medical therapies and thereby meet one of the essential goals of health care reform. PMID:21904102

  15. Are clinical trial results transferable in the real life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Enrico; Marsocci, Alfiera

    2016-06-22

    Generally in the clinical practice patients are more complex in comparison with those included in the clinical trials. In this article, we discuss three relevant items, which may implement the transferability of the clinical trial results in the real world. The observational studies have fewer restrictions on the number of patients included, due to more relaxed inclusion and exlusion criteria than in randomized clinical trials. The absence of randomization however may lead to potential for bias. The recurrent event analysis may extend the positive results of clinical trials regarding the reductions of the first primary endpoint event to total events, including those beyond the first event. This analysis is of great interest in the clinical practice, where recurrent events are common. Finally the reliability of subgroup analysis is discussed. Pre-specified subgroup analyses are more credible and valuable than post-hoc analyses.

  16. The Role of Social Media in Recruiting for Clinical Trials in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahvash Shere; Xiu Yan Zhao; Gideon Koren

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruitment of women in the periconceptional period to clinical studies using traditional advertising through medical establishments is difficult and slow. Given the widespread use of the internet as a source for medical information and research, we analyze the impact of social media in the second phase of an ongoing randomized, open-label clinical trial among pregnant women. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of social media as a recruitment tool through the comparison of...

  17. Sample size determination in clinical trials with multiple endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Sozu, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    This book integrates recent methodological developments for calculating the sample size and power in trials with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, offering an important reference work for statisticians working in this area. The determination of sample size and the evaluation of power are fundamental and critical elements in the design of clinical trials. If the sample size is too small, important effects may go unnoticed; if the sample size is too large, it represents a waste of resources and unethically puts more participants at risk than necessary. Recently many clinical trials have been designed with more than one endpoint considered as multiple primary or co-primary, creating a need for new approaches to the design and analysis of these clinical trials. The book focuses on the evaluation of power and sample size determination when comparing the effects of two interventions in superiority clinical trials with multiple endpoints. Methods for sample size calculation in clin...

  18. [Placebo control and clinical trial of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing

    2010-10-01

    World Health Organization aims to develop safe, effective and practical traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and other complementary and alternative medicine are being recognized in the whole world nowadays. However, the definite effect of Chinese medicine is still in need of scientific research proof. Placebo control is of equal importance to active control and blank control in clinical trial of TCM. This article briefly reviewed the importance of placebo control and commented on its present situation in clinical trial of TCM. This article also brought up the preliminary proposals of placebo application in TCM clinical trial. We should emphasize scientific placebo preparation and good design of placebo-controlled trial, which are directed by International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. A good clinical trial project will avoid unnecessary wastes and provide safe and effective treatment for people.

  19. The conduct and principles of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Some of the guiding principles as well as the pitfall of long-term randomized clinical trials are presented. Examples have been chosen from trials in the cardiovascular field. A typical long-term clinical trial is divided into five phases: planning, preparation, recruitment, clinical follow-up and termination, and finally analysis. Administrative, legal, and ethical aspects of a trial are discussed, as well as the cost of clinical trials. Organization patterns are described and some prevalent ones are criticized. Further, practical matters such as recruitment techniques, obtaining informed consent from the patients, determining drug dosage and formulation as well as the problem of interaction with nonstudy drugs are referred to. Adherence testing remains a problem, because of our inability to test for placebo adherence.

  20. Outcome Measures for Clinical Drug Trials in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Aman, Michael G; Novotny, Sherie; Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lecavalier, Luc; Leonard, Elizabeth; Gadow, Kenneth D.; King, Bryan H; Pearson, Deborah A.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Chez, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper identifies instruments and measures that may be appropriate for randomized clinical trials in participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The Clinical Global Impressions scale was recommended for all randomized clinical trials. At this point, however, there is no “perfect” choice of outcome measure for core features of autism, although we will discuss five measures of potential utility. Several communication instruments are recommended, based in part on suitability across t...

  1. Strategic Analysis of Clinical Trial Outsourcing to China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Haiyan

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing amounts of clinical data required for drug regulatory approval and the fierce competition for patients in the Western countries, the cost of clinical trials continues to rise considerably. This study suggests that outsourcing clinical trials to China is an effective strategy to reduce cost and cycle time of drug development. China offers a high market potential and strong research capacity that can provide long term benefits to pharmaceutical and biotech companies. An inte...

  2. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    gene therapy program with Oxford Biomedica to bring gene therapy for juvenile macular degeneration (Stargardt’s disease). This phase I clinical trial...working with Oxford Biomedica and a separate project with academic investigators on gene therapy for Usher lb syndrome (deaf-blindness due to a gene... Biomedica collaboration will begin no later than 04 2011. 3. NNRI has held multiple clinical investigator meetings to define clinical trial outcomes for

  3. [Clinical trials and licensing of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines for cancer treatment in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cecilia Ferreira da; Silva, Miriam Ventura da; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa

    2016-03-01

    Objective To analyze the pathway of clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines for cancer treatment involving Brazilian institutions from 2003 to 2012. Method This retrospective, descriptive study was based on review of two clinical trial registries, ClinicalTrials.gov and the Brazilian registry ReBEC. Phase II or III studies with participation from Brazilian institutions listed in at least one of the registries were included. Following selection of the trials, the pathway of monoclonal antibodies and biological medicines was investigated from the research stage until licensing by the Brazilian Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (Anvisa), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Results Nine trials (eight phase III and one phase II) were selected. All had a randomized, controlled design. Two trials were double-blind and seven were open-label, and all recruited adults (≥ 18 years of age) of both sexes. The mean number of patients recruited per trial was 985.2. Seven trials had been completed and two had been terminated early. All trials were sponsored by non-Brazilian pharmaceutical companies and focused on renal, colorectal, gastric, and lung (non-small cell) cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and melanoma, and involved the use of cetuximab, figitumumab, ipilimumab, rituximab, bevacizumab and interferon alfa-2a. The FDA was the first agency to license the drugs, followed by EMA, except in the case of interferon alfa-2a, which was not approved by EMA. We were unable to determine the year of drug licensing by Anvisa in Brazil. Conclusions The participation of Brazil in clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies and biological medications for cancer treatment is insufficient. The quality of the available information on trials, history of licensing, and other relevant elements is a major weakness of the sources reviewed.

  4. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  5. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age.

  6. Pediatric Clinical Trials Conducted in South Korea from 2006 to 2015: An Analysis of the South Korean Clinical Research Information Service, US ClinicalTrials.gov and European Clinical Trials Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sheung-Nyoung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2017-08-02

    The status of pediatric clinical trials performed in South Korea in the last decade, including clinical trials of drugs with unapproved indications for children, has not been previously examined. The aim was to provide information regarding the current state of pediatric clinical trials and create a basis for future trials performed in South Korea by reviewing three databases of clinical trials registrations. We searched for pediatric clinical studies (participants gov, and the European Clinical Trials Registry (EuCTR). Additionally, we reviewed whether unapproved indications were involved in each trial by comparing the trials with a list of authorized trials provided by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS). The primary and secondary outcomes were to determine the change in number of pediatric clinical trials with unapproved indications over time and to assess the status of unauthorized pediatric clinical trials from the MFDS and the publication of articles after these clinical trials, respectively. We identified 342 clinical studies registered in the CRIS (n = 81), ClinicalTrials.gov (n = 225), and EuCTR (n = 36), of which 306 were reviewed after excluding duplicate registrations. Among them, 181 studies were interventional trials dealing with drugs and biological agents, of which 129 (71.3%) involved unapproved drugs. Of these 129 trials, 107 (82.9%) were authorized by the MFDS. Pediatric clinical trials in South Korea aiming to establish the safety and efficacy of drugs in children are increasing; however, non-MFDS-authorized studies remain an issue.

  7. Health literacy and usability of clinical trial search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Dina; Bickmore, Timothy W; Barry, Barbara; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Several web-based search engines have been developed to assist individuals to find clinical trials for which they may be interested in volunteering. However, these search engines may be difficult for individuals with low health and computer literacy to navigate. The authors present findings from a usability evaluation of clinical trial search tools with 41 participants across the health and computer literacy spectrum. The study consisted of 3 parts: (a) a usability study of an existing web-based clinical trial search tool; (b) a usability study of a keyword-based clinical trial search tool; and (c) an exploratory study investigating users' information needs when deciding among 2 or more candidate clinical trials. From the first 2 studies, the authors found that users with low health literacy have difficulty forming queries using keywords and have significantly more difficulty using a standard web-based clinical trial search tool compared with users with adequate health literacy. From the third study, the authors identified the search factors most important to individuals searching for clinical trials and how these varied by health literacy level.

  8. Automated information extraction of key trial design elements from clinical trial publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

    2008-11-06

    Clinical trials are one of the most valuable sources of scientific evidence for improving the practice of medicine. The Trial Bank project aims to improve structured access to trial findings by including formalized trial information into a knowledge base. Manually extracting trial information from published articles is costly, but automated information extraction techniques can assist. The current study highlights a single architecture to extract a wide array of information elements from full-text publications of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This architecture combines a text classifier with a weak regular expression matcher. We tested this two-stage architecture on 88 RCT reports from 5 leading medical journals, extracting 23 elements of key trial information such as eligibility rules, sample size, intervention, and outcome names. Results prove this to be a promising avenue to help critical appraisers, systematic reviewers, and curators quickly identify key information elements in published RCT articles.

  9. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide 1989-2004-an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael L; Abedi, Mohammad R; Wixon, Jo; Edelstein, Richard M

    2004-06-01

    In 1989, Rosenberg et al. performed the first human gene therapy trial when they used a retrovirus to introduce the gene coding for resistance to neomycin into human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes before infusing them into five patients with advanced melanoma. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using retroviral gene transduction in humans and set the stage for further studies. Since then, over 900 clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. These trials have been designed to establish feasibility and safety, to demonstrate the reality of expression of therapeutic protein(s) in vivo by the genes transferred and, in some cases, to show therapeutic benefit. There is no single source of information that presents an overview of all the clinical trials undertaken worldwide. In 1997 we set up a database to bring all the information on clinical trials together as comprehensively and as globally as possible. The data were compiled and are regularly updated from official agency sources, the published literature, presentations at conferences and from information kindly provided by investigators or trial sponsors themselves. As of January 31, 2004, we have identified 918 trials in 24 countries. The USA accounts for two-thirds of these trials. Cancer is by far the most common disease indication, followed by inherited monogenic diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Viral vectors have been the most frequently used vehicles for transferring genes into human cells, with retroviruses and adenoviruses representing the vast majority. Plasmid (naked) DNA and other non-viral vectors have been used in one-quarter of the trials. Over 100 distinct genes have been transferred. This article aims to provide a descriptive overview of the clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. Details of the data presented, including an interactive, searchable database that currently holds information on 918

  11. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials.

  12. 'Cloud computing' and clinical trials: report from an ECRIN workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmann, Christian; Canham, Steve; Danielyan, Edgar; Robertshaw, Steve; Legré, Yannick; Clivio, Luca; Demotes, Jacques

    2015-07-29

    Growing use of cloud computing in clinical trials prompted the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network, a European non-profit organisation established to support multinational clinical research, to organise a one-day workshop on the topic to clarify potential benefits and risks. The issues that arose in that workshop are summarised and include the following: the nature of cloud computing and the cloud computing industry; the risks in using cloud computing services now; the lack of explicit guidance on this subject, both generally and with reference to clinical trials; and some possible ways of reducing risks. There was particular interest in developing and using a European 'community cloud' specifically for academic clinical trial data. It was recognised that the day-long workshop was only the start of an ongoing process. Future discussion needs to include clarification of trial-specific regulatory requirements for cloud computing and involve representatives from the relevant regulatory bodies.

  13. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ashish Kadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. Objective: To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. Methods: We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Results: Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%, lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%, and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%. About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%, and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6% would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6% would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject′s fear for study procedures (47% and side effects (44% were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Conclusion: Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India.

  14. Challenges in recruitment and retention of clinical trial subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Rashmi Ashish; Borde, Sanghratna Umakant; Madas, Sapna Amol; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh; Limaye, Sneha Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Successful recruitment of patients is known to be one of the most challenging aspects in conduct of randomized controlled trials. Inadequate patient retention during conduct of trial affects conclusive results. To assess the level of challenges faced by Indian investigators in recruitment and retention of trial subjects. We developed a survey questionnaire on challenges encountered by investigators in subject recruitment and retention which was hosted on a web portal. Seventy-three investigators from India participated in the survey. The frequently encountered challenges in subject recruitment were complexity of study protocol (38%), lack of awareness about clinical trials in patients (37%), and sociocultural issues related to trial participation (37%). About 63% of participants strongly agreed that creating a positive awareness about clinical trials among people through press and media, having a dedicated clinical research coordinator for trial (50.7%), and designing a recruitment strategy prior to study initiation (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Almost 50.7% of participants agreed that interacting with medical community in vicinity of the study site and educating patients about clinical trials during routine outpatient department visits (46.6%) would enhance recruitment. Experiencing a serious adverse event, subject's fear for study procedures (47%) and side effects (44%) were thought to have a moderate effect on subject retention. Our survey has put forth factors related to negative publicity by media, lack of patient education about clinical trials; complex study designs are barriers to clinical trial recruitment in India. It is essential to devise innovative and effective strategies focusing on education of public and mass media about clinical research in India.

  15. Subjective and objective outcomes in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustgaard, Helene; Bello, Segun; Miller, Franklin G

    2014-01-01

    providing a classification of clinical trial outcomes and a descriptive study of how outcomes were classified in 200 PubMed indexed clinical trial reports published in 2012. RESULTS: We identified 90 methodological publications with some form of a classification of outcomes. Three distinct definitions were...... "subjective outcome" and "objective outcome" are defined in methodological publications and clinical trial reports. To put this examination into perspective, we also provide an overview of how outcomes are classified more broadly. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A systematic review of methodological publications...

  16. Outcome measures in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, Sabrina; Cudkowicz, Merit; Berry, James D

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease with an average survival of 3–5 years. While therapies for ALS remain limited, basic and translational ALS research has been host to numerous influential discoveries in recent years. These discoveries have led to a large pipeline of potential therapies that await testing in clinical trials. Until recently, ALS clinical trials have relied on a limited cadre of ‘traditional’ outcome measures, including survival and measures of function. These measures have proven useful, although imperfect, in Phase III ALS trials. However, their utility in early-phase ALS trials is limited. For these early trials, outcome measures focused on target engagement or biological pathway analysis might improve trial outcomes and better support the drug development process.

  17. the infrastructure supporting hiv vaccine clinical trials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    networks, namely the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN - www.hvtn.org) and the International ... These include life skills education, sanitation, potable water supply ... and data management centre, central laboratories, a community advisory ...

  18. Closure of mesenteric defects in laparoscopic gastric bypass: a multicentre, randomised, parallel, open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Erik; Szabo, Eva; Ågren, Göran; Ottosson, Johan; Marsk, Richard; Lönroth, Hans; Boman, Lars; Magnuson, Anders; Thorell, Anders; Näslund, Ingmar

    2016-04-02

    Small bowel obstruction due to internal hernia is a common and potentially serious complication after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Whether closure of surgically created mesenteric defects might reduce the incidence is unknown, so we did a large randomised trial to investigate. This study was a multicentre, randomised trial with a two-arm, parallel design done at 12 centres for bariatric surgery in Sweden. Patients planned for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery at any of the participating centres were offered inclusion. During the operation, a concealed envelope was opened and the patient was randomly assigned to either closure of mesenteric defects beneath the jejunojejunostomy and at Petersen's space or non-closure. After surgery, assignment was open label. The main outcomes were reoperation for small bowel obstruction and severe postoperative complications. Outcome data and safety were analysed in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01137201. Between May 1, 2010, and Nov 14, 2011, 2507 patients were recruited to the study and randomly assigned to closure of the mesenteric defects (n=1259) or non-closure (n=1248). 2503 (99·8%) patients had follow-up for severe postoperative complications at day 30 and 2482 (99·0%) patients had follow-up for reoperation due to small bowel obstruction at 25 months. At 3 years after surgery, the cumulative incidence of reoperation because of small bowel obstruction was significantly reduced in the closure group (cumulative probability 0·055 for closure vs 0·102 for non-closure, hazard ratio 0·56, 95% CI 0·41-0·76, p=0·0002). Closure of mesenteric defects increased the risk for severe postoperative complications (54 [4·3%] for closure vs 35 [2·8%] for non-closure, odds ratio 1·55, 95% CI 1·01-2·39, p=0·044), mainly because of kinking of the jejunojejunostomy. The results of our study support the routine closure of the mesenteric defects in laparoscopic

  19. Randomized Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Address Barriers to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Wong, Yu-Ning; Albrecht, Terrance; Manne, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne M; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Egleston, Brian; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G; Liu, Tasnuva M; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M; Poole, David; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Schluchter, Mark D

    2016-02-10

    Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes have been identified as barriers to participation in clinical trials by patients with cancer. We developed Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT), a theory-guided, Web-based, interactive computer program, to deliver tailored video educational content to patients in an effort to overcome barriers to considering clinical trials as a treatment option. A prospective, randomized clinical trial compared PRE-ACT with a control condition that provided general clinical trials information produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in text format. One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients with cancer were randomly allocated before their initial visit with an oncologist to PRE-ACT (n = 623) or control (n = 632). PRE-ACT had three main components: assessment of clinical trials knowledge and attitudinal barriers, values assessment with clarification back to patients, and provision of a video library tailored to address each patient's barriers. Outcomes included knowledge and attitudes and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both PRE-ACT and control interventions improved knowledge and attitudes (all P < .001) compared with baseline. Patients randomly allocated to PRE-ACT showed a significantly greater increase in knowledge (P < .001) and a significantly greater decrease in attitudinal barriers (P < .001) than did their control (text-only) counterparts. Participants in both arms significantly increased their preparedness to consider clinical trials (P < .001), and there was a trend favoring the PRE-ACT group (P < .09). PRE-ACT was also associated with greater patient satisfaction than was NCI text alone. These data show that patient education before the first oncologist visit improves knowledge, attitudes, and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both text and tailored video were effective. The PRE-ACT interactive video program was more effective than NCI text in improving

  20. Methodology of clinical trials focusing on the PC-Fix clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauke, C; Meisser, A; Perren, S M

    2001-09-01

    Once development and mechanical and biological laboratory testing have been completed, new technologies to be used in orthopaedic and trauma surgery must be investigated in humans before they can be used routinely. Prospective clinical investigations with or without randomization to standard treatments conducted according to the current standards and guidelines for Good Clinical Practice must be performed to prove the safety and efficacy of the new device. Furthermore, these tests serve to determine the specific indications, contraindications, tips and tricks as well as the pitfalls and how to avoid them. Last, but not least, the study must result in improved teaching of the use of the device and in improved follow-up of patients. The basis of every conclusion drawn from such a study is the complete documentation of each single use of the new device. We present the modalities and methodology for conducting a prospective clinical multicentre investigation in trauma surgery, focusing on the clinical trials carried out on the Point Contact Fixator (PC-Fix), a device for the internal fixation of long bone fractures developed as part of the scientific evolution towards the Less Invasive Stabilization Systems (LISS) now being introduced into clinical practice. Four prospective multicentre clinical investigations with an overall number of 1,229 PC-Fixators implanted from October 1993 to May 1998 were performed. To our knowledge this is the largest prospective series ever reported in orthopaedic trauma surgery to test a new device before market introduction. Due to a special documentation and implant replacement procedure, every PC-Fix implantation was documented. Very few patients were lost to long-term follow-up due to the personal commitment of the study monitors. Regular personal visits of the study monitor to the investigating hospitals and close communication between the surgeons, the engineers responsible for development, the study monitor, and the study sponsor

  1. Supporting patient screening to identify suitable clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, Anca; Van Leeuwen, Jasper; Chen, Njin-Zu; Claerhout, Brecht; De Schepper, Kristof; Perez-Rey, David; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; Pugliano, Lina; Saini, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    To support the efficient execution of post-genomic multi-centric clinical trials in breast cancer we propose a solution that streamlines the assessment of the eligibility of patients for available trials. The assessment of the eligibility of a patient for a trial requires evaluating whether each eligibility criterion is satisfied and is often a time consuming and manual task. The main focus in the literature has been on proposing different methods for modelling and formalizing the eligibility criteria. However the current adoption of these approaches in clinical care is limited. Less effort has been dedicated to the automatic matching of criteria to the patient data managed in clinical care. We address both aspects and propose a scalable, efficient and pragmatic patient screening solution enabling automatic evaluation of eligibility of patients for a relevant set of trials. This covers the flexible formalization of criteria and of other relevant trial metadata and the efficient management of these representations.

  2. Organisation of a clinical trial unit--a proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Sørensen, T I

    1998-01-01

    The urgent need for the performance of more, better designed, and better conducted randomised clinical trials is increasingly recognised. Based on structured interviews with leading persons of 43 outstanding organisations and units involved in clinical trials in Europe and North America during 1993......, ways of organising and staffing clinical trial units were investigated. The present proposal is based on this experience from which an attempt to extract a composite set of minimal requirements has been made regarding pertinent objectives and aims, organisational aspects, staffing, and estimated costs...... to a total cost for coordination per trial of about GBP 340,000. However, with a larger staff more studies may be coordinated possibly reducing the cost per trial depending on greater effectiveness in utilisation of the basic facilities....

  3. Implications of geographical variation on clinical outcomes of cardiovascular trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Kaski, Juan-Carlos; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Goldstein, Sidney; Stockbridge, Norman; Alonso-Garcia, Angeles; Ruilope, Luis M; Martinez, Felipe A; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; Fiuzat, Mona; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular clinical trials are increasingly conducted globally as a means to reduce costs, expedite timelines, provide broad applicability, and satisfy regulatory authorities. Potential problems with trial globalization include regional differences in patient characteristics, medical practice patterns, and health policies which may influence outcomes and limit generalizability. Moreover, concerns have been raised about ethical misconduct and unsatisfactory quality oversight in regions with less trial experience and infrastructure. This article reviews geographical differences in cardiovascular trials in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, hypertension and atrial fibrillation. It also explores potential explanations for these differences and methods to standardize the presentation of trial results. This review is based on discussions between basic scientists and clinical trialists at the 8th Global Cardio Vascular Clinical Trialists Forum 2011 in Paris, France, from December 2 to 3. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone Past ... healthy people to help," says Melanie Modlin about clinical trials. "We have a role to play in helping ...

  5. 76 FR 22404 - Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and... Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative. The goal of the... major gaps in scientific information, which can slow down analgesic clinical trials and analgesic...

  6. Reduction of claustrophobia with short-bore versus open magnetic resonance imaging: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Judith; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Klingebiel, Randolf; Asbach, Patrick; Klessen, Christian; Diederichs, Gerd; Wagner, Moritz; Teichgräber, Ulf; Bengner, Thomas; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Claustrophobia is a common problem precluding MR imaging. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether a short-bore or an open magnetic resonance (MR) scanner is superior in alleviating claustrophobia. Institutional review board approval and patient informed consent were obtained to compare short-bore versus open MR. From June 2008 to August 2009, 174 patients (139 women; mean age = 53.1 [SD 12.8]) with an overall mean score of 2.4 (SD 0.7, range 0 to 4) on the Claustrophobia Questionnaire (CLQ) and a clinical indication for imaging, were randomly assigned to receive evaluation by open or by short-bore MR. The primary outcomes were incomplete MR examinations due to a claustrophobic event. Follow-up was conducted 7 months after MR imaging. The primary analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat strategy. With 33 claustrophobic events in the short-bore group (39% [95% confidence interval [CI] 28% to 50%) versus 23 in the open scanner group (26% [95% CI 18% to 37%]; P = 0.08) the difference was not significant. Patients with an event were in the examination room for 3.8 min (SD 4.4) in the short-bore and for 8.5 min (SD 7) in the open group (P = 0.004). This was due to an earlier occurrence of events in the short-bore group. The CLQ suffocation subscale was significantly associated with the occurrence of claustrophobic events (P = 0.003). New findings that explained symptoms were found in 69% of MR examinations and led to changes in medical treatment in 47% and surgery in 10% of patients. After 7 months, perceived claustrophobia increased in 32% of patients with events versus in only 11% of patients without events (P = 0.004). Even recent MR cannot prevent claustrophobia suggesting that further developments to create a more patient-centered MR scanner environment are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806.

  7. A prospective open-label trial of lamotrigine monotherapy in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, Joseph; Joshi, Gagan; Mick, Eric; Doyle, Robert; Georgiopoulos, Anna; Hammerness, Paul; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney; Wozniak, Janet

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of lamotrigine monotherapy as an acute treatment of bipolar mood elevation in children with bipolar spectrum disorders. This was a 12-week, open-label, prospective trial of lamotrigine monotherapy to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of this compound in treating pediatric bipolar disorder. Assessments included the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale (CGI-I), Children's Depression Rating Scale (CDRS), and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Adverse events were assessed through spontaneous self-reports, vital signs weight monitoring, and laboratory analysis. Thirty-nine children with bipolar disorder (YMRS at entry: 31.6 +/- 5.5) were enrolled in the study and 22 (56%) completed the 12-week trial. Lamotrigine was slowly titrated to an average endpoint dose of 160.7 +/- 128.3 in subjects children 12-17 years of age (N = 17). Treatment with lamotrigine was associated with statistically significant levels of improvement in mean YMRS scores (-14.9 +/- 9.7, P disorder (ADHD), and psychotic symptoms. Lamotrigine was generally well tolerated with marginal increase in body weight (47.0 +/- 18.0 kg vs. 47.2 +/- 17.9 kg, P= 0.6) and was not associated with abnormal changes in laboratory parameters. Several participants were discontinued due to skin rash; in all cases, the rash resolved shortly after discontinuation of treatment. No patient developed Steven Johnson syndrome. Open-label lamotrigine treatment appears to be beneficial in the treatment of bipolar disorder and associated conditions in children. Future placebo-controlled, double-blind studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  8. Unique perception of clinical trials by Korean cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su Jin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past few years, the number of clinical trials has increased rapidly in East Asia, especially for gastric and hepatobiliary cancer that are prevalent in Asian populations. However, the actual degree of understanding or perceptions of clinical trials by cancer patients in East Asian countries have seldom been studied. Methods Between July 1st and November 30th of 2011, we conducted a prospective study to survey cancer patients regarding their awareness of, and willingness to participate in, a clinical trial. Patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary cancer who visited the Hematology-Oncology outpatient clinic at Samsung Medical Center (SMC were enrolled. A total of 21 questions were asked including four questions which used the Visual analogue scale (VAS score. Results In this survey study, 1,000 patients were asked to participate and 675 patients consented to participate (67.5%. The awareness of clinical trials was substantially higher in patients who had a higher level of education (pp=0.004, and had a higher economic status (p=0.001. However, the willingness to participate in a clinical trial was not affected by the level of education or economic status of patients. The most influential factors for patient willingness to participate were a physician recommendation (n=181, 26.8%, limited treatment options (n=178, 26.4%, and expectations of effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs (n=142, 21.0%. Patients with previous experience in clinical trials had a greater willingness to participate in clinical trials compared to patients without previous experience (p Conclusions This large patient cohort survey study showed that Korean cancer patients are more aware of clinical trials, but awareness did not translate into willingness to participate.

  9. Authorship issues in multi-centre clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Discussions about authorship often arise in multi-centre clinical trials. Such trials may involve up to hundreds of contributors of whom some will eventually co-author the final publication. It is, however, often impossible to involve all contributors in the manuscript process sufficiently for them...

  10. In silico imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation: initial considerations for VICTRE, a demonstration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Badal, Andreu; Glick, Stephen; Graff, Christian G.; Samuelson, Frank; Sharma, Diksha; Zeng, Rongping

    2017-03-01

    Expensive and lengthy clinical trials can delay regulatory evaluation and add significant burden that stifles innovation affecting patient access to novel, high-quality imaging technologies. In silico imaging holds promise for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of imaging technologies with much less burden than clinical trials. We define in silico imaging as a computer simulation of an entire imaging system (including source, object, task, and observer components) used for research, development, optimization, technology assessment, and regulatory evaluation of new technology. In this work we describe VICTRE (our study of virtual imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation) and the considerations for building an entire imaging pipeline in silico including device (physics), patient (anatomy, disease), and image interpretation models for regulatory evaluation using open-source tools.

  11. The experience of older patients with cancer in phase 1 clinical trials: a qualitative case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Elizabeth A; Woodby, Lesa; Williams, Beverly Rosa

    2010-11-01

    This article explores the experiences of older patients with cancer in phase 1 clinical trials. Conducting a case series of face-to-face, in-depth, open-ended interviews and using qualitative methods of analysis, we find that the psychosocial process of social comparison is relevant for understanding older adults' phase 1 clinical trial participation. Social comparison influences decisions to enroll in a phase 1 clinical trial, shapes perceptions of supportive care needs, and encourages the utilization of hope. Additional research should develop strategies for addressing supportive care needs among this patient cohort whose use of social comparison can inhibit articulation of pain, suffering, and symptom burden as well as use of informal support systems.

  12. Mechanisms and direction of allocation bias in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Asger Sand; Laursen, David R. T.; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2016-01-01

    clinical trials. METHODS: Two systematic reviews and a theoretical analysis. We conducted one systematic review of empirical studies of motives/methods for deciphering patient allocation sequences; and another review of methods publications commenting on allocation bias. We theoretically analysed...

  13. Metabolic deterioration of the sedentary control group in clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahesh J. Patel; Cris A. Slentz; William E. Kraus

    2011-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials of exercise training regimens in sedentary individuals have provided a mechanistic understanding of the long-term health benefits and consequences of physical activity and inactivity...

  14. CNS clinical trials: suicidality and data collection : workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Sarah L; Davis, Miriam (Medical writer); Altevogt, Bruce M

    "The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) now requires that all clinical trials for drugs that affect the central nervous system--including psychiatric drugs--are assessed for whether that drug might cause suicidal ideation or behavior...

  15. Compliance in Early-Phase Cancer Clinical Trials Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Stewart, David J

    2013-01-01

    The issue of compliance in a research environment in which investigators are subject to disciplinary action if they fail to ensure that patients adhere precisely to the intense monitoring mandates of a clinical trial is explored.

  16. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  17. A model for harmonizing flow cytometry in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maecker, Holden T; McCoy, J Philip; Amos, Michael; Elliott, John; Gaigalas, Adolfas; Wang, Lili; Aranda, Richard; Banchereau, Jacques; Boshoff, Chris; Braun, Jonathan; Korin, Yael; Reed, Elaine; Cho, Judy; Hafler, David; Davis, Mark; Fathman, C Garrison; Robinson, William; Denny, Thomas; Weinhold, Kent; Desai, Bela; Diamond, Betty; Gregersen, Peter; Di Meglio, Paola; DiMeglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O; Nestle, Frank; Peakman, Mark; Villanova, Federica; Villnova, Federica; Ferbas, John; Field, Elizabeth; Kantor, Aaron; Kawabata, Thomas; Komocsar, Wendy; Lotze, Michael; Nepom, Jerry; Ochs, Hans; O'Lone, Raegan; Phippard, Deborah; Plevy, Scott; Rich, Stephen; Roederer, Mario; Rotrosen, Dan; Yeh, Jung-Hua

    2010-11-01

    Complexities in sample handling, instrument setup and data analysis are barriers to the effective use of flow cytometry to monitor immunological parameters in clinical trials. The novel use of a central laboratory may help mitigate these issues.

  18. National Database for Clinical Trials Related to Mental Illness (NDCT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Database for Clinical Trials Related to Mental Illness (NDCT) is an extensible informatics platform for relevant data at all levels of biological and...

  19. A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety and Cost Effectiveness of ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Pharmacological control of pain is the mainstay of management of osteoarthritis.

  20. Strategies for dealing with fraud in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herson, Jay

    2016-02-01

    Research misconduct and fraud in clinical research is an increasing problem facing the scientific community. This problem is expected to increase due to discoveries in central statistical monitoring and with the increase in first-time clinical trial investigators in the increasingly global reach of oncology clinical trials. This paper explores the most common forms of fraud in clinical trials in order to develop offensive and defensive strategies to deal with fraud. The offensive strategies are used when fraud is detected during a trial and the defensive strategies are those design strategies that seek to minimize or eliminate the effect of fraud. This leads to a proposed fraud recovery plan (FRP) that would be specified before the start of a clinical trial and would indicate actions to be taken upon detecting fraud of different types. Statistical/regulatory issues related to fraud include: dropping all patients from a site that committed fraud, or just the fraudulent data (perhaps replacing the latter through imputation); the role of intent-to-treat analysis; effect on a planned interim analysis; effect on stratified analyses and model adjustment when fraud is detected in covariates; effect on trial-wide randomization, etc. The details of a typical defensive strategy are also presented. It is concluded that it is best to follow a defensive strategy and to have an FRP in place to follow if fraud is detected during the trial.

  1. Open-label trial and randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of hydrogen-enriched water for mitochondrial and inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Mikako

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular hydrogen has prominent effects on more than 30 animal models especially of oxidative stress-mediated diseases and inflammatory diseases. In addition, hydrogen effects on humans have been reported in diabetes mellitus type 2, hemodialysis, metabolic syndrome, radiotherapy for liver cancer, and brain stem infarction. Hydrogen effects are ascribed to specific radical-scavenging activities that eliminate hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite, and also to signal-modulating activities, but the detailed molecular mechanisms still remain elusive. Hydrogen is a safe molecule that is largely produced by intestinal bacteria in rodents and humans, and no adverse effects have been documented. Methods We performed open-label trial of drinking 1.0 liter per day of hydrogen-enriched water for 12 weeks in five patients with progressive muscular dystrophy (PMD, four patients with polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM, and five patients with mitochondrial myopathies (MM, and measured 18 serum parameters as well as urinary 8-isoprostane every 4 weeks. We next conducted randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of 0.5 liter per day of hydrogen-enriched water or placebo water for 8 weeks in 10 patients with DM and 12 patients with MM, and measured 18 serum parameters every 4 weeks. Results In the open-label trial, no objective improvement or worsening of clinical symptoms was observed. We, however, observed significant effects in lactate-to-pyruvate ratios in PMD and MM, fasting blood glucose in PMD, serum matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3 in PM/DM, and serum triglycerides in PM/DM. In the double-blind trial, no objective clinical effects were observed, but a significant improvement was detected in lactate in MM. Lactate-to-pyruvate ratios in MM and MMP3 in DM also exhibited favorable responses but without statistical significance. No adverse effect was observed in either trial except for hypoglycemic episodes in an insulin

  2. Phases I–III Clinical Trials Using Adult Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Sanz-Ruiz; Enrique Gutiérrez Ibañes; Adolfo Villa Arranz; María Eugenia Fernández Santos; Pedro L. Sánchez Fernández; Francisco Fernández-Avilés

    2010-01-01

    First randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that stem cell therapy can improve cardiac recovery after the acute phase of myocardial ischemia and in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Nevertheless, some trials have shown that conflicting results and uncertainties remain in the case of mechanisms of action and possible ways to improve clinical impact of stem cells in cardiac repair. In this paper we will examine the evidence available, analyze the main phase I and II randomize...

  3. Multi-Agent System for Recruiting Patients for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Multi - Agent System for Recruiting Patients for Clinical Trials Samhar Mahmoud King’s College London London, UK samhar.mahmoud@kcl.ac.uk Gareth Tyson...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multi - Agent System for Recruiting Patients for Clinical Trials 5a...methodology [15] was proposed to guide the process of de- veloping a multi - agent system from analysis to design. For brevity, we focus here on one

  4. Treatment of esophageal cancer with vindesine: an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezwoda, W R; Derman, D P; Weaving, A; Nissenbaum, M

    1984-05-01

    Fifty-two patients with advanced esophageal cancer have been entered in an open study with vindesine. The regimen consisted of vindesine at a dose of 3 mg/m2 as a continuous infusion over 48 hours followed by 3 mg/m2 iv weekly for 4 weeks and then by monthly maintenance therapy using the same dose. Objective response was seen in 14 (27%) patients. Patients who responded to treatment had significant prolongation of survival. Major pretreatment prognostic factors included performance status and serum albumin concentration. It is concluded that vindesine has definite, although limited, activity against esophageal cancer.

  5. Biased safety reporting in blinded randomized clinical trials: meta-analysis of angiotensin receptor blocker trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Takabayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cough is listed as an adverse drug reaction (ADR on the labels of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB. However, a causal association with cough has also been reported for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, which have frequently been used as comparator drugs in the registration clinical trials of ARBs. This prompted us to examine the possible influence of using comparator drugs with well-known ADRs on the safety reporting of investigational drugs in blinded randomized clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The double-blinded, randomized clinical trials with comparator drugs were identified in the Japanese dossiers for the new drug applications of ARBs. The risk ratios (RR of reporting cough and headache in ARB arms were calculated for each ARB by comparing trials using ACEIs and trials using non-ACEIs, were then combined with a meta-analysis. 23 trials with a total of 6643 patients were identified, consisting 6 trials using an ACEI comparator including 819 ARB patients and 17 trials using a non-ACEI comparator including 5824 ARB patients. The combined RR of cough reporting was significantly elevated (20.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.47 to 57.76, indicating more frequent reporting of cough in clinical trials using an ACEI comparator. In contrast, the combined RR of headache, a negative control, was insignificant (1.45; 95% CI, 0.34 to 6.22. CONCLUSION: The use of comparators with well-known ADRs in blinded randomized trials produces potential bias in the reporting frequency of ADRs for investigational drugs. The selection of appropriate comparator drugs should be critical in unbiased safety assessment in double-blinded, randomized clinical trials and thus have relevance in reviewing the safety results from a regulatory point of view.

  6. Intricacy of missing data in clinical trials: Deterrence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Richa; Rana, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Missing data is frequently encountered in clinical studies. Unfortunately, they are often neglected or not properly handled during data analysis and this may significantly bias the results of the study, reduce study power and lead to invalid conclusions. Substantial instances of missing data are a serious problem that undermines the scientific trustworthiness of causal conclusions from clinical trials. The assumption that statistical analysis methods can compensate for such missing data is not justified. Hence aspects of clinical trial design that limit the probability of missing data should be an important objective, while planning a clinical trial. In addition to specific aspects of trial design, many components of clinical trial conduct can also limit the extent of missing data. The topic of missing data is often not a major concern until it is time for data collection and data analysis. This article discusses some basic issues about missing data as well as prospective "watch outs" which could reduce the occurrence of missing data. It provides some possible design considerations that should be considered in order to alleviate patients from dropping out of a clinical trial. In addition to these the concept of the missing data mechanism has also been discussed. Three types of missing data mechanisms missing completely at random, missing at random and not missing at random have been discussed in detail.

  7. Quality assessment of randomized clinical trial in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulliano Peixoto; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Barbosa, Luciano Timbó; Duarte, José Lira

    2009-03-01

    A randomized clinical trial is a prospective study that compares the effect and value of interventions in human beings, of one or more groups vs. a control group. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published randomized clinical trials in Intensive care in Brazil. All randomized clinical trials in intensive care found by manual search in Revista Brasileira de Terapia Intensiva from January 2001 to March 2008 were assessed to evaluate their description by the quality scale. Descriptive statistics and a 95 % confidence interval were used for the primary outcome. Our primary outcome was the randomized clinical trial quality. Our search found 185 original articles, of which 14 were randomized clinical trials. Only one original article (7.1%) showed good quality. There was no statistical significance between the collected data and the data shown in the hypothesis of this search. It can be concluded that in the sample of assessed articles 7% of the randomized clinical trials in intensive care published in a single intensive care journal in Brazil, present good methodological quality.

  8. Perspectives on clinical trial data transparency and disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemayehu, Demissie; Anziano, Richard J; Levenstein, Marcia

    2014-09-01

    The increased demand for transparency and disclosure of data from clinical trials sponsored by pharmaceutical companies poses considerable challenges and opportunities from a statistical perspective. A central issue is the need to protect patient privacy and adhere to Good Clinical and Statistical Practices, while ensuring access to patient-level data from clinical trials to the wider research community. This paper offers options to navigate this dilemma and balance competing priorities, with emphasis on the role of good clinical and statistical practices as proven safeguards for scientific integrity, the importance of adopting best practices for reporting of data from secondary analyses, and the need for optimal collaboration among stakeholders to facilitate data sharing.

  9. Meta-analysis of five photodisinfection clinical trials for periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy(PDT) has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. To evaluate the efficacy of PDT in vivo a series of clinical trials was carried out in multiple centers and populations. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment level, pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing were all evaluated. All groups received the standard of care, scaling and root planing, and the treatment group additionally received a single treatment of PDT. Of the total 309 patients and over 40,000 pockets treated in these 5 trials it was determined that photodynamic therapy provided a statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters over scaling and root planing alone.

  10. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Methods Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). Results The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. Conclusions We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials. PMID:23433341

  11. Characteristics of pediatric pulmonary hypertension trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awerbach, Jordan D; Krasuski, Richard A; Hill, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) drugs has been identified as a high priority by the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH). Studying pediatric PH is challenging due to the rare and heterogeneous nature of the disease. We sought to define the pediatric PH clinical trials landscape, to evaluate areas of trial success or failure, and to identify potential obstacles to the study of pediatric PH drugs. Interventional pediatric (ages 0-17 years) PH trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from June 2005 through December 2014 were analyzed. There were 45 pediatric PH trials registered during the study period. Median (IQR) projected trial enrollment was 40 (24-63), with seven trials (16%) targeting > 100 participants. Industry was the most common trial sponsor (n = 23, 50%), with only two (4.4%) NIH-sponsored trials. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors were the most frequently studied drug (n = 18, 39%). Single group study designs were used in 44% (n = 20) with an active comparator (parallel, factorial, or cross-over designs) in 25 trials, including 22 with randomization and ten that were double-blinded. Study outcomes varied markedly with inconsistent use of known surrogate and composite endpoints. One-third of trials (n = 15, 33%) were terminated, predominantly due to poor participant enrollment. Of the 17 completed trials, 11 had published results and only three efficacy trials met their primary endpoint. There are unique challenges to drug development in pediatric PH, including enrolling patients, identifying appropriate study endpoints, and conducting randomized, controlled, double-blind trials where the likelihood of meeting the study endpoint is optimized.

  12. Clinical Trials in Chronic Liver Disease - What Do They Achieve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Heathcote

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 30 years have seen rapid growth in the number of clinical trials in liver disease; due mostly to effective drug discovery programs by the pharmaceutical industry. The advantages associated with therapeutic trials in chronic liver disease, or any other disease for that matter, go far beyond potential benefit to the individual patient, other beneficiaries include the treating physician, the sponsoring agency and their investors, the institution/university and the general public. But there is always a downside to any experiment. The disadvantages and advantages of clinical trials in liver disease are the topics for this discussion.

  13. On an Approach to Bayesian Sample Sizing in Clinical Trials

    CERN Document Server

    Muirhead, Robb J

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores an approach to Bayesian sample size determination in clinical trials. The approach falls into the category of what is often called "proper Bayesian", in that it does not mix frequentist concepts with Bayesian ones. A criterion for a "successful trial" is defined in terms of a posterior probability, its probability is assessed using the marginal distribution of the data, and this probability forms the basis for choosing sample sizes. We illustrate with a standard problem in clinical trials, that of establishing superiority of a new drug over a control.

  14. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    created military Vision Center of Excellence in NEER steering committee meetings and deliberations. References: 1. Cideciyan AV, Aleman TS, Boye SL, et...2008;105:15112-15117. 2. Hauswirth W, Aleman TS, Kaushal S, et al. Phase I Trial of Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 Mutations by Ocular

  15. Maintenance of Clinical and Radiographic Benefit With Intravenous Golimumab Therapy in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis Despite Methotrexate Therapy: Week-112 Efficacy and Safety Results of the Open-Label Long-Term Extension of a Phase III, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Clifton O; Mendelsohn, Alan M; Kim, Lilianne; Xu, Zhenhua; Leu, Jocelyn; Han, Chenglong; Lo, Kim Hung; Westhovens, Rene; Weinblatt, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and radiographic progression through 2 years of treatment with intravenous (IV) golimumab plus methotrexate (MTX) in an open-label extension of a phase III trial of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite MTX therapy. In the phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled GO-FURTHER trial, 592 patients with active RA were randomized (2:1) to intravenous golimumab 2 mg/kg plus MTX (Group 1) or placebo plus MTX (Group 2) at weeks 0 and 4, then every 8 weeks thereafter; placebo patients crossed over to golimumab at week 16 (early escape) or week 24 (crossover). The final golimumab infusion was at week 100. Assessments included American College of Rheumatology 20%, 50%, 70% (ACR20, ACR50, ACR70) response criteria, 28-joint count disease activity score using the C-reactive protein level (DAS28-CRP), physical function and quality of life measures, and changes in the modified Sharp/van der Heijde scores (SHS). Safety was monitored through week 112. In total, 486 patients (82.1%) continued treatment through week 100, and 68.1%, 43.8%, and 23.5% had an ACR20/50/70 response, respectively, at week 100. Clinical response and improvements in physical function and quality of life were generally maintained from week 24 through 2 years. Mean change from baseline to week 100 in SHS score was 0.74 in Group 1 and 2.10 in Group 2 (P = 0.005); progression from week 52 to week 100 was clinically insignificant in both groups. A total of 481 patients completed the safety followup through week 112; 79.1% had an adverse event, and 18.2% had a serious adverse event. Clinical response to IV golimumab plus MTX was maintained through week 100. Radiographic progression following golimumab treatment was clinically insignificant between week 52 and week 100. No unexpected adverse events occurred through week 112, and the safety profile was consistent with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy. © 2015 The

  16. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  17. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge generated by site representatives through their participation in clinical trials is valuable for testing new products in use and obtaining final market approval. The leverage of this important knowledge is however challenged as the former direct relationships between in-house staff in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract Research Organization) and thereby adding another link in the relationships between site and sponsor. These changes are intended to optimize the time-consuming and costly trial phases; however, there is a need to study whether valuable knowledge and experience is compromised in the process. Limited research exists on the full range of clinical practice insights obtained by investigators during and after clinical trials and how well these insights are transferred to study sponsors. This study explores the important knowledge-transfer processes between sites and sponsors and to what extent sites' knowledge gained in clinical trials is utilized by the industry. Responses from 451 global investigative site representatives are included in the study. The analysis of the extensive dataset reveals that the current processes of collaboration between sites and the industry restrict the leverage of valuable knowledge gained by physicians in the process of clinical trials. These restrictions to knowledge-transfer between site and sponsor are further challenged if CRO partners are integrated in the trial process.

  18. A national strategy to develop pragmatic clinical trials infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, Thomas W; Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Dolor, Rowena J; Meissner, Paul; Tunis, Sean; Krishnan, Jerry A; Pace, Wilson D; Saltz, Joel; Hersh, William R; Michener, Lloyd; Carey, Timothy S

    2014-04-01

    An important challenge in comparative effectiveness research is the lack of infrastructure to support pragmatic clinical trials, which compare interventions in usual practice settings and subjects. These trials present challenges that differ from those of classical efficacy trials, which are conducted under ideal circumstances, in patients selected for their suitability, and with highly controlled protocols. In 2012, we launched a 1-year learning network to identify high-priority pragmatic clinical trials and to deploy research infrastructure through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium that could be used to launch and sustain them. The network and infrastructure were initiated as a learning ground and shared resource for investigators and communities interested in developing pragmatic clinical trials. We followed a three-stage process of developing the network, prioritizing proposed trials, and implementing learning exercises that culminated in a 1-day network meeting at the end of the year. The year-long project resulted in five recommendations related to developing the network, enhancing community engagement, addressing regulatory challenges, advancing information technology, and developing research methods. The recommendations can be implemented within 24 months and are designed to lead toward a sustained national infrastructure for pragmatic trials.

  19. Adaptive design clinical trials: Methodology, challenges and prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New drug development is a time-consuming and expensive process. Recently, there has been stagnation in the development of novel compounds. Moreover, the attrition rate in clinical research is also on the rise. Fearing more stagnation, the Food and Drug Administration released the critical path initiative in 2004 and critical path opportunity list in 2006 thus highlighting the need of advancing innovative trial designs. One of the innovations suggested was the adaptive designed clinical trials, a method promoting introduction of pre-specified modifications in the design or statistical procedures of an on-going trial depending on the data generated from the concerned trial thus making a trial more flexible. The adaptive design trials are proposed to boost clinical research by cutting on the cost and time factor. Although the concept of adaptive designed clinical trials is round-the-corner for the last 40 years, there is still lack of uniformity and understanding on this issue. This review highlights important adaptive designed methodologies besides covering the regulatory positions on this issue.

  20. A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne‐Marie; Dolor, Rowena J.; Meissner, Paul; Tunis, Sean; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Pace, Wilson D.; Saltz, Joel; Hersh, William R.; Michener, Lloyd; Carey, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An important challenge in comparative effectiveness research is the lack of infrastructure to support pragmatic clinical trials, which compare interventions in usual practice settings and subjects. These trials present challenges that differ from those of classical efficacy trials, which are conducted under ideal circumstances, in patients selected for their suitability, and with highly controlled protocols. In 2012, we launched a 1‐year learning network to identify high‐priority pragmatic clinical trials and to deploy research infrastructure through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium that could be used to launch and sustain them. The network and infrastructure were initiated as a learning ground and shared resource for investigators and communities interested in developing pragmatic clinical trials. We followed a three‐stage process of developing the network, prioritizing proposed trials, and implementing learning exercises that culminated in a 1‐day network meeting at the end of the year. The year‐long project resulted in five recommendations related to developing the network, enhancing community engagement, addressing regulatory challenges, advancing information technology, and developing research methods. The recommendations can be implemented within 24 months and are designed to lead toward a sustained national infrastructure for pragmatic trials. PMID:24472114

  1. Design and implementation of clinical trials in rehabilitation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Bagiella, Emilia

    2012-08-01

    The growth of evidence-based medicine means that both researchers and clinicians must grasp the complex issues involved in implementing clinical trials, which are especially challenging for the behavioral (experience-based) treatments that predominate in rehabilitation. In this article we discuss selected issues germane to the design, implementation, and analysis of group-level clinical trials in rehabilitation. We review strengths, weaknesses, and best applications of 1-sample, between-subjects, and within-subjects study designs, including newer models such as practical clinical trials and point-of-care trials. We also discuss the selection of appropriate control conditions against which to test rehabilitation treatments, as well as issues related to trial blinding. In a section on treatment definition, we discuss the challenges of specifying the active ingredients in the complex interventions that are widely used in rehabilitation, and present an illustration of 1 approach to defining treatments via the learning mechanisms that underlie them. Issues related to treatment implementation are also discussed, including therapist allocation and training, and assessment of treatment fidelity. Finally we consider 2 statistical topics of particular importance to many rehabilitation trials: the use of multiple or composite outcomes, and factors that must be weighed in estimating sample size for clinical trials.

  2. RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL IN CHIKUNGUNYA ARTHRITIS CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chikungunya virus is no stranger to the Indian sub- continent. Since its first isolation in Calcutta [1] in 1963, there have been several reports of chikung unya virus infection in different parts of India [2], [3], [4]. The last outbreak of chikungunya virus infection o ccurred in India in 1971. Subsequently there has been no activ e or passive surveillance carried out in the country and therefore, it ‘seemed’ that the virus h ad ‘disappeared’ from the subcontinent [5] However, recent reports of large scale outbreaks of fever caused by chikungunya virus infection in several parts of Southern India have confirmed th e re-emergence of this virus. It has been estimated that over 1,80,000 cases have occurred in India since December 2005 [6] Andhra Pradesh (AP was the first state to report this dise ase in December 2005, and one of the worst affected (over 80,000 suspected cases . Over 12% of patients who contract chikungunya virus infection develop chronic joint symptoms [7] . OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of chloroquine in reducing the pain of chikungunya induced arthritis a s compared to paracetamol. METHODOLOGY: A Randomized Clinical Trial was carried out in a c ommunity attached to urban health centre of PESIMSR, Kuppam during August 2006. Among the 132 cases of arthritis, 86 persons were selected based on their availability and consent to participate. They were divided into two randomly assigned groups namely Cat egory–1(Chloroquine group and Category–2 ( Paracetamol group. Chloroquine tablet -155 mg and Paracetamol tablet - 500 mg were administered as a single dose to the two groups respectively. The groups were followed up for 8 days and the results were analyzed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis was carried out by using S.P.S.S. package. Asymptoic test statistic an d X 2 MH (Chi square test were used to evaluate the effect of the drugs. RESULTS OF THE STUDY: The decrease of pain in chikungunya arthritis cases was

  3. Mind the gap in clinical trials: A participatory action analysis with citizen collaborators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amy; Liew, Su May; Kirkpatrick, Jo; Price, Jazmin; Lopreto, Taylor; Nelken, Yasmin

    2017-02-01

    What are the strengths, gaps, expectations, and barriers to research engagement in clinical trials as communicated through social media? Clinical trials test treatments to provide reliable information for safety and effectiveness. Trials are building blocks in which what is learned in earlier research can be used to improve treatments, compare alternatives, and improve quality of life. For 20 years, the percentages of clinical trials volunteers have decreased whereas the costs of running clinical trials have multiplied. Participants enroll in trials to access latest treatments, to help others, and to advance science, but there is growing unrest. The priorities of those running the trials differ from those of the participants, and the roles for public research involvement lack clarity. Changes to bridge these gaps in the research culture are proposed through the use of participatory action research (PAR) in which stakeholders collaborate to improve research methodology, galvanize citizen participation, multiply health knowledge, problem-solve barriers to access, and explore the value of research volunteers as collaborators. PAR enabled the inclusion of citizens as full collaborators. Social media data were gathered for 120 days until saturation was reached. De-identified data were organized into a Strengths Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats framework and coded into themes for analysis. After the analysis, the authors prioritized potential solutions for improving research engagement. Strengths and opportunities remained constant through trial phases, disease burdens, and interventions. Threats included alienation, litigation, disparity, and shaming. Poor management and barriers to inclusion were identified as weaknesses. Opportunities included improving resource management and information quality. Barriers were minimized when relationships between staff and participants were inclusive, respectful, tolerant, and open to change. Participants' communications

  4. Identifying randomized clinical trials in Spanish-language dermatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, G; Pardo, H; Sánchez, S; Bonfill, X

    2015-06-01

    The necessary foundation for good clinical practice lies in knowledge derived from clinical research. Evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the pillar on which decisions about therapy are based. To search exhaustively and rigorously to identify RCTs in dermatology journals published in Spanish. We located dermatology journals through the following search engines and indexes: PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, Periódica, Latindex, Índice Médico Español, C-17, IBECS, EMBASE, and IMBIOMED. We also sought information through dermatology associations and dermatologists in countries where Spanish was the usual language of publication, and we searched the Internet (Google). Afterwards we searched the journals electronically and manually to identify RCTs in all available volumes and issues, checking from the year publication started through 2012. Of 28 journals identified, we included 21 in the search. We found a total of 144 RCTs published since 1969; 78 (54%) were in Latin American journals and 66 (46%) were in Spanish journals. The most frequent disease contexts for RCTs in Spanish journals were psoriasis, mycoses, and acne vulgaris. In Latin American journals, the most frequent disease contexts were common warts, mycoses, acne vulgaris, and skin ulcers on the lower limbs. Manual searches identified more RCTs than electronic searches. Manual searches found a larger number of RCTs. Relatively fewer RCTs are published in Spanish and Latin American journals than in English-language journals. Internet facilitated access to full texts published by many journals; however, free open access to these texts is still unavailable and a large number of journal issues are still not posted online. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Study of the trial subjects’ protection aspects in Phase I clinical trials and bioequivalence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Zupanets

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection of rights, health and well-being of persons who are taking the drug during the trial (trial subjects is one of the basic principles of clinical trials (CT management. Aim. In order to study key aspects of volunteer protection, determine factors that influence these indicators and estimate the importance of ensuring their proper implementation on the clinical site (CS three survey of 135 trial subjects were carried out to evaluate the importance of assessing the impact of factors such as the procedure of signing the informed consent (IC at the CS and testing procedures for HIV / AIDS, hepatitis and others. Assessment of the quality of life of trial subjects as indirect indicator of the quality of clinical trials that ensures the proper protection of their life was the subject of the third survey. Methods and results. The general model of the relationship between the key aspects of the trial subjects protection and the factors which are providing them during the clinical trials of drugs management was substantiated, which included the main aspects of the trial subjects’ protection, protective factors and basic CT management procedures, the impact of the above factors on the possibility of providing protection aspects depends on their implementation quality. It was found that trial subjects’ protection improvement can be achieved during the IC signing process. It is necessary to ensure a higher level of volunteers understanding of the terms that could be used in the IC form. Regarding the procedure of compulsory testing for HIV/AIDS in the course of screening, we can conclude that the majority of the trial subjects believe that this procedure is an additional factor in their health protection and do not consider it as an excessive psychological pressure on them. Conclusion. Assessing the quality of life during the bioequivalence study at the CS makes possible to reach a conclusion on general well-being and satisfaction with those

  6. Improving data transparency in clinical trials using blockchain smart contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Timothy; Upton, David; Cimpoesu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    The scientific credibility of findings from clinical trials can be undermined by a range of problems including missing data, endpoint switching, data dredging, and selective publication. Together, these issues have contributed to systematically distorted perceptions regarding the benefits and risks of treatments. While these issues have been well documented and widely discussed within the profession, legislative intervention has seen limited success. Recently, a method was described for using a blockchain to prove the existence of documents describing pre-specified endpoints in clinical trials. Here, we extend the idea by using smart contracts - code, and data, that resides at a specific address in a blockchain, and whose execution is cryptographically validated by the network - to demonstrate how trust in clinical trials can be enforced and data manipulation eliminated. We show that blockchain smart contracts provide a novel technological solution to the data manipulation problem, by acting as trusted administrators and providing an immutable record of trial history.

  7. Clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindryckx, Pieter; Baert, Filip; Hart, Ailsa; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Panès, Julian; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    It goes back to 1932 when Dr. Burrill Bernard Crohn and co-workers published their landmark paper, describing regional ileitis as a disease entity. However, clinical trial research has been developing rather slowly in luminal Crohn's disease. It took until the early seventies before the first randomized clinical trial was set up by the National Co-operative Crohn's Disease Study (NCCDS) group. Although the efforts of this group triggered a first wave of clinical trials in Crohn's disease, the lack of guidelines for conducting a clinical trial in this research area resulted in a variety of study designs and much criticism. Besides having a rather small sample size and a short follow-up time, they were often characterized by vague and subjective assessment of disease activity and treatment response. Following the advent of a new and very potent drug class in the late nineties, the anti-TNF agents, investigators started to re-think their study protocols and the first guidelines were set up by the regulatory authorities. Over the last 15years, clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease have been evolving significantly. Inclusion criteria have been shifting from clinical scores such as Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) to more objective disease activity parameters such as biomarkers (C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin) and endoscopic lesions. Primary endpoints have been developing from clinical response to corticosteroid-free remission and more ambitious end-points such as mucosal healing. In this paper, we will give a historical overview on clinical trials in luminal Crohn's disease, before and within the biologic era, and provide insight into how they have shaped our current understanding of trial designs in Crohn's disease.

  8. Veterinary clinical research database for homeopathy: placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J; Albrecht, H; Mathie, R T

    2013-04-01

    Veterinary homeopathy has led a somewhat shadowy existence since its first introduction. Only in the last three decades has the number of clinical trials increased considerably. This literature is generally not well perceived, which may be partly a consequence of the diffuse and somewhat inaccessible nature of some of the relevant research publications. The Veterinary Clinical Research Database for Homeopathy (VetCR) was launched in 2006 to provide information on existing clinical research in veterinary homeopathy and to facilitate the preparation of systematic reviews. The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of this first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy, with a special focus on its content of placebo controlled clinical trials and summarising what is known about placebo effects in animals. In April 2012, the VetCR database contained 302 data records. Among these, 203 controlled trials were identified: 146 randomised and 57 non-randomised. In 97 of those 203 trials, the homeopathic medical intervention was compared to placebo. A program of formal systematic reviews of peer-reviewed randomised controlled trials in veterinary homeopathy is now underway; detailed findings from the program's data extraction and appraisal approach, including the assessment of trial quality (risk of bias), will be reported in due course. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blinded Outcome Assessment Was Infrequently Used and Poorly Reported in Open Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan C Kahan

    Full Text Available Unblinded outcome assessment can lead to biased estimates of treatment effect in randomised trials. We reviewed published trials to assess how often blinded assessment is used, and whether its use varies according to the type of outcome or assessor.A review of parallel group, individually randomised phase III trials published in four general medical journals (BMJ, Journal of the American Medical Association, The Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine in 2010.Whether assessment of the primary outcome was blinded, and whether this differed according to outcome or assessor type.We identified 258 eligible trials. Of these, 106 (41% were reported as double-blind, and 152 (59% as partially or fully open-label (that is, they included some groups who were unblinded, such as patients, those delivering the intervention, or those in charge of medical care. Of the 152 open trials, 125 required outcome assessment. Of these 125 trials, only 26% stated that outcome assessment was blinded; 51% gave no information on whether assessment was blinded or not. Furthermore, 18% of trials did not state who performed the assessment. The choice of outcome type (e.g. instrument measured, rated, or naturally occurring event did not appear to influence whether blinded assessment was performed (range 24-32% for the most common outcome types. However, the choice of outcome assessor did influence blinding; independent assessors were blinded much more frequently (71% than participant (5% or physician (24% assessors. Despite this, open trials did not use independent assessors any more frequently than double-blind trials (17% vs. 18% respectively.Blinding of outcome assessors is infrequently used and poorly reported. Increased use of independent assessors could increase the frequency of blinded assessment.

  10. Likely country of origin in publications on randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials during the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2007-01-01

    The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study.......The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study....

  11. Stiripentol in atypical absence seizures in children: an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwell, J R; Anderson, G D; Kerr, B M; Tor, J A; Levy, R H

    1993-01-01

    Stiripentol (STP) was added to the antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen of 10 patients with uncontrolled atypical absence seizures (more than one seizure a day). Seven boys and three girls aged 6-16 years participated in the study. Concomitant AEDs included various combinations of phenobarbital (PB), phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), and valproate (VPA). Parents counted daily seizures over a 4-week baseline period before institution of STP, and in a 20-week period during STP therapy. To compensate for drug interactions, doses of other AEDs were adjusted during STP administration to keep serum levels close to levels of the baseline period. Maintenance doses of STP were 1,000-3,000 mg/day, giving serum levels of 4-22 micrograms/mL. All patients experienced a decrease in atypical absence seizures. Average decrease was 70% (range 5-95%). Side effects experienced by some patients were dose related and included anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and lethargy. In only 1 patient did an adverse effect (vomiting) require discontinuation of STP. We conclude that STP shows promise in treatment of atypical absence seizures in children, and further trials are warranted.

  12. Open doorway to truth: legacy of the Minnesota tobacco trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard D; Ebbert, Jon O; Muggli, Monique E; Lockhart, Nikki J; Robertson, Channing R

    2009-05-01

    More than a decade has passed since the conclusion of the Minnesota tobacco trial and the signing of the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) by 46 US State Attorneys General and the US tobacco industry. The Minnesota settlement exposed the tobacco industry's long history of deceptive marketing, advertising, and research and ultimately forced the industry to change its business practices. The provisions for public document disclosure that were included in the Minnesota settlement and the MSA have resulted in the release of approximately 70 million pages of documents and nearly 20,000 other media materials. No comparable dynamic, voluminous, and contemporaneous document archive exists. Only a few single events in the history of public health have had as dramatic an effect on tobacco control as the public release of the tobacco industry's previously secret internal documents. This review highlights the genesis of the release of these documents, the history of the document depositories created by the Minnesota settlement, the scientific and policy output based on the documents, and the use of the documents in furthering global public health strategies.

  13. Pharmacy and formulation support for paediatric clinical trials in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mandy; Al Hashimi, Ali; Batchelor, Hannah

    2016-09-25

    Availability and sourcing of investigational drugs for paediatric clinical trials is known to be a challenge for investigator-led clinical trials. The National Institute of Health Research Clinical Research Network: Children (CRN: Children) provides support for formulations and pharmacy related issues to researchers planning and setting up paediatric clinical trials within England. This paper reviews pharmacy and formulation support provided to a consecutive series of investigator-led clinical studies supported by CRN:Children. Case studies are included to describe some of the unique pharmaceutical challenges encountered. 44 trials were reviewed and a total of 103 products were required to support these clinical trials. UK authorised products were suitable for use for 62 of these 103 products. In the remaining 41 cases, 4 could be sourced as an authorised product within the European Union and the remaining 37 required bespoke manufacture. Bespoke manufacture of an investigational drug or placebo is costly. Typical costs for the initial development and testing of a bespoke investigational drug or placebo were in the range of £30,000-100,000 per product. The estimated cost for 19 out of 45 trials was available; in summary, the costs on a per patient per day of therapy basis ranged from under £1 to almost £600; short studies involving multiple agents are obviously the most expensive. This range is dependent upon the need for bespoke manufacture and also the number of participants within the trial. The arrangements for investigational drug supply can greatly affect the study design, regulatory requirements, trial logistics, as well as the total cost of research. As investigational product related activities are often costly, necessitating months of advance planning, it is imperative that specialist inputs are sought from the very start of the study design and planning process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Intelligent Application of Breast Cancer Trials Data in the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Frankli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This meeting commenced with a talk from Prof Loibl on neoadjuvant and adjuvant strategies for HER2positive (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive early breast cancer (EBC, which featured a précis on the most pertinent, recent trial data and how these data may shape future treatment decisions in clinical practice. Prof Conte moved the discussion forward by addressing how recent studies may lead towards a new standard of care (SoC and treatment paradigms in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Prof Schmid gave an overview of potential strategies that could be used to prevent or overcome endocrine therapy resistance in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The session was concluded with a presentation on ‘Precision Medicine for Metastatic Breast Cancer’ by Prof Sotiriou, in which he highlighted the potential applications of precision medicine and some of the different approaches that have been used in metastatic breast cancer. Prof Verma, the meeting chair, opened the symposium and facilitated the discussion sessions. The contents of the presentations and discussions are summarised herein.

  15. An open randomized clinical trial in comparing two artesunate-based combination treatments on Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nigerian children: artesunate/sulphamethoxypyrazine/pyrimethamine (fixed dose over 24 hours versus artesunate/amodiaquine (fixed dose over 48 hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowunmi Akintunde

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT across malaria zones of the world. Fixed dose ACT with shorter courses and fewer tablets may be key determinants to ease of administration and compliance. Methods Children aged one year to 13 years presenting with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were recruited in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. A total of 250 children each were randomly assigned to receive three doses of artesunate/sulphamethoxypyrazine/pyrimethamine (AS + SMP (12 hourly doses over 24 hours or three doses of artesunate/amodiaquine (AS + AQ (daily doses over 48 hours. Efficacy and safety of the two drugs were assessed using a 28-day follow-up and the primary outcome was PCR- corrected parasitological cure rate and clinical response. Results There were two (0.4% early treatment failures, one in each treatment arm. The PCR corrected cure rates for day 28 was 97.9% in the AS + AQ arm and 95.6% in the AS + SMP arm (p = 0.15. The re-infection rate was 1.7% in the AS + AQ arm and 5.7% in the AS + SMP arm (p = 0.021. The fever clearance time was similar in the two treatment groups: 1 - 2 days for both AS + SMP and AS + AQ (p = 0.271. The parasite clearance time was also similar in the two treatment groups with 1 - 7 days for AS + SMP and 1 - 4 days for AS + AQ (p = 0.941. The proportion of children with gametocytes over the follow-up period was similar in both treatment groups. Serious Adverse Events were not reported in any of the patients and in all children, laboratory values (packed cell volume, liver enzymes, bilirubin remained within normal levels during the follow-up period but the packed cell volume was significantly lower in the AS + SMP group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that AS + SMP FDC given as three doses over 24 hours (12-hour intervals has similar efficacy as AS + AQ FDC given as three doses over 48 hours (24-hour interval for the treatment of

  16. Effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on aggressive behavior in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents: results of an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, J N; Liberman, M; Kincaid, M

    1997-01-01

    Low concentrations of the neurotransmitter serotonin and its 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid metabolite in the central nervous system have been associated with increased aggressive behavior in animals and humans. Controlled clinical trials of serotonin agonists in depressed adults have suggested that aggressive behavior is less likely during treatment with these medications than with placebo, but there have been no previous studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aggression in children. We prospectively followed the course of aggressive behavior in 19 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents (not selected for aggressiveness) who received open clinical trials of fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline. The patients received standard doses (equivalent to fluoxetine 10-40 mg daily) for a minimum of 5 weeks. The starting dose was 15 +/- 5 mg, and dosages were raised at a mean rate of 5 mg every 4 days up to a mean dose of 25 +/- 10 mg daily. Results from trials of the three SSRIs were clustered because the sample sizes were not sufficient for separate analyses. Overall, there were no statistically meaningful improvements in the level of aggressive behavior, as measured on a modified version of the Overt Aggression Scale, over the course of these patients' SSRI trials. Symptoms of physical aggression toward others or self were manifest in 12 of the 19 patients while on SSRIs. Of the 19 patients, 13 were assessed both on and off SSRIs: verbal aggression (p = 0.04), physical aggression toward objects (p = 0.05), and physical aggression toward self (p < 0.02) occurred significantly more frequently on SSRIs than off; no increase was observed in physical aggression toward others. Patients with the highest baseline aggressivity scores did not show greater improvement during SSRI treatment. Further research is warranted, particularly to explore whether SSRIs may have therapeutic effects on aggression at higher (or lower) doses than were administered in this

  17. Quality assessment of reports on clinical trials in the Journal of Hepatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Nikolova, D

    1998-01-01

    Electronic searches on databases for randomised clinical trials and controlled clinical trials do not identify as many trials as handsearches, and trial reporting may be flawed. The aims were to identify all fully reported randomised clinical trials in the Journal of Hepatology and to make a qual...... a qualitative assessment of the reporting....

  18. Reporting and evaluation of HIV-related clinical endpoints in two multicenter international clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lifson, A; Rahme, FS; Belloso, WH;

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The processes for reporting and review of progression of HIV disease clinical endpoints are described for two large phase III international clinical trials. METHOD: SILCAAT and ESPRIT are multicenter randomized HIV trials evaluating the impact of interleukin-2 on disease progression...

  19. [How may practitioners interpret the results of clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin, J-M; Adida, M; Blin, O; Simon, N; Fakra, E; Cermolacce, M; Bottai, T; Pringuey, D; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Belzeaux, R; Kaladjian, A

    2016-12-01

    To correctly interpret the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), practitioners have to spot bias and other potential problems present in the trial. Internal as well as external validity of the trial are linked to the presence of such bias. The internal validity is ensured by a clear definition of the objectives of the trial. The number of patients to be included in the trial is calculated on the basis of the main objective of the trial and more precisely on the basis of the primary endpoint selected to assess the efficacy of treatment. This is the best way to ensure that the statistical significance of the result may have a clinical relevance. Internal validity depends also on the process of patients selection, the methods used to ensure comparability of groups and treatments, the criteria employed to assess efficacy, and the methods for the analysis of data. External validity refers to subjects that have been excluded from the trial, limitations of RCTs, as well as the coherence and clinical relevance of the trial. Internal validity has to be fueled by external validity. © L’Encéphale, Paris, 2016.

  20. Comparison of German and American law concerning clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, E

    1983-01-01

    In German and American law, clinical trials require a positive benefit-risk evaluation, free and informed consent, medical and scientific qualification of the doctor, and a written research protocol. American law requires a written consent, which is free of undue influence, the subject being instructed that he is free to withdraw from the trial. In German law, an orally given consent is sufficient for therapeutic trials. With minor or incompetent research subjects, informed consent to therapeutic clinical experimentation has to be given by their parents or guardians, the permissibility of which, in other trials, is controversial. In non-therapeutic trials, blind studies, double-bind studies, and trials involving placebos, special attention has to be paid to the risk-benefit analysis and to informed consent, which in these cases, even in Germany, must be written. The most outstanding feature of American law of clinical trial is that the experimentation is subject to previous control and approval by institutional review boards. The most interesting difference in German law is the investigator's duty to effect an insurance against the risks of the research subject's death or invalidity.

  1. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V; Michalski, Jeff M; Rosen, Mark A; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Shankar, Lalitha K; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C Norman; Deye, James A; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  2. A model of placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Bret R; Roose, Steven P

    2013-07-01

    Placebo response in clinical trials of antidepressant medications is substantial and has been increasing. High placebo response rates hamper efforts to detect signals of efficacy for new antidepressant medications, contributing to trial failures and delaying the delivery of new treatments to market. Media reports seize upon increasing placebo response and modest advantages for active drugs as reasons to question the value of antidepressant medication, which may further stigmatize treatments for depression and dissuade patients from accessing mental health care. Conversely, enhancing the factors responsible for placebo response may represent a strategy for improving available treatments for major depressive disorder. A conceptual framework describing the causes of placebo response is needed in order to develop strategies for minimizing placebo response in clinical trials, maximizing placebo response in clinical practice, and talking with depressed patients about the risks and benefits of antidepressant medications. In this review, the authors examine contributors to placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials and propose an explanatory model. Research aimed at reducing placebo response should focus on limiting patient expectancy and the intensity of therapeutic contact in antidepressant clinical trials, while the optimal strategy in clinical practice may be to combine active medication with a presentation and level of therapeutic contact designed to enhance treatment response.

  3. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling & Simulation to Enable Scientific Discovery and Clinical Care in Knee Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical function of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. The interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and for clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures, their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next generation knee models are noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  4. RESULTS OF AN OPEN-LABEL COMPARATIVE RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL OF AXOGLATIRAN® FS (F-SINTEZ, RUSSIA EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY IN COMPARISON WITH COPAXONE®-TEVA (TEVA PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRIES LTD., ISRAEL IN PATIENTS WITH RELAPSING-REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Khabirov

    2016-01-01

    Axoglatiran® FS and Copaxone®Teva were evaluated as satisfactory in both groups: local reactions were the most common adverse event (57.7 and 63.0 % in the 1st  and 2nd groups respectively.Conclusion. Efficiency, safety and tolerability of Axoglatiran® FS is comparable with the reference medicine Copaxone®-Teva in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This result allows to recommend the use of Axoglatiran® FS in clinical practice.

  5. IMPACT Observatory: tracking the evolution of clinical trial data sharing and research integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krleža-Jerić, Karmela; Gabelica, Mirko; Banzi, Rita; Martinić, Marina Krnić; Pulido, Bibiana; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Reveiz, Ludovic; Šimić, Josip; Utrobičić, Ana; Hrgović, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The opening of research data is emerging thanks to the increasing possibilities of digital technology. The opening of clinical trial (CT) data is a part of this process, expected to have positive scientific, ethical, health, and economic impacts thus contributing to research integrity. The January 2016 proposal by the International Council of Medical Journal Editors triggered ample discussion about CT data sharing and reconfirmed the need for an ongoing assessment of its dynamics. The IMProving Access to Clinical Trials data (IMPACT) Observatory aims to play such a role, and assess the data sharing culture, policies, and practices of key players, the impact of their interventions on CTs, and contribute to a transformation of research. The objective of this paper is to present the IMPACT Observatory as well as share some of its preliminary findings. Materials and methods Methods include a scoping study of research, surveys, interviews, and an environmental scan of research data repositories. Results Our preliminary findings indicate that although opening of CT data has not yet been achieved, its evolution is encouraging. Initiatives by key players contribute to increasing of CT data sharing, and many barriers are shrinking or disappearing. Conclusions The major barrier is the lack of data sharing standards, from preparing data for public sharing to its curatorship, findability and access. However, experiences accumulated by sharing CT data according to “upon request” or “open” mechanisms could inform the development of such standards. The Vivli, CORBEL-ECRIN and Open Trials projects are currently working in this direction.

  6. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic effect of open globe injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Lin Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze clinical characteristics and postoperative outcomes after open globe injury. METHODS: Demographic characteristics(age, gender, eye trauma, profession, cause of injury and injured part, as well as complications and prognosis were analyzed in 152 cases(152 eyesof open globe injury. RESULTS: Patients with open globe injury had an average age of 40.45±38.32 years old with a 5.9:1 male-to-female gender ratio. The left-to-right eye ratio was 1.27:1. Most patients were workers, farmers, or retired. The most common etiologies were scratches, boxing, and falls. Zone Ⅲ was the most commonly injured part. Iridoptosis or iris incarceration, retinal detachment, vitreal prolapse, hyphema or hypopyon, and vitreous hemorrhage were the most common complications. Visual acuity improved in 86 cases postoperatively but ophthalmectomy was still required in 25 eyes. CONCLUSION: Vision can be improved after surgery in open globe injury. However, patients are usually seriously injured and improvement is minimal, thereby resulting in a great loss to patients and society.

  7. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  8. Xyloglucan for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălin Pleșea Condratovici; Vladimir Bacarea; Núria Piqué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xyloglucan, a film-forming agent, improves intestinal mucosa resistance to pathologic damage. The efficacy, safety, and time of onset of the antidiarrheal effect of xyloglucan were assessed in children with acute gastroenteritis receiving oral rehydration solution (ORS). Methods. This randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter, clinical trial included children (3 months–12 years) with acute gastroenteritis of infectious origin. Children were randomized to xylo...

  9. Effect of Folic Acid Supplementation in Pregnancy on Preeclampsia: The Folic Acid Clinical Trial Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shi Wu Wen; Josee Champagne; Ruth Rennicks White; Doug Coyle; William Fraser; Graeme Smith; Dean Fergusson; Walker, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Copyright © 2013 Shi Wu Wen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Preeclampsia (PE) is hypertension with proteinuria that develops during pregnancy and affects at least 5% of pregnancies. The Effect of Folic Acid Supplementation in Pregnancy on Preeclampsia: the Folic Acid Clinical Trial (FACT) aims to recrui...

  10. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  11. Systematic Reviewers in Clinical Neurology Do Not Routinely Search Clinical Trials Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnett, Philip Marcus; Carr, Branden; Cook, Gregory; Mucklerath, Halie; Varney, Laura; Weiher, Matt; Yerokhin, Vadim; Vassar, Matt

    2015-01-01

    We examined the use of clinical trials registries in published systematic reviews and meta-analyses from clinical neurology. A review of publications between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014 from five neuroscience journals (Annals of Neurology, Brain, Lancet Neurology, Neurology, and The Neuroscientist) was performed to identify eligible systematic reviews. The systematic reviews comprising the final sample were independently appraised to determine if clinical trials registries had been included as part of the search process. Studies acknowledging the use of a trials registry were further examined to determine whether trial data had been incorporated into the analysis. The initial search yielded 194 studies, of which 78 systematic reviews met the selection criteria. Of those, five acknowledged the use of a specific clinical trials registry: four reviewed unpublished trial data and two incorporated unpublished trial data into their results. Based on our sample of systematic reviews, there was no increase in the use of trials registries in systematic review searches over time. Few systematic reviews published in clinical neurology journals included data from relevant clinical trials registries.

  12. Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erves, Jennifer Cunningham; Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Hull, Pamela C; Duke, Lauren; Miller, Stephania T

    2017-03-21

    Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  13. A clinical trial primer: historical perspective and modern implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsh, Lawrence I

    2012-01-01

    The structure of modern clinical trials is designed to protect patient safety while generating safety and efficacy data. Safety is the primary concern, and United States regulations are shaped by a series of responses to incidents, including notable safety lapses and unethical trials. These regulations focus on 3 essential components, defined by the 1979 Belmont Report: respect for persons, beneficence, and justice. Further, the international community has formally outlined good clinical practice (GCP), which mandates that trials are designed to produce meaningful data, conform to international ethics regulations, and provide assurances that data are reported in a credible and reliable manner. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and federal government have outlined the necessary components of clinical trials in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). These include institutional review boards (IRBs), standard operating procedures (SOPs), sites, sponsors, investigators, and patients. The investigator is the center of the trial and is required to sign an agreement with the federal government to uphold the CFR. Investigator duties include making sure that investigator and support staff having appropriate qualifications, delegating duties, monitoring the study for compliance and record keeping, providing care, and accepting accountability for the trial, among other duties. Physicians, who already have significant time demands, need a well-trained staff, including clinical coordinators, to adequately meet these duties. Despite these requirements, trials can have significant benefits for investigators, practices, and patients, foremost of which is the ability to provide cutting edge care. However, the clinical trial process requires routine evaluation and continual performance improvement in order to ensure that patients not only receive excellent care, but also do so in the safest possible manner.

  14. Choosing a control intervention for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical trials are performed to resolve uncertainty concerning comparator interventions. Appropriate acknowledgment of uncertainty enables the concurrent achievement of two goals : the acquisition of valuable scientific knowledge and an optimum treatment choice for the patient-participant. The ethical recruitment of patients requires the presence of clinical equipoise. This involves the appropriate choice of a control intervention, particularly when unapproved drugs or innovative interventions are being evaluated. Discussion We argue that the choice of a control intervention should be supported by a systematic review of the relevant literature and, where necessary, solicitation of the informed beliefs of clinical experts through formal surveys and publication of the proposed trial's protocol. Summary When clinical equipoise is present, physicians may confidently propose trial enrollment to their eligible patients as an act of therapeutic beneficence.

  15. More ethical and more efficient clinical research: multiplex trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keus, Frederik; van der Horst, Iwan C C; Nijsten, Maarten W

    2014-08-14

    Today's clinical research faces challenges such as a lack of clinical equipoise between treatment arms, reluctance in randomizing for multiple treatments simultaneously, inability to address interactions and increasingly restricted resources. Furthermore, many trials are biased by extensive exclusion criteria, relatively small sample size and less appropriate outcome measures. We propose a 'Multiplex' trial design that preserves clinical equipoise with a continuous and factorial trial design that will also result in more efficient use of resources. This multiplex design accommodates subtrials with appropriate choice of treatment arms within each subtrial. Clinical equipoise should increase consent rates while the factorial design is the best way to identify interactions. The multiplex design may evolve naturally from today's research limitations and challenges, while principal objections seem absent. However this new design poses important infrastructural, organisational and psychological challenges that need in depth consideration.

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .2 Objective of the trial E.2.1Main objective of the trial The purpose of this trial is to demonstrate that dextromethorphan...– IMP) before and during an OGTT- For dextromethorphan: to assess whether a dose-dependency of PD exists-To

  17. Establishing a clinical trials network in nephrology: experience of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Alicia T; Hawley, Carmel M; Johnson, David W; Badve, Sunil V; Perkovic, Vlado; Reidlinger, Donna M; Cass, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem globally. Despite this, there are fewer high-quality, high-impact clinical trials in nephrology than other internal medicine specialties, which has led to large gaps in evidence. To address this deficiency, the Australasian Kidney Trials Network, a Collaborative Research Group, was formed in 2005. Since then, the Network has provided infrastructure and expertise to conduct patient-focused high-quality, investigator-initiated clinical trials in nephrology. The Network has not only been successful in engaging the nephrology community in Australia and New Zealand but also in forming collaborations with leading researchers from other countries. This article describes the establishment, development, and functions of the Network. The article also discusses the current and future funding strategies to ensure uninterrupted conduct of much needed clinical trials in nephrology to improve the outcomes of patients affected by kidney diseases with cost-effective interventions.

  18. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  19. Brain Connectivity Predicts Placebo Response across Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Pascal; Mansour, Ali; Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2016-01-01

    Placebo response in the clinical trial setting is poorly understood and alleged to be driven by statistical confounds, and its biological underpinnings are questioned. Here we identified and validated that clinical placebo response is predictable from resting-state functional magnetic-resonance-imaging (fMRI) brain connectivity. This also led to discovering a brain region predicting active drug response and demonstrating the adverse effect of active drug interfering with placebo analgesia. Chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain patients (n = 56) underwent pretreatment brain scans in two clinical trials. Study 1 (n = 17) was a 2-wk single-blinded placebo pill trial. Study 2 (n = 39) was a 3-mo double-blinded randomized trial comparing placebo pill to duloxetine. Study 3, which was conducted in additional knee OA pain patients (n = 42), was observational. fMRI-derived brain connectivity maps in study 1 were contrasted between placebo responders and nonresponders and compared to healthy controls (n = 20). Study 2 validated the primary biomarker and identified a brain region predicting drug response. In both studies, approximately half of the participants exhibited analgesia with placebo treatment. In study 1, right midfrontal gyrus connectivity best identified placebo responders. In study 2, the same measure identified placebo responders (95% correct) and predicted the magnitude of placebo’s effectiveness. By subtracting away linearly modeled placebo analgesia from duloxetine response, we uncovered in 6/19 participants a tendency of duloxetine enhancing predicted placebo response, while in another 6/19, we uncovered a tendency for duloxetine to diminish it. Moreover, the approach led to discovering that right parahippocampus gyrus connectivity predicts drug analgesia after correcting for modeled placebo-related analgesia. Our evidence is consistent with clinical placebo response having biological underpinnings and shows that the method can also reveal that active

  20. Exploring the ethical and regulatory issues in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, Robert M; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    The need for high-quality evidence to support decision making about health and health care by patients, physicians, care providers, and policy-makers is well documented. However, serious shortcomings in evidence persist. Pragmatic clinical trials that use novel techniques including emerging information and communication technologies to explore important research questions rapidly and at a fraction of the cost incurred by more "traditional" research methods promise to help close this gap. Nevertheless, while pragmatic clinical trials can bridge clinical practice and research, they may also raise difficult ethical and regulatory challenges. In this article, the authors briefly survey the current state of evidence that is available to inform clinical care and other health-related decisions and discuss the potential for pragmatic clinical trials to improve this state of affairs. They then propose a new working definition for pragmatic research that centers upon fitness for informing decisions about health and health care. Finally, they introduce a project, jointly undertaken by the National Institutes of Health Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory and the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet), which addresses 11 key aspects of current systems for regulatory and ethical oversight of clinical research that pose challenges to conducting pragmatic clinical trials. In the series of articles commissioned on this topic published in this issue of Clinical Trials, each of these aspects is addressed in a dedicated article, with a special focus on the interplay between ethical and regulatory considerations and pragmatic clinical research aimed at informing "real-world" choices about health and health care.