WorldWideScience

Sample records for open cell foam

  1. Radiation effects on polyethylene foam of open cell type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Beilin; Kanako Kaji; Iwao Yoshizawa; Choji Kohara; Motoyoshi Hatada

    1991-01-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on polyethylene foam of open cell type have been studied. Experiments for determining of gel fraction and physical-mechanical properties of irradiated polyethylene foam of open cell type as a function of dose, respectively, were carried out. The dimensional stability of irradiated specimens at elevated temperatures was measured. It was found that tensile strength did not change and gel fraction increased when the specimen was irradiated in nitrogen atmosphere with increasing dose up to 300 kGy. The result shows that dimensional stability of polyethylene foam of open cell type after being kept in an oven at 70 deg C and 110 deg C for 22 h is improved by irradiation in nitrogen atmosphere. The similar results of irradiated EVA foam of open cell type irradiated foam of open cell type were obtained

  2. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  3. Tensile Behaviour of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehořek, Lukáš; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2009), s. 237-241 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821; GA ČR GD106/09/H035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Tensile test * Ceramics foam * Open porosity * Tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  4. Open cell conducting foams for high synchrotron radiation accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Petracca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible use of open cell conductive foams in high synchrotron radiation particle accelerators is considered. Available materials and modeling tools are reviewed, potential pros and cons are discussed, and preliminary conclusions are drawn.

  5. Acoustic absorption behaviour of an open-celled aluminium foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Fusheng; Seiffert, Gary; Zhao Yuyuan; Gibbs, Barry

    2003-01-01

    Metal foams, especially close-celled foams, are generally regarded as poor sound absorbers. This paper studies the sound absorption behaviour of the open-celled Al foams manufactured by the infiltration process, and the mechanisms involved. The foams show a significant improvement in sound absorption compared with close-celled Al foams, because of their high flow resistance. The absorption performance can be further enhanced, especially at low frequencies, if the foam panel is backed by an appropriate air gap. Increasing the air-gap depth usually increases both the height and the width of the absorption peak and shifts the peak towards lower frequencies. The foam samples with the smallest pore size exhibit the best absorption capacities when there is no air gap, whereas those with medium pore sizes have the best overall performance when there is an air gap. The typical maximum absorption coefficient, noise reduction coefficient and half-width of the absorption peak are 0.96-0.99, 0.44-0.62 and 1500-3500 Hz, respectively. The sound dissipation mechanisms in the open-celled foams are principally viscous and thermal losses when there is no air-gap backing and predominantly Helmholtz resonant absorption when there is an air-gap backing

  6. Acoustic absorption behaviour of an open-celled aluminium foam

    CERN Document Server

    Han Fu Sheng; Zhao Yu Yuan; Gibbs, B

    2003-01-01

    Metal foams, especially close-celled foams, are generally regarded as poor sound absorbers. This paper studies the sound absorption behaviour of the open-celled Al foams manufactured by the infiltration process, and the mechanisms involved. The foams show a significant improvement in sound absorption compared with close-celled Al foams, because of their high flow resistance. The absorption performance can be further enhanced, especially at low frequencies, if the foam panel is backed by an appropriate air gap. Increasing the air-gap depth usually increases both the height and the width of the absorption peak and shifts the peak towards lower frequencies. The foam samples with the smallest pore size exhibit the best absorption capacities when there is no air gap, whereas those with medium pore sizes have the best overall performance when there is an air gap. The typical maximum absorption coefficient, noise reduction coefficient and half-width of the absorption peak are 0.96-0.99, 0.44-0.62 and 1500-3500 Hz, r...

  7. Lightweight Hybrid Ablator Incorporating Aerogel-Filled Open-Cell Foam Structural Insulator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In previous work for NASA and DoD, Ultramet developed lightweight open-cell foam insulators composed of a carbon or ceramic structural foam skeleton filled with a...

  8. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  9. Production of Polystyrene Open-celled Microcellular Foam in Batch Process by Super Critical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Enayati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Open-celled foams are capable to allow the passage of fluids through their structure, because of interconnections between the open cells or bubbles and therefore these structures can be used as a membrane and filter. In thiswork, we have studied the production of polystyrene open-celled microcellular foam by using CO2 as blowing agent. To achieve such structures, it is necessary to control the stages of growth in such a way that the cells would connect to each other through the pores without any coalescence. The required processing condition to achieve open-celled structures is predictable by a model theory of opened-cell. This model suggests that at least a 130 bar saturation pressure and foaming time between 9 and 58 s are required for this system. The temperature range has been selected for to be both higher than polymer glass transition temperature and facilitating the foaming process. Experimental results in the batch foaming process has verified the model quite well. The SEM and mercury porousimetry tests show the presence of pores between the cells with open-celled structure. Experimental results show that by increasing the saturation pressure and the foaming temperature, there is a drop in the time required for open-celled structure formation. A 130 bar saturation pressure, 150o C foaming temperature and 60 s foaming time, suggest the attainment of open-celled microcellular foam based on polystyrene/CO2 system in the batch process.

  10. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi, E-mail: paryanto-ds@yahoo.com; Sugiman,; Saputra, Yudhi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Mataram, Mataram, West Nusa Tenggara (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  11. On the plastic collapse stress of open-cell aluminum foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam, E.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Onck, P. R.

    Duocel open-cell aluminum foam (20 PPI) was tested with the long axis of the cells oriented longitudinal or transverse to the loading direction, and for both orientations the samples were both annealed and heat treated. Using the extrapolated stiffness at zero per cent strain, the strain-hardening

  12. Development of pure Mg open-cell foams as structured CO{sub 2} captor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, I.A., E-mail: iafiguera@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, C.P. 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Suarez, M.A.; Velasco-Castro, M.; Pfeiffer, H.; Alcántar-Vázquez, B.; González, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, C.P. 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico); Alfonso, I. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Unidad Morelia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia UNAM, Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro No. 8701, Col. Ex-Hacienda de San José de la Huerta, C.P. 58190 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Lara-Rodríguez, G.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Circuito Exterior S/N, Cd. Universitaria, C.P. 04510 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-10

    Highlights: • The CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the open-cell Mg foams was studied at low temperatures. • Open-cell Mg foams with pore size of 350 μm were used for the CO{sub 2} capture study. • The highest amount of CO{sub 2} captured was obtained at 60 °C and 80% of relative humidity. • A CO{sub 2} capture capacity of 0.87 mmol/g was obtained for the open-cell Mg foams. • The oxidized open-cell Mg foams can be used as CO{sub 2} captors. - Abstract: The CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the superficial oxide layer formed in pure open-cell Mg foams was studied at low temperatures (40–60 °C) varying the relative humidity from 40 to 80%. Mg foam samples with pore size of 350 μm and surface area of 5.4 m{sup 2}/g were used for these analyses. Optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to characterize the cell structure and the superficial oxide formed in the cell-foams, respectively. The final products formed after the CO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O capture experiments were identified by scanning electron microscopy and attenuated total reflexion-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The MgCO{sub 3} and other products, formed after CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O capture process, were thermally decomposed, to quantify the amount of CO{sub 2} captured by the superficial MgO layer using standard thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that the highest amount of CO{sub 2} captured was obtained at 60 °C and 80% of relative humidity, with a CO{sub 2} capture capacity of 0.87 mmol/g, which is comparable with others CO{sub 2} MgO-based captors. The considerable CO{sub 2} capture capacity at low temperatures supports the potential of the pure open-cell Mg foams to be used as structured CO{sub 2} captors.

  13. The microstructural origin of strain hardening in two-dimensional open-cell metal foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangipudi, K. R.; van Buuren, S. W.; Onck, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at elucidating the microstructural origin of strain hardening in open-cell metal foams. We have developed a multiscale model that allows to study the development of plasticity at two length scales: (i) the development of plastic zones inside individual struts (microscopic scale) and

  14. A study of tensile test on open-cell aluminum foam sandwich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, N. A.; Hazza, M. H. F. Al; Adesta, E. Y. T.; Abdullah Sidek, Atiah Bt.; Endut, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum foam sandwich (AFS) panels are one of the growing materials in the various industries because of its lightweight behavior. AFS also known for having excellent stiffness to weight ratio and high-energy absorption. Due to their advantages, many researchers’ shows an interest in aluminum foam material for expanding the use of foam structure. However, there is still a gap need to be fill in order to develop reliable data on mechanical behavior of AFS with different parameters and analysis method approach. Least of researcher focusing on open-cell aluminum foam and statistical analysis. Thus, this research conducted by using open-cell aluminum foam core grade 6101 with aluminum sheets skin tested under tension. The data is analyzed using full factorial in JMP statistical analysis software (version 11). ANOVA result show a significant value of the model which less than 0.500. While scatter diagram and 3D plot surface profiler found that skins thickness gives a significant impact to stress/strain value compared to core thickness.

  15. MECHANICAL STRENGTH ENHANCEMENT OF OPEN-CELL ALUMINA FOAMS USING OPTIMUM CONCENTRATION OF DEFLOCCULANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Open-cell alumina foams were prepared using the appropriate alumina slurry and polyurethane sponge with linear pore density of approximately 14 pores per inch (ppi as a template by the replica method. The rheological studies showed that the optimum solid content for the slurries without deflocculants was 60 wt. %. In order to increase the slurry solid content, Tiron (1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt was used as dispersant. To determine the optimum concentration of dispersant, the viscosity curves of alumina slurries containing different values of Tiron from 0 to 1.2 wt. % (based on dry material weight were studied. The optimum concentration of Tiron obtained for lowest viscosity was 0.8 wt. %. Thus, the solid content in the slurry could be increased from 60 to 66 wt. %. The effect of increase in the slurry solid content and the way it affects the foam structure and the mechanical strength were investigated. Microstructural observations of the foams show a significant reduction in macroscopic and microscopic defects in the foam struts when the slurry solid content is increased. Total porosity of the produced alumina foams prepared using slurries containing 60 and 66 wt. % solid are 83.3 and 80.4 %, respectively, while the compressive strength of the foams has increased from 1.33 to 3.24 MPa.

  16. Thermal and mechanical improvement of aluminum open-cells foams through electrodeposition of copper and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncini Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to its planar structure, graphene is characterized by unique properties, such as excellent chemical inactivity, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high optical transparency, extraordinary flexibility and high mechanical resistance, which make it suitable in a very wide range of applications. This paper details the state of the art in graphene coating applied to aluminum open-cells foams for the improvement of their mechanical and thermal behavior. Metallic foams are highly porous materials with extremely high convective heat transfer coefficients, thanks to their complex structure of three-dimensional open-cells. Graphene nanoplatelets have been used to improve thermal conductivity of aluminum foams, to make them better suitable during heat transfer in transient state. Also, an improvement of mechanical resistance has been observed. Before electrodeposition, all the samples have been subjected to sandblasting process, to eliminate the oxide layer on the surface, enabling a better adhesion of the coating. Different nanoparticles of graphene have been used. The experimental findings revealed a higher thermal conductivity for aluminum open cells foams electroplated with graphene. Considered the relatively low process costs and the improvements obtainable, these materials are very promising in many technological fields. The topics covered include surface modification, electrochemical plating, thermo-graphic analysis.

  17. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X H; Kuang, J J; Lu, T J; Han, F S; Kim, T

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase. (paper)

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Motion of Aerosol Particles in Open Cell Foam Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovev, S. A.; Soloveva, O. V.; Popkova, O. S.

    2018-03-01

    The motion of aerosol particles in open cell foam material is studied. The porous medium is investigated for a three-dimensional case with detailed simulation of cellular structures within an ordered geometry. Numerical calculations of the motion of particles and their deposition due to inertial and gravitational mechanisms are performed. Deposition efficiency curves for a broad range of particle sizes are constructed. The effect deposition mechanisms have on the efficiency of the porous material as a filter is analyzed.

  19. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Open Cell Polyurethane Foam Based on the Fractal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Ankang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fractal theory, the geometric structure inside an open cell polyurethane foam, which is widely used as adiabatic material, is illustrated. A simplified cell fractal model is created. In the model, the method of calculating the equivalent thermal conductivity of the porous foam is described and the fractal dimension is calculated. The mathematical formulas for the fractal equivalent thermal conductivity combined with gas and solid phase, for heat radiation equivalent thermal conductivity and for the total thermal conductivity, are deduced. However, the total effective heat flux is the summation of the heat conduction by the solid phase and the gas in pores, the radiation, and the convection between gas and solid phase. Fractal mathematical equation of effective thermal conductivity is derived with fractal dimension and vacancy porosity in the cell body. The calculated results have good agreement with the experimental data, and the difference is less than 5%. The main influencing factors are summarized. The research work is useful for the enhancement of adiabatic performance of foam materials and development of new materials.

  20. Ceramic-like open-celled geopolymer foam as a porous substrate for water treatment catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářík, T.; Křenek, T.; Pola, M.; Rieger, D.; Kadlec, J.; Franče, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents results from experimental study on microstructural and mechanical properties of geopolymer-based foam filters. The process for making porous ceramic-like geopolymer body was experimentally established, consists of (a) geopolymer paste synthesis, (b) ceramic filler incorporation, (c) coating of open-celled polyurethane foam with geopolymer mixture, (d) rapid setting procedure, (e) thermal treatment. Geopolymer paste was based on potassium silicate solution n(SiO2)/n(K2O)=1.6 and powder mixture of calcined kaolin and precipitated silica. Various types of ceramic granular filler (alumina, calcined schistous clay and cordierite) were tested in relation to aggregate gradation design and particle size distribution. The small amplitude oscillatory rheometry in strain controlled regime 0.01% with angular frequency 10 rad/s was applied for determination of rheology behavior of prepared mixtures. Thermal treatment conditions were applied in the temperature range 1100 - 1300 °C. The developed porous ceramic-like foam effectively served as a substrate for highly active nanoparticles of selected Fe+2 spinels. Such new-type of nanocomposite was tested as a heterogeneous catalyst for technological process of advanced oxidative degradation of resistive antibiotics occurring in waste waters.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  2. Partitioning of elastic energy in open-cell foams under finite deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harb, Rani; Taciroglu, Ertugrul; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2013-01-01

    The challenges associated with the computational modeling and simulation of solid foams are threefold—namely, the proper representation of an intricate geometry, the capability to accurately describe large deformations, and the extremely arduous numerical detection and enforcement of self-contact during crushing. The focus of this study is to assess and accurately quantify the effects of geometric nonlinearities (i.e. finite deformations, work produced under buckling-type motions) on the predicted mechanical response of open-cell foams of aluminum and polyurethane prior to the onset of plasticity and contact. Beam elements endowed with three-dimensional finite deformation kinematics are used to represent the foam ligaments. Ligament cross-sections are discretized through a fiber-based formulation that provides accurate information regarding the onset of plasticity, given the uniaxial yield stress–strain data for the bulk material. It is shown that the (hyper-) elastic energy partition within ligaments is significantly influenced by kinematic nonlinearities, which frequently cause strong coupling between the axial, bending, shear and torsional deformation modes. This deformation mode-coupling is uniquely obtained as a result of evaluating equilibrium in the deformed configuration, and is undetectable when small deformations are assumed. The relationship between the foam topology and energy partitioning at various stages of moderate deformation is also investigated. Coupled deformation modes are shown to play an important role, especially in perturbed Kelvin structures where over 70% of the energy is stored in coupled axial-shear and axial-bending modes. The results from this study indicate that it may not always be possible to accurately simulate the onset of plasticity (and the response beyond this regime) if finite deformation kinematics are neglected

  3. mdFoam+: Advanced molecular dynamics in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshaw, S. M.; Borg, M. K.; Ramisetti, S. B.; Zhang, J.; Lockerby, D. A.; Emerson, D. R.; Reese, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper introduces mdFoam+, which is an MPI parallelised molecular dynamics (MD) solver implemented entirely within the OpenFOAM software framework. It is open-source and released under the same GNU General Public License (GPL) as OpenFOAM. The source code is released as a publicly open software repository that includes detailed documentation and tutorial cases. Since mdFoam+ is designed entirely within the OpenFOAM C++ object-oriented framework, it inherits a number of key features. The code is designed for extensibility and flexibility, so it is aimed first and foremost as an MD research tool, in which new models and test cases can be developed and tested rapidly. Implementing mdFoam+ in OpenFOAM also enables easier development of hybrid methods that couple MD with continuum-based solvers. Setting up MD cases follows the standard OpenFOAM format, as mdFoam+ also relies upon the OpenFOAM dictionary-based directory structure. This ensures that useful pre- and post-processing capabilities provided by OpenFOAM remain available even though the fully Lagrangian nature of an MD simulation is not typical of most OpenFOAM applications. Results show that mdFoam+ compares well to another well-known MD code (e.g. LAMMPS) in terms of benchmark problems, although it also has additional functionality that does not exist in other open-source MD codes.

  4. A New Methodology to Establish Upper Bounds on Open-Cell Foams Homogenized Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Dimitrovová

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodology for determining the upper bounds on the homogenized linear elastic properties of cellular solids, described for the two-dimensional case in Dimitrovová and Faria (1999, is extended to three-dimensional open-cell foams. Besides the upper bounds, the methodology provides necessary and sufficient conditions on optimal media. These conditions are written in terms of generalized internal forces and geometrical parameters. In some cases dependence on internal forces can be replaced by geometrical expressions. In such cases, the optimality of some medium under consideration can be verified directly from the microstructure, without any additional calculation. Some of the bounds derived in this paper are published for the first time, along with a proof of their optimality. 

  5. The influence of strain-induced damage on the mechanical response of open-cell aluminum foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam, E.; de Vries, J. H. B.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Onck, P. R.

    Compression and tensile tests have been performed on annealed (AN) and heat-treated (HT) Duocel open-cell aluminum foam (20 PPI) samples for relative densities ranging between 3 and 13%. The novel approach in this work is to study the evolution of damage and to distinguish the influence of ductile

  6. Mechanical characterization of hybrid and functionally-graded aluminum open-cell foams with nanocrystalline-copper coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi

    absorption capacity. The behavior of Al/Cu hybrid foams under high-strain-rate condition was then investigated using experiments on a split Hopkinson pressure bar. It was found that the ED nano-copper coating can also effectively enhance the energy absorption capacities of aluminum open-cell foams under high strain rate. Similar to the quasi-static behavior, a large stress drop was observed in the compressive response of Al/Cu hybrid foams under high strain rate, which was accompanied by dramatic shattering of material. It is shown that a more ductile behavior and better energy absorption performance under high strain rate condition can be also obtained by introducing an annealing process. Finally, the manufacturing process of Al/Cu hybrid foams was customized to fabricate FGHMF systems with two dimensional property gradients. The performance of these FGHMFs at both quasi-static and dynamic conditions was evaluated. Under quasi-static condition, two flexural type loading conditions were considered, namely, a three point bending condition and a cantilever beam condition. The dynamic behavior of FGHMFs was investigated by conducting drop weight tower tests on a three point bending setup. It was found that the failure mechanism of hybrid metal foams can be modified and the mechanical properties, such as stiffness and strength, and energy absorption capacities of hybrid metal foams can be optimized under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions by introducing strategically designed coating patterns. The presented novel approach and findings in this study provide valuable information on the development of high performance hybrid and functionally-graded cellular materials.

  7. Highly porous open cell Ti-foam using NaCl as temporary space holder through powder metallurgy route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Nidhi; Mondal, D.P.; Dutta Majumdar, J.; Badkul, Anshul; Jha, A.K.; Khare, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► NaCl crystals has been used as space holder. ► Variation of NaCl:Ti ratio varies porosity (65–80%). ► NaCl is cubic but the cells are spherical. ► Two types of pores: micro and macro pores are obtained. ► Foams are suitable for bones scaffolds and engineering applications. - Abstract: Open cell Titanium-foam (Ti-foam) with varying porosities (65–80%) was prepared using sodium chloride (NaCl) particles as space holder through powder metallurgy route. In order to ensure sufficient handling strength in cold compacted pallets, 2 wt.% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solutions (5 wt.% PVA in water) was mixed with the mixture of Ti and NaCl powders prior to cold compaction. After sintering, NaCl salt was removed by dissolving it in hot water. Detailed Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction studies of the prepared Ti-foams were conducted to examine any physical and chemical changes in the phase constituents. The micro-architectural characteristics, density vis-a-vis porosity, and compressive deformation behavior of the synthesized foams were evaluated to examine their suitability as biomaterial and engineering applications

  8. Incorporation of the Pore Size Variation to Modeling of the Elastic Behavior of Metallic Open-Cell Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćwieka K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we present the approach for modeling of the elastic behavior of open-cell metallic foams concerning non-uniform pore size distribution. This approach combines design of foam structures and numerical simulations of compression tests using finite element method (FEM. In the design stage, Laguerre-Voronoi tessellations (LVT were performed on several sets of packed spheres with defined variation of radii, bringing about a set of foam structures with porosity ranging from 74 to 98% and different pore size variation quantified by the coefficient of pore volume variation, CV(V, from 0.5 to 2.1. Each structure was numerically subjected to uni-axial compression test along three directions within the elastic region. Basing on the numerical response, the effective Young’s modulus, Eeff, was calculated for each structure. It is shown that the Eeff is not only dependent on the porosity but also on the pore size variation.

  9. SORPTION OF Ga (III ON FLEXIBLE OPEN CELL POLYURETHANE FOAM OF POLYETHER TYPE IMPREGNATED WITH TRI-N-BUTHYL PHOSPATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Tofan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The obtained results concerning the Ga (III ion retention on flexible open cell polyurethane foam of polyether type pretreated with tri-n-butyl phosphate are presented. The influence of solution acidity, phases contact time, Ga (III concentration and solution temperature have been investigated. The parameters of Ga (III batch sorption have been optimized. On the basis of Langmuir isotherms, the sorption constants and the thermodynamic parameters, ∆G, ∆Η and ∆S have been calculated.

  10. Modeling the overall heat conductive and convective properties of open-cell graphite foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tee, C C; Yu, N; Li, H

    2008-01-01

    This work develops analytic models on the overall thermal conductivity, pressure drop and overall convective heat transfer coefficient of graphite foam. The models study the relationship between the overall heat conductive and convective properties, and foam microstructure, temperature, foam surface friction characteristics and cooling fluid properties. The predicted thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop agree well with experimental data

  11. Use of open-cell resilient polyurethane foam loaded with crown ether for the preconcentration of uranium from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Mesalam, M.M.; El-Naggar, I.M.; Abdel-Hai, M.S.; El-Shahawi, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The preconcentration of uranium from aqueous solutions on open-cell resilient polyurethane foams (PUF) impregnated with crown ether as an organic extractant in different conditions was investigated. The data showed that 50 minutes is a sufficient time to attain equilibrium with a maximum extraction percentage for uranium ion on polyurethane foams loaded with crown ether. Also the extraction percentage of uranium is increased markedly with increasing the pH values up to pH ∼ 6 and displayed the lowest extraction at 8 > pH > 6. The different isotherms of uranium sorption have shown that the sorption followed a Freundlich isotherm. Column studies have been carried out in order to extend these studies to the plant scale. From the data of column sorption and breakthrough curves, the height equivalent of theoretical plates (HETP), and breakthrough capacity which affect the efficiency of the column have been calculated and found to be 1.03 mm/plate, 64 ± 5 and 58.3 mg uranium/gram polyurethane foam impregnated with crown ether, respectively. (author)

  12. Dual-energy X-ray micro-CT imaging of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Zlámal, P.; Jiroušek, O.; Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Jung, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we employ dual-energy X-ray microfocus tomography (DECT) measurement to develop high-resolution finite element (FE) models that can be used for the numerical assessment of the deformation behaviour of hybrid Ni/Al foam subjected to both quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading. Cubic samples of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam with an edge length of [15]mm were investigated by the DECT measurement. The material was prepared using AlSi 7 Mg 0.3 aluminium foam with a mean pore size of [0.85]mm, coated with nanocrystalline nickel (crystallite size of approx. [50]nm) to form a surface layer with a theoretical thickness of [0.075]mm. CT imaging was carried out using state-of-the-art DSCT/DECT X-ray scanner developed at Centre of Excellence Telč. The device consists of a modular orthogonal assembly of two tube-detector imaging pairs, with an independent geometry setting and shared rotational stage mounted on a complex 16-axis CNC positioning system to enable unprecedented measurement variability for highly-detailed tomographical measurements. A sample of the metal foam was simultaneously irradiated using an XWT-240-SE reflection type X-ray tube and an XWT-160-TCHR transmission type X-ray tube. An enhanced dual-source sampling strategy was used for data acquisition. X-ray images were taken using XRD1622 large area GOS scintillator flat panel detectors with an active area of [410 × 410]mm and resolution [2048 × 2048]pixels. Tomographic scanning was performed in 1,200 projections with a 0.3 degree angular step to improve the accuracy of the generated models due to the very complex microstructure and high attenuation of the investigated material. Reconstructed data was processed using a dual-energy algorithm, and was used for the development of a 3D model and voxel model of the foam. The selected parameters of the models were compared with nominal parameters of the actual foam and showed good correlation

  13. Fabrication and electromagnetic interference shielding performance of open-cell foam of a Cu–Ni alloy integrated with CNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Keju; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Jia; Dai, Zhendong, E-mail: zddai@nuaa.edu.cn

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Cu–Ni alloy open-cell foam integrated with CNTs was used for EMI shielding. • The composite was prepared by electroless, electro-, and electrophoretic deposition. • The main shielding mechanism was multiple reflections and absorptions of microwaves. • The composite had a porous structure, large surface area, and inherent permeability. - Abstract: A lightweight multi-layered electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material made of open-cell foam of a Cu–Ni alloy integrated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was prepared by electroless copper plating, then nickel electroplating, and finally electrophoretic deposition of CNTs. The foamed Cu–Ni–CNT composite comprises, from inside to outside, Cu, Ni, and CNT layers. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and EMI tests were employed to characterize the morphology, composition, and EMI performance of the composite, respectively. The results indicated that the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite increased with increasing pore density (indicated as pores per inch (PPI)) and increasing thickness. A specimen with a PPI of 110 and a 1.5-mm thickness had a maximum SE of up to 54.6 dB, and a SE as high as 47.5 dB on average in the 8–12 GHz range. Integrating the inherent superiority of Cu, Ni, and CNTs, the porous structure of the composite can attenuate the incident electromagnetic microwaves by reflecting, scattering, and absorbing them between the metallic skeleton and the CNT layer. The multiple reflections and absorptions make it difficult for the microwaves to escape from the composite before being absorbed, thereby making the composite a potential shielding material.

  14. An experimental study of natural convection in open-cell aluminum foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jaeger, P; Reynders, R; De Schampheleire, S; Joen, C T'; Huisseune, H; Amee, B; De Paepe, M

    2012-01-01

    Natural convecton n air-saturated alumnum foam has been measured. A carefully designed experimental setup is built for his ask. The calibraton is done by comparing he results of a flat plate wh literature data, revealing excellent agreement. The nvestigated foams have a pore densiy of 10 and 20 PPI. The bondng of the foam is performed via brazing, or by applying a single epoxy which is enriched wh highly conductve alumna particles. The Rayleigh number is varied between 2500 and 6000, wh he rato of he surface area o he perimeter of he substrate as characteristc length. The foam height is varied between 12 and 25.4 mm. A major difference between both he bondng methods is observed. The brazed samples showed a beter heat ransfer n all cases. Furthermore, when ncreasing he foam height, a clear augmentaton of he heat ransfer is observed. Based on hese results, a correlaton is presented.

  15. Prediction of the Stress-Strain Behavior of Open-Cell Aluminum Foam under Compressive Loading and the Effects of Various RVE Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi Ghaleh Jigh, Behrang; Farsi, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini Toudeshky, Hossein

    2018-05-01

    The prediction of the mechanical behavior of metallic foams with realistic microstructure and the effects of various boundary conditions on the mechanical behavior is an important and challenging issue in modeling representative volume elements (RVEs). A numerical investigation is conducted to determine the effects of various boundary conditions and cell wall cross sections on the compressive mechanical properties of aluminum foam, including the stiffness, plateau stress and onset strain of densification. The open-cell AA6101-T6 aluminum foam Duocel is used in the analyses in this study. Geometrical characteristics including the cell size, foam relative density, and cross-sectional shape and thickness of the cell walls are extracted from images of the foam. Then, the obtained foam microstructure is analyzed as a 2D model. The ligaments are modeled as shear deformable beams with elastic-plastic material behavior. To prevent interpenetration of the nodes and walls inside the cells with large deformations, self-contact-type frictionless interaction is stipulated between the internal surfaces. Sensitivity analyses are performed using several boundary conditions and cells wall cross-sectional shapes. The predicted results from the finite element analyses are compared with the experimental results. Finally, the most appropriate boundary conditions, leading to more consistent results with the experimental data, are introduced.

  16. Prediction of the Stress-Strain Behavior of Open-Cell Aluminum Foam under Compressive Loading and the Effects of Various RVE Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi Ghaleh Jigh, Behrang; Farsi, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini Toudeshky, Hossein

    2018-04-01

    The prediction of the mechanical behavior of metallic foams with realistic microstructure and the effects of various boundary conditions on the mechanical behavior is an important and challenging issue in modeling representative volume elements (RVEs). A numerical investigation is conducted to determine the effects of various boundary conditions and cell wall cross sections on the compressive mechanical properties of aluminum foam, including the stiffness, plateau stress and onset strain of densification. The open-cell AA6101-T6 aluminum foam Duocel is used in the analyses in this study. Geometrical characteristics including the cell size, foam relative density, and cross-sectional shape and thickness of the cell walls are extracted from images of the foam. Then, the obtained foam microstructure is analyzed as a 2D model. The ligaments are modeled as shear deformable beams with elastic-plastic material behavior. To prevent interpenetration of the nodes and walls inside the cells with large deformations, self-contact-type frictionless interaction is stipulated between the internal surfaces. Sensitivity analyses are performed using several boundary conditions and cells wall cross-sectional shapes. The predicted results from the finite element analyses are compared with the experimental results. Finally, the most appropriate boundary conditions, leading to more consistent results with the experimental data, are introduced.

  17. Functional Performances of CuZnAl Shape Memory Alloy Open-Cell Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, C. A.; Casati, R.; Bassani, P.; Tuissi, A.

    2018-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) with cellular structure offer a unique mixture of thermo-physical-mechanical properties. These characteristics can be tuned by changing the pore size and make the shape memory metallic foams very attractive for developing new devices for structural and functional applications. In this work, CuZnAl SMA foams were produced through the liquid infiltration of space holder method. In comparison, a conventional CuZn brass alloy was foamed trough the same method. Functional performances were studied on both bulk and foamed SMA specimens. Calorimetric response shows similar martensitic transformation (MT) below 0 °C. Compressive response of CuZnAl revealed that mechanical behavior is strongly affected by sample morphology and that damping capacity of metallic foam is increased above the MT temperatures. The shape memory effect was detected in the CuZnAl foams. The conventional brass shows a compressive response similar to that of the martensitic CuZnAl, in which plastic deformation accumulation occurs up to the cellular structure densification after few thermal cycles.

  18. Preparation and Oxidation Performance of Y and Ce-Modified Cr Coating on open-cell Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy Foam by the Pack Cementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Q.; Hu, Z. L.; Wu, G. H.

    2016-12-01

    Metallic foams with a high fraction of porosity, low density and high-energy absorption capacity are a rapidly emerging class of novel ultralight weight materials for various engineering applications. In this study, Y-Cr and Ce-Cr-coated Ni-Cr-Fe alloy foams were prepared via the pack cementation method, and the effects of Y and Ce addition on the coating microstructure and oxidation performance were analyzed in order to improve the oxidation resistance of open-cell nickel-based alloy foams. The results show that the Ce-Cr coating is relatively more uniform and has a denser distribution on the surface of the nickel-based alloy foam. The surface grains of the Ce-Cr-coated alloy foam are finer compared to those of the Y-Cr-coated alloy foam. An obvious Ce peak appears on the interface between the coating and the alloy foam strut, which gives rise to a "site-blocking" effect for the short-circuit transport of the cation in the substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the Y-Cr-coated alloy foam mainly consists of Cr, (Fe, Ni) and (Ni, Cr) phases in the surface layer. The Ce-Cr-coated alloy foam is mainly composed of Cr and (Ni, Cr) phases. Furthermore, the addition of Y and Ce clearly lead to an improvement in the oxidation resistance of the coated alloy foams in the temperature range of 900-1000 °C. The addition of Ce is especially effective in enhancing the diffusion of chromium to the oxidation front, thus, accelerating the formation of a Cr2O3 layer.

  19. Experimental Study of Stress-Strain Behaviour of Open-Cell Aluminium Foam Sandwich Panel for Automotive Structural Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Asmawiyah Ibrahim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of high stiffness and strength to weight ratio, aluminium foam sandwich (AFS has huge advantage in automotive industries in order to reduce the vehicle’s weight which consequently will reduce the fuel consumption. While reducing the weight, AFS must also maintain high strength and durability compared to other competitive materials used which perform same functionalities. AFS had been proved its suitability for industrial application by previous researchers such as in aerospace, automotive and architecture. However, there is still a gap need to be filled in order to expand the use of the AFS in another application. In this paper, the tensile strength of AFS panel made of from aluminium skin sheets and open-cell aluminium foam core with various thickness is investigated. Design of experiment was developed according to JUMP (JMP statistical software and experimental work was done using universal testing machine. The stress-strain behavior was analysed. The result shows that the effect of skin to core ratio is significant on the stress-strain behavior.

  20. Multi-scale Modelling of Fracture in Open-Cell Metal Foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangipudi, K. R.; Onck, P. R.; Ganghoffer, JF; Pastrone, F

    2010-01-01

    Metal foams possess attractive mechanical properties like high stiffness to weight ratio.When used to build light-weight structures they require a good combination of strength and ductility. They are ductile under compression but rather brittle in tension with a few percent of overall strain to

  1. The OpenFOAM technology primer

    CERN Document Server

    Maric, Tomislav; Mooney, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    This book covers two main aspects of working with OpenFOAM: using the applications and developing and extending the library code. In the first part of the book, we chose a few utilities and applications to describe the OpenFOAM work flow. This information should provide a sufficient starting point for the reader, who can investigate his/her interests further by following the provided instructions in a similar way for another solver or application.

  2. Washcoat Deposition of Ni- and Co-ZrO2 Low Surface Area Powders onto Ceramic Open-Cell Foams: Influence of Slurry Formulation and Rheology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Balzarotti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of formulations and procedures to deposit thin active layers based on low surface area powders on complex geometry substrates (open-cell foams was experimentally assessed. An acid-free liquid medium based on water, glycerol, and polyvinyl alcohol was used for powder dispersion, while a dip-coating technique was chosen for washcoat deposition on 30 PPI ceramic open-cell foams. The rheological behavior was explained on the bases of both porosity and actual powder density. It was proved that the use of multiple dippings fulfills flexibility requirements for washcoat load management. Multiple depositions with intermediate flash drying steps at 350 °C were carried out. Washcoat loads in the 2.5 to 22 wt. % range were obtained. Pore clogging was seldom observed in a limited extent in samples with high loading (>20 wt. %. Adhesion, evaluated by means of accelerated stress test in ultrasound bath, pointed out good results of all the deposited layers.

  3. RANS Simulations using OpenFOAM Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    OpenFOAM offers considerable advantages for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations; it is open source, free of charge, and has the ability...physics, laser- plasma interactions, warhead design, air blast, detonation physics and computational fluid dynamics . Since moving into the Hydrodynamics...private industry as a consultant at the company Xdin. Michel has been working in research projects with computational fluid dynamics focusing on

  4. Outgassing from Open and Closed Magma Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix W. von Aulock

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During magma ascent, bubbles nucleate, grow, coalesce, and form a variably permeable porous network. The reorganization, failing and sealing of bubble walls may contribute to the opening and closing of the volcanic system. In this contribution we cause obsidian to nucleate and grow bubbles to high gas volume fraction at atmospheric pressure by heating samples to 950°C for different times and we image the growth through a furnace. Following the experiment, we imaged the internal pore structure of selected samples in 3D and then dissected for analysis of textures and dissolved water content remnant in the glass. We demonstrate that in these high viscosity systems, during foaming and subsequent foam-maturation, bubbles near a free surface resorb via diffusion to produce an impermeable skin of melt around a foam. The skin thickens non-linearly through time. The water concentrations at the outer and inner skin margins reflect the solubility of water in the melt at the partial pressure of water in atmospheric and water-rich bubble conditions, respectively. In this regime, mass transfer of water out of the system is diffusion limited and the sample shrinks slowly. In a second set of experiments in which we polished off the skin of the foamed samples and placed them back in the furnace to allow open system outgassing, we observe rapid sample contraction and collapse of the connected pore network under surface tension as the system efficiently outgasses. In this regime, mass transfer of water is permeability limited. We conclude that diffusion-driven skin formation can efficiently seal connectivity in foams. When rupture of melt film around gas bubbles (i.e., skin removal occurs, then rapid outgassing and consequent foam collapse modulate gas pressurization in the vesiculated magma. The mechanisms described here are relevant to the evolution of pore network heterogeneity in permeable magmas.

  5. Outgassing From Open And Closed Magma Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Maksimenko, Anton; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan

    2017-06-01

    During magma ascent, bubbles nucleate, grow, coalesce, and form a variably permeable porous network. The volcanic system opens and closes as bubble walls reorganize, seal or fail. In this contribution we cause obsidian to nucleate and grow bubbles to high gas volume fraction at atmospheric pressure by heating samples to 950 ºC for different times and we image the growth through a furnace. Following the experiment, we imaged the internal pore structure of selected samples in 3D and then dissected for analysis of textures and dissolved water content remnant in the glass. We demonstrate that in these high viscosity systems, during foaming and subsequent foam-maturation, bubbles near a free surface resorb via diffusion to produce an impermeable skin of melt around a foam. The skin thickens nonlinearly through time. The water concentrations at the outer and inner skin margins reflect the solubility of water in the melt at the partial pressure of water in atmospheric and water-rich bubble conditions, respectively. In this regime, mass transfer of water out of the system is diffusion limited and the sample shrinks slowly. In a second set of experiments in which we polished off the skin of the foamed samples and placed them back in the furnace, we observe rapid sample contraction and collapse of the connected pore network under surface tension as the system efficiently outgasses. In this regime, mass transfer of water is permeability limited. The mechanisms described here are relevant to the evolution of pore network heterogeneity in permeable magmas. We conclude that diffusion-driven skin formation can efficiently seal connectivity in foams. When rupture of melt film around gas bubbles (i.e. skin removal) occurs, then rapid outgassing and consequent foam collapse modulate gas pressurisation in the vesiculated magma.

  6. dsmcFoam+: An OpenFOAM based direct simulation Monte Carlo solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Borg, M. K.; Scanlon, T. J.; Longshaw, S. M.; John, B.; Emerson, D. R.; Reese, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    dsmcFoam+ is a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver for rarefied gas dynamics, implemented within the OpenFOAM software framework, and parallelised with MPI. It is open-source and released under the GNU General Public License in a publicly available software repository that includes detailed documentation and tutorial DSMC gas flow cases. This release of the code includes many features not found in standard dsmcFoam, such as molecular vibrational and electronic energy modes, chemical reactions, and subsonic pressure boundary conditions. Since dsmcFoam+ is designed entirely within OpenFOAM's C++ object-oriented framework, it benefits from a number of key features: the code emphasises extensibility and flexibility so it is aimed first and foremost as a research tool for DSMC, allowing new models and test cases to be developed and tested rapidly. All DSMC cases are as straightforward as setting up any standard OpenFOAM case, as dsmcFoam+ relies upon the standard OpenFOAM dictionary based directory structure. This ensures that useful pre- and post-processing capabilities provided by OpenFOAM remain available even though the fully Lagrangian nature of a DSMC simulation is not typical of most OpenFOAM applications. We show that dsmcFoam+ compares well to other well-known DSMC codes and to analytical solutions in terms of benchmark results.

  7. Characterization of Ti-6Al-4V open cellular foams fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.; Gaytan, S.M.; Medina, F.; Martinez, E.; Martinez, J.L.; Hernandez, D.H.; Machado, B.I.; Ramirez, D.A.; Wicker, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V open cellular foams were fabricated by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM). Foam models were developed from CT-scans of aluminum open cellular foams and embedded in CAD for EBM. These foams were fabricated with solid cell structures as well as hollow cell structures and exhibit tailorable stiffness and strength. The strength in proportion to the measured microindentation hardness is as much as 40% higher for hollow cell (wall) structures in contrast to solid, fully dense EBM fabricated components. Plots of relative stiffness versus relative density were in good agreement with the Gibson-Ashby model for open cellular foam materials. Stiffness or Young's modulus values measured using a resonant frequency-damping analysis technique were found to vary inversely with porosity especially for solid cell wall, open cellular structure foams. These foams exhibit the potential for novel biomedical, aeronautics, and automotive applications.

  8. Development of a GUI Based Front End for Open Source CFD Program, OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Samhee; Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Hyongchol; Park, Sunbyung; Kim, Hyunjik [Nuclear Safety Evaluation, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    OpenFOAM is sorely lacking in user friendliness as it runs in console mode under Li nux. Run{sub F}OAM was developed to greatly simplify the task of running an OpenFOAM calculation under Windows OS. Run{sub F}OAM was written using Delphi object pascal language, and GLScene package was used for the 3D graphics. Verification of Run{sub F}OAM was carried out by performing some OpenFOAM CFD calculations provided in OpenFOAM package, and these showed that the use of Run{sub F}OAM is simple whilst providing sufficient allowances in user modifications. Run{sub F}oam, a GUI based front end program to simplify running Open Foam CFD cases, has been developed. By incorporating numerous GUI in the program, Run{sub F}oam has demonstrated that running an Open Foam case can be easily accomplished. There is a potential for further development as the Open Foam has the great advantage of being free to develop and to use. There is also a potential to couple or interface the Open Foam with the systems analysis code such as Relap5.

  9. Performance evaluation of OpenFOAM on many-core architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzobohatý, Tomáš; Říha, Lubomír; Karásek, Tomáš; Kozubek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    In this article application of Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) C++ libraries for solving engineering problems on many-core architectures is presented. Objective of this article is to present scalability of OpenFOAM on parallel platforms solving real engineering problems of fluid dynamics. Scalability test of OpenFOAM is performed using various hardware and different implementation of standard PCG and PBiCG Krylov iterative methods. Speed up of various implementations of linear solvers using GPU and MIC accelerators are presented in this paper. Numerical experiments of 3D lid-driven cavity flow for several cases with various number of cells are presented

  10. Performance evaluation of OpenFOAM on many-core architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzobohatý, Tomáš; Říha, Lubomír; Karásek, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.karasek@vsb.cz; Kozubek, Tomáš [IT4Innovations National Supercomputing Center, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-10

    In this article application of Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) C++ libraries for solving engineering problems on many-core architectures is presented. Objective of this article is to present scalability of OpenFOAM on parallel platforms solving real engineering problems of fluid dynamics. Scalability test of OpenFOAM is performed using various hardware and different implementation of standard PCG and PBiCG Krylov iterative methods. Speed up of various implementations of linear solvers using GPU and MIC accelerators are presented in this paper. Numerical experiments of 3D lid-driven cavity flow for several cases with various number of cells are presented.

  11. Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stanley R [Windsor, SC; Korinko, Paul S [Aiken, SC

    2008-05-27

    A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

  12. OpenFOAM: Open source CFD in research and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasak, Hrvoje

    2009-12-01

    The current focus of development in industrial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is integration of CFD into Computer-Aided product development, geometrical optimisation, robust design and similar. On the other hand, in CFD research aims to extend the boundaries ofpractical engineering use in "non-traditional " areas. Requirements of computational flexibility and code integration are contradictory: a change of coding paradigm, with object orientation, library components, equation mimicking is proposed as a way forward. This paper describes OpenFOAM, a C++ object oriented library for Computational Continuum Mechanics (CCM) developed by the author. Efficient and flexible implementation of complex physical models is achieved by mimicking the form ofpartial differential equation in software, with code functionality provided in library form. Open Source deployment and development model allows the user to achieve desired versatility in physical modeling without the sacrifice of complex geometry support and execution efficiency.

  13. OpenFOAM: Open source CFD in research and industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Jasak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The current focus of development in industrial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD is integration of CFD into Computer-Aided product development, geometrical optimisation, robust design and similar. On the other hand, in CFD research aims to extend the boundaries of practical engineering use in “non-traditional” areas. Requirements of computational flexibility and code integration are contradictory: a change of coding paradigm, with object orientation, library components, equation mimicking is proposed as a way forward. This paper describes OpenFOAM, a C++ object oriented library for Computational Continuum Mechanics (CCM developed by the author. Efficient and flexible implementation of complex physical models is achieved by mimicking the form of partial differential equation in software, with code functionality provided in library form. Open Source deployment and development model allows the user to achieve desired versatility in physical modeling without the sacrifice of complex geometry support and execution efficiency.

  14. Rebuilding of Rothe's nozzle measurements with OpenFOAM software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlemark, Erik; Nedea, Silvia; Markelov, Gennady

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the dsmcFoam solver is tested and validated for the the three main solver functionalities of 1) free-stream boundary conditions, 2) kinetic intermolecular collision including internal degrees of freedom and 3) gas/surface interactions. The free-stream utility was improved such that a spatially uniform field of particles gets inserted now yielding reliable results for the cells located close to these patches. Implementation of the collision models were validated for two test cases (monatomic gas mixtures and diatomic gas) by observing the equilibration of both the kinetic and internal energies. It was found that the present code had good agreement to the independent codes of HAWK and SMILE as well as to results by G. Bird. The validation of the present codes treatment for the gas/surface interactions was evaluated using the benchmark case of Rothe's nozzle measurements. Results show that the present version of dsmcFoam obtained good agreements for this case compared to the measurements of Rothe for density and temperature. It was also found that the Navier-Stokes solver of OpenFOAM produced reasonable results, even though the local Knudsen number of the flow exceeds the range of applicability for this method, Kn=0.1.

  15. A swirl generator case study for OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, O; Nilsson, H; Bosioc, A I; Susan-Resiga, R F; Muntean, S

    2010-01-01

    This work presents numerical results, using OpenFOAM, of the flow in the swirl flow generator test rig developed at Politehnica University of Timisoara, Romania. The work shows results computed by solving the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations. The unsteady method couples the rotating and stationary parts using a sliding grid interface based on a GGI formulation. Turbulence is modeled using the standard k-ε model, and block structured wall function ICEM-Hexa meshes are used. The numerical results are validated against experimental LDV results, and against designed velocity profiles. The investigation shows that OpenFOAM gives results that are comparable to the experimental and designed profiles. This case study was presented at the 5th OpenFOAM Workshop, held in Gothenburg, Sweden, as a tutorial on how to treat turbomachinery applications in OpenFOAM.

  16. Development and optimization of open cell foam-based platelet milli-reactor for the intensification and the valorisation of CO_2 methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    In response to the different international agreements to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases and limit their impact on global warming, an energy transition is in progress to increase the share of renewable energies. The Power-to-Gas concept is one of many solutions proposed to answer the need to charge and discharge this intermittent energy source. However, the methanation reaction, highly exothermal, needs a process able to efficiently evacuate the heat produced by the reaction. During this thesis, a structure milli-reactor, filled with an open cell foam coated with a catalyst (Ni/Ceria-Zirconia), was developed as an answer to this issue. The reactor was hydrodynamically and thermally characterized. The second one allowed us to evidence hot spots formation. The presence of nano-fibres allowed better control of the heat generated, limiting the deactivation of the catalyst (sintering). Catalytic tests, performed on a small scale pilot, clearly showed the advantage of structured beds compared to fixed bed, classically used in processes, with a moderate heat elevation around 25 C. (author)

  17. Steady-state capabilities for hydroturbines with OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M.; Beaudoin, M.; Giroux, A. M.

    2010-08-01

    The availability of a high quality Open Source CFD simulation platform like OpenFOAM offers new R&D opportunities by providing direct access to models and solver implementation details. Efforts have been made by Hydro-Québec to adapt OpenFOAM to hydroturbines for the development of steady-state capabilities. The paper describes the developments that have been made to implement new turbomachinery related capabilities: Multiple Frame of Reference solver, domain coupling interfaces (GGI, cyclicGGI and mixing plane) and specialized boundary conditions. Practical use of the new turbomachinery capabilities are demonstrated for the analysis of a 195-MW Francis hydroturbine.

  18. Steady-state capabilities for hydroturbines with OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, M; Beaudoin, M; Giroux, A M, E-mail: page.maryse@ireq.c [Hydro-Quebec, Institut de recherche 1800 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S1 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    The availability of a high quality Open Source CFD simulation platform like OpenFOAM offers new R and D opportunities by providing direct access to models and solver implementation details. Efforts have been made by Hydro-Quebec to adapt OpenFOAM to hydroturbines for the development of steady-state capabilities. The paper describes the developments that have been made to implement new turbomachinery related capabilities: Multiple Frame of Reference solver, domain coupling interfaces (GGI, cyclicGGI and mixing plane) and specialized boundary conditions. Practical use of the new turbomachinery capabilities are demonstrated for the analysis of a 195-MW Francis hydroturbine.

  19. Steady-state capabilities for hydroturbines with OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, M; Beaudoin, M; Giroux, A M

    2010-01-01

    The availability of a high quality Open Source CFD simulation platform like OpenFOAM offers new R and D opportunities by providing direct access to models and solver implementation details. Efforts have been made by Hydro-Quebec to adapt OpenFOAM to hydroturbines for the development of steady-state capabilities. The paper describes the developments that have been made to implement new turbomachinery related capabilities: Multiple Frame of Reference solver, domain coupling interfaces (GGI, cyclicGGI and mixing plane) and specialized boundary conditions. Practical use of the new turbomachinery capabilities are demonstrated for the analysis of a 195-MW Francis hydroturbine.

  20. Development of a GUI Based Front End for Open Source CFD Program, OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Samhee; Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Hyongchol; Park, Sunbyung; Kim, Hyunjik

    2013-01-01

    OpenFOAM is sorely lacking in user friendliness as it runs in console mode under Li nux. Run F OAM was developed to greatly simplify the task of running an OpenFOAM calculation under Windows OS. Run F OAM was written using Delphi object pascal language, and GLScene package was used for the 3D graphics. Verification of Run F OAM was carried out by performing some OpenFOAM CFD calculations provided in OpenFOAM package, and these showed that the use of Run F OAM is simple whilst providing sufficient allowances in user modifications. Run F oam, a GUI based front end program to simplify running Open Foam CFD cases, has been developed. By incorporating numerous GUI in the program, Run F oam has demonstrated that running an Open Foam case can be easily accomplished. There is a potential for further development as the Open Foam has the great advantage of being free to develop and to use. There is also a potential to couple or interface the Open Foam with the systems analysis code such as Relap5

  1. Validation of OpenFoam for heavy gas dispersion applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mack, A.; Spruijt, M.P.N.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper heavy gas dispersion calculations were performed with OpenFoam. For a windtunnel test case, numerical data was validated with experiments. For a full scale numerical experiment,a code to code comparison was performed with numerical results obtained from Fluent. The validationwas

  2. PUFoam : A novel open-source CFD solver for the simulation of polyurethane foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Droghetti, H.; Marchisio, D. L.

    2017-08-01

    In this work a transient three-dimensional mathematical model is formulated and validated for the simulation of polyurethane (PU) foams. The model is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is coupled with a population balance equation (PBE) to describe the evolution of the gas bubbles/cells within the PU foam. The front face of the expanding foam is monitored on the basis of the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method using a compressible solver available in OpenFOAM version 3.0.1. The solver is additionally supplemented to include the PBE, solved with the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), the polymerization kinetics, an adequate rheological model and a simple model for the foam thermal conductivity. The new solver is labelled as PUFoam and is, for the first time in this work, validated for 12 different mixing-cup experiments. Comparison of the time evolution of the predicted and experimentally measured density and temperature of the PU foam shows the potentials and limitations of the approach.

  3. The efficacy of magnetic field on the thermal behavior of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofluid as a functional fluid through an open-cell metal foam tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amani, Mohammad [Mechanical and Energy Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ameri, Mohammad, E-mail: ameri_m@yahoo.com [Mechanical and Energy Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kasaeian, Alibakhsh [Department of Renewable Energies Engineering, Faculty of New Sciences & Technologies, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Experiments are performed with MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofluid through an open-cell metal foam tube. • Effects of concentration, Reynolds number and magnetic field on the nanofluid thermal behavior are examined. • Heat transfer is enhanced in attendance of constant and alternating magnetic fields. - Abstract: In the present experimental study, the influence of permanent and alternating magnetic fields on the flow and thermal behavior of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nanofluid flowing through a circular open-cell metal foam tube is investigated under homogeneous heat flux conditions. The experiments are performed at various nanoparticle concentrations, Reynolds numbers and magnetic fields with different strengths and frequencies. According to the observations, the heat transfer rate enhances directly relative to nanoparticle concentration and Reynolds number in attendance of magnetic field, whereas its maximum value of 16.4% is found for 2 wt% nanoparticles at Re = 200 under alternating field with 400 G strength and 20 Hz frequency. Moreover, it is observed that the influence of strength and frequency of magnetic field is insignificant for the pressure drop. Hydrothermal efficiency as the ratio of the Nusselt number to the ratio of the pressure drop is defined in order to evaluate the privilege of using MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofluids in practical applications. The maximum efficiency of 1.25 is observed at 2 wt% under magnetic field with 400 G and 20 Hz at Re = 1000.

  4. Mechanisms of foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Grechko, Andrey V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2017-11-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and cholesterol homeostasis in the peripheral blood is maintained by specialized cells, such as macrophages. Macrophages express a variety of scavenger receptors (SR) that interact with lipoproteins, including SR-A1, CD36, and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). These cells also have several cholesterol transporters, including ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1, ABCG1, and SR-BI, that are involved in reverse cholesterol transport. Lipids internalized by phagocytosis are transported to late endosomes/lysosomes, where lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) digests cholesteryl esters releasing free cholesterol. Free cholesterol in turn is processed by acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (ACAT1), an enzyme that transforms cholesterol to cholesteryl esters. The endoplasmic reticulum serves as a depot for maintaining newly synthesized cholesteryl esters that can be processed by neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH), which generates free cholesterol that can exit via cholesterol transporters. In atherosclerosis, pro-inflammatory stimuli upregulate expression of scavenger receptors, especially LOX-1, and downregulate expression of cholesterol transporters. ACAT1 is also increased, while NCEH expression is reduced. This results in deposition of free and esterified cholesterol in macrophages and generation of foam cells. Moreover, other cell types, such as endothelial (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), can also become foam cells. In this review, we discuss known pathways of foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

  5. A Graphical User Interface for the Computational Fluid Dynamics Software OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Melbø, Henrik Kaald

    2014-01-01

    A graphical user interface for the computational fluid dynamics software OpenFOAM has been constructed. OpenFOAM is a open source and powerful numerical software, but has much to be wanted in the field of user friendliness. In this thesis the basic operation of OpenFOAM will be introduced and the thesis will emerge in a graphical user interface written in PyQt. The graphical user interface will make the use of OpenFOAM simpler, and hopefully make this powerful tool more available for the gene...

  6. Validation of OpenFoam for heavy gas dispersion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, A; Spruijt, M P N

    2013-11-15

    In the present paper heavy gas dispersion calculations were performed with OpenFoam. For a wind tunnel test case, numerical data was validated with experiments. For a full scale numerical experiment, a code to code comparison was performed with numerical results obtained from Fluent. The validation was performed in a gravity driven environment (slope), where the heavy gas induced the turbulence. For the code to code comparison, a hypothetical heavy gas release into a strongly turbulent atmospheric boundary layer including terrain effects was selected. The investigations were performed for SF6 and CO2 as heavy gases applying the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. A strong interaction of the heavy gas with the turbulence is present which results in a strong damping of the turbulence and therefore reduced heavy gas mixing. Especially this interaction, based on the buoyancy effects, was studied in order to ensure that the turbulence-buoyancy coupling is the main driver for the reduced mixing and not the global behaviour of the turbulence modelling. For both test cases, comparisons were performed between OpenFoam and Fluent solutions which were mainly in good agreement with each other. Beside steady state solutions, the time accuracy was investigated. In the low turbulence environment (wind tunnel test) which for both codes (laminar solutions) was in good agreement, also with the experimental data. The turbulent solutions of OpenFoam were in much better agreement with the experimental results than the Fluent solutions. Within the strong turbulence environment, both codes showed an excellent comparability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Actuator Using OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    H. Yazdani; K. Ghorbanian

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with modeling and simulation of the plasma actuator with OpenFOAM. Plasma actuator is one of the newest devices in flow control techniques which can delay separation by inducing external momentum to the boundary layer of the flow. The effects of the plasma actuators on the external flow are incorporated into Navier-Stokes computations as a body force vector which is obtained as a product of the net charge density and the electric field. In order to compute this body force vec...

  8. plasmaFoam: An OpenFOAM framework for computational plasma physics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Verma, Abhishek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    As emphasized in the 2012 Roadmap for low temperature plasmas (LTP), scientific computing has emerged as an essential tool for the investigation and prediction of the fundamental physical and chemical processes associated with these systems. While several in-house and commercial codes exist, with each having its own advantages and disadvantages, a common framework that can be developed by researchers from all over the world will likely accelerate the impact of computational studies on advances in low-temperature plasma physics and chemistry. In this regard, we present a finite volume computational toolbox to perform high-fidelity simulations of LTP systems. This framework, primarily based on the OpenFOAM solver suite, allows us to enhance our understanding of multiscale plasma phenomenon by performing massively parallel, three-dimensional simulations on unstructured meshes using well-established high performance computing tools that are widely used in the computational fluid dynamics community. In this talk, we will present preliminary results obtained using the OpenFOAM-based solver suite with benchmark three-dimensional simulations of microplasma devices including both dielectric and plasma regions. We will also discuss the future outlook for the solver suite.

  9. Modelling of gas-liquid, two-phase flow in porous media and channels of a PEM water electrolysis cell using the Euler-Euler framework of OpenFOAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    was shown to push the limits of the codes ca-pabilities. In order to improve simulation stability and time, a new model is developed in the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. The customizability of this code not only allows for specific relaxation strategies, it also permits the implementation of various...

  10. Manufacturing of Cast Metal Foams with Irregular Cell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupová I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are materials of which the research is still on-going, with the broad applicability in many different areas (e.g. automotive industry, building industry, medicine, etc.. These metallic materials have specific properties, such as large rigidity at low density, high thermal conductivity, capability to absorb energy, etc. The work is focused on the preparation of these materials using conventional casting technology (infiltration method, which ensures rapid and economically feasible method for production of shaped components. In the experimental part we studied conditions of casting of metallic foams with open pores and irregular cell structure made of ferrous and nonferrous alloys by use of various types of filler material (precursors.

  11. A study on temporal accuracy of OpenFOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Bong Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Crank–Nicolson scheme in native OpenFOAM source libraries was not able to provide 2nd order temporal accuracy of velocity and pressure since the volume flux of convective nonlinear terms was 1st accurate in time. In the present study the simplest way of getting the volume flux with 2nd order accuracy was proposed by using old fluxes. A possible numerical instability originated from an explicit estimation of volume fluxes could be handled by introducing a weighting factor which was determined by observing the ratio of the finally corrected volume flux to the intermediate volume flux at the previous step. The new calculation of volume fluxes was able to provide temporally accurate velocity and pressure with 2nd order. The improvement of temporal accuracy was validated by performing numerical simulations of 2D Taylor–Green vortex of which an exact solution was known and 2D vortex shedding from a circular cylinder.

  12. OpenFOAM Analysis of CANDU-6 Moderator Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chang, Se-Myong

    2015-01-01

    In this study OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), an open source CFD solver, is used to simulate the three-dimensional moderator flow in calandria tank of CANDU-6 reactor improving the computational efficiency by parallel computing which does not need any proprietary license. A prototype of CANDU-6 reactor is numerically analyzed about three-dimensional moderator flow in calandrian tank with OpenFOAM, an open source CFD code. The horizontal fuel channels in a CANDU-6 reactor (a pressurized heavy water reactor) are submerged in the heavy water (D 2 O) pool which is contained by a cylindrical tank, calandria. Each fuel channel consists of concentric tubes: a Pressure Tube (PT) and a Calandria Tube (CT). And the CO 2 gas is filled between these tubes. Consequently, a heat flux is rapidly transferred to the outer CT so that a film boiling may occur in CT. As a result, it is important to keep the subcooling in the moderator. It is one of the major concerns in the CANDU safety analyses to estimate the local subcooling margin of the moderator inside the calandria tank. Previous experimental studies showed that the film boiling would be unlikely to occur if the local moderator subcooling is sufficient. Therefore, an accurate prediction of the moderator temperature distribution in the calandria tank is needed to confirm the channel integrity. There have been numerous computational efforts to estimate the thermal hydraulics in the calandria tank using CFD codes. Hadaller et al. obtained a tube bank pressure drop model for tube bundle region of the calandria tank and implemented it into the MODTURC C LAS code. Yoon et al. used the CFX code to develop a CFD model with a porous media approach for the core region. However, it is known that porous media modeling provide only average values of flow velocities and temperatures and do not give any information about local flow variables near tube solid walls, which are necessary to implement accurate heat transfer

  13. OpenFOAM Analysis of CANDU-6 Moderator Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Se-Myong [Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation), an open source CFD solver, is used to simulate the three-dimensional moderator flow in calandria tank of CANDU-6 reactor improving the computational efficiency by parallel computing which does not need any proprietary license. A prototype of CANDU-6 reactor is numerically analyzed about three-dimensional moderator flow in calandrian tank with OpenFOAM, an open source CFD code. The horizontal fuel channels in a CANDU-6 reactor (a pressurized heavy water reactor) are submerged in the heavy water (D{sub 2}O) pool which is contained by a cylindrical tank, calandria. Each fuel channel consists of concentric tubes: a Pressure Tube (PT) and a Calandria Tube (CT). And the CO{sub 2} gas is filled between these tubes. Consequently, a heat flux is rapidly transferred to the outer CT so that a film boiling may occur in CT. As a result, it is important to keep the subcooling in the moderator. It is one of the major concerns in the CANDU safety analyses to estimate the local subcooling margin of the moderator inside the calandria tank. Previous experimental studies showed that the film boiling would be unlikely to occur if the local moderator subcooling is sufficient. Therefore, an accurate prediction of the moderator temperature distribution in the calandria tank is needed to confirm the channel integrity. There have been numerous computational efforts to estimate the thermal hydraulics in the calandria tank using CFD codes. Hadaller et al. obtained a tube bank pressure drop model for tube bundle region of the calandria tank and implemented it into the MODTURC{sub C}LAS code. Yoon et al. used the CFX code to develop a CFD model with a porous media approach for the core region. However, it is known that porous media modeling provide only average values of flow velocities and temperatures and do not give any information about local flow variables near tube solid walls, which are necessary to implement accurate heat

  14. CFD RANS Simulations on a Generic Conventional Scale Model Submarine: Comparison between Fluent and OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED CFD RANS Simulations on a Generic Conventional Scale Model Submarine: Comparison between Fluent and OpenFOAM ... OpenFOAM to replace some of the Fluent simulations. The fidelity of the Fluent code has been carefully validated, but the accuracy of parts of the... OpenFOAM code have not been so extensively tested. To test the accuracy of the OpenFOAM software, CFD simulations have been performed on the DSTO

  15. Compressive Deformation Behavior of Open-Cell Cu-Zn-Al Alloy Foam Made Through P/M Route Using Mechanically Alloyed Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Ajay Kumar; Mondal, D. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Prasanth, N.; Dasgupta, R.

    2018-03-01

    Cu-Zn-Al foams of varying porosity fractions using mechanical alloyed powder have been made through powder metallurgy route. Here, NH4 (HCO3) was used as a space holder. Mechanically alloyed Cu-Zn-Al is made using a planetary ball mill taking the ratio of Cu/Zn/Al = 70:25:5 (by weight ratio). The ball/powder ratios were varied in the four ranges 10:1, 15:1, 20:1, and 25:1. Green compacts of milled powder and space holder samples were sintered at three stages at three different temperatures 350, 550, and 850 °C for 1 h at each stage. The crystalline size and particle size as a function of ball/powder ratios were examined. The compressive deformation responses of foams are varied with relative density and the ball/powder ratio. The plateau stress and energy absorption of these foams increase with an increase in relative density but decreases with increase in ball/powder ratio, even though crystalline size decreases. This has further been explained on the basis of particle morphology as a function of ball/powder ratio.

  16. Comparison of OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D for neutral atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Bechmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The flow solvers OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D are compared in the case of neutral atmospheric flow over terrain using the test cases of Askervein and Bolund hills. Both solvers are run using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes k– turbulence model. One of the main modeling differences...... between the two solvers is the wall-function approach. The Open-FOAM v.1.7.1 uses a Nikuradse’s sand roughness model, while EllipSys3D uses a model based on the atmospheric roughness length. It is found that Nikuradse’s model introduces an error dependent on the near-wall cell height. To mitigate...... this error the near-wall cells should be at least 10 times larger than the surface roughness. It is nonetheless possible to obtain very similar results between EllipSys3D and OpenFOAM v.1.7.1. The more recent OpenFOAM v.2.2.1, which includes the atmospheric roughness length wall-function approach, has also...

  17. Numerical Simulation of Liquids Draining From a Tank Using OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakri, Fadhilah Mohd; Sukri Mat Ali, Mohamed; Zaki Shaikh Salim, Sheikh Ahmad; Muhamad, Sallehuddin

    2017-08-01

    Accurate simulation of liquids draining is a challenging task. It involves two phases flow, i.e. liquid and air. In this study draining a liquid from a cylindrical tank is numerically simulated using OpenFOAM. OpenFOAM is an open source CFD package and it becomes increasingly popular among the academician and also industries. Comparisons with theoretical and results from previous published data confirmed that OpenFOAM is able to simulate the liquids draining very well. This is done using the gas-liquid interface solver available in the standard library of OpenFOAM. Additionally, this study was also able to explain the physics flow of the draining tank.

  18. Mixing foams and grains in Hele-Shaw cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A P B; Tufaile, A; Haddad, T A S, E-mail: tufaile@usp.b [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades da Universidade de Sao Paulo, R. Arlindo Bettio, 1000, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-01

    We have observed some features of the coexistence of foams and granular materials in Hele-Shaw cells. The most part of the liquid and granular material stays at the bottom of the cell, with only a small quantity of the mixture resting on the froth. The fractal dimensions of the final states of the foams are close to the values obtained from the Random Apollonian Packing model. The disperse structure of the granular material affects the probability distribution of number of sides of the foam bubbles. The nearest neighbor distances between the peaks of the sand piles at the bottom of the cell are close to a lognormal distribution.

  19. Simulation of helium release in the Battelle Model Containment facility using OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, Heinz; Ammirabile, Luca, E-mail: luca.ammirabile@ec.europa.eu

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The HYJET Jx7 hydrogen release experiment at BMC facility is studied using OpenFOAM. • The SST model and 2nd order numerics for momentum and species concentration are used. • The behaviour is captured well but helium concentration is generally over-predicted. • OpenFOAM needs smaller time steps, higher resolution, more CPU time compared to CFX. • The study shows the potential of open source CFD codes in some nuclear application. - Abstract: The open source CFD code OpenFOAM has been validated against an experiment of jet release phenomena in the Battelle Model Containment facility (BMC), and benchmarked with the Ansys CFX5.7 results. In the selected test, HYJET Jx7, helium was released into the containment at a speed of 42 m/s over a time of 200 s. The SST turbulence model was applied to model helium release and dispersion with both codes. The overall behaviour is captured adequately. However, there are still some noticeable differences between the CFX and OpenFOAM solutions. The study confirms the potential of using open source codes like OpenFOAM in some nuclear applications. Nevertheless further investigations and improvements are needed.

  20. Simulation of helium release in the Battelle Model Containment facility using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkening, Heinz; Ammirabile, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The HYJET Jx7 hydrogen release experiment at BMC facility is studied using OpenFOAM. • The SST model and 2nd order numerics for momentum and species concentration are used. • The behaviour is captured well but helium concentration is generally over-predicted. • OpenFOAM needs smaller time steps, higher resolution, more CPU time compared to CFX. • The study shows the potential of open source CFD codes in some nuclear application. - Abstract: The open source CFD code OpenFOAM has been validated against an experiment of jet release phenomena in the Battelle Model Containment facility (BMC), and benchmarked with the Ansys CFX5.7 results. In the selected test, HYJET Jx7, helium was released into the containment at a speed of 42 m/s over a time of 200 s. The SST turbulence model was applied to model helium release and dispersion with both codes. The overall behaviour is captured adequately. However, there are still some noticeable differences between the CFX and OpenFOAM solutions. The study confirms the potential of using open source codes like OpenFOAM in some nuclear applications. Nevertheless further investigations and improvements are needed

  1. rhoCentralRfFoam: An OpenFOAM solver for high speed chemically active flows - Simulation of planar detonations -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Marcantoni, L. F.; Tamagno, J.; Elaskar, S.

    2017-10-01

    A new solver developed within the framework of OpenFOAM 2.3.0, called rhoCentralRfFoam which can be interpreted like an evolution of rhoCentralFoam, is presented. Its use, performing numerical simulations on initiation and propagation of planar detonation waves in combustible mixtures H2-Air and H2-O2-Ar, is described. Unsteady one dimensional (1D) Euler equations coupled with sources to take into account chemical activity, are numerically solved using the Kurganov, Noelle and Petrova second order scheme in a domain discretized with finite volumes. The computational code can work with any number of species and its corresponding reactions, but here it was tested with 13 chemically active species (one species inert), and 33 elementary reactions. A gaseous igniter which acts like a shock-tube driver, and powerful enough to generate a strong shock capable of triggering exothermic chemical reactions in fuel mixtures, is used to start planar detonations. The following main aspects of planar detonations are here, treated: induction time of combustible mixtures cited above and required mesh resolutions; convergence of overdriven detonations to Chapman-Jouguet states; detonation structure (ZND model); and the use of reflected shocks to determine induction times experimentally. The rhoCentralRfFoam code was verified comparing numerical results and it was validated, through analytical results and experimental data.

  2. Hyperbolic prisms and foams in Hele-Shaw cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br [Soft Matter Laboratory, Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tufaile, A.P.B. [Soft Matter Laboratory, Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-03

    The propagation of light in foams creates patterns which are generated due to the reflection and refraction of light. One of these patterns is observed by the formation of multiple mirror images inside liquid bridges in a layer of bubbles in a Hele-Shaw cell. We are presenting the existence of these patterns in foams and their relation with hyperbolic geometry and Sierpinski gaskets using the Poincare disk model. The images obtained from the experiment in foams are compared to the case of hyperbolic optical elements. -- Highlights: → The chaotic scattering of light in foams generating deltoid patterns is based on hyperbolic geometry. → The deltoid patterns are obtained through the Plateau borders in a Hele-Shaw cell. → The Plateau borders act like hyperbolic prism. → Some effects of the refraction and reflection of the light rays were studied using a hyperbolic prism.

  3. On the implicit density based OpenFOAM solver for turbulent compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Jiří

    The contribution deals with the development of coupled implicit density based solver for compressible flows in the framework of open source package OpenFOAM. However the standard distribution of OpenFOAM contains several ready-made segregated solvers for compressible flows, the performance of those solvers is rather week in the case of transonic flows. Therefore we extend the work of Shen [15] and we develop an implicit semi-coupled solver. The main flow field variables are updated using lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel method (LU-SGS) whereas the turbulence model variables are updated using implicit Euler method.

  4. A wave generation toolbox for the open‐source CFD library: OpenFoam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The open‐source CFD library OpenFoam® contains a method for solving free surface Newtonian flows using the Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a volume of fluid method. In this paper, it is demonstrated how this has been extended with a generic wave generation and absorption...... method termed ‘wave relaxation zones’, on which a detailed account is given. The ability to use OpenFoam for the modelling of waves is demonstrated using two benchmark test cases, which show the ability to model wave propagation and wave breaking. Furthermore, the reflection coefficient from outlet...... made freely available through the OpenFoam‐Extend Community....

  5. Porosity and cell size control in alumina foam preparation by thermo-foaming of powder dispersions in molten sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Vijayan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The foaming characteristics of alumina powder dispersions in molten sucrose have been studied as a function of alumina powder to sucrose weight ratio (WA/S and foaming temperature. The increase in foaming temperature significantly decreases the foaming and foam setting time and increases the foam volume due to an increase in the rate of OH condensation as well as a decrease in the viscosity of the dispersion. Nevertheless, the foam collapses beyond a critical foaming temperature, which depends on the WA/S. The sintering shrinkage depends mainly on the WA/S and marginally on the foaming temperature. The porosity (83.4–94.6 vol.% and cell size (0.55–1.6 mm increase with an increase in foaming temperature (120–170 °C and a decrease in WA/S (0.8–1.6. The drastic decrease in compressive strength and modulus beyond a WA/S of 1.2 is due to the pores generated on the cell walls and struts as a result of particle agglomeration. Gibson and Ashby plots show large deviation with respect to the model constants ‘C’ and ‘n’, especially at higher alumina powder to sucrose weight ratios.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  7. Dispersion simulation of airborne effluent through tree canopy using OpenFOAM CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakesh, P.T.; Venkatesan, R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear plants are often surrounded by tree canopy as a part of landscaping and green belt development. The transport and dispersion of air borne pollutants within the tree/plant canopies is greatly controlled by turbulence. The density of the tree canopy, the height and type of the trees is of importance while determining the intensity of turbulence. In order to study the mechanical effect of the canopy and the consequent modification in the ground level concentration pattern from a ground level release of radioactivity, a CFD code called OpenFOAM is used. The main task of this study is the implementation of flow and dispersion through plant canopies in Open FOAM

  8. Tensile properties of open cell ceramic foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bertolla, Luca; Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2013), s. 106-113 ISSN 1338-1660. [FRACTOGRAPHY 2012. Stará Lesná, 21.10.2012-24.10.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/1821 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : tension test * cellular materials * ceramics Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  9. Pyrolysis and gasification of single biomass particle – new openFoam solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, K; Zuk, P J; Bajer, K; Dudyński, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a new solver biomassGasificationFoam that extended the functionalities of the well-supported open-source CFD code OpenFOAM. The main goal of this development is to provide a comprehensive computational environment for a wide range of applications involving reacting gases and solids. The biomassGasificationFoam is an integrated solver capable of modelling thermal conversion, including evaporation, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion, of various solid materials. In the paper we show that the gas is hotter than the solid except at the centre of the sample, where the temperature of the solid is higher. This effect is expected because the thermal conductivity of the porous matrix of the solid phase is higher than the thermal conductivity of the gases. This effect, which cannot be considered if thermal equilibrium between the gas and solid is assumed, leads to precise description of heat transfer into wood particles.

  10. Implementation of k-kL-omega turbulence model for compressible flow into OpenFOAM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Martin; Fürst, J.; Příhoda, Jaromír; Doerffer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 821, Januar (2016), s. 63-69 ISSN 1662-7482 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1271; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03020277 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : CFD * openFOAM * RANS * transition * turbulence Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  11. Design of numerical model for thermoacoustic devices using OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisovsky, Tomas; Vit, Tomas

    2017-09-01

    Thermoacoustic devices are increasingly popular especially because of their construction simplicity and the ability to easily convert waste heat into the form of usable energy. Aim of this paper is to introduce some of the effective procedures for creating a complex mathematical model of thermoacoustic devices in OpenFOAM.

  12. Combustion modeling including heat loss using flamelet generated manifolds: a validation study in OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottino, G.M.; Fancello, A.; Falcone, M.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    In numerical combustion applications the Flamelet Generated Manifolds technique (FGM) is being used at an increasingly number of occasions. This technique is an approach to reduce the chemistry efficiently and accurately. In the present work FGM is coupled to an OpenFOAM-based CFD solver. The

  13. Towards numerical simulation of turbulent hydrogen combustion
 based on flamelet generated manifolds in OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fancello, A.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes an application of the Flamelet-Generated Manifolds (FGM) technique in the OpenFOAM environment. FGM is a chemical reduced method for combustion modeling. This technique treats the combustion process as the solution of a small amount of controlling variables. Regarding laminar

  14. Modeling of low-capillary number segmented flows in microchannels using OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang, D.A.; Van Steijn, V.; Portela, L.M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of low-Capillary number segmented flows in microchannels is important for the design of microfluidic devices. We present numerical validations of microfluidic flow simulations using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method as implemented in OpenFOAM. Two benchmark cases were investigated to ensure

  15. Modeling and simulation of diffusion-convection-reaction in heterogeneous nanochannels using OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pimpalgaonkar, H.G.; van Steijn, V.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Kleijn, C.R.; Simos, Theodore; Tsitouras, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    We present a finite volume implementation of a phase field method in OpenFOAM as a tool to simulate reactive multiphase flows on heterogeneous surfaces. Using this tool, we simulate the formation and growth of a droplet due to a chemical reaction on a hydrophilic catalytic patch surrounded by a

  16. Modelling of Tip Vortex Cavitation for Engineering Applications in OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, J.J.A.; Pennings, P.C.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Van Terwisga, T.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper modelling assumptions for the prediction of tip vortex flow and vortex cavitation with the RANS equations and homogeneous fluid approach in Open-FOAM are presented. The effects of the changes in the turbulence model are investigated and the results are compared with PIV measurements.

  17. Computation of Added Mass and Damping Coefficients of a Horizontal Circular Cylinder in Open Foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hao; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents numerical computation of added massand damping coefficients of a slender horizontal cylinder in thefree surface zone, which typically serves as a fish cage floater. A fully viscous two phase flow solver in OpenFOAM was employed in the numerical computation. The purpose...

  18. An Improved Model for FE Modeling and Simulation of Closed Cell Al-Alloy Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, MD. Anwarul

    2010-01-01

    Cell wall material properties of Al-alloy foams have been derived by a combination of nanoindentation experiment and numerical simulation. Using the derived material properties in FE (finite element) modeling of foams, the existing constitutive models of closed-cell Al-alloy foams have been evaluated against experimental results. An improved representative model has been proposed for FE analysis of closed-cell Al-alloy foams. The improved model consists of a combination of spherical and cruci...

  19. Modeling of Diesel Fuel Spray Formation and Combustion in OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesters, Anne

    2012-07-01

    The formation, ignition, and combustion of fuel sprays are highly complex processes and the available models have various shortcomings. The development and application of multidimensional CFD models, that describe the different phenomena have rapidly increased through the use of commercial and public software (e.g. Star-CD, KIVA, FIRE and OpenFOAM). The general approach to spray modeling is given by the Eulerian-Lagrangian method, where the gas phase is modeled as a continuum and the droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The accuracy and robustness of today's spray models vary substantially and spray penetration simulations and the levels of spray-generated turbulence are dependent on the discretization. The work presented here deals with the prediction of spray formation and combustion with improved models implemented in the free, open source software package OpenFOAM. The VSB2 spray model was implemented and tested under varying ambient conditions. The design criteria of the model were to be unconditionally robust, have a minimal number of tuning parameters, and be implementable in any CFD software package supporting particle tracking. The main difference between the VSB2 spray model and standard spray models is how the interaction between the liquid fuel and hot gas phase is modeled. In the VSB2 spray model, a 'blob' is defined, containing differently sized droplets; instead of a parcel containing equally sized droplets. Another feature is the definition of a bubble surrounding the blob. The blob just interacts with the gas phase in the bubble instead of with the gas phase in the whole grid cell. The idea is to reduce grid dependency. Furthermore, equilibrium between the blob and the bubble is ensured, which makes the model very robust. Results of spray penetration simulations are compared with data obtained from experiments done at Chalmers Univ. of Technology and with experimental data published by Siebers and Naber from Sandia National

  20. Fatigue of a Laterally-Constrained Closed Cell Aluminum Foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murthy Kolluri, N.V.V.R.; Mukherjee, M.; Garcia-Moreno, F.; Banhart, J.; Ramamurty, U.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the constant stress amplitude compression–compression fatigue behavior of closed-cell aluminum foam, both with and without lateral constraint, was conducted. Results show that while the early stages of strain accumulation due to fatigue loading are independent of

  1. Mathematical modeling of the heat frozen earth in OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, N.A.; Chmykhov, M.A.; Kartashev, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of heating permafrost has been presented with allowance for the Stefan condition at the boundary melting. A numerical algorithm has been proposed for analyzing this process. A computation module has been developed on an open architecture with the use of object-oriented programming language OpenFOAM. The computation module has been verified on the known exact solutions of simplified problems [ru

  2. Free Open Access Medical Education (FOAM in Emergency Medicine: The Global Distribution of Users in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer W. Bellows

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Free open-access medical education (FOAM is a collection of interactive online medical education resources—free and accessible to students, physicians and other learners. This novel approach to medical education has the potential to reach learners across the globe; however, the extent of its global uptake is unknown. Methods: This descriptive report evaluates the 2016 web analytics data from a convenience sample of FOAM blogs and websites with a focus on emergency medicine (EM and critical care. The number of times a site was accessed, or “sessions”, was categorized by country of access, cross-referenced with World Bank data for population and income level, and then analyzed using simple descriptive statistics and geographic mapping. Results: We analyzed 12 FOAM blogs published from six countries, with a total reported volume of approximately 18.7 million sessions worldwide in 2016. High-income countries accounted for 73.7% of population-weighted FOAM blog and website sessions in 2016, while upper-middle income countries, lower-middle income countries and low-income countries accounted for 17.5%, 8.5% and 0.3%, respectively. Conclusion: FOAM, while largely used in high-income countries, is used in low- and middle-income countries as well. The potential to provide free, online training resources for EM in places where formal training is limited is significant and thus is prime for further investigation.

  3. A Novel Method for Preparing Auxetic Foam from Closed-cell Polymer Foam Based on Steam Penetration and Condensation (SPC) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Donglei; Li, Minggang; Qiu, Jian; Xing, Haiping; Jiang, Zhiwei; Tang, Tao

    2018-05-31

    Auxetic materials are a class of materials possessing negative Poisson's ratio. Here we establish a novel method for preparing auxetic foam from closed-cell polymer foam based on steam penetration and condensation (SPC) process. Using polyethylene (PE) closed-cell foam as an example, the resultant foams treated by SPC process present negative Poisson's ratio during stretching and compression testing. The effect of steam-treated temperature and time on the conversion efficiency of negative Poisson's ratio foam is investigated, and the mechanism of SPC method for forming re-entrant structure is discussed. The results indicate that the presence of enough steam within the cells is a critical factor for the negative Poisson's ratio conversion in the SPC process. The pressure difference caused by steam condensation is the driving force for the conversion from conventional closed-cell foam to the negative Poisson's ratio foam. Furthermore, the applicability of SPC process for fabricating auxetic foam is studied by replacing PE foam by polyvinyl chloride (PVC) foam with closed-cell structure or replacing water steam by ethanol steam. The results verify the universality of SPC process for fabricating auxetic foams from conventional foams with closed-cell structure. In addition, we explored potential application of the obtained auxetic foams by SPC process in the fabrication of shape memory polymer materials.

  4. Numerical study on heat transfer characteristics of liquid-fueled molten salt using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2017-01-01

    To pursue sustainability and safety enhancement of nuclear energy, molten salt reactor is regarded as a promising candidate among various types of gen-IV reactors. Besides, pyroprocessing, which treats molten salt containing fission products, should consider safety related to decay heat from fuel material. For design of molten salt-related nuclear system, it is required to consider both thermal-hydraulic characteristics and neutronic behaviors for demonstration. However, fundamental heat transfer study of molten salt in operation condition is not easy to be experimentally studied due to its large scale, high temperature condition as well as difficulties of treating fuel material. >From that reason, numerical study can have benefit to investigate behaviors of liquid-fueled molten salt in real condition. In this study, open source CFD package OpenFOAM was used to analyze liquid-fueled molten salt loop having internal heat source as a first step of research. Among various molten salts considered as a candidate of liquid fueled molten salt reactors, in this study, FLiBe was chosen as liquid salt. For simulating heat generation from fuel material within fluid flow, volumetric heat source was set for fluid domain and OpenFOAM solver was modified as fvOptions as customized. To investigate thermal-hydraulic behavior of molten salt, CFD model was developed and validated by comparing experimental results in terms of heat transfer and pressure drop. As preliminary stage, 2D cavity simulations were performed to validate the modeling capacity of modified solver of OpenFOAM by comparison with those of ANSYS-CFX. In addition, cases of external heat flux and internal heat source were compared to configure the effect of heat source setting in various operation condition. As a result, modified solver of OpenFOAM considering internal heat source have sufficient modeling capacity to simulate liquid-fueled molten salt systems including heat generation cases. (author)

  5. Parametric model of ventilators simulated in OpenFOAM and Elmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čibera, Václav; Matas, Richard; Sedláček, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The main goal of presented work was to develop parametric model of a ventilator for CFD and structural analysis. The whole model was designed and scripted in freely available open source programmes in particular in OpenFOAM and Elmer. The main script, which runs or generates other scripts and further control the course of simulation, was written in bash scripting language in Linux environment. Further, the scripts needed for a mesh generation and running of a simulation were prepared using m4 word pre-processor. The use of m4 allowed comfortable set up of the higher amount of scripts. Consequently, the mesh was generated for fluid and solid part of the ventilator within OpenFOAM. Although OpenFOAM offers also a few tools for structural analysis, the mesh of solid parts was transferred into Elmer mesh format with the aim to perform structural analysis in this software. This submitted paper deals namely with part concerning fluid flow through parametrized geometry with different initial conditions. As an example, two simulations were conducted for the same geometric parameters and mesh but for different angular velocity of ventilator rotation.

  6. Parametric model of ventilators simulated in OpenFOAM and Elmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čibera Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of presented work was to develop parametric model of a ventilator for CFD and structural analysis. The whole model was designed and scripted in freely available open source programmes in particular in OpenFOAM and Elmer. The main script, which runs or generates other scripts and further control the course of simulation, was written in bash scripting language in Linux environment. Further, the scripts needed for a mesh generation and running of a simulation were prepared using m4 word pre-processor. The use of m4 allowed comfortable set up of the higher amount of scripts. Consequently, the mesh was generated for fluid and solid part of the ventilator within OpenFOAM. Although OpenFOAM offers also a few tools for structural analysis, the mesh of solid parts was transferred into Elmer mesh format with the aim to perform structural analysis in this software. This submitted paper deals namely with part concerning fluid flow through parametrized geometry with different initial conditions. As an example, two simulations were conducted for the same geometric parameters and mesh but for different angular velocity of ventilator rotation.

  7. Numerical Analysis of CANDU-6 Moderator System Using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Se Myong; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2012-01-01

    On the moderator of CANDU-6 reactor, thanks to the rapid development of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), the 1-D model code can be substituted to the 3-D simulation codes. The three-dimensional computation becomes not so expensive that now we can enjoy the benefit of innovation about CFD technology. In this study, we have modeled the Calandria tank system as simplified models preliminarily that is yet far from the real objects, but to see the essential physics and to test the possibility of the present CFD methods for the thermo-hydraulic problem in the moderator system of heavy-water reactors. The use of OpenFOAM is a very important point for the present study. The OpenFOAM is based on the object-oriented programming using C++ language. The solvers and libraries of physical properties, for example, are declared as classes to produce a new code with the reproduction from the existing classes. As this code is fully open to the public, the development of CFD code with OpenFOAM should be very prospective to the future design of system codes, not just restricted in the area of hydro-thermal system concerning atomic reactors

  8. Comparison of OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D for neutral atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cavar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The flow solvers OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D are compared in the case of neutral atmospheric flow over terrain using the test cases of Askervein and Bolund hills. Both solvers are run using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes k–ϵ turbulence model. One of the main modeling differences between the two solvers is the wall-function approach. The OpenFOAM v.1.7.1 uses a Nikuradse's sand roughness model, while EllipSys3D uses a model based on the atmospheric roughness length. It is found that Nikuradse's model introduces an error dependent on the near-wall cell height. To mitigate this error the near-wall cells should be at least 10 times larger than the surface roughness. It is nonetheless possible to obtain very similar results between EllipSys3D and OpenFOAM v.1.7.1. The more recent OpenFOAM v.2.2.1, which includes the atmospheric roughness length wall-function approach, has also been tested and compared to the results of OpenFOAM v.1.7.1 and EllipSys3D. The numerical results obtained using the same wall-modeling approach in both EllipSys3D and OpenFOAM v.2.1.1 proved to be almost identical. Two meshing strategies are investigated using HypGrid and SnappyHexMesh. The performance of OpenFOAM on SnappyHexMesh-based low-aspect-ratio unstructured meshes is found to be almost an order of magnitude faster than on HypGrid-based structured and high-aspect-ratio meshes. However, proper control of boundary layer resolution is found to be very difficult when the SnappyHexMesh tool is utilized for grid generation purposes. The OpenFOAM is generally found to be 2–6 times slower than EllipSys3D in achieving numerical results of the same order of accuracy on similar or identical computational meshes, when utilization of EllipSys3D default grid sequencing procedures is included.

  9. Further validation of liquid metal MHD code for unstructured grid based on OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; He, Qingyun; Ye, Minyou

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Specific correction scheme has been adopted to revise the calculating result for non-orthogonal meshes. • The developed MHD code based on OpenFOAM platform has been validated by benchmark cases under uniform and non-uniform magnetic field in round and rectangular ducts. • ALEX experimental results have been used to validate the MHD code based on OpenFOAM. - Abstract: In fusion liquid metal blankets, complex geometries involving contractions, expansions, bends, manifolds are very common. The characteristics of liquid metal flow in these geometries are significant. In order to extend the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver developed on OpenFOAM platform to be applied in the complex geometry, the MHD solver based on unstructured meshes has been implemented. The adoption of non-orthogonal correction techniques in the solver makes it possible to process the non-orthogonal meshes in complex geometries. The present paper focused on the validation of the code under critical conditions. An analytical solution benchmark case and two experimental benchmark cases were conducted to validate the code. Benchmark case I is MHD flow in a circular pipe with arbitrary electric conductivity of the walls in a uniform magnetic field. Benchmark cases II and III are experimental cases of 3D laminar steady MHD flow under fringing magnetic field. In all these cases, the numerical results match well with the benchmark cases.

  10. Further validation of liquid metal MHD code for unstructured grid based on OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jingchao; Chen, Hongli; He, Qingyun; Ye, Minyou

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Specific correction scheme has been adopted to revise the calculating result for non-orthogonal meshes. • The developed MHD code based on OpenFOAM platform has been validated by benchmark cases under uniform and non-uniform magnetic field in round and rectangular ducts. • ALEX experimental results have been used to validate the MHD code based on OpenFOAM. - Abstract: In fusion liquid metal blankets, complex geometries involving contractions, expansions, bends, manifolds are very common. The characteristics of liquid metal flow in these geometries are significant. In order to extend the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver developed on OpenFOAM platform to be applied in the complex geometry, the MHD solver based on unstructured meshes has been implemented. The adoption of non-orthogonal correction techniques in the solver makes it possible to process the non-orthogonal meshes in complex geometries. The present paper focused on the validation of the code under critical conditions. An analytical solution benchmark case and two experimental benchmark cases were conducted to validate the code. Benchmark case I is MHD flow in a circular pipe with arbitrary electric conductivity of the walls in a uniform magnetic field. Benchmark cases II and III are experimental cases of 3D laminar steady MHD flow under fringing magnetic field. In all these cases, the numerical results match well with the benchmark cases.

  11. Effect of foam stirrer design on the catalytic performance of rotating foam stirrer reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon Matheus, M.A.; Geers, P.; Nijhuis, T.A.; Schaaf, van der J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The liquid–solid mass transfer rate in a rotating foam stirrer reactor and in a slurry reactor is studied using the hydrogenation of styrene as a model reaction. The rotating foam stirrer reactor is a novel type of multi-phase reactor where highly open-celled materials, solid foams, are used as a

  12. Compressive Deformation Behavior of Closed-Cell Micro-Pore Magnesium Composite Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The closed-cell micro-pore magnesium composite foam with hollow ceramic microspheres (CMs was fabricated by a modified melt foaming method. The effect of CMs on the compressive deformation behavior of CM-containing magnesium composite foam was investigated. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for observation of the microstructure. Finite element modeling of the magnesium composite foam was established to predict localized stress, fracture of CMs, and the compressive deformation behavior of the foam. The results showed that CMs and pores directly affected the compressive deformation behavior of the magnesium composite foam by sharing a part of load applied on the foam. Meanwhile, the presence of Mg2Si phase influenced the mechanical properties of the foam by acting as the crack source during the compression process.

  13. OpenFOAM Modeling of Particle Heating and Acceleration in Cold Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, K.-H.; O'Sullivan, M.; Plankensteiner, A.; Kestler, H.; Sigl, L. S.

    2018-01-01

    In cold spraying, a powder material is accelerated and heated in the gas flow of a supersonic nozzle to velocities and temperatures that are sufficient to obtain cohesion of the particles to a substrate. The deposition efficiency of the particles is significantly determined by their velocity and temperature. Particle velocity correlates with the amount of kinetic energy that is converted to plastic deformation and thermal heating. The initial particle temperature significantly influences the mechanical properties of the particle. Velocity and temperature of the particles have nonlinear dependence on the pressure and temperature of the gas at the nozzle entrance. In this contribution, a simulation model based on the reactingParcelFoam solver of OpenFOAM is presented and applied for an analysis of particle velocity and temperature in the cold spray nozzle. The model combines a compressible description of the gas flow in the nozzle with a Lagrangian particle tracking. The predictions of the simulation model are verified based on an analytical description of the gas flow, the particle acceleration and heating in the nozzle. Based on experimental data, the drag model according to Plessis and Masliyah is identified to be best suited for OpenFOAM modeling particle heating and acceleration in cold spraying.

  14. mTOR signaling promotes foam cell formation and inhibits foam cell egress through suppressing the SIRT1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haixiang; Fu, Yucai; Huang, Yusheng; Zheng, Xinde; Yu, Wei; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a chronic immuno‑inflammatory disease accompanied by dyslipidemia. The authors previously demonstrated that sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) may prevent atherogenesis through influencing the liver X receptor/C‑C chemokine receptor type 7/nuclear factor‑κB (LXR‑CCR7/NF‑κB) signaling pathway. Previous studies have suggested a role for mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the potential association between mTOR signaling and SIRT1‑LXR‑CCR7/NF‑κB signaling (SIRT1 signaling) in AS pathogenesis. To induce foam cell formation, U937 cells were differentiated into macrophages by exposure to phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate (PMA) for 24 h, followed by treatment with palmitate and oxidized low density lipoprotein for a further 24 h. Oil red O staining revealed a large accumulation of lipid droplets present in foam cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated increased protein levels of phosphorylated (p)‑mTOR and its downstream factor p‑ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses additionally revealed decreased expression of SIRT1, LXRα and CCR7 and increased expression of NF‑κB and its downstream factor tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) in an atherogenetic condition induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). In addition, abundant lipid droplets accumulated in U937‑LPA‑treated foam cells. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, suppressed the expression and activity of mTOR and p70S6K, however enhanced expression of SIRT1, LXRα, and CCR7. Conversely, rapamycin deceased TNF‑α and NF‑κB activity, the latter of which was further confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis demonstrating increased levels of NF‑κB present in the cytoplasm compared with the nucleus. The findings of the present study suggest that mTOR signaling promotes foam cell formation and inhibits foam

  15. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  16. Novel approach for extinguishing large-scale coal fires using gas-liquid foams in open pit mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinxiao; Wang, Deming; Qin, Botao; Tian, Fuchao; Shi, Guangyi; Dong, Shuaijun

    2015-12-01

    Coal fires are a serious threat to the workers' security and safe production in open pit mines. The coal fire source is hidden and innumerable, and the large-area cavity is prevalent in the coal seam after the coal burned, causing the conventional extinguishment technology difficult to work. Foams are considered as an efficient means of fire extinguishment in these large-scale workplaces. A noble foam preparation method is introduced, and an original design of cavitation jet device is proposed to add foaming agent stably. The jet cavitation occurs when the water flow rate and pressure ratio reach specified values. Through self-building foaming system, the high performance foams are produced and then infused into the blast drilling holes at a large flow. Without complicated operation, this system is found to be very suitable for extinguishing large-scale coal fires. Field application shows that foam generation adopting the proposed key technology makes a good fire extinguishment effect. The temperature reduction using foams is 6-7 times higher than water, and CO concentration is reduced from 9.43 to 0.092‰ in the drilling hole. The coal fires are controlled successfully in open pit mines, ensuring the normal production as well as the security of personnel and equipment.

  17. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and an immobilized electrolyte allow for reversible operation as electrolysis cell or fuel...... cell. In the present work we demonstrate the application of hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active gas diffusion electrodes. PTFE particles and silver nanowires as electro-catalysts were used in the gas diffusion electrodes. Impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed...... to determine the cell characteristics. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was only 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance of 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at 200 °C and 20 bar. A new production method was developed to increase the cell size from lab scale (1...

  18. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and a liquid immobilized electrolyte allow the operation...... of the newly designed electrolysis cell as a fuel cell, but condensation of steam may lead to blocked pores, thereby inhibiting gas diffusion and decreasing the performance of the cell. In the here presented work we present the application of a hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active layer...... the electrochemical characteristics of the cell. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was reduced to 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance as low as 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at a temperature of 200 °C and 20 bar pressure. A new production method was developed...

  19. Fast Response, Open-Celled Porous, Shape Memory Effect Actuators with Integrated Attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Andrew Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the exploitation of porous foam articles exhibiting the Shape Memory Effect as actuators. Each foam article is composed of a plurality of geometric shapes, such that some geometric shapes can fit snugly into or around rigid mating connectors that attach the Shape Memory foam article intimately into the load path between a static structure and a moveable structure. The foam is open-celled, composed of a plurality of interconnected struts whose mean diameter can vary from approximately 50 to 500 microns. Gases and fluids flowing through the foam transfer heat rapidly with the struts, providing rapid Shape Memory Effect transformations. Embodiments of porous foam articles as torsional actuators and approximately planar structures are disposed. Simple, integral connection systems exploiting the ability to supply large loads to a structure, and that can also supply hot and cold gases and fluids to effect rapid actuation are also disposed.

  20. Enhanced SCAP glycosylation by inflammation induces macrophage foam cell formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhou

    Full Text Available Inflammatory stress promotes foam cell formation by disrupting LDL receptor feedback regulation in macrophages. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs Cleavage-Activating Protein (SCAP glycosylation plays crucial roles in regulating LDL receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoAR feedback regulation. The present study was to investigate if inflammatory stress disrupts LDL receptor and HMGCoAR feedback regulation by affecting SCAP glycosylation in THP-1 macrophages. Intracellular cholesterol content was assessed by Oil Red O staining and quantitative assay. The expression of molecules controlling cholesterol homeostasis was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The translocation of SCAP from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi was detected by confocal microscopy. We demonstrated that exposure to inflammatory cytokines increased lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, accompanying with an increased SCAP expression even in the presence of a high concentration of LDL. These inflammatory cytokines also prolonged the half-life of SCAP by enhancing glycosylation of SCAP due to the elevated expression of the Golgi mannosidase II. This may enhance translocation and recycling of SCAP between the ER and the Golgi, escorting more SREBP2 from the ER to the Golgi for activation by proteolytic cleavages as evidenced by an increased N-terminal of SREBP2 (active form. As a consequence, the LDL receptor and HMGCoAR expression were up-regulated. Interestingly, these effects could be blocked by inhibitors of Golgi mannosidases. Our results indicated that inflammation increased native LDL uptake and endogenous cholesterol de novo synthesis, thereby causing foam cell formation via increasing transcription and protein glycosylation of SCAP in macrophages. These data imply that inhibitors of Golgi processing enzymes might have a potential vascular-protective role in prevention of atherosclerotic foam

  1. Extrusion Process by Finite Volume Method Using OpenFoam Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos Martins, Marcelo; Tonini Button, Sergio; Divo Bressan, Jose; Ivankovic, Alojz

    2011-01-01

    The computational codes are very important tools to solve engineering problems. In the analysis of metal forming process, such as extrusion, this is not different because the computational codes allow analyzing the process with reduced cost. Traditionally, the Finite Element Method is used to solve solid mechanic problems, however, the Finite Volume Method (FVM) have been gaining force in this field of applications. This paper presents the velocity field and friction coefficient variation results, obtained by numerical simulation using the OpenFoam Software and the FVM to solve an aluminum direct cold extrusion process.

  2. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    nd Vasile Pârvan Ave., 300223, TM Timişoara, Romania, alin.anton@cs.upt.ro (Romania))" data-affiliation=" (Faculty of Automatic Control and Computing, Politehnica University of Timişoara, 2nd Vasile Pârvan Ave., 300223, TM Timişoara, Romania, alin.anton@cs.upt.ro (Romania))" >Anton, Alin; th Mihai Viteazu Ave., 300221, TM Timişoara (Romania))" data-affiliation=" (Center for Advanced Research in Engineering Science, Romanian Academy – Timişoara Branch, 24th Mihai Viteazu Ave., 300221, TM Timişoara (Romania))" >Muntean, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit ® [1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms

  3. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, Alin [Faculty of Automatic Control and Computing, Politehnica University of Timişoara, 2" n" d Vasile Pârvan Ave., 300223, TM Timişoara, Romania, alin.anton@cs.upt.ro (Romania); Muntean, Sebastian [Center for Advanced Research in Engineering Science, Romanian Academy – Timişoara Branch, 24" t" h Mihai Viteazu Ave., 300221, TM Timişoara (Romania)

    2015-12-31

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit{sup ®}[1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms.

  4. Numerical simulation of sloshing in rectangular tanks with OpenFOAM CFD Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreski, Filip; Markov, Zoran; Diebold, Louis; Gazzola, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to simulate the sloshing phenomenon using OpenFOAM CFD software package. The present paper treats a 2D numerical simulation of a partially filled tank that is located on a LNG carrier. Experiments were done on a rectangular tank excited with different excitation periods and amplitudes and the pressure was measured at certain locations on the tank walls. The goal of this research is to compare the experimental data for the pressure with the pressure results obtained with the CFD software. It is shown that the obtained results match well with the experimental data.

  5. Numerical simulation of thermal stratification in cold legs by using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jiejin; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    During a small-break loss-of-coolant accident in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), emergency core cooling system (ECCS) is actuated and cold water is injected into cold legs. Insufficient mixing of injected cold water and hot primary coolant results in thermal stratification, which is a matter of concern for evaluation of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in view of aging and life extension of nuclear power plants. In this study, an open source CFD software, OpenFOAM, is used to simulate mixing and thermal stratification in the cold leg of ROSA/LSTF, which is the largest thermal-hydraulic integral test facility simulating PWR. One of the cold-leg is numerically simulated from the outlet of primary coolant pump to the inlet of downcomer. ECCS water is injected from injection nozzle connected at the top of the cold leg into the steady-state natural circulation flow under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. The temperature distribution in the cold leg is compared with experimental and FLUENT's results. Effects of turbulent flow models and secondary flow due to the elbow section of the cold leg are discussed for the case with the single-phase natural circulation. Injection into a two-phase stratified flow is also simulated and predictive and numerical capabilities of OpenFOAM are discussed. (author)

  6. Numerical simulation of thermal stratification in cold legs by using openFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jiejin; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    During a small-break loss-of-coolant accident in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), emergency core cooling system (ECCS) is actuated and cold water is injected into cold legs. Insufficient mixing of injected cold water and hot primary coolant results in thermal stratification, which is a matter of concern for evaluation of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in view of aging and life extension of nuclear power plants. In this study, an open source CFD software, OpenFOAM, is used to simulate mixing and thermal stratification in the cold leg of ROSA/LSTF, which is the largest thermal-hydraulic integral test facility simulating PWR. One of the cold-leg is numerically simulated from the outlet of primary coolant pump to the inlet of downcomer. ECCS water is injected from injection nozzle connected at the top of the cold leg into the steady-state natural circulation flow under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. The temperature distribution in the cold leg is compared with experimental and FLUENT's results. Effects of turbulent flow models and secondary flow due to the elbow section of the cold leg are discussed for the case with the single-phase natural circulation. Injection into a two-phase stratified flow is also simulated and predictive and numerical capabilities of OpenFOAM are discussed. (author)

  7. Numerical research of the compressible flow in a vortex tube using OpenFOAM software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burazer Jela M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presented in this paper is dealing with numerical simulation of energy separation mechanism and flow phenomena within a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube. Simulation of turbulent, compressible, highly swirling flow inside vortex tube is performed using RANS approach, with Favre averaged conservation equations. For turbulence closure, k-ε and k-ω shear-stress transport models are used. It is assumed that the mean flow is axisymmetric, so the 2-D computational domain is used. Computations were performed using open-source CFD software Open- FOAM. All compressible solvers available within OpenFOAM were tested, and it was found that most of the solvers cannot predict energy separation. Code of two chosen solvers, which proved as the most robust, is modified in terms of mean energy equation implementation. Newly created solvers predict physically accepted behavior in vortex tube, with good agreement with experimental results. Comparison between performances of solvers is also presented. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR 35046

  8. Salidroside protects against foam cell formation and apoptosis, possibly via the MAPK and AKT signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jing; Li, Yuanmin; Li, Weiming; Guo, Rong

    2017-10-10

    Foam cell formation and apoptosis are closely associated with atherosclerosis pathogenesis. We determined the effect of salidroside on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced foam cell formation and apoptosis in THP1 human acute monocytic leukemia cells and investigated the associated molecular mechanisms. THP1-derived macrophages were incubated with salidroside for 5 h and then exposed to ox-LDL for 24 h to induce foam cell formation. Cytotoxicity, lipid deposition, apoptosis, and the expression of various proteins were tested using the CCK8 kit, Oil Red O staining, flow cytometry, and western blotting, respectively. Ox-LDL treatment alone promoted macrophage-derived foam cell formation, while salidroside treatment alone inhibited it (p foam cell formation and apoptosis, partly by regulating the MAPK and Akt signaling pathways.

  9. Numerical modelling of closed-cell aluminium foam under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Paul; Kader, M. A.; Islam, M. A.; Escobedo, J. P.; Saadatfar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Closed-cell aluminium foams are extensively used in aerospace and automobile industries. The understanding of their behaviour under impact loading conditions is extremely important since impact problems are directly related to design of these engineering structures. This research investigates the response of a closed-cell aluminium foam (CYMAT) subjected to dynamic loading using the finite element software ABAQUS/explicit. The aim of this research is to numerically investigate the material and structural properties of closed-cell aluminium foam under impact loading conditions with interest in shock propagation and its effects on cell wall deformation. A μ-CT based 3D foam geometry is developed to simulate the local cell collapse behaviours. A number of numerical techniques are applied for modelling the crush behaviour of aluminium foam to obtain the more accurate results. The simulation results are compared with experimental data. Comparison of the results shows a good correlation between the experimental results and numerical predictions.

  10. Amalgamation of Chlamydia pneumoniae inclusions with lipid droplets in foam cells in human atherosclerotic plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Killingsworth, Murray C; Tran, Dihn; Lord, Reginald

    2008-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (Chlamydophila pneumoniae) infect macrophages and accelerates foam cell formation in in vitro experiments, but whether this might occur in human atherosclerosis is unknown. In the present study, we examined 17 carotid artery segments, obtained by endarterectomy, in which the presence of C. pneumoniae was confirmed by both polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of structures with the appearance of elementary, reticulate and aberrant bodies of C. pneumoniae in the cytoplasm of macrophage foam cells. The volume of the cytoplasm that was free from vacuoles and lipid droplets in C. pneumoniae-infected foam cells was dramatically reduced, and a phenomenon of the amalgamation of C. pneumoniae inclusions with lipid droplets was detected. Double immunohistochemistry showed that C. pneumoniae-infected foam cells contained a large number of oxidized low-density lipoproteins. The observations provide support to the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae could affect foam cell formation in human atherosclerosis.

  11. Numerical predictions of bubbly two-phase flows with OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michta, E.; Fu, K.; Anglart, H.; Angele, K.

    2011-01-01

    A new model for simulation of bubbly two-phase flows has been developed and implemented into an open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code OpenFOAM. The model employs the two-fluid framework with closure relationships for the interfacial momentum transfer. The bubble size is calculated based on the solution of the interfacial area concentration equations. The predictions are validated against a wide range of experimental data containing measured void fraction, the phasic velocity and the interfacial area concentration. The new model demonstrates the ability to capture the wall peaking of void fraction for small bubbles. The predicted levels of void fraction and phasic velocities are in good agreement with measured data. (author)

  12. A numerical study on manoeuvrability of wind turbine installation vessel using OpenFOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwook Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a numerical prediction method on manoeuvrability of Wind Turbine Installation Vessel (WTIV is presented. Planar Motion Mechanism (PMM captive test for the bare hull of WTIV is carried out in the model basin and compared with the numerical results using RANS simulation based on Open-source Field Operation And Manipulation (OpenFOAM calculation to validate the developed method. The manoeuvrability of WTIV with skeg and/or without skeg is investigated using the numerical approach along with the captive model test. In the numerical calculations, the dynamic stability index which indicates the course keeping ability is evaluated and compared for three different hull configurations i.e. bare hull and other two hulls with center skeg and twin skeg. This paper proves that the numerical approach using RANS simulation can be readily applied to estimate the manoeuvrability of WTIV at the initial design stage.

  13. Numerical Predictions of Bubbly Two-Phase Flows with OpenFOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Michta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new model for simulation of bubbly two-phase flows has been developed and implemented into an open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code OpenFOAM. The model employs the two-fluid framework with closure relationships for the interfacial momentum transfer. The bubble size is calculated based on the solution of the transport equation of the interfacial area concentration. The predictions are validated against selected data obtained in the DEDALE experiment and containing the measured void fraction, the phasic velocities and the interfacial area concentration. In general, good agreement between calculated and measured data is demonstrated; however, the relative phasic velocity is systematically over-predicted. The levels of void fraction and the observed wall void peaking are well captured in the calculations.

  14. Numerical investigation on natural convection and solidification of molten pool with OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xi; Meng Zhaocan; Cheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    The in-vessel retention is adopted by the third generation nuclear power technology as an important severe accident mitigation strategy. The integrity of reactor pressure vessel depends on the heat flux distribution of molten pool. In present study, the solidification model in open source CFD software OpenFOAM was applied to simulate solidification and natural convection which was driven by internal heat source or temperature difference. The stratified molten pool heat transfer experiment carried out by Royal Institute of Technology was analyzed in the paper, and the solidified crust, temperature and heat flux distributions were obtained. The simulation results were compared with experimental data. It is shown that this numerical method can be used in the simulation of natural convection and solidification of molten pool, and it will probably be used in the analysis of molten corium behavior in reactor lower head. (authors)

  15. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuard, Adrian M; Mahmud, Hisham B; King, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ω turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model. (paper)

  16. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid directly induces macrophage-derived foam cell formation by blocking the expression of SRBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linmu; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Xiao; Liu, Yan; Yang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Yu, Chao

    2017-09-23

    The leading cause of morbidity and mortality is the result of cardiovascular disease, mainly atherosclerosis. The formation of macrophage foam cells by ingesting ox-LDL and focal retention in the subendothelial space are the hallmarks of the early atherosclerotic lesion. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which is a low-molecular weight lysophospholipid enriched in oxidized LDL, exerts a range of effects on the cardiovascular system. Previous reports show that LPA increases the uptake of ox-LDL to promote the formation of foam cells. However, as the most active component of ox-LDL, there is no report showing whether LPA directly affects foam cell formation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of LPA on foam cell formation, as well as to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Oil red O staining and a Cholesterol/cholesteryl ester quantitation assay were used to evaluate foam cell formation in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. We utilized a Western blot and RT-PCR to investigate the relationship between LPA receptors and lipid transport related proteins. We found that LPA promoted foam cell formation, using 200 μM for 24 h. Meanwhile, the expression of the Scavenger receptor BI (SRBI), which promotes the efflux of free cholesterol, was decreased. Furthermore, the LPA 1/3 receptor antagonist Ki16425 significantly abolished the LPA effects, indicating that LPA 1/3 was involved in the foam cell formation and SRBI expression induced by LPA. Additionally, the LPA-induced foam cell formation was blocked with an AKT inhibitor. Our results suggest that LPA-enhanced foam cell formation is mediated by LPA 1/3 -AKT activation and subsequent SRBI expression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  19. Numerical investigation of unsteady cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, V H; Luo, X W; Ji, J; Escaler, X; Aguinaga, A

    2014-01-01

    The prediction and control of cavitation damage in pumps, propellers, hydro turbines and fluid machinery in general is necessary during the design stage. The present paper deals with a numerical investigation of unsteady cloud cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil. The current study is focused on understanding the dynamic pressures generated during the cavity collapses as a fundamental characteristic in cavitation erosion. A 2D and 3D unsteady flow simulation has been carried out using OpenFOAM. Then, Paraview and Python programming language have been used to characterize dynamic pressure field. Adapted Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Zwart cavitation model have been implemented to improve the analysis of cloud motion and to visualize the bubble expansions. Additional results also confirm the correlation between cavity formation and generated pressures

  20. Effects of everolimus on macrophage-derived foam cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Steven; Koren, Eugen; Chan, Yen; Koscec, Mirna; Sheehy, Alexander; Kolodgie, Frank; Virmani, Renu; Feder, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of everolimus on foam cell (FC) viability, mRNA levels, and inflammatory cytokine production to better understand its potential inhibitory effects on atheroma progression. Methods and materials: Human THP1 macrophage-derived FC were formed using acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 μg/mL) for 72 hours, followed by everolimus treatment (10 -5 –10 -11 M) for 24 hours. FC viability was quantified using fluorescent calcein AM/DAPI staining. FC lysates and media supernatants were analyzed for apoptosis and necrosis using a Cell Death ELISA PLUS assay. FC lysates and media supernatants were also analyzed for inflammatory cytokine (IL1β, IL8, MCP1, TNFα) mRNA levels and protein expression using quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and a Procarta® immunoassay, respectively. mRNA levels of autophagy (MAP1LC3), apoptosis (survivin, clusterin), and matrix degradation (MMP1, MMP9) markers were evaluated by Quantigene® Plex assay and verified with QPCR. Additionally, hypercholesterolemic rabbits received everolimus-eluting stents (EES) for 28 or 60 days. RAM-11 immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare %RAM-11 positive area between stented sections and unstented proximal sections. Statistical significance was calculated using one-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Calcein AM/DAPI staining showed that FC exposed to everolimus (10 -5 M) had significantly decreased viability compared to control. FC apoptosis was significantly increased at a high dose of everolimus (10 -5 M), with no necrotic effects at any dose tested. Everolimus did not affect endothelial (HUVEC) and smooth muscle (HCASMC) cell apoptosis or necrosis. Everolimus (10 -5 M) significantly increased MAP1LC3, caused an increased trend in clusterin (p = 0.10), and significantly decreased survivin and MMP1 mRNA levels in FC. MCP1 cytokine mRNA levels and secreted protein expression was significantly decreased

  1. Effects of everolimus on macrophage-derived foam cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Steven, E-mail: steven.hsu@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Koren, Eugen; Chan, Yen; Koscec, Mirna; Sheehy, Alexander [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Kolodgie, Frank; Virmani, Renu [CVPath Institute, Inc., 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (United States); Feder, Debra [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of everolimus on foam cell (FC) viability, mRNA levels, and inflammatory cytokine production to better understand its potential inhibitory effects on atheroma progression. Methods and materials: Human THP1 macrophage-derived FC were formed using acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 μg/mL) for 72 hours, followed by everolimus treatment (10{sup -5}–10{sup -11} M) for 24 hours. FC viability was quantified using fluorescent calcein AM/DAPI staining. FC lysates and media supernatants were analyzed for apoptosis and necrosis using a Cell Death ELISA{sup PLUS} assay. FC lysates and media supernatants were also analyzed for inflammatory cytokine (IL1β, IL8, MCP1, TNFα) mRNA levels and protein expression using quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and a Procarta® immunoassay, respectively. mRNA levels of autophagy (MAP1LC3), apoptosis (survivin, clusterin), and matrix degradation (MMP1, MMP9) markers were evaluated by Quantigene® Plex assay and verified with QPCR. Additionally, hypercholesterolemic rabbits received everolimus-eluting stents (EES) for 28 or 60 days. RAM-11 immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare %RAM-11 positive area between stented sections and unstented proximal sections. Statistical significance was calculated using one-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Calcein AM/DAPI staining showed that FC exposed to everolimus (10{sup -5} M) had significantly decreased viability compared to control. FC apoptosis was significantly increased at a high dose of everolimus (10{sup -5} M), with no necrotic effects at any dose tested. Everolimus did not affect endothelial (HUVEC) and smooth muscle (HCASMC) cell apoptosis or necrosis. Everolimus (10{sup -5} M) significantly increased MAP1LC3, caused an increased trend in clusterin (p = 0.10), and significantly decreased survivin and MMP1 mRNA levels in FC. MCP1 cytokine mRNA levels and secreted protein

  2. Cavitating Propeller Performance in Inclined Shaft Conditions with OpenFOAM: PPTC 2015 Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Stefano; Villa, Diego

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present our analysis of the non-cavitating and cavitating unsteady performances of the Potsdam Propeller Test Case (PPTC) in oblique flow. For our calculations, we used the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation (RANSE) solver from the open-source OpenFOAM libraries. We selected the homogeneous mixture approach to solve for multiphase flow with phase change, using the volume of fluid (VoF) approach to solve the multiphase flow and modeling the mass transfer between vapor and water with the Schnerr-Sauer model. Comparing the model results with the experimental measurements collected during the Second Workshop on Cavitation and Propeller Performance - SMP'15 enabled our assessment of the reliability of the open-source calculations. Comparisons with the numerical data collected during the workshop enabled further analysis of the reliability of different flow solvers from which we produced an overview of recommended guidelines (mesh arrangements and solver setups) for accurate numerical prediction even in off-design conditions. Lastly, we propose a number of calculations using the boundary element method developed at the University of Genoa for assessing the reliability of this dated but still widely adopted approach for design and optimization in the preliminary stages of very demanding test cases.

  3. Modelling of RPV lower head under core melt severe accident condition using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madokoro, Hiroshi; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Although six years have been passed since the tragic severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi, still large uncertainties exist in modeling of core degradation and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. It is extremely important to obtain a better understanding of complex phenomena in the lower head in order to improve accident management measures. The possible failure mode of reactor pressure vessel and its failure time are especially a matter of importance. Thermal behavior of the molten pool can be simulated by the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM), which is a distributed-parameter model developed in the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The model calculates convective currents not using a pure CFD approach but based on so called “characteristic velocities” that are determined by empirical correlations depending on the geometry and physical properties of the molten pool. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the PECM has been implemented in the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM in order to receive detailed predictions of a core melt behavior in the RPV lower head under severe accident conditions. An advantage of using OpenFOAM is that it is very flexible to add and modify models and physical properties. In the current work, the solver is extended to couple PECM with a structure analysis model of the vessel wall. The model considers thermal expansion, plasticity, creep and damage. The model and physical properties are based on those implemented in ANSYS. Although the previous implementation had restriction that the amount of and geometry of the melt cannot be changed, our coupled model allows flexibility of the melt amount and geometry. The extended solver was used to simulate the LIVE-L1 and -L7V experiments and has demonstrated good prediction of the temperature distribution in the molten pool and heat flux distribution through the vessel wall. Regarding the vessel failure the model was applied to one of the FOREVER tests

  4. TiO2 hierarchical porous film constructed by ultrastable foams as photoanode for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; He, Xuan; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Hui; Li, Weixin; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Wanqiu; Wang, Junjie; Chen, Huan

    2016-11-01

    It reported a novel and simple method for the first time to prepare TiO2 hierarchical porous film (THPF) using ultrastable foams as a soft template to construct porous structures. Moreover, dodecanol as one foam component was creatively used as solvent during the synthesis of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to decrease reaction temperature and simplify precipitation process. The result showed that hierarchical pores in scale of microns introduced by foams were regarded to benefit for high coverage and unimodal distribution of QDs on the surface of THPF to increase the efficiencies of light-harvesting, charge-collection and charge-transfer. The increased efficiencies caused an enhancement in quantum efficiency of the cell and thus remarkably increased the short circuit current density (Jsc). In addition, the decrease of charge recombination resulted in the increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc) as well. The QDSSC based on THPF exhibited about 2-fold higher power conversion efficiency (η = 2.20%, Jsc = 13.82 mA cm-2, Voc = 0.572 V) than that of TiO2 nanoparticles film (TNF) (η = 1.06%, Jsc = 6.70 mA cm-2, Voc = 0.505 V). It provided a basis to use foams both as soft template and carrier to realize simultaneously construction and in-situ sensitization of photoanode in further work.

  5. Implementation of density-based solver for all speeds in the framework of OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Sun, Fengxian; Xia, Xinlin

    2014-10-01

    In the framework of open source CFD code OpenFOAM, a density-based solver for all speeds flow field is developed. In this solver the preconditioned all speeds AUSM+(P) scheme is adopted and the dual time scheme is implemented to complete the unsteady process. Parallel computation could be implemented to accelerate the solving process. Different interface reconstruction algorithms are implemented, and their accuracy with respect to convection is compared. Three benchmark tests of lid-driven cavity flow, flow crossing over a bump, and flow over a forward-facing step are presented to show the accuracy of the AUSM+(P) solver for low-speed incompressible flow, transonic flow, and supersonic/hypersonic flow. Firstly, for the lid driven cavity flow, the computational results obtained by different interface reconstruction algorithms are compared. It is indicated that the one dimensional reconstruction scheme adopted in this solver possesses high accuracy and the solver developed in this paper can effectively catch the features of low incompressible flow. Then via the test cases regarding the flow crossing over bump and over forward step, the ability to capture characteristics of the transonic and supersonic/hypersonic flows are confirmed. The forward-facing step proves to be the most challenging for the preconditioned solvers with and without the dual time scheme. Nonetheless, the solvers described in this paper reproduce the main features of this flow, including the evolution of the initial transient.

  6. CML/CD36 accelerates atherosclerotic progression via inhibiting foam cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suining; Li, Lihua; Yan, Jinchuan; Ye, Fei; Shao, Chen; Sun, Zhen; Bao, Zhengyang; Dai, Zhiyin; Zhu, Jie; Jing, Lele; Wang, Zhongqun

    2018-01-01

    Among the various complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis causes the highest disability and morbidity. A multitude of macrophage-derived foam cells are retained in atherosclerotic plaques resulting not only from recruitment of monocytes into lesions but also from a reduced rate of macrophage migration from lesions. Nε-carboxymethyl-Lysine (CML), an advanced glycation end product, is responsible for most complications of diabetes. This study was designed to investigate the mechanism of CML/CD36 accelerating atherosclerotic progression via inhibiting foam cell migration. In vivo study and in vitro study were performed. For the in vivo investigation, CML/CD36 accelerated atherosclerotic progression via promoting the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cells in aorta and inhibited macrophage-derived foam cells in aorta migrating to the para-aorta lymph node of diabetic apoE -/- mice. For the in vitro investigation, CML/CD36 inhibited RAW264.7-derived foam cell migration through NOX-derived ROS, FAK phosphorylation, Arp2/3 complex activation and F-actin polymerization. Thus, we concluded that CML/CD36 inhibited foam cells of plaque migrating to para-aorta lymph nodes, accelerating atherosclerotic progression. The corresponding mechanism may be via free cholesterol, ROS generation, p-FAK, Arp2/3, F-actin polymerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell adhesive ability of a biological foam ceramic with surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Li Xiaoyu; Feng Fan; Lin Yunfeng; Liao Yunmao; Tian, Weidong; Liu Lei

    2008-01-01

    Biological foam ceramic is a promising material for tissue engineering scaffold because of its biocompatibility, biodegradation and adequate pores measured from micrometer to nanometers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion and proliferation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) on the biological foam ceramic coated with fibronectin. ADSCs were harvested from SD rats and passaged three times prior to seeding onto biological foam surface modified with fibronectin (50 μg/ml). Scaffold without surface modification served as control. To characterize cellular attachment, cells were incubated on the scaffold for 1 h and 3 h and then the cells attached onto the scaffold were counted. The difference of proliferation was appraised using MTT assay at day 1, 3, 5 and 7 before the cells reached confluence. After 7 days of culture, scanning electron microscope (SEM) was chosen to assess cell morphology and attachment of ADSCs on the biological foam ceramic. Attachment of ADSCs on the biological foam ceramic surface modified with fibronectin at 1 h or 3 h was substantially greater than that in control. MTT assay revealed that ADSCs proliferation tendency of the experimental group was nearly parallel to that of control. SEM view showed that ADSCs in the experimental groups connected more tightly and excreted more collagen than that in control. The coating of fibronectin could improve the cell adhesive ability of biological foam ceramics without evident effect on proliferation

  8. A polymer foam conduit seeded with Schwann cells promotes guided peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, T; Sundback, C; Hunter, D; Cheney, M; Vacanti, J P

    2000-04-01

    axonal regeneration compared with autografts (n = 6). At 6 weeks, axonal regeneration was observed in the midconduit region of all five channels in each experimental animal. The cross-sectional area comprising axons relative to the open conduit cross sectional area (mean 26.3%, SD 10. 1%) compared favorably with autografts (mean 23.8%, SD 3.6%). Our methodology can be used to create polymer foam conduits containing longitudinally aligned channels, to introduce Schwann cells into them, and to implant them into surgically created neural defects. These conduits provide an environment permissive to axonal regeneration. Furthermore, this polymer foam-processing method and unique channeled architecture allows the introduction of neurotrophic factors into the conduit in a controlled fashion. Deposition of different factors into distinct regions within the conduit may be possible to promote more precisely guided neural regeneration.

  9. Comparison between OpenFOAM CFD & BEM theory for variable speed – variable pitch HAWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElQatary Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OpenFoam is used to compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD with blade element momentum theory (BEM for a variable speed - variable pitch HAWT (Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine. The wind turbine is first designed using the BEM to determine the blade chord, twist and operating conditions. The wind turbine blade has an outer diameter of 14 m, uses a NACA 63–415 profile for the entire blade and root to tip twist distribution of 15deg (Figure 3. The RPM varies from 20–75 for freestream velocities varying between 3–10.5 m/s (variable speed and a constant RPM of 78.78 for velocities ranging between 11–25 m/s (variable pitch. OpenFOAM is used to investigate the wind turbine performance at several operating points including cut-in wind speed (3 m/s, rated wind speed (10.5 m/s and in the variable pitch zone. Simulation results show that in the variable-speed operating range, both CFD and BEM compare reasonably well. This agreement can be attributed to the fact that the complex three-dimensional flow around the turbine blades can be split into two radial segments. For radii less than the mid-span, the flow is three-dimensional, whereas for radii greater than the mid-span, the flow is approximately two-dimensional. Since the majority of the power is produced from sections beyond the mid-span, the agreement between CFD and BEM is reasonable. For the variable-pitch operating range the CFD results and BEM deviate considerably. In this case the majority of the power is produced from the inner sections in which the flow is three-dimensional and can no longer be predicted by the BEM. The results show that differences in pitch angles up to 10deg can result to regulate the power for high wind speeds in the variable-pitch operation zone.

  10. Compressive characteristics of closed-cell aluminum foams with different percentages of Er element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-min Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, closed-cell aluminum foams with different percentages of erbium (Er element were successfully prepared. The distribution and existence form of erbium (Er element and its effect on the compressive properties of the foams were investigated. Results show that Er uniformly distributes in the cell walls in the forms of Al3Er intermetallic compound and Al-Er solid solutions. Compared with commercially pure aluminum foam, Er-containing foams possess higher micro-hardness, compressive strength and energy absorption capacity due to solid solution strengthening and second phase strengthening effects. Additionally, the amount of Er element should be controlled in the range of 0.10wt.%-0.50wt.% in order to obtain a good combination of compressive strength and energy absorption properties.

  11. Simulation in CFD of a Pebble Bed: Advanced high temperature reactor core using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, Pamela M.; Su, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a Pebble Bed nuclear reactor core are presented using the multi-physics tool-kit OpenFOAM. The HTR-PM is modeled using the porous media approach, accounting both for viscous and inertial effects through the Darcy and Forchheimer model. Initially, cylindrical 2D and 3D simulations are compared, in order to evaluate their differences and decide if the 2D simulations carry enough of the sought information, considering the savings in computational costs. The porous medium is considered to be isotropic, with the whole length of the packed bed occupied homogeneously with the spherical fuel elements. Steady-state simulations for normal equilibrium operation are performed, using a semi sine function of the power density along the vertical axis as the source term for the energy balance equation.Total pressure drop is calculated and compared with that obtained from literature for a similar case. At a second stage, transient simulations are performed, where relevant parameters are calculated and compared to those of the literature. (author)

  12. Evaluation of an improved mixing plane interface for OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoin, M; Page, M; Magnan, R; Nilsson, H; Jasak, H

    2014-01-01

    A mixing plane interface provides a circumferentially averaging rotor-stator coupling interface, which is extremely useful in practical turbomachinery simulations. It allows fundamentally transient problems to be studied in steady-state, using simplified mesh components having periodic properties, and with the help of a multiple reference frames (MRF) approach. An improved version of the mixing plane interface for the community-driven version of OpenFOAM is presented. This new version of the mixing plane introduces a per- field, user-selectable mixing option for the flow fields at the interface, including the possibility to use a mass-flow averaging algorithm for the velocity field. We show that the quality of the mass-flow transfer can be improved by a proper selection of the mixing options at the interface. This paper focuses on the evaluation of the improved mixing plane interface for various steady-state simulations of incompressible flows, applied to a simple 2D validation test case, and to more complex 3D turbomachinery cases

  13. Simulation in CFD of a Pebble Bed: Advanced high temperature reactor core using OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Pamela M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Numerical simulations of a Pebble Bed nuclear reactor core are presented using the multi-physics tool-kit OpenFOAM. The HTR-PM is modeled using the porous media approach, accounting both for viscous and inertial effects through the Darcy and Forchheimer model. Initially, cylindrical 2D and 3D simulations are compared, in order to evaluate their differences and decide if the 2D simulations carry enough of the sought information, considering the savings in computational costs. The porous medium is considered to be isotropic, with the whole length of the packed bed occupied homogeneously with the spherical fuel elements. Steady-state simulations for normal equilibrium operation are performed, using a semi sine function of the power density along the vertical axis as the source term for the energy balance equation.Total pressure drop is calculated and compared with that obtained from literature for a similar case. At a second stage, transient simulations are performed, where relevant parameters are calculated and compared to those of the literature. (author)

  14. GeN-Foam: a novel OpenFOAM{sup ®} based multi-physics solver for 2D/3D transient analysis of nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.fiorina@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour – PSI, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Clifford, Ivor [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour – PSI, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Aufiero, Manuele [LPSC-IN2P3-CNRS/UJF/Grenoble INP, 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Mikityuk, Konstantin [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour – PSI, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Development of a new multi-physics solver based on OpenFOAM{sup ®}. • Tight coupling of thermal-hydraulics, thermal-mechanics and neutronics. • Combined use of traditional RANS and porous-medium models. • Mesh for neutronics deformed according to the predicted displacement field. • Use of three unstructured meshes, adaptive time step, parallel computing. - Abstract: The FAST group at the Paul Scherrer Institut has been developing a code system for reactor analysis for many years. For transient analysis, this code system is currently based on a state-of-the-art coupled TRACE-PARCS routine. This work presents an attempt to supplement the FAST code system with a novel solver characterized by tight coupling between the different equations, parallel computing capabilities, adaptive time-stepping and more accurate treatment of some of the phenomena involved in a reactor transient. The new solver is based on OpenFOAM{sup ®}, an open-source C++ library for the solution of partial differential equations using finite-volume discretization. It couples together a multi-scale fine/coarse mesh sub-solver for thermal-hydraulics, a multi-group diffusion sub-solver for neutronics, a displacement-based sub-solver for thermal-mechanics and a finite-difference model for the temperature field in the fuel. It is targeted toward the analysis of pin-based reactors (e.g., liquid metal fast reactors or light water reactors) or homogeneous reactors (e.g., fast-spectrum molten salt reactors). This paper presents each “single-physics” sub-solver and the overall coupling strategy, using the sodium-cooled fast reactor as a test case, and essential code verification tests are described.

  15. GeN-Foam: a novel OpenFOAM"® based multi-physics solver for 2D/3D transient analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorina, Carlo; Clifford, Ivor; Aufiero, Manuele; Mikityuk, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a new multi-physics solver based on OpenFOAM"®. • Tight coupling of thermal-hydraulics, thermal-mechanics and neutronics. • Combined use of traditional RANS and porous-medium models. • Mesh for neutronics deformed according to the predicted displacement field. • Use of three unstructured meshes, adaptive time step, parallel computing. - Abstract: The FAST group at the Paul Scherrer Institut has been developing a code system for reactor analysis for many years. For transient analysis, this code system is currently based on a state-of-the-art coupled TRACE-PARCS routine. This work presents an attempt to supplement the FAST code system with a novel solver characterized by tight coupling between the different equations, parallel computing capabilities, adaptive time-stepping and more accurate treatment of some of the phenomena involved in a reactor transient. The new solver is based on OpenFOAM"®, an open-source C++ library for the solution of partial differential equations using finite-volume discretization. It couples together a multi-scale fine/coarse mesh sub-solver for thermal-hydraulics, a multi-group diffusion sub-solver for neutronics, a displacement-based sub-solver for thermal-mechanics and a finite-difference model for the temperature field in the fuel. It is targeted toward the analysis of pin-based reactors (e.g., liquid metal fast reactors or light water reactors) or homogeneous reactors (e.g., fast-spectrum molten salt reactors). This paper presents each “single-physics” sub-solver and the overall coupling strategy, using the sodium-cooled fast reactor as a test case, and essential code verification tests are described.

  16. Acceleration of the OpenFOAM-based MHD solver using graphics processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Qingyun; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Jingchao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D PISO-MHD was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using CUDA technology. • A consistent and conservative scheme is used in the code which was validated by three basic benchmarks in a rectangular and round ducts. • Parallelized of CPU and GPU acceleration were compared relating to single core CPU in MHD problems and non-MHD problems. • Different preconditions for solving MHD solver were compared and the results showed that AMG method is better for calculations. - Abstract: The pressure-implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) magnetohydrodynamics MHD solver of the couple of Navier–Stokes equations and Maxwell equations was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using the CUDA technology. The solver is developed on open source code OpenFOAM based on consistent and conservative scheme which is suitable for simulating MHD flow under strong magnetic field in fusion liquid metal blanket with structured or unstructured mesh. We verified the validity of the implementation on several standard cases including the benchmark I of Shercliff and Hunt's cases, benchmark II of fully developed circular pipe MHD flow cases and benchmark III of KIT experimental case. Computational performance of the GPU implementation was examined by comparing its double precision run times with those of essentially the same algorithms and meshes. The resulted showed that a GPU (GTX 770) can outperform a server-class 4-core, 8-thread CPU (Intel Core i7-4770k) by a factor of 2 at least.

  17. Acceleration of the OpenFOAM-based MHD solver using graphics processing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qingyun; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Feng, Jingchao

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A 3D PISO-MHD was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using CUDA technology. • A consistent and conservative scheme is used in the code which was validated by three basic benchmarks in a rectangular and round ducts. • Parallelized of CPU and GPU acceleration were compared relating to single core CPU in MHD problems and non-MHD problems. • Different preconditions for solving MHD solver were compared and the results showed that AMG method is better for calculations. - Abstract: The pressure-implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) magnetohydrodynamics MHD solver of the couple of Navier–Stokes equations and Maxwell equations was implemented on Kepler-class graphics processing units (GPUs) using the CUDA technology. The solver is developed on open source code OpenFOAM based on consistent and conservative scheme which is suitable for simulating MHD flow under strong magnetic field in fusion liquid metal blanket with structured or unstructured mesh. We verified the validity of the implementation on several standard cases including the benchmark I of Shercliff and Hunt's cases, benchmark II of fully developed circular pipe MHD flow cases and benchmark III of KIT experimental case. Computational performance of the GPU implementation was examined by comparing its double precision run times with those of essentially the same algorithms and meshes. The resulted showed that a GPU (GTX 770) can outperform a server-class 4-core, 8-thread CPU (Intel Core i7-4770k) by a factor of 2 at least.

  18. Evaluation of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) code Open FOAM in the study of the pressurized thermal stress of PWR reactors. Comparison with the commercial code Ansys-CFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu Martin, G.; Chiva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this work is proposed to evaluate the potential of the OpenFOAM code for the simulation of typical fluid flows in reactors PWR, in particular for the study of pressurized thermal stress. Test T1-1 has been simulated , within the OECD ROSA project, with the objective of evaluating the performance of the code OpenFOAM and models of turbulence that has implemented to capture the effect of the thrust forces in the case study.

  19. Alginate foam-based three-dimensional culture to investigate drug sensitivity in primary leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpoor, Mahroo; Yebra-Fernandez, Eva; Parhizkar, Maryam; Orlu, Mine; Craig, Duncan; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2018-04-01

    The development of assays for evaluating the sensitivity of leukaemia cells to anti-cancer agents is becoming an important aspect of personalized medicine. Conventional cell cultures lack the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the bone marrow (BM), the extracellular matrix and stromal components which are crucial for the growth and survival of leukaemia stem cells. To accurately predict the sensitivity of the leukaemia cells in an in vitro assay a culturing system containing the essential components of BM is required. In this study, we developed a porous calcium alginate foam-based scaffold to be used for 3D culture. The new 3D culture was shown to be cell compatible as it supported the proliferation of both normal haematopoietic and leukaemia cells. Our cell differential assay for myeloid markers showed that the porous foam-based 3D culture enhanced myeloid differentiation in both leukaemia and normal haematopoietic cells compared to two-dimensional culture. The foam-based scaffold reduced the sensitivity of the leukaemia cells to the tested antileukaemia agents in K562 and HL60 leukaemia cell line model and also primary myeloid leukaemia cells. This observation supports the application of calcium alginate foams as scaffold components of the 3D cultures for investigation of sensitivity to antileukaemia agents in primary myeloid cells. © 2018 The Author(s).

  20. The mechanical behavior of microcellular foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkul, M.H.; Mark, J.E. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (USA)); Aubert, J.H. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of microcellular open-cell foams prepared by a thermally induced phase separation process are investigated. The foams studied were prepared from isotactic polystyrene, polyacrylonitrile, and poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (rigid foams), and polyurethane and Lycra (elastomeric foams). Their densities were in the range 0.04--0.27 g/cm3. Conventional polystyrene foams were used for comparison. The moduli and collapse stresses of these foams were measured in compression and compared with the current constitutive laws which relate mechanical properties to densities. A reinforcement technique based on the in-situ precipitation of silica was used to improve the mechanical properties. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. RGO/Au NPs/N-doped CNTs supported on nickel foam as an anode for enzymatic biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Yujie; Yu, You; Xu, Miao; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Liang; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-11-15

    In this study, three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide/Au NPs/nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (RGO/Au NPs/N-doped CNTs) assembly supported on nickel foam was utilized as an anode for enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs). 3D RGO/Au NPs was obtained by electrodepositing reduced graphene oxide on nickel foam (Ni foam), while Au NPs were co-deposited during the process. Afterwards, nitrogen doped CNTs (N-CNTs) were allowed to grow seamlessly on the surfaces of 3D RGO/Au NPs via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. In this nanostructure, Au NPs co-deposition and nitrogen doping offer more active sites for bioelectrocatalysis. Additionally, N-CNTs were demonstrated providing high specific surface area for enzyme immobilization and facilitating the electron transfer between glucose oxidase (GOx) and electrode. The resulting bioanode achieved efficient glucose oxidation with high current densities of 7.02mAcm -2 (0.3V vs. Ag/AgCl). Coupling with a Pt cathode, the fabricated glucose/air biofuel cell exhibited an open-circuit potential of 0.32V and generated a maximum power density 235µWcm -2 at 0.15V. This novel electrode substrate achieved high performance in current density at bioelectrochemical systems and could be useful for further exploiting the application of three dimensional carbon-based nanomaterials in EBFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Industrial Application of Open Pore Ceramic Foam for Molten Metal Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauckler, L. J.; Waeber, M. M.; Conti, C.; Jacob-Dulière, M.

    Ceramic foam filters were used for industrial filtration of aluminum. Results are compared with laboratory experiments which are in good agreement with trajectory analyses of deep bed filtration for the early stage of filtration.

  3. Design and Optimization of OpenFOAM-based CFD Applications for Modern Hybrid and Heterogeneous HPC Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    AlOnazi, Amani A.

    2014-02-01

    The progress of high performance computing platforms is dramatic, and most of the simulations carried out on these platforms result in improvements on one level, yet expose shortcomings of current CFD packages. Therefore, hardware-aware design and optimizations are crucial towards exploiting modern computing resources. This thesis proposes optimizations aimed at accelerating numerical simulations, which are illus- trated in OpenFOAM solvers. A hybrid MPI and GPGPU parallel conjugate gradient linear solver has been designed and implemented to solve the sparse linear algebraic kernel that derives from two CFD solver: icoFoam, which is an incompressible flow solver, and laplacianFoam, which solves the Poisson equation, for e.g., thermal dif- fusion. A load-balancing step is applied using heterogeneous decomposition, which decomposes the computations taking into account the performance of each comput- ing device and seeking to minimize communication. In addition, we implemented the recently developed pipeline conjugate gradient as an algorithmic improvement, and parallelized it using MPI, GPGPU, and a hybrid technique. While many questions of ultimately attainable per node performance and multi-node scaling remain, the ex- perimental results show that the hybrid implementation of both solvers significantly outperforms state-of-the-art implementations of a widely used open source package.

  4. Closed-cell polymeric foam for hydrogen separation and storage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pientka, Zbyněk; Pokorný, P.; Bélafi-Bakó, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 304, 1-2 (2007), s. 82-87 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1207 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymeric foam * gas separation * hydrogen storage Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.432, year: 2007

  5. Supercritical CO2 Foaming of Thermoplastic Materials Derived from Maize: Proof-of-Concept Use in Mammalian Cell Culture Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Portales-Cabrera, Cynthia Guadalupe; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Araiz-Hernández, Diana; Del Barone, Maria Cristina; García-López, Erika; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; de los Angeles De Santiago-Miramontes, María; Segoviano-Ramírez, Juan Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Rodríguez-González, Ciro Ángel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Di Maio, Ernesto; Iannace, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background Foams are high porosity and low density materials. In nature, they are a common architecture. Some of their relevant technological applications include heat and sound insulation, lightweight materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Foams derived from natural polymers are particularly attractive for tissue culture due to their biodegradability and bio-compatibility. Here, the foaming potential of an extensive list of materials was assayed, including slabs elaborated from whole flour, the starch component only, or the protein fraction only of maize seeds. Methodology/Principal Findings We used supercritical CO2 to produce foams from thermoplasticized maize derived materials. Polyethylene-glycol, sorbitol/glycerol, or urea/formamide were used as plasticizers. We report expansion ratios, porosities, average pore sizes, pore morphologies, and pore size distributions for these materials. High porosity foams were obtained from zein thermoplasticized with polyethylene glycol, and from starch thermoplasticized with urea/formamide. Zein foams had a higher porosity than starch foams (88% and 85%, respectively) and a narrower and more evenly distributed pore size. Starch foams exhibited a wider span of pore sizes and a larger average pore size than zein (208.84 vs. 55.43 μm2, respectively). Proof-of-concept cell culture experiments confirmed that mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and two different prostate cancer cell lines (22RV1, DU145) attached to and proliferated on zein foams. Conclusions/Significance We conducted screening and proof-of-concept experiments on the fabrication of foams from cereal-based bioplastics. We propose that a key indicator of foamability is the strain at break of the materials to be foamed (as calculated from stress vs. strain rate curves). Zein foams exhibit attractive properties (average pore size, pore size distribution, and porosity) for cell culture applications; we were able to establish and sustain mammalian cell cultures on zein

  6. Supercritical CO2 foaming of thermoplastic materials derived from maize: proof-of-concept use in mammalian cell culture applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Portales-Cabrera, Cynthia Guadalupe; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Araiz-Hernández, Diana; Del Barone, Maria Cristina; García-López, Erika; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; de Los Angeles De Santiago-Miramontes, María; Segoviano-Ramírez, Juan Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Rodríguez-González, Ciro Ángel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Di Maio, Ernesto; Iannace, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Foams are high porosity and low density materials. In nature, they are a common architecture. Some of their relevant technological applications include heat and sound insulation, lightweight materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Foams derived from natural polymers are particularly attractive for tissue culture due to their biodegradability and bio-compatibility. Here, the foaming potential of an extensive list of materials was assayed, including slabs elaborated from whole flour, the starch component only, or the protein fraction only of maize seeds. We used supercritical CO2 to produce foams from thermoplasticized maize derived materials. Polyethylene-glycol, sorbitol/glycerol, or urea/formamide were used as plasticizers. We report expansion ratios, porosities, average pore sizes, pore morphologies, and pore size distributions for these materials. High porosity foams were obtained from zein thermoplasticized with polyethylene glycol, and from starch thermoplasticized with urea/formamide. Zein foams had a higher porosity than starch foams (88% and 85%, respectively) and a narrower and more evenly distributed pore size. Starch foams exhibited a wider span of pore sizes and a larger average pore size than zein (208.84 vs. 55.43 μm2, respectively). Proof-of-concept cell culture experiments confirmed that mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and two different prostate cancer cell lines (22RV1, DU145) attached to and proliferated on zein foams. We conducted screening and proof-of-concept experiments on the fabrication of foams from cereal-based bioplastics. We propose that a key indicator of foamability is the strain at break of the materials to be foamed (as calculated from stress vs. strain rate curves). Zein foams exhibit attractive properties (average pore size, pore size distribution, and porosity) for cell culture applications; we were able to establish and sustain mammalian cell cultures on zein foams for extended time periods.

  7. Supercritical CO2 foaming of thermoplastic materials derived from maize: proof-of-concept use in mammalian cell culture applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grissel Trujillo-de Santiago

    Full Text Available Foams are high porosity and low density materials. In nature, they are a common architecture. Some of their relevant technological applications include heat and sound insulation, lightweight materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Foams derived from natural polymers are particularly attractive for tissue culture due to their biodegradability and bio-compatibility. Here, the foaming potential of an extensive list of materials was assayed, including slabs elaborated from whole flour, the starch component only, or the protein fraction only of maize seeds.We used supercritical CO2 to produce foams from thermoplasticized maize derived materials. Polyethylene-glycol, sorbitol/glycerol, or urea/formamide were used as plasticizers. We report expansion ratios, porosities, average pore sizes, pore morphologies, and pore size distributions for these materials. High porosity foams were obtained from zein thermoplasticized with polyethylene glycol, and from starch thermoplasticized with urea/formamide. Zein foams had a higher porosity than starch foams (88% and 85%, respectively and a narrower and more evenly distributed pore size. Starch foams exhibited a wider span of pore sizes and a larger average pore size than zein (208.84 vs. 55.43 μm2, respectively. Proof-of-concept cell culture experiments confirmed that mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 and two different prostate cancer cell lines (22RV1, DU145 attached to and proliferated on zein foams.We conducted screening and proof-of-concept experiments on the fabrication of foams from cereal-based bioplastics. We propose that a key indicator of foamability is the strain at break of the materials to be foamed (as calculated from stress vs. strain rate curves. Zein foams exhibit attractive properties (average pore size, pore size distribution, and porosity for cell culture applications; we were able to establish and sustain mammalian cell cultures on zein foams for extended time periods.

  8. Application of Auxetic Foam in Sports Helmets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Foster

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation explored the viability of using open cell polyurethane auxetic foams to augment the conformable layer in a sports helmet and improve its linear impact acceleration attenuation. Foam types were compared by examining the impact severity on an instrumented anthropomorphic headform within a helmet consisting of three layers: a rigid shell, a stiff closed cell foam, and an open cell foam as a conformable layer. Auxetic and conventional foams were interchanged to act as the helmet’s conformable component. Attenuation of linear acceleration was examined by dropping the combined helmet and headform on the front and the side. The helmet with auxetic foam reduced peak linear accelerations (p < 0.05 relative to its conventional counterpart at the highest impact energy in both orientations. Gadd Severity Index reduced by 11% for frontal impacts (38.9 J and 44% for side impacts (24.3 J. The conformable layer within a helmet can influence the overall impact attenuating properties. The helmet fitted with auxetic foam can attenuate impact severity more than when fitted with conventional foam, and warrants further investigation for its potential to reduce the risk of traumatic brain injuries in sport specific impacts.

  9. The hydrodynamic dust retention modeling process with a foam layer for open linear dynamic technological systems at construction industry enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespalov Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical essence of the reducing air pollution hydrodynamic method by means of the foamy method as the most effective dust retention technology for open long sources at construction industry enterprises is presented in the article. The mathematical description of this technology has been performed, taking into account the physical and chemical properties of the dust and foam bubble, as well as the parameters of the return of dust particles to technological raw material due to various physical mechanisms for their capture. The obtained parametric dependence of dust retention efficiency provides the possibility of its predicted calculation as a resultant parameter for the considering technology, taking into account the interaction of dust with a foam layer.

  10. Andrographolide Inhibits Oxidized LDL-Induced Cholesterol Accumulation and Foam Cell Formation in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Chih; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Chen, Hui-Chun; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Yang, Ya-Chen; Chen, Haw-Wen

    2018-01-01

    oxLDL is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions through cholesterol accumulation in macrophage foam cells. Andrographolide, the bioactive component of Andrographis paniculata, possesses several biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anticancer functions. Scavenger receptors (SRs), including class A SR (SR-A) and CD36, are responsible for the internalization of oxLDL. In contrast, receptors for reverse cholesterol transport, including ABCA1 and ABCG1, mediate the efflux of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells. Transcription factor liver X receptor [Formula: see text] (LXR[Formula: see text] plays a key role in lipid metabolism and inflammation as well as in the regulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. Because of the contribution of inflammation to macrophage foam cell formation and the potent anti-inflammatory activity of andrographolide, we hypothesized that andrographolide might inhibit oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. The results showed that andrographolide reduced oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophage foam cells. Andrographolide decreased the mRNA and protein expression of CD36 by inducing the degradation of CD36 mRNA; however, andrographolide had no effect on SR-A expression. In contrast, andrographolide increased the mRNA and protein expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, which were dependent on LXR[Formula: see text]. Andrographolide enhanced LXR[Formula: see text] nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity. Treatment with the LXR[Formula: see text] antagonist GGPP and transfection with LXR[Formula: see text] siRNA reversed the ability of andrographolide to stimulate ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression. In conclusion, inhibition of CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake and induction of ABCA1- and ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux are two working mechanisms by which andrographolide inhibits macrophage foam cell formation, which suggests that andrographolide could be a potential candidate to prevent

  11. Acyl Chain Preference in Foam Cell Formation from Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yuko; Hama, Kotaro; Tsukahara, Makoto; Izumi-Tsuzuki, Ryosuke; Nagai, Toru; Ohe-Yamada, Mihoko; Inoue, Keizo; Yokoyama, Kazuaki

    2018-01-01

    Macrophage foam cells play critical roles in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis by synthesizing and accumulating cholesteryl ester (CE) in lipid droplets. However, in analyzing lipid metabolism in foam cell formation, studies have focused on the sterol group, and little research has been done on the acyl chains. Therefore, we adapted a model system using liposomes containing particular acyl chains and examined the effect of various acyl chains on foam cell formation. Of the phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes tested containing PS, phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol, we found that unsaturated (C18:1), but not saturated (C16:0 and C18:0), PS liposomes induced lipid droplet formation, indicating that foam cell formation depends on the nature of the acyl chain of the PS liposomes. Experiments on the uptake and accumulation of cholesterol from liposomes by adding [ 14 C]cholesterol suggested that foam cell formation could be induced only when cholesterol was converted to CE in the case of C18:1 PS liposomes. Both microscopic observations and metabolic analysis suggest that cholesterol incorporated into either C16:0 or C18:0 PS liposomes may stay intact after being taken in by endosomes. The [ 14 C]C18:1 fatty acyl chain in the C18:1 PS liposome was used to synthesize CE and triacylglycerol (TG). Interestingly, the [ 14 C]C16:0 in the C18:1 PS liposome was metabolized to sphingomyelin rather than being incorporated into either CE or TG, which could be because of enzymatic acyl chain selectivity. In conclusion, our results indicate that the acyl chain preference of macrophages could have some impact on their progression to foam cells.

  12. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis

  13. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young, E-mail: hayoung@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Doo [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Suk-Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Hyuk [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Hyun [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zabel, Brian A. [Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor modified macrophages transdifferentiate into endothelial-like cells and decrease foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; He, Yujuan; Dai, Jun; Yang, Lili; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ruan, Qiurong

    2017-06-30

    Macrophages are largely involved in the whole process of atherosclerosis from an initiation lesion to an advanced lesion. Endothelial disruption is the initial step and macrophage-derived foam cells are the hallmark of atherosclerosis. Promotion of vascular integrity and inhibition of foam cell formation are two important strategies for preventing atherosclerosis. How can we inhibit even the reverse negative role of macrophages in atherosclerosis? The present study was performed to investigate if overexpressing endogenous human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could facilitate transdifferentiation of macrophages into endothelial-like cells (ELCs) and inhibit foam cell formation. We demonstrated that VEGF-modified macrophages which stably overexpressed human VEGF (hVEGF 165 ) displayed a high capability to alter their phenotype and function into ELCs in vitro Exogenous VEGF could not replace endogenous VEGF to induce the transdifferentiation of macrophages into ELCs in vitro We further showed that VEGF-modified macrophages significantly decreased cytoplasmic lipid accumulation after treatment with oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Moreover, down-regulation of CD36 expression in these cells was probably one of the mechanisms of reduction in foam cell formation. Our results provided the in vitro proof of VEGF-modified macrophages as atheroprotective therapeutic cells by both promotion of vascular repair and inhibition of foam cell formation. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. An Open-Source Toolbox for PEM Fuel Cell Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Kone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an open-source toolbox that can be used to accurately predict the distribution of the major physical quantities that are transported within a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell is presented. The toolbox has been developed using the Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM platform, which is an open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The base case results for the distribution of velocity, pressure, chemical species, Nernst potential, current density, and temperature are as expected. The plotted polarization curve was compared to the results from a numerical model and experimental data taken from the literature. The conducted simulations have generated a significant amount of data and information about the transport processes that are involved in the operation of a PEM fuel cell. The key role played by the concentration constant in shaping the cell polarization curve has been explored. The development of the present toolbox is in line with the objectives outlined in the International Energy Agency (IEA, Paris, France Advanced Fuel Cell Annex 37 that is devoted to developing open-source computational tools to facilitate fuel cell technologies. The work therefore serves as a basis for devising additional features that are not always feasible with a commercial code.

  16. NF-κB inhibitors that prevent foam cell formation and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Jesse D; Elias, Michael G; Dellinger, Anthony L; Kepley, Christopher L

    2017-08-01

    The transformation of monocyte-derived macrophages into lipid-laden foam cells is one inflammatory process underlying atherosclerotic disease. Previous studies have demonstrated that fullerene derivatives (FDs) have inflammation-blunting properties. Thus, it was hypothesized that FD could inhibit the transformation process underlying foam cell formation. Fullerene derivatives inhibited the phorbol myristic acid/oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced differentiation of macrophages into foam cells as determined by lipid staining and morphology.Lipoprotein-induced generation of TNF-α, C5a-induced MC activation, ICAM-1 driven adhesion, and CD36 expression were significantly inhibited in FD treated cells compared to non-treated cells. Inhibition appeared to be mediated through the NF-κB pathway as FD reduced expression of NF-κB and atherosclerosis-associated genes. Compared to controls, FD dramatically inhibited plaque formation in arteries of apolipoprotein E null mice. Thus, FD may be an unrecognized therapy to prevent atherosclerotic lesions via inhibition of foam cell formation and MC stabilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The inhibition of macrophage foam cell formation by tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside is driven by suppressing vimentin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenjuan; Huang, Lei; Sun, Qinju; Yang, Lifeng; Tang, Lian; Meng, Guoliang; Xu, Xiaole; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation triggered by oxLDL is an important event that occurs during the development of atherosclerosis. 2,3,5,4'-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside (TSG) exhibits significant anti-atherosclerotic activity. Herein we used U937 cells induced by PMA and oxLDL in vitro to investigate the inhibitory effects of TSG on U937 differentiation and macrophage foam cell formation. TSG pretreatment markedly inhibited cell differentiation induced by PMA, macrophage apoptosis and foam cell formation induced by oxLDL. The inhibition of vimentin expression and cleavage was involved in these inhibitory effects of TSG. The suppression of vimentin by siRNA in U937 significantly inhibited cell differentiation, apoptosis and foam cell formation. Using inhibitors for TGFβR1 and PI3K, we found that vimentin production in U937 cells is regulated by TGFβ/Smad signaling, but not by PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling. Meanwhile, TSG pretreatment inhibited both the expression of TGFβ1 and the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, and TSG suppressed the nuclear translocation of Smad4 induced by PMA and oxLDL. Furthermore, TSG attenuated the induced caspase-3 activation and adhesion molecules levels by PMA and oxLDL. PMA and oxLDL increased the co-localization of vimentin with ICAM-1, which was attenuated by pretreatment with TSG. These results suggest that TSG inhibits macrophage foam cell formation through suppressing vimentin expression and cleavage, adhesion molecules expression and vimentin-ICAM-1 co-localization. The interruption of TGFβ/Smad pathway and caspase-3 activation is responsible for the downregulation of TSG on vimentin expression and degradation, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of Different Droplet Formation Regimes in a T-junction Microchannel Using the VOF Technique in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Shima; Roohi, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    Here we aimed to investigate various droplet formation regimes in a two-dimensional T-junction microchannel geometry using the open source software OpenFOAM. Two incompressible fluids, continuous phase in the main channel and dispersed phase in the lateral channel, have been considered. The interFoam solver was used to simulate laminar flow with two incompressible and isothermal phases. We evaluated the capability of "Compressive Interface Capturing Scheme for Arbitrary Meshes (CICSAM)" volume of fluid (VOF) technique of the OpenFOAM for modeling of the droplet formation and movement in different regimes. The flow behavior in the T-junction microchannel over a wide range of capillary numbers (0.006 to 0.12), volume flow rate ratio (0.125, 0.25, 0.5), and contact angle (130° to 180°) in the squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes were examined.The importance of parameters such as contact angle, capillary number, flow rate ratio, and Reynolds number at the time of separation, as well as the formation of droplets, was investigated in different regimes. We found that droplet detachment time increases by increasing the contact angle in the squeezing regime while increasing the contact angle in the dripping regime results in a decrease in the droplet detachment time. We compare the role of pressure gradient and shear stress forces in the droplet formation process in both dripping and squeezing regimes in details. We also provide a classification of two-phase flow regimes in the investigated T-junction microchannel in terms of three main parameters of, e.g., flow rate ratio, contact angle, and capillary number.

  19. Comparison of OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D actuator line methods with (NEW) MEXICO results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, J.; Meyer Forsting, A. R.; Troldborg, N.; Masson, C.

    2017-05-01

    The Actuator Line Method exists for more than a decade and has become a well established choice for simulating wind rotors in computational fluid dynamics. Numerous implementations exist and are used in the wind energy research community. These codes were verified by experimental data such as the MEXICO experiment. Often the verification against other codes were made on a very broad scale. Therefore this study attempts first a validation by comparing two different implementations, namely an adapted version of SOWFA/OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D and also a verification by comparing against experimental results from the MEXICO and NEW MEXICO experiments.

  20. Comparison of OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D actuator line methods with (NEW) MEXICO results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, J; Masson, C; Meyer Forsting, A R; Troldborg, N

    2017-01-01

    The Actuator Line Method exists for more than a decade and has become a well established choice for simulating wind rotors in computational fluid dynamics. Numerous implementations exist and are used in the wind energy research community. These codes were verified by experimental data such as the MEXICO experiment. Often the verification against other codes were made on a very broad scale. Therefore this study attempts first a validation by comparing two different implementations, namely an adapted version of SOWFA/OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D and also a verification by comparing against experimental results from the MEXICO and NEW MEXICO experiments. (paper)

  1. Experimental analysis of compressive notch strengthening in closed-cell aluminum alloy foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, A; Onck, PR; Bastawros, Ashraf F.

    2004-01-01

    The notch strengthening effect is studied experimentally in closed cell aluminum foams. The limit loads, net section strength were found for a set of double-edge-notched (DEN) and single-edge-notched (SEN) specimens loaded in compression. In addition, the evolution of the deformation is monitored

  2. Small cell foams and blends and a process for their preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-07

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents. These modified dense star polymers or dendrimers are particularly effective for the production of small cell foams.

  3. Macrophage Liver Kinase B1 Inhibits Foam Cell Formation and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyu; Zhu, Huaiping; Dai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Cheng; Ding, Ye; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-10-13

    LKB1 (liver kinase B1) is a serine/threonine kinase and tumor suppressor, which regulates the homeostasis of hematopoietic cells and immune responses. Macrophages transform into foam cells upon taking-in lipids. No role for LKB1 in foam cell formation has previously been reported. We sought to establish the role of LKB1 in atherosclerotic foam cell formation. LKB1 expression was examined in human carotid atherosclerotic plaques and in western diet-fed atherosclerosis-prone Ldlr -/- and ApoE -/- mice. LKB1 expression was markedly reduced in human plaques when compared with nonatherosclerotic vessels. Consistently, time-dependent reduction of LKB1 levels occurred in atherosclerotic lesions in western diet-fed Ldlr -/- and ApoE -/- mice. Exposure of macrophages to oxidized low-density lipoprotein downregulated LKB1 in vitro. Furthermore, LKB1 deficiency in macrophages significantly increased the expression of SRA (scavenger receptor A), modified low-density lipoprotein uptake and foam cell formation, all of which were abolished by blocking SRA. Further, we found LKB1 phosphorylates SRA resulting in its lysosome degradation. To further investigate the role of macrophage LKB1 in vivo, ApoE -/- LKB1 fl/fl LysM cre and ApoE -/- LKB1 fl/fl mice were fed with western diet for 16 weeks. Compared with ApoE -/- LKB1 fl/fl wild-type control, ApoE -/- LKB1 fl/fl LysM cre mice developed more atherosclerotic lesions in whole aorta and aortic root area, with markedly increased SRA expression in aortic root lesions. We conclude that macrophage LKB1 reduction caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein promotes foam cell formation and the progression of atherosclerosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Molecular machines open cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Víctor; Chen, Fang; Nilewski, Lizanne G; Duret, Guillaume; Aliyan, Amir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Robinson, Jacob T; Wang, Gufeng; Pal, Robert; Tour, James M

    2017-08-30

    Beyond the more common chemical delivery strategies, several physical techniques are used to open the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes. These include using electric and magnetic fields, temperature, ultrasound or light to introduce compounds into cells, to release molecular species from cells or to selectively induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) or uncontrolled cell death (necrosis). More recently, molecular motors and switches that can change their conformation in a controlled manner in response to external stimuli have been used to produce mechanical actions on tissue for biomedical applications. Here we show that molecular machines can drill through cellular bilayers using their molecular-scale actuation, specifically nanomechanical action. Upon physical adsorption of the molecular motors onto lipid bilayers and subsequent activation of the motors using ultraviolet light, holes are drilled in the cell membranes. We designed molecular motors and complementary experimental protocols that use nanomechanical action to induce the diffusion of chemical species out of synthetic vesicles, to enhance the diffusion of traceable molecular machines into and within live cells, to induce necrosis and to introduce chemical species into live cells. We also show that, by using molecular machines that bear short peptide addends, nanomechanical action can selectively target specific cell-surface recognition sites. Beyond the in vitro applications demonstrated here, we expect that molecular machines could also be used in vivo, especially as their design progresses to allow two-photon, near-infrared and radio-frequency activation.

  5. Molecular machines open cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, Víctor; Chen, Fang; Nilewski, Lizanne G.; Duret, Guillaume; Aliyan, Amir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Robinson, Jacob T.; Wang, Gufeng; Pal, Robert; Tour, James M.

    2017-08-01

    Beyond the more common chemical delivery strategies, several physical techniques are used to open the lipid bilayers of cellular membranes. These include using electric and magnetic fields, temperature, ultrasound or light to introduce compounds into cells, to release molecular species from cells or to selectively induce programmed cell death (apoptosis) or uncontrolled cell death (necrosis). More recently, molecular motors and switches that can change their conformation in a controlled manner in response to external stimuli have been used to produce mechanical actions on tissue for biomedical applications. Here we show that molecular machines can drill through cellular bilayers using their molecular-scale actuation, specifically nanomechanical action. Upon physical adsorption of the molecular motors onto lipid bilayers and subsequent activation of the motors using ultraviolet light, holes are drilled in the cell membranes. We designed molecular motors and complementary experimental protocols that use nanomechanical action to induce the diffusion of chemical species out of synthetic vesicles, to enhance the diffusion of traceable molecular machines into and within live cells, to induce necrosis and to introduce chemical species into live cells. We also show that, by using molecular machines that bear short peptide addends, nanomechanical action can selectively target specific cell-surface recognition sites. Beyond the in vitro applications demonstrated here, we expect that molecular machines could also be used in vivo, especially as their design progresses to allow two-photon, near-infrared and radio-frequency activation.

  6. Evaluation of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) code Open FOAM in the study of the pressurized thermal stress of PWR reactors. Comparison with the commercial code Ansys-CFX; Evaluacion del codigo de Dinamica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD) Open FOAM en el estudio del estres termico presurizado de los reactores PWR. Comparacion con el codigo comercial Ansys-CFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu Martin, G.; Chiva, S.

    2012-07-01

    In this work is proposed to evaluate the potential of the OpenFOAM code for the simulation of typical fluid flows in reactors PWR, in particular for the study of pressurized thermal stress. Test T1-1 has been simulated , within the OECD ROSA project, with the objective of evaluating the performance of the code OpenFOAM and models of turbulence that has implemented to capture the effect of the thrust forces in the case study.

  7. Foamed Antenna Support for Very Large Apertures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase I program will demonstrate the feasibility of the in-space production of large aperture antenna structures. The use of a novel open cell foam,...

  8. The Temperature Effect on the Compressive Behavior of Closed-Cell Aluminum-Alloy Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Nima; Linul, Emanoil; Marsavina, Liviu

    2018-01-01

    In this research, the mechanical behavior of closed-cell aluminum (Al)-alloy foams was investigated at different temperatures in the range of 25-450 °C. The main mechanical properties of porous Al-alloy foams are affected by the testing temperature, and they decrease with the increase in the temperature during uniaxial compression. From both the constant/serrated character of stress-strain curves and macro/microstructural morphology of deformed cellular structure, it was found that Al foams present a transition temperature from brittle to ductile behavior around 192 °C. Due to the softening of the cellular structure at higher temperatures, linear correlations of the stress amplitude and that of the absorbed energy with the temperature were proposed. Also, it was observed that the presence of inherent defects like micropores in the foam cell walls induced further local stress concentration which weakens the cellular structure's strength and crack propagation and cell-wall plastic deformation are the dominant collapse mechanisms. Finally, an energy absorption study was performed and an optimum temperature was proposed.

  9. Performance analysis of a membrane humidifier containing porous metal foam as flow distributor in a PEM fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Baharlou Houreh, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three metal foam configurations for the membrane humidifier are introduced. • The performances of the humidifiers containing metal foam are investigated. • A 3D CFD model is developed to compare the introduced humidifiers with one another. • Using metal foam at dry side has no positive effect on the humidifier performance. - Abstract: Using metal foam as flow distributor in membrane humidifier for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system has some unique characteristics like more water transfer, low manufacturing complexity and low cost compared to the conventional flow channel plate. Metal foam can be applied at wet side or dry side or both sides of a humidifier. The three-dimensional CFD models are developed to investigate the performance of the above mentioned meanwhile compare them with the conventional humidifier. This model consists of a set of coupled equations including conservations of mass, momentum, species and energy for all regions of the humidifier. The results indicate that with the metal foam installed at wet side and both sides, water recovery ratio and dew point at dry side outlet are more than that of the conventional humidifier, indicating a better humidifier performance; while using metal foam at dry side has no positive effect on humidifier performance. At dry side mass flow rates higher than 10 mgr/s pressure drop in humidifier containing metal foam at wet side is lower than that of the conventional humidifier. As the mass flow rate increases from 9 to 15 mgr/s humidifier containing metal foam at wet side has better performance, while at mass flow rates lower than 9 mgr/s, the humidifier containing metal foam at both sides has better performance. At dry side inlet temperatures lower than 303 K, humidifier containing metal foam at wet side has better performance and at temperatures higher than 303 K, humidifier containing metal foam at both sides has better performance

  10. Euler-Lagrangian Model of Particle Motion and Deposition Effects in Electro-Static Fields based on OpenFoam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boiger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the powder coating process of metal substrates, a comprehensive, numerical 3D Eulerian-LaGrangian model, featuring two particle sub-models, has been developed. The model considers the effects of electro-static, fluid-dynamic and gravity forces. The code has been implemented in C++ within the open source CFD platform OpenFoam®, is transient in nature with respect to the applied LaGrangian particle implementation and the electro-static field calculation and is stationary regarding fluid-dynamic phenomena. Qualitative validation of the developed solver has already been achieved by comparison to simple coating experiments and will hereby be presented alongside a thorough description of the model itself. Upon combining knowledge of the relevant dimensionless groups and the numerical model, a dimensionless chart, representing all possible states of coating, was populated with comprehensive, exemplary cases, which are shown here as well.

  11. Sodium borohydride hydrogen generator using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for 200 W proton exchange membrane fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Taek Hyun; Gang, Byeong Gyu; Kim, Hyuntak; Kwon, Sejin

    2015-01-01

    The response characteristics of electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam catalysts for sodium borohydride hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of nickel foam geometry on the properties of the catalysts was evaluated. As the PPI (pores per inch) of the nickel foam increased, the hydrogen generation rate per gram of the deposited catalyst increased due to an increase in surface area. The response characteristics of various catalysts were compared under real operating conditions. When a thin nickel foam with high PPI was used, the response characteristics of the catalyst improved due to an increase in the amount of the deposited catalyst and surface area. Finally, a 200 W PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system using electroless-deposited Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst was investigated. The response time to reach a hydrogen generation rate sufficient for a 200 W PEMFC was 71 s, and the energy density of a 200 W fuel cell system for producing 600 Wh was 252.1 Wh/kg. A fuel cell system using Co–P/Ni foam catalysts can be widely used as a power source for mobile applications due to fast response characteristics and high energy density. - Highlights: • Response characteristics of Co–P/Ni foam catalysts are investigated. • Catalytic activity is improved with increase in PPI (pores per inch) of Ni foam. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst has improved response characteristics. • The energy density of a 200 W PEMFC system for producing 600 Wh is 252.1 Wh/kg. • Co–P/Ni foam (110 PPI) catalyst is suitable for fuel cell system.

  12. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing [Department of Geratory, Linzi District People’s Hospital of Zibo City, Zibo, Shandong (China); Zhang, Suhua, E-mail: drsuhuangzhang@qq.com [Department of HealthCare, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University (Qingdao), Qingdao City, Qingdao (China)

    2016-08-05

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. -- Highlights: •miR-150 inhibits macrophage foam cell formation. •miR-150 accelerates cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. •miR-150 suppresses macrophage foam cell

  13. SIRT6 reduces macrophage foam cell formation by inducing autophagy and cholesterol efflux under ox-LDL condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangping; Zhang, Guangya; Pang, Qi; Yu, Cong; Xiong, Jie; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Fengling

    2017-05-01

    SIRT6 is a pivotal regulator of lipid metabolism. It is also closely connected to cardiovascular diseases, which are the main cause of death in diabetic patients. We observed a decrease in the expression of SIRT6 and key autophagy effectors (ATG5, LC3B, and LAMP1) in ox-LDL-induced foam cells, a special form of lipid-laden macrophages. In these cells, SIRT6 WT but not SIRT6 H133Y overexpression markedly reduced foam cell formation, as shown by Oil Red O staining, while inducing autophagy flux, as determined by both mRFP-GFP-LC3 labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Silencing the key autophagy initiation gene ATG5, reversed the autophagy-promoting effect of SIRT6 in ox-LDL-treated THP1 cells, as evidenced by an increase in foam cells. Cholesterol efflux assays indicated that SIRT6 overexpression in foam cells promoted cholesterol efflux, increased the levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, and reduced miR-33 levels. By transfecting miR-33 into cells overexpressing SIRT6, we observed that reduced foam cell formation and autophagy flux induction were largely reversed. These data imply that SIRT6 plays an essential role in protecting against atherosclerosis by reducing foam cell formation through an autophagy-dependent pathway. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Efficient solution of 3D electromagnetic eddy-current problems within the finite volume framework of OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstein, Pascal; Galindo, Vladimir; Vukčević, Vuko

    2017-09-01

    Eddy-current problems occur in a wide range of industrial and metallurgical applications where conducting material is processed inductively. Motivated by realising coupled multi-physics simulations, we present a new method for the solution of such problems in the finite volume framework of foam-extend, an extended version of the very popular OpenFOAM software. The numerical procedure involves a semi-coupled multi-mesh approach to solve Maxwell's equations for non-magnetic materials by means of the Coulomb gauged magnetic vector potential A and the electric scalar potential ϕ. The concept is further extended on the basis of the impressed and reduced magnetic vector potential and its usage in accordance with Biot-Savart's law to achieve a very efficient overall modelling even for complex three-dimensional geometries. Moreover, we present a special discretisation scheme to account for possible discontinuities in the electrical conductivity. To complement our numerical method, an extensive validation is completing the paper, which provides insight into the behaviour and the potential of our approach.

  15. 3D casing-distributor analysis with a novel block coupled OpenFOAM solver for hydraulic design application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devals, C; Zhang, Y; Dompierre, J; Guibault, F; Vu, T C; Mangani, L

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, computational fluid dynamics is commonly used by design engineers to evaluate and compare losses in hydraulic components as it is less expensive and less time consuming than model tests. For that purpose, an automatic tool for casing and distributor analysis will be presented in this paper. An in-house mesh generator and a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equation solver using the standard k-ω SST turbulence model will be used to perform all computations. Two solvers based on the C++ OpenFOAM library will be used and compared to a commercial solver. The performance of the new fully coupled block solver developed by the University of Lucerne and Andritz will be compared to the standard 1.6ext segregated simpleFoam solver and to a commercial solver. In this study, relative comparisons of different geometries of casing and distributor will be performed. The present study is thus aimed at validating the block solver and the tool chain and providing design engineers with a faster and more reliable analysis tool that can be integrated into their design process

  16. Investigation of microstructural and mechanical properties of cell walls of closed-cell aluminium alloy foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M.A.; Kader, M.A.; Hazell, P.J.; Brown, A.D. [School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra, ACT 2610 (Australia); Saadatfar, M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Quadir, M.Z [Electron Microscope Unit, Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre (MWAC), The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility (MMF), John de Laeter Centre (JdLC), Curtin University, WA 6102 (Australia); Escobedo, J.P., E-mail: J.Escobedo-Diaz@adfa.edu.au [School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra, ACT 2610 (Australia)

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the influence of microstructure on the strength properties of individual cell walls of closed-cell stabilized aluminium foams (SAFs). Optical microscopy (OM), micro-computed X-ray tomography (µ-CT), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were conducted to examine the microstructural properties of SAF cell walls. Novel micro-tensile tests were performed to investigate the strength properties of individual cell walls. Microstructural analysis of the SAF cell walls revealed that the material consists of eutectic Al-Si and dendritic a-Al with an inhomogeneous distribution of intermetallic particles and micro-pores (void defects). These microstructural features affected the micro-mechanism fracture behaviour and tensile strength of the specimens. Laser-based extensometer and digital image correlation (DIC) analyses were employed to observe the strain fields of individual tensile specimens. The tensile failure mode of these materials has been evaluated using microstructural analysis of post-mortem specimens, revealing a brittle cleavage fracture of the cell wall materials. The micro-porosities and intermetallic particles reduced the strength under tensile loading, limiting the elongation to fracture on average to ~3.2% and an average ultimate tensile strength to ~192 MPa. Finally, interactions between crack propagation and obstructing intermetallic compounds during the tensile deformation have been elucidated.

  17. Inflammation induced mTORC2-Akt-mTORC1 signaling promotes macrophage foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Dipanjan; Sinha, Archana; Saikia, Sudeshna; Gogoi, Bhaskarjyoti; Rathore, Arvind K; Das, Anindhya Sundar; Pal, Durba; Buragohain, Alak K; Dasgupta, Suman

    2018-06-05

    The transformation of macrophages into lipid loaded foam cells is a critical and early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Several recent reports highlighted that induction of TLR4 signaling promotes macrophage foam cell formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been clearly elucidated. Here, we found that the TLR4 mediated inflammatory signaling communicated with mTORC2-Akt-mTORC1 metabolic cascade in macrophage and thereby promoting lipid uptake and foam cell formation. Mechanistically, LPS treatment markedly upregulates TLR4 mediated inflammatory pathway which by activating mTORC2 induces Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and that aggravate mTORC1 dependent scavenger receptors expression and consequent lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages. Inhibition of mTORC2 either by silencing Rictor expression or inhibiting its association with mTOR notably prevents LPS induced Akt activation, scavenger receptors expression and macrophage lipid accumulation. Although suppression of mTORC1 expression by genetic knockdown of Raptor did not produce any significant change in Akt S473 phosphorylation, however, incubation with Akt activator in Rictor silenced cells failed to promote scavenger receptors expression and macrophage foam cell formation. Thus, present research explored the signaling pathway involved in inflammation induced macrophage foam cells formation and therefore, targeting this pathway might be useful for preventing macrophage foam cell formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Supercritical CO2 foaming of radiation crosslinked polypropylene/high-density polyethylene blend: Cell structure and tensile property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenguang; Xing, Zhe; Zhang, Mingxing; Zhao, Quan; Wang, Mouhua; Wu, Guozhong

    2017-12-01

    A blend of isotactic polypropylene (PP) with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in different PP/HDPE ratios was irradiated by γ-ray to induce cross-linking and then foamed using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a blowing agent. Radiation effect on the melting point and crystallinity were analyzed in detail. The average cell diameter and cell density were compared for PP/HDPE foams prepared under different conditions. The optimum absorbed dose for the scCO2 foaming of PP/HDPE in terms of foaming ability and cell structure was 20 kGy. Tensile measurements showed that the elongation at break and tensile strength at break of the crosslinked PP/HDPE foams were higher than the non-crosslinked ones. Of particular interest was the increase in the foaming temperature window from 4 ℃ for pristine PP to 8-12 ℃ for the radiation crosslinked PP/HDPE blends. This implies much easier handling of scCO2 foaming of crosslinked PP with the addition of HDPE.

  19. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular...... matrix (ECM) of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. METHODS: We 1) cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I) 2) investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of water flow through spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements using the Open FOAM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Guilherme A.M.; Vieira, Tiago A.S.; Castro, Higor F.P.

    2017-01-01

    With the advancement and development of computational tools, the studies of thermofluidodynamic behavior in nuclear fuel elements have been developed in recent years. Of the devices present in these elements, the spacing grids received more attention. They have kept the fuel rods equally spaced and have fins that aim to improve the heat transfer process between the water and the fuel element. Therefore, the grids present an important structural and thermal function. This work was carried out with the purpose of verifying and validating simulations of spacer grids using OpenFOAM (2017) software of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The simulations were validated using results obtained through the commercial CFD program, Ansys CFX, and experiments available in the literature and obtained in test sections assembled on the Water-Air Circuit (CCA) of the CDTN thermo-hydraulic laboratory

  1. 2D Numerical Investigation of the Laminar and Turbulent Flow Over Different Airfoils Using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, H; Stoevesandt, B; Peinke, J; Medjroubi, W

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the prediction capabilities of the turbulence models and the transition model kkl-ω available in OpenFOAM and to achieve a database of airfoil aerodynamical characteristics. The airfoils chosen for the simulations are FX 79-W- 15A and NACA 63-430, which are widely used in wind turbines. The numerically obtained lift and drag coefficients are compared with available experimental results. A quantitative and qualitative study is conducted to determine the influence of meshing strategies, computational time step together with interpolation and temporal schemes. Two Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes models (RANS models) are used, which are the k-ω SST model by Menter and the kkl-ω model (which involves transition modeling) by Walters and Davor

  2. Thermal-hydraulics verification of a coarse-mesh OpenFOAM-based solver for a Sodium Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonet López, M.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, in the Institute Swiss Paul Scherrer Institut, is has developed a platform Multiphysics, based in OpenFOAM, that is capable of performing an analysis multidimensional of a reactor nuclear. One of the main objectives of this project is to verify the part of the code responsible for the Thermo-hydraulic analysis of the reactor. To carry out simulations this part of the code uses the approximation of thick mesh based on the equations of a porous medium. Therefore, the other objective is demonstrate that this method is applicable to the analysis of a reactor nuclear fast of sodium, focusing is in his capacity of predict the transfer of heat between a subset and the space vacuum between subsets of the core of the reactor. (Author)

  3. Assessment of particle-tracking models for dispersed particle-laden flows implemented in OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Greifzu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two benchmark problems for turbulent dispersed particle-laden flow are investigated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD. How the CFD programs OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT model these flows is tested and compared. The numerical results obtained with Lagrangian–Eulerian (LE point-particle (PP models for Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations of the fluid flow in steady state and transient modes are compared with the experimental data available in the literature. The effect of the dispersion model on the particle motion is investigated in particular, as well as the order of coupling between the continuous carrier phase and the dispersed phase. First, a backward-facing step (BFS case is validated. As a second case, the confined bluff body (CBB is used. The simulated fluid flows correspond well with the experimental data for both test cases. The results for the dispersed solid phase reveal a good accordance between the simulation results and the experiments. It seems that particle dispersion is slightly under-predicted when ANSYS FLUENT is used, whereas the applied solver in OpenFOAM overestimates the dispersion somewhat. Only minor differences between the coupling schemes are detected due to the low volume fractions and mass loadings that are investigated. In the BFS test case the importance of the spatial dimension of the numerical model is demonstrated. Even if it is reasonable to assume a two-dimensional fluid flow structure, it is crucial to simulate the turbulent particle-laden flow with a three-dimensional model since the turbulent dispersion of the particles is three-dimensional.

  4. Combustion and radiation modeling of laminar premixed flames using OpenFOAM: A numerical investigation of radiative heat transfer in the RADIADE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Pang, Kar Mun; Ivarsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the computational fluid dynamics modelling of a laminar premixed flame. A specific solver named ’rareLTSFoam’ is developed using OpenFOAM ® code. The solver is used to simulate experimental stoichiometric and rich laminar premixed flames. The modelling is carried out for thermal...

  5. The influence of polyol type on cell geometry and the thermal stability of polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prendžov Slobodan J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the influence of substituting defined amounts of polyol Voranol 3322 by polyol Voranol CP 1055 on the cell geometry and thermal stability of the synthesized flexible polyurethane foams. The influence of the amount of antipyrene on the cell geometry and their thermal stability was also investigated. The following components were used in the synthesis of the polyurethanes: a mixture of two polyols (Voranol 3322 with the hydroxyl number 47 mg KOH/g, mean molecular mass 3400 and Voranol CP 1055 with the hydroxyl number 156 mg KOH/g, mean molecular mass 1000, toluene discarnate as the isocyanate component, a combination of an organic-metallic compound and a tertiary amine as catalysts, surfactant and water as the coreactant. The thermal stability was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (in a nitrogen atmosphere. The cell geometry was analyzed by optical microscopy. Examination of the cell geometry revealed different cell shapes. The form factor as an indicator of cell deviation from spherical shape increased (more round forms were observed with increasing amount of Voranol CP 1055. The TG examination showed that specimens with 6 and 8 g of Voranol 3322 substituted by Voranol CP 1055 completely degraded at 350 °C, while foams with 10 and 12 g of Voranol 3322 substituted by Voranol CP 1055 displayed lower mass loss at higher temperatures and had residual masses of 46 % and 43 % at 600°C respectively. The addition of antipyrene in an amount of 1% (based on the amount of polyol contributed to improved thermal stability, no visible color change of the specimen tested at 210°C for 40 minutes, and to rounder cell forms. Considering the obtained results it can be concluded that an increase in the amount of Voranol CP 1055 yielded more spherically shaped cells and better thermal stability of the synthesized flexible polyurethane foams. The addition of antipyrene improves the thermal stability and the cell geometry.

  6. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic coupling using Milonga and OpenFOAM codes: an approach using free software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Vitor Vasconcelos Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The development of a fine mesh coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics framework mainly using open source software is presented. The contributions proposed go in two different directions: one, is the focus on the open software development, a concept widely spread in many fields of knowledge but rarely explored in the nuclear engineering field; the second, is the use of operating system shared memory as a fast and reliable storage area to couple the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM to the free and flexible reactor core analysis code Milonga. This concept was applied to simulate the behavior of the TRIGA Mark 1 IPR-R1 reactor fuel pin in steady-state mode. The macroscopic cross-sections for the model, a set of two-group cross-sections data, were generated using WIMSD-5B code. The results show that this innovative coupled system gives consistent results, encouraging system further development and its use for complex nuclear systems. (author)

  7. Thermal Expansion of Three Closed Cell Polymeric Foams at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) contains the liquid H2 fuel and liquid oxygen oxidizer and supplies them under pressure to the three space shuttle main engines (SSME) in the orbiter during lift-off and ascent. The ET thermal protection system consists of sprayed-on foam insulation and pre-molded ablator materials. The closed-cell foams are the external coating on the ET and are responsible for minimizing the amount of moisture that condenses out and freezes on the tank from the humid air in Florida while it is on the pad with cryogenic propellant awaiting launch. This effort was part of the overall drive to understand the behavior of these materials under use-conditions. There are four specially-engineered closed-cell foams used on the tank. The thermal expansion (contraction) of three of the polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams were measured from -423 F (the temperature of liquid hydrogen) to 125 F under atmospheric conditions and under vacuum. One of them, NCFI 24-124, is a mechanically-applied material and covers the main acreage of the tank, accounting for 77 percent of the total foam used. Another, BX-265, is also a mechanically-applied and hand-sprayed material used on the tank's "closeout" areas. PDL 1034 is a hand-poured foam used for filling odd-shaped cavities in the tank, Measurements were made in triplicate in the three primary material directions in the case of the first two materials and the two primary material directions in the case of the last. Task 1 was developing the techniques for getting a uniform heating rate and minimizing axial and radial thermal gradients in the specimens. Temperature measurements were made at four locations in the specimens during this initial development phase of testing. Major challenges that were overcome include developing techniques for transferring the coolant, liquid helium (-452 F), from its storage container to the test facility with a minimal transfer of heat to the coolant and control of the heating

  8. Role of Rab5 in the formation of macrophage-derived foam cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lokwern; Hong, Jin; Pan, Junjie; Li, Jian; Wen, Zhichao; Shi, Haiming; Ding, Jianping; Luo, Xinping

    2017-09-12

    Foam cells play a key role in the occurrence and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Its formation starts with the ingestion of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The process is associated with Ras related protein in brain 5 (Rab5) which plays a critical role in regulating endocytosis and early endosomal trafficking. Base on this, we presumed that Rab5 might participate in the maturation of foam cell. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Rab5 on macrophage cholesterol during the evolvement of macrophage when induced by oxLDL to the formation of foam cell. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the distribution of macrophages and Rab5 in atherosclerotic plaque. RNA inteference study and transfection of inactive mutant (GFP-Rab5-S34N) and active mutant (GFP-Rab5-Q79L) in U937-derived macrophage were utilized to investigate the impact of Rab5 on the process of macrophage cholesterol, which could be detected by oil red O staining, determination of intracellular lipid content, filipin staining, nile red staining and the costaining of early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1) and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylin dicarbocyanine (Dil)-labelled oxLDL (Dil-oxLDL). Rab5 was found abundantly localized in macrophage rich areas of human atherosclerotic lesions. On the foam cell study, the expression of Rab5 was increased after the incubation of oxLDL. The inteference study indicated the depletion of Rab5 led to the decreases of oil red O staining areas, total cholesterol and cholesterol esters in U937-derived marophages. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity of filipin and nile red staining were lower in GFP-Rab5-S34N as compared with GFP-Rab5-Q79L. The confocal study demonstrated less Dil-oxLDL was internalized in GFP-Rab5-S34N as compared with GFP-Rab5-Q79L; the result showed also the decrease in colocalization of internalized Dil-oxLDL and EEA-1 for GFP-Rab5-S34N as compared with GFP-Rab5-Q79L. Rab5 plays an important role in modulating the

  9. A constitutive model for the compressive response of metallic closed-cell foams including micro-inertia effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthélémy Romain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams have known a keen interest in the last decades. Their ability to undergo very large deformations while transmitting low stress levels make them capable of performing functions of protective layers against intense loadings and of energy absorbers, for instance. The behaviour of metal foams varies considerably between quasi-static and dynamic regimes. Those differences can be linked to the strain-rate sensitivity of the skeleton material and to micro-inertial effects (induced by the crushing of the foam cells. In the present work, a micromechanical model has been developed to take into account micro-inertia effects on the macroscopic behaviour of closed-cell foams under dynamic loading conditions. The proposed modelling is based on the dynamic homogenisation procedure introduced by Molinari and Mercier (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001 1497–1516. Within this framework, the macrostress is the sum of two terms. The first one is a static stress, that can be described with any existing model of metal foam. The second contribution is a dynamic stress related to micro-inertia effects. Considering an initially spherical shell as a Representative Volume Element (RVE of the foam material, a closed-form expression of the dynamic stress was obtained. The proposed modelling was applied to shock propagation in aluminium foams (it should however be noted that the present theory is not restricted to uniaxial deformation but can be applied to arbitrary loadings. From experimental data of the literature, it is observed that incorporating micro-inertia effects allows one to achieve a better description of the foam shock response. This indicates that micro-inertia may have a significant influence on the dynamic behaviour of metallic foams.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor I reduces lipid oxidation and foam cell formation via downregulation of 12/15-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergiy; Snarski, Patricia; Vaughn, Charlotte; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia; Kim, Catherine; Higashi, Yusuke; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2015-02-01

    We have shown that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) infusion in Apoe(-/-) mice decreased atherosclerotic plaque size and plaque macrophage and lipid content suggesting that IGF-1 suppressed formation of macrophage-derived foam cells. Since 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) plays an important role in OxLDL and foam cell formation, we hypothesized that IGF-1 downregulates 12/15-LOX, thereby suppressing lipid oxidation and foam cell formation. We found that IGF-1 decreased 12/15-LOX plaque immunopositivity and serum OxLDL levels in Apoe(-/-) mice. IGF-1 reduced 12/15-LOX protein and mRNA levels in cultured THP-1 macrophages and IGF-1 also decreased expression of STAT6 transcription factor. IGF-1 reduction in macrophage 12/15-LOX was mediated in part via a PI3 kinase- and STAT6-dependent transcriptional mechanism. IGF-1 suppressed THP-1 macrophage ability to oxidize lipids and form foam cells. IGF-1 downregulated 12/15-LOX in human blood-derived primary macrophages and IGF-1 decreased LDL oxidation induced by these cells. IGF-1 reduced LDL oxidation and formation of foam cells by wild type murine peritoneal macrophages, however these effects were completely blocked in 12/15-LOX-null macrophages suggesting that the ability of IGF-1 to reduce LDL oxidation and foam cells formation is dependent on its ability to downregulate 12/15-LOX. Overall our data demonstrate that IGF-1 reduces lipid oxidation and foam cell formation via downregulation of 12/15-LOX and this mechanism may play a major role in the anti-atherosclerotic effects of IGF-1. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Insulin-like Growth Factor I Reduces Lipid Oxidation and Foam Cell Formation via Downregulation of 12/15-lipoxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergiy; Snarski, Patricia; Vaughn, Charlotte; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia; Kim, Catherine; Higashi, Yusuke; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Objective We have shown that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) infusion in Apoe−/− mice decreased atherosclerotic plaque size and plaque macrophage and lipid content suggesting that IGF-1 suppressed formation of macrophage-derived foam cells. Since 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) plays an important role in OxLDL and foam cell formation, we hypothesized that IGF-1 downregulates 12/15-LOX, thereby suppressing lipid oxidation and foam cell formation. Approach and Results We found that IGF-1 decreased 12/15-LOX plaque immunopositivity and serum OxLDL levels in Apoe−/− mice. IGF-1 reduced 12/15-LOX protein and mRNA levels in cultured THP-1 macrophages and IGF-1 also decreased expression of STAT6 transcription factor. IGF-1 reduction in macrophage 12/15-LOX was mediated in part via a PI3 kinase- and STAT6-dependent transcriptional mechanism. IGF-1 suppressed THP-1 macrophage ability to oxidize lipids and form foam cells. IGF-1 downregulated 12/15-LOX in human blood-derived primary macrophages and IGF-1 decreased LDL oxidation induced by these cells. IGF-1 reduced LDL oxidation and formation of foam cells by wild type murine peritoneal macrophages, however these effects were completely blocked in 12/15-LOX-null macrophages suggesting that the ability of IGF-1 to reduce LDL oxidation and foam cells formation is dependent on its ability to downregulate 12/15-LOX. Conclusions Overall our data demonstrate that IGF-1 reduces lipid oxidation and foam cell formation via downregulation of 12/15-LOX and this mechanism may play a major role in the anti-atherosclerotic effects of IGF-1. PMID:25549319

  12. Mitigation of open-air explosions by blast absorbing barriers and foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F. van der; Carton, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    Open-air explosions are inevitable connected to activities from the Ministry of Defense (e.g. large detonations or EOD operations). And also the industry uses open-air explosions for production processes (e.g. explosion welding). This requires the protection of people and buildings relatively close

  13. Numerical modeling of foam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheddadi, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Liquid foam flows are involved in numerous applications, e.g. food and cosmetics industries, oil extraction, nuclear decontamination. Moreover, their study leads to fundamental knowledge: as it is easier to manipulate and analyse, foam is used as a model material to understand the flow of emulsions, polymers, pastes, or cell aggregates, all of which display both solid and liquid behaviour. Systematic experiments performed by Francois Graner et al. provide precise data that emphasize the non Newtonian properties of the foam. Meanwhile, Pierre Saramito proposed a visco-elasto-plastic continuous tensorial model, akin to predict the behaviour of the foam. The goal of this thesis is to understand this complex behaviour, using these two elements. We have built and validated a resolution algorithm based on a bidimensional finite elements methods. The numerical solutions are in excellent agreement with the spatial distribution of all measured quantities, and confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. The dominant parameters have been identified and we evidenced the fact that the viscous, elastic, and plastic contributions to the flow have to be treated simultaneously in a tensorial formalism. We provide a substantial contribution to the understanding of foams and open the path to realistic simulations of complex VEP flows for industrial applications. (author)

  14. Development of a Hopkinson Bar Apparatus for Testing Soft Materials: Application to a Closed-Cell Aluminum Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Peroni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing interest in lightweight metallic foams for automotive, aerospace, and other applications has been observed in recent years. This is mainly due to the weight reduction that can be achieved using foams and for their mechanical energy absorption and acoustic damping capabilities. An accurate knowledge of the mechanical behavior of these materials, especially under dynamic loadings, is thus necessary. Unfortunately, metal foams and in general “soft” materials exhibit a series of peculiarities that make difficult the adoption of standard testing techniques for their high strain-rate characterization. This paper presents an innovative apparatus, where high strain-rate tests of metal foams or other soft materials can be performed by exploiting the operating principle of the Hopkinson bar methods. Using the pre-stress method to generate directly a long compression pulse (compared with traditional SHPB, a displacement of about 20 mm can be applied to the specimen with a single propagating wave, suitable for evaluating the whole stress-strain curve of medium-sized cell foams (pores of about 1–2 mm. The potential of this testing rig is shown in the characterization of a closed-cell aluminum foam, where all the above features are amply demonstrated.

  15. Design and Optimization of OpenFOAM-based CFD Applications for Modern Hybrid and Heterogeneous HPC Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    AlOnazi, Amani A.

    2014-01-01

    has been designed and implemented to solve the sparse linear algebraic kernel that derives from two CFD solver: icoFoam, which is an incompressible flow solver, and laplacianFoam, which solves the Poisson equation, for e.g., thermal dif- fusion. A load

  16. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  17. Streptococcus sanguinis induces foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages in association with production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Okinaga, Toshinori; Sakurai, Atsuo; Terao, Yutaka; Nakata, Masanobu; Nakashima, Keisuke; Shintani, Seikou; Kawabata, Shigetada; Ooshima, Takashi; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity, is a common streptococcal species implicated in infective endocarditis. Herein, we investigated the effects of infection with S. sanguinis on foam cell formation and cell death of macrophages. Infection with S. sanguinis stimulated foam cell formation of THP-1, a human macrophage cell line. At a multiplicity of infection >100, S. sanguinis-induced cell death of the macrophages. Viable bacterial infection was required to trigger cell death because heat-inactivated S. sanguinis did not induce cell death. The production of cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α from macrophages was also stimulated during bacterial infection. Inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulted in reduced cell death, suggesting an association of ROS with cell death. Furthermore, S. sanguinis-induced cell death appeared to be independent of activation of inflammasomes, because cleavage of procaspase-1 was not evident in infected macrophages. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Implementation and application of the actuator line model by OpenFOAM for a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, L.; Giljarhus, K.-E.; Hjertager, B.; Kalvig, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    University of Stavanger has started The Smart Sustainable Campus & Energy Lab project, to gain knowledge and facilitate project based education in the field of renewable and sustainable energy and increase the research effort in the same area. This project includes the future installation of a vertical axis wind turbine on the campus roof. A newly developed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model by OpenFOAM have been implemented to study the wind behavior over the building and the turbine performance. The online available wind turbine model case from Bachant, Goude and Wosnik from 2016 is used as the starting point. This is a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) case set up that uses the Actuator Line Model. The available test case considers a water tank with controlled external parameters. Bachant et al.’s model has been modified to study a VAWT in the atmospheric boundary layer. Various simulations have been performed trying to verify the models use and suitability. Simulation outcomes help to understand the impact of the surroundings on the turbine as well as its reaction to parameters changes. The developed model can be used for wind energy and flow simulations for both onshore and offshore applications.

  19. Thermosetting Fluoropolymer Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng Yen

    1987-01-01

    New process makes fluoropolymer foams with controllable amounts of inert-gas fillings in foam cells. Thermosetting fluoropolymers do not require foaming additives leaving undesirable residues and do not have to be molded and sintered at temperatures of about 240 to 400 degree C. Consequently, better for use with electronic or other parts sensitive to high temperatures or residues. Uses include coatings, electrical insulation, and structural parts.

  20. Silica-Assisted Nucleation of Polymer Foam Cells with Nanoscopic Dimensions: Impact of Particle Size, Line Tension, and Surface Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanqiu; Eijkelenkamp, Rik; Duvigneau, Joost; Vancso, G Julius

    2017-11-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles consisting of silica as core and surface-grafted poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as shell with different diameters were prepared and used as heterogeneous nucleation agents to obtain CO 2 -blown poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposite foams. PDMS was selected as the shell material as it possesses a low surface energy and high CO 2 -philicity. The successful synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The cell size and cell density of the PMMA micro- and nanocellular materials were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The cell nucleation efficiency using core-shell nanoparticles was significantly enhanced when compared to that of unmodified silica. The highest nucleation efficiency observed had a value of ∼0.5 for nanoparticles with a core diameter of 80 nm. The particle size dependence of cell nucleation efficiency is discussed taking into account line tension effects. Complete engulfment by the polymer matrix of particles with a core diameter below 40 nm at the cell wall interface was observed corresponding to line tension values of approximately 0.42 nN. This line tension significantly increases the energy barrier of heterogeneous nucleation and thus reduces the nucleation efficiency. The increase of the CO 2 saturation pressure to 300 bar prior to batch foaming resulted in an increased line tension length. We observed a decrease of the heterogeneous nucleation efficiency for foaming after saturation with CO 2 at 300 bar, which we attribute to homogenous nucleation becoming more favorable at the expense of heterogeneous nucleation in this case. Overall, it is shown that the contribution of line tension to the free energy barrier of heterogeneous foam cell nucleation must be considered to understand foaming of viscoelastic materials. This finding emphasizes the need for new strategies including the use of

  1. TRPV4 calcium-permeable channel is a novel regulator of oxidized LDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rishov; Merth, Michael; Sharma, Shweta; Alharbi, Mazen O; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Zhu, Xiaoping; Rahaman, Shaik O

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in United States, and atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory arterial disease, is the most dominant underlying pathology. Macrophages are thought to orchestrate atherosclerosis by generating lipid-laden foam cells and by secreting inflammatory mediators. Emerging data support a role for a mechanical factor, e.g., matrix stiffness, in regulation of macrophage function, vascular elasticity, and atherogenesis. However, the identity of the plasma membrane mechanosensor and the mechanisms by which pro-atherogenic signals are transduced/maintained are unknown. We have obtained evidence that TRPV4, an ion channel in the transient receptor potential vanilloid family and a known mechanosensor, is the likely mediator of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-dependent macrophage foam cell formation, a critical process in atherogenesis. Specifically, we found that: i) genetic ablation of TRPV4 or pharmacologic inhibition of TRPV4 activity by a specific antagonist blocked oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, and ii) TRPV4 deficiency prevented pathophysiological range matrix stiffness or scratch-induced exacerbation of oxLDL-induced foam cell formation. Mechanistically, we found that: i) plasma membrane localization of TRPV4 was sensitized to the increasing level of matrix stiffness, ii) lack of foam cell formation in TRPV4 null cells was not due to lack of expression of CD36, a major receptor for oxLDL, and iii) TRPV4 channel activity regulated oxLDL uptake but not its binding on macrophages. Altogether, these findings identify a novel role for TRPV4 in regulating macrophage foam cell formation by modulating uptake of oxLDL. These findings suggest that therapeutic targeting of TRPV4 may provide a selective approach to the treatment of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Combustion and radiation modeling of laminar premixed flames using OpenFOAM: A numerical investigation of radiative heat transfer in the RADIADE project

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Sajjad; Pang, Kar Mun; Ivarsson, Anders; Schramm, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the computational fluid dynamics modelling of a laminar premixed flame. A specific solver named ’rareLTSFoam’ is developed using OpenFOAM ® code. The solver is used to simulate experimental stoichiometric and rich laminar premixed flames. The modelling is carried out for thermal flow and combusting flow cases. The results show that without including radiation modelling, the predicted flame temperature is higher than the measured values. P1 radiation Model is used with sub-...

  3. Phytosterols Differentially Influence ABC transporter Expression, Cholesterol Efflux and Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion in Macrophage Foam Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeva, Nadezhda S; McPhaul, Christopher M; Li, Xiangan; Cory, Theodore J.; Feola, David J.; Graf, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Phytosterol supplements lower low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, but accumulate in vascular lesions of patients and limit the anti-atherosclerotic effects of LDL lowering in apolipoprotein E deficient mice, suggesting that the cholesterol lowering benefit of phytosterol supplementation may not be fully realized. Individual phytosterols have cell-type specific effects that may either be beneficial or deleterious with respect to atherosclerosis, but little is known concerning their effects on macrophage function. The effects of phytosterols on ABCA1 and ABCG1 abundance, cholesterol efflux, and inflammatory cytokine secretion were determined in cultured macrophage foam cells. Among the commonly consumed phytosterols, stigmasterol increased expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 and increased efflux of cholesterol to apolipoprotein (Apo) AI and high density lipoprotein (HDL). Campesterol and sitosterol had no effect on ABCA1 or ABCG1 levels. Sitosterol had no effect of cholesterol efflux to Apo AI or HDL, whereas campesterol had a modest, but significant reduction in cholesterol efflux to HDL in THP-1 macrophages. Whereas stigmasterol blunted aggregated LDL-induced increases in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β secretion, sitosterol exacerbated these effects. The presence of campesterol had no effect on agLDL-induced inflammatory cytokine secretion from THP-1 macrophages. In conclusion, the presence of stigmasterol in modified lipoproteins promoted cholesterol efflux and suppressed inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to lipid loading in macrophage foam cells. While campesterol was largely inert, the presence of sitosterol increased the proinflammatory cytokine secretion. PMID:21111593

  4. Zirconium phosphate coating on aluminium foams by electrophoretic deposition for acidic catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordomskiy, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    The electrophoretic deposition method has been applied for the formation of an amorphous zirconium phosphate layer on the surface of open-cell aluminum foam. The aluminum foam was fully and uniformly covered by the zirconium phosphate layer with a good mechanical adherence to the support. The

  5. Synthesis of Foam-Shaped Nanoporous Zeolite Material: A Simple Template-Based Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Vipin K.; Pires, Joao

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous zeolite foam is an interesting crystalline material with an open-cell microcellular structure, similar to polyurethane foam (PUF). The aluminosilicate structure of this material has a large surface area, extended porosity, and mechanical strength. Owing to these properties, this material is suitable for industrial applications such as…

  6. Polyethylene ionomer-based nano-composite foams prepared by a batch process and MuCell injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hidetomo; Mori, Tomoki; Okamoto, Masami; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Hayami, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To understand the correlation between foamability and melt rheology of polyethylene-based ionomers having different degrees of the neutralization and corresponding nano-composites, we have conducted the foam processing via a batch process in an autoclave and microcellular foam injection molding (FIM) process using the MuCell technology. We have discussed the obtainable morphological properties in both foaming processes. All cellular structures were investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The competitive phenomenon between the cell nucleation and the cell growth including the coalescence of cell was discussed in light of the interfacial energy and the relaxation rate as revealed by the modified classical nucleation theory and rheological measurement, respectively. The FIM process led to the opposite behavior in the cell growth and coalescence of cell as compared with that of the batch process, where the ionic cross-linked structure has significant contribution to retard the cell growth and coalescence of cell. The mechanical properties of the structural foams obtained by FIM process were discussed.

  7. Mitofusin2 decreases intracellular cholesterol of oxidized LDL-induced foam cells from rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Chen, Ying; Liu, Chun; Cao, Ming; Fan, Yu-jin; Guo, Xiao-mei

    2013-04-01

    Mitofusin2 (Mfn2) plays a pivotal role in the proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Mfn2 on the trafficking of intracellular cholesterol in the foam cells derived from rat VSMCs (rVSMCs) and also to investigate the effects of Mfn2 on the expression of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette subfamily G member 1 (ABCG1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). The rVSMCs were co-cultured with oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL, 80 μg/mL) to produce foam cells and cholesterol accumulation in cells. Before oxidized LDL treatment, different titers (20, 40 and 60 pfu/cell) of recombinant adenovirus containing Mfn2 gene (Adv-Mfn2) were added into the culture medium for 24 h to transfect the Mfn2 gene into the rVSMCs. Then the cells were harvested for analyses. The protein expression of Mfn2 was significantly higher in Adv-Mfn2-transfected group than in untransfected group (PLDL treatment, rVSMCs became irregular and their nuclei became larger, and their plasma abounded with red lipid droplets. However, the number of red lipid droplets was significantly decreased in Adv-Mfn2-transfected group as compared with untransfected group. At 48 h after oxidized LDL treatment, the intracellular cholesterol in rVSMCs was significantly increased (P0.05), the phosporylation levels of PPARγ were significantly decreased in Adv-Mfn2-transfected group as compared with untransfected group (Pcholesterol in oxidized LDL-induced rVSMCs possibly by decreasing PPARγ phosporylation and then increasing protein expression levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, which may be helpful to suppress the formation of foam cells.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of convective boundary layer generated by highly heated source with open source code, OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuo; Suto, Hitoshi; Eguchi, Yuzuru; Sano, Tadashi; Shirai, Koji; Ishihara, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Spatial- and temporal-characteristics of turbulence structures in the close vicinity of a heat source, which is a horizontal upward-facing round plate heated at high temperature, are examined by using well resolved large-eddy simulations. The verification is carried out through the comparison with experiments: the predicted statistics, including the PDF distribution of temperature fluctuations, agree well with measurements, indicating that the present simulations have a capability to appropriately reproduce turbulence structures near the heat source. The reproduced three-dimensional thermal- and fluid-fields in the close vicinity of the heat source reveals developing processes of coherence structures along the surface: the stationary- and streaky-flow patterns appear near the edge, and such patterns randomly shift to cell-like patterns with incursion into the center region, resulting in thermal-plume meandering. Both the patterns have very thin structures, but the depth of streaky structure is considerably small compared with that of cell-like patterns; this discrepancy causes the layered structures. The structure is the source of peculiar turbulence characteristics, the prediction of which is quite difficult with RANS-type turbulence models. The understanding such structures obtained in present study must be helpful to improve the turbulence model used in nuclear engineering. (author)

  9. Thermoviscous analysis of open photoacoustic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Kang, Sangmo

    2017-11-01

    Open photoacoustic cells, apart from the conventional spectroscopic applications, are increasingly useful in bio medical applications such as in vivo blood sugar measurement. Maximising the acoustic pressure amplitude and the quality factor are major design considerations associated with open cells.Conventionaly, resonant photoacoustic cells are analyzed by either transmission line analogy or Eigen mode expansion method. In this study, we conducted a more comprehensive thermo viscous analysis of open photoacoustic cells. A Helmholtz cell and a T-shaped cell, which are acoustically different, are considered for analysis. Effect of geometrical dimensions on the acoustic pressure, quality factor and the intrusion of noise are analyzed and compared between these cells. Specific attention is given to the sizing of the opening and fixtures on it to minimize the radiational losses and the intrusion of noise. Our results are useful for proper selection of the type of open photoacoustic cells for in vivo blood sugar measurement and the optimization of geometric variables of such cells. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and future planning (2017R1A2B4005006).

  10. Evaluation of Experimental Parameters in the Accelerated Aging of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Vanderlan, Michael [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2012-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C1303 standard test method led to the ruggedness test described here. This test program included the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods of five years for direct comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. The test protocol has been completed and this report provides a detailed evaluation of the impact of the test parameters on the accuracy of the 5-year thermal conductivity prediction.

  11. Use of Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel on nickel foam in direct ethanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Chi Him A.; Leung, D. Y. C.

    2018-01-01

    A size customized binder-free bimetallic Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel deposited on nickel foam plate (Pd-Pt/GA/NFP) was prepared and used as an electrode for an alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) under room temperature. The effect of fuel concentration and metal composition on the output power density of the DEFC was systematically investigated. Under the optimum fuel concentration, the cell could achieve a value of 3.6 mW cm-2 at room temperature for the graphene electrode with Pd/Pt ratio approaching 1:1. Such results demonstrated the possibility of producing a size customized metal loaded GA/NFP electrode for fuel cell with high performance.

  12. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce migration and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and accelerate foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yuka; Tada-Oikawa, Saeko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yabata, Masayuki; Izuoka, Kiyora [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Suzuki, Masako; Sakai, Kiyoshi [Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Ichihara, Sahoko, E-mail: saho@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO{sub 2} and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO{sub 2} particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. - Highlights: • Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on foam cell formation were investigated. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles induced migration and adhesion of monocytes. • Exposure to ZnO nanoparticles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake. • Expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL was also increased. • These effects were not observed after exposure to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  13. Impact of glutathione peroxidase-1 deficiency on macrophage foam cell formation and proliferation: implications for atherogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cheng

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a protective role for the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1 in the atherogenic process. GPx-1 deficiency accelerates atherosclerosis and increases lesion cellularity in ApoE(-/- mice. However, the distribution of GPx-1 within the atherosclerotic lesion as well as the mechanisms leading to increased macrophage numbers in lesions is still unknown. Accordingly, the aims of the present study were (1 to analyze which cells express GPx-1 within atherosclerotic lesions and (2 to determine whether a lack of GPx-1 affects macrophage foam cell formation and cellular proliferation. Both in situ-hybridization and immunohistochemistry of lesions of the aortic sinus of ApoE(-/- mice after 12 weeks on a Western type diet revealed that both macrophages and - even though to a less extent - smooth muscle cells contribute to GPx-1 expression within atherosclerotic lesions. In isolated mouse peritoneal macrophages differentiated for 3 days with macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (MCSF, GPx-1 deficiency increased oxidized low density-lipoprotein (oxLDL induced foam cell formation and led to increased proliferative activity of peritoneal macrophages. The MCSF- and oxLDL-induced proliferation of peritoneal macrophages from GPx-1(-/-ApoE(-/- mice was mediated by the p44/42 MAPK (p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, namely ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2, signaling pathway as demonstrated by ERK1/2 signaling pathways inhibitors, Western blots on cell lysates with primary antibodies against total and phosphorylated ERK1/2, MEK1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2, p90RSK (p90 ribosomal s6 kinase, p38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and immunohistochemistry of mice atherosclerotic lesions with antibodies against phosphorylated ERK1/2, MEK1/2 and p90RSK. Representative effects of GPx-1 deficiency on both macrophage proliferation and

  14. Effects of an anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitor on apoptosis/necrosis and cholesterol accumulation under oxidative stress in THP-1 cell-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miike, Tomohiro; Shirahase, Hiroaki; Jino, Hiroshi; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Kanda, Mamoru; Kurahashi, Kazuyoshi

    2008-01-02

    THP-1 cell-derived foam cells were exposed to oxidative stress through combined treatment with acetylated LDL (acLDL) and copper ions (Cu2+). The foam cells showed caspase-dependent apoptotic changes on exposure to oxidative stress for 6 h, and necrotic changes with the leakage of LDH after 24 h. KY-455, an anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitor, and ascorbic acid (VC) but not YM-750, an ACAT inhibitor, prevented apoptotic and necrotic changes. These preventive effects of KY-455 and VC were accompanied by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in culture medium containing acLDL and Cu2+, suggesting the involvement of oxidized acLDL in apoptosis and necrosis. Foam cells accumulated esterified cholesterol (EC) for 24 h in the presence of acLDL without Cu2+, which was suppressed by KY-455 and YM-750. Foam cells showed necrotic changes and died in the presence of acLDL and Cu2+. KY-455 but not YM-750 prevented cell death and reduced the amount of EC accumulated. The foam cells treated with VC further accumulated EC without necrotic changes for 24 h even in the presence of acLDL and Cu2+. YM-750 as well as KY-455 inhibited lipid accumulation when co-incubated with VC in foam cells exposed to oxidative stress. It is concluded that an anti-oxidative ACAT inhibitor or the combination of an antioxidant and an ACAT inhibitor protects foam cells from oxidative stress and effectively reduces cholesterol levels, which would be a promising approach in anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  15. X-ray micro computed tomography characterization of cellular SiC foams for their applications in chemical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Xiaoxia [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Zhang, Xun; Lowe, Tristan [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Blanc, Remi [FEI, 3 Impasse Rudolf Diesel, BP 50227, 33708 Mérignac (France); Rad, Mansoureh Norouzi [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Wang, Ying [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Batail, Nelly; Pham, Charlotte [SICAT SARL, 20 Place des Halles, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Shokri, Nima; Garforth, Arthur A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip J. [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Fan, Xiaolei, E-mail: xiaolei.fan@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Open-cell SiC foams clearly are promising materials for continuous-flow chemical applications such as heterogeneous catalysis and distillation. X-ray micro computed tomography characterization of cellular β-SiC foams at a spatial voxel size of 13.6{sup 3} μm{sup 3} and the interpretation of morphological properties of SiC open-cell foams with implications to their transport properties are presented. Static liquid hold-up in SiC foams was investigated through in-situ draining experiments for the first time using the μ-CT technique providing thorough 3D information about the amount and distribution of liquid hold-up inside the foam. This will enable better modeling and design of structured reactors based on SiC foams in the future. In order to see more practical uses, μ-CT data of cellular foams must be exploited to optimize the design of the morphology of foams for a specific application. - Highlights: •Characterization of SiC foams using novel X-ray micro computed tomography. •Interpretation of structural properties of SiC foams regarding to their transport properties. •Static liquid hold-up analysis of SiC foams through in-situ draining experiments.

  16. Preparation And Characterization Of Silicon Carbide Foam By Using In-Situ Generated Polyurethane Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Saxena

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The open cell silicon carbide SiC foam was prepared using highly crosslinked hybrid organic- inorganic polymer resin matrix. As inorganic polymer polycarbosilane was taken and organic resin was taken as a mixture of epoxy resin and diisocyanates. The resultant highly crosslinked hybrid resin matrix on heating and subsequently on pyrolysis yielded open cell silicon carbide foam. The hybrid resin matrix was characterized by Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy FT-IR and thermal properties i.e. Thermogravimetric analysis TGA amp Differential Scanning Calorimetry DSC were also studied. The morphological studies of silicon carbide ceramic foam were carried out using X-ray Spectroscopy XRD amp Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM.

  17. Model fire tests on polyphosphazene rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widenor, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A video tape record of model room fire tests was shown, comparing polyphosphazene (P-N) rubber and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)/nitrile rubber closed-cell foams as interior finish thermal insulation under conditions directly translatable to an actual fire situation. Flashover did not occur with the P-N foam and only moderate amounts of low density smoke were formed, whereas with the PVC/nitrile foam, flashover occurred quickly and large volumes of high density smoke were emitted. The P-N foam was produced in a pilot plant under carefully controlled conditions. The PVC/nitrile foam was a commercial product. A major phase of the overall program involved fire tests on P-N open-cell foam cushioning.

  18. NF-kB activity-dependent P-selectin involved in ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation in U937 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Minghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cao, Heng; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Ox-LDL induced foam cell formation in the human U937 promonocytic cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. → Ox-LDL induced expression of P-selectin through degradation of IkBa and augment of NF-kB activity and protein level during macrophage-derived foam cell formation. → P-selectin and NF-kB may be identified as pivotal regulators of ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation. → Therapy based on the inhibition of P-selectin and NF-kB may complement conventional treatments to prevent atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) plays a critical role in regulation of atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the role of Nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activity-dependent P-selectin in ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation during atherosclerosis. In this study, we first investigated ox-LDL induced foam cell formation in the human U937 promonocytic cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of U937 cells with ox-LDL increased lipid accumulation as well as intracellular cholesterol content. Next, a comparative analysis of gene expression profiling using cDNA microarray and Real-time-PCR indicated that ox-LDL exposure induced, in three treated groups, an extremely marked increase in the mRNA level of P-selectin. Protein levels of P-selectin and its upstream regulators IkBa and NF-kB showed that NF-kB pathway is involved in the ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation. Finally, overexpression of NF-kB significantly accelerated, whereas, inhibition of NF-kB with siRNA remarkably attenuated ox-LDL-induced macrophage-derived foam cell formation. It was concluded that the activity of NF-kB is augmented during macrophage-derived foam cell formation. Activation of NF-kB increased, whereas, inhibition of NF-kB decreased ox-LDL-induced P-selectin expression and lipid accumulation in macrophages, suggesting ox-LDL induced expression of P-selectin through degradation of IkBa and activation of NF-kB in the regulation of foam

  19. NF-kB activity-dependent P-selectin involved in ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation in U937 cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi, E-mail: wangyi2004a@126.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080 (China); Wang, Xiang; Sun, Minghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cao, Heng; Chen, Xiaoqing [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai First People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080 (China)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Ox-LDL induced foam cell formation in the human U937 promonocytic cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. {yields} Ox-LDL induced expression of P-selectin through degradation of IkBa and augment of NF-kB activity and protein level during macrophage-derived foam cell formation. {yields} P-selectin and NF-kB may be identified as pivotal regulators of ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation. {yields} Therapy based on the inhibition of P-selectin and NF-kB may complement conventional treatments to prevent atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) plays a critical role in regulation of atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the role of Nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activity-dependent P-selectin in ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation during atherosclerosis. In this study, we first investigated ox-LDL induced foam cell formation in the human U937 promonocytic cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of U937 cells with ox-LDL increased lipid accumulation as well as intracellular cholesterol content. Next, a comparative analysis of gene expression profiling using cDNA microarray and Real-time-PCR indicated that ox-LDL exposure induced, in three treated groups, an extremely marked increase in the mRNA level of P-selectin. Protein levels of P-selectin and its upstream regulators IkBa and NF-kB showed that NF-kB pathway is involved in the ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation. Finally, overexpression of NF-kB significantly accelerated, whereas, inhibition of NF-kB with siRNA remarkably attenuated ox-LDL-induced macrophage-derived foam cell formation. It was concluded that the activity of NF-kB is augmented during macrophage-derived foam cell formation. Activation of NF-kB increased, whereas, inhibition of NF-kB decreased ox-LDL-induced P-selectin expression and lipid accumulation in macrophages, suggesting ox-LDL induced expression of P-selectin through degradation of IkBa and activation of NF-kB in the

  20. Tofacitinib ameliorates atherosclerosis and reduces foam cell formation in apoE deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zaicun; Wang, Shumei; Wang, Zunzhe; Yun, Tiantian; Wang, Chenchen; Wang, Huating

    2017-08-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory cardiovascular disease with high mortality worldwide. Tofacitinib (CP-690,550), an oral small-molecule Janus kinase inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune encephalomyelitis and ulcerative colitis. However, its protective effect against atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Tofacitinib on atherogenic diet (ATD)-induced atherosclerosis using apolipoprotein E deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Atherosclerosis-prone apoE-/- mice were fed with ATD and treated with or without Tofacitinib through intragastrical administration (10 mg kg -1 day -1 ) for 8 weeks. Our results showed that Tofacitinib did not change plasma lipids, while significantly reduced the levels of plasma pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. It also significantly attenuated atherosclerotic plaque lesion in the aortic root and macrophages contained in plaque as shown with Mac2 immuno-staining. Peritoneal macrophages (PMC) were separated from apoE-/- mice fed with 8-week ATD, and then subjected to inflammation tests. Flow cytometry analysis of F4/80 and CD206 and mRNA levels of M1 and M2 macrophages markers showed that M1 macrophages decreased while M2 macrophages increased in Tofacitinib treated group. Expressions of other inflammatory genes also indicated an anti-inflammatory status in mice treated with Tofacitinib. Ox-LDL was used to induce foam cell formation from PMC in wild type mice, and the results displayed a reduced formation of foam cells and decreased inflammation in mice with Tofacitinib administration (1 μM). The mRNA and protein levels of ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1), a key gene involved in cholesterol efflux, remarkably increased, while it was absence of alterations in scavenger receptors expression. Therefore, we demonstrated that Tofacitinib could attenuate atherosclerosis and foam cells formation by

  1. Effect of methanolic extract of Piper sarmentosum leaves on neointimal foam cell infiltration in rabbits fed with high cholesterol diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, Adel A.; Zakaria, Zaiton; Othman, Faizah; Das, Srijit; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Raj, Santhana; Nordin, Nor-Anita MM

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown the beneficial effects of aqueous extract of Piper sarmentosum (P.s) on atherosclerosis. The first stage in atherosclerosis is the formation of foam cell. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the methanol extract of P.s on fatty streaks by calculating neointimal foam cell infiltration in rabbits fed with high cholesterol diet. Thirty six male New Zealand white rabbits were divided equally into six groups: (i) C: control group fed normal rabbit chow; (ii) CH: cholesterol diet (1 % cholesterol); (iii) PM1: 1 % cholesterol with methanol extract of P.s (62.5 mg/kg); (iv) PM2: 1 % cholesterol with methanol extract of P.s (125 mg/kg); (v) PM3: 1 % cholesterol with methanol extract of P.s (250 mg/kg); (vi) SMV group fed 1 % cholesterol supplemented with Simvistatin drug (1.2 mg/kg). All animals were treated for 10 weeks. At the end of the treatment, the rabbits were fasted and sacrificed and the aortic tissues were collected for histological studies to measure the area of the neointimal foam cell infiltration using software. The thickening of intima ratio of atherosclerosis and morphological changes by scanning electron microscope were measured. The results showed that the atherosclerotic group had significantly bigger area of fatty streak compared to the control group. The area of fatty streak in the abdominal aorta was significantly reduced in the treatment groups which were similar with the SMV group. Similarly, there was a reduction in the number of foam cell in the treatment groups compared to the atherosclerotic group as seen under scanning microscope. In conclusion, histological study demonstrated that the methanol extract of the P.s could reduce the neointimal foam cell infiltration in the lumen of the aorta and the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:27366140

  2. CD14 is a key mediator of both lysophosphatidic acid and lipopolysaccharide induction of foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dong; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Fuqiang; Kong, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Xu, Xuemin; Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2017-09-01

    Macrophage uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plays an important role in foam cell formation and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We report here that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) enhances lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxLDL uptake in macrophages. Our data revealed that both LPA and LPS highly induce the CD14 expression at messenger RNA and protein levels in macrophages. The role of CD14, one component of the LPS receptor cluster, in LPA-induced biological functions has been unknown. We took several steps to examine the role of CD14 in LPA signaling pathways. Knockdown of CD14 expression nearly completely blocked LPA/LPS-induced oxLDL uptake in macrophages, demonstrating for the first time that CD14 is a key mediator responsible for both LPA- and LPS-induced oxLDL uptake/foam cell formation. To determine the molecular mechanism mediating CD14 function, we demonstrated that both LPA and LPS significantly induce the expression of scavenger receptor class A type I (SR-AI), which has been implicated in lipid uptake process, and depletion of CD14 levels blocked LPA/LPS-induced SR-AI expression. We further showed that the SR-AI-specific antibody, which quenches SR-AI function, blocked LPA- and LPS-induced foam cell formation. Thus, SR-AI is the downstream mediator of CD14 in regulating LPA-, LPS-, and LPA/LPS-induced foam cell formation. Taken together, our results provide the first experimental evidence that CD14 is a novel connecting molecule linking both LPA and LPS pathways and is a key mediator responsible for LPA/LPS-induced foam cell formation. The LPA/LPS-CD14-SR-AI nexus might be the new convergent pathway, contributing to the worsening of atherosclerosis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A semi-parabolic wake model for large offshore wind farms based on the open source CFD solver OpenFOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabezón D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wake effect represents one of the main sources of energy loss and uncertainty when designing offshore wind farms. Traditionally analytical models have been used to optimize and estimate power deficits. However these models have shown to underestimate wake effect and consequently overestimate output power [1, 2]. This means that analytical models can be very helpful at optimizing preliminary layouts but not as accurate as needed for an ultimate fine design. Different techniques can be found in the literature to study wind turbine wakes that include simplified kinematic models and more advanced field models, that solve flow equations with different turbulence closure schemes. See the review papers of Crespo et al. [3], Vermeer et al. [4], and Sanderse et al. [5]. Purely elliptic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD models based on the actuator disk technique have been developed during the last years [6–8]. They consider wind turbine rotor as a disk where a distribution of axial forces act over the incoming air. It is a fair approach but it can still be computationally expensive for big wind farms in an operative mode. With this technique still active, an alternative approach inspired on the parabolic wake models [9, 10] is proposed. Wind turbine rotors continue to be represented as actuator disks but now the domain is split into subdomains containing one or more wind turbines. The output of each subdomain is mapped onto the input boundary of the next one until the end of the domain is reached, getting a considerable decrease on computational time, by a factor of order 10. As the model is based on the open source CFD solver OpenFOAM, it can be parallelized to speed-up convergence. The near wake is calculated so no initial wind speed deficit profiles have to be supposed as in totally parabolic models and alternative turbulence models, such as the anisotropic Reynolds Stress Model (RSM can be used. Traditional problems of elliptic models related to

  4. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Chi-Ping; Lin, Hui-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu 2+ -induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression

  5. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing-Hsien [School of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Wen [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chi-Ping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hui-Hsuan, E-mail: linhh@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  6. Leucine supplementation attenuates macrophage foam-cell formation: Studies in humans, mice, and cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Rom, Oren; Hamoud, Shadi; Volkova, Nina; Hayek, Tony; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Aviram, Michael

    2018-02-05

    Whereas atherogenicity of dietary lipids has been largely studied, relatively little is known about the possible contribution of dietary amino acids to macrophage foam-cell formation, a hallmark of early atherogenesis. Recently, we showed that leucine has antiatherogenic properties in the macrophage model system. In this study, an in-depth investigation of the role of leucine in macrophage lipid metabolism was conducted by supplementing humans, mice, or cultured macrophages with leucine. Macrophage incubation with serum obtained from healthy adults supplemented with leucine (5 g/d, 3 weeks) significantly decreased cellular cholesterol mass by inhibiting the rate of cholesterol biosynthesis and increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Similarly, leucine supplementation to C57BL/6 mice (8 weeks) resulted in decreased cholesterol content in their harvested peritoneal macrophages (MPM) in relation with reduced cholesterol biosynthesis rate. Studies in J774A.1 murine macrophages revealed that leucine dose-dependently decreased cellular cholesterol and triglyceride mass. Macrophages treated with leucine (0.2 mM) showed attenuated uptake of very low-density lipoproteins and triglyceride biosynthesis rate, with a concurrent down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, a key enzyme catalyzing triglyceride biosynthesis in macrophages. Similar effects were observed when macrophages were treated with α-ketoisocaproate, a key leucine metabolite. Finally, both in vivo and in vitro leucine supplementation significantly improved macrophage mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. The above studies, conducted in human, mice, and cultured macrophages, highlight a protective role for leucine attenuating macrophage foam-cell formation by mechanisms related to the metabolism of cholesterol, triglycerides, and energy production. © 2018 BioFactors, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Simulated Tip Rub Testing of Low-Density Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jones, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary acoustic studies have indicated that low-density, open-cell, metal foams may be suitable acoustic liner material for noise suppression in high by-pass engines. Metal foam response under simulated tip rub conditions was studied to assess whether its durability would be sufficient for the foam to serve both as a rub strip above the rotor as well as an acoustic treatment. Samples represented four metal alloys, nominal cell dimensions ranging from 60 to 120 cells per inch (cpi), and relative densities ranging from 3.4 to 10 percent. The resulting rubbed surfaces were relatively smooth and the open cell structure of the foam was not adversely affected. Sample relative density appeared to have significant influence on the forces induced by the rub event. Acoustic responses of various surface preparations were measured using a normal incidence tube. The results of this study indicate that the foam s open-cell structure was retained after rubbing and that the acoustic absorption spectra variation was minimal.

  8. Image-based correlation between the meso-scale structure and deformation of closed-cell foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yongle, E-mail: yongle.sun@manchester.ac.uk [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Zhang, Xun [Henry Moseley X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Upper Brook Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Shao, Zhushan [School of Civil Engineering, Xi' an University of Architecture & Technology, Xi' an 710055 (China); Li, Q.M. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-03-14

    In the correlation between structural parameters and compressive behaviour of cellular materials, previous studies have mostly focused on averaged structural parameters and bulk material properties for different samples. This study focuses on the meso-scale correlation between structure and deformation in a 2D foam sample generated from a computed tomography slice of Alporas™ foam, for which quasi-static compression was simulated using 2D image-based finite element modelling. First, a comprehensive meso-scale structural characterisation of the 2D foam was carried out to determine the size, aspect ratio, orientation and anisotropy of individual cells, as well as the length, straightness, inclination and thickness of individual cell walls. Measurements were then conducted to obtain the axial distributions of local structural parameters averaged laterally to compression axis. Second, the meso-scale deformation was characterised by cell-wall strain, cell area ratio, digital image correlation strain and local compressive engineering strain. According to the results, the through-width sub-regions over an axial length between the average (lower bound) and the maximum (upper bound) of cell size should be used to characterise the meso-scale heterogeneity of the cell structure and deformation. It was found that the first crush band forms in a sub-region where the ratio of cell-wall thickness to cell-wall length is a minimum, in which the collapse deformation is dominated by the plastic bending and buckling of cell walls. Other morphological parameters have secondary effect on the initiation of crush band in the 2D foam. The finding of this study suggests that the measurement of local structural properties is crucial for the identification of the “weakest” region which determines the initiation of collapse and hence the corresponding collapse load of a heterogeneous cellular material.

  9. Image-based correlation between the meso-scale structure and deformation of closed-cell foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yongle; Zhang, Xun; Shao, Zhushan; Li, Q.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the correlation between structural parameters and compressive behaviour of cellular materials, previous studies have mostly focused on averaged structural parameters and bulk material properties for different samples. This study focuses on the meso-scale correlation between structure and deformation in a 2D foam sample generated from a computed tomography slice of Alporas™ foam, for which quasi-static compression was simulated using 2D image-based finite element modelling. First, a comprehensive meso-scale structural characterisation of the 2D foam was carried out to determine the size, aspect ratio, orientation and anisotropy of individual cells, as well as the length, straightness, inclination and thickness of individual cell walls. Measurements were then conducted to obtain the axial distributions of local structural parameters averaged laterally to compression axis. Second, the meso-scale deformation was characterised by cell-wall strain, cell area ratio, digital image correlation strain and local compressive engineering strain. According to the results, the through-width sub-regions over an axial length between the average (lower bound) and the maximum (upper bound) of cell size should be used to characterise the meso-scale heterogeneity of the cell structure and deformation. It was found that the first crush band forms in a sub-region where the ratio of cell-wall thickness to cell-wall length is a minimum, in which the collapse deformation is dominated by the plastic bending and buckling of cell walls. Other morphological parameters have secondary effect on the initiation of crush band in the 2D foam. The finding of this study suggests that the measurement of local structural properties is crucial for the identification of the “weakest” region which determines the initiation of collapse and hence the corresponding collapse load of a heterogeneous cellular material.

  10. Numerical analysis on the calandria tubes in the moderator of a heavy water reactor using OpenFOAM and other codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.M.; Kim, H.T.

    2013-01-01

    CANDU, a prototype of heavy water reactor is modeled for the moderator system with porous media buoyancy-effect heat-transfer turbulence model. OpenFOAM, a set of C++ classes and libraries developed under the object-oriented concept, is selected as the tool of numerical analysis. The result from this computational code is compared with experiments and other commercial code data through ANSYS-CFX and COMSOL Multi-physics. The three-dimensional code concerning buoyancy force, turbulence, and heat transfer is tested and shown to be successful for the analysis of thermo-hydraulic system of heavy water reactors. (authors)

  11. Failure mechanisms of closed-cell aluminum foam under monotonic and cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsterdam, E.; De Hosson, J.Th.M.; Onck, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the differences in failure mechanisms of Alporas closed-cell aluminum foam under either monotonic or cyclic loading. The emphasis lies on aspects of crack nucleation and crack propagation in relation to the microstructure. The cell wall material consists of Al dendrites and an interdendritic network of Al 4 Ca and Al 22 CaTi 2 precipitates. In situ scanning electron microscopy monotonic tensile tests were performed on small samples to study crack nucleation and propagation. Digital image correlation was employed to map the strain in the cell wall on the characteristic microstructural length scale. Monotonic tensile tests and tension-tension fatigue tests were performed on larger samples to observe the overall fracture behavior and crack path in monotonic and cyclic loading. The crack nucleation and propagation path in both loading conditions are revealed and it can be concluded that during monotonic tension cracks nucleate in and propagate partly through the Al 4 Ca interdendritic network, whereas under cyclic loading cracks nucleate and propagate through the Al dendrites

  12. CFD analysis for the hydrogen transport in the primary contention of a BWR using the codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez P, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    limited number of semi-empirical data, and instead, mathematical relationships are used taking into account the various physical phenomena as well the interactions that occur among them, such as heat transfer between the fluid and the solid walls condensation of water vapor on the walls, the turbulent effects in areas of restricted passage, etc. Taking into account these advantages, this study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison between the CFD codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow related to the transport phenomena of Hydrogen and other gases in the primary containment of a BWR reactor. Gas-Flow is a code of commercial license that is well validated, developed in Germany to analyze the transport of gases in nuclear reactor containments. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source CFD code offering several solvers for different phenomena assessments, in this work, the reacting Foam solver is used because it has a strong similarity to the intended application of Hydrogen transport. In this thesis the results obtained using the reacting Foam solver of OpenFOAM for the calculation of transport of Hydrogen are compared with the results of the Gas-Flow code in order to assess if it is feasible to use the open source code OpenFOAM in the case of Hydrogen transport in primary containment of a BWR reactor. Some differences in the qualitative and quantitative results from both codes were found, the differences (with a maximum error rate of 4%) in the quantitative results were found are small and are considered more than acceptable for this type of analysis, moreover, these differences are mainly attributed to the transport models used, mainly because OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous mixture model and Gas-Flow a heterogeneous one. Implementing appropriate solvers in codes like OpenFOAM has the goal to develop own tools that are applicable to the transport of Hydrogen in the primary containment of a BWR reactor and thus, to gain some independence while not relying on commercial

  13. Adding complex terrain and stable atmospheric condition capability to the OpenFOAM-based flow solver of the simulator for on/offshore wind farm applications (SOWFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchfield Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications contains an OpenFOAM-based flow solver for performing large-eddy simulation of flow through wind plants. The solver computes the atmospheric boundary layer flow and models turbines with actuator lines. Until recently, the solver was limited to flows over flat terrain and could only use the standard Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model. In this work, we present our improvements to the flow solver that enable us to 1 use any OpenFOAM-standard subgrid-scale model and 2 simulate flow over complex terrain. We used the flow solver to compute a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer using both the standard and the Lagrangian-averaged scale-independent dynamic Smagorinsky models. Surprisingly, the results using the standard Smagorinsky model compare well to other researchers' results of the same case, although it is often said that the standard Smagorinsky model is too dissipative for accurate stable stratification calculations. The scale-independent dynamic subgrid-scale model produced poor results, probably due to the spikes in model constant with values as high as 4.6. We applied a simple bounding of the model constant to remove these spikes, which caused the model to produce results much more in line with other researchers' results. We also computed flow over a simple hilly terrain and performed some basic qualitative analysis to verify the proper operation of the terrain-local surface stress model we employed.

  14. Dynamics of poroelastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Yoel; Sobac, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Soft poroelastic structures are widespread in biological tissues such as cartilaginous joints in bones, blood-filled placentae or plant organs. Here we investigate the dynamics of open elastic foams immersed in viscous fluids, as model soft poroelastic materials. The experiment consists in slowly compacting blocs of polyurethane solid foam embedded in silicon oil-tanks and studying their relaxation to equilibrium when the confining stress is suddenly released. Measurements of the local fluid pressure and foam velocity field are compared with a simple two-phase flow approach. For small initial compactions, the results show quantitative agreement with the classical diffusion theory of soil consolidation (Terzaghi, Biot). On the other hand, for large initial compactions, the dynamics exhibits long relaxation times and decompaction fronts, which are mainly controlled by the highly non-linear mechanical response of the foam. The analogy between this process and the evaporation of a polymer melt close to the glass transition will be briefly discussed.

  15. Preconcentration of traces of radionuclides and elements with foamed polyurethane sorbents in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palagyi, S.; Braun, T.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of preconcentration and the permanent need of efficient preconcentrating agents in environmental analysis are pointed out. Foamed polyurethane sorbents draw attention as novel agents in separation chemistry. A survey is presented of recent applications of unloaded and reagent-loaded open-cell type resilient polyurethane foams in the separation and preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, and of the latest uses of these foams in the preconcentration and detection of traces of some, mainly inorganic materials in environmental samples, using radioanalytical techniques. Possible future uses of polyurethane foams in trace element detection in environmental analysis are outlined. (author)

  16. Experiments, modeling and simulation of the magnetic behavior of inhomogeneously coated nickel/aluminum hybrid foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, A., E-mail: anne.jung@mx.uni-saarland.de [Universität des Saarlandes, Institute of Applied Mechanics, Campus A4 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Klis, D., E-mail: d.klis@lte.uni-saarland.de [Universität des Saarlandes, Laboratory for Electromagnetic Theory, Campus C6 3, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Goldschmidt, F., E-mail: f.goldschmidt@mx.uni-saarland.de [Universität des Saarlandes, Institute of Applied Mechanics, Campus A4 2, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Open-cell metal foams are used as lightweight construction elements, energy absorbers or as support for catalytic coatings. Coating of open-cell metal foams is not only used for catalytic applications, but it leads also to tremendous increase in stiffness and energy absorption capacity. A non-line of sight coating technique for complex 3D structures is electrodeposition. Unfortunately, due to the 3D porosity and the related problems in mass transport limitation during the deposition, it is not possible to produce homogeneously coated foams. In the present contribution, we present a semi-non-destructive technique applicable to determine the coating thickness distribution of magnetic coatings by measuring the remanent magnetic field of coated foams. In order to have a closer look at the mass transport mechanism, a numerical model was developed to predict the field scans for different coating thickness distributions in the foams. For long deposition times the deposition reaches a steady state whereas a Helmholtz equation is sufficient to predict the coating thickness distribution. The applied current density could be identified as the main influencing parameter. Based on the developed model, it is possible to improve the electrodeposition process and hence the homogeneity in the coating thickness of coated metal foams. This leads to enhanced mechanical properties of the hybrid foams and contributes to better and resource-efficient energy absorbers and lightweight materials. - Highlights: • Production of hybrid foams by electrodeposition of nickel on open-cell metal foams. • Magnetic field scans for visualization of spatial coating thickness distribution. • Modeling of magnetic fields of inhomogeneously coated hybrid foams. • Investigation of mass transport limitation during coating by a Helmholtz equation. • Increasing coating homogeneity by use of low current densities and deposition rates.

  17. Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in highly porous alginate-foams supplemented with chondroitin sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhao; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Kohl, Benjamin; Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W.; Meier, Carola; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Godkin, Owen; Ertel, Wolfgang; Arens, Stephan; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the limited intrinsic cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) was implanted into cartilage defects. For this purpose suitable biocompatible scaffolds are needed to provide cell retention, chondrogenesis and initial mechanical stability. The present study should indicate whether a recently developed highly porous alginate (Alg) foam scaffold supplemented with chondroitin sulfate (CS) allows the attachment, survival and chondrogenesis of BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes. The foams were prepared using a freeze-drying method; some of them were supplemented with CS and subsequently characterized for porosity, biodegradation and mechanical profile. BM-MSCs were cultured for 1–2 weeks on the scaffold either under chondrogenic or maintenance conditions. Cell vitality assays, histology, glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay, and type II and I collagen immunolabelings were performed to monitor cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in the scaffolds. Scaffolds had a high porosity ~ 93–95% with a mean pore sizes of 237 ± 48 μm (Alg) and 197 ± 61 μm (Alg/CS). Incorporation of CS increased mechanical strength of the foams providing gradually CS release over 7 days. Most of the cells survived in the scaffolds. BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes formed rounded clusters within the scaffold pores. The BM-MSCs, irrespective of whether cultured under non/chondrogenic conditions and chondrocytes produced an ECM containing sGAGs, and types II and I collagen. Total collagen and sGAG contents were higher in differentiated BM-MSC cultures supplemented with CS than in CS-free foams after 14 days. The cell cluster formation induced by the scaffolds might stimulate chondrogenesis via initial intense cell–cell contacts. - Highlights: • Alginate foam scaffolds revealed a high porosity and mean pore size of 197–237 μm. • Chondroitin sulfate was released over 14 days by the scaffolds. • Chondrocytes

  18. Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in highly porous alginate-foams supplemented with chondroitin sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhao [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Nooeaid, Patcharakamon [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Kohl, Benjamin [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W. [Institute of Polymer Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Meier, Carola [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Godkin, Owen; Ertel, Wolfgang; Arens, Stephan [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula, E-mail: gundula.schulze@pmu.ac.at [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To overcome the limited intrinsic cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) was implanted into cartilage defects. For this purpose suitable biocompatible scaffolds are needed to provide cell retention, chondrogenesis and initial mechanical stability. The present study should indicate whether a recently developed highly porous alginate (Alg) foam scaffold supplemented with chondroitin sulfate (CS) allows the attachment, survival and chondrogenesis of BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes. The foams were prepared using a freeze-drying method; some of them were supplemented with CS and subsequently characterized for porosity, biodegradation and mechanical profile. BM-MSCs were cultured for 1–2 weeks on the scaffold either under chondrogenic or maintenance conditions. Cell vitality assays, histology, glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay, and type II and I collagen immunolabelings were performed to monitor cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in the scaffolds. Scaffolds had a high porosity ~ 93–95% with a mean pore sizes of 237 ± 48 μm (Alg) and 197 ± 61 μm (Alg/CS). Incorporation of CS increased mechanical strength of the foams providing gradually CS release over 7 days. Most of the cells survived in the scaffolds. BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes formed rounded clusters within the scaffold pores. The BM-MSCs, irrespective of whether cultured under non/chondrogenic conditions and chondrocytes produced an ECM containing sGAGs, and types II and I collagen. Total collagen and sGAG contents were higher in differentiated BM-MSC cultures supplemented with CS than in CS-free foams after 14 days. The cell cluster formation induced by the scaffolds might stimulate chondrogenesis via initial intense cell–cell contacts. - Highlights: • Alginate foam scaffolds revealed a high porosity and mean pore size of 197–237 μm. • Chondroitin sulfate was released over 14 days by the scaffolds. • Chondrocytes

  19. Permeability of Aluminium Foams Produced by Replication Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim L. Cherny

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The replication casting process is used for manufacturing open-pore aluminum foams with advanced performances, such as stability and repeatability of foam structure with porosity over 60%. A simple foam structure model based on the interaction between sodium chloride solid particles poorly wetted by melted aluminum, which leads to the formation of air pockets (or “air collars”, is proposed for the permeability of porous material. The equation for the minimum pore radius of replicated aluminum foam is derived. According to the proposed model, the main assumption of the permeability model consists in a concentration of flow resistance in a circular aperture of radius rmin. The permeability of aluminum open-pore foams is measured using transformer oil as the fluid, changing the fractions of initial sodium chloride. Measured values of minimum pore size are close to theoretically predicted ones regardless of the particle shape. The expression for the permeability of replicated aluminum foam derived on the basis of the “bottleneck” model of porous media agrees well with the experimental data. The obtained data can be applied for commercial filter cells and pneumatic silencers.

  20. Reduced material model for closed cell metal foam infiltrated with phase change material based on high resolution numerical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsenbrügge, Christoph; Marth, Wieland; Navarro y de Sosa, Iñaki; Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Voigt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Closed cell metal foam sandwich structures were investigated. • High resolution numerical studies were conducted using CT scan data. • A reduced model for use in commercial FE software reduces needed degrees of freedom. • Thermal inertia is increased about 4 to 5 times in PCM filled structures. • The reduced material model was verified using experimental data. - Abstract: The thermal behaviour of closed cell metal foam infiltrated with paraffin wax as latent heat storage for application in high precision tool machines was examined. Aluminium foam sandwiches with metallically bound cover layers were prepared in a powder metallurgical process and cross-sectional images of the structures were generated with X-ray computed tomography. Based on the image data a three dimensional highly detailed model was derived and prepared for simulation with the adaptive FE-library AMDiS. The pores were assumed to be filled with paraffin wax. The thermal conductivity and the transient thermal behaviour in the phase-change region were investigated. Based on the results from the highly detailed simulations a reduced model for use in commercial FE-software (ANSYS) was derived. It incorporates the properties of the matrix and the phase change material into a homogenized material. A sandwich-structure with and without paraffin was investigated experimentally under constant thermal load. The results were used to verify the reduced material model in ANSYS.

  1. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams and Their Potential as TPS Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams with compositions that have potential as a thermal protection material. The use of pre-ceramic polymers with the addition of sacrificial blowing agents or sacrificial fillers offers a viable approach to form either open or closed cell insulation. Our work demonstrates that this is a feasible method to form refractory ceramic foams at relatively low processing temperatures. It is possible to foam complex shapes then pyrolize the system to form a ceramic while retaining the shape of the unfired foam. Initial work focused on identifying suitable pre-ceramic polymers with desired properties such as ceramic yield and chemical make up of the pyrolysis product after firing. We focused on making foams in the Si system (Sic, Si02, Si-0-C), which is in use in current acreage TPS systems. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies and the characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties are presented. We have conducted preliminary arc jet testing on selected foams with the materials being exposed to typical re-entry conditions for acreage TPS and these results will be discussed. Foams processed using these approaches have bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g/cm3 and cell sizes ranging from 5 to 500 pm. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these systems. Finally, preliminary oxidation studies have been conducted on selected systems and will be discussed.

  2. Inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome attenuates foam cell formation of THP-1 macrophages by suppressing ox-LDL uptake and promoting cholesterol efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Yao, Qiying; Xu, Siwei; Wang, Hongyan; Qu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    The NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. The activated NLRP3 inflammasome has been reported to promote macrophage foam cell formation, but not all studies have obtained the same result, and how NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in the formation of foam cells remains elusive. We used selective NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors and NLRP3-deficient THP-1 cells to assess the effect of NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition on macrophage foam cell formation, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) uptake, esterification, and cholesterol efflux, as well as the expression of associated proteins. Inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome attenuated foam cell formation, diminished ox-LDL uptake, and promoted cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages. Moreover, it downregulated CD36, acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 and neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase expression; upregulated ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) expression; but had no effect on the expression of scavenger receptor class A and ATP-binding cassette transporter G1. Collectively, our findings show that inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome decreases foam cell formation of THP-1 macrophages via suppression of ox-LDL uptake and enhancement of cholesterol efflux, which may be due to downregulation of CD36 expression and upregulation of ABCA1 and SR-BI expression, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fe and Fe-P Foam for Biodegradable Bone Replacement Material: Morphology, Corrosion Behaviour, and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hrubovčáková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron and iron-phosphorus open-cell foams were manufactured by a replica method based on a powder metallurgical approach to serve as a temporary biodegradable bone replacement material. Iron foams alloyed with phosphorus were prepared with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties and manipulating the corrosion rate. Two different types of Fe-P foams containing 0.5 wt.% of P were prepared: Fe-P(I foams from a phosphated carbonyl iron powder and Fe-P(II foams from a mixture of carbonyl iron and commercial Fe3P. The microstructure of foams was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties and the corrosion behaviour were studied by compression tests and potentiodynamic polarization in Hank’s solution and a physiological saline solution. The results showed that the manufactured foams exhibited an open, interconnected, microstructure similar to that of a cancellous bone. The presence of phosphorus improved the mechanical properties of the foams and decreased the corrosion rate as compared to pure iron foams.

  4. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  5. Characterization and three-dimensional reconstruction of synthetic bone model foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, S. [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Vlad, M.D. [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, “Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Str. Kogalniceanu 9-13, 700454 Iasi (Romania); López, J. [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Navarro, M. [Centre de Biotecnologia Animal i de Teràpia Gènica (CBATEG), Departament de Sanitat i d' Anatomia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Fernández, E., E-mail: enrique.fernandez@upc.edu [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    Sawbones© open-cell foams with different porosity grades are being used as synthetic bone-like models for in vitro mechanical and infiltration experiments. However, a comprehensive characterization of these foams is not available and there is a lack of reliable information about them. For this reason two of these foams (Refs. 1522-505 and -507) have been characterized at the micro architectural level by scanning electron microscopy, computed tomography and image data analysis. BoneJ open software and ImageJ open software were used to obtain the characteristic histomorphometric parameters and the three dimensional virtual models of the foams. The results showed that both foams, while having different macro porosities, appeared undistinguishable at the micro scale. Moreover, the micro structural features resembled those of osteoporotic rather than healthy trabecular bone. It is concluded that Sawbones© foams behave reasonably as synthetic bone-like models. Consequently, their use is recommended for in vitro comparison purposes of both mechanical and infiltration testing performed in real vertebra. Finally, the virtual models obtained, which are available under request, can favour comparisons between future self-similar in vitro experiments and computer simulations. - Highlights: • Sawbones© model foams have been scanned by μ-CT. • Histomorphometric indices and 3D virtual models have been obtained. • The results will be of use to understand biocement vertebra infiltration studies.

  6. Characterization and three-dimensional reconstruction of synthetic bone model foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez, S.; Vlad, M.D.; López, J.; Navarro, M.; Fernández, E.

    2013-01-01

    Sawbones© open-cell foams with different porosity grades are being used as synthetic bone-like models for in vitro mechanical and infiltration experiments. However, a comprehensive characterization of these foams is not available and there is a lack of reliable information about them. For this reason two of these foams (Refs. 1522-505 and -507) have been characterized at the micro architectural level by scanning electron microscopy, computed tomography and image data analysis. BoneJ open software and ImageJ open software were used to obtain the characteristic histomorphometric parameters and the three dimensional virtual models of the foams. The results showed that both foams, while having different macro porosities, appeared undistinguishable at the micro scale. Moreover, the micro structural features resembled those of osteoporotic rather than healthy trabecular bone. It is concluded that Sawbones© foams behave reasonably as synthetic bone-like models. Consequently, their use is recommended for in vitro comparison purposes of both mechanical and infiltration testing performed in real vertebra. Finally, the virtual models obtained, which are available under request, can favour comparisons between future self-similar in vitro experiments and computer simulations. - Highlights: • Sawbones© model foams have been scanned by μ-CT. • Histomorphometric indices and 3D virtual models have been obtained. • The results will be of use to understand biocement vertebra infiltration studies

  7. Neopterin negatively regulates expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 by the LXRα signaling pathway in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin-quan; Tan, Chun-zhi; Wu, Jin-hua; Zhang, Dong-cui; Chen, Ji-ling; Zeng, Bin-yuan; Jiang, Yu-ping; Nie, Jin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Qin; Dai, Hao

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effects of neopterin on ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells, and to explore the role of the liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) involved. In the present study, THP-1 cells were pre-incubated with ox-LDL to become foam cells. The protein and mRNA expression were examined by Western blot assays and real-time quantitative PCR, respectively. Liquid scintillation counting and high performance liquid chromatography assays were used to test cellular cholesterol efflux and cholesterol content. Neopterin decreased ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells, and the LXRα siRNA can reverse the inhibitory effects induced by neopterin. Neoterin has a negative regulation on ABCA1 expression via the LXRα signaling pathway, which suggests the aggravated effects of neopterin on atherosclerosis.

  8. Low-density carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.M.; Buckley, S.R.; Giles, C.L. Jr.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III; Price, C.W.; Cook, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents research and development on resorcinol- formaldehyde-based foam materials conducted between 1986 and June 1990, when the effort was discontinued. The foams discussed are resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) foam, carbonized RF (CRF) foam, and two composite foams, a polystyrene/RF (PS/RF) foam and its carbonized derivative (CPR). The RF foams are synthesized by the polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in a slightly basic solution. Their structure and density depend strongly on the concentration of the sodium carbonate catalyst. The have an interconnected bead structure similar to that of silica aerogels; bead sizes range from 30 to 130 Angstrom, and cell sizes are less than 0.1 μm. We have achieved densities of 16 to 200 mg/cm 3 . The RF foams can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a vitreous carbon foam (CRF), which has a similar microstructure but much higher mechanical strength. The PS/RF foams are obtained by filling the 2- to 3-μm cells of PS foam (a low-density hydrocarbon foam we have developed) with RF. The resultant foams have the outstanding handling and machinability of the PS foam matrix and the small cell size of RF. Pyrolyzing PS/RF foams causes depolymerization and loss of the PS; the resulting CPR foams have a structure similar to the PS foams in which CRF both replicates and fills the PS cells

  9. Modified Capillary Cell for Foam Film Studies Allowing Exchange of the Film-Forming Liquidwie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Basheva, E.S.; Denkov, N.D.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the macroscopic properties of foams and emulsions are controlled by the mesoscopic properties of the thin films separating the bubbles or droplets. The properties of these films depend on contributions (1) from the adsorbed surface layers and (2) from the liquid that separates these adsorbed

  10. CFD analysis for the hydrogen transport in the primary contention of a BWR using the codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow; Analisis CFD para el transporte de hidrogeno en la contencion primaria de un reactor BWR usando los codigos OpenFOAM y GasFlow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez P, D. A.

    2014-07-01

    using a limited number of semi-empirical data, and instead, mathematical relationships are used taking into account the various physical phenomena as well the interactions that occur among them, such as heat transfer between the fluid and the solid walls condensation of water vapor on the walls, the turbulent effects in areas of restricted passage, etc. Taking into account these advantages, this study presents a qualitative and quantitative comparison between the CFD codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow related to the transport phenomena of Hydrogen and other gases in the primary containment of a BWR reactor. Gas-Flow is a code of commercial license that is well validated, developed in Germany to analyze the transport of gases in nuclear reactor containments. On the other hand, OpenFOAM is an open source CFD code offering several solvers for different phenomena assessments, in this work, the reacting Foam solver is used because it has a strong similarity to the intended application of Hydrogen transport. In this thesis the results obtained using the reacting Foam solver of OpenFOAM for the calculation of transport of Hydrogen are compared with the results of the Gas-Flow code in order to assess if it is feasible to use the open source code OpenFOAM in the case of Hydrogen transport in primary containment of a BWR reactor. Some differences in the qualitative and quantitative results from both codes were found, the differences (with a maximum error rate of 4%) in the quantitative results were found are small and are considered more than acceptable for this type of analysis, moreover, these differences are mainly attributed to the transport models used, mainly because OpenFOAM uses a homogeneous mixture model and Gas-Flow a heterogeneous one. Implementing appropriate solvers in codes like OpenFOAM has the goal to develop own tools that are applicable to the transport of Hydrogen in the primary containment of a BWR reactor and thus, to gain some independence while not relying on

  11. Effect of minoxidil topical foam on frontotemporal and vertex androgenetic alopecia in men: a 104-week open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanti, V; Hillmann, K; Kottner, J; Stroux, A; Canfield, D; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2016-07-01

    Topical minoxidil formulations have been shown to be effective in treating androgenetic alopecia (AGA) for 12 months. Efficacy and safety in both frontotemporal and vertex regions over longer application periods have not been studied so far. To evaluate the effect of 5% minoxidil topical foam (5% MTF) in the frontotemporal and vertex areas in patients with moderate AGA over 104 weeks. An 80-week, open-label extension phase was performed, following a 24-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in men with AGA grade IIIvertex to VI. Group 1 (n = 22) received ongoing 5% MTF for 104 weeks, Group 2 (n = 23) received placebo topical foam (plaTF) until week 24, followed by 5% MTF until week 104 during the extension phase. Frontotemporal and vertex target area non-vellus hair counts (f-TAHC, v-TAHC) and cumulative hair width (f-TAHW, v-TAHW) were assessed at baseline and at weeks 24, 52, 76 and 104. In Group 1, f-TAHW and f-TAHC showed a statistically significant increase from baseline to week 52 and week 76, respectively, returning to values comparable to baseline at week 104. No significant differences were found between baseline and week 104 in v-TAHC in Group 1 as well as f-TAHC, v-TAHC, f-TAHW and v-TAHW values in Group 2. 5% MTF is effective in stabilizing hair density, hair width and scalp coverage in both frontotemporal and vertex areas over an application period of 104 weeks, while showing a good safety and tolerability profile with a low rate of irritant contact dermatitis. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. OffWindSolver: Wind farm design tool based on actuator line/actuator disk concept in OpenFoam architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjwani Balram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is a good alternative to meet the energy requirements in some parts of the world; however the efficiency of wind farm depends on the optimized location of the wind turbines. Therefore a software tool that is capable of predicting the in-situ performance of multiple turbine installations in different operating conditions with reliable accuracy is needed. In present study wind farm layout design tool OffWindSolver is developed within the OpenFoam architecture. Unsteady PisoFoam solver is extended to account for wind turbines, where each turbine is modeled as a sink term in the momentum equation. Turbine modeling is based on actuator line concepts derived from SOWFA code, where each blade of the turbine is represented as a line. The loading on each line/blade of the turbine is estimated using the Blade Element Method (BEM. The inputs for the solver are tabulated airfoil aerodynamic data, dimension and height of the wind turbines, wind magnitude and direction. OffWindSolver is validated for a real wind farm – Lillgrund offshore facility in Sweden/Denmark operated by Vattenfall Vindkraft AB. Because of the scale of the computation, we only examine the effect of wind from one direction at one speed. In the absence of time dependent Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL, a log wind profile with surface roughness of 0.04 is used at the inlet. The simulated power production of each turbine is compared to the field data and large-eddy simulation. The overall power of the wind farm is well predicted. The simulation shows the significant decreases of the power for those turbines that were in the wake.

  13. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Diseases: Involvement of Nrf2 Antioxidant Redox Signaling in Macrophage Foam Cells Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Kee Ooi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an important risk factor contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress that results from excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS production accounts for impaired endothelial function, a process which promotes atherosclerotic lesion or fatty streaks formation (foam cells. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a transcription factor involved in cellular redox homeostasis. Upon exposure to oxidative stress, Nrf2 is dissociated from its inhibitor Keap-1 and translocated into the nucleus, where it results in the transcriptional activation of cell defense genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be involved in the protection against foam cells formation by regulating the expression of antioxidant proteins (HO-1, Prxs, and GPx1, ATP-binding cassette (ABC efflux transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1 and scavenger receptors (scavenger receptor class B (CD36, scavenger receptor class A (SR-A and lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1. However, Nrf2 has also been reported to exhibit pro-atherogenic effects. A better understanding on the mechanism of Nrf2 in oxidative stress-induced cardiac injury, as well as the regulation of cholesterol uptake and efflux, are required before it can serve as a novel therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases prevention and treatment.

  14. Foam patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  15. Cobalt and molybdenum activated electrodes in foam based alkaline electrolysis cells at 150-250 °C and 40 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    A new type of alkaline electrolysis cells with nickel foam based gas diffusion electrodes and KOH (aq) immobilized in mesoporous SrTiO3 has been developed and tested at temperatures of 150 C, 200 C and 250 C at a pressure of 40 bar. Two cells have been characterized during the 270 h long test...

  16. On the development of OpenFOAM solvers based on explicit and implicit high-order Runge-Kutta schemes for incompressible flows with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Valerio; Binci, Lorenzo; Montelpare, Sergio; Ricci, Renato

    2018-01-01

    Open-source CFD codes provide suitable environments for implementing and testing low-dissipative algorithms typically used to simulate turbulence. In this research work we developed CFD solvers for incompressible flows based on high-order explicit and diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta (RK) schemes for time integration. In particular, an iterated PISO-like procedure based on Rhie-Chow correction was used to handle pressure-velocity coupling within each implicit RK stage. For the explicit approach, a projected scheme was used to avoid the "checker-board" effect. The above-mentioned approaches were also extended to flow problems involving heat transfer. It is worth noting that the numerical technology available in the OpenFOAM library was used for space discretization. In this work, we additionally explore the reliability and effectiveness of the proposed implementations by computing several unsteady flow benchmarks; we also show that the numerical diffusion due to the time integration approach is completely canceled using the solution techniques proposed here.

  17. Foam Microrheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRAYNIK, ANDREW M.; LOEWENBERG, MICHAEL; REINELT, DOUGLAS A.

    1999-01-01

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams

  18. Tumor necrosis factor-α and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand augment human macrophage foam-cell destruction of extracellular matrix through protease-mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Barascuk, Natasha; Larsen, Lise

    2012-01-01

    By secreting proteases such as cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), macrophage foam cells may be a major cause of ruptured atherosclerotic plaques. The aims of the present study were to investigate in vitro role of human macrophage foam cells in degrading type I collagen, a major...

  19. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Assisted Processing of Silica/PMMA Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Deniz; Schadler, Linda S.; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposite foams receive considerable attention in both scientific and industrial communities. These structures are defined as closed or open cells (pores) surrounded by bulk material and are widely observed in nature in the form of bone structure, sponge, corals and natural cork. Inspired by these materials, polymer nanocomposite foams are widely used in advanced applications, such as bone scaffolds, food packaging and transportation materials due to their lightweight and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to bulk polymer foams. The presence of the nanosized fillers facilitates heterogeneous bubble nucleation as a result, the number of bubbles increases while the average bubble size decreases. Therefore, the foam morphology can be controlled by the size, concentration, and surface chemistry of the nanofiller. In the current study, we used supercritical carbon dioxide as a foaming agent for silica/poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, foams. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified by fluoroalkane chains to make them CO2-philic. The surface coverage was controlled via tethering density, and the effect of silica surface coverage and concentration on foam morphology was investigated through scanning electron microscopy and image processing. Results indicated that nanofiller concentration and filler surface chemistry (CO2-philicity) had tremendous effect on foam morphology but surface coverage did not have any effect.

  20. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  1. The effects of composition and sintering temperature on the silica foam fabricated by slurry method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baharom, Syazwani; Ahmad, Sufizar; Taib, Hariati; Muda, Rizamarhaiza

    2016-01-01

    Reticulated ceramic or open pore ceramic foam is a well-known material which exhibits extremely high porosities, with a significant degree of interconnectivity that makes them desirable in a wide range of applications. There were broad types of ceramic foam fabrication method such as polymeric sponge method, direct foaming, and starch consolidation. In this study, the slurry method has been chosen to fabricate Silica (SiO_2) foam. In this process, Polyurethane (PU) foam template was dipped into ceramic slurry and followed by drying and sintering to obtain foam which contains porosity in the range of 50% to 70%. The compositions of SiO_2 were varied starting from 55 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 65 wt.% and 70 wt.%. The samples of SiO_2 that have been dipped and dried were sintered at 900°C, 1000°C, 1100°C, and 1250°C. The sintered SiO_2 ceramic foam samples were characterized to observe their morphology, and physical properties. Thus, the microstructure of the SiO_2 ceramic foams samples was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Meanwhile, the physical properties of the SiO_2 ceramic foam samples such as the total porosity (%) and bulk density were determined using Archimedes method. It was found that the density of ceramic foam produced was in the range of 0.25 g/cm"3 up to 0.75 g/cm"3, whereas the level of porosity percentage was in the range of 61.81% to 82.18% with the size of open pore or window cells were in between 141 µm up to 626 µm.

  2. The effects of composition and sintering temperature on the silica foam fabricated by slurry method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baharom, Syazwani, E-mail: hd140001@siswa.uthm.edu.my; Ahmad, Sufizar, E-mail: sufizar@uthm.edu.my; Taib, Hariati, E-mail: hariati@uthm.edu.my; Muda, Rizamarhaiza, E-mail: hd130013@siswa.uthm.edu.my [Department of Material and Design Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM), 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    Reticulated ceramic or open pore ceramic foam is a well-known material which exhibits extremely high porosities, with a significant degree of interconnectivity that makes them desirable in a wide range of applications. There were broad types of ceramic foam fabrication method such as polymeric sponge method, direct foaming, and starch consolidation. In this study, the slurry method has been chosen to fabricate Silica (SiO{sub 2}) foam. In this process, Polyurethane (PU) foam template was dipped into ceramic slurry and followed by drying and sintering to obtain foam which contains porosity in the range of 50% to 70%. The compositions of SiO{sub 2} were varied starting from 55 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 65 wt.% and 70 wt.%. The samples of SiO{sub 2} that have been dipped and dried were sintered at 900°C, 1000°C, 1100°C, and 1250°C. The sintered SiO{sub 2} ceramic foam samples were characterized to observe their morphology, and physical properties. Thus, the microstructure of the SiO{sub 2} ceramic foams samples was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Meanwhile, the physical properties of the SiO{sub 2} ceramic foam samples such as the total porosity (%) and bulk density were determined using Archimedes method. It was found that the density of ceramic foam produced was in the range of 0.25 g/cm{sup 3} up to 0.75 g/cm{sup 3}, whereas the level of porosity percentage was in the range of 61.81% to 82.18% with the size of open pore or window cells were in between 141 µm up to 626 µm.

  3. Endothelial cell death and intimal foam cell accumulation in the coronary artery of infected hypercholesterolemic minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Saraste, Antti; Hyttel, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs) has been suggested to play a role in atherosclerosis. We studied the synergism of hypercholesterolemia with Chlamydia pneumoniae and influenza virus infections on EC morphology and intimal changes in a minipig model. The coronary artery was excised at euthanasia...

  4. Effects of inlet boundary conditions, on the computed flow in the Turbine-99 draft tube, using OpenFOAM and CFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, H.; Cervantes, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    The flow in the Turbine-99 Kaplan draft tube was thoroughly investigated at three workshops (1999, 2001, 2005), which aimed at determining the state of the art of draft tube simulations. The flow is challenging due to the different flow phenomena appearing simultaneously such as unsteadiness, separation, swirl, turbulence, and a strong adverse pressure gradient. The geometry and the experimentally determined inlet boundary conditions were provided to the Turbine-99 workshop participants. At the final workshop, angular resolved inlet velocity boundary conditions were provided. The rotating non-axi-symmetry of the inlet flow due to the runner blades was thus included. The effect of the rotating angular resolution was however not fully investigated at that workshop. The first purpose of this work is to further investigate this effect. Several different inlet boundary conditions are applied - the angular resolved experimental data distributed at the Turbine-99 workshop, the angular resolved results of a runner simulation with interpolated values using different resolution in the tangential and radial directions, and an axi-symmetric variant of the same numerical data. The second purpose of this work is to compare the results from the OpenFOAM and CFX CFD codes, using as similar settings as possible. The present results suggest that the experimental angular inlet boundary conditions proposed to the workshop are not adequate to simulate accurately the flow in the T-99 draft tube. The reason for this is that the experimental phase-averaged data has some important differences compared to the previously measured time-averaged data. Using the interpolated data from the runner simulation as inlet boundary condition however gives good results as long as the resolution of that data is sufficient. It is shown that the difference between the results using the angular-resolved and the corresponding symmetric inlet data is very small, suggesting that the importance of the angular

  5. Assessment of a simplified set of momentum closure relations for low volume fraction regimes in STAR-CCM+ and OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugrue, Rosemary; Magolan, Ben; Lubchenko, Nazar; Baglietto, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A simplified set of momentum closures – Bubbly And Moderate void Fraction (BAMF) – is proposed. •BAMF model is assessed by simulation of 12 cases from the Liu and Bankoff experimental database. •Portability between STAR-CCM+ and OpenFOAM CFD softwares is demonstrated. •Both CFD softwares yield mean flow predictions in close agreement with experimental results. -- Abstract: Multiphase computational fluid dynamics (M-CFD) modeling approaches provide three-dimensional resolution of complex two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer phenomena, which makes them an invaluable tool for nuclear reactor design applications. By virtue of the Eulerian-Eulerian spatial and temporal averaging framework, additional terms manifest in the phase momentum equations that require closure through prescription of interfacial forces in the stream-wise and lateral flow directions, as well as in the near-wall region. These momentum closures are critical to M-CFD prediction of mean flow profiles, including velocity and volume fraction distributions, and yet while an overwhelming number of them has been developed, no consensus exists on how to assemble them to achieve a simplified set of closures that is numerically robust and extensible to a wide array of flow configurations; further, no consistent demonstration has been shown of the cross-code portability of these closures between CFD softwares. To address these challenges, we propose in this work a simplified set of momentum closures for stream-wise drag and lateral redistribution mechanisms—collectively referred to as the Bubbly And Moderate void Fraction (BAMF) model—and assess its performance by simulation of 12 cases from the Liu and Bankoff experimental database using STAR-CCM+ and OpenFOAM. Both CFD softwares yield mean flow predictions that are in close agreement with the experimental results, and also in close agreement with each other. These results confirm the effectiveness of the BAMF model and its

  6. Effects of inlet boundary conditions, on the computed flow in the Turbine-99 draft tube, using OpenFOAM and CFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, H; Cervantes, M J

    2012-01-01

    The flow in the Turbine-99 Kaplan draft tube was thoroughly investigated at three workshops (1999, 2001, 2005), which aimed at determining the state of the art of draft tube simulations. The flow is challenging due to the different flow phenomena appearing simultaneously such as unsteadiness, separation, swirl, turbulence, and a strong adverse pressure gradient. The geometry and the experimentally determined inlet boundary conditions were provided to the Turbine-99 workshop participants. At the final workshop, angular resolved inlet velocity boundary conditions were provided. The rotating non-axi-symmetry of the inlet flow due to the runner blades was thus included. The effect of the rotating angular resolution was however not fully investigated at that workshop. The first purpose of this work is to further investigate this effect. Several different inlet boundary conditions are applied – the angular resolved experimental data distributed at the Turbine-99 workshop, the angular resolved results of a runner simulation with interpolated values using different resolution in the tangential and radial directions, and an axi-symmetric variant of the same numerical data. The second purpose of this work is to compare the results from the OpenFOAM and CFX CFD codes, using as similar settings as possible. The present results suggest that the experimental angular inlet boundary conditions proposed to the workshop are not adequate to simulate accurately the flow in the T-99 draft tube. The reason for this is that the experimental phase-averaged data has some important differences compared to the previously measured time-averaged data. Using the interpolated data from the runner simulation as inlet boundary condition however gives good results as long as the resolution of that data is sufficient. It is shown that the difference between the results using the angular-resolved and the corresponding symmetric inlet data is very small, suggesting that the importance of the angular

  7. Design and production of stopper made of concrete foam composite used for open channel conduit cover and parking bumper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Bustami; Sebayang, Alexander; Sebayang, Septian; Muttaqin, Maraghi; Darmadi, Harry; Basuki, WS; Sabri, M.; Abda, S.

    2018-03-01

    Open channel conduit is designed and produced with the aims to reduce excess water, whether from rain, seepage, or excess irrigation water in an area. It is also included in one of the important components of urban infrastructure in tackling the problem of flooding and waterlogging. On the roadway, e.g. housing complex the open channel conduits should function the same, however conduit covers are needed. The covers should be also designed to function as parking bumper. This paper discusses the design and production of the stoppers using our newly invented materials; the stoppers are structurally tested under static, dynamic, and bump test. Response of the conduit cover are found from structural analysis using finite element software ANSYS MECHANICAL version 17.5. Two types of stoppers are introduced: flat and curvy configuration. It was obtained that both types are suitable for open channel conduit cover and parking bumper.

  8. Investigation of the fluid-structure interaction of a high head Francis turbine using OpenFOAM and Code_Aster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, M.; Doujak, E.; Waldner, L.

    2016-11-01

    The increasing energy consumption and highly stressed power grids influence the operating conditions of turbines and pump turbines in the present situation. To provide or use energy as quick as possible, hydraulic turbines are operated more frequent and over longer periods of time in lower part load at off-design conditions. This leads to a more turbulent behavior and to higher requirements of the strength of stressed components (e.g. runner, guide or stay vanes). The modern advantages of computational capabilities regarding numerical investigations allow a precise prediction of appearing flow conditions and thereby induced strains in hydraulic machines. This paper focuses on the calculation of the unsteady pressure field of a high head Francis turbine with a specific speed of nq ≈ 24 min-1 and its impact on the structure at different operating conditions. In the first step, unsteady numerical flow simulations are performed with the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. To obtain the appearing dynamic flow phenomena, the entire machine, consisting of the spiral casing, the stay vanes, the wicket gate, the runner and the draft tube, is taken into account. Additionally, a reduced model without the spiral casing and with a simplified inlet boundary is used. To evaluate the accuracy of the CFD simulations, operating parameters such as head and torque are compared with the results of site measurements carried out on the corresponding prototype machine. In the second part, the obtained pressure fields are used for a fluid-structure analysis with the open-source Finite Element software Code_Aster, to predict the static loads on the runner.

  9. Gly[14]-humanin inhibits ox-LDL uptake and stimulates cholesterol efflux in macrophage-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wa-Wa; Wang, Shu-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Cao, Yong-Jun; Wang, Fen; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chun-Feng; Xie, Ying; Xie, Ying; Zhang, Yan-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Foam cell formation, which is caused by imbalanced cholesterol influx and efflux by macrophages, plays a vital role in the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Humanin (HN), a mitochondria-derived peptide, can prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and death of human aortic endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and has a protective effect on patients with in early atherosclerosis. However, the effects of HN on the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in RAW 264.7 macrophages are still unknown. This study was designed to investigate the role of [Gly14]-humanin (HNG) in lipid uptake and cholesterol efflux in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Flow cytometry and live cell imaging results showed that HNG reduced Dil-ox-LDL accumulation in the RAW 264.7 macrophages. A similar result was obtained for lipid accumulation by measuring cellular cholesterol content. Western blot analysis showed that ox-LDL treatment upregulated not only the protein expression of CD36 and LOX-1, which mediate ox-LDL endocytosis, but also ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 and ABCG1, which mediate ox-LDL exflux. HNG pretreatment inhibited the upregulation of CD36 and LOX-1 levels, prompting the upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 levels induced by ox-LDL. Therefore we concluded that HNG could inhibit ox-LDL-induced macrophage-derived foam cell formation, which occurs because of a decrease in lipid uptake and an increase in cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perturbed microRNA Expression by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Promotes Macrophage Polarization Leading to Pro-survival Foam Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Pankaj Kumar; Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Sehajpal, Prabodh Kumar; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the prevalent causes of death worldwide, with 95% of these deaths occurring in developing countries, like India. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) has the tenacious ability to circumvent the host's immune system for its own advantage. Macrophages are one of the phagocytic cells that are central to immunity against MTb. These are highly plastic cells dependent on the milieu and can showcase M1/M2 polarization. M1 macrophages are bactericidal in action, but M2 macrophages are anti-inflammatory in their immune response. This computational study is an effort to elucidate the role of miRNAs that influences the survival of MTb in the macrophage. To identify the miRNAs against critical transcription factors, we selected only conserved hits from TargetScan database. Further, validation of these miRNAs was achieved using four databases viz . DIANA-microT, miRDB, miRanda-mirSVR, and miRNAMap. All miRNAs were identified through a conserved seed sequence against the 3'-UTR of transcription factors. This bioinformatics study found that miR-27a and miR-27b has a putative binding site at 3'-UTR of IRF4, and miR-302c against IRF5. miR-155, miR-132, and miR-455-5p are predicted microRNAs against suppressor of cytokine signaling transcription factors. Several other microRNAs, which have an affinity for critical transcription factors, are also predicted in this study. This MTb-associated modulation of microRNAs to modify the expression of the target gene(s) plays a critical role in TB pathogenesis. Other than M1/M2 plasticity, MTb has the ability to convert macrophage into foam cells that are rich in lipids and cholesterol. We have highlighted few microRNAs which overlap between M2/foam cell continuums. miR-155, miR-33, miR-27a, and miR-27b plays a dual role in deciding macrophage polarity and its conversion to foam cells. This study shows a glimpse of microRNAs which can be modulated by MTb not only to prevent its elimination but also

  11. Forming and bending of metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebosky, Paul; Tyszka, Daniel; Niebur, Glen; Schmid, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the formability of a porous tantalum foam, known as trabecular metal (TM). Used as a bone ingrowth surface on orthopedic implants, TM is desirable due to its combination of high strength, low relative density, and excellent osteoconductive properties. This research aims to develop bend and stretch forming as a cost-effective alternative to net machining and EDM for manufacturing thin parts made of TM. Experimentally, bending about a single axis using a wiping die was studied by observing cracking and measuring springback. It was found that die radius and clearance strongly affect the springback properties of TM, while punch speed, embossings, die radius and clearance all influence cracking. Depending on the various combinations of die radius and clearance, springback factor ranged from .70-.91. To examine the affect of the foam microstructure, bending also was examined numerically using a horizontal hexagonal mesh. As the hexagonal cells were elongated along the sheet length, elastic springback decreased. This can be explained by the earlier onset of plastic hinging occurring at the vertices of the cells. While the numerical results matched the experimental results for the case of zero clearance, differences at higher clearances arose due to an imprecise characterization of the post-yield properties of tantalum. By changing the material properties of the struts, the models can be modified for use with other open-cell metallic foams

  12. Stretching and folding mechanism in foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufaile, Alberto; Pedrosa Biscaia Tufaile, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    We have described the stretching and folding of foams in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing air and a surfactant solution, from a sequence of upside-down flips. Besides the fractal dimension of the foam, we have observed the logistic growth for the soap film length. The stretching and folding mechanism is present during the foam formation, and this mechanism is observed even after the foam has reached its respective maximum fractal dimension. Observing the motion of bubbles inside the foam, large bubbles present power spectrum associated with random walk motion in both directions, while the small bubbles are scattered like balls in a Galton board

  13. Stretching and folding mechanism in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, Alberto [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Pedrosa Biscaia Tufaile, Adriana [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-13

    We have described the stretching and folding of foams in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing air and a surfactant solution, from a sequence of upside-down flips. Besides the fractal dimension of the foam, we have observed the logistic growth for the soap film length. The stretching and folding mechanism is present during the foam formation, and this mechanism is observed even after the foam has reached its respective maximum fractal dimension. Observing the motion of bubbles inside the foam, large bubbles present power spectrum associated with random walk motion in both directions, while the small bubbles are scattered like balls in a Galton board.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of water flow through spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements using the Open FOAM code; Investigação numérica e experimental do escoamento de água através de grades espaçadoras de elementos combustíveis nucleares utilizando o código OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Guilherme A.M.; Vieira, Tiago A.S.; Castro, Higor F.P., E-mail: gvidal.ufmg@gmail.com, E-mail: tiago.vieira.eng@gmail.com, E-mail: higorfabiano@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecânica; Santos, André A.C. dos; Silva, Vitor V. A.; Barros Filho, José A., E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br, E-mail: vitors@cdtn.br, E-mail: jabf@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    With the advancement and development of computational tools, the studies of thermofluidodynamic behavior in nuclear fuel elements have been developed in recent years. Of the devices present in these elements, the spacing grids received more attention. They have kept the fuel rods equally spaced and have fins that aim to improve the heat transfer process between the water and the fuel element. Therefore, the grids present an important structural and thermal function. This work was carried out with the purpose of verifying and validating simulations of spacer grids using OpenFOAM (2017) software of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The simulations were validated using results obtained through the commercial CFD program, Ansys CFX, and experiments available in the literature and obtained in test sections assembled on the Water-Air Circuit (CCA) of the CDTN thermo-hydraulic laboratory.

  15. Spiromastixones Inhibit Foam Cell Formation via Regulation of Cholesterol Efflux and Uptake in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongming Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioassay-guided evaluation shows that a deep sea-derived fungus, Spiromastix sp. MCCC 3A00308, possesses lipid-lowering activity. Chromatographic separation of a culture broth resulted in the isolation of 15 known depsidone-based analogues, labeled spiromastixones A–O (1–15. Each of these compounds was tested for its ability to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL-induced foam cell formation in RAW264.7 macrophages. Spiromastixones 6–8 and 12–14 significantly decreased oxLDL-induced lipid over-accumulation, reduced cell surface area, and reduced intracellular cholesterol concentration. Of these compounds, spiromastixones 6 and 14 exerted the strongest inhibitory effects. Spiromastixones 6 and 14 dramatically inhibited cholesterol uptake and stimulated cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1 and high-density lipoprotein (HDL in RAW264.7 macrophages. Mechanistic investigation indicated that spiromastixones 6, 7, 12 and 14 significantly up-regulated the mRNA levels of ATP-binding cassette sub-family A1 (ABCA1 and down-regulated those of scavenger receptor CD36, while the transcription of ATP-binding cassette sub-family A1 (ABCG1 and proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ were selectively up-regulated by 6 and 14. A transactivation reporter assay revealed that spiromastixones 6 and 14 remarkably enhanced the transcriptional activity of PPARγ. These results suggest that spiromastixones inhibit foam cell formation through upregulation of PPARγ and ABCA1/G1 and downregulation of CD36, indicating that spiromastixones 6 and 14 are promising lead compounds for further development as anti-atherogenic agents.

  16. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  17. The finite volume method in computational fluid dynamics an advanced introduction with OpenFOAM and Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Moukalled, F; Darwish, M

    2016-01-01

    This textbook explores both the theoretical foundation of the Finite Volume Method (FVM) and its applications in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Readers will discover a thorough explanation of the FVM numerics and algorithms used for the simulation of incompressible and compressible fluid flows, along with a detailed examination of the components needed for the development of a collocated unstructured pressure-based CFD solver. Two particular CFD codes are explored. The first is uFVM, a three-dimensional unstructured pressure-based finite volume academic CFD code, implemented within Matlab. The second is OpenFOAM®, an open source framework used in the development of a range of CFD programs for the simulation of industrial scale flow problems. With over 220 figures, numerous examples and more than one hundred exercise on FVM numerics, programming, and applications, this textbook is suitable for use in an introductory course on the FVM, in an advanced course on numerics, and as a reference for CFD programm...

  18. Hydroxyapatite fiber reinforced poly(alpha-hydroxy ester) foams for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R. C.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Powers, J. M.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A process has been developed to manufacture biodegradable composite foams of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and hydroxyapatite short fibers for use in bone regeneration. The processing technique allows the manufacture of three-dimensional foam scaffolds and involves the formation of a composite material consisting of a porogen material (either gelatin microspheres or salt particles) and hydroxyapatite short fibers embedded in a PLGA matrix. After the porogen is leached out, an open-cell composite foam remains which has a pore size and morphology defined by the porogen. By changing the weight fraction of the leachable component it was possible to produce composite foams with controlled porosities ranging from 0.47 +/- 0.02 to 0.85 +/- 0.01 (n = 3). Up to a polymer:fiber ratio of 7:6, short hydroxyapatite fibers served to reinforce low-porosity PLGA foams manufactured using gelatin microspheres as a porogen. Foams with a compressive yield strength up to 2.82 +/- 0.63 MPa (n = 3) and a porosity of 0.47 +/- 0.02 (n = 3) were manufactured using a polymer:fiber weight ratio of 7:6. In contrast, high-porosity composite foams (up to 0.81 +/- 0.02, n = 3) suitable for cell seeding were not reinforced by the introduction of increasing quantities of hydroxyapatite short fibers. We were therefore able to manufacture high-porosity foams which may be seeded with cells but which have minimal compressive yield strength, or low porosity foams with enhanced osteoconductivity and compressive yield strength.

  19. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic coupling using Milonga and OpenFOAM codes: an approach using free software; Acoplamento neutrônico e termo-hidráulico usando os códigos Milonga e OpenFOAM: uma abordagem com software livre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Vitor Vasconcelos Araújo

    2016-07-01

    The development of a fine mesh coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics framework mainly using open source software is presented. The contributions proposed go in two different directions: one, is the focus on the open software development, a concept widely spread in many fields of knowledge but rarely explored in the nuclear engineering field; the second, is the use of operating system shared memory as a fast and reliable storage area to couple the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM to the free and flexible reactor core analysis code Milonga. This concept was applied to simulate the behavior of the TRIGA Mark 1 IPR-R1 reactor fuel pin in steady-state mode. The macroscopic cross-sections for the model, a set of two-group cross-sections data, were generated using WIMSD-5B code. The results show that this innovative coupled system gives consistent results, encouraging system further development and its use for complex nuclear systems. (author)

  20. Heat Transfer in Metal Foam Heat Exchangers at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Pakeeza

    Heat transfer though open-cell metal foam is experimentally studied for heat exchanger and heat shield applications at high temperatures (˜750°C). Nickel foam sheets with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per linear inch (PPI), have been used to make the heat exchangers and heat shields by using thermal spray coating to deposit an Inconel skin on a foam core. Heat transfer measurements were performed on a test rig capable of generating hot gas up to 1000°C. The heat exchangers were tested by exposing their outer surface to combustion gases at a temperature of 550°C and 750°C while being cooled by air flowing through them at room temperature at velocities up to 5 m/s. The temperature rise of the air, the surface temperature of the heat exchangers and the air temperature inside the heat exchanger were measured. The volumetric heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number were calculated for different velocities. The heat transfer performance of the 40PPI sample brazed with the foil is found to be the most efficient. Pressure drop measurements were also performed for 10 and 40PPI metal foam. Thermographic measurements were done on 40PPI foam heat exchangers using a high temperature infrared camera. A high power electric heater was used to produce hot air at 300°C that passed over the foam heat exchanger while the cooling air was blown through it. Heat shields were made by depositing porous skins on metal foam and it was observed that a small amount of coolant leaking through the pores notably reduces the heat transfer from the hot gases. An analytical model was developed based assuming local thermal non-equilibrium that accounts for the temperature difference between solid and fluid phase. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the predicted values of the model.

  1. Cellular Dewetting: Opening of Macroapertures in Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Maddugoda, Madhavi P.; Stefani, Caroline; Janel, Sebastien; Lafont, Frank; Cuvelier, Damien; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    Pathogenic bacteria can cross from blood vessels to host tissues by opening transendothelial cell macroapertures (TEMs). To induce TEM opening, bacteria intoxicate endothelial cells with proteins that disrupt the contractile cytoskeletal network. Cell membrane tension is no longer resisted by contractile fibers, leading to the opening of TEMs. Here we model the opening of TEMs as a new form of dewetting. While liquid dewetting is irreversible, we show that cellular dewetting is transient. Our model predicts the minimum radius for hole nucleation, the maximum TEM size, and the dynamics of TEM opening, in good agreement with experimental data. The physical model is then coupled with biological experimental data to reveal that the protein missing in metastasis (MIM) controls the line tension at the rim of the TEM and opposes its opening.

  2. Separation of uranium by extraction with foamed plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkisch, J.

    1983-07-01

    Polyurethane foams are frequently used for the extraction and separation of inorganic and organic species. The attraction of the materials lies in their favourable hydrodynamic properties obviating the need for the forced-flow conditions associated with conventional chromatographic-type column packing of small particles. The research work described has been directed to providing information on the extraction and separation of uranium (and thorium) by an open-cell polyurethane foam from media containing nitrates and from hydrochloric acid systems. The influence of many different experimental parameters (concentrations, acidity, impregnation of the foam with organic extractants) on the extraction was investigated. Based on the results of these investigations two methods were developed to separate uranium from nitric acid solution and from hydrochloric acid solution, respectively. The first uses calcium or aluminium nitrate salting and foam impregnated with Aliquat 336, the second ascorbic acid addition and TOPO-impregnated foam. The methods separate uranium and thorium from each other and from most other elements and can be used analytically or in the purification of uranium from impure plant products such as yellow cake

  3. The Natural Compound Dansameum Reduces foam Cell Formation by Downregulating CD36 and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-gamma; Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kang-Seo; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Lee, Kang Pa; Park, Sun-Young; Cheon, Jin Hong; Choi, Jun-Yong; Kim, Kibong

    2018-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-induced vascular disorders are major causes of death in most western countries. During the development of atherosclerotic lesions, foam cell formation is essential and formed through the expression of CD36 and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). To investigate whether dansameum extract (DSE) could show anti-atherosclerotic effect through down-regulating cellular redox state including CD36 and PARP-γ expression in oxidative low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-treated RAW264.7 cells and on differentiated foam cells in ApoE Knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. The Korean polyherbal medicine DSE was prepared from three plants in the following proportions: 40 g of Salvia miltiorrhiza root, 4 g of Amomumxanthioides fruit, and 4 g of Santalum album lignum. The immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used for analysis of protein and mRNA involved in foam cell formation. We first showed that effects of DSE on foam cell formation in both oxLDL-induced RAW264.7 cells and in blood vessels from apolipoprotein E deficientApoE-/- mice with high fat diet-fed. DSE treatment significantly reduced the expression of CD36 and PPAR-γ in oxLDL-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and ApoE-/-mice, in the latter case by regulating heme oxygenase-1. Furthermore, DSE treatment also reduced cellular lipid content in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our data suggest that DSE may have anti-atherosclerotic properties through regulating foam cell formation. Dansameum extract (DSE) Regulates the expression of CD36 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in oxidative low-density lipoprotein-stimulated RAW264.7 Cells and ApoE Knockout (ApoE Knockout [ApoE-/-]) miceDSE Regulates Cholesterol Levels in the Serum of ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) miceDSE Reduced the Formation of Foam Cells by Regulating heme oxygenase-1 in ApoE-/- mice with high fat diet-fed. Abbreviations used: DSE: Dansameum extract, PPAR-γ: Peroxisome proliferator

  4. 3D morphological analysis of copper foams as current collectors for Li-ion batteries by means of X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etiemble, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique – Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Adrien, J. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Maire, E., E-mail: eric.maire@insa-lyon.fr [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Idrissi, H. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Reyter, D. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique – Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Roué, L., E-mail: roue@emt.inrs.ca [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique – Centre Énergie, Matériaux, Télécommunications, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • X-ray tomography analysis of open-cell copper foams is performed. • The effect of a dissolution treatment on the foam morphology is highlighted. • The interest of such Cu foams as current collectors for Li-ion batteries is discussed. - Abstract: As-received and chemically treated copper foams were characterized by means of laboratory X-ray tomography with a resolution of 0.5 μm. 3D image processing and analysis allowed the morphological parameters (size, sphericity, tortuosity etc.) of the pores and copper skeleton to be determined. The chemical dissolution of the Cu foam in an acid hydrogen peroxide solution results in an increase of the open pore size (from 54 to 93 μm) and a decrease of the foam thickness (from 140 to 115 μm). With an open porosity of 81.8% and a specific surface area as high as 280,000 (49,000) m{sup 2}/m{sup 3} of Cu (foam), the chemically-treated Cu foam appears very attractive for use as a 3D current collector for metal (e.g. Si) based anodes for Li-ion batteries.

  5. Quasi-static characterisation and impact testing of auxetic foam for sports safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, Olly; Alderson, Andrew; Foster, Leon; Senior, Terry; Allen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This study compared low strain rate material properties and impact force attenuation of auxetic foam and the conventional open-cell polyurethane counterpart. This furthers our knowledge with regards to how best to apply these highly conformable and breathable auxetic foams to protective sports equipment. Cubes of auxetic foam measuring 150 × 150 × 150 mm were fabricated using a thermo–mechanical conversion process. Quasi-static compression confirmed the converted foam to be auxetic, prior to being sliced into 20 mm thick cuboid samples for further testing. Density, Poisson’s ratio and the stress–strain curve were all found to be dependent on the position of each cuboid from within the cube. Impact tests with a hemispherical drop hammer were performed for energies up to 6 J, on foams covered with a polypropylene sheet between 1 and 2 mm thick. Auxetic samples reduced peak force by ∼10 times in comparison to the conventional foam. This work has shown further potential for auxetic foam to be applied to protective equipment, while identifying that improved fabrication methods are required. (paper)

  6. Preparation of multishell ICF target plastic-foam cushion materials by thermally induced phase-inversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.T.; Moreno, D.K.; Marsters, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    Homogenous, low-density plastic foams for ICF targets have been prepared by thermally induced phase inversion processes. Uniform, open cell foams have been obtained by the rapid freezing of water solutions of modified cellulose polymers with densities in the range of 5 mg/cm 3 to 0.7 mg/cm 3 and respective average cell sizes of 2 to 40 micrometers. In addition, low-density, microcellular foams have been prepared from the hydrocarbon polymer poly(4-methyl-l-pentene) via a similar phase inversion process using homogenous solutions in organic solvents. These foams have densities from 2 to 5 mg/cm 3 and average cell sizes of 20 micrometers. The physical-chemical aspects of the thermally induced phase inversion process is presented

  7. Follicular and percutaneous penetration pathways of topically applied minoxidil foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Massoudy, Lida; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Dietz, Ekkehart; Rasulev, Utkur; Garcia Bartels, Natalie

    2010-11-01

    In the past, it was assumed that the intercellular route was the only relevant penetration pathway for topically applied substances. Recent results on follicular penetration emphasize that the hair follicles represent a highly relevant and efficient penetration pathway and reservoir for topically applied substances. This study investigates a selective closure technique of hair follicle orifices in vivo assessing interfollicular and follicular absorption rates of topical minoxidil foam in humans. In delimited skin area, single hair orifices or interfollicular skin were blocked with a microdrop of special varnish-wax-mixture in vivo. Minoxidil foam (5%) was topically applied, and transcutaneous absorption was measured by a new surface ionization mass spectrometry technique in serum. Different settings (open, closed or none of both) enabled to clearly distinguish between interfollicular and follicular penetration of the topically applied minoxidil foam. Five minutes after topical application, minoxidil was detected in blood samples when follicles remained open, whereas with closed follicles 30 min were needed. Highest levels were found first when both pathways were open, followed by open follicles and subsequently by closed follicles. These results demonstrate the high importance of the follicular penetration pathway. Hair follicles are surrounded by a dense network of blood capillaries and dendritic cells and have stem cells in their immediate vicinity, making them ideal targets for drug delivery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Polymer foam comprising a polymer and nanoparticles, and nanoparticles for the manufacture of such foam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancso, Gyula J.; Duvigneau, Joost; Nederkoorn, P.H.J.; Wassing, T.

    2014-01-01

    A polymer foam is produced comprising a polymer and nanoparticles having a maximum dimensionof 750 nm, which foam has cells with an average cell size of at most 1 µm and a cell density of at least 1012 cells/ml, wherein polymeric grafts have been attached to the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles may

  9. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The

  10. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  11. Defect generation during solidification of aluminium foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, M.; Garcia-Moreno, F.; Banhart, J.

    2010-01-01

    The reason for the frequent occurrence of cell wall defects in metal foams was investigated. Aluminium foams often expand during solidification, a process which is referred as solidification expansion (SE). The effect of SE on the structure of aluminium foams was studied in situ by X-ray radioscopy and ex situ by X-ray tomography. A direct correlation between the magnitude of SE and the number of cell wall ruptures during SE and finally the number of defects in the solidified foams was found.

  12. Influence of Rubber Powders on Foaming Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Foamed Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Yue

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene/rubber powders composites with different kinds of rubber powders were foamed by injection molding machine equipped with volume-adjustable cavity. The effect of dispersity of rubber powders and crystallization behavior of composites on the foaming behavior and mechanical properties was investigated. The results show that the addition of rubber powders can improve the cell structure of foamed PP with fine and uniform cell distribution. And cell density and size of PP/PP-MAH/NBR foams are 7.64×106cell/cm3 and 29.78μm respectively, which are the best among these foams. Combining cell structures with mechanical properties, notch impact strength of PP/PP-MAH/CNBR composites increases approximately by 2.2 times while tensile strength is reduced just by 26% compared with those of the pure PP. This indicates that PP/PP-MAH/CNBR composites are ideal foamed materials.

  13. Fracture of metal foams : In-situ testing and numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; van Merkerk, R.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Schmidt, I

    This paper is on a combined experimental/modeling study on the tensile fracture of open-cell foams. In-situ tensile tests show that individual struts can fail in a brittle or ductile mode, presumably depending on the presence of casting defects. In-situ single strut tests were performed, enabling

  14. Interplay between cellular activity and three-dimensional scaffold-cell constructs with different foam structure processed by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, Krishna C; Misra, R Devesh K; Gaytan, Sara M; Murr, Lawrence E

    2015-05-01

    The cellular activity, biological response, and consequent integration of scaffold-cell construct in the physiological system are governed by the ability of cells to adhere, proliferate, and biomineralize. In this regard, we combine cellular biology and materials science and engineering to fundamentally elucidate the interplay between cellular activity and interconnected three-dimensional foamed architecture obtained by a novel process of electron beam melting and computational tools. Furthermore, the organization of key proteins, notably, actin, vinclulin, and fibronectin, involved in cellular activity and biological functions and relationship with the structure was explored. The interconnected foamed structure with ligaments was favorable to cellular activity that includes cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. The primary rationale for favorable modulation of cellular functions is that the foamed structure provided a channel for migration and communication between cells leading to highly mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) by the differentiating osteoblasts. The filopodial interaction amongst cells on the ligaments was a governing factor in the secretion of ECM, with consequent influence on maturation and mineralization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH Promotes Macrophage Foam Cell Formation via Reduced Expression of ATP Binding Cassette Transporter-1 (ABCA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyoung Cho

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the major pathology of cardiovascular disease, is caused by multiple factors involving psychological stress. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, which is released by neurosecretory cells in the hypothalamus, peripheral nerve terminals and epithelial cells, regulates various stress-related responses. Our current study aimed to verify the role of CRH in macrophage foam cell formation, the initial critical stage of atherosclerosis. Our quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, and Western blot results indicate that CRH down-regulates ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABCA1 and liver X receptor (LXR-α, a transcription factor for ABCA1, in murine peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Oil-red O (ORO staining and intracellular cholesterol measurement of macrophages treated with or without oxidized LDL (oxLDL and with or without CRH (10 nM in the presence of apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1 revealed that CRH treatment promotes macrophage foam cell formation. The boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY-conjugated cholesterol efflux assay showed that CRH treatment reduces macrophage cholesterol efflux. Western blot analysis showed that CRH-induced down-regulation of ABCA1 is dependent on phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473 induced by interaction between CRH and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1. We conclude that activation of this pathway by CRH accelerates macrophage foam cell formation and may promote stress-related atherosclerosis.

  16. Open Zinc Freezing-Point Cell Assembly and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žužek, V.; Batagelj, V.; Drnovšek, J.; Bojkovski, J.

    2014-07-01

    An open metal freezing-point cell design has been developed in the Laboratory of Metrology and Quality. According to our design, a zinc cell was successfully assembled. The paper presents the needed parts for the cell, the cleaning process, and sealing of the cell. The assembled cell was then evaluated by comparison with two commercial closed zinc cells of different manufacturers. The freezing plateaus of the cells were measured, and a direct cell comparison was made. It was shown that the assembled open cell performed better than the used closed cell and was close to the brand new closed cell. The nominal purity of the zinc used for the open cell was 7 N, but the freezing plateau measurement suggests a higher impurity concentration. It was assumed that the zinc was contaminated to some extent during the process of cutting as its original shape was an irregular cylinder. The uncertainty due to impurities for the assembled cell is estimated to be 0.3 mK. Furthermore, the immersion profile and the pressure coefficient were measured. Both results are close to their theoretical values.

  17. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm 3 and cell sizes of 30μm or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure

  18. Foam generator and viscometer apparatus and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Troy D.; Pickell, Mark B.; Volk, Leonard J.

    2004-10-26

    An apparatus and process to generate a liquid-gas-surfactant foam and to measure its viscosity and enable optical and or electronic measurements of physical properties. The process includes the steps of pumping selected and measured liquids and measured gases into a mixing cell. The mixing cell is pressurized to a desired pressure and maintained at a desired pressure. Liquids and gas are mixed in the mixing cell to produce a foam of desired consistency. The temperature of the foam in the mixing cell is controlled. Foam is delivered from the mixing cell through a viscometer under controlled pressure and temperature conditions where the viscous and physical properties of the foam are measured and observed.

  19. B-Plant canyon fire foam supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gainey, T.

    1995-01-01

    A new raw water supply was installed for the B-Plant fire foam system. This document details tests to be performed which will demonstrate that the system can function as designed. The tests include: Verification of the operation of the automatic valves at the cells; Measurement of water flow and pressure downstream of the proportioner; Production of foam, and measurement of foam concentration. Included as an appendix is a copy of the work package resolution (J4 ampersand J4a)

  20. Fluid-Phase Pinocytosis of Native Low Density Lipoprotein Promotes Murine M-CSF Differentiated Macrophage Foam Cell Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Bohnacker, Thomas; Wymann, Matthias P.; Kruth, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    During atherosclerosis, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol accumulates in macrophages to form foam cells. Macrophage uptake of LDL promotes foam cell formation but the mechanism mediating this process is not clear. The present study investigates the mechanism of LDL uptake for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-differentiated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. LDL receptor-null (LDLR−/−) macrophages incubated with LDL showed non-saturable accumulation of cholesterol that did not down-regulate for the 24 h examined. Incubation of LDLR−/− macrophages with increasing concentrations of 125I-LDL showed non-saturable macrophage LDL uptake. A 20-fold excess of unlabeled LDL had no effect on 125I-LDL uptake by wild-type macrophages and genetic deletion of the macrophage scavenger receptors CD36 and SRA did not affect 125I-LDL uptake, showing that LDL uptake occurred by fluid-phase pinocytosis independently of receptors. Cholesterol accumulation was inhibited approximately 50% in wild-type and LDLR−/− mice treated with LY294002 or wortmannin, inhibitors of all classes of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). Time-lapse, phase-contrast microscopy showed that macropinocytosis, an important fluid-phase uptake pathway in macrophages, was blocked almost completely by PI3K inhibition with wortmannin. Pharmacological inhibition of the class I PI3K isoforms alpha, beta, gamma or delta did not affect macrophage LDL-derived cholesterol accumulation or macropinocytosis. Furthermore, macrophages from mice expressing kinase-dead class I PI3K beta, gamma or delta isoforms showed no decrease in cholesterol accumulation or macropinocytosis when compared with wild-type macrophages. Thus, non-class I PI3K isoforms mediated macropinocytosis in these macrophages. Further characterization of the components necessary for LDL uptake, cholesterol accumulation, and macropinocytosis identified dynamin, microtubules, actin, and vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase as

  1. Hyperbolic kaleidoscopes and Chaos in foams and Hele-Shaw cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufaile, A P B; Tufaile, A; Liger-Belair, G

    2011-01-01

    Liquid foams have fascinating optical properties, which are caused by the large number of light refractions and reflections by liquid films and Plateau borders. Due to refraction and reflection at the interfaces, the direction of the rays leaving a Plateau border can vary greatly for the same incident angle and a small positional offset. A close look in some configurations of the Plateau borders or liquid bridges reveals the existence of some triangular patterns surrounded by a complex structure, and these patterns bear a resemblance to those observed in some systems involving chaotic scattering and multiple light reflections between spheres. Provided the optical properties of the sphere surfaces are chosen appropriately, fractals are natural consequences of multiple scattering of light rays in these cavities. The cavity acts as a hyperbolic kaleidoscope multiplying the scattering of light rays generating patterns related to Poincare disks and Sierpinski gaskets in comparison to linear kaleidoscopes. We present some experimental results and simulations of these patterns explained by the light of the chaotic scattering.

  2. Hyperbolic kaleidoscopes and Chaos in foams and Hele-Shaw cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A P B; Tufaile, A [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades da Universidade de Sao Paulo, R. Arlindo Bettio, 1000, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Liger-Belair, G, E-mail: atufaile@usp.br [Laboratoire d' OEnologie et Chimie Appliquee, UPRES EA 2069, URVVC, Faculte de Sciences de Reims, Moulin de la Housse, B. P. 1039, 51687 Reims, Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-03-01

    Liquid foams have fascinating optical properties, which are caused by the large number of light refractions and reflections by liquid films and Plateau borders. Due to refraction and reflection at the interfaces, the direction of the rays leaving a Plateau border can vary greatly for the same incident angle and a small positional offset. A close look in some configurations of the Plateau borders or liquid bridges reveals the existence of some triangular patterns surrounded by a complex structure, and these patterns bear a resemblance to those observed in some systems involving chaotic scattering and multiple light reflections between spheres. Provided the optical properties of the sphere surfaces are chosen appropriately, fractals are natural consequences of multiple scattering of light rays in these cavities. The cavity acts as a hyperbolic kaleidoscope multiplying the scattering of light rays generating patterns related to Poincare disks and Sierpinski gaskets in comparison to linear kaleidoscopes. We present some experimental results and simulations of these patterns explained by the light of the chaotic scattering.

  3. An open, parallel, randomized, comparative, multicenter study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness, performance, tolerance, and safety of a silver-containing soft silicone foam dressing (intervention) vs silver sulfadiazine cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Paul; Heimbach, David; Meites, Herbert; Latenser, Barbara; Mozingo, David; Mullins, Fred; Garner, Warren; Turkowski, Joseph; Shupp, Jeffrey; Glat, Paul; Purdue, Gary

    2011-01-01

    An open, parallel, randomized, comparative, multicenter study was implemented to evaluate the cost-effectiveness, performance, tolerance, and safety of a silver-containing soft silicone foam dressing (Mepilex Ag) vs silver sulfadiazine cream (control) in the treatment of partial-thickness thermal burns. Individuals aged 5 years and older with partial-thickness thermal burns (2.5-20% BSA) were randomized into two groups and treated with the trial products for 21 days or until healed, whichever occurred first. Data were obtained and analyzed on cost (direct and indirect), healing rates, pain, comfort, ease of product use, and adverse events. A total of 101 subjects were recruited. There were no significant differences in burn area profiles within the groups. The cost of dressing-related analgesia was lower in the intervention group (P = .03) as was the cost of background analgesia (P = .07). The mean total cost of treatment was $309 vs $513 in the control (P < .001). The average cost-effectiveness per treatment regime was $381 lower in the intervention product, producing an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1688 in favor of the soft silicone foam dressing. Mean healing rates were 71.7 vs 60.8% at final visit, and the number of dressing changes were 2.2 vs 12.4 in the treatment and control groups, respectively. Subjects reported significantly less pain at application (P = .02) and during wear (P = .048) of the Mepilex Ag dressing in the acute stages of wound healing. Clinicians reported the intervention dressing was significantly easier to use (P = .03) and flexible (P = .04). Both treatments were well tolerated; however, the total incidence of adverse events was higher in the control group. The silver-containing soft silicone foam dressing was as effective in the treatment of patients as the standard care (silver sulfadiazine). In addition, the group of patients treated with the soft silicone foam dressing demonstrated decreased pain and lower costs associated

  4. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-05

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crosslinked polyethylene foams, via eb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, E.C.L.; Lugao, A. B.; Andrade e Silva, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Polyethylene foams, produced by radio-induced crosslinking, show a smooth and homogeneous surface, when compared to chemical crosslinking method using peroxide as crosslinking agent. This process fosters excellent adhesive and printability properties. Besides that, closed cells, intrinsic to these foams, imparts optimum mechanical, shocks and insulation resistance, indicating these foams to some markets segments as: automotive and transport; buoyancy, flotation and marine; building and insulation; packaging; domestic sports and leisure goods. We were in search of an ideal foam, by adding 5 to 15% of blowing agent in LDPE. A series of preliminary trials defined 203 degree sign C as the right blowing agent decomposition temperature. At a 22.7 kGys/dose ratio, the lowest dose for providing an efficient foam was 30 kGy, for a formulation comprising 10% of azodicarbonamide in LDPE, within a 10 minutes foaming time

  6. Faraday instability at foam-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, A; Caps, H

    2012-12-01

    A nearly two-dimensional foam is generated inside a Hele-shaw cell and left at rest on its liquid bath. The system is then vertically shaken and, above a well-defined acceleration threshold, surface waves appear at the foam-liquid interface. Those waves are shown to be subharmonic. The acceleration threshold is studied and compared to the common liquid-gas case, emphasizing the energy dissipation inside the foam. An empirical model is proposed for this energy loss, accounting for the foam characteristics such as the bubble size but also the excitation parameter, namely the linear velocity.

  7. Development and validation of a new solver based on the interfacial area transport equation for the numerical simulation of sub-cooled boiling with OpenFOAM CFD code for nuclear safety applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alali, Abdullah

    2014-02-21

    The one-group interfacial area transport equation has been coupled to a wall heat flux partitioning model in the framework of two-phase Eulerian approach using the OpenFOAM CFD code for better prediction of subcooled boiling phenomena which is essential for safety analysis of nuclear reactors. The interfacial area transport equation has been modified to include the effect of bubble nucleation at the wall and condensation by subcooled liquid in the bulk that governs the non-uniform bubble size distribution.

  8. Development and validation of a new solver based on the interfacial area transport equation for the numerical simulation of sub-cooled boiling with OpenFOAM CFD code for nuclear safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alali, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The one-group interfacial area transport equation has been coupled to a wall heat flux partitioning model in the framework of two-phase Eulerian approach using the OpenFOAM CFD code for better prediction of subcooled boiling phenomena which is essential for safety analysis of nuclear reactors. The interfacial area transport equation has been modified to include the effect of bubble nucleation at the wall and condensation by subcooled liquid in the bulk that governs the non-uniform bubble size distribution.

  9. Method of Heating a Foam-Based Catalyst Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.

    2009-01-01

    A method of heating a foam-based catalyst bed has been developed using silicon carbide as the catalyst support due to its readily accessible, high surface area that is oxidation-resistant and is electrically conductive. The foam support may be resistively heated by passing an electric current through it. This allows the catalyst bed to be heated directly, requiring less power to reach the desired temperature more quickly. Designed for heterogeneous catalysis, the method can be used by the petrochemical, chemical processing, and power-generating industries, as well as automotive catalytic converters. Catalyst beds must be heated to a light-off temperature before they catalyze the desired reactions. This typically is done by heating the assembly that contains the catalyst bed, which results in much of the power being wasted and/or lost to the surrounding environment. The catalyst bed is heated indirectly, thus requiring excessive power. With the electrically heated catalyst bed, virtually all of the power is used to heat the support, and only a small fraction is lost to the surroundings. Although the light-off temperature of most catalysts is only a few hundred degrees Celsius, the electrically heated foam is able to achieve temperatures of 1,200 C. Lower temperatures are achievable by supplying less electrical power to the foam. Furthermore, because of the foam s open-cell structure, the catalyst can be applied either directly to the foam ligaments or in the form of a catalyst- containing washcoat. This innovation would be very useful for heterogeneous catalysis where elevated temperatures are needed to drive the reaction.

  10. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized...... by performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  11. CD147 induces up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in U937-derived foam cells through PI3K/AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, JiaXin; Li, YunTian; Du, DaYong; Liu, Yang; Yin, YongJun

    2016-11-01

    Intraplaque angiogenesis has been recognized as an important risk factor for the rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in recent years. CD147, also called Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer, has been found the ability to promote angiogenesis in many pathological conditions such as cancer diseases and rheumatoid arthritis via the up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a critical mediator of angiogenesis. We investigated whether CD147 would also induce the up-regulation of VEGF in the foam cells formation process and explored the probable signaling pathway. The results showed the expression of CD147 and VEGF was significantly higher in U937-derived foam cells. After CD147 stealth siRNA transfection treatment, the production of VEGF was reduced depended on the inhibition efficiency of CD147 siRNAs.The special signaling pathway inhibitors LY294002, SP600125, SB203580 and U0126 were added to cultures respectively and the results showed LY294002 dose-dependently inhibited the expression of VEGF. The reduction of phospho-Akt was observed in both LY294002 and siRNA groups, suggested that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway may be the probable signaling pathway underlying CD147 induced up-regulation of VEGF in U937-derived foam cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Low density lipoprotein labelling characterizes experimentally induced atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits in vivo as to presence of foam cells and endothelial coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgolini, I.; Sinzinger, H.; Angelberger, P.; O'Grady, J.

    1991-01-01

    The entry of autologous iodine 125 low density lipoprotein ( 125 I-LDL) into the aortic wall in rabbits was measured. After abdominal endothelium abrasion with a Fogarthy catheter the animals were fed at 1% cholesterol-supplemented diet for 4 weeks. The animals were killed 1-48 h after administration of 25 μCi 125 I-LDL. Local entry of radiolabelled LDL was estimated and correlated to endothelial surface lining and foam cell content, both controlled morphologically. Endothelialized segments showed the lowest entry of 125 I-LDL, the maximum uptake was reached at around 8 h. In de-endothelialized segments the entry was higher and the peak later (12 h), while in re-endothelialized segments a continuous increase in 125 I-LDL entry up to 48 h was measured. Number and extent of foam cells correlated with the entry of LDL. The data indicate the usefulnes of LDL radiolabelling for qualitative in vivo information on surface lining and foam cell content. (orig.)

  13. Foam pad of appropriate thickness can improve diagnostic value of foam posturography in detecting postural instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yangming; Zhou, Renhong; Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Dongdong; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2018-04-01

    The present study investigated the effect of foam thickness on postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) during foam posturography. Static and foam posturography were performed in 33 patients (UVH group) and 30 healthy subjects (control group) with eyes open (EO) and closed (EC) on firm surface and on 1-5 foam pad(s). Sway velocity (SV) of center of pressure, standing time before falling (STBF) and falls reaction were recorded and analyzed. (1) SVs had an increasing tendency in both groups as the foam pads were added under EO and EC conditions. (2) STBFs, only in UVH group with EC, decreased with foam thickness increasing. (3) Significant differences in SV were found between the control and UVH group with EO (except for standing on firm surface, on 1 and 2 foam pad(s)) and with EC (all surface conditions). (4) Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the SV could better reflect the difference in postural stability between the two groups while standing on the 4 foam pads with EC. Our study showed that diagnostic value of foam posturography in detecting postural instability might be enhanced by using foam pad of right thickness.

  14. Overexpression of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Increases Macrophage-Derived Foam Cell Accumulation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Transgenic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoucui Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C are inversely associated with the risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases; thus, pharmacological inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP is considered to be a therapeutic method of raising HDL-C levels. However, many CETP inhibitors have failed to achieve a clinical benefit despite raising HDL-C. In the study, we generated transgenic (Tg rabbits that overexpressed the human CETP gene to examine the influence of CETP on the development of atherosclerosis. Both Tg rabbits and their non-Tg littermates were fed a high cholesterol diet for 16 weeks. Plasma lipids and body weight were measured every 4 weeks. Gross lesion areas of the aortic atherosclerosis along with lesional cellular components were quantitatively analyzed. Overexpression of human CETP did not significantly alter the gross atherosclerotic lesion area, but the number of macrophages in lesions was significantly increased. Overexpression of human CETP did not change the plasma levels of total cholesterol or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol but lowered plasma HDL-C and increased triglycerides. These data revealed that human CETP may play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis mainly by decreasing HDL-C levels and increasing the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cells.

  15. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  16. Macroporous graphitic carbon foam decorated with polydopamine as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Yang, Lu; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji

    2017-09-01

    Herein, a macroporous graphitic carbon foam (MGCF) electrode decorated with polydopamine (PDA) is used as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell (MFC) applications. The MGCF is facilely prepared by pyrolysis of a powder mixture comprising maltose, nickel nitrate, and ammonia chloride, without using solid porous template. The MGCF is coated with PDA by self-polymerization of dopamine in a basic solution. The MGCF can provide a large surface area for bacterial attachment, and PDA coated on the MGCF electrode can further promote bacterial adhesion resulting from the improved hydrophility, so the MGCF-PDA electrode as an anode in a MFC can show ultrahigh bacterial loading capacity. Moreover, the electrochemical oxidation of flavins at the MGCF-PDA electrode is greatly accelerated, so the extracellular electron transfer mediated by flavins is improved. As a result, the MFC equipped with a MGCF-PDA anode can show a maximum power density of 1735 mW cm-2, which is 6.7 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon felt anode, indicating a promising anode for MFC applications.

  17. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO 2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  18. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength).

  19. Epigenetic regulation of open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    The recent progress in pluripotent stem cell research has opened new avenues of disease modeling, drug screening, and transplantation of patient-specific tissues that had been unimaginable until a decade ago. The central mechanism underlying pluripotency is epigenetic gene regulation; the majority of cell signaling pathways, both extracellular and cytoplasmic, eventually alter the epigenetic status of their target genes during the process of activating or suppressing the genes to acquire or maintain pluripotency. It has long been thought that the chromatin of pluripotent stem cells is globally open to enable the timely activation of essentially all genes in the genome during differentiation into multiple lineages. The current article reviews descriptive observations and the epigenetic machinery relevant to what is supposed to be globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells. This includes microscopic appearance, permissive gene transcription, chromatin remodeling complexes, histone modifications, DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, dynamic movement of chromatin proteins, nucleosome accessibility and positioning, and long-range chromosomal interactions. Detailed analyses of each element, however, have revealed that the globally open chromatin hypothesis is not necessarily supported by some of the critical experimental evidence, such as genome-wide nucleosome accessibility and nucleosome positioning. Further understanding of the epigenetic gene regulation is expected to determine the true nature of the so-called globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem. PMID:24695097

  20. Bi-liquid foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneville, Odile

    1997-01-01

    Concentrated emulsions have structures similar to foams; for this reason they are also called 'bi-liquid foams'. For oil in water emulsions, they are made of polyhedral oil cells separated by aqueous surfactant films. The limited stability of these Systems is a major nuisance in their applications. In this work, we tried to understand and to control the mechanisms through which bi-liquid foams can loose their stability. In a first stage, we characterized the states of surfactant films in bi-liquid foams submitted to different pressures. We determined their hydration, the surfactant density at interfaces as well as their thicknesses. The bi-liquid foams were made by concentrating hexadecane-in-water emulsions through centrifugation. The initial emulsions contained submicron oil droplets that were completely covered with surfactant. We measured the resistance of the films to dehydration, and we represented it by pressure-film thickness curves or pressure-film hydration curves. We also obtained evidence that the interfacial surfactant density increases when the film thickness is decreased (SDS case). The Newton Black Film state is the most dehydrated metastable state that can be reached. In this state, the films can be described as surfactant bilayers that only contain the hydration water of the surfactant polar heads. Two different processes are involved the destabilization of bi-liquid foams: Ostwald ripening (oil transfer from small cells to large cells) and coalescence (films rupture). The first mechanism can be controlled by choosing oils that are very insoluble in water, avoiding ethoxylated nonionic surfactants of low molecular weight, and making emulsions that are not too fine. The second mechanism is responsible for the catastrophic destabilization of bi-liquid foams made of droplets above one micron or with a low coverage in surfactant. In these cases, destabilization occurs in the early stages of concentration, when the films are still thick. It is caused

  1. Torsion Property of the Structure Bonded Aluminum Foam Due to Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang G.W.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum foam added with foaming agent, is classified into an open-cell type for heat transfer and a closed-cell type for shock absorption. This study investigates the characteristic on the torsion of aluminum foam for a closed-cell type under impact. The fracture characteristics are investigated through the composite of five types of aluminum foam (the thicknesses of 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65 mm, when applying the torsional moment of impact energy on the junction of a porous structure attached by an adhesive. When applying the impact energy of 100, 200 and 300J, the aluminum foams with thicknesses of 25 mm and 35 mm broke off under all conditions. For the energy over 200J, aluminums thicker than 55 mm continued to be attached. Furthermore, the aluminum specimens with thicknesses of 55 mm and 65 mm that were attached with more than 30% of bonding interface remained, proving that they could maintain bonding interface against impact energy. By comparing the data based on the analysis and test result, an increase in the thickness of specimen leads to the plastic deformation as the stress at the top and bottom of bonding interface moves to the middle by spreading the stress horizontally. Based on this fracture characteristic, this study can provide the data on the destruction and separation of bonding interface and may contribute to the safety design.

  2. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billiet, Marijn; De Schampheleire, Sven; Huisseune, Henk; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 ∘C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 ∘C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink. PMID:28793601

  3. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Billiet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 °C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 °C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink.

  4. Bubble and foam chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    This indispensable guide will equip the reader with a thorough understanding of the field of foaming chemistry. Assuming only basic theoretical background knowledge, the book provides a straightforward introduction to the principles and properties of foams and foaming surfactants. It discusses the key ideas that underpin why foaming occurs, how it can be avoided and how different degrees of antifoaming can be achieved, and covers the latest test methods, including laboratory and industrial developed techniques. Detailing a variety of different kinds of foams, from wet detergents and food foams, to polymeric, material and metal foams, it connects theory to real-world applications and recent developments in foam research. Combining academic and industrial viewpoints, this book is the definitive stand-alone resource for researchers, students and industrialists working on foam technology, colloidal systems in the field of chemical engineering, fluid mechanics, physical chemistry, and applied physics.

  5. Can children with sickle cell disease undergo open splenectomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report three children with sickle cell anaemia presenting with chronic massive splenomegaly and hypersplenism. The children were initially denied surgery because of extremely low haemoglobin levels and the inefficacy of transfusion. Subsequently, they underwent successful open abdominal splenectomy without any ...

  6. Manufacturing and Characterization of Temperature-Stable, Novel, Viscoelastic Polyurea Based Foams for Impact Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Brian Josue

    The aim of this thesis was to develop advance, high performance polyurea foams for multi-hit capability in protective equipment that respond over a range of impact energies, temperatures, and strain rates. In addition, the microstructure of these materials should be tunable such that the peak stress (or force) transmitted across the foam section can be limited to a specific value defined by an injury threshold while maximizing impact energy absorption. Novel polyurea foams were manufactured and found to exhibit a reversible viscoelastic shear deformation at the molecular level. The intrinsic shear dissipation process is synergistically coupled to controlled collapse of a novel pore structure. The microstructure compromises of stochastic polyhedral cells ranging from 200 - 500 mum with perforated membranes with small apertures ( 20 mum). This makes them strain rate sensitive as the rate at which the air escapes the cells depend upon the loading rate. These mechanisms operate simultaneously and sequentially, thereby significantly reducing the transmitted impact forces across the foam section. Thus, they behave as an elastically modulated layered composite because the cells stiffen or soften in response to the changing loading rate. Therefore, the newly developed polyurea foams are able to manage the varying material strain rate that occurs within the same loading event without the need to modulate the stiffness or density. Additionally, polyurea foams were found to retain its excellent impact properties over a range of temperatures (0°C to 40°C) by having a glass transition temperature well below 0°C. This is in contrast to commercially available high performance foams that have the glass transition temperature near 0°C and absorb energy through phase transformation at ambient conditions, but significantly stiffen at lower temperatures, and dramatically soften at higher temperatures. This expands the application domain of polyurea foam material considerably as it

  7. High Temperature Alkaline Electrolysis Cells with Metal Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operating at 250°C and 40 bar are able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. In the present work we demonstrate the application of a PTFE hydrophobic network and Ag nanowires as oxygen evolution electrocatalyst...

  8. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhonghua [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Wang, Haiqin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Fifth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, The Fourth People' s Hospital Of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Huo, Ran, E-mail: rhuo12@163.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2015-12-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing.

  9. Three-dimensional graphene foams loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells promote skin wound healing with reduced scarring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua; Wang, Haiqin; Yang, Bo; Sun, Yukai; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of functional skin remains elusive, due to poor engraftment, deficient vascularization, and excessive scar formation. Aiming to overcome these issues, the present study proposed the combination of a three-dimensional graphene foam (GF) scaffold loaded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve skin wound healing. The GFs demonstrated good biocompatibility and promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in animal model. The dermis formed in the presence of the GF structure loaded with MSCs was thicker and possessed a more complex structure at day 14 post-surgery. The transplanted MSCs correlated with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which may lead to neo-vascularization. Additionally, an anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of the 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs, as evidenced by a downregulation of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) together with an increase of TGF-β3. Altogether, the GF scaffold could guide the wound healing process with reduced scarring, and the MSCs were crucial to enhance vascularization and provided a better quality neo-skin. The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs possesses necessary bioactive cues to improve wound healing with reduced scarring, which may be of great clinical significance for skin wound healing. - Highlights: • The GFs promoted the growth and proliferation of MSCs. • The GFs loaded with MSCs obviously facilitated wound closure in the animal model. • An anti-scarring effect was observed in the presence of 3D-GF scaffold and MSCs. • The GF scaffold loaded with MSCs has great effect on skin wound healing

  10. Foams theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Saad A

    1996-01-01

    This volume discusses the physics and physical processes of foam and foaming. It delineates various measurement techniques for characterizing foams and foam properties as well as the chemistry and application of foams. The use of foams in the textile industry, personal care products, enhanced oil recovery, firefighting and mineral floatation are highlighted, and the connection between the microstructure and physical properties of foam are detailed. Coverage includes nonaqueous foams and silicone antifoams, and more.

  11. Multifunctional foaming agent to prepare aluminum foam with enhanced mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xun; Liu, Ying; Ye, Jinwen; An, Xuguang; Ran, Huaying

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, CuSO4 was used as foaming agent to prepare close cell Aluminum foam(Al foam) at the temperature range of 680 °C ∼ 758 °C for the first time. The results show that CuSO4 has multifunctional such as, foaming, viscosity increasing, reinforcement in Al matrix, it has a wide decomposition temperature range of 641 °C ∼ 816 °C, its sustain-release time is 5.5 min at 758 °C. The compression stress and energy absorption of CuSO4-Al foam is 6.89 Mpa and 4.82 × 106 J m‑3(compression strain 50%), which are 77.12% and 99.17% higher than that of TiH2-Al foam at the same porosity(76% in porosity) due to the reinforcement in Al matrix and uniform pore dispersion.

  12. Literature Review: An Overview of Epoxy Resin Syntactic Foams with Glass Microballoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-12

    Syntactic foams are an important category of composite materials that have abundant applications in a wide variety of fields. The bulk phase of syntactic foams is a three-part epoxy resin formulation that consists of a base resin, a curative (curing agent) and a modifier (diluent and/or accelerator) [12]. These thermoset materials [12] are used frequently for their thermal stability [9], low moisture absorption and high compressive strength [10]. The characteristic feature of a syntactic foam is a network of beads that forms pores within the epoxy matrix [3]. In this review, hollow glass beads (known as glass microballoons) are considered, however, solid beads or microballoons made from materials such as ceramic, polymer or metal can also be used [3M, Peter]. The network of hollow beads forms a closed-cell foam; the term closed-cell comes from the fact that the microspheres used in the resin matrix are completely closed and filled with gas (termed hollow). In contrast, the microspheres used in open-cell foams are either not completely closed or broken so that matrix material can fill the spheres [11]. Although closed foams have been found to possess higher densities than open cell foams, their rigid structures give them superior mechanical properties [12]. Past research has extensively studied the effects that changing the volume fraction of microballoons to epoxy will have on the resulting syntactic foam [3,4,9]. In addition, published literature also explores how the microballoon wall thickness affects the final product [4,9,10]. Findings detail that indeed both the mechanical and some thermal properties of syntactic foams can be tailored to a specific application by varying either the volume fraction or the wall thickness of the microballoons used [10]. The major trends in syntactic foam research show that microballoon volume fraction has an inversely proportionate relationship to dynamic properties, while microballoon wall thickness is proportional to those

  13. Pore-level determination of spectral reflection behaviors of high-porosity metal foam sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xia, Xin-Lin; Ai, Qing; Sun, Chuang; Tan, He-Ping

    2018-03-01

    Open cell metal foams are currently attracting attention and their radiative behaviors are of primary importance in high temperature applications. The spectral reflection behaviors of high-porosity metal foam sheets, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and directional-hemispherical reflectivity were numerically investigated. A set of realistic nickel foams with porosity from 0.87 to 0.97 and pore density from 10 to 40 pores per inch were tomographied to obtain their 3-D digital cell network. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method was employed in order to compute the pore-level radiative transfer inside the network within the limit of geometrical optics. The apparent reflection behaviors and their dependency on the textural parameters and strut optical properties were comprehensively computed and analysed. The results show a backward scattering of the reflected energy at the foam sheet surface. Except in the cases of large incident angles, an energy peak is located almost along the incident direction and increases with increasing incident angles. Through an analytical relation established, the directional-hemispherical reflectivity can be related directly to the porosity of the foam sheet and to the complex refractive index of the solid phase as well as the specularity parameter which characterizes the local reflection model. The computations show that a linear decrease in normal-hemispherical reflectivity occurs with increasing porosity. The rate of this decrease is directly proportional to the strut normal reflectivity. In addition, the hemispherical reflectivity increases as a power function of the incident angle cosine.

  14. Identification of strain fields in pure Al and hybrid Ni/Al metal foams using X-ray micro-tomography under loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fíla, T.; Jiroušek, O.; Jung, A.; Kumpová, I.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid foams are materials formed by a core from a standard open cell metal foam that is during the process of electrodeposition coated by a thin layer of different nanocrystalline metals. The material properties of the base metal foam are in this way modified resulting in higher plateau stress and, more importantly, by introduction of strain-rate dependence to its deformation response. In this paper, we used time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography for the mechanical characterization of Ni/Al hybrid foams (aluminium open cell foams with nickel coating layer). To fully understand the effects of the coating layer on the material's effective properties, we compared the compressive response of the base uncoated foam to the response of the material with coating thickness of 50 and 75 μm. Digital volume correlation (DVC) was applied to obtain volumetric strain fields of the deforming micro-structure up to the densification region of the deforming cellular structure. The analysis was performed as a compressive mechanical test with simultaneous observation using X-ray radiography and tomography. A custom design experimental device was used for compression of the foam specimens in several deformation states directly in the X-ray setup. Planar X-ray images were taken during the loading phases and a X-ray tomography was performed at the end of each loading phase (up to engineering strain 22%). The samples were irradiated using micro-focus reflection type X-ray tube and images were taken using a large area flat panel detector. Tomography reconstructions were used for an identification of a strain distribution in the foam using digital volumetric correlation. A comparison of the deformation response of the coated and the uncoated foam in uniaxial quasi-static compression is summarized in the paper.

  15. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  16. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  17. Silica-Assisted Nucleation of Polymer Foam Cells with Nanoscopic Dimensions : Impact of Particle Size, Line Tension, and Surface Functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shanqiu; Eijkelenkamp, Rik; Duvigneau, Joost; Vancso, G. Julius

    2017-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles consisting of silica as core and surface-grafted poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as shell with different diameters were prepared and used as heterogeneous nucleation agents to obtain CO2-blown poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposite foams. PDMS was selected as the shell

  18. Processing, Characterization, and Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Choonghee; Naguib, Hani E.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of the material parameters and processing conditions on the foam morphologies, and mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposite foams were studied. Microcellular closed-cell nanocomposite foams were manufactured with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and high density polyethylene (HDPE), where the nanoclay loadings of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt% were used. The effect of clay contents and foaming conditions on the volume expansion ratio, cell size, elastic modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break were investigated and compared between amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. An elastic modulus model for tensile behavior of foams was proposed by using the micromechanics theory. The model was expressed in terms of microstructural properties of polymer and physical properties of the foams. The tensile experimental data of the foams were compared with those predicted by the theoretical model.

  19. In situ production of microporous foams in sub-millimeter cylindrical gold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yongheng; Luo Xuan; Fang Yu; Ren Hongbo; Yuan Guanghui; Wang Honglian; Zhou Lan; Zhang Lin; Du Kai

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of microcellular foam in sub-millimeter cylindrical gold targets is described. Small, open-ended, gold cylinders of 400 μm diameter, 700 μm length, and 20 μm wall thickness were fabricated by electroplating gold onto a silicon bronze mandrel and leaching the mandrel with concentrated nitric acid. After several rinsing and cleaning steps, the cylinders were filled with a solution containing acrylate monomers. The solution was polymerized in situ with ultraviolet light to produce a gel. Precipitation of these gels in a non-solvent such as methanol and subsequent drying by means of a critical point drying apparatus produced cylinders filled with microporous foams. The foams have densities of 50 mg · cm -3 and cell sizes on more than 1 μm. They fill the cylinders completely without shrinkage during the drying process, and need no subsequent machining. (authors)

  20. Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, Marie-Therese; Verhoog, Roelof; Precigout, Claude

    1996-09-24

    A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

  1. Structural Continuum Modeling of Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, Brian; Ayala, Sam; Purlee, T. Eric; Shaw, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation reporting on work in modeling the foam insulation of the Space Shuttle External Tank. An analytical understanding of foam mechanics is required to design against structural failure. The Space Shuttle External Tank is covered primarily with closed cell foam to: Prevent ice, Protect structure from ascent aerodynamic and engine plume heating, and Delay break-up during re-entry. It is important that the foam does not shed unacceptable debris during ascent environment. Therefore a modeling of the foam insulation was undertaken.

  2. Foam engineering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Containing contributions from leading academic and industrial researchers, this book provides a much needed update of foam science research. The first section of the book presents an accessible summary of the theory and fundamentals of foams. This includes chapters on morphology, drainage, Ostwald ripening, coalescence, rheology, and pneumatic foams. The second section demonstrates how this theory is used in a wide range of industrial applications, including foam fractionation, froth flotation and foam mitigation. It includes chapters on suprafroths, flotation of oil sands, foams in enhancing petroleum recovery, Gas-liquid Mass Transfer in foam, foams in glass manufacturing, fire-fighting foam technology and consumer product foams.

  3. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baez, John C; Christensen, J Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (e iS ) rather than imaginary-time e -S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model

  4. Lādētu daļiņu kustības magnētiskā laukā 3D modelēšana OpenFOAM vidē

    OpenAIRE

    Venčels, Juris

    2013-01-01

    Darbā tiek aplūkota aprēķinu programmas izveide un tās funkcionalitāte elektriskā un magnētiskā lauka modelēšanai trijās dimensijās, izmantojot magnētiskā vektorpotenciāla “A, V-A” formulējumu. Programma veidota uz atvērtā koda bibliotēkas OpenFOAM bāzes. Rezultāti salīdzināti ar programmas FEMM aksiāl-simetriskajiem aprēķiniem. Programma nodrošina multi-reģionu aprēķinus, iespēju vienlaicīgi modelēt dažādus procesus, uzdot fizikālu lielumu atkarību no citiem lielumiem. Programma modelē el...

  5. Cell Division, a new open access online forum for and from the cell cycle community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldis Philipp

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell Division is a new, open access, peer-reviewed online journal that publishes cutting-edge articles, commentaries and reviews on all exciting aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. A major goal of this new journal is to publish timely and significant studies on the aberrations of the cell cycle network that occur in cancer and other diseases.

  6. Design and fabrication of highly open nickel cobalt sulfide nanosheets on Ni foam for asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density and long cycle-life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Daosong; Fu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Lili; Zhu, Junwu; Wang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Nickel cobalt sulfides (NiCo-S) are promising electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors but normally show poor rate capability and unsatisfactory long-term endurance. To overcome these disadvantages, a properly constructed electrode architecture with abundant electron transport channels, excellent electronic conductivity and robust structural stability is required. Herein, considering that in situ transformation can mostly retain the specific structural advantages of the precursors, a two-step strategy is purposefully developed to construct a binder-free electrode composed of interconnected NiCo-S nanosheets on Ni foam (NiCo-S/NF), in which NiCo-S/NF is synthesized via the in situ sulfuration of networked acetate anion-intercalated nickel cobalt layered double hydroxide nanosheets loaded on Ni foam (A-NiCo-LDH/NF). Noticeably, the optimized Ni1Co1-S/NF exhibits an ultrahigh specific capacitance of 2553.9 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1, excellent rate capability (1898.1 F g-1 at 50 A g-1) and superior cycling stability (nearly 90% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles). Furthermore, the assembled asymmetric supercapacitor based on Ni1Co1-S/NF demonstrates a high energy density of 58.1 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 796 W kg-1 and impressive long-term durability even after a repeated charge/discharge process as long as 70,000 cycles (∼92% capacitance retention). The attractive properties endow the Ni1Co1-S/NF electrode with significant potential for high-performance energy storage devices.

  7. Liquid foam templating - A route to tailor-made polymer foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieux, Sébastien; Quell, Aggeliki; Stubenrauch, Cosima; Drenckhan, Wiebke

    2018-06-01

    Solid foams with pore sizes between a few micrometres and a few millimetres are heavily exploited in a wide range of established and emerging applications. While the optimisation of foam applications requires a fine control over their structural properties (pore size distribution, pore opening, foam density, …), the great complexity of most foaming processes still defies a sound scientific understanding and therefore explicit control and prediction of these parameters. We therefore need to improve our understanding of existing processes and also develop new fabrication routes which we understand and which we can exploit to tailor-make new porous materials. One of these new routes is liquid templating in general and liquid foam templating in particular, to which this review article is dedicated. While all solid foams are generated from an initially liquid(-like) state, the particular notion of liquid foam templating implies the specific condition that the liquid foam has time to find its "equilibrium structure" before it is solidified. In other words, the characteristic time scales of the liquid foam's stability and its solidification are well separated, allowing to build on the vast know-how on liquid foams established over the last 20 years. The dispersed phase of the liquid foam determines the final pore size and pore size distribution, while the continuous phase contains the precursors of the desired porous scaffold. We review here the three key challenges which need to be addressed by this approach: (1) the control of the structure of the liquid template, (2) the matching of the time scales between the stability of the liquid template and solidification, and (3) the preservation of the structure of the template throughout the process. Focusing on the field of polymer foams, this review gives an overview of recent research on the properties of liquid foam templates and summarises a key set of studies in the emerging field of liquid foam templating. It

  8. Metal foam - a material for heat engineering. Porous structures increase the efficiency of heat exchangers and cooling elements; Metallschaum - ein Werkstoff fuer die Waermetechnik. Offenporige Strukturen steigern die Effizienz von Waermeuebertragern und Kuehlelementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Franz

    2016-11-01

    Metal foams are increasingly developing into materials with diverse uses. While metal foams with closed pores have already become established as rigid and strong lightweight materials, the open-cell variant is suitable for thermal engineering applications. Until now, the material has been rarely used in heat exchangers or coolers because the production is expensive and its application little tested. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Dresden now want to change this. Together with industry partners, they are further developing the production method, are characterising different metal foams and are testing them in practice.

  9. Urotensin II increases foam cell formation by repressing ABCA1 expression through the ERK/NF-κB pathway in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Wu, Jian-Feng [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Yuan [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Chen, Kong; Zeng, Meng-Ya [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Zheng, Xi-Long [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 (Canada); Zeng, Gao-Feng, E-mail: qichingnudou@tom.com [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Tang, Chao-Ke, E-mail: tangchaoke@qq.com [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • U II reduces cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. • U II decreases the expression of ABCA1. • Inhibition of the ERK/NF-κB pathway reduces U II effects on ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. - Abstract: Objective: Foam cell formation in the arterial wall plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Recent studies showed that Urotensin II (U II) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of human U II on ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and the underlying mechanism in THP-1 macrophages. Methods and results: Cultured THP-1 macrophages were treated with U II, followed by measuring the intracellular lipid contents, cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 levels. The results showed that U II dramatically decreased ABCA1 levels and impaired cholesterol efflux. However, the effects of U II on ABCA1 protein expression and cellular cholesterol efflux were partially reversed by inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, suggesting the potential roles of ERK1/2 and NF-κB in ABCA1 expression, respectively. Conclusion: Our current data indicate that U II may have promoting effects on the progression of atherosclerosis, likely through suppressing ABCA1 expression via activation of the ERK/NF-κB pathway and reducing cholesterol efflux to promote macrophage foam cell formation.

  10. Preparation and characterization of cellulose-based foams via microwave curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitri, Christian; Giuri, Antonella; Raucci, Maria Grazia; Giugliano, Daniela; Madaghiele, Marta; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-02-06

    In this work, a mixture of a sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose (CMCNa) and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA700) was used for the preparation of a microporous structure by using the combination of two different procedures. First, physical foaming was induced using Pluronic as a blowing agent, followed by a chemical stabilization. This second step was carried out by means of an azobis(2-methylpropionamidine)dihydrochloride as the thermoinitiator (TI). This reaction was activated by heating the sample homogeneously using a microwave generator. Finally, the influence of different CMCNa and PEGDA700 ratios on the final properties of the foams was investigated. The viscosity, water absorption capacity, elastic modulus and porous structure were evaluated for each sample. In addition, preliminary biological characterization was carried out with the aim to prove the biocompatibility of the resulting material. The foam, including 20% of PEGDA700 in the mixture, demonstrated higher viscosity and stability before thermo-polymerization. In addition, increased water absorption capacity, mechanical resistance and a more uniform microporous structure were obtained for this sample. In particular, foam with 3% of CMCNa shows a hierarchical structure with open pores of different sizes. This morphology increased the properties of the foams. The full set of samples demonstrated an excellent biocompatibility profile with a good cell proliferation rate of more than 7 days.

  11. Development of Nanoparticle-Stabilized Foams to Improve Performance of Water-less Hydraulic Fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prodanovic, Masa [The University of Texas at Austin; Johnston, Keith P. [The University of Texas at Austin

    2017-12-29

    We have successfully created ultra dry carbon-dioxide-in-water and nitrogen-in-water foams (with water content down to 2-5% range), that are remarkably stable at high temperatures (up to 120 deg, C) and pressures (up to 3000psi) and viscous enough (100-200 cP tunable range) to carry proppant. Two generations of these ultra-dry foams have been developed; they are stabilized either with a synergy of surfactants and nanoparticle, or just with viscoelastic surfactants that viscosify the aqueous phase. Not only does this reduce water utilization and disposal, but it minimizes fluid blocking of hydrocarbon production. Further, the most recent development shows successful use of environmentally friendly surfactants at high temperature and pressure. We pay special attention to the role of nanoparticles in stabilization of the foams, specifically for high salinity brines. The preliminary numerical simulation for which shows they open wider fractures with shorter half-length and require less clean-up due to minimal water use. We also tested the stability and sand carrying properties of these foams at high pressure, room temperature conditions in sapphire cell. We performed on a preliminary numerical investigation of applicability for improved oil recovery applications. The applicability was evaluated by running multiphase flow injection simulations in a case-study oil reservoir. The results of this research thus expand the options available to operators for hydraulic fracturing and can simplify the design and field implementation of foamed fracturing fluids.

  12. A calorimeter for the electrolytic cell and other open systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.; Papucci, F.; Salvetti, G.; Tognoni, E.; Tombari, E.

    1996-01-01

    It is presented a calorimetric method and the construction details of a differential calorimeter use full for studying the reaction in an electrolytic cell and more generally slow chemico-physical processes occurring in the thermodynamically open systems. The method allows measurements of the heat balance of the cell, from which the enthalpy change of the process under investigation can be calculated. the theoretical description of the calorimetric cell and the results of several studies planned to describe the performances of the instrument up to the boiling point of the electrolytic solution are reported. The features of this calorimeter fulfill most of the requirements of 'cold fusion' experiments, where the heat production is the fundamental and controversial aspect. By controlling both the heat and the matter exchanged, the calorimeter can be utilised also to study bio energetic processes, e. g. fermentation, microbial metabolism and biodegradation, and liquid phase chemical reactions, involving gases as reactants and/or products

  13. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  14. A comparison of mechanical properties of some foams and honeycombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Balakrishna T.; Wang, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study is conducted of the mechanical properties of foam-core and honeycomb-core sandwich panels, using a normalizing procedure based on common properties of cellular solids and related properties of dense solids. Seven different honeycombs and closed-foam cells are discussed; of these, three are commercial Al alloy honeycombs, one is an Al-alloy foam, and two are polymeric foams. It is concluded that ideal, closed-cell foams may furnish compressive strengths which while isotropic can be fully comparable to the compressive strengths of honeycombs in the thickness direction. The shear strength of ideal closed-cell foams may be superior to the shear strength of honeycombs.

  15. Operator spin foam models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Hellmann, Frank; Kaminski, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to spin foams. We define operator spin foams, that is foams labelled by group representations and operators, as our main tool. A set of moves we define in the set of the operator spin foams (among other operations) allows us to split the faces and the edges of the foams. We assign to each operator spin foam a contracted operator, by using the contractions at the vertices and suitably adjusted face amplitudes. The emergence of the face amplitudes is the consequence of assuming the invariance of the contracted operator with respect to the moves. Next, we define spin foam models and consider the class of models assumed to be symmetric with respect to the moves we have introduced, and assuming their partition functions (state sums) are defined by the contracted operators. Briefly speaking, those operator spin foam models are invariant with respect to the cellular decomposition, and are sensitive only to the topology and colouring of the foam. Imposing an extra symmetry leads to a family we call natural operator spin foam models. This symmetry, combined with assumed invariance with respect to the edge splitting move, determines a complete characterization of a general natural model. It can be obtained by applying arbitrary (quantum) constraints on an arbitrary BF spin foam model. In particular, imposing suitable constraints on a spin(4) BF spin foam model is exactly the way we tend to view 4D quantum gravity, starting with the BC model and continuing with the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) or Freidel-Krasnov (FK) models. That makes our framework directly applicable to those models. Specifically, our operator spin foam framework can be translated into the language of spin foams and partition functions. Among our natural spin foam models there are the BF spin foam model, the BC model, and a model corresponding to the EPRL intertwiners. Our operator spin foam framework can also be used for more general spin

  16. Tensile and fracture behavior of polymer foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, Md. E.; Saha, M.C.; Jeelani, S.

    2006-01-01

    Tensile and mode-I fracture behavior of cross-linked polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and rigid polyurethane (PUR) foams are examined. Tension tests are performed using prismatic bar specimens and mode-I fracture tests are performed using single edge notched bend (SENB) specimens under three-point bending. Test specimens are prepared from PVC foams with three densities and two different levels of cross-linking, and PUR foam with one density. Tension and quasi-static fracture tests are performed using a Zwick/Rowell test machine. Dynamic fracture tests are performed using a DYNATUP model 8210 instrumented drop-tower test set up at three different impact energy levels. Various parameters such as specimen size, loading rate, foam density, cross-linking, crack length, cell orientation (flow and rise-direction) and solid polymer material are studied. It is found that foam density and solid polymer material have a significant effect on tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness of polymer foams. Level of polymer cross-linking is also found to have a significant effect on fracture toughness. The presence of cracks in the rise- and flow direction as well as loading rate has minimal effect. Dynamic fracture behavior is found to be different as compared to quasi-static fracture behavior. Dynamic fracture toughness (K d ) increases with impact energy. Examination of fracture surfaces reveals that the fracture occurs in fairly brittle manner for all foam materials

  17. Drainage and Stratification Kinetics of Foam Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Foam lifetime, drainage kinetics and stability are strongly influenced by surfactant type (ionic vs non-ionic), and added proteins, particles or polymers modify typical responses. The rate at which fluid drains out from a foam film, i.e. drainage kinetics, is determined in the last stages primarily by molecular interactions and capillarity. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, colloids and polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures, a layered ordering of molecules, micelles or particles inside the foam films leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. Though stratification is observed in many confined systems including foam films containing particles or polyelectrolytes, films containing globular proteins seem not to show this behavior. Using a Scheludko-type cell, we experimentally study the drainage and stratification kinetics of horizontal foam films formed by protein-surfactant mixtures, and carefully determine how the presence of proteins influences the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of foam films.

  18. Biodiesel production by using lipase immobilized onto novel silica-based hybrid foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Nicolas [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, Pessac (France); Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Talence (France); Garcia, Annick Babeau; Oestreicher, Victor; Durand, Fabien; Backov, Renal [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, Pessac (France); Deleuze, Herve [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires, Talence (France); Laurent, Guillaume; Sanchez, Clement [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    The covalent immobilization of crude lipases within silica-based macroporous frameworks have been performed by combining sol-gel process, concentrated direct emulsion, lyotropic mesophase and post-synthesis functionalizations. The assynthesized open cell hybrid monoliths exhibit high macroscopic porosity, around 90%, providing interconnected scaffold while reducing the diffusion low kinetic issue. The entrapment of enzymes in such foams deals with a high stability over esterification of fatty acids, hydrolysis of triglycerides (not shown herein) and biodiesel production by transesterification. (orig.)

  19. Synthesis of α-Fe2O3 and Fe-Mn Oxide Foams with Highly Tunable Magnetic Properties by the Replication Method from Polyurethane Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Feng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Open cell foams consisting of Fe and Fe-Mn oxides are prepared from metallic Fe and Mn powder precursors by the replication method using porous polyurethane (PU templates. First, reticulated PU templates are coated by slurry impregnation. The templates are then thermally removed at 260 °C and the debinded powders are sintered at 1000 °C under N2 atmosphere. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties are studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. The obtained Fe and Fe-Mn oxide foams possess both high surface area and homogeneous open-cell structure. Hematite (α-Fe2O3 foams are obtained from the metallic iron slurry independently of the N2 flow. In contrast, the microstructure of the FeMn-based oxide foams can be tailored by adjusting the N2 flow. While the main phases for a N2 flow rate of 180 L/h are α-Fe2O3 and FeMnO3, the predominant phase for high N2 flow rates (e.g., 650 L/h is Fe2MnO4. Accordingly, a linear magnetization versus field behavior is observed for the hematite foams, while clear hysteresis loops are obtained for the Fe2MnO4 foams. Actually, the saturation magnetization of the foams containing Mn increases from 5 emu/g to 52 emu/g when the N2 flow rate (i.e., the amount of Fe2MnO4 is increased. The obtained foams are appealing for a wide range of applications, such as electromagnetic absorbers, catalysts supports, thermal and acoustic insulation systems or wirelessly magnetically-guided porous objects in fluids.

  20. Synthesis of α-Fe₂O₃ and Fe-Mn Oxide Foams with Highly Tunable Magnetic Properties by the Replication Method from Polyurethane Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuping; Fornell, Jordina; Zhang, Huiyan; Solsona, Pau; Barό, Maria Dolors; Suriñach, Santiago; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2018-02-11

    Open cell foams consisting of Fe and Fe-Mn oxides are prepared from metallic Fe and Mn powder precursors by the replication method using porous polyurethane (PU) templates. First, reticulated PU templates are coated by slurry impregnation. The templates are then thermally removed at 260 °C and the debinded powders are sintered at 1000 °C under N₂ atmosphere. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties are studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. The obtained Fe and Fe-Mn oxide foams possess both high surface area and homogeneous open-cell structure. Hematite (α-Fe₂O₃) foams are obtained from the metallic iron slurry independently of the N₂ flow. In contrast, the microstructure of the FeMn-based oxide foams can be tailored by adjusting the N₂ flow. While the main phases for a N₂ flow rate of 180 L/h are α-Fe₂O₃ and FeMnO₃, the predominant phase for high N₂ flow rates (e.g., 650 L/h) is Fe₂MnO₄. Accordingly, a linear magnetization versus field behavior is observed for the hematite foams, while clear hysteresis loops are obtained for the Fe₂MnO₄ foams. Actually, the saturation magnetization of the foams containing Mn increases from 5 emu/g to 52 emu/g when the N₂ flow rate (i.e., the amount of Fe₂MnO₄) is increased. The obtained foams are appealing for a wide range of applications, such as electromagnetic absorbers, catalysts supports, thermal and acoustic insulation systems or wirelessly magnetically-guided porous objects in fluids.

  1. Synthesis of α-Fe2O3 and Fe-Mn Oxide Foams with Highly Tunable Magnetic Properties by the Replication Method from Polyurethane Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuping; Fornell, Jordina; Zhang, Huiyan; Solsona, Pau; Barό, Maria Dolors; Suriñach, Santiago; Sort, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    Open cell foams consisting of Fe and Fe-Mn oxides are prepared from metallic Fe and Mn powder precursors by the replication method using porous polyurethane (PU) templates. First, reticulated PU templates are coated by slurry impregnation. The templates are then thermally removed at 260 °C and the debinded powders are sintered at 1000 °C under N2 atmosphere. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties are studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. The obtained Fe and Fe-Mn oxide foams possess both high surface area and homogeneous open-cell structure. Hematite (α-Fe2O3) foams are obtained from the metallic iron slurry independently of the N2 flow. In contrast, the microstructure of the FeMn-based oxide foams can be tailored by adjusting the N2 flow. While the main phases for a N2 flow rate of 180 L/h are α-Fe2O3 and FeMnO3, the predominant phase for high N2 flow rates (e.g., 650 L/h) is Fe2MnO4. Accordingly, a linear magnetization versus field behavior is observed for the hematite foams, while clear hysteresis loops are obtained for the Fe2MnO4 foams. Actually, the saturation magnetization of the foams containing Mn increases from 5 emu/g to 52 emu/g when the N2 flow rate (i.e., the amount of Fe2MnO4) is increased. The obtained foams are appealing for a wide range of applications, such as electromagnetic absorbers, catalysts supports, thermal and acoustic insulation systems or wirelessly magnetically-guided porous objects in fluids. PMID:29439450

  2. Preparation and properties of polymer foams for ICF targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Lucht, L.M.

    1986-09-01

    Low density small cell sized foams were developed to localize the liquid DT layer in a direct drive wetted foam laser fusion target. We have developed foams made from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene gels and polystyrene inverse emulsions. Materials in the density range of from 0.020 to 0.300 g/cc were prepared and characterized for cell size, mechanical properties, machinability, specific surface area, and wetting. Foams with a density of 0.05 g/cc were made with a cell size of less than 5 μm. A cell structure model was developed which relates the density and specific surface area to cell size and cell wall thickness. Wetting tests in organic solvents and in liquid hydrogen were used to characterize the capillary pressure, pore structure and uniformity of the foams. 13 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  4. Study of the characterization of crosslinking polyethylene foam by irradiation process with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Djalma Batista

    2007-01-01

    The polyethylene foams are widely used. Their main applications are used for both home appliances to medical equipment. Beside that, they have applications in building and automotive industries. The foam properties depend on the density and its cellular structure, that is, the amount of open and closed cells, of the distribution and size of them. The methods of the crosslinking polyethylene foam production are classified in two types, according to the crosslinking method. One method is based on the chemical crosslinking, which utilizes peroxide as crosslinking agent. In the other method, the crosslinking is induced by electron beam radiation. The foams obtained from the crosslinking polyethylene by irradiation process presented a smooth and the homogeneous surface, and are formed basically by closed cells. The aim of this study was to apply the ionizing radiation from electron beam to crosslink low density polyethylene (LDPE), to obtain foams. Their morphological, thermal and mechanical properties were studied to evaluate the obtained samples. The samples of low density polyethylene (0,946 g/cm 3 ), containing 5% of azodicarbonamide (ADCA), as expander agent, were irradiated with electron beam with doses of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100 kGy. After the irradiation, these LDPE samples were put into an oven to obtain the foams. It was determined the crosslinking degree of the foams. Some samples were also thermally aged. The mechanical performance of the foams samples was evaluated by means of the tensile strength, compression, hardness, permanent deformation by compression and resilience. It was also carried out thermogravimetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results have shown that, in the interval of radiation doses studied, that the tensile strength increases with the increase of the crosslinking degree. The compression resistance results obtained from with samples with to radiation dose of 40 kGy showed significant decreasing. The resilience

  5. Graphene foam as a biocompatible scaffold for culturing human neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Cristiana; Nasr, Babak; Hudson, Emma J.; Alshawaf, Abdullah J.; Chana, Gursharan; Everall, Ian P.; Dottori, Mirella; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we explore the use of electrically active graphene foam as a scaffold for the culture of human-derived neurons. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cortical neurons fated as either glutamatergic or GABAergic neuronal phenotypes were cultured on graphene foam. We show that graphene foam is biocompatible for the culture of human neurons, capable of supporting cell viability and differentiation of hESC-derived cortical neurons. Based on the findings, we propose that graphene foam represents a suitable scaffold for engineering neuronal tissue and warrants further investigation as a model for understanding neuronal maturation, function and circuit formation. PMID:29657752

  6. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  7. High performance polymeric foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy

  8. Fire-retardant foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliani, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of polyimide resins are being developed as foams with exceptional fire-retardant properties. Foams are potentially useful for seat cushions in aircraft and ground vehicles and for applications such as home furnishings and building-construction materials. Basic formulations can be modified with reinforcing fibers or fillers to produce celular materials for variety of applications. By selecting reactants, polymer structure can be modified to give foams with properties ranging from high resiliency and flexibility to brittleness and rigidity.

  9. Preparation and characterization of PMMA graded microporous foams via one-step supercritical carbon dioxide foaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Huan; Li Junguo; Xiong Yuanlu; Luo Guoqiang; Shen Qiang; Zhang Lianmeng

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (ScCO 2 ) foaming which is inexpensive and environmental friendly has been widely used to prepare polymer-based microporous materials. In this paper, PMMA graded microporous materials were foamed by PMMA matrix after an unstable saturation process which was done under supercritical condition of 28MPa and 50 °C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the morphology of the graded foam. A gas adsorption model was proposed to predict the graded gas concentration in the different region of the polymer matrix. The SEM results showed that the solid and foam region of the graded foam can be connected without laminated layers. With the increasing thickness position of the graded microporous foam, the cell size increased from 3.4 to 27.5 μm, while the cell density decreased from 1.04 × 10 9 to 1.96 × 10 7 cells/cm 3 . It also found that the gradient microporous structure of the foam came from graded gas concentration which was obtained in the initial saturation process.

  10. Tough graphene-polymer microcellular foams for electromagnetic interference shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-Bin; Yan, Qing; Zheng, Wen-Ge; He, Zhixian; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2011-03-01

    Functional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/graphene nanocomposite microcellular foams were prepared by blending of PMMA with graphene sheets followed by foaming with subcritical CO(2) as an environmentally benign foaming agent. The addition of graphene sheets endows the insulating PMMA foams with high electrical conductivity and improved electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency with microwave absorption as the dominant EMI shielding mechanism. Interestingly, because of the presence of the numerous microcellular cells, the graphene-PMMA foam exhibits greatly improved ductility and tensile toughness compared to its bulk counterpart. This work provides a promising methodology to fabricate tough and lightweight graphene-PMMA nanocomposite microcellular foams with superior electrical and EMI shielding properties by simultaneously combining the functionality and reinforcement of the graphene sheets and the toughening effect of the microcellular cells.

  11. The effect of crystallinity on cell growth in semi-crystalline microcellular foams by solid-state process: modeling and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvanpanah, Elham; Ghaffarian Anbaran, S. Reza

    2017-11-01

    This study establishes a model and simulation scheme to describe the effect of crystallinity as one of the most effective parameters on cell growth phenomena in a solid batch foaming process. The governing model of cell growth dynamics, based on the well-known ‘Cell model’, is attained in details. To include the effect of crystallinity in the model, the properties of the polymer/gas mixtures (i.e. solubility, diffusivity, surface tension and viscosity) are estimated by modifying relations to consider the effect of crystallinity. A finite element-finite difference (FEFD) method is employed to solve the highly nonlinear and coupled equations of cell growth dynamics. The proposed simulation is able to evaluate all properties of the system at the given process condition and uses them to calculate the cell size, pressure and gas concentration gradient with time. A high-density polyethylene/nitrogen (HDPE/N2) system is used herein as a case study. Comparing the simulation results with the others works and experimental results verify the accuracy of the simulation scheme. The cell growth is a complicated combination of several phenomena. This study attempted to reach a better understanding of cell growth trend, driving and retarding forces and the effect of crystallinity on them.

  12. Macrophage specific overexpression of the human macrophage scavenger receptor in transgenic mice, using a 180-kb yeast artificial chromosome, leads to enhanced foam cell formation of isolated peritoneal macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, M. P.; van Dijk, K. W.; van Vlijmen, B. J.; Gijbels, M. J.; Heus, J. J.; Wijers, E. R.; van den Bos, A. C.; Breuer, M.; Frants, R. R.; Havekes, L. M.; Hofker, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors class A (MSR) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages in the vessel wall leading to foam cell formation. To investigate the in vivo role of the MSR in this process, a transgenic

  13. Flexible Foam Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Werner, Brian T.; Scherzinger, William M.; Lo, Chi S.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of a 15 pcf flexible polyurethane foam to large deformation at different strain rates and temperatures. Results from these experiments indicated that at room temperature, flexible polyurethane foams exhibit significant nonlinear elastic deformation and nearly return to their original undeformed shape when unloaded. However, when these foams are cooled to temperatures below their glass transition temperature of approximately -35 o C, they behave like rigid polyurethane foams and exhibit significant permanent deformation when compressed. Thus, a new model which captures this dramatic change in behavior with temperature was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Flex_Foam to describe the mechanical response of both flexible and rigid foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments. Next, development of the Flex Foam model for flexible polyurethane and other flexible foams is described. Selection of material parameters are discussed and finite element simulations with the new Flex Foam model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this new model.

  14. On the crush behavior of an ultra light multi-cell foam-filled composite structures for energy absorption: Part 2-Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taher, Siavash T.; Rizal Zahari; Faizal Mustapha; Ataollahi, Simin

    2010-01-01

    The present paper is dealing with the implementation of the finite element explicit dynamic analysis code module incorporated ANSYS/ LS-DYNA computer software to the simulation of the crash behavior and energy adsorption characteristics of a novel multi-cell cost-effective crash worthy composite sandwich structure. In a previous paper, the authors developed the concept of the triple-layered foam-filled block and submitted experimental results of the crash behaviour and crash worthiness characteristics of such structure. The obtained numerical results of axial compression model of composite blocks are compared with actual experimental data of crash energy adsorption, load-displacement history and crush zone characteristics, showing very good agreement. Theoretical and experimental results showed good similarities in peak load, average load and energy absorption with and without use of two types of collapse trigger mechanism. (author)

  15. High Uric Acid Activates the ROS-AMPK Pathway, Impairs CD68 Expression and Inhibits OxLDL-Induced Foam-Cell Formation in a Human Monocytic Cell Line, THP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohuan Luo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hyperuricemia is part of the metabolic-syndrome cluster of abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Monocytes/macrophages are critical in the development of metabolic syndrome, including gout, obesity and atherosclerosis. However, how high uric acid (HUA exposure affects monocyte/macrophage function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of HUA exposure in monocytes/macrophages and its impact on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL-induced foam-cell formation in a human monocytic cell line, THP-1. Methods: We primed THP-1 cells with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA for differentiation, then exposed cells to HUA and detected the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and analyzed the level of phospho-AMPKα. THP-1 cells were pre-incubated with Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, or HUA before PMA, to assess CD68 expression and phospho-AMPKα level. PMA-primed THP-1 cells were pre-treated with oxLDL before Compound C and HUA treatment. Western blot analysis was used to examine the levels of phospho-AMPKα, CD68, ABCG1, ABCA1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and NF-κB (p65. Flow cytometry was used to assess ROS production and CD68 expression in live cells. Oil-red O staining was used to observe oxLDL uptake in cells. Results: HUA treatment increased ROS production in PMA-primed THP-1 cells; NAC blocked HUA-induced oxidative stress. HUA treatment time-dependently increased phospho-AMPKα level in PMA-primed THP-1 cells. The HUA-induced oxidative stress increased phospho-AMPKα levels, which was blocked by NAC. HUA treatment impaired CD68 expression during cell differentiation by activating the AMPK pathway, which was reversed by Compound C treatment. Finally, HUA treatment inhibited oxLDL uptake in the formation of foam cells in THP-1 cells, which was blocked by Compound C treatment. HUA treatment

  16. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Foaming is commonly achieved by adding foaming agents such as metal oxides or metal carbonates to glass powder. At elevated temperature, the glass melt becomes viscous and the foaming agents decompose or react to form gas, causing a foamy glass melt. Subsequent cooling to room temperature, result...... in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... low density foam glass for thermal insulation applications. In this thesis, it is argued that the use of metal carbonates as foaming agents is not suitable for low density foam glass. A reaction mechanism is proposed to justify this result. Furthermore, an in situ method is developed to optimise...

  17. Supplementation with linoleic acid-rich soybean oil stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via increased oxidative stress and diacylglycerol acyltransferase1-mediated triglyceride biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Jeries, Helana; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael

    2017-01-02

    During the last decades there has been a staggering rise in human consumption of soybean oil (SO) and its major polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid (LA). The role of SO or LA in cardiovascular diseases is highly controversial, and their impact on macrophage foam cell formation, the hallmark of early atherogenesis, is unclear. To investigate the effects of high SO or LA intake on macrophage lipid metabolism and the related mechanisms of action, C57BL/6 mice were orally supplemented with increasing levels of SO-based emulsion or equivalent levels of purified LA for 1 month, followed by analyses of lipid accumulation and peroxidation in aortas, serum and in peritoneal macrophages (MPM) of the mice. Lipid peroxidation and triglyceride mass in aortas from SO or LA supplemented mice were dose-dependently and significantly increased. In MPM from SO or LA supplemented mice, lipid peroxides were significantly increased and a marked accumulation of cellular triglycerides was found in accordance with enhanced triglyceride biosynthesis rate and overexpression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1), the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis. In cultured J774A.1 macrophages treated with SO or LA, triglyceride accumulated via increased oxidative stress and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated overexpression of DGAT1. Accordingly, anti-oxidants (pomegranate polyphenols), inhibition of p38 MAPK (by SB202190) or DGAT1 (by oleanolic acid), all significantly attenuated SO or LA-induced macrophage triglyceride accumulation. These findings reveal novel mechanisms by which supplementation with SO or LA stimulate macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting a pro-atherogenic role for overconsumption of SO or LA. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(1):100-116, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Beer foam physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronteltap, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The physical aspects of beer foam behavior were studied in terms of the four physical processes, mainly involved in the formation and breakdown of foam. These processes are, bubble formation, drainage, disproportionation and coalescence. In detail, the processes disproportionation and

  19. Vegetable-origin foam employed in dye extraction in tanning and leather processing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Cangemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the use of conventional and vegetable origin polyurethane foams to extract C. I. Acid Orange 61 dye. The quantitative determination of the residual dye was carried out with an UV/Vis absorption spectrophotometer. The extraction of the dye was found to depend on various factors such as pH of the solution, foam cell structure, contact time and dye and foam interactions. After 45 days, better results were obtained for conventional foam when compared to vegetable foam. Despite presenting a lower percentage of extraction, vegetable foam is advantageous as it is considered a polymer with biodegradable characteristics.

  20. EMS providers do not use FOAM for education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; McCoy, Jonathan

    2018-05-24

    Free open access to medical education (FOAM, #FOAM) is the free availability of educational materials on various medicine topics. We hope to evaluate the use of social media and FOAM by emergency medical services (EMS) providers. We designed an online survey distributed to EMS providers with questions about demographics and social media/FOAM use by providers. The survey was sent to the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) EMS Listserv of medical directors and was asked to be distributed to their respective agencies. The survey was designed to inquire about the providers' knowledge of FOAM and social media and their use of the above for EMS education. There were 169 respondents out of a total of 523 providers yielding a response rate of 32.3%. Fifty-three percent of respondents are paramedics, 37% are EMT-Basic trained, and the remainder (16%) were "other." The minority (20%) of respondents had heard of FOAM. However, 54% of respondents had heard of "free medical education online" regarding pertinent topics. Of the total respondents who used social media for education, 31% used Facebook and 23% used blogs and podcasts as resources for online education. Only 4% of respondents stated they produced FOAM content. Seventy-six percent of respondents said they were "interested" or "very interested" in using FOAM for medical education. If FOAM provided continuing medical education (CME), 83% of respondents would be interested in using it. Social media is not used frequently by EMS providers for the purposes of FOAM. There is interest within EMS providers to use FOAM for education, even if CME was not provided. FOAM can provide a novel area of education for EMS.

  1. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  2. Comparison of elastic properties of open-cell metallic biomaterials with different unit cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedayati, R.; Sadighi, M.; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Hosseini-Toudeshky, H

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques have made it possible to create open-cell porous structures with arbitrary micro-geometrical characteristics. Since a wide range of micro-geometrical features is available for making an implant, having a comprehensive knowledge of the mechanical response of

  3. Impact of foamed matrix components on foamed concrete properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. N.

    2018-03-01

    The improvement of the matrix foam structure by means of foam stabilizing additives is aimed at solving the technology-oriented problems as well as at the further improvement of physical and mechanical properties of cellular-concrete composites. The dry foam mineralization is the mainstream of this research. Adding the concrete densifiers, foam stabilizers and mineral powders reduces the drying shrinkage, which makes the foam concrete products technologically effective.

  4. Ultra low density biodegradable shape memory polymer foams with tunable physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2017-12-12

    Compositions and/or structures of degradable shape memory polymers (SMPs) ranging in form from neat/unfoamed to ultra low density materials of down to 0.005 g/cc density. These materials show controllable degradation rate, actuation temperature and breadth of transitions along with high modulus and excellent shape memory behavior. A method of m ly low density foams (up to 0.005 g/cc) via use of combined chemical and physical aking extreme blowing agents, where the physical blowing agents may be a single compound or mixtures of two or more compounds, and other related methods, including of using multiple co-blowing agents of successively higher boiling points in order to achieve a large range of densities for a fixed net chemical composition. Methods of optimization of the physical properties of the foams such as porosity, cell size and distribution, cell openness etc. of these materials, to further expand their uses and improve their performance.

  5. OpenCFU, a new free and open-source software to count cell colonies and other circular objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissmann, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Counting circular objects such as cell colonies is an important source of information for biologists. Although this task is often time-consuming and subjective, it is still predominantly performed manually. The aim of the present work is to provide a new tool to enumerate circular objects from digital pictures and video streams. Here, I demonstrate that the created program, OpenCFU, is very robust, accurate and fast. In addition, it provides control over the processing parameters and is implemented in an intuitive and modern interface. OpenCFU is a cross-platform and open-source software freely available at http://opencfu.sourceforge.net.

  6. Microbial analysis in biogas reactors suffering by foaming incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; De Francisci, Davide; Treu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    , lipids and carbohydrates before and after foaming incidents was characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Moreover, the microbial diversity between the liquid and foaming layer was assessed. A number of genera that are known to produce biosurfactants, contain mycolic acid in their cell wall...

  7. 77 FR 18243 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC); Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC); Notice of Open... open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory... Committee: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) was established under Section 807...

  8. An approach for characterising cellular polymeric foam structures using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youming; Das, Raj; Battley, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Global properties of foams depend on foam base materials and microstructures. Characterisation of foam microstructures is important for developing numerical foam models. In this study, the microstructures of four polymeric structural foams were imaged using a micro-CT scanner. Image processing and analysis methods were proposed to quantify the relative density, cell wall thickness and cell size of these foams from the captured CT images. Overall, the cells in these foams are fairly isotropic, and cell walls are rather straight. The measured average relative densities are in good agreement with the actual values. Relative density, cell size and cell wall thickness in these foams are found to vary along the thickness of foam panel direction. Cell walls in two of these foams are found to be filled with secondary pores. In addition, it is found that the average cell wall thickness measured from 2D images is around 1.4 times of that measured from 3D images, and the average cell size measured from 3D images is 1.16 times of that measured from 2D images. The distributions of cell wall thickness and cell size measured from 2D images exhibit lager dispersion in comparison to those measured from 3D images.

  9. Dual-energy X-ray micro-CT imaging of hybrid Ni/Al open-cell foam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fíla, T.; Kumpová, Ivana; Koudelka_ml., P.; Zlámal, P.; Vavřík, Daniel; Jiroušek, O.; Jung, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2016), C01005 ISSN 1748-0221. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors (IWORID2015) /17./. Hamburg, 28.06.2015-02.07.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : computerized tomography (CT) * computed radiography (CR) * X-ray radiography and digital radiography (DR) * inspection with x-rays Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/11/01/C01005/pdf

  10. Technology of foamed propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnlein-Mauss, Jutta; Kroeber, Hartmut [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Chemische Technologie ICT, Pfinztal (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Foamed propellants are based on crystalline explosives bonded in energetic reaction polymers. Due to their porous structures they are distinguished by high burning rates. Energy content and material characteristics can be varied by using different energetic fillers, energetic polymers and porous structures. Foamed charges can be produced easily by the reaction injection moulding process. For the manufacturing of foamed propellants a semi-continuous remote controlled production plant in pilot scale was set up and a modified reaction injection moulding process was applied. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Numerical study of metal foam heat sinks under uniform impinging flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreozzi, A; Bianco, N; Iasiello, M; Naso, V

    2017-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for performance improvement and miniaturization of electronics has led to a significant generation of waste heat that must be dissipated to ensure a reliable device operation. The miniaturization of the components complicates this task. In fact, reducing the heat transfer area, at the same required heat rate, it is necessary to increase the heat flux, so that the materials operate in a temperature range suitable to its proper functioning. Traditional heat sinks are no longer capable of dissipating the generated heat and innovative approaches are needed to address the emerging thermal management challenges. Recently, heat transfer in open-cell metal foams under an impinging jet has received attention due to the considerable heat transfer potential of combining two cooling technologies: impinging jet and porous medium. This paper presents a numerical study on Finned Metal Foam (FMF) and Metal Foam (MF) heat sinks under impinging air jet cooling. The analysis is carried out by means of the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics®. The purpose is to analyze the thermal performance of the metal foam heat sink, finned or not, varying its geometric parameters. Results are presented in terms of predicted dissipated heat rate, convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure losses. (paper)

  12. Inhibition of LDL oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced foam cell formation in RAW 264.7 cells show anti-atherogenic properties of a foliar methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Sinjitha S; Shetty, Nandini Prasad; Bhatt, Praveena; Neelwarne, Bhagyalakshmi

    2014-04-01

    Oxidation of low density lipoproteins and their further uptake by macrophages is known to result in the formation of foam cells, which are critical in the initiation of atherosclerosis through activation of inflammatory signalling cascades. Thus, powerful dietary antioxidants are receiving attention for the reversal of such pathological states. Extracts of Scoparia dulcis have been used as tea and health drinks with various health promoting effects. In the present study, we examined the reactive oxygen scavenging potential as well as anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic efficacies, using leaf extracts obtained after successive extraction with various solvents. A methanol extract showed potent antioxidant activity with an IC50 value of 570 μg/ml, caused hydrogen peroxide scavenging (28.9 µg/ml) and anti-inflammatory effects by improving human erythrocyte membrane stabilisation (about 86%). The methanol extract also efficiently inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidation of low density lipoproteins, thus preventing foam cell formation in cultured RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, phytochemical screening of the extracts showed high accumulation of flavonoids. The foliar methanol extract of Scoparia dulcis has a strong anti-atherogenic potential and this property could be attributed maybe due to presence of flavonoids since HPLC analysis showed high concentrations of myricetin and rutin in the methanol extract.

  13. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Rutledge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. The SMCF structure revealed agglomerates of swollen starch granules connected by a web of starch with pores in the 50-200 nanometer range. Heating the SMCF-fiber in a nitrogen atmosphere to temperatures between 350-700˚C produced carbon foams with a three-dimensional closed cell foam structure with cell diameters around 50 microns and pore walls around 1-3 microns. The stress versus strain compression data for carbonized samples displayed a linear elastic region and a plateau indicative of brittle crushing, typical of an elastic-brittle foam. The carbon foam products from these renew-able precursors are promising carbon structures with moderate strength and low density.

  14. Foam flows through a local constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, T.; Koivisto, J.; Shmakova, N.; Alava, M. J.; Puisto, A.; Raufaste, C.; Santucci, S.

    2017-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the flow of a liquid foam, composed of a monolayer of millimetric bubbles, forced to invade an inhomogeneous medium at a constant flow rate. To model the simplest heterogeneous fracture medium, we use a Hele-Shaw cell consisting of two glass plates separated by a millimetric gap, with a local constriction. This single defect localized in the middle of the cell reduces locally its gap thickness, and thus its local permeability. We investigate here the influence of the geometrical property of the defect, specifically its height, on the average steady-state flow of the foam. In the frame of the flowing foam, we can observe a clear recirculation around the obstacle, characterized by a quadrupolar velocity field with a negative wake downstream the obstacle, which intensity evolves systematically with the obstacle height.

  15. PhysiCell: An open source physics-based cell simulator for 3-D multicellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Heiland, Randy; Friedman, Samuel H; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Macklin, Paul

    2018-02-01

    Many multicellular systems problems can only be understood by studying how cells move, grow, divide, interact, and die. Tissue-scale dynamics emerge from systems of many interacting cells as they respond to and influence their microenvironment. The ideal "virtual laboratory" for such multicellular systems simulates both the biochemical microenvironment (the "stage") and many mechanically and biochemically interacting cells (the "players" upon the stage). PhysiCell-physics-based multicellular simulator-is an open source agent-based simulator that provides both the stage and the players for studying many interacting cells in dynamic tissue microenvironments. It builds upon a multi-substrate biotransport solver to link cell phenotype to multiple diffusing substrates and signaling factors. It includes biologically-driven sub-models for cell cycling, apoptosis, necrosis, solid and fluid volume changes, mechanics, and motility "out of the box." The C++ code has minimal dependencies, making it simple to maintain and deploy across platforms. PhysiCell has been parallelized with OpenMP, and its performance scales linearly with the number of cells. Simulations up to 105-106 cells are feasible on quad-core desktop workstations; larger simulations are attainable on single HPC compute nodes. We demonstrate PhysiCell by simulating the impact of necrotic core biomechanics, 3-D geometry, and stochasticity on the dynamics of hanging drop tumor spheroids and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. We demonstrate stochastic motility, chemical and contact-based interaction of multiple cell types, and the extensibility of PhysiCell with examples in synthetic multicellular systems (a "cellular cargo delivery" system, with application to anti-cancer treatments), cancer heterogeneity, and cancer immunology. PhysiCell is a powerful multicellular systems simulator that will be continually improved with new capabilities and performance improvements. It also represents a significant

  16. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily

  17. Three dimensional graphene foam supported platinum-ruthenium bimetallic nanocatalysts for direct methanol and direct ethanol fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Chih-Chien; Lin, Po-Yuan; Xue, Yuhua; Akolkar, Rohan; Dai, Liming; Yu, Xiong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2014-06-01

    A novel composite material of hierarchically structured platinum-ruthenium (PtRu) nanoparticles grown on large surface area three dimensional graphene foam (3D GF) is reported. 3D GF was incorporated with PtRu bimetallic nanoparticles as an electrochemical nanocatalyst for methanol and ethanol oxidation. PtRu/3D GF nanocatalyst showed a higher tolerance to poisoning by CO and exhibited improved catalytic activity for both methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) results and long-term cycling stability tests demonstrated that GF provided a promising platform for the development of electrochemical nanocatalysts. Specifically, PtRu/3D GF nanocatalyst showed excellent catalytic activity toward MOR and EOR compared with PtRu/Graphene (Commercial graphene), PtRu/C (Vulcan XC-72R carbon), and PtRu alone. The crystal size of PtRu on 3D GF was reduced to 3.5 nm and its active surface area was enhanced to 186.2 m2 g-1. Consequently, the MOR and EOR rates were nearly doubled on PtRu/3D GF compared to those on PtRu/Graphene.

  18. Improvement of the mechanical properties of reinforced aluminum foam samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, A.; Barone, A.; Carrino, L.; De Fazio, D.; Langella, A.; Viscusi, A.; Durante, M.

    2018-05-01

    Closed-cell aluminum foam has attracted increasing attention due to its very interesting properties, thanks to which it is expected to be used as both structural and functional material. A research challenge is the improvement of the mechanical properties of foam-based structures adopting a reinforced approach that does not compromise their lightness. Consequently, the aim of this research is the fabrication of enhanced aluminum foam samples without significantly increasing their original weight. In this regard, cylindrical samples with a core of closed-cell aluminum foam and a skin of fabrics and grids of different materials were fabricated in a one step process and were mechanically characterized, in order to investigate their behaviour and to compare their mechanical properties to the ones of the traditional foam.

  19. PhysiCell: An open source physics-based cell simulator for 3-D multicellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.

    2018-01-01

    Many multicellular systems problems can only be understood by studying how cells move, grow, divide, interact, and die. Tissue-scale dynamics emerge from systems of many interacting cells as they respond to and influence their microenvironment. The ideal “virtual laboratory” for such multicellular systems simulates both the biochemical microenvironment (the “stage”) and many mechanically and biochemically interacting cells (the “players” upon the stage). PhysiCell—physics-based multicellular simulator—is an open source agent-based simulator that provides both the stage and the players for studying many interacting cells in dynamic tissue microenvironments. It builds upon a multi-substrate biotransport solver to link cell phenotype to multiple diffusing substrates and signaling factors. It includes biologically-driven sub-models for cell cycling, apoptosis, necrosis, solid and fluid volume changes, mechanics, and motility “out of the box.” The C++ code has minimal dependencies, making it simple to maintain and deploy across platforms. PhysiCell has been parallelized with OpenMP, and its performance scales linearly with the number of cells. Simulations up to 105-106 cells are feasible on quad-core desktop workstations; larger simulations are attainable on single HPC compute nodes. We demonstrate PhysiCell by simulating the impact of necrotic core biomechanics, 3-D geometry, and stochasticity on the dynamics of hanging drop tumor spheroids and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. We demonstrate stochastic motility, chemical and contact-based interaction of multiple cell types, and the extensibility of PhysiCell with examples in synthetic multicellular systems (a “cellular cargo delivery” system, with application to anti-cancer treatments), cancer heterogeneity, and cancer immunology. PhysiCell is a powerful multicellular systems simulator that will be continually improved with new capabilities and performance improvements. It also

  20. Polyurethane foam scaffold as in vitro model for breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Valentina; Contessi, Nicola; De Marco, Cinzia; Bertoldi, Serena; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Farè, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Breast cancer (BC) represents the most incident cancer case in women (29%), with high mortality rate. Bone metastasis occurs in 20-50% cases and, despite advances in BC research, the interactions between tumor cells and the metastatic microenvironment are still poorly understood. In vitro 3D models gained great interest in cancer research, thanks to the reproducibility, the 3D spatial cues and associated low costs, compared to in vivo and 2D in vitro models. In this study, we investigated the suitability of a poly-ether-urethane (PU) foam as 3D in vitro model to study the interactions between BC tumor-initiating cells and the bone microenvironment. PU foam open porosity (>70%) appeared suitable to mimic trabecular bone structure. The PU foam showed good mechanical properties under cyclic compression (E=69-109kPa), even if lower than human trabecular bone. The scaffold supported osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line proliferation, with no cytotoxic effects. Human adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) were cultured and differentiated into osteoblast lineage on the PU foam, as shown by alizarin red staining and RT-PCR, thus offering a bone biomimetic microenvironment to the further co-culture with BC derived tumor-initiating cells (MCFS). Tumor aggregates were observed after three weeks of co-culture by e-cadherin staining and SEM; modification in CaP distribution was identified by SEM-EDX and associated to the presence of tumor cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated the suitability of the PU foam to reproduce a bone biomimetic microenvironment, useful for the co-culture of human osteoblasts/BC tumor-initiating cells and to investigate their interaction. 3D in vitro models represent an outstanding alternative in the study of tumor metastases development, compared to traditional 2D in vitro cultures, which oversimplify the 3D tissue microenvironment, and in vivo studies, affected by low reproducibility and ethical issues. Several scaffold-based 3D in vitro models have been proposed

  1. Foam generation and sample composition optimization for the FOAM-C experiment of the ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpy, R; Picker, G; Amann, B; Ranebo, H; Vincent-Bonnieu, S; Minster, O; Winter, J; Dettmann, J; Castiglione, L; Höhler, R; Langevin, D

    2011-01-01

    End of 2009 and early 2010 a sealed cell, for foam generation and observation, has been designed and manufactured at Astrium Friedrichshafen facilities. With the use of this cell, different sample compositions of 'wet foams' have been optimized for mixtures of chemicals such as water, dodecanol, pluronic, aethoxisclerol, glycerol, CTAB, SDS, as well as glass beads. This development is performed in the frame of the breadboarding development activities of the Experiment Container FOAM-C for operation in the ISS Fluid Science Laboratory (ISS). The sample cell supports multiple observation methods such as: Diffusing-Wave and Diffuse Transmission Spectrometry, Time Resolved Correlation Spectroscopy and microscope observation, all of these methods are applied in the cell with a relatively small experiment volume 3 . These units, will be on orbit replaceable sets, that will allow multiple sample compositions processing (in the range of >40).

  2. Foam generation and sample composition optimization for the FOAM-C experiment of the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpy, R.; Picker, G.; Amann, B.; Ranebo, H.; Vincent-Bonnieu, S.; Minster, O.; Winter, J.; Dettmann, J.; Castiglione, L.; Höhler, R.; Langevin, D.

    2011-12-01

    End of 2009 and early 2010 a sealed cell, for foam generation and observation, has been designed and manufactured at Astrium Friedrichshafen facilities. With the use of this cell, different sample compositions of "wet foams" have been optimized for mixtures of chemicals such as water, dodecanol, pluronic, aethoxisclerol, glycerol, CTAB, SDS, as well as glass beads. This development is performed in the frame of the breadboarding development activities of the Experiment Container FOAM-C for operation in the ISS Fluid Science Laboratory (ISS). The sample cell supports multiple observation methods such as: Diffusing-Wave and Diffuse Transmission Spectrometry, Time Resolved Correlation Spectroscopy [1] and microscope observation, all of these methods are applied in the cell with a relatively small experiment volume 40).

  3. Development of a phenomenological constitutive model for polyurethane foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilsen, M.K.; Morgan, H.S.; Krieg, R.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam is used in impact limiters in nuclear waste transport containers. During a hypothetical nuclear waste transport accident, the foam is expected to absorb a significant amount of impact energy by undergoing large inelastic volume reductions. Consequently, the crushing of polyurethane foams must be well characterized and accurately modeled to properly analyze a transport container accident. At the request of Sandia National Laboratories, a series of uniaxial, hydrostatic and triaxial compression tests on polyurethane foams were performed by the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI). The combination of hydrostatic and triaxial tests was chosen to provide sufficient data to characterize both the volumetric and deviatoric behaviors of the foams and the coupling between the two responses. Typical results from the NMERI tests are included in this paper. A complete description of these tests can be found in Neilsen et al., 1987. Constitutive models that have been used in the past to model foam did not capture some important foam behaviors observed in the NMERI tests. Therefore, a new constitutive model for rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foams was developed and implemented in two finite element codes. Development of the new model is discussed in this paper. Also, results from analyses with the new model and other constitutive models are presented to demonstrate differences between the various models. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  4. OPEN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Anders; Paterno, Fabio; Grasselli, Agnese

    2010-01-01

    and be controlled by the platform to enrich the user experience with the application. We describe the challenges following the centralisation of a migration platform that can support different types of applications, both games and business applications, implemented with either web-technologies or as component......One important aspect of ubiquitous environments is to provide users with the possibility to freely move about and continue to interact with the available applications through a variety of interactive devices such as cell phones, PDAs, desktop computers, intelligent watches or digital television...

  5. Nano-Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund B.; Frances, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Closed cell polyurethane and, particularly, polyisocyanurate foams are a large family of flexible and rigid products the result of a reactive two part process wherein a urethane based polyol is combined with a foaming or "blowing" agent to create a cellular solid at room temperature. The ratio of reactive components, the constituency of the base materials, temperature, humidity, molding, pouring, spraying and many other processing techniques vary greatly. However, there is no known process for incorporating reinforcing fibers small enough to be integrally dispersed within the cell walls resulting in superior final products. The key differentiating aspect from the current state of art resides in the many processing technologies to be fully developed from the novel concept of milled nano pulp aramid fibers and their enabling entanglement capability fully enclosed within the cell walls of these closed cell urethane foams. The authors present the results of research and development of reinforced foam processing, equipment development, strength characteristics and the evolution of its many applications.

  6. AC and DC electrical properties of graphene nanoplatelets reinforced epoxy syntactic foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Ephraim; Wicker, Scott; Woldesenbet, Eyassu

    2018-04-01

    Benefits of employing graphene nanopletlates (GNPLs) in composite structures include mechanical as well as multifunctional properties. Understanding the impedance behavior of GNPLs reinforced syntactic foams may open new applications for syntactic foam composites. In this work, GNPLs reinforced syntactic foams were fabricated and tested for DC and AC electrical properties. Four sets of syntactic foam samples containing 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 vol% of GNPLs were fabricated and tested. Significant increase in conductivity of syntactic foams due to the addition of GNPLs was noted. AC impedance measurements indicated that the GNPLs syntactic foams become frequency dependent as the volume fraction of GNPLs increases. With addition of GNPLs, the characteristic of the syntactic foams are also observed to transition from dominant capacitive to dominant resistive behavior. This work was carried out at Southern University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, United States of America.

  7. Development of rubidium and niobium containing plastic foams. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botham, R.A.; McClung, C.E.; Schwendeman, J.I.

    1978-01-01

    Rubidium fluoride and niobium metal-containing foam samples (rods and sheets) were prepared using two foam sytems: (1) hydrophilic polyurethanes prepared from W.R. Grace Co.'s Hypol prepolymers and (2) polyimides prepared from Monsanto Company's Skybond polyimide resin. The first system was used only for preparation of rubidium fluoride-containing foams while the second was used for both rubidium fluoride and niobium-containing foams. The niobium metal could readily be incorporated into the polyimide foam during molding, to produce foam sheets of the required dimensions and density. The rubidium fluoride-containing polyimide foams were preferably prepared by first rendering the molded polyimide foam hydrophilic with a postcuring treatment, then absorbing the rubidium fluoride from water solution. Similarly, rubidium fluoride was absorbed into the hydrophilic polyurethanes from water solution. Since the high reactive rubidium metal could not be employed, rubidium fluoride, which is very hygroscopic, was used instead, primarily because of its high rubidium content (approximately 82 weight percent). This was important in view of the low total densities and the high weight percentage rubidium required in the foam samples. In addition, at the later request of LLL, a block of rigid Hypol hydrophilic polyurethane foam (with a density of approximately 0.04 g/cm 3 and cell sizes = or <0.2 mm) was prepared without any metal or metal compounds in it. Two shipments of foam samples, which met or closely approximated the project specifications, were submitted to LLL during the course of this project. Information on these samples is contained in Table 1. A complete description of their preparation is given in the Experimental Results and Discussion Section

  8. Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel on nickel foam composite as binder-free anode for a direct glucose fuel cell unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Chi Him A.; Leung, D. Y. C.

    2017-09-01

    Fabrication of electrocatalyst for direct glucose fuel cell (DGFC) operation involves destructive preparation methods with the use of stabilizer like binder, which may cause activity depreciation. Binder-free electrocatalytic electrode becomes a possible solution to the above problem. Binder-free bimetallic Pd-Pt loaded graphene aerogel on nickel foam plates with different Pd/Pt ratios (1:2.32, 1:1.62, and 1:0.98) are successfully fabricated through a green one-step mild reduction process producing a Pd-Pt/GO/nickel form plate (NFP) composite. Anode with the binder-free electrocatalysts exhibit a strong activity in a batch type DGFC unit under room temperature. The effects of glucose and KOH concentrations, and the Pd/Pt ratios of the electrocatalyst on the DGFC performance are also studied. Maximum power density output of 1.25 mW cm-2 is recorded with 0.5 M glucose/3 M KOH as the anodic fuel, and Pd1Pt0.98/GA/NFP as catalyst, which is the highest obtained so far among other types of electrocatalyst.

  9. Elaboration of recycled polyethylene foams reticulated by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia M, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this work some obtained results are presented to make irradiation tests on recycled polymeric material (polyethylene) as well as mixtures of this with certain additive classes (foaming and reticulating agents) which will be used for the foams elaboration, objective of this work. Two types of foaming basically exist which are elaborated with low density polyethylene base. They are: a) the extruded and, b) the reticulated through ionizing radiation and chemically. Some of the properties that the expanded or foamed polyethylene are: flexibility, resistance, thermal stability, inter medium mechanical properties between the highly flexible foams and rigid among others. All of them determined by the cell type which conform them. Also was carried out the characterization of the obtained material contributing of this manner to diminish the quantity of solid wastes generated. (Author)

  10. Applications of Foamed Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sari Kamarul Aini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of foamed concrete is increasing at present due to high demand on foamed concrete structures with good mechanical and physical properties. This paper discusses on the use of basic raw materials, their characteristics, production process, and their application in foamed lightweight concrete with densities between 300 kg/m3 and 1800 kg/m3. It also discusses the factors that influence the strengths and weaknesses of foamed concrete based on studies that were conducted previously.

  11. Dielectric and Radiative Properties of Sea Foam at Microwave Frequencies: Conceptual Understanding of Foam Emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Peter W. Gaiser; Magdalena D. Anguelova

    2012-01-01

    Foam fraction can be retrieved from space-based microwave radiometric data at frequencies from 1 to 37 GHz. The retrievals require modeling of ocean surface emissivity fully covered with sea foam. To model foam emissivity well, knowledge of foam properties, both mechanical and dielectric, is necessary because these control the radiative processes in foam. We present a physical description of foam dielectric properties obtained from the foam dielectric constant including foam skin depth; foam ...

  12. The Anisotropy of Replicated Aluminum Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeny L. Furman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The replication casting process gives the open-cell aluminum foams that can be used in many industrial applications as well as in filtering technology. The essential requirement for filters is the uniformity of filtering degree which is defined by the minimal pore size. However the structure of replication castings is often inhomogeneous and the minimal pore radius is decreasing in the direction of melt infiltration. The objective of this investigation is to study the dynamics of melt impregnation of the porous medium by vacuum suction to identify the possibility of reducing the anisotropy. Theoretical data illustrate the processes at the boundary between melt and gas medium. The experiments were carried out using the replication aluminum samples produced according to commercial technology. It was found that the permeability coefficient varies throughout the height of castings. A method for estimation of pressure on the line of melt movement was proposed. The resistance of NaCl layer and circular vents of the mold causes the inhomogeneity of castings. Finally the ways of minimizing the anisotropy were offered.

  13. Foams in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  14. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  15. Daintain/AIF-1 Plays Roles in Coronary Heart Disease via Affecting the Blood Composition and Promoting Macrophage Uptake and Foam Cell Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhan Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Daintain/AIF-1 is an inflammatory polypeptide factor/allograft inflammatory factor 1 derived from macrophages. It is characterized in APOE-/- mice as a novel inflammatory factor associated with atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize its function in human atherosclerosis. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the expression of daintain/AIF-1 in vessel segments within and far from atherosclerotic plaques; High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to display the effects of daintain/AIF-1 on C-reactive protein (CRP, oxidative capacity and superoxide dismutase (SOD in vivo; Oil Red O Staining was used to show the effects of daintain/AIF-1 on uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL into U937 cells, a macrophage line; Western Blot was used to test scavenger receptor A (SRA expression. Results: A high density of daintain/AIF-1 was observed in the tunica intima and media of coronary artery with atherosclerotic plaque, and fewer daintain/AIF-1 in the vessels without atherosclerotic plaque; Daintain/AIF-1 injected intravenously into BALB/c mice boosted oxidative capacity, significantly impaired SOD activities and augmented the CRP level in blood. According to the oil red O test, daintain/AIF-1 profoundly facilitated the uptake of ox-LDL in U937 macrophages and formation of foam cells in the endothelium. We also found that the molecular mechanisms are effective by promoting overexpression of SRA on macrophages. Conclusion: These findings implicate that the inflammatory factor daintain/AIF-1 is closely associated with atherogenesis, and could be further characterized as a novel risk factor for atherosclerosis

  16. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, N; Iasiello, M; Naso, V

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics ® . Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared. (paper)

  17. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, N.; Iasiello, M.; Naso, V.

    2015-11-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics®. Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared.

  18. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOOLSBY, TOMMY D.; SCOTT, STEVEN H.

    1999-01-01

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be

  19. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might

  20. An open-source library for the numerical modeling of mass-transfer in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaresio, Valerio; García-Camprubí, María; Izquierdo, Salvador; Asinari, Pietro; Fueyo, Norberto

    2012-01-01

    The generation of direct current electricity using solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) involves several interplaying transport phenomena. Their simulation is crucial for the design and optimization of reliable and competitive equipment, and for the eventual market deployment of this technology. An open-source library for the computational modeling of mass-transport phenomena in SOFCs is presented in this article. It includes several multicomponent mass-transport models ( i.e. Fickian, Stefan-Maxwell and Dusty Gas Model), which can be applied both within porous media and in porosity-free domains, and several diffusivity models for gases. The library has been developed for its use with OpenFOAM ®, a widespread open-source code for fluid and continuum mechanics. The library can be used to model any fluid flow configuration involving multicomponent transport phenomena and it is validated in this paper against the analytical solution of one-dimensional test cases. In addition, it is applied for the simulation of a real SOFC and further validated using experimental data. Program summaryProgram title: multiSpeciesTransportModels Catalogue identifier: AEKB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 140 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 64 285 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language:: C++ Computer: Any x86 (the instructions reported in the paper consider only the 64 bit case for the sake of simplicity) Operating system: Generic Linux (the instructions reported in the paper consider only the open-source Ubuntu distribution for the sake of simplicity) Classification: 12 External routines: OpenFOAM® (version 1.6-ext) ( http://www.extend-project.de) Nature of problem: This software provides a library of models for

  1. Molded ultra-low density microcellular foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

    1986-07-01

    Ultra-low density (< 0.01 g/cc) microcellular foams were required for the NARYA pulsed-power-driven x-ray laser development program. Because of their extreme fragility, molded pieces would be necessary to successfully field these foams in the pulsed power accelerator. All of the foams evaluated were made by the thermally induced phase separation technique from solutions of water soluble polymers. The process involved rapidly freezing the solution to induce the phase separation, and then freeze drying to remove the water without destroying the foam's structure. More than sixty water soluble polymers were evaluated by attempting to make their solutions into foams. The foams were evaluated for shrinkage, density, and microstructure to determine their suitability for molding and meeting the required density and cell size requirements of 5.0 mg/cc and less than twenty μmeters. Several promising water soluble polymers were identified including the polyactylic acids, guar gums, polyactylamide, and polyethylene oxide. Because of thier purity, structure, and low shrinkage, the polyacrylic acids were chosen to develop molding processes. The initial requirements were for 2.0 cm. long molded rods with diameters of 1.0, 2.0. and 3.0 mm. These rods were made by freezing the solution in thin walled silicon rubber molds, extracting the frozen preform from the mold, and then freeze drying. Requirements for half rods and half annuli necessitated using aluminum molds. Again we successfully molded these shapes. Our best efforts to date involve molding annuli with 3.0 mm outside diameters and 2.0 mm inside diameters

  2. Experimental study of 3-D structure and evolution of foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Tan, E.; Bauer, J. M.

    1998-11-01

    Liquid foam coarsens due to diffusion of gas between adjacent foam cells. This evolution process is slow, but leads to rapid topological changes taking place during localized rearrangements of Plateau borders or disappearance of small cells. We are developing a new imaging technique to construct the three-dimensional topology of real soap foam contained in a small glass container. The technique uses 3 video cameras equipped with lenses having narrow depth-of-field. These cameras are moved with respect to the container, in effect obtaining numerous slices through the foam. Preliminary experimental results showing typical rearrangement events will also be presented. These events involve for example disappearance of either triangular or rectangular cell faces.

  3. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  4. Effect of the three-dimensional microstructure on the sound absorption of foams: A parametric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillotte, Fabien; Perrot, Camille

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to systematically study the effect of the throat and the pore sizes on the sound absorbing properties of open-cell foams. The three-dimensional idealized unit cell used in this work enables to mimic the acoustical macro-behavior of a large class of cellular solid foams. This study is carried out for a normal incidence and also for a diffuse field excitation, with a relatively large range of sample thicknesses. The transport and sound absorbing properties are numerically studied as a function of the throat size, the pore size, and the sample thickness. The resulting diagrams show the ranges of the specific throat sizes and pore sizes where the sound absorption grading is maximized due to the pore morphology as a function of the sample thickness, and how it correlates with the corresponding transport parameters. These charts demonstrate, together with typical examples, how the morphological characteristics of foam could be modified in order to increase the visco-thermal dissipation effects.

  5. Construction of an open tin cell at Inmetro

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R.; Teixeira, R. N.

    2013-09-01

    For the last decade, the Thermometry Laboratory of the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (INMETRO) has been developing its own primary standards. In late 2010, a brand new fixed point cell containing high purity tin (99.9999 %) was constructed as the continuation of a project for constructing metal fixed-point cells in the positive range, in accordance with the temperature fixed-points described by the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) [1]. This is the fourth temperature fixed-point constructed by the laboratory team, which enables the performance of some calibrations without having to rely solely on commercially available cells. The materials and their preparation, the design, the procedures for the construction of the cell, the equipment, the investigation on its performance and its results will be detailed in the present paper. In addition, it is worth mentioning that this cell has recently taken part in a bilateral comparison with the National Physical Laboratory - NPL.

  6. Flexible polyurethane foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide for a method of preparing a polyurethane foam, including reacting least one initiator comprising at least two hydroxyl groups with at least one 12-hydroxystearic acid to form at least one polyester polyol, reacting the at least one polyester polyol with at least

  7. Foam concrete of increased strength with the thermomodified peat additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Kopanitsa, N. O.; Sarkisov, Ju S.; Kasatkina, A. V.; Prischepa, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research of foam concrete with thermomodified peat additives. The aim of the research was to study the effect of modifying additives on cement stone and foam concrete properties. Peat additives are prepared by heat treatment of peat at 600 °C. Two approaches of obtaining additives are examined: in condition of open air access (TMT-600) and in condition of limited air access (TMT-600-k). Compressive strength of a cement stone with modifiers found to be increased by 28.9 - 65.2%. Introducing peat modifiers into foam concrete mix leads to increase of compressive strength by 44-57% at 28- day age and heat conductivity of foam concrete decreases by 0.089 W/(m·°C).

  8. Automatic tracking of red blood cells in micro channels using OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vânia; Rodrigues, Pedro J.; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to developan automatic method able to track red blood cells (RBCs) trajectories flowing through a microchannel using the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV). The developed method is based on optical flux calculation assisted by the maximization of the template-matching product. The experimental results show a good functional performance of this method.

  9. Open questions: The disrupted circuitry of the cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2014-10-24

    Every new decade of biology brings with it a change in outlook driven by new technologies and fresh perspectives. Such is the case for cancer and how we consider the disease. The advent of molecular biology led to the identification of altered signaling molecules and 'oncogenes' that were proposed to drive uncontrolled cell proliferation. The rise of cell biology and new imaging and culturing technologies led to the idea that disruptions in the extracellular environment prime cells for transformation. In the current genomics era, cancer is most commonly seen as a genetic disorder where an unstable genome gives rise to a variety of different cell variants that are selected for proliferation and survival. All of these views are partially correct, of course, and are simply different ways of saying that genetic alterations in cancer cells result in a loss of growth homeostasis. They also take the view that molecular changes 'drive' a cell to grow uncontrollably, rather than tip the balance from one normal state (quiescence) to another (proliferation). Underlying this oversimplification is a profound ignorance of what controls homeostatic cell growth in the first place and how specific mutations impact it.

  10. Effect of Bonding Pressure and Bonding Time on the Tensile Properties of Cu-Foam / Cu-Plate Diffusion Bonded Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Heo, Hoe-Jun; Kang, Chung-Yun; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Open cell Cu foam, which has been widely utilized in various industries because of its high thermal conductivity, lightweight and large surface area, was successfully joined with Cu plate by diffusion bonding. To prevent excessive deformation of the Cu foam during bonding process, the bonding pressure should be lower than 500 kPa at 800 ℃ for 60 min and bonding pressure should be lowered with increasing holding time. The bonding strength was evaluated by tensile tests. The tensile load of joints increased with the bonding pressure and holding time. In the case of higher bonding pressure or time, the bonded length at the interface was usually longer than the cross-sectional length of the foam, so fracture occurred at the foam. For the same reason, base metal (foam) fracture mainly occurred at the node-plate junction rather than in the strut-plate junction because the bonded surface area of the node was relatively larger than that of the strut.

  11. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  12. Configurational phases in elastic foams under lengthscale-free punching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuwala, Tapan; Dai, Xiangyu; Gioia, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    We carry out experiments with brick-like specimens of elastic open-cell (EOC) foams of three relative densities. Individual specimens may be "tall" (height = width = depth) or "short" (2 height = width = depth). We place each specimen on a supporting plate and use a lengthscale-free (wedge-shaped or conical) punch to apply forces downward along the specimen's height. Regardless of the type of specimen, the force-penetration curves remain linear, for the wedge-shaped punch, or quadratic, for the conical punch, up to a sizable penetration commensurate with the smallest lengthscale of the specimen. After that there is an abrupt, all-but-discontinuous change in stiffness: if the specimen is tall, the stiffness drops; if the specimen is short, the stiffness shoots up. To analyze these curious experimental results, we posit that EOC foams can be found in either of two configurational phases, here termed the low-strain phase and the high-strain phase, which share a two-dimensional interface (a surface of strain discontinuity). The analysis may be outlined as follows. In the first part of an experiment, there obtains a "similarity regime" in which the penetration of the punch and the radius of the interface are the only prevailing lengthscales (because the punch is lengthscale free). In this case, it is possible to show that the force-penetration curve must be linear, or quadratic, depending on whether the punch be wedge-shaped or conical, respectively. This prediction of the analysis is consistent with the experiments. In time, the similarity regime breaks down when the interface reaches one of the specimen's boundaries distal to the tip of the punch. If the specimen is tall, the soft, stress-free lateral boundary is reached first, and the stiffness must drop; if the specimen is short, the hard boundary in contact with the supporting plate is reached first, and the stiffness must shoot up. These predictions too are consistent with the experiments. To provide direct

  13. Geometry anisotropy and mechanical property isotropy in titanium foam fabricated by replica impregnation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manonukul, Anchalee, E-mail: anchalm@mtec.or.th [National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Srikudvien, Pathompoom [National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 114 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Tange, Makiko [Taisei Kogyo Thailand Co., Ltd., Room INC2d-409, Innovation Cluster 2 Building, Tower D, 141 Thailand Science Park, Paholyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Puncreobutr, Chedtha [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-02-08

    Polyurethane (PU) foams have both geometry and mechanical property anisotropy. Metal foams, which are manufacturing by investment casting or melt deposition method and using PU foam as a template, also have mechanical property anisotropy. This work studied the mechanical properties in two directions of titanium foam with four different cell sizes fabricated using the replica impregnation method. The two directions are (1) the loading direction parallel to the foaming direction where the cells are elongated (EL direction) and (2) the loading direction perpendicular to the foaming direction where the cell are equiaxed (EQ direction). The results show that the compression responses for both EL and EQ directions are isotropy. Micrographs and X-ray micro-computed tomography show that the degree of geometry anisotropy is not strong enough to results in mechanical property anisotropy.

  14. Geometry anisotropy and mechanical property isotropy in titanium foam fabricated by replica impregnation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manonukul, Anchalee; Srikudvien, Pathompoom; Tange, Makiko; Puncreobutr, Chedtha

    2016-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) foams have both geometry and mechanical property anisotropy. Metal foams, which are manufacturing by investment casting or melt deposition method and using PU foam as a template, also have mechanical property anisotropy. This work studied the mechanical properties in two directions of titanium foam with four different cell sizes fabricated using the replica impregnation method. The two directions are (1) the loading direction parallel to the foaming direction where the cells are elongated (EL direction) and (2) the loading direction perpendicular to the foaming direction where the cell are equiaxed (EQ direction). The results show that the compression responses for both EL and EQ directions are isotropy. Micrographs and X-ray micro-computed tomography show that the degree of geometry anisotropy is not strong enough to results in mechanical property anisotropy.

  15. Classical and alternative activation and metalloproteinase expression occurs in foam cell macrophages in male and female ApoE null mice in the absence of T- and B-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Mo Hayes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques accounts for most life-threatening myocardial infarctions. Classical (M1 and alternative (M2 macrophage activation could promote atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture by increasing production of proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Lymphocyte-derived cytokines may be essential for generating M1 and M2 phenotypes in plaques, although this has not been rigorously tested until now.Methods and Results: We validated the expression of M1 markers (iNOS and COX-2 and M2 markers (arginase-1, Ym-1 and CD206 and then measured MMP mRNA levels in mouse macrophages during classical and alternative activation in vitro. We then compared mRNA expression of these genes ex vivo in foam cells from subcutaneous granulomas in fat-fed immune-competent ApoE knockout and immune-compromised ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice, which lack all T and B cells. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemistry in subcutaneous granulomas and in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery atherosclerotic plaques to measure the extent of M1/M2 marker and MMP protein expression in vivo. Classical activation of mouse macrophages with bacterial lipopolysaccharide in vitro increased MMPs-13, -14 and -25 but decreased MMP-19 and TIMP-2 mRNA expressions. Alternative activation with IL-4 increased MMP-19 expression. Foam cells in subcutaneous granulomas expressed all M1/M2 markers and MMPs at ex vivo mRNA and in vivo protein levels, irrespective of Rag-1 genotype. There were also similar percentages of foam cell macrophages carrying M1/M2 markers and MMPs in atherosclerotic plaques from ApoE knockout and ApoE/Rag-1 double knockout mice. Conclusions: Classical and alternative activation leads to distinct MMP expression patterns in mouse macrophages in vitro. M1 and M2 polarization in vivo occurs in the absence of T and B lymphocytes in either granuloma or plaque foam cell macrophages.

  16. Unexpected Anal Squamous Cells Carcinoma after Open Hemorrhoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarra Luca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of unexpected anal squamous cells carcinoma found in hemorrhoidectomy specimen. The patient had a 3-year history of prolapsing hemorrhoids. A prolapsing hemorrhoid was present at eleven o’clock in lithotomy. Milligan-Morgan was performed and gross examination of the specimen was unremarkable. Histopathologic evaluation showed noninvasive squamous cells carcinoma. The present case report evidences the opportunity of routine histopathologic analysis of hemorrhoidal specimens particularly in case of long-standing prolapse. Questions arise in the option of those techniques where no specimens are collected or tissue is excised far from deceased area.

  17. Close the Textbook & Open "The Cell: An Image Library"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Cheston; Taylor, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Many students leave the biology classroom with misconceptions centered on cellular structure. This article presents an activity in which students utilize images from an online database called "The Cell: An Image Library" (http://www.cellimagelibrary. org/) to gain a greater understanding of the diversity of cellular structure and the…

  18. Novel techniques of oxygen bleeding for polymer electrolyte fuel cells under impure anode feeding and poisoning condition: A computational study using OpenFOAM®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafttananian, M.; Ramiar, A.; Ranjbar, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxygen bleeding as a treatment of poisoned fuel cells is simulated. • Oxygen bleeding, depended on impurity concentration, has an optimize range. • Three novel techniques of oxygen bleeding are introduced. • The OBME parameter is introduced to compare oxygen bleeding methods. • Pulsating and sinusoidal methods lead to 2.74 and 1.74 effectiveness, respectively. - Abstract: PEM fuel cells fed by steam methane reformate (SMR) and water gas shift reformate (WGSR) are always subjected to catalyst poisoning due to trace amounts of carbon monoxide in the fuel stream. Air or oxygen bleeding are the most common, cost-effective and easy-to-implement methods of mitigation for such conditions. In the present work, important restrictions of oxygen bleeding and disadvantages of continuous constant O_2 bleeding are introduced. In order to simulating the problem, a mathematical model containing reaction kinetics, governing equations, boundary conditions and constitutive relations are presented and according to these, a comprehensive OpenFOAM transient multicomponent solver having the capability of simulating anode side of PEM fuel cell is developed, introduced and validated with existing experimental data. In addition, three novel methods of oxygen bleeding: namely pulsating, exponential and sinusoidal methods are introduced which are practical for both open-end and dead-end fuel cells. A quantitative criterion, Oxygen Bleeding Method Effectiveness (OBME), is also introduced to attain comparability of novel methods with continuous constant O_2 bleeding as common method. Results showed up to more than 5% increase in recovery ratio accompanied with up to 63% save in oxygen consumption.

  19. Relação entre macrófagos espumosos ("foam cells") no fígado de bovinos e ingestão de Brachiaria spp no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Driemeier,David; Döbereiner,Jürgen; Peixoto,Paulo Vargas; Brito,Marilene F.

    1999-01-01

    Com o objetivo de estabelecer uma relação etiológica e caracterizar, cronologicamente, o aparecimento de macrófagos espumosos (foam cells), comuns em fígados de bovinos oriundos das regiões de clima tropical do Brasil, foram reexaminados cortes histológicos de fígado de bovinos dos arquivos do Setor de Anatomia Patológica da Embrapa-Projeto Sanidade Animal, RJ. O material utilizado provinha de investigações sobre causas de mortandades em bovinos nas regiões Norte, Centro-Oeste e Sudeste do Br...

  20. Aerosol-foam interaction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, M.H.E.; Luscombe, C.DeM.; Mitchell, J.P.

    1990-03-01

    Foam treatment offers the potential to clean gas streams containing radioactive particles. A large decontamination factor has been claimed for the removal of airborne plutonium dust when spraying a commercially available foam on the walls and horizontal surfaces of an alpha-active room. Experiments have been designed and undertaken to reproduce these conditions with a non-radioactive simulant aerosol. Careful measurements of aerosol concentrations with and without foam treatment failed to provide convincing evidence to support the earlier observation. The foam may not have been as well mixed with the aerosol in the present studies. Further work is required to explore more efficient mixing methods, including systems in which the aerosol steam is passed through the foam, rather than merely spraying foam into the path of the aerosol. (author)

  1. Chaotic bubbling and nonstagnant foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufaile, Alberto; Sartorelli, José Carlos; Jeandet, Philippe; Liger-Belair, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the agglomeration of bubbles obtained from a nozzle working in different bubbling regimes. This experiment consists of a continuous production of bubbles from a nozzle at the bottom of a liquid column, and these bubbles create a two-dimensional (2D) foam (or a bubble raft) at the top of this column. The bubbles can assemble in various dynamically stable arrangement, forming different kinds of foams in a liquid mixture of water and glycerol, with the effect that the bubble formation regimes influence the foam obtained from this agglomeration of bubbles. The average number of bubbles in the foam is related to the bubble formation frequency and the bubble mean lifetime. The periodic bubbling can generate regular or irregular foam, while a chaotic bubbling only generates irregular foam.

  2. Foams structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cantat, Isabelle; Graner, François; Pitois, Olivier; Höhler, Reinard; Elias, Florence; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Rouyer, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first to provide a thorough description of all aspects of the physico-chemical properties of foams. It sets out what is known about their structure, their stability, and their rheology. Engineers, researchers and students will find descriptions of all the key concepts, illustrated by numerous applications, as well as experiments and exercises for the reader. A solutions manual for lecturers is available via the publisher's web site.

  3. Pourable Foam Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, James A.; Butler, John M.; Chartoff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes search for polyisocyanurate/polyurethane foam insulation with superior characteristics. Discusses chemistry of current formulations. Tests of formulations, of individual ingredients and or alternative new formulations described. Search revealed commercially available formulations exhibiting increased thermal stability at temperatures up to 600 degree C, pours readily before curing, presents good appearance after curing, and remains securely bonded to aluminum at cryogenic temperatures. Total of 42 different formulations investigated, 10 found to meet requirements.

  4. Experimental analysis of R134a flow boiling inside a 5 PPI copper foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, A.; Mancin, S.; Rossetto, L.

    2014-04-01

    Heat dissipation is one of the most important issues for the reliability of electronic equipment. Boiling can be a very efficient heat transfer mechanism when used to face with the electronic technology needs of efficient and compact heat sinks. Recently, cellular structured materials both stochastic and periodic, particularly open cell metal foams, have been proposed as possible enhanced surfaces to lower the junction temperatures at high heat fluxes. Up today, most of the research on metal foams only regards single phase flow, whereas the two phase flow is still almost unexplored. This paper presents an experimental study on the heat transfer of R134a during flow boiling inside a 5 PPI (Pores Per linear Inch) copper foam, which is 5 mm high, 10 mm wide and 200 mm long, and it is brazed on a 10 mm thick copper plate. The experimental measurements were carried out by imposing three different heat fluxes (50, 75, and 100 kW m-2) and by varying the refrigerant mass velocity between 50 and 200 kg m-2 s-1 and the vapour quality from 0.2 to 0.90, at constant saturation temperature (30°C). The effects of the refrigerant mass flow rate, heat flux and vapour quality on the heat transfer coefficient, dry out phenomenon, and pressure drop are studied.

  5. Investigation of low-frequency-oscillating water flow in metal foam with 10 pores per inch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağcı, Ö.; Arbak, A.; De Paepe, M.; Dukhan, N.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, oscillating water flow in metal foam with open cells is investigated experimentally. The metal foam sample has a porosity of 88% and 10 pores. The water was oscillated in the test section with three frequencies between 0.116 Hz and 0.348 Hz, which are considered low for water oscillation, and three flow displacements ranging between 74.35 mm and 111.53 mm. The combinations of frequencies of displacements were studied for their impacts of dimensional and non-dimensional pressure loss quantities. To this purpose, friction factor was correlated as a function of kinetic Reynolds number. The same metal foam sample was studied by exposing it to steady-state water flow to investigate its permeability and drag coefficient in low-velocity flow regimes. The friction factor distribution for oscillating flow was found to be over that found for steady state. The outcomes of the study are important for studying heat transfer under the same flow conditions.

  6. Properties and Characterization of Kenaf-Filled Natural Rubber Latex Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fikri Abdul Karim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf powder was incorporated with natural rubber latex (NRL compound and foamed to make natural rubber latex foam (NRLF by using a well known technique called the Dunlop method. Different loadings of kenaf powder were added to NRL compound and was foamed to make NRLF. The mechanical properties, density, compression, thermal, and micro-structural characterization of control NRLF and kenaf incorporated NRLF were studied. Increasing content of kenaf reduced the tensile strength, elongation at break, and compressive strength of a NRLF. Modulus at 100% elongation and density of the NRLF increased with an increase in filler loading. Higher kenaf loading indicated higher elasticity of kenaf-filled NRLF, but the recovery percentage of kenaf-filled NRLF decreased with increasing kenaf loading. From thermogravimetric analysis (TGA result, an increase in the amount of kenaf loading from 1 to 7 phr increased the thermal stability of kenaf-filled NRLF. Morphological and micro-structural characterization performed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that kenaf powder filled up the micro-sized pores in the open cell structure of kenaf-filled NRLF.

  7. Numerical Analysis of a Paraffin/Metal Foam Composite for Thermal Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio, P.; Iasiello, M.; Viglione, A.; Mameli, M.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Andreozzi, A.; Bianco, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) as passive thermal energy storage has been widely studied both analytically and experimentally. Among the PCMs, paraffins show many advantages, such as having a high latent heat, a low vapour pressure, being chemically inert, stable and non-toxic. But, their thermal conductivity is very low with a high volume change during the melting process. An efficient way to increase their poor thermal conductivity is to couple them with open cells metallic foams. This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of paraffin melting process inside an aluminum foam. A mathematical model is developed by using the volume-averaged governing equations for the porous domain, made up by the PCM embedded into the metal foam. Non-Darcian and buoyancy effects are considered in the momentum equation, while the energy equations are modelled with the Local Thermal Non-Equilibrium (LTNE) approach. The PCM liquefaction is treated with the apparent heat capacity method and the governing equations are solved with a finite-element scheme by COMSOL Multiphysics®. A new method to calculate the coupling coefficients needed for the thermal model has been developed and the results obtained have been validated comparing them to experimental data in literature.

  8. Characterization of synthetic foam structures used to manufacture artificial vertebral trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, David; Senck, Sascha; Hollensteiner, Marianne; Esterer, Benjamin; Augat, Peter; Eckstein, Felix; Schrempf, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Artificial materials reflecting the mechanical properties of human bone are essential for valid and reliable implant testing and design. They also are of great benefit for realistic simulation of surgical procedures. The objective of this study was therefore to characterize two groups of self-developed synthetic foam structures by static compressive testing and by microcomputed tomography. Two mineral fillers and varying amounts of a blowing agent were used to create different expansion behavior of the synthetic open-cell foams. The resulting compressive and morphometric properties thus differed within and also slightly between both groups. Apart from the structural anisotropy, the compressive and morphometric properties of the synthetic foam materials were shown to mirror the respective characteristics of human vertebral trabecular bone in good approximation. In conclusion, the artificial materials created can be used to manufacture valid synthetic bones for surgical training. Further, they provide novel possibilities for studying the relationship between trabecular bone microstructure and biomechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of highly open polyhedral networks from vitreous carbon for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güiza-Argüello, V.; Bayona-Becerra, M.; Cruz-Orellana, S.; Córdoba-Tuta, E.

    2017-01-01

    Highly open polyhedral networks were fabricated using an economical and environmentally friendly template route. Recycled cellulose foams were impregnated with a sucrose resin and then pyrolyzed in order to produce reticulated vitreous carbon foams with morphological features that closely resemble trabecular bone. Also, cell sizes ~1mm were achieved, a trait that will allow the mechanical reinforcement of such scaffolds using a biomaterial coating without compromising the pore size that favors osteoblast cell infiltration and growth (200-500µm). Moreover, initial studies showed that carbonization conditions have an effect on the mechanical properties of the synthesized foams and, therefore, such process parameters could be further evaluated towards the enhancement of the mechanical resistance of the scaffolds. The materials developed here are visualized as the porous component of a synthetic bone graft with features that could help overcome the current limitations associated with the medical treatments used for bone defect repair.

  10. Blending Novatein{sup ®} thermoplastic protein with PLA for carbon dioxide assisted batch foaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walallavita, Anuradha, E-mail: asw15@students.waikato.ac.nz; Verbeek, Casparus J. R., E-mail: jverbeek@waikato.ac.nz; Lay, Mark, E-mail: mclay@waikato.ac.nz [University of Waikato, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2016-03-09

    The convenience of polymeric foams has led to their widespread utilisation in everyday life. However, disposal of synthetic petroleum-derived foams has had a detrimental effect on the environment which needs to be addressed. This study uses a clean and sustainable approach to investigate the foaming capability of a blend of two biodegradable polymers, polylactic acid (PLA) and Novatein® Thermoplastic Protein (NTP). PLA, derived from corn starch, can successfully be foamed using a batch technique developed by the Biopolymer Network Ltd. NTP is a patented formulation of bloodmeal and chemical additives which can be extruded and injection moulded similar to other thermoplastics. However, foaming NTP is a new area of study and its interaction with blowing agents in the batch process is entirely unknown. Subcritical and supercritical carbon dioxide have been examined individually in two uniquely designed pressure vessels to foam various compositions of NTP-PLA blends. Foamed material were characterised in terms of expansion ratio, cell size, and cellular morphology in order to study how the composition of NTP-PLA affects foaming with carbon dioxide. It was found that blends with 5 wt. % NTP foamed using subcritical CO{sub 2} expanded up to 11 times due to heterogeneous nucleation. Morphology analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that foams blown with supercritical CO{sub 2} had a finer cell structure with consistent cell size, whereas, foams blown with subcritical CO{sub 2} ranged in cell size and showed cell wall rupture. Ultimately, this research would contribute to the production of a biodegradable foam material to be used in packaging applications, thereby adding to the application potential of NTP.

  11. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  12. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  13. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  14. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System Polyurethane Foam Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Wells, Doug; Morgan, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the basic fracture properties of Thermal Protection System (TPS) polyurethane foam insulation materials was conducted to validate the methodology used in estimating critical defect sizes in TPS applications on the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. The polyurethane foam found on the External Tank (ET) is manufactured by mixing liquid constituents and allowing them to react and expand upwards - a process which creates component cells that are generally elongated in the foam rise direction and gives rise to mechanical anisotropy. Similarly, the application of successive foam layers to the ET produces cohesive foam interfaces (knitlines) which may lead to local variations in mechanical properties. This study reports the fracture toughness of BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL-1034 closed-cell polyurethane foam as a function of ambient and cryogenic temperatures and knitline/cellular orientation at ambient pressure.

  15. Effect of Grinding Fineness of Fly Ash on the Properties of Geopolymer Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the development of geopolymer foam prepared from ground F class power station fly ash. The effect of the fly ash fineness on the rheology of the geopolymer paste and the foam properties have been investigated. The raw fly ash was ground in a ball mill for various duration, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min. Geopolymer paste was prepared from the raw and ground fly ash with NaOH – sodium silicate mixture as alkaline activator. Geopolymer foam production was made using H2O2 as foaming agent. Additionally, the geopolymer material structure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, the foam cell structure was monitored using optical microscopy. The rheological behaviour of the geopolymer paste changed due to the grinding of fly ash (from Bingham plastic to Newtonian liquid. Grinding of fly ash has a significant effect on the physical properties as well as on the cell structure of the geopolymer foam.

  16. Foam injection method and system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, W C; Parmley, J B; Shepard, J C

    1977-05-10

    A method is described for more efficiently practicing in situ combustion techniques by generating a gas-water mist or foam adjacent to the combustion formation within the injection well. The mist or foam is forced out of the well into the formation to transport heat away from the burned region of the formation toward the periphery of the combustion region to conserve fuel. Also taught are a method and system for fluid treating a formation while maintaining enhanced conformance of the fluid injection profile by generating a mist or foam down-hole adjacent to the formation and then forcing the mist or foam out into the formation. (19 claims)

  17. Polyurethane Foams with Pyrimidine Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kania Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligoetherols based on pyrimidine ring were obtained upon reaction of barbituric acid with glycidol and alkylene carbonates. These oligoetherols were then used to obtain polyurethane foams in the reaction of oligoetherols with isocyanates and water. The protocol of foam synthesis was optimized by the choice of proper kind of oligoetherol and synthetic composition. The thermal resistance was studied by dynamic and static methods with concomitant monitoring of compressive strength. The polyurethane foams have similar physical properties as the classic ones except their enhanced thermal resistance. They stand long-time heating even at 200°C. Moreover thermal exposition of foams results generally in increase of their compressive strength.

  18. On-Demand Microwave-Assisted Fabrication of Gelatin Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane D. Frazier

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraporous gelatin foams (porosity >94%, ρ ≈ 0.039–0.056 g/cm3 have been fabricated via microwave radiation. The resulting foam structures are unique with regard to pore morphology (i.e., closed-cell and exhibit 100% macroporosity (pore size 332 to 1700 μm, presence of an external skin, and densities similar to aerogels. Results indicate that the primary foaming mechanism is governed by the vaporization of water that is tightly bound in secondary structures (i.e., helices, β-turns, β-sheets that are present in dehydrated gelatin films but not present in the foams after microwave radiation (700 Watts.

  19. Performance Improvements of Selective Emitters by Laser Openings on Large-Area Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Shih Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the laser opening technique used to form a selective emitter (SE structure on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si. This technique can be used in the large-area (156 × 156 mm2 solar cells. SE process of this investigation was performed using 3 samples SE1–SE3. Laser fluences can vary in range of 2–5 J/cm2. The optimal conversion efficiency of 15.95% is obtained with the SE3 (2 J/cm2 fluence after laser opening with optimization of heavy and light dopant, which yields a gain of 0.48%abs compared with that of a reference cell (without fluence. In addition, this optimal SE3 cell displays improved characteristics compared with other cells with a higher average value of external quantum efficiency (EQEavg = 68.6% and a lower average value of power loss (Ploss = 2.33 mW/cm2. For the fabrication of solar cells, the laser opening process comprises fewer steps than traditional photolithography does. Furthermore, the laser opening process decreases consumption of chemical materials; therefore, the laser opening process decreases both time and cost. Therefore, SE process is simple, cheap, and suitable for commercialization. Moreover, the prominent features of the process render it effective means to promote overall performance in the photovoltaic industry.

  20. Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-circuit voltage and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Jianhui; Zhang, Shaoqing; Liang, Yongye; Yang, Guanwen; Yang, Yang; Yu, Luping; Wu, Yue; Li, Gang

    2009-11-01

    Following the development of the bulk heterojunction structure, recent years have seen a dramatic improvement in the efficiency of polymer solar cells. Maximizing the open-circuit voltage in a low-bandgap polymer is one of the critical factors towards enabling high-efficiency solar cells. Study of the relation between open-circuit voltage and the energy levels of the donor/acceptor in bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells has stimulated interest in modifying the open-circuit voltage by tuning the energy levels of polymers. Here, we show that the open-circuit voltage of polymer solar cells constructed based on the structure of a low-bandgap polymer, PBDTTT, can be tuned, step by step, using different functional groups, to achieve values as high as 0.76 V. This increased open-circuit voltage combined with a high short-circuit current density results in a polymer solar cell with a power conversion efficiency as high as 6.77%, as certified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  1. High-Surface-Area, Emulsion-Templated Carbon Foams by Activation of polyHIPEs Derived from Pickering Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T. Woodward

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon foams displaying hierarchical porosity and excellent surface areas of >1400 m2/g can be produced by the activation of macroporous poly(divinylbenzene. Poly(divinylbenzene was synthesized from the polymerization of the continuous, but minority, phase of a simple high internal phase Pickering emulsion. By the addition of KOH, chemical activation of the materials is induced during carbonization, producing Pickering-emulsion-templated carbon foams, or carboHIPEs, with tailorable macropore diameters and surface areas almost triple that of those previously reported. The retention of the customizable, macroporous open-cell structure of the poly(divinylbenzene precursor and the production of a large degree of microporosity during activation leads to tailorable carboHIPEs with excellent surface areas.

  2. Mechanical behaviour of cyclic olefin copolymer/exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets nanocomposites foamed through supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Biani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A cycloolefin copolymer matrix was melt mixed with exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP and the resulting nanocomposites were foamed by supercritical carbon dioxide. The density of the obtained foams decreased with the foaming pressure. Moreover, xGnP limited the cell growth during the expansion process thus reducing the cell diameter (from 1.08 to 0.22 mm with an XGnP amount of 10 wt% at 150 bar and increasing the cell density (from 12 to 45 cells/mm2 with a nanofiller content of 10 wt% at 150 bar. Electron microscopy observations of foams evidenced exfoliation and orientation of the nanoplatelets along the cell walls. Quasi-static compressive tests and tensile creep tests on foams clearly indicated that xGnP improved the modulus (up to a factor of 10 for a xGnP content of 10 wt% and the creep stability.

  3. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  4. Use of the supercritical fluid technology to prepare efficient nanocomposite foams for environmental protection purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanczyk, Laetitia; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Huynen, Isabelle; Alexandre, Michaël; Jérôme, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the preparation of novel nanocomposite foams that are efficient broadband microwave absorbers. Carbon nanotubes are first successfully dispersed into PCL and PMMA by melt blending. Then, foaming is promoted by supercritical CO2 by depressurization. Regular cellular structures are obtained in both cases with cells size around 10-50µm. The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency of these materials are then evaluated and compared to the non-foamed nanocomposi...

  5. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, W.F. [Orion International Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aubert, J.H. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  6. THIRD-GENERATION FOAM BLOWING AGENTS FOR FOAM INSULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study of third-generation blowing agents for foam insulation. (NOTE: the search for third-generation foam blowing agents has led to the realization that, as the number of potential substitutes increases, new concerns, such as their potential to act a...

  7. Using egg albumin foam to extinguish fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hytham A. Alsaati

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil, coal and chemical fires are often difficult to put out using water. In certain hydrocarbon fires, protein foam can extinguish fires better than water by keeping air (oxygen away from the flames and by ''blowing'' the flame away from its fuel source. Egg albumin is a relatively inexpensive protein and is representative of foaming proteins, which are candidates for use as fire suppression agents. This paper begins to deal with the effect of the foam bulk pH, foam protein concentration and generating air flow rate into the foam on the fire extinguishing time in laboratory experiments. A Bunsen burner was used to generate a small, controlled laboratory fire within a plastic container, which represented a point source in a partially open room in the experiments. The Bunsen burner represents a gaseous hydrocarbon fire, which can be difficult to extinguish. Both a low pH foam and one made with a high air flow rate favor a reduction in time required to put out the Bunsen burner flame.Chamas produzidas por óleo, carvão e produtos químicos (incêndios provocados são difíceis de ser extinguidos com água. Algumas chamas de hidrocarbonetos podem ser extinguidas por espumas protéicas melhor do que a manutenção de ar (oxigênio fora do alcance das chamas ou pelo sopramento da chama para longe da sua fonte. Albumina de ovo é uma proteína relativamente barata e é representativa dentre as proteínas usadas como espuma para a (supressão extinção de agentes causadores de incêndio. Este artigo trata do estudo do efeito do pH e concentração da espuma protéica, além da geração de ar no interior da espuma, sobre o tempo de extinção de incêndio em experimentos laboratoriais. Nos experimentos um bico de Bunsen foi usado para gerar uma pequena chama, controlada em um container de plástico, representando uma fonte pontual em um ambiente parcialmente aberto. A chama do bico de Bunsen representa uma chama gasosa de hidrocarbonetos, que são dif

  8. Mass transfer measurements in foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, J.G.; Fournel, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:This study participates to the elaboration of a method for decontamination of the inside surfaces of steel structures (pipes, tanks,...). The solution which has been chosen is to attack the surface of the structure by a dipping solution. In order to reduce the quantity of product to be recovered and treated at the end of the cleaning process, the active solution will be introduced as a foam. During its free or forced drainage the foam supplies an active liquid film along the structure surfaces. It was important to know if the transfers of the dipping liquid inside the foam and between foam and wall film are sufficient to allow a correct supplying of the active liquid at the wall and a correct dragging of the dipped products. The objective of this work is to develop a numerical model which simulates the various transfers. However such a modeling cannot be performed without a thorough knowledge of the different transfer parameters in the foam and in the film. The following study has been performed on a model foam (foaming water + air) held in a smooth vertical glass pipe and submitted to a forced drainage by the foaming water (water + surfactants). The liquid transfer involves the dispersion of the drainage liquid inside the foam and the transfer between the foam and the liquid film flowing down at the wall. The different transfers has been analyzed by NMR using a PFGSE-NMR sequence, which allows to determine the propagator, i.e., the probability density of the liquid particle displacements during a given time interval Δt, along a selected direction. This study allowed to measure, firstly, the mean liquid and the liquid dispersion in the foam along the vertical and horizontal direction, and secondly, the vertical mean velocity in the parietal liquid film. (authors)

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma opening switch with external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yulan; Zeng Zhengzhong; Sun Fengju

    2003-01-01

    Fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations are performed to study the effects of an external magnetic field on coaxial plasma opening switch (POS). The simulation results show that POS opening performance can be significantly improved only when external longitudinal magnetic field coils are placed at the cathode side, and an additional azimuthal magnetic field is effective whether the central electrode is of positive or negative polarity. Voltage multiplication coefficient K rises with the additional magnetic field increasing till the electron current is completely magnetically insulated during the opening of POS

  10. Open Science Meets Stem Cells: A New Drug Discovery Approach for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chanshuai; Chaineau, Mathilde; Chen, Carol X-Q; Beitel, Lenore K; Durcan, Thomas M

    2018-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a challenge for drug discovery, as the biological mechanisms are complex and poorly understood, with a paucity of models that faithfully recapitulate these disorders. Recent advances in stem cell technology have provided a paradigm shift, providing researchers with tools to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient cells. With the potential to generate any human cell type, we can now generate human neurons and develop "first-of-their-kind" disease-relevant assays for small molecule screening. Now that the tools are in place, it is imperative that we accelerate discoveries from the bench to the clinic. Using traditional closed-door research systems raises barriers to discovery, by restricting access to cells, data and other research findings. Thus, a new strategy is required, and the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) and its partners are piloting an "Open Science" model. One signature initiative will be that the MNI biorepository will curate and disseminate patient samples in a more accessible manner through open transfer agreements. This feeds into the MNI open drug discovery platform, focused on developing industry-standard assays with iPSC-derived neurons. All cell lines, reagents and assay findings developed in this open fashion will be made available to academia and industry. By removing the obstacles many universities and companies face in distributing patient samples and assay results, our goal is to accelerate translational medical research and the development of new therapies for devastating neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Open Science Meets Stem Cells: A New Drug Discovery Approach for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanshuai Han

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are a challenge for drug discovery, as the biological mechanisms are complex and poorly understood, with a paucity of models that faithfully recapitulate these disorders. Recent advances in stem cell technology have provided a paradigm shift, providing researchers with tools to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patient cells. With the potential to generate any human cell type, we can now generate human neurons and develop “first-of-their-kind” disease-relevant assays for small molecule screening. Now that the tools are in place, it is imperative that we accelerate discoveries from the bench to the clinic. Using traditional closed-door research systems raises barriers to discovery, by restricting access to cells, data and other research findings. Thus, a new strategy is required, and the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI and its partners are piloting an “Open Science” model. One signature initiative will be that the MNI biorepository will curate and disseminate patient samples in a more accessible manner through open transfer agreements. This feeds into the MNI open drug discovery platform, focused on developing industry-standard assays with iPSC-derived neurons. All cell lines, reagents and assay findings developed in this open fashion will be made available to academia and industry. By removing the obstacles many universities and companies face in distributing patient samples and assay results, our goal is to accelerate translational medical research and the development of new therapies for devastating neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Sida rhomboidea.Roxb aqueous extract down-regulates in vivo expression of vascular cell adhesion molecules in atherogenic rats and inhibits in vitro macrophage differentiation and foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Salunke, Sunita P; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluates efficacy of Sida rhomboidea.Roxb (SR) leaves extract in ameliorating experimental atherosclerosis using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Atherogenic (ATH) diet fed rats recorded significant increment in the serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very LDL (VLDL), autoantibody against oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), markers of LDL oxidation and decrement in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) along with increment in aortic TC and TG. The ex vivo LDL oxidation assay revealed an increased susceptibility of LDL isolated from ATH rats to undergo copper mediated oxidation. These set of changes were minimized by simultaneous co-supplementation of SR extract to ATH diet fed rats. Histopathology of aorta and immunolocalization studies recorded pronounced atheromatous plaque formation, vascular calcification, significant elastin derangements and higher expression of macrophage surface marker (F4/80), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and p-selectin in ATH rats. Whereas, ATH+SR rats depicted minimal evidence of atheromatous plaque formation, calcium deposition, distortion/defragmentation of elastin and accumulation of macrophages along with lowered expression of VCAM-1 and P-selectin compared to ATH rats. Further, monocyte to macrophage differentiation and in vitro foam cell formation were significantly attenuated in presence of SR extract. In conclusion, SR extract has the potency of controlling experimental atherosclerosis and can be used as promising herbal supplement in combating atherosclerosis.

  13. FoamVis, A Visualization System for Foam Research: Design and Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Lipsa, Dan; Roberts, Richard; Laramee, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Liquid foams are used in areas such as mineral separation, oil recovery, food and beverage production, sanitation and fire fighting. To improve the quality of products and the efficiency of processes in these areas, foam scientists wish to understand and control foam behaviour. To this end, foam scientists have used foam simulations to model foam behaviour; however, analysing these simulations presents difficult challenges. We describe the main foam research challenges and present the design ...