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Sample records for opal reactor

  1. The OPAL reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.; Irwin, T. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ordonez, J.P. [INVAP SE, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2007-07-01

    The project to provide a replacement for Australia's HIFAR reactor began with governmental approval in September 1997 and reached its latest milestone with the achievement of the first full power operation of the OPAL reactor in November 2006. OPAL is a pool-type reactor with a thermal power of 20 MW and a fuel enrichment maximum of 20 per cent. This has been a successful project for both ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation) and the contractor INVAP SE. This project was characterised by extensive interaction with the project's stake-holders during project definition and the use of a performance-based turnkey contract which gave the contractor the maximum opportunity to optimise the design to achieve performance and cost effectiveness. The contactor provided significant in-house resources as well as capacity to manage an international team of suppliers and sub-contractors. A key contributor to the project's successful outcomes has been the development and maintenance of an excellent working relationship between ANSTO and INVAP project teams. Commissioning was undertaken in accordance with the IAEA recommended stages. This paper presents the approaches used to define the project requirements, to choose the supplier and to deliver the project. The main results of hot commissioning are reviewed and the problems encountered examined. Operational experience since hot commissioning is also reviewed.

  2. Progress with OPAL, the new Australian research reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Robinson

    2008-11-01

    Australian science is entering a new `golden age', with the start-up of bright new neutron and photon sources in Sydney and Melbourne, in 2006 and 2007 respectively. The OPAL reactor and the Australian Synchrotron can be considered as the greatest single investment in scientific infrastructure in Australia's history. They will essentially be `sister' facilities, with a common open user ethos, and a vision to play a major role in international science. Fuel was loaded into the reactor in August 2006, and full power was (20 MW) achieved in November 2006. The first call for proposals was made in 2007, and commissioning experiments have taken place well before then. The first three instruments in operation are high-resolution powder diffractometer (for materials discovery), high-intensity powder diffractometer (for kinetics experiments and small samples) and a strain scanner (for mechanical engineering and industrial applications). These are closely followed by four more instruments with broad application in nanoscience, condensed matter physics and other scientific disciplines. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere. To date there is committed funding for nine instruments, with a capacity to install a total of ∼ 18 beamlines. An update will be given on the status of OPAL, its thermal and cold neutron sources, its instruments and the first results.

  3. OPAL REACTOR: Calculation/Experiment comparison of Neutron Flux Mapping in Flux Coolant Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbot, L.; Domergue, C.; Villard, J. F.; Destouches, C. [CEA, Paris (France); Braoudakis, G.; Wassink, D.; Sinclair, B.; Osborn, J. C.; Huayou, Wu [ANSTO, Syeney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    The measurement and calculation of the neutron flux mapping of the OPAL research reactor are presented. Following an investigation of fuel coolant channels using sub-miniature fission chambers to measure thermal neutron flux profiles, neutronic calculations were performed. Comparison between calculation and measurement shows very good agreement.

  4. Low temperature catalytic combustion of propane over Pt-based catalyst with inverse opal microstructure in a microchannel reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guoqing; Zapf, Ralf; Kolb, Gunther; Men, Yong; Hessel, Volker; Loewe, Holger; Ye, Jianhui; Zentel, Rudolf

    2007-01-21

    A novel Pt-based catalyst with highly regular, periodic inverse opal microstructure was fabricated in a microchannel reactor, and catalytic testing revealed excellent conversion and stable activity for propane combustion at low temperatures.

  5. The Periodic Safety Review of ANSTO's OPAL Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerfield, Mark [ANSTO, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the process by which the first Periodic Safety Review (PSR) of ANSTO's OPAL reactor was performed and documented. Emphasis is given to the methodology adopted and the practical means of actually doing a PSR with the aim of providing advice and guidance to other research reactor operators intending (or required) to perform a PSR. A summary of the results is also provided, including an overview of the recommendations. Feedback received from the Australian Nuclear Regulator ARPANSA and the subsequent preparation of a PSR Supplement is discussed.

  6. Residual stress diffractometer KOWARI at the Australian research reactor OPAL: Status of the project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brule, Alain; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Neutron scattering using diffraction techniques is now recognized as the most precise and reliable method of mapping sub-surface residual stresses in materials or even components, which are not only of academic but also of industrial-economic relevance. The great potential of neutrons in the field of residual stresses was recognized by ANSTO and its external Beam Instrument Advisory Group for the new research reactor OPAL. The recommendation was to build the dedicated strain scanner KOWARI among the first suite of instruments available to users. We give an update on the overall project and present the current status of the diffractometer. It is anticipated that the instrument will be commissioned in mid 2006 and available to users at the end of the OPAL project.

  7. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  8. Template-synthesized opal hydrogels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; JI Lijun; RONG Jianhua; YANG Zhenzhong

    2003-01-01

    Opal hydrogels could be synthesized with polymer inverse opal template. A pH responsive opal N-iso- propylacrylamide/acrylic acid copolymerized hydrogel was prepared as an example. The ordered structure and response to pH were investigated. Through the sol-gel process of tetrabutyl titanate, opal titania was obtained with the opal hydrogel template.

  9. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  10. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  11. OPAL detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    Half of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the OPAL detector is seen in this photo. This calorimeter consists of 4720 blocks of lead glass. It was used to detect and measure the energy of photons, electrons and positrons by absorbing them.

  12. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  13. Synthetic magnetic opals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Gupta; Alexei Yu Ganin; Parmanand Sharma; Vikrant Agnihotri; L M Belova; K V Rao; Mikhail E Kozlov; A A Zakhidov; R H Baughman

    2002-05-01

    We present studies of novel nanocomposites of BiNi impregnated into the structure of opals as well as inverse opals. Atomic force microscopy and high resolution elemental analyses show a highly ordered structure and uniform distribution of the BiNi filler in the matrix. These BiNi-based nanocomposites are found to exhibit distinct ferromagnetic-like ordering with transition temperature of about 675 K. As far as we know there exists no report in literature on any BiNi compound which is magnetic.

  14. OPAL and More

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G

    2009-01-01

    We shall summarize some of the research activities performed in collaboration with Ben Shen in the OPAL experiment at LEP and in the CMS experiment at the LHC. And we shall recall the LEP legacy to particle physics in general and to the Standard Model in particular. Short recollections are made in other fields in which Ben was interested, in particular in Astroparticle Physics.

  15. Dismantling OPAL's cylindrical magnet core

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    Lifting a handling device for dismounting the pressure bells, which are inside the cylindrical magnet coil on the central section of OPAL, on the right part of the photo. OPAL was a detector on the LEP accelerator, which ran from 1989 to 2000.

  16. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  17. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Ortiz Marlen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal, despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  18. Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1988-01-01

    This standard applies to the following types of reactors: shunt reactors, current-limiting reactors including neutral-earthing reactors, damping reactors, tuning (filter) reactors, earthing transformers (neutral couplers), arc-suppression reactors, smoothing reactors, with the exception of the following reactors: small reactors with a rating generally less than 2 kvar single-phase and 10 kvar three-phase, reactors for special purposes such as high-frequency line traps or reactors mounted on rolling stock.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  20. OPAL 96 Blocks Lead Glass

    CERN Multimedia

    This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. One half of the complete calorimeter is shown in the picture above. There were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. These are made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP interactions.

  1. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B. [Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW (Australia). School of Resource Science and Management; Torrence, R. [Australian Museum, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Division of Anthropology

    1999-11-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO{sub 2}nH{sub 2}0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  2. OPAL Cold Neutron Guide In-Pile Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rownes, T.; Eltobaji, A.; Bell, M.; Klose, F. [Nuclear Operations, Baitain (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    The 20 MW{sub th} OPAL research reactor has five neutron beam assemblies. These provide cold and thermal neutrons to various neutron guides and associated neutron beam instruments. In 2010 a project was initiated to install a new cold neutron guide, CG2, in one of the assemblies. This installation would allow up to four new neutron beam instruments to be built, significantly expanding the reactor's capabilities. The project concluded in December 2012 with the successful installation of CG2. Each neutron beam assembly has an in-pile plug, a primary shutter and a front cover. Together these constitute the neutron guide's in-pile components, with a total mass of over 12 tonnes. The CG2 installation required the complete replacement of the existing components. This replacement was scheduled to coincide with OPAL's first major shutdown. With a budget of $2.3 million and an expected dose of 50 man.mSv, the CG2 installation was a large and complex task. Work during the shutdown involved over 40 ANSTO personnel and radiation fields approached 1 Sv/h in some areas. Despite this, the installation team received a collective dose of only 10 man.mSv, and the project was completed to budget and within schedule. This paper will outline the details of the project, focusing on lessons learned and recommended practices. Each OPAL in-pile plug has a design life of 10 years at full power operation, and similar replacements will be performed regularly as the reactor ages. It is hoped that this information will be useful for other research reactors planning large capital engineering projects.

  3. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  4. Lagrangian modelling of OPALE dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Jaime E.; Thomas, Jennie; Bekki, Slimane; Kukui, Alexandre; Ancellet, Gerad; Preunkert, Susanne; Legrand, Michel; Frey, Markus; Savarino, Joel; Jourdain, Bruno; Kerbrat, Michel; France, James; King, Martin; Toumi, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    The OPALE measurement campaign aimed to characterize the atmospheric chemistry of the East Antarctic Plateau making a range of measurements at two sites, a coastal one, Dumont d'Urville (DDU) (From December 2010 until March 2011, 66o S, 123oE, coastal site) and on top of the Antarctic plateau Dome C (From December 2011 until January 2012 at Dome C, 75oS, 123o E, 3233 m a.s.l.). There are relatively few observations of chemistry occurring inland and coastal sites Antarctic sites. During the campaign air masses originating from the marine boundary layer, the free troposphere, the Antarctic continent, and of mixed origins were observed. We present analyses of chemical measurements (including O3, NO2, OH, RO2, hydrocarbons) using the CiTTyCAT photochemical trajectory model. The model simulates the chemistry of air masses over multiple (~5) days back trajectories provided by a stochastic trajectory model (FLEXPART). In some cases, the initial chemical conditions are taken from a chemistry-transport model (MOZART). The effect of clouds on the photolysis rates is also accounted for using MODIS satellite data. The model results are compared with measurements performed during both OPALE campaign years. Differences between the reactive nitrogen and hydroxyl radical chemistry at DDU and Dome C and the strong influence of reactive exchanges of trace gases between the snow and the atmosphere at Dome C are highlighted. The implications for the oxidizing capacity of the Antarctic boundary layer are also discussed.

  5. Rectification of the OPAL Cold Neutron Source Cryogenic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Weijian [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    The Cold Neutron Source (CNS) at ANSTO's OPAL Reactor had experienced repeated outages since 2009 due to failures in the cryogenic system. An extensive root cause analysis was initiated in May 2012, led by an ANSTO team that also involved knowledgeable external experts. At the conclusion of the investigation, a set of recommendations was released to address the identified contributing causes. A rectification program was established to implement the solutions. Cryogenic operation of the CNS, providing end users with cold neutrons, successfully returned to service in July 2013. Thanks to the unique stand-by operation mode of the CNS, irradiation activities at the reactor, as well as thermal neutron availability, had not been affected during the year-long investigation/rectification process. Some technical and operational aspects of the investigation, testing and engineering modifications are discussed in this presentation.

  6. Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

  7. Opal shell structures: direct assembly versus inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Song; Sharifi, Parvin; Marlow, Frank

    2013-09-16

    Opal shell structures can be fabricated in two ways: By direct assembly from hollow spheres (hs-opal) or by infiltration of precursors into opal templates and inversion. The resulting lattice disturbances were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and transmission spectra. The hs-opal system shows much lower disturbances, for example, a lower number of cracks and lattice deformations. The strong suppression of crack formation in one of these inverse opal structures can be considered as promising candidates for the fabrication of more perfect photonic crystals.

  8. Photonic crystal waveguides in artificial opals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Kiyan, Roman; Neumeister, Andrei;

    2008-01-01

    3D photonic crystals based on Si inverted-opals are numerically explored as hosts for effective air-channel waveguides, which can serve as parts of photonic circuits. Two basic shapes of straight waveguides are considered: cylindrical and a chain of spheres. Modelling shows that transmission...

  9. The barrel electromagnetic calorimeter on OPAL

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1993-01-01

    The two particle beams collide at the centre of this barrel and eject a large number of different particles. The energy of some of these particles will be measured by this electromagnetic calorimeter by absorbing all of the particle's energy. The OPAL detector was used on the LEP accelerator, which ran from 1989 to 2000.

  10. Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  11. Opal web services for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingyuan; Williams, Nadya; Clementi, Luca; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W

    2010-07-01

    Biomedical applications have become increasingly complex, and they often require large-scale high-performance computing resources with a large number of processors and memory. The complexity of application deployment and the advances in cluster, grid and cloud computing require new modes of support for biomedical research. Scientific Software as a Service (sSaaS) enables scalable and transparent access to biomedical applications through simple standards-based Web interfaces. Towards this end, we built a production web server (http://ws.nbcr.net) in August 2007 to support the bioinformatics application called MEME. The server has grown since to include docking analysis with AutoDock and AutoDock Vina, electrostatic calculations using PDB2PQR and APBS, and off-target analysis using SMAP. All the applications on the servers are powered by Opal, a toolkit that allows users to wrap scientific applications easily as web services without any modification to the scientific codes, by writing simple XML configuration files. Opal allows both web forms-based access and programmatic access of all our applications. The Opal toolkit currently supports SOAP-based Web service access to a number of popular applications from the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR) and affiliated collaborative and service projects. In addition, Opal's programmatic access capability allows our applications to be accessed through many workflow tools, including Vision, Kepler, Nimrod/K and VisTrails. From mid-August 2007 to the end of 2009, we have successfully executed 239,814 jobs. The number of successfully executed jobs more than doubled from 205 to 411 per day between 2008 and 2009. The Opal-enabled service model is useful for a wide range of applications. It provides for interoperation with other applications with Web Service interfaces, and allows application developers to focus on the scientific tool and workflow development. Web server availability: http://ws.nbcr.net.

  12. Investigation and calculation of filling factor of SnO2 inverse opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Shimin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Li, Jinpeng; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In the process of preparing inverse opal, the structure of inverse opal is affected by many factors, and the filling factor of inverse opal is difficult to directly test. In this paper, SnO2 inverse opal was prepared with the sol-gel method by cooperative opal template. The repetition times of the infiltrating precursor into the opal templates were investigated in detail. The band-gap positions of SnO2 inverse opal were tested. In order to prepare perfect inverse opal structure, the filling quantity of the precursor is greater, as the diameter of the PS microsphere of opal is bigger. The filling factor of air in inverse opal can be calculated with a formula derived from Bragg’s law. For inverse opal, the filling factor of air in inverse opal gradually enlarges as the diameter of the void increases.

  13. Equations for filling factor estimation in opal matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Abrarov, S M; Kim, T W

    2005-01-01

    We consider two equations for the filling factor estimation of infiltrated zinc oxide (ZnO) in silica (SiO2) opal and gallium nitride in ZnO opal. The first equation is based on the effective medium approximation, while the second one - on Maxwell-Garnett approximation. The comparison between two filling factors shows that both equations can be equally used for the estimation of the quantity of infiltrated nanocrystals inside opal matrix.

  14. Formation Process of a TiO2 Inverse Opal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪培根; 程丙英; 张道中

    2002-01-01

    Inverse opals of TiO2 with different filling fractions were fabricated by using an opal of polystyrene spheres as a template. Scanning electron microscopy showed the accumulative process of TiO2. The transmission spectra of inverse opals with different filling fractions were measured and the shifts of transmission dip with the filling fraction were observed. Our investigation made the infiltration process clear, and it might be helpful for further improvement of the fabrication of TiO2 inverse opals.

  15. Liquid-impermeable inverse opals with invariant photonic bandgap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyelim; Lee, Joon-Seok; Chang, Won Seok; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-02-18

    Omniphobic inverse opals are created by structurally and chemically modifying the surface of inverse opals through reactive ion etching. During the etching, void arrays of the inverse opal surface evolves to a triangular post array with re-entrant geometry. The elaborate structure can efficiently pin the air-liquid interface and retain air cavities against water and oil, thereby providing liquid-impermeable inverse opals with invariant photonic bandgap. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Microstructural study of CdS/OPAL composites

    CERN Document Server

    Torrecillas, R; Brito, M E; López, C; Miguez, M; Meseguer, F; Moya, J S

    2000-01-01

    CdS/opal photonic materials have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. The photonic properties of opals formed by CdS- SiO/sub 2/ nanospheres 380 nm in diameter, face-centred cubic ordered and with different CdS filling factors were studied by means of specular reflectance or transmission spectroscopy. It is shown that CdS semiconductor grows homogeneously in the opal interstices, in a cubic phase, with 24 nm being the microcrystal particle size. We show here that chemical bath deposition (CBD) is a useful method to fill the opal interstices, a crucial step for producing photonic band gap materials. (22 refs).

  17. Carbon Inverse Opal Rods for Nonenzymatic Cholesterol Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qifeng; Xie, Zhuoying; Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Yang, Zixue; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-18

    Carbon inverse opal rods made from silica photonic crystal rods are used for nonenzymatic cholesterol sensing. The characteristic reflection peak originating from the physical periodic structure works as sensing signals for quantitatively estimating cholesterol concentrations. Carbon inverse opal rods work both in cholesterol standard solutions and human serum. They are suitable for practical use in clinical diagnose.

  18. Structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji; Katayama, Shin'ichi; Koyano, Mikio; Ito, Nobuaki

    2013-10-01

    The structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment up to 1,400 °C were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The results indicate that the dehydration and condensation of silanol in opal are very important factors in the structural evolution of heat-treated synthetic opal. Synthetic opal releases water molecules and silanols by heat treatment up to 400 °C, where the dehydration of silanol may lead to the condensation of a new Si-O-Si network comprising a four-membered ring structure of SiO4 tetrahedra, even at 400 °C. Above 600 °C, water molecules are lost and the opal surface and internal silanol molecules are completely dehydrated by heat effect, and the medium-temperature range structure of opal may begin to thermally reconstruct to six-membered rings of SiO4 tetrahedra. Above 1,000 °C, the opal structure almost approaches that of silica glass with an average structure of six-membered rings. Above 1,200 °C, the opal changes to low-cristobalite; however, minor evidence of low-tridymite stacking was evident after heat treatment at 1,400 °C.

  19. Synthesis and photonic bandgap characterization of polymer inverse opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales; Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Centro Tecnologico de Ondas; Lopez-Tejeira, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada

    2001-03-16

    Polymer inverse opals with long-range order have been fabricated and their photonic crystal behavior examined. Good agreement between band structure calculations and experiment is found. It is envisaged that these inverse opals could be used for the modification of the electronic properties of incorporated luminescent materials and as matrices for the synthesis of spherical colloidal particles. (orig.)

  20. Barium titanate inverted opals-synthesis, characterization, and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soten, I.; Miguez, H.; Yang, S.M.; Petrov, S.; Coombs, N.; Tetreault, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Matsuura, N.; Ruda, H.E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

    2002-01-01

    The engineering of cubic or tetragonal polymorphs of nanocrystalline barium titanate inverted opals has been achieved by thermally induced transformations. Optical characterization demonstrated photonic crystal behavior of the opals. The tuning of the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition around the Curie temperature is shown in this paper. (orig.)

  1. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  2. Artificial Opals as Nanophotonic Materials for Optical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Leyrer, R J; Wohlleben, W

    2007-01-01

    We report on advances in the fabrication of thick and homogeneous polymer opals films with bead sizes up to 600 nm; photo-ablation and point and line defect inscription with femtosecond laser pulses; analysis of the influence of imperfections on opal transmission-reflection properties and numeric...

  3. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  4. Kinetic parameters calculation and measurements during the OPAL commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergenreder, D.F.; Lecot, C.A.; Villarino, E.A. [INVAP S.E., Nuclear Projects Dept., Nuclear Engineering Div., Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2007-07-01

    During the Commissioning Stage of the OPAL Research Reactor (Australia) the Prompt Neutron Decay constant ({alpha}) was measured by analysing the inherent fluctuations that occur in the neutron population. The ratio of the variance to the mean number of counts as a function of counting time is used to determine experimentally the {alpha} parameter. This technique is also called Feynman-{alpha} Method. The CITVAP and MCNP codes were used to calculate the prompt neutron decay constant for the first core configuration. By means of two different MCNP calculations, one considering prompt fission neutrons only and another with total fission neutrons; the effective delayed neutron fraction is estimated. The experimental method, the measured value as well as the numerical assessment are presented in this paper. A good agreement was obtained between measurements and calculations, particularly it is worth noticing that the measured value for the {alpha} parameter, when {rho} = 0, is 38.1 s{sup -1} while the calculated value is 37.2 s{sup -1}.

  5. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  6. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, N.; Gieseke, S.; Kluth, S.; Plätzer, S.; Skands, P.

    2016-07-01

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  7. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  8. Upgrade of the neutron guide system at the OPAL Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Kennedy, S. J.; Klose, F.

    2010-11-01

    The new research reactor at ANSTO (OPAL) is operating with seven neutron beam instruments in the user programme and three more under construction. The reactor design provides for expansion of the facility to eighteen instruments, and much of the basic infrastructure is already in place. However, an expansion of the neutron guide system is needed for further beam instruments. For this purpose, several possibilities are under consideration, such as insertion of multi-channel neutron benders in the existing cold guides or the construction of a new elliptic cold guide. In this work Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to evaluate performance of these guide configurations. Results show that these configurations can be competitive with the best instruments in the world.

  9. Inverted opal luminescent Ce-doped silica glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scotti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted opal Ce-doped silica glasses (Ce : Si molar ratio 1 ⋅ 10−3 were prepared by a sol-gel method using opals of latex microspheres as templates. The rare earth is homogeneously dispersed in silica host matrix, as evidenced by the absence of segregated CeO2, instead present in monolithic Ce-doped SG with the same cerium content. This suggests that the nanometric dimensions of bridges and junctions of the host matrix in the inverted opal structures favor the RE distribution avoiding the possible segregation of CeO2.

  10. Precision luminosity measurement with the OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Arcelli, S

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary, high precision measurement of the luminosity of the LEP colliding beams for the LEP I data recorded between 1993 and 1995 with the OPAL experiment is presented, the measurement is based on the OPAL Silicon-Tungten luminosity monitor, which detects electrons from small-angle Bhabha scattering at angles between approximately 25 and 58 mrad. The overall experimental uncertainty on the measured luminosity is 3.3*10/sup -4/. Such uncertainty contributes negligibly to the uncertainty on the OPAL cross section measurements near the Z /sup 0/ resonance. (3 refs).

  11. Optical properties of metallo-dielectric microspheres in opal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y; Whitehouse, C; Li, Jensen; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Sheng Ping [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2003-09-03

    We report the fabrication of opal structure using metallo-dielectric silica microspheres. Mono-dispersed silica microspheres were coated with silver using an electrode-less wet-plating technique. Thin slabs of opal were obtained by assembling the silver-coated microspheres between two glass plates using a forced-packing method. The optical properties of the resulting opal structure were studied in the infrared range. Good agreement is obtained with the predictions of a multiple scattering approach, provided that the silver layer is modelled as a silver composite.

  12. Polymer sol-gel composite inverse opal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Blanchard, G J

    2015-03-25

    We report on the formation of composite inverse opal structures where the matrix used to form the inverse opal contains both silica, formed using sol-gel chemistry, and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. We find that the morphology of the inverse opal structure depends on both the amount of PEG incorporated into the matrix and its molecular weight. The extent of organization in the inverse opal structure, which is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical reflectance data, is mediated by the chemical bonding interactions between the silica and PEG constituents in the hybrid matrix. Both polymer chain terminus Si-O-C bonding and hydrogen bonding between the polymer backbone oxygens and silanol functionalities can contribute, with the polymer mediating the extent to which Si-O-Si bonds can form within the silica regions of the matrix due to hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  13. Treating temperature effect on bandgap in polymer opal photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The optical reflective spectra and microstruc- tures of polystyrene opal photonic crystals treated with dif- ferent temperatures have been investigated. With tempera- ture increasing, the polystyrene spheres in opal structure transform to dodecahedrons, and the peak of reflective spec- trum moves to shorter wavelength. The experiment result testifies the effect of the effective refractive index and the filling ratio to the bandgap position, and it corresponds to the theoretical simulative result.

  14. Abnormal Modulation of Dielectric Band Transmittance of Polystyrene Opal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-Yong; GONG Qi-Huang; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2005-01-01

    @@ The abnormal transmittance in the dielectric band edge of a polystyrene opal is observed and analysed. The transmittance is periodically modulated and the period of modulation varies with the wavelength, which destroys the perfect structure of the photonic band gap. The transmittance modulation originates from the propagation of the low order whispering-gallery mode excited in polystyrene spheres. These results indicate that the whisperinggallery mode has a great influence on practical applications of polystyrene opal.

  15. Preliminary Results of Occurrence and Mineralogical Properties of Opals from Northwest part of Central Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalık, Ayten

    2016-04-01

    The study area, is located in northwest part of central Anatolian, consists of Eskişehir and Kütahya region where are important for finding occurrence of opaline silica mineralization as well as chalcedonic silica mineralization. In this study preliminary results of mineralogical properties of opals from four different area (Sabuncupınar, Belkavak, Gokçekısık and Derekoy), located between Eskisehir and Kutahya region, have been given. In the Kütahya region, dendritic opal nodules present in Pliocene pyroclastic rocks - Kanoturaǧı hill and white opals outcrop in stockwork veins with serpentinites in Küçükali hill around Sabuncupınar village. The mainly whitish - blue and gray opal nodules range from millimetres in diameter to about five and ten centimetres in Kanoturagı hill. White opals, called milky opal, are white color and present in veins within serpentinites. The Kanoturagı opal is made up of tiny spheres, the milky opal is made up tiny sphere with fibrous texture based on the SEM. Green opals present in Miocene pyroclastic rocks in Belkavak village. The Belkavak opals are greenish color and having a brecciated appearance. Opals outcrops around Sabuncu pınar and Belkavak villages consist of opal - CT, alpha quartz and, moganite, and a lesser amount of opal - C based on the results of XRD analysis. In the Eskişehir region, the dendritic opals occur as nodules in volcanogenetic conglomerates of Pliocene age in the Dereyalak area. The Dereyalak opals vary in size from millimetres in diameter to about ten centimetres. Their color are mainly white, beige, greenish, yellowish orange and black. On the other hand, Pliocene pyroclastic rocks are the host rock of opals in Gökçekısık village - Eskişehir. Gökçekısık Opals are mainly colorless, pale shades of yellow, whitish blue and gray colors and display a reinous to sub vitreous luster. Dereyalak dendiritic opals consist of opal - CT, opal - C and a lesser amount of alpha quartz and, moganite

  16. Particulate inverse opal carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Sang-Ok; Chae, Yu Jin; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-01-29

    Inverse opal carbon materials were used as anodes for lithium ion batteries. We applied particulate inverse opal structures and their dispersion in the formation of anode electrodes via solution casting. We prepared aminophenyl-grafted inverse opal carbons (a-IOC), inverse opal carbons with mesopores (mIOC), and bare inverse opal carbons (IOC) and investigated the electrochemical behavior of these samples as anode materials. Surface modification by aminophenyl groups was confirmed by XPS measurements. TEM images showed mesopores, and the specific area of mIOC was compared with that of IOC using BET analysis. A half-cell test was performed to compare a-IOC with IOC and mIOC with IOC. In the case of the a-IOC structure, the cell test revealed no improvement in the reversible specific capacity or the cycle performance. The mIOC cell showed a reversible specific capacity of 432 mAh/g, and the capacity was maintained at 88%-approximately 380 mAh/g-over 20 cycles.

  17. Diagenesis of 1900-year-old siliceous sinter (opal-A to quartz) at Opal Mound, Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne, Bridget Y.; Campbell, Kathleen A.; Moore, J. N.; Browne, P. R. L.

    2005-08-01

    White, vitreous, siliceous sinter dated by 14C at ˜1900 years BP is located along the crest of the Opal Mound deposit at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, U.S.A. Deposition at vents resulted from the Opal Mound fault opening conduits to the surface, allowing thermal fluids to discharge. Fault movement subsequently fractured the sinter and initiated a second period of fluid discharge. Colorful silica was deposited in this later period and formed the distal slope sinter, dated at ˜1600 years BP. The sinter preserves both end-members in the mineralogical maturation of silica, from initial opal-A to mature quartz, and also records incremental intermediate steps, as revealed by X-ray powder diffractrometry and by scanning electron, optical and Raman laser microscopy. Textural and mineralogical changes from one silica phase to another transpired gradually and gradationally. During diagenesis, incremental morphological changes alternated three times through nano- to micro-particle size transitions. The three corresponding mineralogical steps comprise: (1) opal-A to opal-CT, (2) opal-CT to opal-C, and (3) opal-C to quartz. Mineralogical changes preceded all morphological changes. Each step was initiated when silica nanostructures reached a critical diameter of 200 nm. The initial starting point of fresh (modern), polymeric, siliceous sinter deposition worldwide is nano-spherical particles of colloidal opal-A. Opaline sinter at Opal Mound is slightly more mature, reflecting the beginning of the aging process, and comprises botryoidal clusters of silica microspheres (quartz formation, the opal-C nano-rods recrystallize into groups of blocky nanostructures, each up to 200 × 300 nm. Quartz crystals grow at the expense of and pseudomorph opal-C, shown by remnant bands of blocky nanostructures at the base of the quartz crystals. Two generations of quartz crystals occur at Opal Mound: (1) diagenetic, which developed as opal-C nanostructures recrystallize to quartz; and (2

  18. Nuclear research reactors activities in INVAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, Juan Pablo [INVAP, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    This presentation describes the different activities in the research reactor field that are being carried out by INVAP. INVAP is presently involved in the design of three new research reactors in three different countries. The RA-10 is a multipurpose reactor, in Argentina, planned as a replacement for the RA-3 reactor. INVAP was contracted by CNEA for carrying out the preliminary engineering for this reactor, and has recently been contracted by CNEA for the detailed engineering. CNEA groups are strongly involved in the design of this reactor. The RMB is a multipurpose reactor, planned by CNEN from Brazil. CNEN, through REDETEC, has contracted INVAP to carry out the preliminary engineering for this reactor. As the user requirements for RA-10 and RMB are very similar, an agreement was signed between Argentina and Brasil governments to cooperate in these two projects. The agreement included that both reactors would use the OPAL reactor in Australia, design and built by INVAP, as a reference reactor. INVAP has also designed the LPRR reactor for KACST in Saudi Arabia. The LPRR is a 30 kw reactor for educational purposes. KACST initially contracted INVAP for the engineering for this reactor and has recently signed the contract with INVAP for building the reactor. General details of these three reactors will be presented.

  19. Responsive inverse opal hydrogels for the sensing of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jean-Philippe; Sütterlin, Martin; Laschewsky, André; Hettrich, Cornelia; Wischerhoff, Erik

    2015-05-26

    Dual responsive inverse opal hydrogels were designed as autonomous sensor systems for (bio)macromolecules, exploiting the analyte-induced modulation of the opal's structural color. The systems that are based on oligo(ethylene glycol) macromonomers additionally incorporate comonomers with various recognition units. They combine a coil-to-globule collapse transition of the LCST type with sensitivity of the transition temperature toward molecular recognition processes. This enables the specific detection of macromolecular analytes, such as glycopolymers and proteins, by simple optical methods. While the inverse opal structure assists the effective diffusion even of large analytes into the photonic crystal, the stimulus responsiveness gives rise to strong shifts of the optical Bragg peak of more than 100 nm upon analyte binding at a given temperature. The systems' design provides a versatile platform for the development of easy-to-use, fast, and low-cost sensors for pathogens.

  20. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasnetsov, M.V., E-mail: vasnet@hotmail.com [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N. [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO{sub 2}) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO{sub 2} globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature.

  1. Thermochromic effect in synthetic opal/polyaniline composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, F.; Khokhar, A. Z.

    2009-02-01

    The design and construction of a novel storage/indicator bilayer system is described where ammonia gas stored in a porous material can be used to dope a colour-changing polyaniline film. Both reversible and irreversible colour change effects are possible. A thin synthetic opal film is coupled to a polyaniline film in a parallel plate glass cell with ammonia gas adsorbed on the silica balls that form the opal structure. When heated and cooled, ammonia reversibly exchanges between the opal and polyaniline films causing a very distinct change in the colour of the polyaniline film. This thermochromic effect is also electrically detectable because of the large concomitant change in the resistivity of the polyaniline film that accompanies its colour change.

  2. Stimulated Brillouin scattering enhancement in silicon inverse opal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M J A; de Sterke, C Martijn; Lapine, M; Kuhlmey, B T; Poulton, C G

    2016-01-01

    Silicon is an ideal material for on-chip applications, however its poor acoustic properties limit its performance for important optoacoustic applications, particularly for Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We theoretically show that silicon inverse opals exhibit a strongly improved acoustic performance that enhances the bulk SBS gain coefficient by more than two orders of magnitude. We also design a waveguide that incorporates silicon inverse opals and which has SBS gain values that are comparable with chalcogenide glass waveguides. This research opens new directions for opto-acoustic applications in on-chip material systems.

  3. Optical monitoring the degradation of PLGA inverse opal film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Guo Sun; Zhuo-Ying Xie; Yuan-Jin Zhao; Hong-Mei Wei; Zhong-Ze Gu

    2013-01-01

    Implantable materials have broad applications in tissue engineering and in vivo sensors.It is essential to know the detailed information of the implantable materials during their degradation.In this paper,we developed a method to monitor the degradation process of a well-used biomaterial,poly(lactide-coglycolide) (PLGA) by taking advantage of inverse opal structure.We found that mass loss,molecular weight and glass transition temperature of PLGA during the degradation process in Hank's artificial body fluid can be in situ monitored by measuring the optical properties of PLGA inverse opal.

  4. OPAL - extension for use with ventilation and pump systems; OPAL-Erweiterung mit Luefter- und Pumpensystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses how an existing software tool called OPAL that supports the energy-efficient dimensioning of electrical drive systems was extended to cover pump and fan applications. According to the authors, the new version 3 allows the energy efficiency of such systems as well as the economic feasibility of many types of improvement projects to be evaluated in a fast and accurate manner. Software is described that has been designed and optimised using real world examples that can be often found in the water supply and facility management areas. These include heating-system pumps as well as ventilation and pressure-boosting applications. The practicability and benefits offered by the tool are demonstrated using several examples.

  5. OPAL - extension for use with ventilation and pump systems; OPAL-Erweiterung mit Luefter- und Pumpensystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses how an existing software tool called OPAL that supports the energy-efficient dimensioning of electrical drive systems was extended to cover pump and fan applications. According to the authors, the new version 3 allows the energy efficiency of such systems as well as the economic feasibility of many types of improvement projects to be evaluated in a fast and accurate manner. Software is described that has been designed and optimised using real world examples that can be often found in the water supply and facility management areas. These include heating-system pumps as well as ventilation and pressure-boosting applications. The practicability and benefits offered by the tool are demonstrated using several examples.

  6. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  7. Oxygen Isotopes and Origin of Opal in an Antarctic Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, H.; Beard, A. D.; Franchi, I. A.; Greenwood, R. C.

    2016-08-01

    Fragments of opal (SiO2.nH2O) in several internal chips of a single Antarctic polymict ureilite meteorite Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309 have been studied by NanoSIMS to determine their oxygen isotope compositions and hence constrain their origin.

  8. Wood opals from Yakuplu, Turkey: their properties and genesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, P.

    1975-01-01

    Fossil driftwood from Sarmatian (Late Miocene) gravel deposits near Yakuplu, Turkey, ranges between lignitic and opaline. Opalization occurred in various stages of decay. The stage of decay of the wood and the eventual admixture of detritic clay influenced the crystallinity and the dehydration chara

  9. Artificial black opal fabricated from nanoporous carbon spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuri; Ishii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tadashi; Yano, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-15

    A nanocasting method via chemical vapor deposition of acetonitrile was successfully employed to fabricate porous carbon colloidal crystal using colloidal crystal from monodispersed mesoporous silica spheres (MMSS) as a sacrificial scaffold. The mesostructure as well as periodic arrays within (111) plane of MMSS were replicated for the carbon colloidal crystal (black opal) with the length scale in the centimeter range. Brilliant iridescent colors were clearly observed for the first time on the black carbon colloidal crystal fabricated from porous carbon spheres, and they changed dramatically in accordance with the observation angle, like natural black opals. Reflection spectra measurements based on 2D surface diffraction and Bragg diffraction in the mirror mode were conducted for the fabricated carbon periodic arrays. The periodicity in the (111) plane as well as in the direction perpendicular to the (111) plane of the colloidal crystal was evaluated by comparing the results obtained from these two measurements. It was found that the periodicity in the direction perpendicular to the (111) surface is not high for the obtained black carbon opal. On the other hand, the relationship between the incident angles and the peak wavelengths of the reflection spectra, collected in the condition where the incident light and the reflected light pass through in the same direction, is governed by an approximation based on 2D surface diffraction. The results imply that the origin of the iridescent colors on the fabricated black carbon opal is derived from the periodicity not in the direction perpendicular to the (111) plane but within the (111) plane.

  10. Submarine barite-opal rocks of hydrothermal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertine, K K; Keene, J B

    1975-04-11

    Unusual submarine rocks consisting of barite, opal, and volcanic detritus were recovered from the Lau Basin northeast of Australia. It is proposed that these rocks were formed when hydrothermal solutions emanating from a fracture zone offsetting the active spreading center in the Lau Basin came into contact with cooler ocean waters.

  11. Effects of heating on fire opal and diaspore from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatipoglu, M. [Dokuz Eyluel University, IMYO, Izmir Multidisciplinary Vocational School, Gemmology and Jewelry Program, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.co [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of the Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 45100 Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Karali, T. [Ege University, Applied School of Nuclear Sciences, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-04-01

    Fire opal (SiO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) and diaspore [Al(OH)O] are two different precious and rare mineral species with high water content. While these species are being cut and polished to make gems, defect-induced weaknesses such as fragility, splintering, and cracking become apparent since the temperature of the mineral species may be increased to high temperatures during the process. These deformations may be broadly related to water loss (molecular (H{sub 2}O) and hydroxyl (OH) group) and transformation of the base building components and/or inclusion minerals. In this study, thermal properties and thermal stability as dehydratial behaviors of both gem quality fire opal (SiO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) from the Saphane region (Kuetahya, Turkey) and gem quality diaspore (AlOHO) from the Milas region (Mugla, Turkey), including some associated mineral inclusions, were studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Fourier transform-Infrared absorption (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermal analysis (DTA/TGA). During heating to 1400 deg. C, DTA/TGA patterns indicated that the weight losses of the fire opal and diaspore were due to the water loss only, and that these losses occur in the temperature ranges between about 342 and 722 deg. C in fire opal, and between about 592 and 718 deg. C in diaspore. In addition, after making some corrections concerning the mass gain observed, being due to the drift with buoyancy effect of the atmosphere, in their TGA curves, the fire opal shows a mass loss of 7.942%, and one distinctive sharp endotherm at 1089.99 deg. C and seven weaker endotherms, whereas the diaspore shows a mass loss of about 13.826%, and one distinctive sharpest endotherm at 650.47 deg. C and four weaker endotherms.

  12. Opal instability: a relationship between water and microstructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauviré, Boris; Thomas, Paul; Rondeau, Benjamin; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    Unlike other gem minerals, opals can suffer a change in their quality with time, resulting in a lack of confidence and hence marketability of this gemstone. The instability has been described and categorized into 2 main types (Aguilar et al., 2004; Aguilar-Reyes et al., 2005; Rondeau et al., 2011): cracking (development of a network of micro-fractures) and whitening (decrease of transparency). Available literature about opal instability, however, is restricted to its description. Although the process involved in the destabilization remains poorly understood, it has been proved, in at least one instance, to be associated with the release of water and a change of its speciation (Pearson, 1985; Paris et al, 2007). We propose 3 models to explain the cracking and/or whitening: (i) drying shrinkage of microstructural units, (ii) differential partial pressure between water enclosed in the opal and atmosphere and (iii) release of water yielding empty pores resulting in a strong light-scattering and hence opacity. In order to ascertain the model, a comprehensive set of opals from various origin and structure have been selected for investigation base on previous heating experiments which identified samples with a high susceptibility to crack or whiten. These samples will be investigated to identify the origins of the destabilization phenomena using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis (gravimetric (TG) and calorimetric (DSC)) and gas adsorption measurements. FTIR will allow the main species of water present in opals (molecular water and hydroxyl groups) and their proportion to be determined while TG will be used to accurately determine the total water content. Gas adsorption and thermoporosity (DSC) will be used to characterize the porosity (surface area, pore size and crystallizable water content). The characterization of water and microstructure for each opal may provide the potential link between the mobility of water in the microstructure and the observed

  13. OPAL extension for permanent-magnet motors; OPAL-Erweiterung fuer Permanentmagnet-Motoren - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R.

    2008-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at an extension to the OPAL software that is concerned with the energy-efficient design of pump and fan systems that use induction motors. This software has been extended by a module for permanent magnet motors which directly addresses the question of how much energy and cost can be saved through the use of this type of motors compared to ASM standard motors. However, it is noted that certain parameters of permanent magnet motors necessary to make use of this new design feature must be available, which is currently not the case. In order to make this design application available to a wider group of users, a web-based user interface has been developed. New Web-2.0 features that have been included to provide improved usability are discussed. In addition, it is noted that the software has now been adapted to support German, English and French versions. Also, the EuroDEEM database has been integrated, thus giving access to the performance data of more than 10,000 motors.

  14. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between conjugated molecules infiltrated in three-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Lu; Sui, Ning; Wang, Ying-Hui, E-mail: yinghui_wang@jlu.edu.cn; Qian, Cheng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Han-Zhuang, E-mail: zhanghz@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 6 (C-6) to Sulforhodamine B (S-B) infiltrated into opal PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) photonic crystals (PCs) has been studied in detail. The intrinsic mesh micro-porous structure of opal PCs could increase the luminescent efficiency through inhibiting the intermolecular interaction. Meanwhile, its structure of periodically varying refractive indices could also modify the FRET through affecting the luminescence characteristics of energy donor or energy acceptor. The results demonstrate that the FRET efficiency between conjugated dyes was easily modified by opal PCs. - Highlights: • We investigate the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two kinds of dyes. • These two kinds of dyes are infiltrated in PMMA opal photonic crystals. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the luminescent characteristics. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the energy transfer characteristics.

  15. Electrochemical properties of opal-V{sub 6}O{sub 13} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernardou, D., E-mail: dimitra@iesl.forth.gr [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Apostolopoulou, M. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Louloudakis, D. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Spanakis, E. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katsarakis, N. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Koudoumas, E. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Applied Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Electrical Engineering Department, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, 710 04 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); McGrath, J.; Pemble, M.E. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Opal-V{sub 6}O{sub 13} composites grown at 95 °C for 50 h. • The deposition period affects the void filling of the opals. • The electrochemical performance is correlated with the oxide’s characteristics. -- Abstract: Vanadium oxides were hydrothermally grown on opal glass substrates at 95 °C. The deposition period was observed to affect the structure of the oxides and the voids filling of the opal surfaces. V{sub 6}O{sub 13} grown on opal for 50 h presented satisfactory electrochemical performance and electrochromic response with a contrast ratio of 2. The specific capacitance of this composite reached a value of 192 F g{sup −1}, which was stable up to 500 continuous charge intercalation/deintercalation scans. The importance of achieving crystalline V{sub 6}O{sub 13} and high opal surface coverage towards the enhancement of the electrochemical properties is presented.

  16. Cell orientation gradients on an inverse opal substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Zou, Xin; Zhao, Ze; Mu, Zhongde; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-05-20

    The generation of cell gradients is critical for understanding many biological systems and realizing the unique functionality of many implanted biomaterials. However, most previous work can only control the gradient of cell density and this has no effect on the gradient of cell orientation, which has an important role in regulating the functions of many connecting tissues. Here, we report on a simple stretched inverse opal substrate for establishing desired cell orientation gradients. It was demonstrated that tendon fibroblasts on the stretched inverse opal gradient showed a corresponding alignment along with the elongation gradient of the substrate. This "random-to-aligned" cell gradient reproduces the insertion part of many connecting tissues, and thus, will have important applications in tissue engineering.

  17. OPAL Forward Calorimeter (half cylinder with lead scintillator)

    CERN Multimedia

    1 half cylinder piece is available for loan. The OPAL forward Detector Calorimeter was made in 4 half cylindrical pieces. Two full cylinders were placed round the LEP beam pipe about 3m downstream of the interaction point. The detector was used primarily to measure the luminosity of LEP (rate of interactions) and also to trigger on 2-photon events. In addition it formed an essential part of the detector coverage which OPAL needed to carry out searches for new particles such as the Higgs boson. The detector is made of scintillators sandwiched between lead sheets. The light from the scintillators passes via bars of wavelength shifter and light guides on its way to be measured by photomultipliers. There is a layer of gas filled tube chambers within the calorimeter. These provide a measure of the position of the particles interacting in the calorimeter.

  18. Modified optical properties in a samarium doped titania inverse opal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Song, Hongwei; Liu, Qiong; Bai, Xue; Wang, Yu; Dong, Biao

    2010-05-01

    The TiO(2):Sm(3+) inverse opal has been prepared by a template-assisted method, and its modification on photoluminescent (PL) properties of Sm(3+) is studied. Transmittance spectra show a dip within the photonic bandgap, whose location shifts a little to red and then to blue with an increasing detection angle between the incident light and the surface normal; such an irregular shift is attributed to uneven shrinkage of lattices. Steady-state PL spectra indicate a spatial redistribution of emission lines. Decay kinetics demonstrate that the spontaneous emission rates of Sm(3+) ions in the inverse opal decrease to varied extent depending on the emission wavelength and detection angle. All the facts are examined to be consistent with the photonic bandgap effect.

  19. Opal-like photonic crystal with diamond lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Santamaria, F; López, C; Meseguer, F; Miyazaki, H T; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution, a method to fabricate a diamond structure with a complete PBG in the near infrared is proposed. The procedure starts by building an opal composed of two types of microspheres (organic and inorganic) in a body-centered-cubic symmetry by means of a micro- robotic technique. Then, the organic particles may be selectively removed to obtain a diamond structure of inorganic particles. Once this structure is assembled its filling fraction may be controlled by sintering. Subsequently this template can be infiltrated with an adequate high refractive index material. In this way, the method can be extended to make diamond inverse opals of, for instance, silicon with gap to mid gap ratios as large as 13% for moderate filling fractions. An overview of micromanipulation as well as previous experimental results will be offered to show the feasibility of this method. (24 refs).

  20. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  1. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L., E-mail: guerreroleo@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Garza, F.J., E-mail: fjgarza@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Hinojosa, M., E-mail: hinojosa@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2010-09-25

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 {mu}m and 0.4 {mu}m) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, {zeta}, and the correlation length, {xi}, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is {zeta} {approx} 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  2. Preparation of TiO2 Inverse Opal via a Modified Filling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qian; DONG Peng; YI Gui-Yun; LIU Li-Xia; CHENG Bing-Ying

    2005-01-01

    @@ By applying polystyrene opals made by a vertical deposition method as the templates, a modified filling method and a well-controlled calcination process, we have successfully obtained a large-area ordered TiO2 inverse opal with a higher volume fraction (14.5%) and a visible photonic bandgap. The influences of the filling process and calcination conditions on the fabrication of the TiO2 inverse opal are investigated.

  3. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.

  4. Compact drift-chambers for the OPAL forward detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.E.; Attree, D.J.; Charalambous, A.; Cranfield, R.; Cresswell, M.; Crone, G.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Dryburgh, M.; Kennedy, B.W.; Hayes, D.; Marradi, L.; Miller, D.J.; Sherwood, P.; Spreadbury, E.; Wood, N.C.; Young, K.K. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1989-11-10

    Two planes of four chambers are mounted in front of the forward calorimeter at each end of OPAL. Beam tests at CERN show good linearity (within 0.5 mm over 130 mm maximum drift) and good resolution in the drift direction (average 300 {mu}m over the whole range of drift distances). The resolution along the wire is {plus minus}1 mm. (orig.).

  5. Symmetry characterization of eigenstates in opal-based photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Tejeira, F.; Ochiai, T; Sakoda, K; Sanchez-Dehesa, J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete symmetry characterization of eigenstates in bare opal systems is obtained by means of group theory. This symmetry assignment has allowed us to identify several bands that cannot couple with an incident external plane wave. Our prediction is supported by layer-KKR calculations, which are also performed: the coupling coefficients between bulk modes and externally excited field tend to zero when symmetry properties mismatch.

  6. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to two jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. Here a Z0 particle is produced in the collision between an electron and positron that then decays into a quark-antiquark pair. The quark pair is seen as a pair of hadron jets in the detector.

  7. Implementation of New OPAL Tables in Eggleton's Stellar Evolution Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Fei Chen; Christopher A. Tout

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous works of OPAL, we construct a series of opacity tables for various metallicities Z = 0, 0.000 01, 0.000 03, 0.000 1, 0.000 3, 0.001, 0.004, 0.01, 0.02,0.03, 0.04, 0.05, 0.06, 0.08 and 0.1. These tables can be easily used in Eggleton's stellar evolution code in place of the old tables without changing the code. The OPAL tables are used for log10 (T/K) > 3.95 and Alexander's for log10 (T/K) < 3.95. At log10 (T/K) - 3.95, the two groups' data fit well for all hydrogen mass fractions. Conductive opacities are included by reciprocal addition according to the formulae of Yakovlev and Urpin. A comparison of 1 and 5 M⊙ models constructed with the older OPAL tables of Iglesias and Rogers shows that the new opacities have most effect in the late stages of evolution, the extension of the blue loop during helium burning for intermediate-mass and massive stars.

  8. Plio-Pleistocene Biogenic Opal Deposition in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, G.; Gersonde, R.

    2002-12-01

    About 2/3 of the annual supply of silicic acid to the World Ocean is buried in the Southern Ocean as biogenic silica (BSi), formed by diatoms and radiolaria in surface waters and exported to the seafloor. Main BSi accumulation occurs in an area between the sea ice edge and the Polar Front Zone and seems to be steered by a complex interaction of biological and physical parameters governing the modern Southern Ocean ecosystem. Sediment cores recovered during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 177 and expeditions with RV POLARSTERN reveal the history of the opal deposition in the Atlantic and Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean during the Pliocene and the Pleistocene. This period is characterized by distinct changes and variability in global climate and ocean circulation that can be related to the spatial-temporal distribution of BSi deposition on long and short time scales. Changes in ocean circulation, water mass structure, sea ice and climatic variability that impact the distribution of silicic acid and the development of coarsly silicified diatoms (e.g. Actinocyclus ingens, Thalassiosira antarctica, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis), presenting the major carriers of biogenic opal, control past BSi deposition in the Southern Ocean. Major deposition in the area of the modern Southern Ocean opal belt starts at the Plio/Pleistocene transition. Such strong export of BSi and related organic carbon might have reinforced the trend of global cooling observed since the Mid-Pliocene climate optimum.

  9. Investigation of the Thermal Conductance of Selected Opal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, , Jr.; Tritt, Terry M.; Zakhidov, A.; Baughmann, R.; Khayrullin, I.

    1999-11-01

    In relation to thermoelectrics, recently some attention has come to opal structures.^1 The structure of the SiO2 opals is hoped to be useful in lowering thermal conductivity when this structure is infiltrated with traditional thermoelectric materials, such as Bi or Bi_2Te_3. Preliminary measurements show that, by infiltration, it may be possible to increase the thermoelectric figure of merit by improving the ratio of electrical conductivity to thermal conductivity.^2 We have built a new steady state thermal conductivity apparatus for measuring thermal conductivity of samples between 10K and 350K. With this new system the thermal properties of the opal systems and the effects of infiltration will be investigated. Data from the thermal conductivity and heat capacity measurements will be presented and discussed, along with a comparison of thermal conductivity obtained with the laser flash method. 1.) A. Zakhidov et al., Science , 282, 897 (1998) 2.) R. Baughman, A. Zakhidov, et.al, Proc. of ICT '98, IEEE Press, p 288 (1998)

  10. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  11. Optics of an opal modeled with a stratified effective index and the effect of the interface

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Isabelle; Laliotis, Athanasios; Bloch, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reflection and transmission for an artificial opal are described through a model of stratified medium based upon a one-dimensional variation of an effective index. The model is notably applicable to a Langmuir-Blodgett type disordered opal. Light scattering is accounted for by a phenomenological absorption. The interface region between the opal and the substrate -or the vacuum- induces a periodicity break in the photonic crystal arrangement, which exhibits a prominent influence on the reflection, notably away from the Bragg reflection peak. Experimental results are compared to our model. The model is extendable to inverse opals, stacked cylinders, or irradiation by evanescent waves

  12. Synthesis of Polypyrrole Inverse Opal in [bmim]PF6- Containing Acetonitrile and the Application of the Inverse Opal in Cell Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most primary cells use Zn or Li as the anode, a metallic oxide as the cathode, and an acidic or alkaline solution or moist past as the electrolytic solution. In this paper, highly ordered polypyrrole (PPy inverse opals have been successfully synthesized in the acetonitrile solution containing [bmim]PF6. PPy films were prepared under the same experimental conditions. Cyclic voltammograms of the PPy film and the PPy inverse opal in neutral phosphate buffer solution (PBS were recorded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the structural surface of the PPy films and the PPy inverse opals. It is found that the PF6- anions kept dedoping from the PPy films during the potential scanning process, resulting in the electrochemical inactivity. Although PF6- anions also kept dedoping from the PPy inverse opals, the PO43- anions from PBS could dope into the inverse opal, explaining why the PPy inverse opals kept their electrochemical activity. An environmental friendly cell prototype was constructed, using the PPy inverse opal as the anode. The electrolytes in both the cathodic and anodic half-cells were neutral PBSs. The open-circuit potential of the cell prototype reached 0.487 V and showed a stable output over several hundred hours.

  13. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  14. Small angle X ray diffraction investigation of twinned opal_like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Sinev, I.S.; Samusev, K.B.; Rybin, M.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Byelov, D.; Trofimova, E.Y.; Kurdyukov, D.A.; Golubev, V.G.; Limonov, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Small angle X ray diffraction from synthetic opal films has been investigated as a function of the orientation of the sample. All the observed (hkl) diffraction reflections have been interpreted. The reconstruct tion of the reciprocal lattice of the studied opal films has been carried out. The diffr

  15. Small angle X ray diffraction investigation of twinned opal_like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Sinev, I.S.; Samusev, K.B.; Rybin, M.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Byelov, D.; Trofimova, E.Y.; Kurdyukov, D.A.; Golubev, V.G.; Limonov, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Small angle X ray diffraction from synthetic opal films has been investigated as a function of the orientation of the sample. All the observed (hkl) diffraction reflections have been interpreted. The reconstruct tion of the reciprocal lattice of the studied opal films has been carried out. The diffr

  16. Fabrication of titania inverse opals by multi-cycle dip-infiltration for optical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chun-Chen; Tuyen, Le Dac; Ren, Ching-Rung; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Wu, Cheng Yi; Huang, Ping-Ji; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2016-04-01

    We have demonstrated a low-cost method to fabricate TiO2 inverse opal photonic crystals with high refractive index skeleton. The TiO2 inverse opal films were fabricated from a polystyrene opal template by multi-cycle dip-infiltration-coating method. The properties of the TiO2 inverse opal films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Bragg reflection spectroscopy. The reflection spectroscopic measurements of the TiO2 inverse opal films were compared with theories of photonic band calculations and Bragg law. The agreement between experiment and theory indicates that we can precisely predict the refractive index of the infiltrated liquid sample in the TiO2 inverse opal films from the measurement results. The red-shift of the peak wavelength in the Bragg reflection spectra for both alcohol mixtures and aqueous sucrose solutions of increasing refractive index was observed and respective refractive index sensitivities of 296 and 286 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) were achieved. As the fabrication of the TiO2 inverse opal films and reflection spectroscopic measurement are fairly easy, the TiO2 inverse opal films have potential applications in optical sensing.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad homogene...

  18. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance.

  19. Photonic crystal heterostructures from self-assembled opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Ali Z.; Rahman, Faiz; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of opal-based photonic crystal heterostructures. These heterostructures were created by using multilayer deposition of silica and polystyrene spheres. The fabricated structures involved both different lattice constants and different dielectric constants. Single and double heterostructures working in the visible region were fabricated by using techniques described here. The optical properties of these heterostructures were investigated experimentally and showed the superposition of the properties of each individual crystal region as well as optical signatures due to inter-layer defects.

  20. Filtering of elastic waves by opal-based hypersonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasyuk, Alexey S; Scherbakov, Alexey V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Akimov, Andrey V; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A; Kaplan, Saveliy F; Grudinkin, Sergey A; Nashchekin, Alexey V; Pevtsov, Alexander B; Golubev, Valery G; Berstermann, Thorsten; Brüggemann, Christian; Bombeck, Michael; Bayer, Manfred

    2010-04-14

    We report experiments in which high quality silica opal films are used as three-dimensional hypersonic crystals in the 10 GHz range. Controlled sintering of these structures leads to well-defined elastic bonding between the submicrometer-sized silica spheres, due to which a band structure for elastic waves is formed. The sonic crystal properties are studied by injection of a broadband elastic wave packet with a femtosecond laser. Depending on the elastic bonding strength, the band structure separates long-living surface acoustic waves with frequencies in the complete band gap from bulk waves with band frequencies that propagate into the crystal leading to a fast decay.

  1. The OPAL Detector (an~Omni~Purpose~Apparatus~for~Lep)

    CERN Multimedia

    Schaile, D A; Watson, N; Craciun, M; Hanson, G; Mcmahon, T J; Stokes, W; Wilson, G W; Carter, J; Plane, D; Scharff-hansen, P; Sahr, O M; Rembser, C; Saeki, T; Nisius, R; Campana, S; Kormos, L L; Marchant, T E; Takeda, H; Kupper, M; Hill, J C; Hajdu, C; Hauschild, M; Charlton, D; Kellogg, R; Kluth, S; Asai, S; Nellen, B; Bright-thomas, P; Polok, J; Guenther, P O; Keeler, R; Schwick, C; Stephens, K; Zankel, K; Watkins, P; Chang, C Y; Roney, M; Fischer, H; Dubbert, J

    2002-01-01

    The OPAL Detector (an Omni Purpose Apparatus for Lep) \\\\ \\\\OPAL, a general purpose detector, was designed to study a wide range of unexplored physics at LEP. \\\\ \\\\At LEP1, one of the central issues is the precise determination of the mass, width and couplings to quarks and leptons of the Z$^{0}$ boson. At LEP2 the mass and couplings of the W$^\\pm$ bosons are determined. Accurate measurements of these quantities might reveal the mechanisms by which symmetries are broken. Many topics relating to heavy flavours are studied, including the properties of tau leptons, and the spectroscopy, lifetimes and mixing of hadrons containing b-quarks. \\\\ \\\\There are very active QCD and Two-Photon groups. Among the topics being studied are the determination of the strong coupling constant, $ \\alpha _{S} $, tests of the group structure of QCD, differences between quark- and gluon-induced jets, many aspects of the fragmentation process measurements of many different final states in photon-photon collision, and measurement of str...

  2. Patterning hierarchy in direct and inverse opal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya; Hatton, Benjamin; Kolle, Mathias; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2012-06-25

    Biological strategies for bottom-up synthesis of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials within topographic templates have recently become an attractive approach for fabricating complex synthetic structures. Inspired by these strategies, herein the synthesis of multi-layered, hierarchical inverse colloidal crystal films formed directly on topographically patterned substrates via evaporative deposition, or "co-assembly", of polymeric spheres with a silicate sol-gel precursor solution and subsequent removal of the colloidal template, is described. The response of this growing composite colloid-silica system to artificially imposed 3D spatial constraints of various geometries is systematically studied, and compared with that of direct colloidal crystal assembly on the same template. Substrates designed with arrays of rectangular, triangular, and hexagonal prisms and cylinders are shown to control crystallographic domain nucleation and orientation of the direct and inverse opals. With this bottom-up topographical approach, it is demonstrated that the system can be manipulated to either form large patterned single crystals, or crystals with a fine-tuned extent of disorder, and to nucleate distinct colloidal domains of a defined size, location, and orientation in a wide range of length-scales. The resulting ordered, quasi-ordered, and disordered colloidal crystal films show distinct optical properties. Therefore, this method provides a means of controlling bottom-up synthesis of complex, hierarchical direct and inverse opal structures designed for altering optical properties and increased functionality. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Quasi-ballistic Electronic Thermal Conduction in Metal Inverse Opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barako, Michael T; Sood, Aditya; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Junjie; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Zheng, Xiaolin; Braun, Paul V; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2016-04-13

    Porous metals are used in interfacial transport applications that leverage the combination of electrical and/or thermal conductivity and the large available surface area. As nanomaterials push toward smaller pore sizes to increase the total surface area and reduce diffusion length scales, electron conduction within the metal scaffold becomes suppressed due to increased surface scattering. Here we observe the transition from diffusive to quasi-ballistic thermal conduction using metal inverse opals (IOs), which are metal films that contain a periodic arrangement of interconnected spherical pores. As the material dimensions are reduced from ∼230 nm to ∼23 nm, the thermal conductivity of copper IOs is reduced by more than 57% due to the increase in surface scattering. In contrast, nickel IOs exhibit diffusive-like conduction and have a constant thermal conductivity over this size regime. The quasi-ballistic nature of electron transport at these length scales is modeled considering the inverse opal geometry, surface scattering, and grain boundaries. Understanding the characteristics of electron conduction at the nanoscale is essential to minimizing the total resistance of porous metals for interfacial transport applications, such as the total electrical resistance of battery electrodes and the total thermal resistance of microscale heat exchangers.

  4. MODIFIED OPAL:A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueren Qian; Xianhui An; Wenbo Liu; Gang Yu; Zhanqian Song

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. The results showed that the modified opal in place of sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3% ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp and deinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modified opal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp is improved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching to increase temperature and time within a permissive extent. The suitable process conditions are 10% of pulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% of sodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70℃ and 60 min when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At these conditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16% ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorable for bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulp can increase I%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate is added. The cost analysis indicated that the modified opal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspect and has further the potential of market development.

  5. Face-Centred-Cubic Artificial Opal Embedded with CdS Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岭; 李明海; 张宇; 马懿; 徐骏; 黄信凡; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    Highly monodispersed colloidal silica spheres in sub-micrometre size with distribution standard deviation less than 5% were synthesized by a chemical method. Using the self-crystallization of the silica spheres, we successfully obtained the three-dimensional close-packed face-centred-cubic silica matrices and artificial opals. Then,a colloidal photonic crystal embedded with CdS quantum dots (QDs) was also chemically prepared by using artificial opals as a template. A reflection spectra study reveals that both artificial opals with and without CdS QDs possess (111) directional photonic bandgap features.

  6. Application of a nanoEA-IRMS system for δ13C measurement of biomineral-bound organics in samples of diatom opal with nanomolar quantities of C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vicente, Ana; María Mejía-Ramírez, Luz; Stoll, Heather

    2013-04-01

    We describe the isotopic measurement of δ13C in very small samples of diatom opal (nanomolar quantities of C) both from fossil sediments and cultures. We use a nano-EA system composed of a combustion elemental analyzer (EA3000 series, Eurovector), with standard 18 mm diameter quartz oxidation-reduction reactors and an ash removal device that aids in removal of uncombusted opal and ensures a long reactor lifetime. This is coupled to a custom designed trapping and cromatography system (Nano-CF, Nu Instruments Ltd.) which cryogenically removes CO2 generated by sample combustion and introduces the gas into a low-flow helium carrier stream to the mass spectrometer (Nu Perspective IRMS instrument, Nu Instruments Ltd.). This technique allows for an important reduction in the minimum sample requirements for analysis compared to a typical EA, however the need to reduce the contribution of the blank to the measured values becomes all the more critical. Blank from the capsules can be minimized through specific protocols including cleaning with solvents and reducing the size of the capsule by cutting it to a smaller size, attaining blanks as low as 13.75±2.15 nmol C. Under these conditions we can accurately measure both standards and diatom reference materials in the range of 100 to 330 nmol C, with a precision of 2σ 10 ‰ analysed in sequence. Applied to measure biomineral-bound organics in cleaned diatom samples from sediments, the low sample size requirements of this technique allows us to analyse multiple size fractions within one sample, and explore isotopic fractionation patterns between them. We have analysed samples from sediments of both centric and pennate diatoms typically in the range of 200 to 1300 µg of cleaned opal. Analysis of culture samples of Thalassiosira pseudonana of 20 to 150 µg of cleaned opal, allows us to evaluate if there is covariation of the whole cell particulate organic carbon (POC) and diatom-bound δ13C values. Initial results suggest

  7. Brazilian multipurpose reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) Project is an action of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Science Technology and Innovation (MCTI) and has its execution under the responsibility of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). Within the CNEN, the project is coordinated by the Research and Development Directorate (DPD) and developed through research units of this board: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (IPEN); Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN); Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN); Regional Center of Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE); and Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). The Navy Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP) and also the participation of other research centers, universities, laboratories and companies in the nuclear sector are important and strategic partnerships. The conceptual design and the safety analysis of the reactor and main facilities, related to nuclear and environmental licensing, are performed by technicians of the research units of DPD / CNEN. The basic design was contracted to engineering companies as INTERTHECNE from Brazil and INVAP from Argentine. The research units from DPD/CNEN are also responsible for the design verification on all engineering documents developed by the contracted companies. The construction and installation should be performed by specific national companies and international partnerships. The Nuclear Reactor RMB will be a open pool type reactor with maximum power of 30 MW and have the OPAL nuclear reactor of 20 MW, built in Australia and designed by INVAP, as reference. The RMB reactor core will have a 5x5 configuration, consisting of 23 elements fuels (EC) of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion-type Al having a density of up to 3.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and enrichment of 19.75% by weight of {sup 23{sup 5}}U. Two positions will be available in the core for materials irradiation devices. The main objectives of the RMB Reactor and the other nuclear and radioactive

  8. Reflection of focused beams from opal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Karri; Mattila, Marco; Arpiainen, Sanna; Ahopelto, Jouni; Jonsson, Fredrik; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia; Egen, Marc; Zentel, Rudolf

    2005-04-04

    We present a robust method for computing the reflection of arbitrarily shaped and sized beams from finite thickness photonic crystals. The method is based on dividing the incident beam into plane waves, each of which can be solved individually using Bloch periodic boundary conditions. This procedure allows us to take a full advantage of the crystal symmetry and also leads to a linear scaling of the computation time with respect to the number of plane waves needed to expand the incident beam. The algorithm for computing the reflection of an individual plane wave is also reviewed. Finally, we find an excellent agreement between the computational results and measurement data obtained from opals that are synthesized using polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres.

  9. Analysis of trace elements in opal using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Ruth, E-mail: ruth.hinrichs@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is particularly important for the analysis of trace elements of precious samples, being one of the few methods to determine elements with ppm concentration that does not affect sample integrity. A PIXE methodology for trace element analysis in opal was developed. To avoid detector count saturation due to the high number of Si-Kα X-rays generated in the sample, several filters were employed to optimize the reduction of the Si-Kα signal, while maintaining acceptable intensities of the other relevant X-ray lines. Two proton beam energies were tested, to establish the signal to noise ratio in different X-ray energies. Spectra were fitted with the software GUPIX, using a matrix composition determined with electron beam excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Above the energy of the silicon X-ray, several trace elements were quantified.

  10. Nanoparticle-tuned structural color from polymer opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursiainen, Otto L; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Winkler, Holger; Viel, Benjamin; Spahn, Peter; Ruhl, Tilmann

    2007-07-23

    The production of high-quality low-defect single-domain flexible polymer opals which possess fundamental photonic bandgaps tuneable across the visible and near-infrared regions is demonstrated in an industrially-scalable process. Incorporating sub-50nm nanoparticles into the interstices of the fcc lattice dramatically changes the perceived color without affecting the lattice quality. Contrary to iridescence based on Bragg diffraction, color generation arises through spectrally-resonant scattering inside the 3D photonic crystal. Viewing angles widen beyond 40 masculine removing the strong dependence of the perceived color on the position of light sources, greatly enhancing the color appearance. This opens up a range of decorative, sensing, security and photonic applications, and suggests an origin for structural colors in Nature.

  11. Modulating light propagation in ZnO-Cu₂O-inverse opal solar cells for enhanced photocurrents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantara, Natalia; Pham, Thi Thu Trang; Boix, Pablo P; Mathews, Nripan

    2015-09-01

    The advantages of employing an interconnected periodic ZnO morphology, i.e. an inverse opal structure, in electrodeposited ZnO/Cu2O devices are presented. The solar cells are fabricated using low cost solution based methods such as spin coating and electrodeposition. The impact of inverse opal geometry, mainly the diameter and thickness, is scrutinized. By employing 3 layers of an inverse opal structure with a 300 nm pore diameter, higher short circuit photocurrents (∼84% improvement) are observed; however the open circuit voltages decrease with increasing interfacial area. Optical simulation using a finite difference time domain method shows that the inverse opal structure modulates light propagation within the devices such that more photons are absorbed close to the ZnO/Cu2O junction. This increases the collection probability resulting in improved short circuit currents.

  12. Ordered macroporous platinum electrode and enhanced mass transfer in fuel cells using inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Park, Hee-Young; Kim, Minhyoung; Lim, Ju Wan; Chung, Dong Young; Lee, Myeong Jae; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opal structures are attractive materials for various applications in electrochemical devices because of the benefits derived from their periodic structures: relatively large surface areas, large voidage, low tortuosity and interconnected macropores. However, a direct application of an inverse opal structure in membrane electrode assemblies has been considered impractical because of the limitations in fabrication routes including an unsuitable substrate. Here we report the demonstration of a single cell that maintains an inverse opal structure entirely within a membrane electrode assembly. Compared with the conventional catalyst slurry, an ink-based assembly, this modified assembly has a robust and integrated configuration of catalyst layers; therefore, the loss of catalyst particles can be minimized. Furthermore, the inverse-opal-structure electrode maintains an effective porosity, an enhanced performance, as well as an improved mass transfer and more effective water management, owing to its morphological advantages.

  13. Hierarchical opal grating films prepared by slide coating of colloidal dispersions in binary liquid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmok; Kim, Seulgi; Kim, Seulki; Kim, Jin-Ho; Lee, Hyunjung

    2015-02-15

    There are active researches on well ordered opal films due to their possible applications to various photonic devices. A recently developed slide coating method is capable of rapid fabrication of large area opal films from aqueous colloidal dispersion. In the current study, the slide coating of polystyrene colloidal dispersions in water/i-propanol (IPA) binary media is investigated. Under high IPA content in a dispersing medium, resulting opal film showed a deterioration of long range order, as well as a decreased film thickness due to dilution effect. From the binary liquid, the dried opal films exhibited the unprecedented topological groove patterns with varying periodic distances as a function of alcohol contents in the media. The groove patterns were consisted of the hierarchical structures of the terraced opal layers with periodic thickness variations. The origin of the groove patterns was attributed to a shear-induced periodic instability of colloidal concentration within a thin channel during the coating process which was directly converted to a groove patterns in a resulting opal film due to rapid evaporation of liquid. The groove periods of opal films were in the range of 50-500 μm, and the thickness differences between peak and valley of the groove were significantly large enough to be optically distinguishable, such that the coated films can be utilized as the optical grating film to disperse infra-red light. Utilizing a lowered hydrophilicity of water/IPA dispersant, an opal film could be successfully coated on a flexible Mylar film without significant dewetting problem.

  14. Status of the OPAL microvertex detector and new radiation monitoring and beam dump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Sijbrand de

    1998-11-01

    The status of the OPAL Phase III microvertex detector is discussed briefly. This is followed by a more detailed description of the OPAL microvertex detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system. This system measures AC currents induced by radiation on each passing of the beams in silicon diodes mounted close to the microvertex detector front-end electronics. Examples are shown for incidents leading to a beam dump trigger. The integrated radiation dose is also discussed.

  15. A Raman, infrared and XRD analysis of the instability in volcanic opals from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrooumov, Mikhail

    2007-12-01

    A series of natural volcanic opal samples with the destabilization phenomena from Mexican deposits (states of Queretaro and Jalisco) was investigated by Raman microprobe (RMP), infrared spectrometry and XRD analysis. These techniques show that at low and room temperatures the unaltered transparent opals may be transformed into destabilized white opals, which are a mixture of different polymorphs of tridymite and α-cristobalite with various degrees of crystallinity. We found systematic changes in frequencies of both the Raman and the infrared bands, caused by increasing regularities of bond-lengths and bond-angles Si-O-Si groups under the effect of stability. Micro-Raman spectrometry confirms that in the destabilized opal the principal mineral phases are MC (monoclinic ordered)- and MX (incommensurate monoclinic)-tridymites that are characterized by more structural order in comparison with other structural modification of this phase in unaltered opal (POn pseudo-orthorhombic disordered tridymite). XRD investigations show that in the sequence from unaltered to destabilized opal the position of principal maximum (4.30, 4.10 and 2.50 Å) shifts towards higher d-spacing. This XRD shifting to higher d-spacing can largely be explained by an increasing amount of tridymite stacking and unresolved superposition of cristobalite and tridymite reflections. The destabilization phenomena in volcanic opals is due to the structural ordering/disordering that is characterized mainly by the formation of the different tridymite polymorphs (MC and MX) in the destabilized opal-CT as well as the decreasing content of molecular water in the structure.

  16. Nano-structure of the cristobalite and tridymite stacking sequences in the common purple opal from the Gevrekseydi deposit, Seyitömer-Kütahya, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Hatipoğlu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The strata that include the fine purple opal formations examined in this paper from the magmagenetic hydrothermal dis solutions. The opals are locally known as Gevrekseydi purple opals. These opal-bearing strata are deposited in volcanic lavas and tuffs in the Seyitömer-Kütahya region of western Turkey. The purple opals are common-type and attractive gem-quality, and they are sold on the worldwide gem markets. We conducted mineralogical investigations to clarify their silica building components, measure their nano-size, and determine their origins. The opals are an opal-CT (opal-cristobalite/tridymite- type silica polymorph with the variable number of cristobalite and tridymite layers. The cristobalite and tridymite stacking sequences were evaluated in terms of maturation, crystallite size, and genesis of the opaline silica material. These sequences are modelled using X-ray diffraction patterns. The relationship between the crystallite size and full width at half maximum values of the Gevrekseydi purple opals were also examined using X-ray diffraction patterns. The crystallite sizes were found to be L=17 nm for the main opal-CT peak (4.09 Å, L=23 nm for the shoulder opal-CT peak (4.29 Å, and L=27 nm for the opal-CT/C peak (2.51 Å. Given the relationship between the crystallite size and maturation of opal-CT, the Gevrekseydi volcanic common purple opals are most likely in a stage of early to mid maturation

  17. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications.

  18. Efficiency enhancement in solid state dye sensitized solar cells by including inverse opals with controlled layer thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hanbin; Shah, Said Karim; Abbas, Mamatimin; Ly, Isabelle; Rivera, Thomas; Almeida, Rui M.; Hirsch, Lionel; Toupance, Thierry; Ravaine, Serge

    2016-09-01

    The photoconversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells can be enhanced by the incorporation of light management nanostructures such as photonic crystals. Here, we present a facile route to incorporate titania inverse opals into solid state dye sensitized solar cells and report photoconversion efficiency enhancements of up to 56% compared with a model system without the inverse opal. Our approach is based on the precise design of titania inverse opals with a predetermined thickness that can be controlled at the individual layer level. By choosing an inverse opal exhibiting a photonic bandgap which overlaps the absorption bands of the dye, our results show that there is an optimal thickness of the inverse opal structure for maximum efficiency enhancement of the cell. This is the first experimental proof that the thickness of a titania inverse opal plays a pivotal role in cell efficiency enhancement in solid state dye sensitized solar cells.

  19. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  20. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  1. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Uraniferous, fluorescent opal, which occurs in tuffaceous sedimentary rocks at Virgin Valley, Nevada, records the temperature and composition of uranium-rich solutions as well as the time of uranium-silica coprecipitation. Results are integrated with previous geologic and geochronologic data for the area to produce a model for uranium mobility that may be used to explore for uranium deposits in similar geologic settings. Uraniferous opal occurs as replacements of diatomite, or silicic air-fall ash layers in tuffaceous lakebeds of the Virgin Valley Formation (Miocene) of Merriam (1907). Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and highangle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal. ?? 1982.

  2. Optical chracterization and lasing in three-dimensional opal-structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eNishijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lasing properties of dye-permeated opal pyramidal structures are compared with the lasing properties of opal films. The opal-structures studied were made by sedimentation of micro-spheres and by sol-gel inversion of the direct-opals. Forced-sedimentation by centrifugation inside wet-etched pyramidal pits on silicon surfaces was used to improve the structural quality of the direct-opal structures. Single crystalline pyramids with the base length of ∼ 100 µm were formed by centrifuged sedimentation. The lasing of dyes in the well-ordered crystalline and poly-crystalline structures showed a distinct multi-modal spectrum. Gain via a distributed feedback was responsible for the lasing since the photonic band gap was negligible in a low refractive index contrast medium; the indices of silica and ethylene glycol are 1.46 and 1.42, respectively. A disordered lasing spectrum was observed from opal films with structural defects and multi-domain regions. The three dimensional structural quality of the structures was assessed by in situ optical diffraction and confocal fluorescence. A correlation between the lasing spectrum and the three-dimensional structural quality was established. Lasing threshold of a sulforhodamine dye in a silica opal was controlled via Förster mechanism by addition of a donor rhodamine 6G dye. The lasing spectrum had a well-ordered modal structure which was spectrally stable at different excitation powers. The sharp lasing threshold characterized by a spontaneous emission coupling ratio β ' 10−2 was obtained.

  3. Phase space optimisation of the USANS instrument Kookaburra at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, A. K.; Rehm, C.

    2011-04-01

    An optimisation of the USANS instrument Kookaburra has been conducted determining the most efficient type of premonochromator crystal and scattering geometry. The approach has been based on representations in phase space combining direct and reciprocal space diagrams. Results are presented for several scenarios involving flat and curved, perfect and mosaic crystals, horizontal and vertical scattering planes. The highest peak current density of 1.7×105 cm-2 s-1 is provided for a wavelength of 4.43 Å by a doubly curved pyrolytic graphite premonochromator diffracting in a horizontal plane and producing a beam size of about 50 cm2 at the sample position. The smallest background is achieved for a wavelength of 2.56 Å and a vertical scattering plane using a bent perfect premonochromator crystal and optionally a collimator to decrease the divergence of the beam exiting the cold neutron guide. For this wavelength a peak current density of 6.6×104 cm-2 s-1 is collected into a sample area of 10 cm2. The bent perfect crystal design is of particular advantage for small samples.

  4. Phase space optimisation of the USANS instrument Kookaburra at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K., E-mail: kafreund@free.f [Via Cordis, 92, rue Abbe de l' Epee, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble, Cedex (France); Rehm, C. [ANSTO, Bragg Institute, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2011-04-01

    An optimisation of the USANS instrument Kookaburra has been conducted determining the most efficient type of premonochromator crystal and scattering geometry. The approach has been based on representations in phase space combining direct and reciprocal space diagrams. Results are presented for several scenarios involving flat and curved, perfect and mosaic crystals, horizontal and vertical scattering planes. The highest peak current density of 1.7x10{sup 5} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is provided for a wavelength of 4.43 A by a doubly curved pyrolytic graphite premonochromator diffracting in a horizontal plane and producing a beam size of about 50 cm{sup 2} at the sample position. The smallest background is achieved for a wavelength of 2.56 A and a vertical scattering plane using a bent perfect premonochromator crystal and optionally a collimator to decrease the divergence of the beam exiting the cold neutron guide. For this wavelength a peak current density of 6.6x10{sup 4} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is collected into a sample area of 10 cm{sup 2}. The bent perfect crystal design is of particular advantage for small samples.

  5. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L., E-mail: l.davies@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Howard, C. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Hobbs, S.J. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Jones, D.T. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Power, S.A. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rose, N. [Department of Geography, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ryder, C.; Seed, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stevens, G. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); White, P.C.L. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: > Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. > Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. > New insights into urban pollution. > A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  6. Superconductivity of Bi Confined in an Opal Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. C.; Nieskoski, M. D.; Disseler, S. M.; Huber, T. E.; Graf, M. J.

    2013-02-01

    Superconductivity is observed in a composite of rhombohedral crystalline bismuth nanoparticles imbedded in an insulating porous opal host via electrical transport and AC magnetic susceptibility. The onset of superconductivity in this system occurs in two steps, with upper transition temperature T c, U =4.1 K and lower transition temperature of T c, L =0.7 K, which we attribute to the granular nature of the composite. The transition at T c, U is observed to split into two transitions with the application of a magnetic field, and these have upper critical fields extrapolated to T=0 K of H c2,1(0)=0.7 T and H c2,2(0)=1.0 T, corresponding to coherence lengths of ξ 1(0)=21 nm and ξ 2(0)=18 nm, respectively. We suggest that because of the lack of bulk-like states in the Bi nanoparticles due to confinement effects, superconductivity originates from surface states arising from Rashba spin-orbit scattering at the interface.

  7. Selectively Patterning Polymer Opal Films via Microimprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Zhao, Qibin; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale structural color flexible coatings have been hard to create, and patterning color on them is key to many applications, including large-area strain sensors, wall-size displays, security devices, and smart fabrics. To achieve controlled tuning, a micro-imprinting technique is applied here to pattern both the surface morphology and the structural color of the polymer opal films (POFs). These POFs are made of 3D ordered arrays of hard spherical particles embedded inside soft shells. The soft outer shells cause the POFs to deform upon imprinting with a pre-patterned stamp, driving a flow of the soft polymer and a rearrangement of the hard spheres within the films. As a result, a patterned surface morphology is generated within the POFs and the structural colors are selectively modified within different regions. These changes are dependent on the pressure, temperature, and duration of imprinting, as well as the feature sizes in the stamps. Moreover, the pattern geometry and structural colors can then be further tuned by stretching. Micropattern color generation upon imprinting depends on control of colloidal transport in a polymer matrix under shear flow and brings many potential properties including stretchability and tunability, as well as being of fundamental interest.

  8. Practitioner insights on obesity prevention: the voice of South Australian OPAL workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge based on science has been central to implementing community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions. The art of practitioner wisdom is equally critical to ensure locally relevant responses. In South Australia (SA), the OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle) program has been implemented to reduce childhood obesity across 20 communities reaching nearly one quarter of the state's population. Staff from across the State come together at regular intervals to share practice challenges and insights and refine the model of practice. Over a 3-year period 12 reflective practice workshops were held with OPAL staff (n = 46). OPAL staff were guided by an external facilitator using inquiring questions to reflect on their health promotion practice within local government. Three themes were identified as central within the reflections. The first theme is shared clarity through the OPAL obesity prevention model highlighting the importance of working to a clearly articulated, holistic obesity prevention model. The second theme is practitioner skill and sensitivity required to implement the model and deal with the 'politics' of obesity prevention. The final theme is the power of relationships as intrinsic to effective community based health promotion. Insights into the daily practices and reflections from obesity prevention practitioners are shared to shed light on the skills required to contribute to individual and social change. OPAL staff co-authored this paper.

  9. Er3+-activated silica inverse opals synthesized by the solgel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Chiappini; L. Zampedri; G. Nunzi Conti; S. Pelli; R. M. Almeida; G. C. Righini; C.Armellini; A. Chiasera; Y. Jestin; M. Ferrari; M. Mattarelli; M. Montagna; E. Moser; C. Tosello

    2007-01-01

    We present the details of the sol-gel processing used to realize inverse silica opal, where the silica was activated with 0.3 mol% of Er3+ ions. The template (direct opal) was obtained assembling polystyrene spheres of the dimensions of 260 nm by means of a vertical deposition technique. The Er3+-activated silica inverse opal was obtained infiltrating, into the void of the template, the silica sol doped with Er3+ ions and subsequently removing the polystyrene spheres by means of calcinations.Scanning electron microscope showed that the inverse opals possess a fcc structure with a air hollows of about 210 nm and a photonic band gap, in the visible range, was observed from reflectance measurements. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+-activated silica inverse opal were investigated by luminescence spectroscopy, where, upon excitation at 514.5 nm, an emission of 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 of Er3+ ions transition with a 21 nm bandwidth was observed. Moreover the 4I13/2 level decay curve presents a single-exponential profile, with a measured lifetime of 18 ms, corresponding a high quantum efficiency of the system.

  10. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection.

  11. The optical interface of a photonic crystal: Modeling an opal with a stratified effective index

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Isabelle; Laliotis, Athanasios; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An artificial opal is a compact arrangement of transparent spheres, and is an archetype of a three-dimensional photonic crystal. Here, we describe the optics of an opal using a flexible model based upon a stratified medium whose (effective) index is governed by the opal density in a small planar slice of the opal. We take into account the effect of the substrate and assume a well- controlled number of layers, as it occurs for an opal fabricated by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The calculations are performed with transfer matrices, and an absorptive component in the effective index is introduced to account for the light scattering. This one-dimensional formalism allows quantitative predictions for reflection and transmission, notably as a function of the ratio between the irradiation wavelength and the sphere diameter, or as a function of the incidence angle or of the polarization. It can be used for an irradiation from the substrate side or from the vacuum side and can account for defect layers. The interface...

  12. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as

  13. Resonant infiltration of an opal: Reflection line shape and contribution from in-depth regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, Isabelle; Bloch, Daniel

    2015-06-21

    We analyze the resonant variation of the optical reflection on an infiltrated artificial opal made of transparent nanospheres. The resonant infiltration is considered as a perturbation in the frame of a previously described one-dimensional model based upon a stratified effective index. We show that for a thin slice of resonant medium, the resonant response oscillates with the position of this slice. We derive that for adequate conditions of incidence angle, this spatially oscillating behavior matches the geometrical periodicity of the opal and hence the related density of resonant infiltration. Close to these matching conditions, the resonant response of the global infiltration varies sharply in amplitude and shape with the incidence angle and polarization. The corresponding resonant reflection originates from a rather deep infiltration, up to several wavelengths or layers of spheres. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the present predictions and our previous observations on an opal infiltrated with a resonant vapor.

  14. Fabrication of BaTiO3 Inverse Opal Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An XIANG; Jian Ping GAO; Hong Kui CHEN; Jiu Gao YU; Rui Xian LIU

    2004-01-01

    The colloidal crystal template or opal with a closed-packed face centered cubic (fcc) lattice, was prepared from monodisperse polystyrene (PS) spheres by gravity sedimentation. The template was used for the generation of photonic crystal. The template provided void space for infiltration of liquid precursor composed of titanium butyloxide, barium acetate, ethanol, and acetic acid. The opal composite was hydrolyzed, dried, sintered by heating for completely removing PS spheres to form BaTiO3 photonic crystals with inverse opal structure. The PS spheres were replaced by air spheres, which interconnected each other through the windows on the BaTiO3 wall. So both the BaTiO3 wall and air void constitute continuous phases.

  15. PAM-PAA microgel inverse opal photonic crystal and pH response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The colloidal crystal template or opal with a closed-packed face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice was prepared from monodisperse polystyrene (PS) spheres by vertical sedimentation. The template provided void space for infiltration of monomer precursor composed of acrylate acid, acrylamide and ammonium persulfate, as well as microgel from the subsequent copolymerization. The sample was immersed in dimethylbenzene for completely removing PS spheres to form PAM inverse opal hydrogels (IOHPAM) or PAM/PAA inverse opal hydrogels (IOHPAM/PAA) photonic crystals. The PS spheres were replaced by air spheres, which interconnected each other through the windows. The study of responses to pH show that there are two peaks for both IOHPAM and IOHPAM/PAA films, but the IOHPAM/PAA peaks shift to higher pH, and the peaks are independent with the AA content.

  16. Optical analysis of the fine crystalline structure of artificial opal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, G; Dorado, L A; Schinca, D; Depine, R A; Míguez, H

    2009-11-17

    Herein, we present a detailed analysis of the structure of artificial opal films. We demonstrate that, rather than the generally assumed face centered cubic lattice of spheres, opal films are better approximated by rhombohedral assemblies of distorted colloids. Detailed analysis of the optical response in a very wide spectral range (0.4 < or = a/lambda < or = 2, where a is the conventional lattice constant), as well as at perpendicular and off-normal directions, unambiguously shows that the interparticle distance coincides very approximately with the expected diameter only along directions contained in the same close-packed plane but differs significantly in directions oblique to the [111] one. A full description of the real and reciprocal lattices of actual opal films is provided, as well as of the photonic band structure of the proposed arrangement. The implications of this distortion in the optical response of the lattice are discussed.

  17. Optical link design and validation testing of the Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaida, Bogdan V.; Wu, William; Erkmen, Baris I.; Biswas, Abhijit; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Kokorowski, Michael; Wilkerson, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) system developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, will be used for optical telecommunications link experiments from the International Space Station (ISS) to a ground telescope located at Table Mountain, CA. The launch of the flight terminal is scheduled for late February 2014 with an initially planned 90-day operations period following deployment on the exterior of the ISS. The simple, low-cost OPALS system will downlink a pre-encoded video file at 50 Mb/s on a 1550 nm laser carrier using on-off key (OOK) modulation and Reed-Solomon forward error correction. A continuous wave (cw) 976 nm multibeam laser beacon transmitted from the ground to the ISS will initiate link acquisition and tracking by the flight subsystem. Link analysis along with pre-flight results of the end-to-end free-space testing of the OPALS link are presented.

  18. Resonant infiltration of an opal: reflection lineshape and contribution from in-depth regions

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the resonant variation of the optical reflection on an infiltrated artificial opal made of transparent nanospheres. The resonant infiltration is considered as a perturbation in the frame of a previously described one-dimensional model based upon a stratified effective index. We show that for a thin slice of resonant medium, the resonant response oscillates with the position of this slice. We derive that for adequate conditions of incidence angle, this spatially oscillating behavior matches the geometrical periodicity of the opal, and hence the related density of resonant infiltration. Close to these matching conditions, the resonant response of the global infiltration varies sharply in amplitude and shape with the incidence angle and polarization. The corresponding resonant reflection originates from a rather deep infiltration, up to several wavelengths or layers of spheres. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the present predictions and our previous observations on an opal infiltrated wit...

  19. Color Tunable and Upconversion Luminescence in Yb-Tm Co-Doped Yttrium Phosphate Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqin; Qiu, Jianbei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Zhengwen

    2016-04-01

    For this paper, YPO4: Tm, Yb inverse opals with the photonic band gaps at 475 nm and 655 nm were prepared by polystyrene colloidal crystal templates. We investigated the influence of photonic band gaps on the Tm-Yb upconversion emission which was in the YPO4: Tm Yb inverse opal photonic crystals. Comparing with the reference sample, significant suppression of both the blue and red upconversion luminescence of Tm3+ ions were observed in the inverse opals. The color purity of the blue emission was improved in the inverse opal by the suppression of red upconversion emission. Additionally, mechanism of upconversion emission in the inverse opal was discussed. We believe that the present work will be valuable for not only the foundational study of upconversion emission modification but also the development of new optical devices in upconversion lighting and display.

  20. Spectroscopy of stop bands in artificial opals filled with an alcohol solution of potassium iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Filatov, V. V.

    2012-09-01

    The spectral position of the stop bands in photonic crystals based on artificial opals filled with an alcohol solution of potassium iodide is investigated. The energy-band structure of samples with quartz globules 230 nm in diameter is modeled based on the dispersion equation. The spectral position of the stop bands in the [111] direction at different solution concentrations is determined. The conditions for forbidden-band "collapse" are established. The possibility of applying artificial opals in optical cavities of lasers of different types is analyzed.

  1. Chemically Patterned Inverse Opal Created by a Selective Photolysis Modification Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Gao, Ning; Gu, Chen; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Lan, Yue; Yin, Xianpeng; Li, Guangtao

    2015-09-01

    Anisotropic photonic crystal materials have long been pursued for their broad applications. A novel method for creating chemically patterned inverse opals is proposed here. The patterning technique is based on selective photolysis of a photolabile polymer together with postmodification on released amine groups. The patterning method allows regioselective modification within an inverse opal structure, taking advantage of selective chemical reaction. Moreover, combined with the unique signal self-reporting feature of the photonic crystal, the fabricated structure is capable of various applications, including gradient photonic bandgap and dynamic chemical patterns. The proposed method provides the ability to extend the structural and chemical complexity of the photonic crystal, as well as its potential applications.

  2. Nanocomposites based on opal matrixes with 3D-structure formed by mangnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkevich A. B.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of electromagnetic waves with nanocomposites of materials obtained by doping of opal matrixes with nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrite has been studied. The opal matrixes contain of SiO2 nanospheres with diameter about 250 nm with ferrite nanoparticles in the nanosphere voids. The measurements are carried out in frequency range from 26 to 38 GHz in magnetic fields up to 30 kOe. It was shown that magnetic resonance in the doped matrix is the main reason for microwave variations.

  3. Permanent tuning of the opal stop-band with the application of uniaxial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Ali Z.; DeLa Rue, Richard M.; Ren, Kun; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2007-05-01

    Three-dimensional photonic crystals have been prepared by self-assembly from sub-micrometre polystyrene spheres. Such crystals are known as a synthetic opal and possess a partial stop-band in the \\langle 111\\rangle direction. The stop-band is tuned towards the shorter wavelengths by applying uniaxial pressure along the \\langle 111\\rangle direction of the face-centred cubic opal structure. The tuning is found to be irreversible and it was also observed that the normalized stop-bandwidth increased after applying uniaxial pressure. The experimental results are compared with the simulation results and found to be in very close agreement.

  4. Mesozooplankton biomass and grazing responses to Cyclone Opal, a subtropical mesoscale eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael R.; Decima, Moira; Simmons, Melinda P.; Hannides, Cecelia C. S.; Daniels, Emy

    2008-05-01

    As part of E-Flux III cruise studies in March 2005, plankton net collections were made to assess the effects of a cyclonic cold-core eddy (Cyclone Opal) on the biomass and grazing of mesozooplankton. Mesozooplankton biomass in the central region of Cyclone Opal, an area of uplifted nutricline and a subsurface diatom bloom, averaged 0.80±0.24 and 1.51±0.59 g DW m -2, for day and night tows, respectively. These biomass estimates were about 80% higher than control (OUT) stations, with increases more or less proportionately distributed among size classes from 0.2 to >5 mm. Though elevated relative to surrounding waters south of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawai'i lee), total biomass and size distribution in Cyclone Opal were almost exactly the same as contemporary measurements made at Stn. ALOHA, 100 km north of the islands, by the HOT (Hawaii Ocean Time-series) Program. Mesozooplankton biomass and community composition at the OUT stations were also similar to ALOHA values from 1994 to 1996, preceding a recent decadal increase. These comparisons may therefore provide insight into production characteristics or biomass gradients associated with decadal changes at Stn. ALOHA. Gut fluorescence estimates were higher in Opal than in ambient waters, translating to grazing impacts of 0.11±0.02 d -1 (IN) versus 0.03±0.01 d -1 (OUT). Over the depth-integrated euphotic zone, mesozooplankton accounted for 30% of the combined grazing losses of phytoplankton to micro- and meso-herbivores in Opal, as compared to 13% at control stations. Estimates of active export flux by migrating zooplankton averaged 0.81 mmol C m -2 d -1 in Cyclone Opal and 0.37 mmol C m -2 d -1 at OUT stations, 53% and 24%, respectively, of the carbon export measured by passive sediment traps. Migrants also exported 0.18 mmol N m -2 d -1 (117% of trap N flux) in Cyclone Opal compared to 0.08 mmol N m -2 d -1 (51% of trap flux) at control stations. Overall, the food-web importance of mesozooplankton increased in

  5. Automated spray coating process for the fabrication of large-area artificial opals on textured substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprafke, Alexander N; Schneevoigt, Daniela; Seidel, Sophie; Schweizer, Stefan L; Wehrspohn, Ralf B

    2013-05-06

    3D photonic crystals, such as opals, have been shown to have a high potential to increase the efficiency of solar cells by enabling advanced light management concepts. However, methods which comply with the demands of the photovoltaic industry for integration of these structures, i. e. the fabrication in a low-cost, fast, and large-scale manner, are missing up to now. In this work, we present the spray coating of a colloidal suspension on textured substrates and subsequent drying. We fabricated opaline films of much larger lateral dimensions and in much shorter times than what is possible using conventional opal fabrication methods.

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  7. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  8. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  9. Ornamental Stones and Gemstones: The limits of heritage stone designation: The case for and against Australian Precious Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry

    2015-04-01

    When the international designation of natural stone types was first mooted in 2007, stones that were utilised in building and construction were the primary focus of attention. However following public discussion it soon became apparent that sculptural stones, stone used for utilitarian purposes such as millstones, as well as archaeological materials including stones used by early man could all be positively assessed as a potential Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR). Over the past 2 years it has been realised there is also a range of ornamental and semi-precious stones that may also be considered in the same international context. Examples in this respect include Imperial Porphyry sourced from Egypt that was much prized in the ancient world and "Derbyshire Blue John" a variety of fluorspar from central England that was used for vases, chalices, urns, candle sticks, jars, bowls door, jewellery and fire-place surrounds, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is at this point that rock materials, sometimes used as gemstones, impinge on the domain of typical heritage stones. In Australia, the gemstone most identifiable with the country is precious opal formed by sedimentary processes in the Great Artesian Basin. In this paper the question is asked whether "Australian Precious Opal" could be or should be considered as a heritage stone of international significance. Immediately Australian Precious Opal satisfies several GHSR criteria including historic use for more than 50 years and wide-ranging utilisation for prestige jewellery around the world. It is also recognised as a cultural icon including association with national identity in Australia as it is legally defined as Australia's "National Gemstone" as well as being the "Gemstone Emblem" for the State of South Australia. Opal continues to be mined. Designation of Australian Precious Opal as a Global Heritage Stone Resource would likely involve formal international recognition of Australian opal in the

  10. Infiltrating a thin or single layer opal with an atomic vapour: sub-doppler signals and crystal optics

    CERN Document Server

    Moufarej, Elias; Zabkov, Ilya; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ballin, Philippe; Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Artificial thin glass opals can be infiltrated with a resonant alkali-metal vapour, providing novel types of hybrid systems. The reflection at the interface between the substrate and the opal yields a resonant signal, which exhibits sub-Doppler structures in linear spectroscopy for a range of oblique incidences. This result is suspected to originate in an effect of the three-dimensional confinement of the vapour in the opal interstices. It is here extended to a situation where the opal is limited to a few or even a single layer opal film, which is a kind of bidimensional grating. We have developed a flexible one-dimensional layered optical model, well suited for a Langmuir-Blodgett opal. Once extended to the case of a resonant infiltration, the model reproduces quick variations of the lineshape with incidence angle or polarization. Alternately, for an opal limited to a single layer of identical spheres, a three-dimensional numerical calculation was developed. It predicts crystalline anisotropy, which is demon...

  11. Two-dimensional inverse opal hydrogel for pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Meng, Zihui; Qi, Fenglian; Xue, Min; Wang, Fengyan; Chen, Wei; Yan, Zequn

    2014-12-01

    A novel hydrogel film with a highly ordered macropore monolayer on its surface was prepared by templated photo-polymerization of hydrogel monomers on a two-dimensional (2D) polystyrene colloidal array. The 2D inverse opal hydrogel has prominent advantages over traditional three-dimensional (3D) inverse opal hydrogels. First, the formation of the 2D array template through a self-assembly method is considerably faster and simpler. Second, the stable ordering structure of the 2D array template makes it easier to introduce the polymerization solution into the template. Third, a simple measurement, a Debye diffraction ring, is utilized to characterize the neighboring pore spacing of the 2D inverse opal hydrogel. Acrylic acid was copolymerized into the hydrogel; thus, the hydrogel responded to pH through volume change, which resulted from the formation of the Donnan potential. The 2D inverse opal hydrogel showed that the neighboring pore spacing increased by about 150 nm and diffracted color red-shifted from blue to red as the pH increased from pH 2 to 7. In addition, the pH response kinetics and ionic strength effect of this 2D mesoporous polymer film were also investigated.

  12. Green Color Purification in Tb(3+) Ions through Silica Inverse Opal Heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Vishnu Prasad; Sivakumar, Sri; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-06-10

    The ordered SiO2:Tb(3+) inverse opal heterostructure films are fabricated through polystyrene spheres hetero-opal template using the convective self-assembly method to examine their potential for color purification. Their optical properties and photoluminescence have been investigated and compared with individual single inverse opals and reference (SiO2:Tb(3+) powder). The heterostructures are shown to possess two broad photonic stop bands separated by an effective pass band, causing suppression of blue, orange, and red emission bands corresponding to (5)D4 → (7)F(j); j = 6, 4, 3 transitions, respectively and an enhancement of green emission (i.e., (5)D4 → (7)F5). Although the suppression of various emission occurs because of its overlap with the photonic band gaps (PSBs), the enhancement of green radiation is observed because of its location matching with the pass band region. The Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of the emission spectrum of the heterostructure based on polystyrene sphere of 390 and 500 nm diameter are x = 0.2936, y = 0.6512 and lie closest to those of standard green color (wavelength 545 nm). In addition, a significant increase observed in luminescence lifetime for (5)D4 level of terbium in inverse opal heterostructures vis-à-vis reference (SiO2:Tb(3+) powder) is attributed to the change in the effective refractive index.

  13. Metal-induced fluorescence properties of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous silver inverse opal platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Lee, Myung-Jin; Kim, Kisun; Hyun, Jerome K.; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the metal-induced fluorescence properties of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous silver inverse opal (IO) films. Electrochemically synthesized silver IO films with a micrometer cavity exhibited notable fluorescence enhancement at the silver frame, and a decrease in fluorescence lifetime. Numerical calculations supported the observations of a higher fluorescence efficiency at the frame than in the cavity.

  14. Study of the structure of synthetic opals affected by temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somenkov, V. A.; Agafonov, S. S.; Glazkov, V. P.; Kovalenko, E. S.; Shushunov, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    It is demonstrated that synthetic opals, like most natural ones, have a cristobalite rather than quartz basis, change their color from white to blue after losing their water-containing component, and form superlattices. Being affected by temperature and pressure, they undergo partial or complete crystallization to the corresponding polymorphic modifications.

  15. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Themagnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ra

  16. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.G.; Byelov, D.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-r

  17. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  18. Diamond Opal-Replica Photonic Crystals and Graphitic Metallic Photonic Band Gap Structures: Fabrication and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhidov, A. A.; Baughman, R. H.; Iqbal, Z.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Ralchenko, V. G.

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate a new method for the formation of photonic bandgap crystals that operate at optical wavelengths. This method involves the templating of a self-assempled SiO2 lattice with diamond, graphite, or amorphous forms of carbon, followed by the removal of the original SiO2 lattice matrix by chemical means. Such carbon opal replicas are the "air type" of photonic crystal (where air replaces silica spheres) that are most favourable for photonic bandgap formation. Surprisingly, the structure of the original opal lattice having a typical cubic lattice dimension of 250 nm) is reliably replicated down to the nanometer scale using either a diamond, graphite, or amorphous carbon templated material. The optical properties of these photonic bandgap crystals are reported and compared with both theory and experimental results on other types of opal-derived lattices that we have investigated. The graphitic reverse opal is the first example of a network type metallic photonic crystal for the optical domain, for which a large photonic bandgap have been predicted.

  19. Focused ion beam milling of nanocavities in single colloidal particles and self-assembled opals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldering, Leon A.; Otter, A.M.(Bert); Husken, Bart H.; Vos, Willem L.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method of realizing single nanocavities in individual colloidal particles on the surface of silicon dioxide artificial opals using a focused ion beam milling technique. We show that both the radius and the position of the nanocavity can be controlled with nanometre precision, to rad

  20. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Bong Kim; Thierry Lasserre; Yifang Wang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  1. BOILING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  2. Quaternary high-resolution opal record and its paleopro- ductivity implication at ODP Site 1143, southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The correlation of opal content and MAR with oxygen isotopic records of benthonic foraminifera at Site 1143, southern South China Sea indicates that, since about 900 ka, the increasing opal content and MAR during the interglacial periods is inferred to reflect the higher surface productivity, for the intensified summer monsoon during the interglacial periods would result in the enhanced upwelling and nutrient supply. Time-sequence spectral analyses of oxygen isotopic record, opal content and MAR at intervals of 0-900 ka reveal that the changes of surface productivity were dominantly forced by the variations of the earth orbital cycles.

  3. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) CubeSat Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, M.; Miller, J.; Cox, W.; Taylor, M. J.; Swenson, C.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Scherliess, L.; Christensen, A. B.; Cleave, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's lower thermosphere is an important interface region between the neutral atmosphere and the "space weather" environment. While the high-latitude region of the thermosphere responds promptly to energy inputs, relatively little is known about the global/regional response to these energy inputs. Global temperatures are predicted to respond within 3-6 hours, but the details of the thermal response of the atmosphere as energy transports away from high-latitude source regions is not well understood. The Optical Profiling of the Atmospheric Limb (OPAL) mission aims to characterize this thermal response through observation of the temperature structure of the lower thermosphere at mid- and low-latitudes. The OPAL instrument is designed to map global thermospheric temperature variability over the critical "thermospheric gap" region (~100-140 km altitude) by spectroscopic analysis of molecular oxygen A-band emission (758 - 768 nm). The OPAL instrument is a grating-based imaging spectrometer with refractive optics and a high-efficiency volume holographic grating (VHG). The scene is sampled by 7 parallel slits that form non-overlapping spectral profiles at the focal plane with resolution of 0.5 nm (spectral), 1.5 km (limb profiling), and 60 km (horizontal sampling). A CCD camera at the instrument focal plane delivers low noise and high sensitivity. The instrument is designed to strongly reject stray light from daylight regions of the earth. The OPAL mission is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) CubeSat-based Science Missions for Geospace and Atmospheric Research program. The OPAL instrument, CubeSat bus and mission are being designed, built and executed by a team comprised of students and professors from Utah State University, Dixie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, with support from professional scientists and engineers from the Space Dynamics Laboratory and Hawk Institute for Space Science.

  4. Membrane reactor. Membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindo, Y.; Wakabayashi, K. (National Chemical Laboratory for Industry, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1990-08-05

    Many reaction examples were introduced of membrane reactor, to be on the point of forming a new region in the field of chemical technology. It is a reactor to exhibit excellent function, by its being installed with membrane therein, and is generally classified into catalyst function type and reaction promotion type. What firstly belongs to the former is stabilized zirconia, where oxygen, supplied to the cathodic side of membrane with voltage, impressed thereon, becomes O {sup 2 {minus}} to be diffused through the membrane and supplied, as variously activated oxygenous species, on the anodic side. Examples with many advantages can be given such as methane coupling, propylene oxidation, methanating reaction of carbon dioxide, etc. Apart, palladium film and naphion film also belong to the former. While examples of the latter comprise, among others, decomposition of hydrogen sulfide by porous glass film and dehydrogenation of cyclohexane or palladium alloy film, which are expected to be developed and materialized in the industry. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  5. The computer application for the opal breccia deposit performance: the discreet interpolation or the finite diferences method

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The application of discreet interpolation or the finite differences methods for opal breccia deposit. The performance is carried out by computer application and graphical presentation for quartz and aluminium oxide.

  6. Spontaneous emission of semiconductor quantum dots in inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Yang, Yingshu; Wang, Yinghui; Gao, Jiechao; Sui, Ning; Chi, Xiaochun; Zou, Lu; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2016-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) infiltrated into inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals (PCs) are systemically studied. The special porous structure of inverse opal PCs enhanced the thermal exchange rate between the CdSe QDs and their surrounding environment. Finally, inverse opal SiO2 PCs suppressed the nonlinear PL enhancement of CdSe QDs in PCs excited by a continuum laser and effectively modulated the PL characteristics of CdSe QDs in PCs at high temperatures in comparison with that of CdSe QDs out of PCs. The final results are of benefit in further understanding the role of inverse opal PCs on the PL characteristics of QDs.

  7. Photoluminescence and energy transfer investigation from SiO2: Tb, Au inverse opals to rhodamine-B dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianzhi; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2016-10-01

    Energy transfer has attracted extensive attention due to its widespread applications in medical diagnostics, DNA analysis and lighting devices. There are few reports on the energy transfer from rare earth ions to dyes. In the present work, the SiO2:Tb inverse opals with and without Au nanoparticles were prepared, and the organic rhodamine-B (RhB) dyes were filled into the voids of SiO2:Tb inverse opals. Non-radiative and radiative energy transfer processes from the SiO2:Tb inverse opals to the RhB were observed. The influence of Au nanoparticles and photonic band gap on the energy transfer from SiO2:Tb inverse opals to the RhB was investigated. The Au nanoparticles enhanced energy transfer was observed due to the surface plasmon resonance effects of the Au nanoparticles. When the emission peaks from the SiO2:Tb inverse opal is overlapped with the photonic band gap, the emission suppression of the SiO2:Tb inverse opal as well the emission enhancement of the RhB dyes were obtained, which is attributed to improved energy transfer caused by the photonic band gap. The steady state rate equations were used to explain enhancement of energy transfer caused by the photonic band gap.

  8. 不同品种授粉对Opal Star费约果着果及果实品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦晓旭; 张猛; 王丹; 李泽华

    2015-01-01

    Opal Star费约果为母本,分别授以Unique、Mammoth、Coolidge、Triumph品种的花粉,探讨不同品种对Opal Star着果及果实品质的影响.结果表明,不同品种授粉后能够显著提高Opal Star着果率,着果率从大到小依次为Unique> Coolidge> Mammoth> Triumph> OpalStar处理.授粉后Opal Star果实的单果质量、果形指数、种子数和可食率增加,果实内在品质得到改善.Unique和Triumph是Opal Star理想的授粉品种.

  9. 圆柱形蛋白石和反蛋白石结构光子晶体的制备及其光学性质*%Fabrication of cylindrical opals and inverse opals and their optical properties*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈威; 王鸣†; 倪海彬

    2013-01-01

      研究了在圆柱曲面基底上自组装空心和实心的圆柱形蛋白石和反蛋白石结构光子晶体的方法。用垂直沉积法在不同曲率半径的毛细管内自组装了空心圆柱形聚苯乙烯(PS)蛋白石结构光子晶体薄膜和二氧化硅(SiO2)反蛋白石结构薄膜;用类重力沉积法制得实心圆柱形蛋白石和反蛋白石结构光子晶体,并讨论了这一生长方式中的状态变化过程及影响因素。用扫描电子显微镜对样品内部结构进行了表征,用光谱仪测试了光子晶体薄膜的反射光谱,结果表明:基底曲率半径和微球粒径的大小是影响空心蛋白石和反蛋白石薄膜质量的主要因素;微球大小是影响实心结构有序性的主要因素。%Hollow and solid cylindrical opals and inverse opals have been made by the self-assembly method in a capillary. The mechanism as well as the assembly process of monodispersed microspheres self-assembly in a capillary has been investigated. By the vertical self-assembly method, hollow cylindrical polystyrene opals and silica inverse opals of different radii have been made in capillaries;whereas cylindrical solid opals and inverse opals have been prepared under the interactions of gravity sedimentation, evaporation induced micro-flow, liquid surface tension and capillary tension. The growth process of producing solid photonic crystals in capillaries have been described and discussed. By scanning electron microscope, we characterize the internal structure of the samples and with spectrometer we test the reflection spectra of these films. Results show that the substrate curvature radius and microsphere size are the main factors that affect the quality of hollow cylindrical opal and inverse opal films while microsphere size has influence on the internal structure of solid cylindrical opals and inverse opals.

  10. Synthesis and Band Gap Control in Three-Dimensional Polystyrene Opal Photonic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ye; ZHENG Zhong-Yu; QIN Fei; ZHOU Fei; ZHOU Chang-Zhu; ZHANG Dao-Zhong; MENG Qing-Bo; LI Zhi-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    High-quality three-dimensional polystyrene opal photonic crystals are fabricated by vertical deposition method.The transmission properties with different incident angles and different composite refractive index contrasts are experimentally and theoretically studied. Good agreement between the experiment and theory is achieved. We find that with the increasing incident angle, the gap position shifts to the short wavelength (blue shift) and the gap becomes shallower; and with the increase of refractive index of the opal void materials and decrease the contrast of refractive index, the gap position shifts to the long wavelength (red shift). At the same time, we observe the swelling effects when the sample is immerged in the solutions with different refractive indices, which make the microsphere diameter in solution become larger than that in air. The understanding of band gap shift behaviour may be helpful in designing optical sensors and tunable photonic crystal ultrafast optical switches.

  11. Angular shaping of fluorescence from synthetic opal-based photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, Vitalii; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Dolgov, Leonid; Kiisk, Valter; Sildos, Ilmo; Loot, Ardi; Gorelik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spectral, angular, and temporal distributions of fluorescence as well as specular reflection were investigated for silica-based artificial opals. Periodic arrangement of nanosized silica globules in the opal causes a specific dip in the defect-related fluorescence spectra and a peak in the reflectance spectrum. The spectral position of the dip coincides with the photonic stop band. The latter is dependent on the size of silica globules and the angle of observation. The spectral shape and intensity of defect-related fluorescence can be controlled by variation of detection angle. Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip. Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed. Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

  12. Millimeter Waveband Dielectric Properties of Nanocomposite Materials Based on Opal Matrices with Particles of Spinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Perov, D. V.; Pakhomov, Ya A.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kuznetsov, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The dielectric properties of 3D nanocomposites based on opal matrices containing the particles of compounds with spinel structure have been studied. Microwave measurements have been carried out in the frequency range from 26 to 38 GHz. The frequency dependences of transmission and reflection coefficients are obtained. The values of the real and imaginary parts of complex dielectric permittivity have been retrieved. The X-ray phase analysis of the nanocomposites is performed and their structures are studied.

  13. Magnetic properties of nanocomposites based on opal matrices with embedded ferrite-spinel nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Klescheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic properties of nanocomposites based on opal matrices with ferrite-spinel nanoparticles embedded have been investigated in temperature range from 2 to 300 K. The magnetization curves and hysteresis loops as well as the temperature dependence of magnetic moment and the temperature and frequency dependences of AC susceptibility have been measured. The results of magnetic measurements are compared to X-ray analysis and electron microscopy investigations.

  14. Diffraction anomalies in hybrid structures based on chalcogenide-coated opal photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Voronov, M M; Yakovlev, S A; Kurdyukov, D A; Golubev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The results of spectroscopic studies of the diffraction anomalies (the so-called resonant Wood anomalies) in spatially-periodic hybrid structures based on halcogenide (GST225)-coated opal films of various thickness are presented. A theoretical analysis of spectral-angular dependencies of the Wood anomalies has been made by means of a phenomenological approach using the concept of the effective refractive index of waveguiding surface layer.

  15. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm, E-mail: mrm5@cam.ac.uk; Butler, Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin [Cavendish Laboratory, NanoPhotonics Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids.

  16. Characterization of the OPAL LiDAR under controlled obscurant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoying; Church, Philip; Matheson, Justin

    2016-05-01

    Neptec Technologies' OPAL-120 3D LiDAR is optimized for obscurant penetration. The OPAL-120 uses a scanning mechanism based on the Risley prism pair. The scan patterns are created by rotating two prisms under independent motor control. The geometry and material properties of the prisms define the conical field-of-view of the sensor, which can be built to between 60 to 120 degrees. The OPAL-120 was recently evaluated using a controlled obscurant chamber capable of generating clouds of obscurants over a depth of 22m. Obscurants used in this investigation include: Arizona road dust, water fog, and fog-oil. The obscurant cloud optical densities were monitored with a transmissometer. Optical depths values ranged from an upper value of 6 and progressively decreased to 0. Targets were positioned at the back of the obscurant chamber at a distance of 60m from the LiDAR. The targets are made of a foreground array of equally spaced painted wood stripes in front of a solid background. Reflectivity contrasts were achieved with foreground/background combinations of white/white, white/black and black/white. Data analysis will be presented on the effect of optical densities on range and cross-range resolution, and accuracy. The analysis includes the combinations of all obscurant types and target reflectivity contrasts.

  17. Inverse gold photonic crystals and conjugated polymer coated opals for functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, P.B.; Gutierrez, Jose; Ferraris, John P.; Martinez, I.L.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Wu, Y.-C.; Lee, Sergey; Parikh, Kunjal; Gillespie, Jessica; Ussery, Geoffrey; Karimi, Behzad; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar; Glosser, R

    2003-10-01

    Inverse gold photonic crystals templated from synthetic opals with a face centered cubic (FCC) crystal lattice were constructed by heat converting gold chloride to metallic gold. Tetrahedral formations constructed of alternating large and small octahedrons oriented in the zinc sulfide structure were created by controlling the infiltration of gold chloride. Silica spheres were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and 5 nm colloidal gold. Ordinary yeast cells were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole and 5 nm colloidal gold. Spheres coated with MEH-PPV were dispersed in H{sub 2}O and coated with polyelectrolytes which recharged and sterically stabilized the colloidal surfaces. The recharged spheres self-assembled by sedimentation with a FCC crystalline lattice possessing 500 {mu}m wide and 1 mm long crystallites. Silica spheres with diameters as large as 1500 {mu}m were self-assembled along the [1 0 0] direction of the FCC crystal lattice. Opals infiltrated with gold and opals constructed from polymer coated spheres were co-infiltrated with polypropylene yielding inverse polypropylene composite photonic crystals.

  18. Multifunctional reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much

  19. A New Neutron Radiography / Tomography / Imaging Station DINGO at OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.; Davidson, G.; Pangelis, S.; Kennedy, S. J.

    A new neutron radiography / tomography / imaging instrument DINGO was built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument is designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defense, industrial, cultural heritage and archaeology applications. In the industrial field it provides a useful tool for studying cracking and defects in steel or other metals. The instrument construction was completed at the end of June 2013 and it is currently in the hot commissioning stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The instrument position for DINGO is the thermal neutron beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The measured flux (using gold foil) for an L/D of approximately 500 at HB-2 is 5.3*107 [n/cm2s], which is in a similar range to other facilities. A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator position in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 500 and 1000. A secondary collimator separates the two beams by blocking one and positions another aperture for the other beam. The whole instrument operates in two different positions, one for high resolution and one for high speed. In the current configuration DINGO measured first radiography and tomography data sets on friendly user test samples.

  20. Ceria based inverse opals for thermochemical fuel production: Quantification and prediction of high temperature behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Danielle Courtney

    Solar energy has the potential to supply more than enough energy to meet humanity's energy demands. Here, a method for thermochemical solar energy storage through fuel production is presented. A porous non-stoichiometric oxide, ceria, undergoes partial thermal reduction and oxidation with concentrated solar energy as a heat source, and water as an oxidant. The resulting yields for hydrogen fuel and oxygen are produced in two discrete steps, while the starting material maintains its original phase. Ordered porosity has been shown superior to random porosity for thermochemical fuel production applications, but stability limits for these structures are currently undefined. Ceria-based inverse opals are currently being investigated to assess the architectural influence on thermochemical hydrogen production. Low tortuosity and continuous interconnected pore network allow for facile gas transport and improved reaction kinetics. Ceria-based ordered materials have recently been shown to increase maximum hydrogen production over non-ordered porous ceria. Thermal stability of ordered porosity was quantified using quantitative image analysis. Fourier analysis was applied to SEM images of the material. The algorithm results in an order parameter gamma that describes the degree of long range order maintained by these structures, where gamma>4 signifies ordered porosity. According to this metric, a minimum zirconium content of 20 atomic percent (at%) is necessary for these architectures to survive aggressive annealing up to 1000°C. Zirconium substituted ceria (ZSC) with Zr loadings in excess of 20at% developed undesired tetragonal phases. Through gamma, we were able to find a balance between the benefit of zirconium additions on structural stability and its negative impact on phase. This work demonstrates the stability of seemingly delicate architectures, and the operational limit for ceria based inverse opals to be 1000°C for 1microm pore size. Inverse opals having sub

  1. Reactor vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and comprising connections for supplying (9, 10, 11) and discharging (13, 14, 15) via the channels (3) gases and/or liquids entering into a reaction with each other and substances formed upon this reactio...

  2. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  3. Reactor Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Bong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very recently the most precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. This paper provides an overview of the upcoming experiments and of the projects under development, including the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible use of neutrinos for society, for nonproliferation of nuclear materials, and geophysics.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  5. Reactor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lema, Juan M.; López, Carmen; Eibes, Gemma; Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Moreira, M. Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    In this chapter, the engineering aspects of processes catalyzed by peroxidases will be presented. In particular, a discussion of the existing technologies that utilize peroxidases for different purposes, such as the removal of recalcitrant compounds or the synthesis of polymers, is analyzed. In the first section, the essential variables controlling the process will be investigated, not only those that are common in any enzymatic system but also those specific to peroxidative reactions. Next, different reactor configurations and operational modes will be proposed, emphasizing their suitability and unsuitability for different systems. Finally, two specific reactors will be described in detail: enzymatic membrane reactors and biphasic reactors. These configurations are especially valuable for the treatment of xenobiotics with high and poor water solubility, respectively.

  6. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Lasserre, T.; Sobel, H.W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrin...

  7. ZnS-opal与反opal结构ZnS光子晶体的组装%Fabrication and characterization of ZnS-opal and inverse opal ZnS photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段涛; 彭同江; 唐永建

    2009-01-01

    以单分散SiO2微球为基元,在75%~80%湿度、30~45℃恒温密闭烘箱中垂直快速组装opal模板;以Zn(NO3)2(0.035mol/L)、TAA乙醇溶液(0.05mol/L)为前体,通过溶剂热法充填形成ZnS-opal复合光子晶体;ZnS-opal复合光子晶体在2%~5%的HF溶液中浸泡4~5 h后卸载模板,制得反opal结构ZnS基光子晶体;采用XRD、SEM、UV-Vis测试手段对反opal结构ZnS基光子晶体形貌、物相和光学性能进行了表征.结果表明:溶剂热法多次充填可使ZnS纳米晶在模板密堆积形成的空隙中均匀成核;经过酸处理的ZnS-opal中SiO2微球溶解、坍塌,形成蜂窝状三维有序介孔和反opal结构ZnS基光子晶体;相同粒径SiO2微球组装的opal模板、ZnS-opal以及反opal结构ZnS光子晶体均表现出光子带隙特性,但反opal结构ZnS光子晶体带隙位置相比前两者发生了蓝移.%Opal templates were rapidly assembled from monodisperse SiO2 microspheres as building blocks by vertical sedimentation in an airtight oven at 30-45 ℃ and in a certain humidity. With a precursor composed of 0.035mol/L Zn (NO3)2 and 0.05mol/L TAA ethanol solution, ZnS photortic crystals with opal structure were prepared by solvothermal synthesis method repeatly. ZnS photonic crystals with inverse opal structure were obtained by removing the opal template after immersing in 2%-5% HF acid for 4-5 h. The morphology, component and optical properties of the synthetic samples were tested and compared. Results of XRD, SEM, and UV-Vis indicated that ZnS nanocrystals can grow in and fill in the void of opal template, and SiO2 microspheres of templates are dissolved so as to form some three dimensional ordered porous structure and to form the inverse opal ZnS photonic crystals. Compared with opal templates, ZnS-opal and inverse opal ZnS photonic crystals assembled with SiO2 spheres in the same diameter show good optical properties and exhibited photonic band gap. The photonic band gap position of inverse

  8. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  9. Thermoresponsive Polymers and Inverse Opal Hydrogels for the Detection of Diols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jean-Philippe; Wischerhoff, Erik; Bernin, Robert; Hettrich, Cornelia; Koetz, Joachim; Sütterlin, Martin; Tiersch, Brigitte; Laschewsky, André

    2016-05-01

    Responsive inverse opal hydrogels functionalized by boroxole moieties were synthesized and explored as sensor platforms for various low molar mass as well as polymeric diols and polyols, including saccharides, glycopolymers and catechols, by exploiting the diol induced modulation of their structural color. The underlying thermoresponsive water-soluble copolymers and hydrogels exhibit a coil-to-globule or volume phase transition, respectively, of the LCST-type. They were prepared from oligoethylene oxide methacrylate (macro)monomers and functionalized via copolymerization to bear benzoboroxole moieties. The resulting copolymers represent weak polyacids, which can bind specifically to diols within an appropriate pH window. Due to the resulting modulation of the overall hydrophilicity of the systems and the consequent shift of their phase transition temperature, the usefulness of such systems for indicating the presence of catechols, saccharides, and glycopolymers was studied, exploiting the diol/polyol induced shifts of the soluble polymers' cloud point, or the induced changes of the hydrogels' swelling. In particular, the increased acidity of benzoboroxoles compared to standard phenylboronic acids allowed performing the studies in PBS buffer (phosphate buffered saline) at the physiologically relevant pH of 7.4. The inverse opals constructed of these thermo- and analyte-responsive hydrogels enabled following the binding of specific diols by the induced shift of the optical stop band. Their highly porous structure enabled the facile and specific optical detection of not only low molar mass but also of high molar mass diol/polyol analytes such as glycopolymers. Accordingly, such thermoresponsive inverse opal systems functionalized with recognition units represent attractive and promising platforms for the facile sensing of even rather big analytes by simple optical means, or even by the bare eye.

  10. Calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Pedogenic or hypogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Harmon, R.S. [and others

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this paper is to consider all of the geological and geochemical data available for the calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain and to ascertain whether this data favors a pedogenic or hyogene origin for these deposits. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site. It is also the purpose of this paper to serve as a foundation for a lengthy feature article to be submitted for publication in 1994. In addition, a stand has been taken by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences against the upwelling-water model (a vote of 17 to 0 against), and this same panel report has concluded that {open_quotes}there is no compelling evidence for the repetitive flooding of the environment by expulsion of groundwater{close_quotes} and that {open_quotes}instead, the evidence strongly supports the idea that the near-surface mineral deposits resulted from percolating rainwater, which carried soil minerals down into rock fractures{close_quotes}. Based on such information the Department of Energy has stated that it {open_quotes}finds no basis to continue to study the origin of these specific deposits{close_quotes}. This study, based upon many different independent lines of evidence, reaches the opposite conclusion and instead favors a hypogene spring-travertine origin for the controversial calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. This study recognizes a pedogenic carbonate component at Yucca Mountain, but argues that this component is distinct from, and sometimes intermixed with, the calcite/opal deposits.

  11. Stress factors in the aftermath of Hurricanes Erin and Opal: data from small business owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, C; Armstrong, T; Stopp, H

    1997-06-01

    Hurricanes Erin and Opal struck the same coastal region in the Northwest Florida Panhandle in late summer of 1995. The study examined the stressors that most affected small businesses in the region in the aftermath of the storms. Power outages, telephone disruptions, employees' availability, debris removal, and lack of customers were the major problem areas reported by business owners (N = 57 of 500 potential respondents). The results indicate that most of the stress factors were transitory and the findings are discussed in light of Murphy's 1985 conceptual model of disaster research.

  12. Fabrication and Photo-Detecting Performance of 2D ZnO Inverse Opal Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D ZnO inverse opal (IO films were fabricated by co-assembly of sacrificed polystyrene (PS microspheres and citric acid/zinc acetate (CA/ZA aqueous solution at an oil–water interface followed by calcination. Their morphologies could be controlled by the surface property of polymer templates and CA/ZA molar ratio. Moreover, photo-detecting devices based on such films were constructed, which showed high photocurrent (up to 4.6 μA, excellent spectral selectivity, and reversible response to optical switch.

  13. Magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites consisting of an opal matrix with embedded spinel ferrite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kleshcheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites representing Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn, Co-Zn, La-Co-Zn, and Nd-Co-Zn spinel ferrite particles embedded in the interspherical spaces of opal matrices are studied. Experimental data are obtained in the temperature interval 2-300 K by measuring the magnetization at a static magnetic field strength of up to 50 kOe and the ac magnetic susceptibility at an alternating magnetic field amplitude of 4 kOe and a frequency of 80 Hz.

  14. Sputtered-silica defect layer in artificial opals: tunability of highly transmitted and reflected optical modes

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Phan Ngoc; Coolen, Laurent; Maître, Agnès; Schwob, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    We propose an original and efficient method to engineer a defect between two well-ordered silica opals by sputtering silica on the top of the first one. As the amount of sputtered silica can be well controlled, it is also the case for the thickness of the layer and consequently for the spectral position of the defect mode. The optical response of these sandwich structures is studied in terms of specular reflection and transmission spectroscopy. Tunable highly transmitted and reflected optical modes are evidenced. The very good agreement between the experimental results and the simulations, run without fitting parameters, demonstrates the almost perfect order of the synthesized structures.

  15. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebel, O.; Braibant, S.; de Jong, S. J.; Hammarström, R.; Hilgers, R.; Honma, A. K.; Jovanovic, P.; Lauber, J. A.; Neal, H. A.

    1998-02-01

    The radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector is described. This system was designed and implemented to measure the radiation dose over time scales varying from a millisecond to a year, and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation exceeds a given threshold in dose and in dose rate within a very small time interval. The system uses reverse-biased silicon diodes as sensitive elements and good stability is achieved by AC coupling of the amplifiers to the sensors.

  16. Fabrication of Au- and Ag–SiO{sub 2} inverse opals having both localized surface plasmon resonance and Bragg diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erola, Markus O.A.; Philip, Anish; Ahmed, Tanzir; Suvanto, Sari; Pakkanen, Tuula T., E-mail: Tuula.Pakkanen@uef.fi

    2015-10-15

    The inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} containing metal nanoparticles can have both the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanoparticles and the Bragg diffraction of inverse opal crystals of SiO{sub 2}, which are very useful properties for applications, such as tunable photonic structures, catalysts and sensors. However, effective processes for fabrication of these films from colloidal particles have rarely been reported. In our study, two methods for preparation of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} with three different crystal sizes and containing gold or silver nanoparticles (NPs) via self-assembly using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces are reported. The Bragg diffraction of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} in the presence and absence of the template was measured and predicted on the basis of with UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The preparation methods used provided good-quality inverse opal SiO{sub 2} films containing highly dispersed, plasmonic AuNPs or AgNPs and having both Bragg diffractions and LSPRs. - Graphical abstract: For syntheses of SiO{sub 2} inverse opals containing Au/Ag nanoparticles two approaches and three template sizes were employed. Self-assembly of template molecules and metal nanoparticles occurred using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces. Both the Bragg diffraction of the photonic crystal and the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au/Ag nanoparticles were detected. - Highlights: • Fabrication methods of silica inverse opals containing metal nanoparticles studied. • Three template sizes used to produce SiO{sub 2} inverse opals with Au/Ag nanoparticles. • PS templates with Au nanoparticles adsorbed used in formation of inverse opals. • Ag particles infiltrated in inverse opals with capillary and electrostatic forces. • Bragg diffractions of IOs and surface plasmon resonances of nanoparticles observed.

  17. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  18. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-07

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  19. Preparation and structural stability of ordered nanocomposites: opal matrix - lead titanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylovich, M. I.; Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Belyanin, A. F.; Bagdasaryan, S. A.; Kiziridi, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The conditions for the formation of nanocomposites based on the basis of lattice packings of SiO2 nanospheres (opal matrices) with included crystallites of lead titanates (PbTiO3 and PbTi3O7) in interspherical nanospacing are considered. For the formation of nanocomposites are used sample opal matrices with dimensions of single-domain regions ≥0,1 mm.3 The diameter of SiO2 nanospheres was ∼260 nm. Obtained nanocomposites volume >2 cm3 in filling >20% of interspherical nanospacing PbTiO3, PbTi3O7 crystallites were size of 16-36 nm. Using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy are studied composition and structural stability when heated nanocomposites to 550°C, which allowed the identification of a local phase transition with change of the space group. The dependence of the composition of synthesized materials on the conditions of their preparation is submitted.

  20. αs analyses from hadronic tau decays with OPAL and ALEPH data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boito, Diogo; Golterman, Maarten; Maltman, Kim; Peris, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    Recently, we extracted the strong coupling, αs(mτ2), from the revised ALEPH data for non-strange hadronic tau decays. Our analysis is based on a method previously used for the determination of the strong coupling from OPAL data. In our strategy, we employ different moments of the spectral functions both with and without pinching, including duality violations, in order to obtain fully self-consistent analyses that do not rely on untested assumptions (such as the smallness of higher dimension contributions in the operation product expansion (OPE)). Here we discuss the αs values obtained from the ALEPH and the OPAL data, the robustness of the analysis, as well as non-perturbative contributions from DVs and the OPE. We show that, although the αs determination is sound, non-perturbative effects limit the accuracy with which one can extract the strong coupling from tau decay data. Finally, we discuss the compatibility of the data sets and the possibility of a combined analysis.

  1. Manifestation of intrinsic defects in optical properties of self-organized opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov; Astratov; Baryshev; Kaplyanskii; Karimov; Limonov

    2000-05-01

    Self-organized synthetic opals possessing a face centered cubic (fcc) lattice are promising for fabrication of a three-dimensional photonic crystal with a full photonic band gap in the visible. The fundamental limiting factor of this method is the large concentration of lattice defects and, especially, planar stacking faults, which are intrinsic to self-assembling growth of colloidal crystal. We have studied the influence of various types of defects on photonic band structure of synthetic opals by means of optical transmission, reflection and diffraction along different crystallographic directions. We found that in carefully chosen samples the stacking probability alpha can be as high as 0.8-0.9 revealing the strong preference of fcc packing sequence over the hexagonal close-packed (hcp). It is shown that scattering on plane stacking faults located perpendicular to the direction of growth results in a strong anisotropy of diffraction pattern as well as in appearance of a pronounced doublet structure in transmission and reflection spectra taken from the directions other than the direction of growth. This doublet is a direct manifestation of the coexistence of two crystallographic phases--pure fcc and strongly faulted. As a result the inhomogeneously broadened stop-bands overlap over a considerable amount of phase space. The latter, however, does not mean the depletion of the photonic density of states since large disordering results in filling of the partial gaps with both localized and extended states.

  2. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  3. A novel opal closest-packing photonic crystal for naked-eye glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaodi; Peng, Yuan; Bai, Jialei; Ning, Baoan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Zhijiang; Gao, Zhixian

    2014-04-09

    A novel opal closest-packing (OCP) photonic crystal (PC) is successfully prepared for naked-eye glucose detection. This PC is fabricated via a vertical convective self-assembly method with a new type of monodisperse microsphere polymerized by co-monomers, namely, methyl methacrylate (MMA), N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA), and 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA). The OCP PC has high stability and periodically-ordered structure, showing the desired structural color. The proposed PC material displays a red shift and reduced reflection intensity when detecting glucose molecules. The red-shift wavelength reaches 75 nm, which clearly changes the structural color from brilliant blue to emerald green. This visually distinguishable color change facilitates the detection of the glucose concentrations from 3 to 20 mm, which demonstrates the potential of the opal PC material for naked-eye detection. Thus, the novel PMMA–NIPA–AAPBA OCP PC is a simply prepared and sensitive material, which shows promising use in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and in real-time monitoring of diabetes. Different types of appropriated recognition groups are expected to be introduced into the 3D OCP PC to form new functional materials or chemical sensors, which will extensively broaden the PC material application.

  4. Inverse opal hydrogel-collagen composite scaffolds as a supportive microenvironment for immune cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Agnieszka N; Irvine, Darrell J

    2008-06-01

    Immunotherapies harness the inherent potential of the body to destroy foreign or infected cells, and are currently being investigated as treatments for cancer. One way to boost native immune responses might be to engineer ectopic lymphoid tissue, providing a supportive microenvironment for immune cell priming, and/or bringing together immune cells at a desired location (e.g., solid tumor sites). Here we describe the development and in vitro testing of composite macroporous poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel scaffolds infused with collagen as a tissue engineering platform for immunotherapy. The PEG hydrogel with ordered, interconnected pores provided mechanical stability and the potential to depot supporting cytokines/chemokines, while an infused collagen matrix supported intra-scaffold migration of loaded T cells and dendritic cells. Rapid, nearly unconstrained T cell migration through scaffolds was achieved by using inverse opal supporting structures with 80 microm macropores. In addition, we demonstrated that the lymphoid tissue chemokine CCL21 could be bound to the inverse opal gel walls of these scaffolds, to provide motility-inducing cues for T cells within these structures. This hybrid scaffold approach combines the strengths of the synthetic and biopolymer hydrogels used in a highly synergistic fashion, allowing each material to compensate for limiting properties of its partner. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. $\\alpha_s$ analyses from hadronic tau decays with OPAL and ALEPH data

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Maltman, Kim; Peris, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we extracted the strong coupling, $\\alpha_s(m_\\tau^2)$, from the revised ALEPH data for non-strange hadronic tau decays. Our analysis is based on a method previously used for the determination of the strong coupling from OPAL data. In our strategy, we employ different moments of the spectral functions both with and without pinching, including Duality Violations, in order to obtain fully self-consistent analyses that do not rely on untested assumptions (such as the smallness of higher dimension contributions in the OPE). Here we discuss the $\\alpha_s$ values obtained from the ALEPH and the OPAL data, the robustness of the analysis, as well as non-perturbative contributions from DVs and the OPE. We show that, although the $\\alpha_s$ determination is sound, non-perturbative effects limit the accuracy with which one can extract the strong coupling from tau decay data. Finally, we discuss the compatibility of the data sets and the possibility of a combined analysis.

  6. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications. PMID:27600885

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  8. Sonochemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  9. Past Warmer Climate Periods at the Antarctic Margin Detected From Proxies and Measurements of Biogenic Opal in the AND-1B Core: The XRF Spectral Silver (Ag) Peak Used as a new Tool for Biogenic Opal Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, G.; Helling, D.; von Eynatten, H.; Niessen, F.; Magens, D.

    2008-12-01

    Quantification of biogenic opal in marine sediments is a time consuming job, but the results could indicate periods of higher bioproductivity and warmer conditions than today at the Antarctic margin. Within the international Antarctic Geological Drilling Program (ANDRILL), core AND-1B was drilled and recovered a 1285 m sequence from a flexural moat basin filled with glacimarine, terrigenous, volcanic and biogenic sediments below the McMurdo Ice Shelf. Our main goal is to study the variability and the stability of the Ross Ice Shelf from Miocene to Recent. The melting and collapse of large Antarctic ice shelves may cause a significant sea level rise because of accelerated inland ice glacier surges into the ocean. Biogenic opal content in sediments can be deduced indirectly from grain density measurements on single samples, or faster and more continuous by gamma ray attenuation measurements on the core, with subsequent wet bulk and grain density calculations. Spectral colour reflectance (b* value) measurements on the split core surface can also be a fast tool for opal content quantification. Of course, they all have disadvantages in comparison to direct measurement on samples using X-ray diffraction or geochemical leaching methods. Some major and minor chemical elements were measured directly on split core surfaces with a non- destructive X-Ray Fluorescence Core Scanner method (XRF-CS, Avaatech) in the field. Quantitative geochemical analyses like determination of total inorganic and organic carbon (TOC), biogenic opal as well as major and minor elements were done on core samples. We found a strong positive correlation between the counts per second of the XRF-CS Ag peak area and the biogenic opal content of the samples (r=0.81) not only in the AND-1B core but in others as well from the Antarctic margin. In literature, it is noted that diatoms could accumulate Ag in sediments, so at first we were pleased to find this Ag enrichment with our tool. But further

  10. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Iversen, M.H.; Koski, Marja;

    2008-01-01

    sp., T. weissflogii, and E. huxleyi, respectively. The average carbon-specific respiration rate was 0.15 d(-1) independent on diet (range: 0.08-0.21 d(-1)). Because of ballasting of opal and calcite, sinking velocities were significantly higher for pellets produced on T. weissflogii (322 +/- 169 m d...

  11. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-cente

  12. Opal phytolith and isotopic studies of "Restinga" communities of Maricá, Brazil, as a modern reference for paleobiogeoclimatic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Pereira dos Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe Maricá restinga, located in the eastern part of the Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil, corresponds to one of the few remaining preserved areas of the state's coastal plain. This paper reports on a study of the Maricá restinga plant communities and also presents an identification of the main plant species present in each community, with the objective of establishing reference collections, by the methods of the proxies opal phytoliths and stable carbon isotopes, for paleoenvironmental reconstructions of this coastal area during the Quaternary. Six plant communities, distributed perpendicularly to the coast line over sandy barriers, lagoonal plain, lagoon margin and weathered basement were identified: halophile-psamophile, scrub, herbaceous swamp, slack, shrubby vegetation and dry forest. In general, the plant species analyzed in each community presented low productivity of opal phytoliths, as only the Poaceae, Cyperaceae and Arecaceae families produce a great amount and diversity of morphotypes of opal phytoliths. The results of the analysis of stable carbon isotopes in sediments indicated a predominance of C3 or a mixture of C3 and C4 plants, presenting a close correlation with the results found in plants collected in each community. In conclusion, it was verified that the carbon isotope analysis associated with that of the opal phytoliths are good proxies for the reconstruction of vegetation in the study area.

  13. Multifunctional Inverse Opal-Like TiO2 Electron Transport Layer for Efficient Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Yi Chu; Chen, Ying; Hou, Yu; Yang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-09-01

    A novel multifunctional inverse opal-like TiO2 electron transport layer (IOT-ETL) is designed to replace the traditional compact layer and mesoporous scaffold layer in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Improved light harvesting efficiency and charge transporting performance in IOT-ETL based PSCs yield high power conversion efficiency of 13.11%.

  14. Regional variations in the fluxes of foraminifera carbonate, coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye, B.

    NE Fig. 10. Pie diagrams showing the relative fluxes of diatom-opal, coccolithoph material during the southwest (SW) and northeast (NE) monsoon period. CBBT EIOT WAST SW NE SW NE argued that in the presence of iron, derived from aeolian dust...

  15. Optimisation and fabrication of a composite pyrolytic graphite monochromator for the Pelican instrument at the ANSTO OPAL reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, A. K.; Yu, D. H.

    2011-04-01

    The triple monochromator for the TOF neutron spectrometer Pelican at ANSTO has been fully optimised in terms of overall performance, including the determination of the thickness of the pyrolytic graphite crystals. A total of 24 composite crystals were designed and fabricated. The calculated optimum thickness of 1.3 mm and the length of 15 cm of the monochromator crystals, that are not available commercially, were obtained by cleaving and soldering with indium. An extensive characterisation of the crystals using X-ray and neutron diffraction was conducted before and after the cleaving and bonding processes. The results proved that no damage was introduced during fabrication and showed that the design goals were fully met. The measured peak reflectivity and rocking curve widths were indeed in an excellent agreement with theory. In addition to the superior efficiency of the triple monochromator achieved by this novel approach, the amount of the crystal material required could be reduced by 1/3.

  16. Solving geological and historical puzzles with advanced gemologic techniques: The Franco Dávila (1772 precious opal case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Guinea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The large precious opal weighting 33 grams fitted in a silver jewel and exposed to visitors at the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN is well documented in: (i its own mounting (1772, (ii at the 775 document of the Archive of the MNCN and (iii the 395 specimen described in the of Pedro Franco Dávila catalogue. The X-ray diffractogram (XRD performed onto the opal block is very similar to other opals of volcanic origin containing varied amounts of cristobalite, tridymite and amorphous silica. The Raman spectrum shows a band peaked at 242, 343 and 416 cm-1 associated with O-Si-O stretching groups; other spectral band peaked at 780 and 819 cm-1 corresponding to vibration of symmetrical O-Si-O rings of 3 and 4 link members, plus other minor bands. The Raman spectrum is also very similar to those observed in Mexican opals of volcanic origin containing an spectral band of stretching nodes v1 (OH at 3233, 3393, 3511, 3628 cm-1 related to OH groups with hydrogen bonds of isolated silanol groups. The interferometric confocal dual microscope 3D (MCI3D, which is a nondestructive facility of high resolution and LED technology reveals the geometry of graver tools on the silver jewel and the computed tomography X-ray highlights the opal cutting as a squared princess type and silver chloride infillings of a crack probably caused by a shock on a corner. Under the scanning electron microscope we observed barite, sealed veins of silica rich in Mn and opal with high contents of Al and K which, along with the historical data, the piece can be attributed to the historical site of opals hosted in Slovakia andesite rocks, this data explains the optical light behavior in the cabochon. The silver jewel has large amounts of Hg and AgCl indicating amalgam method. In addition the natural AgS2 phases probably come from Nueva España (year 1772 in full production of silver in such time. The association of new analytical non-destructive techniques combines the

  17. Solving geological and historical puzzles with advanced gemologic techniques: The Franco Dávila (1772) precious opal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Guinea, J.; Gonzalez-Alcalde, J.; Furio, M.; Jorge, A.; Garrido, F.

    2016-07-01

    The large precious opal weighting 33 grams fitted in a silver jewel and exposed to visitors at the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN) is well documented in: (i) its own mounting (1772), (ii) at the 775 document of the Archive of the MNCN and (iii) the 395 specimen described in the of Pedro Franco Dávila catalogue. The X-ray diffractogram (XRD) performed onto the opal block is very similar to other opals of volcanic origin containing varied amounts of cristobalite, tridymite and amorphous silica. The Raman spectrum shows a band peaked at 242, 343 and 416 cm−1 associated with O-Si-O stretching groups; other spectral band peaked at 780 and 819 cm−1 corresponding to vibration of symmetrical O-Si-O rings of 3 and 4 link members, plus other minor bands. The Raman spectrum is also very similar to those observed in Mexican opals of volcanic origin containing an spectral band of stretching nodes ν1 (OH) at 3233, 3393, 3511, 3628 cm−1 related to OH groups with hydrogen bonds of isolated silanol groups. The interferometric confocal dual microscope 3D (MCI3D), which is a nondestructive facility of high resolution and LED technology reveals the geometry of graver tools on the silver jewel and the computed tomography X-ray highlights the opal cutting as a squared princess type and silver chloride infillings of a crack probably caused by a shock on a corner. Under the scanning electron microscope we observed barite, sealed veins of silica rich in Mn and opal with high contents of Al and K which, along with the historical data, the piece can be attributed to the historical site of opals hosted in Slovakia andesite rocks, this data explains the optical light behavior in the cabochon. The silver jewel has large amounts of Hg and AgCl indicating amalgam method. In addition the natural AgS2 phases probably come from Nueva España (year 1772) in full production of silver in such time. The association of new analytical non-destructive techniques combines the

  18. Quaternary biogenic opal records in the South China Sea: Linkages to East Asian monsoon, global ice volume and orbital forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG RuJian; JIAN ZhiMin; XIAO WenShen; TIAN Jun; LI JianRu; CHEN RongHua; ZHENG YuLong; CHEN JianFang

    2007-01-01

    Particulate fluxes investigated in the central South China Sea (SCS) during 1993-1996 indicate that opal flux can be used to show primary productivity change, which provides a foundation for tracing the evolutionary relationship between the surface productivity and East Asian monsoon in the SCS during the late Quaternary glacial and interglacial periods. Based on the studies of opal % and their mass accumulation rates (MAR) at the six sites recovered from the SCS during the "Resolution" ODP Leg 184 and "Sonne" 95 cruise of the Sino-Germany cooperation, opal % and their MARs increased evidently in the northern sites since 470-900 ka, and they enhanced and reduced, respectively, during the glacial and interglacial periods. Whereas they increased obviously in the southern sites since 420-450 ka,and they augmented and declined, respectively, during the interglacial and glacial periods. The variability in opal % and their MARs in the late Quaternary glacial cyclicity indicate the "seesaw" pattern of surface productivity in the SCS. The winter monsoon intensified during the glacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased, respectively, in the northern and southern SCS. The summer monsoon strengthened during the interglacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased,respectively, in the southern and northern SCS. The cross spectral analyses between the opal % in the northern and southern SCS during the Quaternary and global ice volume (δ18O) and orbital forcing (ETP) indicate that the East Asian winter and summer monsoons could be ascribed to the different drive mechanisms. On the orbital time scale, the global ice volume change could be a dominant factor for the winter monsoon intension and temporal variations. As compared with the winter monsoon, the correlative summer solar radiation with the obliquity and precession in the Northern Hemisphere could be a mostly controlling factor for the summer monsoon intension and temporal variations.

  19. Quaternary biogenic opal records in the South China Sea: Linkages to East Asian monsoon, global ice volume and orbital forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Particulate fluxes investigated in the central South China Sea (SCS) during 1993―1996 indicate that opal flux can be used to show primary productivity change, which provides a foundation for tracing the evolutionary relationship between the surface productivity and East Asian monsoon in the SCS during the late Quaternary glacial and interglacial periods. Based on the studies of opal % and their mass accumulation rates (MAR) at the six sites recovered from the SCS during the “Resolution” ODP Leg 184 and “Sonne” 95 cruise of the Sino-Germany cooperation, opal % and their MARs increased evidently in the northern sites since 470―900 ka, and they enhanced and reduced, respectively, during the glacial and interglacial periods. Whereas they increased obviously in the southern sites since 420―450 ka, and they augmented and declined, respectively, during the interglacial and glacial periods. The vari- ability in opal % and their MARs in the late Quaternary glacial cyclicity indicate the “seesaw” pattern of surface productivity in the SCS. The winter monsoon intensified during the glacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased, respectively, in the northern and southern SCS. The summer monsoon strengthened during the interglacial periods, surface productivity increased and decreased, respectively, in the southern and northern SCS. The cross spectral analyses between the opal % in the northern and southern SCS during the Quaternary and global ice volume (δ 18O) and orbital forcing (ETP) indicate that the East Asian winter and summer monsoons could be ascribed to the different drive mechanisms. On the orbital time scale, the global ice volume change could be a dominant factor for the winter monsoon intension and temporal variations. As compared with the winter monsoon, the correlative summer solar radiation with the obliquity and precession in the Northern Hemisphere could be a mostly controlling factor for the summer monsoon intension and

  20. COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF TOM OPAL 878L CATALYST FOR OLEFIN DECREASING%TOM OPAL 878L型降烯烃催化剂的工业应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐武清; 叶晓东

    2003-01-01

    介绍了洛阳分公司Ⅰ套催化裂化装置使用TOM OPAL 878L降汽油烯烃催化剂的情况.该剂在占系统催化剂藏量46%时进行的标定结果表明:该剂具有比较明显的降汽油烯烃效果,汽油烯烃体积分数由49.7%降到42%,下降了7.7个百分点,汽油辛烷值没有降低;产品分布得到改善,重油裂化能力强,干气和焦炭选择性好,干气产率降低了0.16个百分点,焦炭产率降低了0.81个百分点,轻质油收率增加了1.58个百分点,轻液体收率增加了2.36个百分点.

  1. Plasmonics of opalic surface: a combined near-and far-field approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lethiec, Clotilde; Popescu, Trajan; Frederich, Hugo; Ngoc, Phan; Yraola, Eduardo; Schwob, Catherine; Charra, Fabrice; Coolen, Laurent; Douillard, Ludovic; Maître, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    An opalic plasmonic sample, constituted by a hexagonal arrangement of metallized silica spheres, presents remarkable optical properties due to the mixing of periodic arrangement and singularities at the sphere touching points. It is therefore an interesting candidate for exploiting the excitation of both localized and propagating surface plasmons. Several channels of excitation based on these properties or exploiting a certain level of disorder are evidenced, opening new routes for the efficient excitation of plasmons on a wide spectral range. The versatility of such hybrid system is evidenced in the context of two complementary experiments: specular reflective spectrometry and photoemission electron microscopy. Both techniques offer different points of view on the same physical phenomenon and the link between them is discussed. Such experiments evidence the opportunities offered by these 2D hybrid materials in the context of nanophotonics.

  2. Inclusions in precious Australian opals offer a unique access to Martian-like weathering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gemma; Rey, Patrice; Carter, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Spectral signatures of the surface of Mars indicate a variety of hydrated minerals, including Al- and Fe/Mg-rich phyllosilicates, iron oxides, sulfates, and opaline silica. Their formation has been attributed to a long-lived low-temperature aqueous weathering history (e.g. Bishop et al., 2008; Ehlmann et al., 2013) followed by a period of intense acidic oxidative weathering (e.g. Carter et al., 2013). Very acidic weathering, driven by volcanic-derived sulfuric acid, is possible on a regional scale on Mars because of the lack of carbonate. On Earth, however, low-pH weathering on a regional scale is unusual because of the abundance of carbonate. Finding regional-scale Martian analogues on Earth is therefore a challenge. The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) in central Australia formed during the Early Cretaceous from the deposition of pyrite-rich volcaniclastic sediments in a cold, muddy, anoxic and shallow continental sea. Following mid-Cretaceous sea regression, a deep (~100 m) weathering profile recorded a protracted episode (~from 97 to 60 Ma) of oxidative weathering during continuous uplift and denudation, which stopped 60 myr ago. Since then, the weathering profile, which consists of Al- and Fe-rich phyllosilicates, iron oxides, and sulfates, has been constantly reworked. Interestingly, this profile hosts the bulk of the world's precious opal deposits. Since no opal deposit can be found in post-60 Ma rock formations, it is most likely that opal is part of the weathering profile developed during the drying out of central Australia. We analysed the mineral inclusions from six opal samples from the GAB to better document the early oxidative weathering. Using VNIR and Raman spectroscopy we were able to identify a variety of minerals including ferrihydrite, barite, gypsum and alunite replaced by goethite. This mineralogical assemblage is indicative of acidic oxidative conditions that points to Martian-like acidic weathering. We propose that acidity was derived from the

  3. Dark Current and Multipacting Capabilities in OPAL: Model Benchmarks and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, C; Yin, Z G; Zhang, T J

    2012-01-01

    Dark current and multiple electron impacts (multipacting), as for example observed in radio frequency (RF) structures of accelerators, are usually harmful to the equipment and the beam quality. These effects need to be suppressed to guarantee efficient and stable operation. Large scale simulations can be used to understand causes and develop strategies to suppress these phenomenas. We extend \\opal, a parallel framework for charged particle optics in accelerator structures and beam lines, with the necessary physics models to efficiently and precisely simulate multipacting phenomenas. We added a Fowler-Nordheim field emission model, two secondary electron emission models, developed by Furman-Pivi and Vaughan respectively, as well as efficient 3D boundary geometry handling capabilities. The models and their implementation are carefully benchmark against a non-stationary multipacting theory for the classic parallel plate geometry. A dedicated, parallel plate experiment is sketched.

  4. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Feng; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Thin Films, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Junling [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-04-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opal (io-BiVO{sub 4}) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO{sub 4} maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO{sub 4} to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO{sub 4} exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO{sub 4} thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  5. Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Strategy to Improve Photocatalysis: Underexplored Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Mariano; Schneider, Jenny; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Mendive, Cecilia B

    2015-10-01

    The structuring of materials in the form of photonic crystals for photocatalytic applications is a quite new strategy aiming to enhance the performance of the photocatalysts at wavelength ranges where their absorption is poor. It is of particular interest to successfully manufacture an efficient photocatalytic system that could make use of solar light. Thus, the key of the strategy is the "slow photon effect", occurring at the edges of a forbidden band for photons. In this Perspective we have chosen some questions that we consider of relevance and that are well worth being addressed both theoretically and experimentally. It is the aim of this discussion to eventually lead to a more productive use of inverse opals as photonic photocatalytic materials.

  6. Enhancement of Tb-Yb quantum cutting emission by inverse opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Siqin

    2016-04-01

    Yb3+, Tb3+ co-doped YPO4 inverse opal photonic crystal was prepared directly by sol-gel technique in combination with self-assembly method. With the influence of the photonic band gap, quantum cutting emission of Tb3+, Yb3+ was investigated in photonic crystals by photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime. The result clearly shows that, when the spontaneous emission of donor Tb3+ is inhibited by photonic band gap, Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting quantum efficiency from Tb3+ to Yb3+ could be enhanced from 131.2% to 140.5%. The mechanisms for the influence of the photonic band gap on quantum cutting process of Tb3+ and Yb3+ are discussed. We believe that the present work will be valuable for the foundational study of quantum cutting energy transfer process and application of quantum cutting optical devices in spectral modification materials for silicon solar cells.

  7. Impact of opal nanoconfinement on electronic properties of sodium particles: NMR studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charnaya, E.V., E-mail: charnaya@live.com [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Lee, M.K. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); MoST Instrument Center at NCKU, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); Chang, L.J. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101 Taiwan (China); Kumzerov, Yu.A.; Fokin, A.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Samoylovich, M.I. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow, 141700 (Russian Federation); Bugaev, A.S. [CSR Institute of Technology “Technomash”, Moscow, 121108 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-20

    The {sup 23}Na Knight shift of NMR line which is highly correlated with the electron spin susceptibility and density of states at the Fermi level was studied for the sodium loaded opal. The measurements were carried out within a temperature range from 100 to 400 K for solid and melted confined sodium nanoparticles. The NMR line below 305 K was a singlet with the Knight shift reduced compared to that in bulk. Above this temperature the NMR line split reproducibly into two components with opposite trends in the Knight shift temperature dependences which evidenced a nanoconfinement-induced transformation and heterogeneity in the electron system. The findings were suggested to be related to changes in the topology of the Fermi surface.

  8. Enhanced spontaneous emission from nanodiamond colour centres on opal photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Inam, Faraz A; Bradac, Carlo; Stewart, Luke; Withford, Michael J; Dawes, Judith M; Rabeau, James R; Steel, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Colour centres in diamond are promising candidates as a platform for quantum technologies and biomedical imaging based on spins and/or photons. Controlling the emission properties of colour centres in diamond is a key requirement for developing efficient single photon sources with high collection efficiency. A number of groups have produced enhancement in the emission rate over narrow wavelength ranges by coupling single emitters in nanodiamond crystals to resonant electromagnetic structures. Here we characterise in detail the spontaneous emission rates of nitrogen-vacancy centres positioned in various locations on a structured substrate. We show an average factor of 1.5 enhancement of the total emission rate when nanodiamonds are on an opal photonic crystal surface, and observe changes in the lifetime distribution. We present a model to explain these observations and associate the lifetime properties with dipole orientation and polarization effects.

  9. Mimicking natural fibrous structures of opals by means of a microemulsion-mediated hydrothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Verdinelli, Valeria; Ruso, Juan M; Messina, Paula V

    2011-07-19

    Silica-based nanomaterials are of great interest because of their potential applications in constructing electronic and optoelectronic nanodevices. Especially significant are those that combine the properties of photonic crystal with a fibrous semiconductor structure. Here we report the use of microemulsion droplet systems as a simple and controllable route for the synthesis of 3D opals materials with an unusual fibrous microstructure similar to those that exist in nature. By this method, we demonstrate the creation of very long fibrils of 30-50 nm diameter and more than 20 μm length showing simultaneous short and long wavelength light emissions and band gap values (5.50 and 4.41 eV) comparable to those obtained for silicon-based metal oxide semiconductors.

  10. Search for Supersymmetric Particles with the OPAL Detector at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaya, N

    A search of Supersymmetric particles was performed using the data collected in 1999 and 2000 by the Opal detector at the LEP2 e+e- collider. The center-of-mass energies ranged from 192 GeV to 209 GeV, and the data analyzed correspond to an integrated luminosity of 432 pb-1. Supersymmetric models permit a large number of different experimental final states which should all be investigated. The search presented here is sensitive to final states with photons plus additional detector activity with missing energy. these topologies are characteristic of events expected in Gauge-Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking (GMSB) models. No significant evidence for their existence is observed. Finally, using various search results at centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV, constraints on the parameters have been given within the framework of the minimal GMSB model.

  11. Graphene-embedded 3D TiO2 inverse opal electrodes for highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells: morphological characteristics and photocurrent enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Na; Yoo, Haemin; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-05-21

    We demonstrated the preparation of graphene-embedded 3D inverse opal electrodes for use in DSSCs. The graphene was incorporated locally into the top layers of the inverse opal structures and was embedded into the TiO2 matrix via post-treatment of the TiO2 precursors. DSSCs comprising the bare and 1-5 wt% graphene-incorporated TiO2 inverse opal electrodes were compared. We observed that the local arrangement of graphene sheets effectively enhanced electron transport without significantly reducing light harvesting by the dye molecules. A high efficiency of 7.5% was achieved in DSSCs prepared with the 3 wt% graphene-incorporated TiO2 inverse opal electrodes, constituting a 50% increase over the efficiencies of DSSCs prepared without graphene. The increase in efficiency was mainly attributed to an increase in J(SC), as determined by the photovoltaic parameters and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis.

  12. 206Pb-230Th-234U-238U and 207Pb-235U geochronology of Quaternary opal, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.

    2000-01-01

    U–Th–Pb isotopic systems have been studied in submillimeter-thick outermost layers of Quaternary opal occurring in calcite–silica fracture and cavity coatings within Tertiary tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. These coatings preserve a record of paleohydrologic conditions at this site, which is being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The opal precipitated from groundwater is variably enriched in 234U (measured 234U/238U activity ratio 1.124–6.179) and has high U (30–313 ppm), low Th (0.008–3.7 ppm), and low common Pb concentrations (measured 206Pb/204Pb up to 11,370). It has been demonstrated that the laboratory acid treatment used in this study to clean sample surfaces and to remove adherent calcite, did not disturb U–Th–Pb isotopic systems in opal. The opal ages calculated from 206Pb∗/238U and 207Pb∗/235U ratios display strong reverse discordance because of excess radiogenic 206Pb∗ derived from the elevated initial 234U. The data are best interpreted using projections of a new four-dimensional concordia diagram defined by 206Pb∗/238U, 207Pb∗/235U, 234U/238Uactivity, and 230Th/238Uactivity. Ages and initial 234U/238U activity ratios have been calculated using different projections of this diagram and tested for concordance. The data are discordant, that is observed 207Pb∗/235U ages of 170 ± 32 (2σ) to 1772 ± 40 ka are systematically older than 230Th/U ages of 34.1 ± 0.6 to 452 ± 32 ka. The age discordance is not a result of migration of uranium and its decay products under the open system conditions, but a consequence of noninstantaneous growth of opal. Combined U–Pb and 230Th/U ages support the model of slow mineral deposition at the rates of millimeters per million years resulting in layering on a scale too fine for mechanical sampling. In this case, U–Pb ages provide more accurate estimates of the average age for mixed multiage samples than 230Th/U ages, because ages based on shorter

  13. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  14. D and DR Reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The world's second full-scale nuclear reactor was the D Reactor at Hanford which was built in the early 1940's and went operational in December of 1944.D Reactor ran...

  15. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  16. Can citizen science produce good science? Testing the OPAL Air Survey methodology, using lichens as indicators of nitrogenous pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregidgo, Daniel J; West, Sarah E; Ashmore, Mike R

    2013-11-01

    Citizen science is having increasing influence on environmental monitoring as its advantages are becoming recognised. However methodologies are often simplified to make them accessible to citizen scientists. We tested whether a recent citizen science survey (the OPAL Air Survey) could detect trends in lichen community composition over transects away from roads. We hypothesised that the abundance of nitrophilic lichens would decrease with distance from the road, while that of nitrophobic lichens would increase. The hypothesised changes were detected along strong pollution gradients, but not where the road source was relatively weak, or background pollution relatively high. We conclude that the simplified OPAL methodology can detect large contrasts in nitrogenous pollution, but it may not be able to detect more subtle changes in pollution exposure. Similar studies are needed in conjunction with the ever-growing body of citizen science work to ensure that the limitations of these methods are fully understood.

  17. Production of luster glaze on opal tableware using zarinfam technique and characterization of its structure and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Fahime; Rashidi Huyeh, Majid; Ghahari, Mahdi

    2016-05-01

    Lusters are potters that have attracted much attention due to their specific optical features, one of the most important of which is their sparkle that appears in various colors at different angles. This effect linked to the multilayer structure of luster and the presence of metallic nanoparticles in enamel layer. In this research, luster glaze was produced on Opal tableware, manufactured in Mahfam Jam Co., using Zarinfam technique. SEM micrograph image of the samples indicated that the glaze forms a multilayer structure, on the Opal tableware surface, consisting of a glassy superficial layer of some tens of nanometers and a composite layer of some hundreds of nanometers. The enamel composite layer contains silver nanoparticles embedded in a silica medium. Employing a multilayer model, we studied the influence of different parameters such as luster enamel thickness, nanoparticles volume fraction in enamel, nanoparticle size, observe angle, and glass layer thickness on luster color.

  18. Variations of opal accumulation rates and paleoproductivity over the past 12 Ma at ODP Site 1143,southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The biogenic silica analysis was performed on 463 samples from ODP 184 Site 1143, the southern South China Sea. The results show that the opal content and MAR evidently increased between 12.3 and 5.7 Ma, which was contemporary with the high carbonate and total MARs, reflecting the high biogenic productivity in the late Miocene.This demonstrates the occurrence of the late Miocene "Biogenie Bloom Event" in the southern South China Sea, corresponding to the late Miocene-early Pliocene "Biogenic Bloom Event" in the Indian-Pacific Ocean. The increases of opal content and MAR after the middle Pleistocene (about 0.7 Ma)is inferred to result from the enhanced upwelling and nutrient supply, which was induced by the intensified monsoon circulation after the "Mid-Pleistocene Revolution".

  19. Fabrication and optical properties of Alq 3 doped PMMA microsphere arrays templated by ZnO inverse opal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ming; Deng, Lier; Zhao, Ailun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Dawei

    2010-07-01

    PMMA microsphere arrays are fabricated by a double replicating method with common used polystyrene colloidal crystal template. High quality ZnO inverse opals formed by electrodeposition play the key role between the PMMA microsphere arrays and polystyrene colloidal crystals. The electrodeposition method has advantage on fabricating IO structures with high solid fraction. After the subsequently in-situ polymerization of MMA in the voids of ZnO inverse opals, the ZnO is removed by hydrochloric acid solution. Microsphere arrays fabricated by PMMA or PMMA doped with Alq 3 are prepared. Reflection stop bands are detected from the formed PMMA microsphere arrays. Solid fraction from 37% to 50% of the PMMA arrays can be formed by different in-situ polymerization modes of MMA. The photoluminescence of Alq 3 in the PMMA spheres is partly suppressed at the wavelength of the photonic stop band induced by PMMA arrays.

  20. CdS quantum dots modified CuO inverse opal electrodes for ultrasensitive electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biosensor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The CuO inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and modified with CdS quantum dots by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). CdS QDs modified CuO IOPCs FTO electrodes of different SILAR cycles were fabricated and their electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (I–t). Structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microsc...

  1. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  2. Reactor and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  3. Geohydrologic reconnaissance of Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study is a geohydrologic reconnaissance of about 170 square miles in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area from Las Vegas Wash to Opal Mountain, Nevada. The study is one of a series that describes the geohydrology of the recreation area and that indentifies areas where water supplies can be developed. Precipitation in this arid area is about 5 inches per year. Streamflow is seasonal and extremely variable except for that in the Colorado River, which adjoins the area. Pan evaporation is more than 20 times greater than precipitation; therefore, regional ground-water supplies are meager except near the Colorado River, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave. Large ground-water supplies can be developed near the river and lakes, and much smaller supplies may be obtained in a few favorable locations farther from the river and lakes. Ground water in most of the areas probably contains more than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, but water that contains less than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids can be obtained within about 1 mile of the lakes. Crystalline rocks of metamorphic, intrusive and volcanic origin crop out in the area. These rocks are overlain by conglomerate and mudstone of the Muddy Creek Formation, gravel and conglomerate of the older alluvium, and sand and gravel of the Chemehuevi Formation and younger alluvium. The crystalline rocks, where sufficiently fractured, yield water to springs and would yield small amounts of water to favorably located wells. The poorly cemented and more permeable beds of the older alluvium, Chemehuevi Formation, and younger alluvium are the better potential aquifers, particularly along the Colorado River and Lakes Mead and Mohave. Thermal springs in the gorge of the Colorado River south of Hoover Dam discharge at least 2,580 acre-feet per year of water from the volcanic rocks and metamorphic and plutonic rocks. The discharge is much greater than could be infiltrated in the drainage basin above the springs

  4. Oxygen persufflation as adjunct in liver preservation (OPAL: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherag Andre

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early graft dysfunction due to preservation/reperfusion injury represents a dramatic event after liver transplantation. Enhancement of donor organ criteria, in order to cope with the ever increasing donor shortage, further increases graft susceptibility to ischemic alterations. Major parts of post-preservation injury, however, occur at the time of warm reperfusion but not during ischemic storage; successful reperfusion of ischemic tissue in turn depends on an adequate redox and intracellular signal homeostasis. The latter has been shown experimentally to be favorably influenced by oxygen persufflation within short time spans. Thus viability of marginally preserved liver grafts could still be augmented by transient hypothermic reconditioning even after normal procurement and static cold storage. The present study is aimed to confirm the conceptual expectations, that hypothermic reconditioning by gaseous oxygen persufflation is a useful method to suppress injurious cellular activation cascades and to improve post-ischemic recovery of marginally preserved liver grafts. Methods/Design OPAL is a prospective single center randomized proof of concept study, including two parallel groups in a total of 116 liver transplant patients. The effect of an in hospital treatment of the isolated liver graft by 2 hours of oxygen persufflation immediately prior to transplantation will be assesses as compared to standard procedure (cold storage without further intervention. The primary endpoint is the peak transaminase serum level (AST during the first three days after transplantation as a surrogate readout for parenchymal liver injury. Other outcomes comprise patient and graft survival, time of intensive care requirement, hepatic tissue perfusion 1h after revascularisation, early onset of graft dysfunction based on coagulation parameters, as well as the use of a refined scoring-system for initial graft function based on a multi-parameter (AST

  5. Cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels for a spatially separated co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeyun; Bencherif, Sidi A; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional macroporous scaffolds have extensively been studied for cell-based tissue engineering but their use is mostly limited to mechanical support for cell adhesion and growth on the surface of macropores. Here, a templated fabrication method is described to prepare cell-friendly inverse opal-like hydrogels (IOHs) allowing both cell encapsulation within the hydrogel matrix and cell seeding on the surface of macropores. Ionically crosslinked alginate microbeads and photocrosslinkable biocompatible polymers are used as a sacrificial template and as a matrix, respectively. The alginate microbeads are easily removed by a chelating agent, with minimal toxicity for the encapsulated cells during template removal. The outer surface of macropores in IOHs can also provide a space for cell adherence. The cells encapsulated or attached in IOHs are able to remain viable and to proliferate over time. The elastic modulus and cell-adhesion properties of IOHs can be easily controlled and tuned. Finally, it is demonstrated that IOH can be used to co-culture two distinct cell populations in different spatial positions. This cell-friendly IOH system provides a 3D scaffold for organizing different cell types in a controllable microenvironment to investigate biological processes such as stem cell niches or tumor microenvironments.

  6. Gold nanoparticle incorporated inverse opal photonic crystal capillaries for optofluidic surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangwei; Xue, Jiangyang; Mu, Zhongde; Huang, Yin; Lu, Meng; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-10-15

    Novel transducers are needed for point of care testing (POCT) devices which aim at facile, sensitive and quick acquisition of health related information. Recent advances in optofluidics offer tremendous opportunities for biological/chemical analysis using extremely small sample volumes. This paper demonstrates nanostructured capillary tubes for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis in a flow-through fashion. The capillary tube integrates the SERS sensor and the nanofluidic structure to synergistically offer sample delivery and analysis functions. Inside the capillary tube, inverse opal photonic crystal (IO PhC) was fabricated using the co-assembly approach to form nanoscale liquid pathways. In the nano-voids of the IO PhC, gold nanoparticles were in situ synthesized and functioned as the SERS hotspots. The advantages of the flow-through SERS sensor are multifold. The capillary effect facilities the sample delivery process, the nanofluidic channels boosts the interaction of analyte and gold nanoparticles, and the PhC structure strengthens the optical field near the SERS hotspots and results in enhanced SERS signals from analytes. As an exemplary demonstration, the sensor was used to measure creatinein spiked in artificial urine samples with detection limit of 0.9 mg/dL.

  7. Zinc oxide inverse opal electrodes modified by glucose oxidase for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Song, Jian; Xu, Ru; Liu, Dali; Dong, Biao; Xu, Lin; Song, Hongwei

    2014-09-15

    The ZnO inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method using the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as a template. For glucose detection, glucose oxidase (GOD) was further immobilized on the inwall and surface of the IOPCs. The biosensing properties toward glucose of the Nafion/GOD/ZnO IOPCs modified FTO electrodes were carefully studied and the results indicated that the sensitivity of ZnO IOPCs modified electrode was 18 times than reference electrode due to the large surface area and uniform porous structure of ZnO IOPCs. Moreover, photoelectrochemical detection for glucose using the electrode was realized and the sensitivity approached to 52.4 µA mM(-1) cm(-2), which was about four times to electrochemical detection (14.1 µA mM(-1) cm(-2)). It indicated that photoelectrochemical detection can highly improve the sensor performance than conventional electrochemical method. It also exhibited an excellent anti-interference property and a good stability at the same time. This work provides a promising approach for realizing excellent photoelectrochemical biosensor of similar semiconductor photoelectric material.

  8. Hematite-based photoelectrochemical water splitting supported by inverse opal structures of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Yong; Lee, Jung-Soo; Kim, Kwanghyun; Bak, Chang Hong; Kim, Sun-I; Kim, Jin-Baek; Jang, Ji-Hyun

    2014-12-24

    By coupling α-Fe2O3 with a 3D graphene inverse opal (3D-GIO) conducting electrode, the short diffusion length of carriers and low absorption coefficient in α-Fe2O3 for photoelectrochemical applications were successfully addressed. GIO was directly grown on FTO substrate under low temperature conditions, removing the need for a graphene transfer process. α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were hydrothermally deposited on the surface of GIO, creating α-Fe2O3/GIO. The photocurrent density of α-Fe2O3/GIO in water splitting reactions reached 1.62 mA/cm(2) at 1.5 V vs RHE, which is 1.4 times greater than that of optimized α-Fe2O3. The EIS and IPCE data confirm reduced electron-hole recombination and fast electron transfer processes due to the short distance between active materials and the conducting electrode in the α-Fe2O3/GIO system. Our result may pave the way for designing devices in advanced energy conversion applications as well as a high efficiency hematite-based PEC system.

  9. 神圣华丽话欧泊%The Sacred and Magnificent Opal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂泽时

    2001-01-01

    “欧泊”是“蛋白石”(OPAL)的英文译音.源于拉丁文(OPALUS).意思是”集宝石之美于一身”,作为金色十月的诞辰石.可见其华丽之极。实际上蛋白石中能做宝石的极少.而只有能做宝石的才能称之为“欧泊”.其最大的特点是具有绚丽夺目的变幻色彩.古罗马自然科学家普林尼描述道:欧泊五彩缤纷.美不胜收,有些欧泊石之美不亚于画家的调色板.另一些则不亚于硫磺之火焰或燃油之火舌,是希望之火和幸福的象征。

  10. Properties of Vulcanized Polyisoprene Rubber Composites Filled with Opalized White Tuff and Precipitated Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Samaržija-Jovanović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Opalized white tuff (OWT with 40 μm average particle size and 39.3 m2/g specific surface area has been introduced into polyisoprene rubber (NR. Their reinforcing effects were evaluated by comparisons with those from precipitated silica (PSi. The cure characteristic, apparent activation energy of cross-link (Eac and reversion (Ear, and mechanical properties of a variety of composites based on these rubbers were studied. This was done using vulcanization techniques, mechanical testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that OWT can greatly improve the vulcanizing process by shortening the time of optimum cure (tc90 and the scorch time (ts2 of cross-linked rubber composites, which improves production efficiency and operational security. The rubber composites filled with 50 phr of OWT were found to have good mechanical and elastomeric properties. The tensile strengths of the NR/OWT composites are close to those of NR/PSi composites, but the tear strength and modulus are not as good as the corresponding properties of those containing precipitated silica. Morphology results revealed that the OWT is poorly dispersed in the rubber matrix. According to that, the lower interactions between OWT and polyisoprene rubber macromolecules are obtained, but similar mechanical properties of NR/OWT (100/50 rubber composites compared with NR/PSi (100/50 rubber composites are resulted.

  11. Ultrasensitive Sensing Material Based on Opal Photonic Crystal for Label-Free Monitoring of Transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Enqi; Peng, Yuan; Zhang, Xihao; Bai, Jialei; Song, Yanqiu; He, Houluo; Fan, Longxing; Qu, Xiaochen; Gao, Zhixian; Liu, Ying; Ning, Baoan

    2017-02-22

    A new opal photonic crystal (PC) sensing material, allowing label-free detection of transferrin (TRF), is proposed in the current study. This photonic crystal was prepared via a vertical convective self-assembly method with monodisperse microspheres polymerized by methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA). FTIR, TG, and DLS were used to characterize the components and particle size of the monodisperse microspheres. SEM was used to observe the morphology of the PC. The diffraction peak intensity decreases as the TRF concentration increase. This was due to the combination of TRF to the boronic acid group of the photonic crystal. After condition optimization, a standard curve was obtained and the linear range of TRF concentration was from 2 × 10(-3) ng/mL to 200 ng/mL. Measurement of TRF concentration in simulated urine sample was also investigated using the sensing material. The results indicated that the PC provided a cheap, label-free, and easy-to-use alternative for TRF determination in clinical diagnostics.

  12. A Study of charm quark production in beauty quark decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Waller, David

    2003-01-01

    The production of charm quarks in beauty quark decays has been studied with the OPAL detector at the Large Electron Positron collider near Geneva, Switzerland. The branching ratio Br(b -1 DDX) has been measured using hadronic zo decays collected between 1993 and 1995. Here b refers to the admixture of weakly decaying hadrons containing ab quark that are produced in electron-positron annihilations at a centre of mass energy equal to the mass of the zo boson. The impact parameter significance of tracks in tagged b-jets is used to differentiate b -1 DDX decays from other decays. The result is Br(b -1 DDX) = (10.0 ± 3.2(stat.)~~:~(syst. det.)~~~04 (syst. phys.))%. where syst. det. is the systematic uncertainty due to the modelling of the detector, and syst. phys. is the systematic uncertainty due to the modelling of the underlying particle physics. Using this result, the average number of charm and anti-charm quarks produced in a beauty quark decay, nc, is found to be l.12~8:i6- Ill

  13. Search for Invisibly Decaying Higgs Bosons with Large Decay Width Using the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostu, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Bailari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batly, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; shen, B.C.; sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a topological search for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson,H, produced via the Bjorken process (e+e- -> HZ). The analysis is based on data recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 629pb-1. In the analysis only hadronic decays of the Z boson are considered. A scan over Higgs boson masses from 1 to 120 GeV and decay widths from 1 to 3000 GeV revealed no indication for a signal in the data. From a likelihood ratio of expected signal and Standard Model background we determine upper limits on cross-section times branching ratio to an invisible final state. For moderate Higgs boson decay widths, these range from about 0.07pb Mh = 60GeV) to 0.57pb (Mh = 114GeV). For decay widths above 200GeV the upper limits are of the order of 0.15pb. The results can be interpreted in general scenarios predicting a large invisible decay width of the Higgs boson. As an example we interpret the results in the so-called...

  14. Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ using Jet Rates at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Hadronic events produced in e+e- collisions by the LEP collider and recorded by the OPAL detector were used to form distributions based on the number of reconstructed jets. The data were collected between 1995 and 2000 and correspond to energies of 91 GeV, 130-136 GeV and 161-209 GeV. The jet rates were determined using four different jet-finding algorithms (Cone, JADE, Durham and Cambridge). The differential two-jet rate and the average jet rate with the Durham and Cambridge algorithms were used to measure alpha(s) in the LEP energy range by fitting an expression in which order alpah_2s calculations were matched to a NLLA prediction and fitted to the data. Combining the measurements at different centre-of-mass energies, the value of alpha_s (Mz) was determined to be alpha(s)(Mz)=0.1177+-0.0006(stat.)+-0.0012$(expt.)+-0.0010(had.)+-0.0032

  15. Implications for Late Pleistocene Mastodon Diet from Opal Phytoliths in Tooth Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobetz, Katrina E.; Bozarth, Steven R.

    2001-03-01

    Calculus removed from the molar teeth of four American mastodons (Mammut americanum) contained opal phytoliths which reflect major dietary components. Three samples contained abundant grass phytoliths (ca. 86% of total), with long cells and trapezoidal pooid short cells dominant (ca. 25 and 31%, respectively). Dicot phytoliths from hackberry (Celtis sp.) seeds and indeterminate deciduous trees were rare (1-3%), though well preserved, whereas phytoliths from conifer trees were not recognizable in any of the samples. Comparative analysis of calculus from modern and fossil browsers and mixed feeders implies that dicots and conifers are nearly invisible in the phytolith record. This scarcity may result from poor preservation, low silica production in woody taxa, and/or animals' selection of young, silica-poor leaves and shoots. However, abundant grass phytoliths in the mixed feeders suggest that presence versus absence of grass phytoliths may distinguish mixed feeders and grazers from browsers. Mastodons are traditionally considered browsers, but grass phytolith assemblages in three individual mastodons contained similarly high concentrations of pooids, suggesting that these grasses were a significant part of the diet. Abundant pooid phytoliths, in addition to diatoms, indicate that these mastodons grazed in a cool, moist late Pleistocene environment, possibly near water.

  16. Search for the production of single top quarks using the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Leins, Axel; Dunnweber, W.

    2002-01-01

    Innerhalb des sogenannten Standardmodells (SM) der Teilchenphysik ist der Prozess der Flavour-andernden neutralen Str ¨ ome (FCNC) auf Born-Niveau verboten, und nur ¨ uber Prozesse h ¨ oherer Ordnung m ¨ oglich. FCNC-Prozesse sind daher extrem unter- ¨ druckt und sehr selten. Experimentell konnte dies f ¨ ur die ersten beiden Generationen ¨ von Quarks bestatigt werden. F ¨ ur die dritte Generation, speziell f ¨ ur das Top-Quark, ¨ existieren bisher nur wenige experimentelle Erkenntnisse uber FCNC-Prozesse. Durch ¨ theoretische Erweiterungen des SM konnen, aufgrund der extrem großen Masse des ¨ Top-Quarks und der damit verbundenen Sonderstellung, FCNC-Prozesse fur Top- ¨ Quarks vorhergesagt werden, die um mehrere Großenordnungen gegen ¨ uber dem SM ¨ erhoht sind. ¨ In dieser Arbeit wird nach der Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks uber ¨ Flavourandernde neutrale Str ¨ ome mit den Daten des OPAL-Detektors am e ¨ e -Speicherring LEP gesucht. Hierzu wird im hadronischen Zerfallskanal des W-Bosons...

  17. Ag Nanoparticle/Polydopamine-Coated Inverse Opals as Highly Efficient Catalytic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gwan H; Rhee, Do Kyung; Park, A Reum; Oh, Min Jun; Hong, Sunghwan; Richardson, Joseph J; Guo, Junling; Caruso, Frank; Yoo, Pil J

    2016-02-10

    Polymeric three-dimensional inverse-opal (IO) structures provide unique structural properties useful for various applications ranging from optics to separation technologies. Despite vast needs for IO functionalization to impart additional chemical properties, this task has been seriously challenged by the intrinsic limitation of polymeric porous materials that do not allow for the easy penetration of waterborne moieties or precursors. To overcome this restriction, we present a robust and straightforward method of employing a dipping-based surface modification with polydopamine (PDA) inside the IO structures, and demonstrate their application to catalytic membranes via synthetic incorporation of Ag nanoparticles. The PDA coating offers simultaneous advantages of achieving the improved hydrophilicity required for the facilitated infiltration of aqueous precursors and successful creation of nucleation sites for a reduction of growth of the Ag nanoparticles. The resulting Ag nanoparticle-incorporated IO structures are utilized as catalytic membranes for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to its amino derivatives in the presence of NaBH4. Synergistically combined characteristics of high reactivity of Ag nanoparticles along with a greatly enhanced internal surface area of IO structures enable the implementation of remarkably improved catalytic performance, exhibiting a good conversion efficiency greater than 99% while minimizing loss in the membrane permeability.

  18. Untersuchung perturbativer und nichtperturbativer Struktur der Momente hadronischer Ereignisformvariablen mit den Experimenten JADE und OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Pahl, Christoph Johannes

    2007-01-01

    In Hadronproduktionsdaten der e+e− - Vernichtungsexperimente JADE und OPAL messen wir die ersten f¨unf Momente von zw¨olf hadronischen Ereignisformvariablen bei Schwerpunktsenergien von 14 bis 207GeV. Aus dem Vergleich der QCD NLO-Vorhersage mit den mittels MC-Modellen um Hadronisierung korrigierten Daten erhalten wir den Referenzwert der starken Kopplung αs(MZ0) = 0.1254 ± 0.0007(stat.) ± 0.0010(exp.)+0.0009 −0.0023(had.)+0.0069 −0.0053(theo.) . F¨ur einige, insbesondere h¨ohere, Momente sind systematische Unzul¨anglichkeiten in der QCD NLO-Vorhersage erkenntlich. Simultane Fits an zwei Momente unter Annahme identischer Renormierungsskalen ergeben Skalenwerte von xμ=0.057 bis xμ=0.196 . Wir pr¨ufen Vorhersagen verschiedener nichtperturbativer Modelle. Aus der Single Dressed Gluon - N¨aherung ergibt sich eine perturbative Vorhersage in O(α5 s ) mit zu vernachl¨assigender Energiepotenzkorrektur, die den Mittelwert von Thrust auf Hadronniveau gut beschreibt mit αs(MZ0) = 0.1186 ± 0.0007(st...

  19. Changes in opal fluxes along the northwest African margin during the last glacial period; linking high and low latitude patterns of productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradtmiller, L. I.; Galgay, M.; McGee, D.; Kinsley, C. W.; Anderson, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have proposed competing hypotheses to explain increased opal fluxes in high and low latitudes during the most recent deglaciation. Anderson et al. (2009) rely on increased wind-driven upwelling in the Southern Ocean to explain the increased availability of Si in both the Southern Ocean and tropical thermoclines, leading to increased opal fluxes in both regions coincident with the deglacial rise in CO2. Meckler et al. (2013) suggest that a decrease in the presence of North Atlantic intermediate water (GNAIW) during the deglaciation allowed Si-rich southern-sourced waters to fill the tropical Atlantic leading to increased opal burial. We attempt to distinguish between these two mechanisms by reconstructing opal fluxes and fluxes of windblown dust over the past ~65ka at four sites along the northwest African margin. The records include the deglaciation, including Heinrich Event 1 (H1) and the Younger Dryas (YD), as well as several earlier Heinrich events. We find that opal and dust fluxes increase simultaneously during the deglaciation, and more highly resolved cores record H1 and the YD as distinct peaks within the deglaciation. Furthermore, opal and dust fluxes scale approximately linearly with one another during these events. We observe opal peaks associated with most Heinrich Events through H6. Finally, we observe a strong similarity between patterns of opal flux in the Southern Ocean and along the African Margin. This suggests that the pattern of diatom productivity and opal flux along the African Margin reflects a combination of changes in wind strength due to shifting temperature gradients, and changes in the export of silica-rich water from the Southern Ocean, both as a result of the global scale climate changes associated with Heinrich Events. Anderson, R. F., S. Ali, L. I. Bradtmiller, S. H. H. Nielsen, M. Q. Fleisher, B. E. Anderson and L. H. Burckle. Wind-Driven Upwelling in the Southern Ocean and the Deglacial Rise in Atmospheric CO2

  20. Surveying the citizen science landscape: an exploration of the design, delivery and impact of citizen science through the lens of the Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Linda; Fradera, Roger; Riesch, Hauke; Lakeman-Fraser, Poppy

    2016-07-22

    This paper provides a short introduction to the topic of citizen science (CS) identifying the shift from the knowledge deficit model to more inclusive, participatory science. It acknowledges the benefits of new technology and the opportunities it brings for mass participation and data manipulation. It focuses on the increase in interest in CS in recent years and draws on experience gained from the Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) programme launched in England in 2007. The drivers and objectives for OPAL are presented together with background information on the partnership, methods and scales. The approaches used by researchers ranged from direct public participation in mass data collection through field surveys to research with minimal public engagement. The supporting services focused on education, particularly to support participants new to science, a media strategy and data services. Examples from OPAL are used to illustrate the different approaches to the design and delivery of CS that have emerged over recent years and the breadth of opportunities for public participation the current landscape provides. Qualitative and quantitative data from OPAL are used as evidence of the impact of CS. While OPAL was conceived ahead of the more recent formalisation of approaches to the design, delivery and analysis of CS projects and their impact, it nevertheless provides a range of examples against which to assess the various benefits and challenges emerging in this fast developing field.

  1. CHARACTERISTICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF OPALS IN PALYGORSKITE CLAY AT THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN JIANGSU AND ANHUI PROVINCES%苏皖坡缕石粘土中蛋白石特征及其成因意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈天虎; 徐晓春; Huifang Xu; 岳书仓

    2005-01-01

    TEM和XRD研究表明,在苏皖坡缕石粘土矿床的蛋白石坡缕石层中存在opal-A和opal-CT两种结构的蛋白石.蛋白石坡缕石层主要含坡缕石、opal-A、opal-CT,以及少量白云石和其它矿物,由富opal-A层和富opal-CT层互层组成,交互层的厚度在几个厘米左右.蛋白石坡缕石层中的矿物基本是自生矿物,从蒸发湖水中化学沉淀形成.矿物组成特征研究表明,蛋白石坡缕石层的矿物组分(Si、Mg、Al)来源于盆地周围玄武岩淋滤的浅层地下水.根据Opal-A和Opal-CT溶解度图解和坡缕石、白云石形成物理化学条件图解,当湖水具有高浓度溶解SiO2和Mg2+时,有利于opal-A和坡缕石形成,当湖水具有低浓度溶解SiO2时,有利于opal-CT结晶.因此,沉淀SiO2的结构状态取决于地下水补给的湖水溶解SiO2浓度.富opal-A和富opal-CT交互层的形成是古气候、古水文周期性变化的指示.富opal-CT层指示高地下水补给流入量,低蒸发量,湖水低盐度和溶解组分,代表湿润气候时期;而富opal-A层代表低地下水补给流入量,高蒸发量,高溶解组分浓度,代表干旱气候时期.

  2. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  3. Engineering three-dimensionally electrodeposited Si-on-Ni inverse opal structure for high volumetric capacity Li-ion microbattery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Cho, Hyung-Man; Meng, Ying Shirley; Li, Quan

    2014-06-25

    Aiming at improving the volumetric capacity of nanostructured Li-ion battery anode, an electrodeposited Si-on-Ni inverse opal structure has been proposed in the present work. This type of electrode provides three-dimensional bi-continuous pathways for ion/electron transport and high surface area-to-volume ratios, and thus exhibits lower interfacial resistance, but higher effective Li ions diffusion coefficients, when compared to the Si-on-Ni nanocable array electrode of the same active material mass. As a result, improved volumetric capacities and rate capabilities have been demonstrated in the Si-on-Ni inverse opal anode. We also show that optimization of the volumetric capacities and the rate performance of the inverse opal electrode can be realized by manipulating the pore size of the Ni scaffold and the thickness of the Si deposit.

  4. Monolithic multiscale bilayer inverse opal electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Woo; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2015-03-12

    Multilayer structures in which the layers are both electrically and physically connected are critical to be used as high-performance electrodes for photovoltaic devices. We present the first multiscale bilayer inverse opal (IO) structures for application as electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). A bilayer of a mesoscopic IO layer (70 nm pore diameter) and a top macroporous IO layer (215 nm and 250 nm pore diameters) was fabricated as the high-specific-area electrode and the light-harvesting enhancing layer, respectively. The mesoscopic IO layer exhibits a dye-adsorption density, which is approximately 4 times greater than that of the macroporous IO structure because of its small pore size. The macroporous IO layer exhibits a photonic bandgap reflection in the visible-light wavelength range. We incorporated the bilayer IO electrodes into DSCs and compared the effects of the pore sizes of the macroporous layers on the photocurrent densities of the DSCs. We observed that the bilayer IO electrode DSCs that contained a 250 nm IO layer exhibited photocurrent densities greater than those of 215 nm IO DSCs. This enhanced photocurrent density was achieved because the photonic bandgap (PBG) reflection wavelength matches the wavelength range in which the N719 dye has a small light-absorption coefficient. The fabrication of this structurally homogeneous IO bilayer allows a strong contact between the layers, and the resulting bilayer, therefore, exhibits a high photovoltaic performance. We believe that this bilayer structure provides an alternative approach to the development of optimized electrode structures for various devices.

  5. Oxygen Isotopes in Fresh Water Biogenic Opal: Northeastern US Alleroed-Younger Dryas Temperature Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Aldo; Peteet, Dorothy

    1997-01-01

    The first oxygen isotope analysis of biogenic opal from lake sediments, from the Allerod/Younger Dryas transition in a core from Linsley Pond, Connecticut, gives an average estimate of a 6 C drop in temperature during the Younger Dryas. This shift represents temperatures during the bloom season, and may be less than the winter temperature drop. The sharp transition itself, with a duration of about 200 years, suggests that the temperature decrease may have been as large as 12 C. Previous estimates of the Allerod/Younger Dryas temperature shifts are controversial, and range from 3-20 C, suggesting that further interdisciplinary research on the same samples is warranted. One way that global climate change manifests itself is by redistributing energy throughout the globe. The Northern Hemisphere latitudinal temperature gradient during the late-glacial is at present a controversial topic. The magnitude of air temperature shifts during the Allerod/Younger Dryas (YD) oscillation are estimated from mid-latitude pollen records surrounding the North Atlantic to be 3-5 C in Europe [Lowe et al., 19941 and 3-4 C in the eastern US [Peteet et al., 1993]. In contrast, lake temperatures estimates derived from aquatic midge larvae in the Canadian eastern maritimes and Maine range from 6-20 C, with larger shifts at more southern sites [Levesque et al., 1997]. The magnitude of YD cooling in Greenland ice cores ranges from at least 7 C from the Bolling warming [Dansgaard et al., 1989] to 15 C - a more recent estimate from borehole temperatures [Cuffey et al., 1995]. The ice core geochemical records reveal that massive frequent and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event, suggesting a very dynamic circulation [Mayewski et al., 1993).

  6. Attrition reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  7. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe

    2014-04-23

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive backbone host. Using a combination of self-assembly, hydrothermal or electrodeposition of single crystalline ZnO nanowires and TiO2 passivation, a novel photoanode with scattering capability for optimal light harvesting is fabricated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Acoustic and NMR investigations of melting and crystallization of indium-gallium alloys in pores of synthetic opal matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozerskii, A. L.; Charnaya, E. V.; Lee, M. K.; Chang, L. J.; Nedbai, A. I.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Fokin, A. V.; Samoilovich, M. I.; Lebedeva, E. L.; Bugaev, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the results of studying the crystallization and melting processes of Ga-In eutectic alloys, which are embedded in opal matrices, using acoustic and NMR methods. The indium concentrations in the alloys were 4, 6, 9, and 15 at %. Measurements were performed upon cooling from room temperature to complete crystallization of the alloys and subsequent heating. It is revealed how the size effects and alloy composition influence the formation of phases with α- and β-Ga structures and on changes in the melting-temperature ranges. A difference was observed between the results obtained using acoustic and NMR methods, which was attributed to different temperature measurement conditions.

  9. Measurement of observables sensitive to coherence effects in hadronic Z decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Nadine; Kluth, Stefan; Plätzer, Simon; Skands, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397000 $e^+e^-$ hadronic annihilation events collected at $\\sqrt{s}=91$ GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  10. Measurement of observables sensitive to coherence effects in hadronic Z decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, N.; Gieseke, S.; Kluth, S.; Plätzer, S.; Skands, P.

    2015-12-01

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √{s}=91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  11. Measurement of observables sensitive to coherence effects in hadronic Z decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne (Australia); Gieseke, S. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kluth, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Plaetzer, S. [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Skands, P. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne (Australia); Theoretical Physics, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Collaboration: OPAL Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e{sup +}e{sup -} hadronic annihilation events collected at √(s) = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of observables sensitive to coherence effects in hadronic Z decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N., E-mail: nadine.fischer@monash.edu [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Gieseke, S. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kluth, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Plätzer, S. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Skands, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Theoretical Physics, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Collaboration: OPAL Collaboration

    2015-11-30

    A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e{sup +}e{sup -} hadronic annihilation events collected at √s=91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  13. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hiroto

    1995-02-07

    A reactor container of the present invention has a structure that the reactor container is entirely at the same temperature as that at the inlet of the reactor and, a hot pool is incorporated therein, and the reactor container has is entirely at the same temperature and has substantially uniform temperature follow-up property transiently. Namely, if the temperature at the inlet of the reactor core changes, the temperature of the entire reactor container changes following this change, but no great temperature gradient is caused in the axial direction and no great heat stresses due to axial temperature distribution is caused. Occurrence of thermal stresses caused by the axial temperature distribution can be suppressed to improve the reliability of the reactor container. In addition, since the laying of the reactor inlet pipelines over the inside of the reactor is eliminated, the reactor container is made compact and the heat shielding structures above the reactor and a protection structure of container walls are simplified. Further, secondary coolants are filled to the outside of the reactor container to simplify the shieldings. The combined effects described above can improve economical property and reliability. (N.H.).

  14. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  15. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  16. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy.

  17. Electrodeposited Structurally Stable V2O5 Inverse Opal Networks as High Performance Thin Film Lithium Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2015-12-01

    High performance thin film lithium batteries using structurally stable electrodeposited V2O5 inverse opal (IO) networks as cathodes provide high capacity and outstanding cycling capability and also were demonstrated on transparent conducting oxide current collectors. The superior electrochemical performance of the inverse opal structures was evaluated through galvanostatic and potentiodynamic cycling, and the IO thin film battery offers increased capacity retention compared to micron-scale bulk particles from improved mechanical stability and electrical contact to stainless steel or transparent conducting current collectors from bottom-up electrodeposition growth. Li(+) is inserted into planar and IO structures at different potentials, and correlated to a preferential exposure of insertion sites of the IO network to the electrolyte. Additionally, potentiodynamic testing quantified the portion of the capacity stored as surface bound capacitive charge. Raman scattering and XRD characterization showed how the IO allows swelling into the pore volume rather than away from the current collector. V2O5 IO coin cells offer high initial capacities, but capacity fading can occur with limited electrolyte. Finally, we demonstrate that a V2O5 IO thin film battery prepared on a transparent conducting current collector with excess electrolyte exhibits high capacities (∼200 mAh g(-1)) and outstanding capacity retention and rate capability.

  18. Color-Coded Batteries - Electro-Photonic Inverse Opal Materials for Enhanced Electrochemical Energy Storage and Optically Encoded Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-07-01

    For consumer electronic devices, long-life, stable, and reasonably fast charging Li-ion batteries with good stable capacities are a necessity. For exciting and important advances in the materials that drive innovations in electrochemical energy storage (EES), modular thin-film solar cells, and wearable, flexible technology of the future, real-time analysis and indication of battery performance and health is crucial. Here, developments in color-coded assessment of battery material performance and diagnostics are described, and a vision for using electro-photonic inverse opal materials and all-optical probes to assess, characterize, and monitor the processes non-destructively in real time are outlined. By structuring any cathode or anode material in the form of a photonic crystal or as a 3D macroporous inverse opal, color-coded "chameleon" battery-strip electrodes may provide an amenable way to distinguish the type of process, the voltage, material and chemical phase changes, remaining capacity, cycle health, and state of charge or discharge of either existing or new materials in Li-ion or emerging alternative battery types, simply by monitoring its color change.

  19. Current-induced suppression of superconductivity in a three-dimensional lattice of weakly linked indium grains in opal

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, S G

    2000-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of the metal-dielectric composite have been investigated in the range of the resistive state near the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/. The composite structure can be represented as a face-centered cubic lattice, which involves a large number of weakly linked indium nanograins and is stabilized in structural cavities of opal. The response to microwave radiation is used to characterize the resistive state of the composite. The comparative investigation into the current-voltage characteristics and the response of the composite to microwave radiation makes it possible to conclude that the weak links are superconducting in the region of the critical current (I/sub c/) of the composite as a whole. The transition of weak links to the resistive state occurs at currents immediately preceding the transition of the composite from the resistive state to the ohmic state. The model of the resistivity of the indium-opal composite is proposed on the basis of morphological e...

  20. A visual and organic vapor sensitive photonic crystal sensor consisting of polymer-infiltrated SiO2 inverse opal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Qiu, Jianhua; Hu, Rongrong; Li, Pei; Gao, Loujun; Heng, Liping; Tang, Ben Zhong; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-21

    A photonic crystal (PC) sensor that can selectively detect organic vapors through visual color changes has been proposed. The sensor was fabricated by infiltrating a tetraphenylethene polymer (TPEP) into the voids of SiO2 inverse opal photonic crystal. When the sensor was exposed to tetrahydrofuran or acetone vapor, a red shift of the stopband of more than 50 nm could be clearly observed; meanwhile, the film's color changed from violet to cyan. Subsequently, when exposed to air, the stopband underwent a blue shift and the color returned to violet. The reason for the observed change is that a reversible adsorption-desorption process occurs on alternate exposure of the sensor to organic vapor and air, due to the high specific surface area of the inverse opal macroporous structure and the high affinity of TPEP to tetrahydrofuran and acetone. The adsorption of vapor analyte can increase the PC's effective refractive index, which will induce the stopband red shift and the resulting color change according to Bragg's Law. The reversible adsorption-desorption of organic vapors varied the effective refractive index of the sensor repeatedly, causing the reversible stopband shift and color change, and providing a general method for the design of visual vapor sensors.

  1. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  2. Conceptual Design of I and C Architecture for a New Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Suk; Park, Jae Kwan; Kim, Taek Kyu; Bae, Sang Hoon; Baang, Dane; Kim, Young Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    NRR) by 2016 was launched by KAERI in 2012. The purposes of the project are to meet domestic industrial needs of a research reactor and to secure an internationally competitive NRR. For instrumentation and control (I and C) systems of the NRR, it shall also be designed to secure the competition of the NRR. The I and C should account for the competition in terms of three aspects: safety, performance and cost. A I and C conceptual design activity should be carried out at the early stage of the project to figure out the I and C on the high level. Constructing I and C architecture is to accomplish the high level design. During the I and C architecture construction, the three aspects should be taken into account. This paper conceptually constructs the I and C architecture for the NRR by comparing to the cases of a Jordan training and research reactor (JRTR) project and a RA-10 multipurpose research reactor. The JRTR is an on-going project launched by KAERI and DAEWOO consortium in 2011. The I and C of the JRTR was digitalized based on the I and C functions of the HANARO research reactor, as shown in Fig. 1. The RA-10 was launched by INVAP of Argentina in 2011. The digital I and C developed by INVAP was built in an OPAL of Australia, as shown in Fig. 2

  3. Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) at Dome C, East Antarctica, during the OPALE campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; Roscoe, H. K.; Kukui, A.; Savarino, J.; France, J. L.; King, M. D.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.

    2015-07-01

    Mixing ratios of the atmospheric nitrogen oxides NO and NO2 were measured as part of the OPALE (Oxidant Production in Antarctic Lands & Export) campaign at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1° S, 123.3° E, 3233 m), during December 2011 to January 2012. Profiles of NOx mixing ratios of the lower 100 m of the atmosphere confirm that, in contrast to the South Pole, air chemistry at Dome C is strongly influenced by large diurnal cycles in solar irradiance and a sudden collapse of the atmospheric boundary layer in the early evening. Depth profiles of mixing ratios in firn air suggest that the upper snowpack at Dome C holds a significant reservoir of photolytically produced NO2 and is a sink of gas-phase ozone (O3). First-time observations of bromine oxide (BrO) at Dome C show that mixing ratios of BrO near the ground are low, certainly less than 5 pptv, with higher levels in the free troposphere. Assuming steady state, observed mixing ratios of BrO and RO2 radicals are too low to explain the large NO2 : NO ratios found in ambient air, possibly indicating the existence of an unknown process contributing to the atmospheric chemistry of reactive nitrogen above the Antarctic Plateau. During 2011-2012, NOx mixing ratios and flux were larger than in 2009-2010, consistent with also larger surface O3 mixing ratios resulting from increased net O3 production. Large NOx mixing ratios at Dome C arise from a combination of continuous sunlight, shallow mixing height and significant NOx emissions by surface snow (FNOx). During 23 December 2011-12 January 2012, median FNOx was twice that during the same period in 2009-2010 due to significantly larger atmospheric turbulence and a slightly stronger snowpack source. A tripling of FNOx in December 2011 was largely due to changes in snowpack source strength caused primarily by changes in NO3- concentrations in the snow skin layer, and only to a secondary order by decrease of total column O3 and associated increase in NO3- photolysis rates. A

  4. Coupling of titania inverse opals to nanocrystalline titania layers in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun Anna; Abrams, Neal M; Hoertz, Paul G; Barber, Greg D; Halaoui, Lara I; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2008-11-20

    We report a quantitative comparison of the photoaction spectra, short circuit current densities, and power conversion efficiencies of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) that contain bilayers of nanocrystalline TiO2 (nc-TiO2) and titania inverse opal photonic crystals (PCs). Cells were fabricated with PC/nc-TiO2 and nc-TiO2/PC bilayer films on glass/tin oxide anode of the cell, as well as in a split configuration in which the nc-TiO2 and PC layers were deposited on the anode and cathode sides of the cell, respectively. Incident photon current efficiencies at single wavelengths and current-voltage curves in white light were obtained with both cathode and anode side illumination. The results obtained support a model proposed by Miguez and co-workers, in which coupling of the low refractive index PC layer to the higher index nc-TiO2 layer creates a standing wave in the nc-TiO2 layer, enhancing the response of the DSSC in the red region of the spectrum. This enhancement is very sensitive to the degree of physical contact between the two layers. A gap on the order of 200 nm thick, created by a polymer templating technique, is sufficient to decouple the two layers optically. The coupling of the nc-TiO2 and PC layers across the gap could be improved slightly by treatment with TiCl4 vapor. In the bilayer configuration, there is an enhancement in the IPCE across the visible spectrum, which is primarily caused by defect scattering in the PC layer. There is also an increase of 20-50 mV in the open circuit photovoltage of the cell. With anode side illumination, the addition of a PC layer to the nc-TiO2 layer increased the efficiency of DSSCs from 6.5 to 8.3% at a constant N719 dye loading of 155-160 nmol/cm2.

  5. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  6. High-performance characteristics of silicon inverse opal synthesized by the simple magnesium reduction as anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Hun; Kim, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Dong-Won; Kim, Ketack; Lee, Sung-Man; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2015-12-01

    Inverse silicon opal (ISi) and carbon-coated inverse Si opal (C-ISi) structures are prepared from the simple thermal reduction method using magnesium and investigated as the anode materials in lithium-ion batteries. The ISi and C-ISi samples comprise continuously arranged inverse opal structures, constructed by Si nanoparticles. The macroporous structures in ∼1 μm range are favourable for lithium-ion transport and more importantly for absorbing volumetric change in the silicon nanoparticles. Moreover, the carbon coating on the inverse Si opal improves the electrical conductivity and acts as a mechanical buffer for the volume change. C-ISi sample shows a high capacity of 1550 mAh g-1 at the 100th cycle with very stable cycle retention, whereas the ISi and pristine Si samples show 1146.4 mAh g-1 and approximately zero, respectively, at the 100th cycle with rapid capacity fading. Surprisingly, the volumetric expansion of C-ISi electrode after 100th cycles is only 16.1%, which is as low as that for commercial graphite electrodes.

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of inverse opal photonic crystals studied by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoriev, S.V.; Napolskii, K.S.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Petukhov, A.V.; Belov, D.V.; Eliseev, A.A.; Lukashin, A.V.; Tretyakov, Y.D.; Sinitskii, A.S.; Eckerlebe, H.

    2009-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of nickel inverse opal photonic crystal have been studied by complementary experimental techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, wide-angle and small-angle diffraction of synchrotron radiation, and polarized neutrons. The sample was fabricated by ele

  8. Expression of the outcome predictor in acute leukemia 1 (OPAL1) gene is not an independent prognostic factor in patients treated according to COALL or St Jude protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing); J.R. Downing (James); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); U. Göbel (Ulrich); U. Graubner (Ulrike)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNew prognostic factors may result in better risk classification and improved treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recently, high expression of a gene named OPAL1 (outcome predictor in acute leukemia) was reported to be associated with favorable prognosis in ALL.

  9. Coupling of Ag Nanoparticle with Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Novel Strategy for Upconversion Emission Enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Li, Jun; Yang, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-11-18

    Rare-earth-ion-doped upconversion (UC) nanoparticles have generated considerable interest because of their potential application in solar cells, biological labeling, therapeutics, and imaging. However, the applications of UC nanoparticles were still limited because of their low emission efficiency. Photonic crystals and noble metal nanoparticles are applied extensively to enhance the UC emission of rare earth ions. In the present work, a novel substrate consisting of inverse opal photonic crystals and Ag nanoparticles was prepared by the template-assisted method, which was used to enhance the UC emission of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles. The red or green UC emissions of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles were selectively enhanced on the inverse opal substrates because of the Bragg reflection of the photonic band gap. Additionally, the UC emission enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles induced by the coupling of metal nanoparticle plasmons and photonic crystal effects was realized on the Ag nanoparticles included in the inverse opal substrate. The present results demonstrated that coupling of Ag nanoparticle with inverse opal photonic crystals provides a useful strategy to enhance UC emission of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticles.

  10. Light and Small-Angle X-Ray Diffraction from Opal-Like Structures: Transition from Two- to Three-Dimensional Regimes and Effects of Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Samusev, K.B.; Sinev, I.S.; Rybin, M.V.; Limonov, M.F.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoryeva, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829196

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions To summarize, in this chapter diffraction of light and x-rays on opal-like structures is considered. New methodological approaches to collection, processing, and interpretation of experimental data are presented. In particular, a novel representation of the light diffraction data in the

  11. Light and Small-Angle X-Ray Diffraction from Opal-Like Structures: Transition from Two- to Three-Dimensional Regimes and Effects of Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Samusev, K.B.; Sinev, I.S.; Rybin, M.V.; Limonov, M.F.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoryeva, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions To summarize, in this chapter diffraction of light and x-rays on opal-like structures is considered. New methodological approaches to collection, processing, and interpretation of experimental data are presented. In particular, a novel representation of the light diffraction data in the

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of SnO2 Inverse opal Materials%SnO2反opal光子晶体的制备及表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代超; 王爱军; 陈胜利; 袁桂梅

    2012-01-01

    SnO2 inverse opal thin films were fabricated by filling opal films of polystyrene (PS) spheres with SnO2 and then removing the PS spheres through calcining at 450°C. The filling process of opal films was accomplished by the dip-drawing method and Sol-LPD method. The quality of photonic crystal samples were assessed by SEM and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. It is found that the obtained SnO2 inverse opals displayed the three-dimensional ordered structure. Brag reflection peaks of the SnO2 inverse opal films prepared by Sol-LPD method is red-shifted, in compared to that prepared by dip-drawing method of the same PS template, indicating that the filling rate of SnO2 inverse opal films prepared by Sol-LPD method was higher than that prepared by dipping drawing method SnO2 heterostruc-ture inverse opal film were fabricated by Sol-LPD filling method.%以PS opal膜为模板制得了SnO2反opal光子晶体膜.采用浸渍提拉法和Sol-LPD法对PS opal模板进行填充,450℃焙烧除去PS模极得到SnO2反opal光子晶体.SEM和UV-Vis透射表征显示,两种填充方式都能得到三维有序的SnO2反opal光子晶体;以相同的PS opal膜为模板,通过Sol-LPI填充法得到的SnO2反opal膜的禁带位置向长波移动(以浸渍提拉法制得的光子晶体的禁带位置为基准).这证实Sol-LPD填充法比浸渍提拉法有更高的填充率.通过Sol-LPD填充法还能够制备具有多重禁带的SnO2反opal异质复合膜.

  13. Biogenic CaCO3 and Opal Depositions and Their Latitudinal Comparison During the Past 600 ka in the Central Equatorial Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boo-Keun Khim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbital-scale variations in biogenic CaCO3 and opal abundance in two piston cores collected in the central equatorial Pacific (core PC5101 from a southern site at _ and core PC5103 from a northern site at _ were compared to assess latitudinal differences. The correlation between the oxygen isotope stratigraphy of planktonic foraminifera (Globigerinoides sacculifer of PC5103 with the LR04 stacks provides the age of PC5103 to be approximately 950 ka. The age of PC5103 was further refined by correlating the CaCO3 content with the well-dated core RC11-210. The age of PC5101 was also constrained by the same CaCO3 chronostratigraphic correlation with RC11-210, resulting in an age of approximately 650 ka. Distinct orbital-scale series of CaCO3 and opal variations appear to be parallel between the two cores during the past 600 ka, which are controlled mainly by eccentricity with an approximate periodicity of 100 ka. It is worth noting that the biogenic CaCO3 and opal deposition patterns in the two cores differ between interglacial and glacial periods. During interglacial periods the biogenic opal content is higher in the southern core than in the northern core, which corresponds with the present-day condition. In contrast the CaCO3 content is higher in the northern core, which is contradictory to the present-day northward decreasing CaCO3 deposition pattern from the Equator. The collection site of PC5101 is approximately 350 m deeper than that of PC5103, which significantly promotes CaCO3 dissolution and causes unexpectedly high CaCO3 content at the northern site in contrast to the biogenic opal content.

  14. SNTP program reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Lewis A.; Sapyta, Joseph J.

    1993-06-01

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is evaluating the feasibility of a particle bed reactor for a high-performance nuclear thermal rocket engine. Reactors operating between 500 MW and 2,000 MW will produce engine thrusts ranging from 20,000 pounds to 80,000 pounds. The optimum reactor arrangement depends on the power level desired and the intended application. The key components of the reactor have been developed and are being tested. Flow-to-power matching considerations dominate the thermal-hydraulic design of the reactor. Optimal propellant management during decay heat cooling requires a three-pronged approach. Adequate computational methods exist to perform the neutronics analysis of the reactor core. These methods have been benchmarked to critical experiment data.

  15. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  16. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  17. LEP1 measurement of heavy quark forward-backward asymmetries with Opal detector; Mesure de l`asymetrie avant-arriere des quarks lourds a LEP1 avec le detecteur Opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafoux, H.

    1996-04-30

    Using all data collected by OPAL during the first phase of LEP operation, called LEP1, we have measured the b and c quark forward-backward asymmetries on and around the Z{sup 0} peak. The measurement, which is based on prompt leptons produced in semileptonic decays of heavy quarks, has been optimized using artificial neural networks whenever necessary, that is whenever the problem to solve implied taking into account simultaneously a large number of parameters. Our results are compatible with other LEP measurements and with the Standard Model predictions for a top quark of 174{+-}31 GeV/c{open_square} and a Higgs boson mass between 60 and 1000 GeV/c{open_square}. (author). 159 refs., 88 figs., 37 tabs.

  18. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru

    1997-04-04

    An LMFBR type reactor comprises a plurality of reactor cores in a reactor container. Namely, a plurality of pot containing vessels are disposed in the reactor vessel and a plurality of reactor cores are formed in a state where an integrated-type fuel assembly is each inserted to a pot, and a coolant pipeline is connected to each of the pot containing-vessel to cool the reactor core respectively. When fuels are exchanged, the integrated-type fuel assembly is taken out together with the pot from the reactor vessel in a state where the integrated-type fuel assembly is immersed in the coolants in the pot as it is. Accordingly, coolants are supplied to each of the pot containing-vessel connected with the coolant pipeline and circulate while cooling the integrated-type fuel assembly for every pot. Then, when the fuels are exchanged, the integrated type fuel assembly is taken out to the outside of the reactor together with the pot by taking up the pot from the pot-containing vessel. Then, neutron economy is improved to thereby improve reactor power and the breeding ratio. (N.H.)

  19. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Villarino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors.

  20. Multi purpose research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raina, V.K. [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: vkrain@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Sasidharan, K. [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sengupta, Samiran [Research Reactor Design and Projects Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, Tej [Research Reactor Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2006-04-15

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor.

  1. Enhancement of second harmonic generation in NaNO{sub 2}-infiltrated opal photonic crystal using structural light focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I., E-mail: kirzay@gmail.com; Yurchenko, Stanislav O., E-mail: st.yurchenko@mail.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 105005, 2nd Baumanskaya str. 5, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-04

    Experimental and numerical results for second harmonic generation (SHG) in photonic crystal (PC) based on NaNO{sub 2}-infiltrated opal matrix are presented. SHG is performed in reflection mode; thus, the direction of the SHG maximum is equal to the angle of mirror reflection. The PC was pumped with femtosecond optical pulses at different angles of incidence, allowing the dependence of the SHG efficiency on the location of the fundamental wavelength toward the PC band gap (BG) to be examined. The most efficient SHG was observed when pumping the BG of the PC. To interpret the experimental results, finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations of the light interaction with the PC were conducted. The observed effect of highly efficient SHG is associated with structural light focusing, and, as a consequence, with strong optical field localization within certain near-surface PC regions. Thus, SHG enhancement based on structural light focusing in PC was demonstrated.

  2. Reflection Band Control of Inverse Opal Film with Photoresponse Properties of Push-Pull Type Azobenzene LC Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunnam Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available DcAz2Mc and DR1Mc molecules having push-pull type of azobenzene groups are synthesized, and their photo-orientational behaviors are investigated in the polymer system. In order to understand the relationship between a molecular structure and its physical properties, electronic structure calculation is computationally carried out. Regarding to their photo response properties, the copolymers of poly(DcAz2Mc-co-M6PBMe and poly(DR1Mc-co-M6PBMe are infiltrated into inverse opal films, and Bragg reflection shifts are observed under photostimuli. When the linearly polarized light is irradiated, Bragg reflection bands are shifted to the longer wavelength region as reflective index increases.

  3. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, Ian B; Loncar, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

  4. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ian B; Aizenberg, Joanna; Lončar, Marko

    2013-12-01

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

  5. Enhancement of second harmonic generation in NaNO2-infiltrated opal photonic crystal using structural light focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2014-08-01

    Experimental and numerical results for second harmonic generation (SHG) in photonic crystal (PC) based on NaNO2-infiltrated opal matrix are presented. SHG is performed in reflection mode; thus, the direction of the SHG maximum is equal to the angle of mirror reflection. The PC was pumped with femtosecond optical pulses at different angles of incidence, allowing the dependence of the SHG efficiency on the location of the fundamental wavelength toward the PC band gap (BG) to be examined. The most efficient SHG was observed when pumping the BG of the PC. To interpret the experimental results, finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations of the light interaction with the PC were conducted. The observed effect of highly efficient SHG is associated with structural light focusing, and, as a consequence, with strong optical field localization within certain near-surface PC regions. Thus, SHG enhancement based on structural light focusing in PC was demonstrated.

  6. Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions with the OPAL Detector at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Cozzi, M.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay Jr., A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2008-01-01

    This letter describes a direct search for pair produced magnetic monopoles in e+e- collisions. The analysis is based on 62.7 pb^-1 of data collected with the OPAL detector at an average centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)= 206.3GeV. The monopole signal was assumed to be characterized by two back-to-back particles with an anomalously high ionization energy loss de/dx in the tracking chambers. No evidence for production of monopoles was observed. Upper limits were obtained on the magnetic monopole pair-production cross-section (sigma) in the mass range 45 GeV/c^2

  7. Study of prompt photon and neutral pion production in photon-photon scattering with the OPAL experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lillich, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    For the first time at LEP the production of prompt photons is studied in the collisions of quasi-real photons using the OPAL data taken at e+e- centre-of mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The total inclusive production cross-section for isolated prompt photons in the kinematic range of transverse momentum > 3.0 GeV and the absolut value of pseudorapidity <1 is determined to be (0.32 +- 0.04 (stat) +- 0.04 (sys)) pb. Differential cross-sections are compared to the predictions of a next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculation. In the second part of this thesis inclusive differential neutral pion cross-sections in photon photon collisons are measured. This measurement is an important test of QCD. In addition this process is the main background for prompt photons.

  8. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  9. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  10. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  11. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  12. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  13. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  14. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  15. Reactors licensing: proposal of an integrated quality and environment regulatory structure for nuclear research reactors in Brazil; Licenciamento de reatores: proposta de uma estrutura regulatoria integrada com abordagem em qualidade e meio ambiente para reatores de pesquisa no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Reynaldo Cavalcanti

    2014-07-01

    A new integrated regulatory structure based on quality and integrated issues has been proposed to be implemented on the licensing process of nuclear research reactors in Brazil. The study starts with a literature review about the licensing process in several countries, all of them members of the International Atomic Energy Agency. After this phase it is performed a comparative study with the Brazilian licensing process to identify good practices (positive aspects), the gaps on it and to propose an approach of an integrated quality and environmental management system, in order to contribute with a new licensing process scheme in Brazil. The literature review considered the following research nuclear reactors: Jules-Horowitz and OSIRIS (France), Hanaro (Korea), Maples 1 and 2 (Canada), OPAL (Australia), Pallas (Holand), ETRR-2 (Egypt) and IEA-R1 (Brazil). The current nuclear research reactors licensing process in Brazil is conducted by two regulatory bodies: the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA). CNEN is responsible by nuclear issues, while IBAMA by environmental one. To support the study it was applied a questionnaire and interviews based on the current regulatory structure to four nuclear research reactors in Brazil. Nowadays, the nuclear research reactor’s licensing process, in Brazil, has six phases and the environmental licensing process has three phases. A correlation study among these phases leads to a proposal of a new quality and environmental integrated licensing structure with four harmonized phases, hence reducing potential delays in this process. (author)

  16. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  17. Gas cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-06-01

    Although most of the development work on fast breeder reactors has been devoted to the use of liquid metal cooling, interest has been expressed for a number of years in alternative breeder concepts using other coolants. One of a number of concepts in which interest has been retained is the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). As presently envisioned, it would operate on the uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel cycle, similar to that used in the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), and would use helium gas as the coolant.

  18. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G [Champaign, IL; Mitrovski, Svetlana M [Urbana, IL

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  19. Slow light enhanced near infrared luminescence in CeO{sub 2}: Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} inverse opal photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhengwen, E-mail: yangzw@kmust.edu.cn; Wu, Hangjun; Li, Jun; Shao, Bo; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-08-25

    Highlights: • CeO{sub 2}: Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} photonic crystals was prepared. • Near infrared emission in the CeO{sub 2}: Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} inverse opal was obtained. • Near infrared emission was enhanced by slow light effect of photonic crystals. - Abstract: The surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles and energy transfer between rare earth ions were used widely to enhance the near infrared emission of rare earth ions. In this paper, a new method for near infrared emission enhancement of rare-earth is reported. The CeO{sub 2}: Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} inverse opals with the photonic band gaps at the 500 and 450 nm were prepared by using polystyrene colloidal crystal as templates, and their near infrared emission properties were investigated. The results show that the near infrared emission property of the CeO{sub 2}: Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} inverse opals depends on the overlapped extend between the excited light and photonic band gap. The near infrared emission located at the 1540 nm of the CeO{sub 2}: Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} inverse opals have been enhanced obviously when the wavelength of the excitation light overlapped with photonic band gaps edge, which is attributed to the slow light effect of photonic crystals. The enhancement of near infrared emission may be important for the development of infrared laser and amplifiers for optical communication.

  20. Measurements of jet rates with the anti-$k_T$ and SiScone algorithms at LEP with the OPAL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Verbytskyi, A

    2016-01-01

    We study jet production in $e^+e^−$ annihilation to hadrons with data recorded by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 90 GeV and 207 GeV. The jet $e^+e^−$ production rates were measured for the first time with the anti-$k_T$ and SiScone jet clustering algorithms. We compare the data with predictions by modern Monte Carlo event generators.

  1. Real-time Simulation of Cyber-physical Power System Based on OPAL-RT and OPNET%基于OPAL-RT和OPNET的电力信息物理系统实时仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤奕; 王琦; 邰伟; 陈彬; 倪明

    2016-01-01

    With the development of smart grid technology,the observability and controllability of power cyber-physical system (CPS) are greatly enhanced.The procedures of information collection,transmission and processing have more influences on power system services.The construction of dynamic co-simulation platform for power CPS will provide technical support for the researches of related theories and applications.The existing simulation schemes and their structures are analyzed.The essential difference between mathematical models of power flow and information flow makes it necessary to build a real-time co-simulation platform.Based on the power system simulation tool OPAL-RT and the communication simulation tool OPNET, a real-time simulation platform for power CPS is proposed with the originally developed data transmission interface and conversion module,which can precisely simulate the dynamic characteristics of power system with a high speed.A case study of load control system shows the reasonability and validity of the platform.%随着智能电网建设的推进,电力信息物理系统(CPS)的可观性和可控性得到了极大增强。电力CPS的信息采集、传输、处理等过程对电力业务的影响越发明显。建立电力 CPS的动态联合仿真平台有助于为相关理论和应用研究提供坚实的技术支撑。文中对比分析了现有的联合仿真平台方案与架构,指出由于电力流和信息流在数学模型上的本质区别,需要建立实时联合仿真平台;基于电力仿真工具 OPAL-RT和通信仿真工具 OPNET,研制开发了数据交互接口及数据转换模块,建立了电力CPS 实时仿真平台,能够高速、精确地模拟电力 CPS 动态响应特性。针对电力CPS负荷控制的仿真算例结果表明,所研制的电力CPS实时仿真平台具有合理性和有效性。

  2. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  3. New reactor type proposed

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  4. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  5. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  6. Energy transfer and visible-infrared quantum cutting photoluminescence modification in Tm-Yb codoped YPO(4) inverse opal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqin; Qiu, Jianbei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Zhengwen

    2015-08-01

    YPO4:  Tm, Yb inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully synthesized by the colloidal crystal templates method, and the visible-infrared quantum cutting (QC) photoluminescence properties of YPO4:  Tm, Yb inverse opal photonic crystals were investigated. We obtained tetragonal phase YPO4 in all the samples when the samples sintered at 950°C for 5 h. The visible emission intensity of Tm3+ decreased significantly when the photonic bandgap was located at 650 nm under 480 nm excitation. On the contrary, the QC emission intensity of Yb3+ was enhanced as compared with the no photonic bandgap sample. When the photonic bandgap was located at 480 nm, the Yb3+ and Tm3+ light-emitting intensity weakened at the same time. We demonstrated that the energy transfer between Tm3+ and Yb3+ is enhanced by the suppression of the red emission of Tm3+. Additionally, the mechanisms for the influence of the photonic bandgap on the energy transfer process of the Tm3+, Yb3+ codoped YPO4 inverse opal are discussed.

  7. Paleoproductivity and paleoceanography of the last 4.3 Myrs at IODP Expedition 323 Site U1341 in the Bering Sea based on biogenic opal content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinya; Takahashi, Kozo; Kanematsu, Yoshiyuki; Asahi, Hirofumi; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Ravelo, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Site U1341 in the southern Bering Sea was drilled and cored down to 600 meters below sea-floor (mbsf) during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 323, covering a nearly complete record of the last 4.3 million years (Myrs). Analyses of the biogenic opal content of sediments at the site provide detailed and useful information on past biological productivity and paleoceanographic changes that occurred in the region including shifts in the oceanographic condition during the intensification of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) and the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT). An overall decreasing trend in the %biogenic opal record, combined with evidence from microfossil assemblages, indicates a gradual shift in environmental conditions during the last 4.3 Myrs, from warm and nutrient-rich conditions to cool conditions with sea-ice. On the other hand, biogenic opal mass accumulation rates (MAR) were high during 2.6-2.1 Ma after the intensification of the NHG, unlike in the western North Pacific. High biological productivity during this specific interval is consistent with the results of previous studies in the other Marginal Seas, possibly suggesting that iron leakage from the Bering Continental Shelf occurred. After the MPT, the data suggest that there was sea-ice expansion and discharge of lithogenic matter during glacial periods, and high productivity during interglacial periods.

  8. The effect of particle size, morphology and C-rates on 3D structured Co3O4 inverse opal conversion mode anode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, David; Geaney, Hugh; Carroll, Elaine; Garvey, Shane; Lonergan, Alex; O’Dwyer, Colm

    2017-02-01

    Engineering Co3O4 nanoparticles into highly ordered, 3D inverse opal (IO) structures is shown to significantly improve their performance as more efficient conversion mode Li-ion anode materials. By comparison with Co3O4 microparticles, the advantages of the porous anode architecture are clearly shown. The inverse opal material markedly enhances specific capacity and capacity retention. The impact of various C rates on the rate of the initial charge demonstrates that higher rate charging (10 C) was much less destructive to the inverse opal structure than charging at a slow rate (0.1 C). Slower C rates that affect the IO structure resulted in higher specific capacities (more Li2O) as well as improved capacity retention. The IO structures cycle as CoO, which improves Coulombic efficiency and limits volumetric changes, allowing rate changes more efficiently. This work demonstrates how 3D IOs improve conversion mode anode material performance in the absence of additive or binders, thus enhancing mass transport of Li2O charge–discharge product through the open structure. This effect mitigates clogging by structural changes at slow rates (high capacity) and is beneficial to the overall electrochemical performance.

  9. Future Reactor Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ opens a gateway for the next generation experiments to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy and the leptonic CP-violating phase. Future reactor experiments will focus on mass hierarchy determination and the precision measurement of mixing parameters. Mass hierarchy can be determined from the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos based on the interference effect of two separated oscillation modes. Relative and absolute measure...

  10. Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measu...

  11. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  12. Helias reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C.D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Grieger, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Harmeyer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Kisslinger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Karulin, N. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Maurer, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany); Nuehrenberg, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Rau, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Sapper, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wobig, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    The present status of Helias reactor studies is characterised by the identification and investigation of specific issues which result from the particular properties of this type of stellarator. On the technical side these are issues related to the coil system, while physics studies have concentrated on confinement, alpha-particle behaviour and ignition conditions. The usual assumptions have been made in those fields which are common to all toroidal fusion reactors: blanket and shield, refuelling and exhaust, safety and economic aspects. For blanket and shield sufficient space has been provided, a detailed concept will be developed in future. To date more emphasis has been placed on scoping and parameter studies as opposed to fixing a specific set of parameters and providing a detailed point study. One result of the Helias reactor studies is that physical dimensions are on the same order as those of tokamak reactors. However, it should be noticed that this comparison is difficult in view of the large spectrum of tokamak reactors ranging from a small reactor like Aries, to a large device such as SEAFP. The notion that the large aspect ratio of 10 or more in Helias configurations also leads to large reactors is misleading, since the large major radius of 22 m is compensated by the average plasma radius of 1.8 m and the average coil radius of 5 m. The plasma volume of 1400 m{sup 3} is about the same as the ITER reactor and the magnetic energy of the coil system is about the same or even slightly smaller than envisaged in ITER. (orig.)

  13. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Villarino; Alicia Doval

    2011-01-01

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper ...

  14. The reactor antineutrino anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haser, Julia; Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Major discoveries were made in the past few years in the field of neutrino flavour oscillation. Nuclear reactors produce a clean and intense flux of electron antineutrinos and are thus an essential neutrino source for the determination of oscillation parameters. Most currently the reactor antineutrino experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO have accomplished to measure θ{sub 13}, the smallest of the three-flavour mixing angles. In the course of these experiments two anomalies emerged: (1) the reanalysis of the reactor predictions revealed a deficit in experimentally observed antineutrino flux, known as the ''reactor antineutrino anomaly''. (2) The high precision of the latest generation of neutrino experiments resolved a spectral shape distortion relative to the expected energy spectra. Both puzzles are yet to be solved and triggered new experimental as well as theoretical studies, with the search for light sterile neutrinos as most popular explanation for the flux anomaly. This talk outlines the two reactor antineutrino anomalies. Discussing possible explanations for their occurrence, recent and upcoming efforts to solve the reactor puzzles are highlighted.

  15. Moon base reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  16. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  17. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  18. Scaleable, High Efficiency Microchannel Sabatier Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Microchannel Sabatier Reactor System (MSRS) consisting of cross connected arrays of isothermal or graded temperature reactors is proposed. The reactor array...

  19. CdS quantum dots modified CuO inverse opal electrodes for ultrasensitive electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Xu, Lin; Song, Jian; Xu, Ru; Liu, Dali; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2015-06-04

    The CuO inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and modified with CdS quantum dots by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). CdS QDs modified CuO IOPCs FTO electrodes of different SILAR cycles were fabricated and their electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (I-t). Structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The result indicated that the structure of IOPCs and loading of CdS QDs could greatly improve the electrochemical properties. Three SILAR cycles of CdS QDs sensitization was the optimum condition for preparing electrodes, it exhibited a sensitivity of 4345 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) to glucose with a 0.15 μM detection limit (S/N= 3) and a linear range from 0.15 μM to 0.5 mM under a working potential of +0.7 V. It also showed strong stability, good reproducibility, excellent selectivity and fast amperometric response. This work provides a promising approach for realizing excellent photoelectrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensor of similar composite structure.

  20. CdS quantum dots modified CuO inverse opal electrodes for ultrasensitive electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Xu, Lin; Song, Jian; Xu, Ru; Liu, Dali; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    The CuO inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs) were synthesized by the sol-gel method and modified with CdS quantum dots by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). CdS QDs modified CuO IOPCs FTO electrodes of different SILAR cycles were fabricated and their electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (I–t). Structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The result indicated that the structure of IOPCs and loading of CdS QDs could greatly improve the electrochemical properties. Three SILAR cycles of CdS QDs sensitization was the optimum condition for preparing electrodes, it exhibited a sensitivity of 4345 μA mM-1 cm-2 to glucose with a 0.15 μM detection limit (S/N= 3) and a linear range from 0.15 μM to 0.5 mM under a working potential of +0.7 V. It also showed strong stability, good reproducibility, excellent selectivity and fast amperometric response. This work provides a promising approach for realizing excellent photoelectrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensor of similar composite structure. PMID:26042520

  1. Molecular imprinted opal closest-packing photonic crystals for the detection of trace 17β-estradiol in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Na; Wu, Yuntang; Sun, Zhong; Huang, Guowei; Gao, Zhixian

    2015-11-01

    A novel opal closest-packing (OCP) photonic crystal (PC) was prepared by the introduction of molecular imprinting technique into the OCP PC. This molecular imprinted (MI)-OCP PC was fabricated via a vertical convective self-assembly method using 17β-estradiol (E2) as template molecules for monitoring E2 in aqueous solution. Morphology characterization showed that the MI-OCP PC possessed a highly ordered three-dimensional (3D) periodically-ordered structure, showing the desired structural color. The proposed PC material displayed a reduced reflection intensity when detecting E2 in water environment, because the molecular imprinting recognition events make the optical characteristics of PC change. The Bragg diffraction intensity decreased by 19.864 a.u. with the increase of E2 concentration from 1.5 ng mL(-1) to 364.5 ng mL(-1) within 6 min, whereas there were no obvious peak intensity changes for estriol, estrone, cholesterol, testosterone and diethylstilbestrol, indicating that the MI-OCP PC had selective and rapid response for E2 molecules. The adsorption results showed that the OCP structure and homogeneous layers were created in the MI-OCP PC with higher adsorption capacity. Thus, it was learned the MI-OCP PC is a simple prepared, sensitive, selective, and easy operative material, which shows promising use in routine supervision for residue detection in food and environment.

  2. Nanocasting hierarchical carbide-derived carbons in nanostructured opal assemblies for high-performance cathodes in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Claudia; Thieme, Sören; Brückner, Jan; Oschatz, Martin; Biemelt, Tim; Mondin, Giovanni; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan

    2014-12-23

    Silica nanospheres are used as templates for the generation of carbide-derived carbons with monodisperse spherical mesopores (d=20-40 nm) and microporous walls. The nanocasting approach with a polycarbosilane precursor and subsequent pyrolysis, followed by silica template removal and chlorine treatment, results in carbide-derived carbons DUT-86 (DUT=Dresden University of Technology) with remarkable textural characteristics, monodisperse, spherical mesopores tunable in diameter, and very high pore volumes up to 5.0 cm3 g(-1). Morphology replication allows these nanopores to be arranged in a nanostructured inverse opal-like structure. Specific surface areas are very high (2450 m2 g(-1)) due to the simultaneous presence of micropores. Testing DUT-86 samples as cathode materials in Li-S batteries reveals excellent performance, and tailoring of the pore size allows optimization of cell performance, especially the active center accessibility and sulfur utilization. The outstanding pore volumes allow sulfur loadings of 80 wt %, a value seldom achieved in composite cathodes, and initial capacities of 1165 mAh gsulfur(-1) are reached. After 100 cycle capacities of 860 mAh gsulfur(-1) are retained, rendering DUT-86 a high-performance sulfur host material.

  3. Investigation of hidden periodic structures on SEM images of opal-like materials using FFT and IFFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephant, Nicolas; Rondeau, Benjamin; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Cody, Jason A; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to use fast Fourier transformation (FFT) and inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT) to investigate hidden periodic structures on SEM images. We focused on samples of natural, play-of-color opals that diffract visible light and hence are periodically structured. Conventional sample preparation by hydrofluoric acid etch was not used; untreated, freshly broken surfaces were examined at low magnification relative to the expected period of the structural features, and, the SEM was adjusted to get a very high number of pixels in the images. These SEM images were treated by software to calculate autocorrelation, FFT, and IFFT. We present how we adjusted SEM acquisition parameters for best results. We first applied our procedure on an SEM image on which the structure was obvious. Then, we applied the same procedure on a sample that must contain a periodic structure because it diffracts visible light, but on which no structure was visible on the SEM image. In both cases, we obtained clearly periodic patterns that allowed measurements of structural parameters. We also investigated how the irregularly broken surface interfered with the periodic structure to produce additional periodicity. We tested the limits of our methodology with the help of simulated images.

  4. Enhanced rare earth photoluminescence in inverse opal photonic crystals and its application for pH sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongsheng; Cui, Shaobo; Wang, Yinhua; Liu, Mao; Lu, Cheng; Mishra, Abhinay; Xu, Wen

    2016-10-01

    Concentration quenching effects of identical rare earth (RE) activator ions and energy transfer (ET) between different RE ions often compromise the photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency in RE based luminescence materials. Here, we demonstrate that in NaGd(WO4)2:Tb3+, Eu3+ inverse opal photonic crystals (IOPCs), the suppression of the emission line located in the photonic stop band (PSB) and a dramatic increase of the lifetimes of Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions are observed. More interestingly, the concentration quenching among Eu3+ ions and ET from Tb3+ to Eu3+ is significantly relieved owing to the periodic empty cavity structure of IOPCs. As a consequence, the luminescent quantum efficiency (QE) of the NaGd(WO4)2:Tb3+, Eu3+ IOPCs increases ˜2 times more than that of crushed NaGd(WO4)2:Tb3+, Eu3+ powder. In addition, a reusable pH sensor with good linear response (pH 5-10) has been designed based on the high surface-to-volume ratio, high connectivity, and enhanced luminescence of NaGd(WO4)2:Tb3+, Eu3+IOPCs, which could be applied to the dynamical detection of pH value.

  5. Measurement of the running of the QED coupling in small angle Bhabha scattering with the OPAL detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, P.

    2005-06-01

    Using the high precision OPAL Silicon-Tungsten luminometer at LEP, the running of the effective QED coupling {alpha}(t) is measured for space-like momentum transfer 1.81 {<=} -t {<=} 6.07 GeV{sup 2} through its effect on the angular spectrum of small angle Bhabha scattering. In an almost ideal QED framework, with very favourable experimental conditions, we obtain a strong direct evidence that the running of {alpha}(t) is consistent with standard model expectations. The null hypothesis that {alpha} remains constant within the above interval of -t is excluded with a significance above 5{sigma}: {delta}{alpha}(-6.07 GeV{sup 2}) - {delta}{alpha}(-1.81 GeV{sup 2}) = 0.00450 {+-} 0.00079 The hadronic contribution to the running of the coupling has been estimated to be: {delta}{alpha}{sub had}(-6.07 GeV{sup 2}) - {delta}{alpha}{sub had}(-1.81 GeV{sup 2}) = 0.00248 {+-} 0.00079. This result is inconsistent at the level of more than 3{sigma} with the hypothesis that only leptonic loops contribute to the running, and therefore provide the first clear space-like experimental evidence that hadronic loops also contribute. (orig.)

  6. Anatomy of biologically mediated opal speleothems in the World's largest sandstone cave: Cueva Charles Brewer, Chimantá Plateau, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, R.; Brewer-Carías, Ch.; Šmída, B.; Audy, M.; Kováčik, Ľ.

    2008-01-01

    Siliceous speleothems can be formed in sandstone caves. Recently, opal "biospeleothems" have been found in the World's largest cave in Precambrian sandstones on the Chimantá Tepui in Venezuela. The speleothems, although reminiscent of normal stalactites and stalagmites from limestone caves, are in fact large microbialites. More than a dozen forms were distinguished, but they share a common structure and origin. They consist of two main types: 1. fine-laminated columnar stromatolite formed by silicified filamentous microbes (either heterotrophic filamentous bacteria or cyanobacteria) and 2. a porous peloidal stromatolite formed by Nostoc-type cyanobacteria. The first type usually forms the central part and the second type, the outer part, of speleothems. Fungal hyphae, metazoan and plant remains also subordinately contribute to speleothem construction. The speleothems occur out of the reach of flowing water; the main source of silica is the condensed cave moisture which is the main dissolution-reprecipitation agent. Speleothems which originated by encrustation of spider threads are unique.

  7. Facile control of silica nanoparticles using a novel solvent varying method for the fabrication of artificial opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weihong; Rigout, Muriel; Owens, Huw

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the Stöber process was applied to produce uniform silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in the meso-scale size range. The novel aspect of this work was to control the produced silica particle size by only varying the volume of the solvent ethanol used, whilst fixing the other reaction conditions. Using this one-step Stöber-based solvent varying (SV) method, seven batches of SNPs with target diameters ranging from 70 to 400 nm were repeatedly reproduced, and the size distribution in terms of the polydispersity index (PDI) was well maintained (within 0.1). An exponential equation was used to fit the relationship between the particle diameter and ethanol volume. This equation allows the prediction of the amount of ethanol required in order to produce particles of any target diameter within this size range. In addition, it was found that the reaction was completed in approximately 2 h for all batches regardless of the volume of ethanol. Structurally coloured artificial opal photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated from the prepared SNPs by self-assembly under gravity sedimentation.

  8. Synthesis and Photocatalytic Property of ZnO/TiO2 Inverse Opals Films with Controllable Composition and Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiao; Yang, Bei-fang; Fu, Zheng-ping; Wen, Mei-wang; Zhao, Yong-xun

    2012-04-01

    A novel method to fabricate composition- and topology-controlled ZnO/TiO2 inverse opals (IO) films using a positive sacrificial ZnO IO template has been developed. This method includes a two-step process, preparation of ZnO IO by a simple electrochemical deposition using a self-assembly polystyrene colloidal crystal template and preparation of ZnO/TiO2 IO by a liquid phase deposition (LPD) process at room temperature. The composition and topology of ZnO/TiO2 IO can be easily controlled by changing the duration of the LPD. After 20 min LPD process, a ZnO/TiO2 composite IO with non-close-packed face-centered cubic air sphere array was obtained. Prolonging the duration to 60 min, a pure TiO2 IO (TIO-LPD60) with obviously thickened walls was formed. The formation mechanism for the compositional and topological variation was discussed. A preliminary study on UV photocatalytic property of the samples for degradation of methylene blue reveals that the composition and topology significantly influenced the photocatalytic activity of the IO film. The ZnO/TiO2 composite IO demonstrates a higher degree of activity than both pure ZnO and pure TiO2 IO, although they have a similar IO wall thickness. Moreover, with increasing IO wall thickness from ~52 nm to ~90 nm, TIO-LPD60 exhibits the highest level of photocatalytic performance.

  9. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Iida, Masaaki; Moriki, Yasuyuki

    1994-10-18

    A reactor core is divided into a plurality of coolants flowrate regions, and electromagnetic pumps exclusively used for each of the flowrate regions are disposed to distribute coolants flowrates in the reactor core. Further, the flowrate of each of the electromagnetic pumps is automatically controlled depending on signals from a temperature detector disposed at the exit of the reactor core, so that the flowrate of the region can be controlled optimally depending on the burning of reactor core fuels. Then, the electromagnetic pumps disposed for every divided region are controlled respectively, so that the coolants flowrate distribution suitable to each of the regions can be attained. Margin for fuel design is decreased, fuels are used effectively, as well as an operation efficiency can be improved. Moreover, since the electromagnetic pump has less flow resistance compared with a mechanical type pump, and flow resistance of the reactor core flowrate control mechanism is eliminated, greater circulating flowrate can be ensured after occurrence of accident in a natural convection using a buoyancy of coolants utilizable for after-heat removal as a driving force. (N.H.).

  10. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbe, U., E-mail: ulf.garbe@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Randall, T.; Hughes, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2011-09-21

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75x10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 ) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 ). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  11. The new neutron radiography/tomography/imaging station DINGO at OPAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, U.; Randall, T.; Hughes, C.

    2011-09-01

    A new neutron imaging instrument will be built to support the area of neutron imaging research (neutron radiography/tomography) at ANSTO. The instrument will be designed for an international user community and for routine quality control for defence, industrial, mining, space and aircraft applications. It will also be a useful tool for assessing oil and water flow in sedimentary rock reservoirs (like the North West Shelf), assessing water damage in aircraft components, and the study of hydrogen distribution and cracking in steel. The instrument is planned to be completed by the end of June 2013 and is currently in the design stage. The usable neutron flux is mainly determined by the neutron source, but it also depends on the instrument position and the resolution. The designated instrument position for DINGO is the beam port HB-2 in the reactor hall. The estimated flux for an L/ D of approximately 250 at HB-2 is calculated by Mcstas simulation in a range of 4.75×10 7 n/cm 2 s, which is in the same range of other facilities like ANSTARES (FRM II; Schillinger et al., 2004 [1]) or BT2 (NIST; Hussey et al., 2005 [2]). A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator place in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/ D of 250 and 1000. A secondary collimator will separate the two beams and block one. The whole instrument will operate in two different positions, one for high resolution and the other for high speed.

  12. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  13. Operation of Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    3.1 Annual Report of SPR Operation Chu Shaochu Having overseen by National Nuclear Safety Administration and specialists, the reactor restarted up successfully after Safety renovation on April 16, 1996. In August 1996 the normal operation of SPR was approved by the authorities of Naitonal Nuclear Safety Administration. 1 Operation status In 1996, the reactor operated safely for 40 d and the energy released was about 137.3 MW·d. The operation status of SPR is shown in table 1. The reactor started up to higher power (power more than 1 MW) and lower power (for physics experiments) 4 times and 14 times respectively. Measurement of control rod efficiency and other measurement tasks were 2 times and 5 times respectively.

  14. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  15. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

  16. Sol–gel preparation of well-adhered films and long range ordered inverse opal films of BaTiO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Arjan, Wafa S. [Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); King Faisal University, PO Box 380, Al Hofuf (Saudi Arabia); Algaradah, Mohammed M.F. [Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); King Khalid College, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Brewer, Jack [Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Hector, Andrew L., E-mail: a.l.hector@soton.ac.uk [Chemistry, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Highly adaptable sols are presented for processing of the electroceramic materials BaTiO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. • High quality thin films are produced by dip coating with good phase control. • Infiltration of cross-linked polystyrene templates led to high quality inverse opals. - Abstract: Barium and bismuth titanate thin films and well-ordered inverse opal films are produced by dip coating from sols containing titanium alkoxides with acetic acid, acetylacetone, methoxyethanol and water. The inverse opal preparations used crosslinked polystyrene opal templates. Heat treatment in air produced tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3} or mixtures of the hexagonal and tetragonal phases, or phase pure Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Good quality films were obtained with a thickness of 5 μm from a single dipping, and the thickness could be increased by dipping multiple times. Inverse opals were well ordered and exhibited opalescence and photonic stop band effects.

  17. An Overview of Reactor Concepts, a Survey of Reactor Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Public Affairs Office and is releasaole to the National Technical Information Services (NTIS). At NTIS, it will be available to the general public...Reactors that use deu- terium (heavy water) as a coolant can use natural uranium as a fuel. The * Canadian reactor, CANDU , utilizes this concept...reactor core at the top and discharged at the Dotton while the reactor is in operation. The discharged fuel can then b inspected to see if it can De used

  18. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  19. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  20. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  1. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  2. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  3. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Tests of perturbative and non perturbative structure of moments of hadronic event shapes using experiments JADE and OPAL; Untersuchung perturbativer und nichtperturbativer Struktur der Momente hadronischer Ereignisformvariablen mit den Experimenten JADE und OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahl, Christoph Johannes

    2008-01-29

    In hadron production data of the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation experiments JADE and OPAL we measure the first five moments of twelve hadronic-event-shape variables at c.m. energies from 14 to 207 GeV. From the comparison of the QCD NLO prediction with the data corrected by means of MC models about hadronization we obtain the reference value of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z{sup 0}})=0.1254{+-}0.0007(stat.){+-}0.0010(exp.){sup +0.0009}{sub -0.0023}(had.){sup +0.0069}{sub -0.0053}(theo.). For some, especially higher moments, systematic unsufficiencies in the QCD NLO prediction are recognizable. Simultaneous fits to two moments under assumption of identical renormalization scales yield scale values from x{sub {mu}}=0.057 to x{sub {mu}}=0.196. We check predictions of different non-perturbative models. From the single-dressed-gluon approximation a perturbative prediction in O({alpha}{sup 5}{sub s}) results with neglegible energy power correction, which describes the thrust average on hadron level well with {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z{sup 0}})=0.1186{+-}0,0017(exp.){sub -0.0028}{sup +0.0033}(theo.). The variance of the event-shape variable is measured and compared with models as well as predictions. [German] In Hadronproduktionsdaten der e{sup +}e{sup -}-Vernichtungsexperimente JADE und OPAL messen wir die ersten fuenf Momente von zwoelf hadronischen Ereignisformvariablen bei Schwerpunktsenergien von 14 bis 207 GeV. Aus dem Vergleich der QCD NLO-Vorhersage mit den mittels MC-Modellen um Hadronisierung korrigierten Daten erhalten wir den Referenzwert der starken Kopplung {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z{sup 0}})=0.1254{+-}0.0007(stat.){+-}0.0010(exp.){sup +0.0009}{sub -0.0023}(had.){sup +0.0069}{sub -0.0053}(theo.). Fuer einige, insbesondere hoehere, Momente sind systematische Unzulaenglichkeiten in der QCD NLO-Vorhersage erkenntlich. Simultane Fits an zwei Momente unter Annahme identischer Renormierungsskalen ergeben Skalenwerte von x{sub {mu}}=0.057 bis x{sub {mu}}=0

  5. Reactor operation safety information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  6. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  7. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  8. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  9. MULTISTAGE FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonke, A.A.; Graae, J.E.A.; Levitz, N.M.

    1959-11-01

    A multistage fluidized bed reactor is described in which each of a number of stages is arranged with respect to an associated baffle so that a fluidizing gas flows upward and a granular solid downward through the stages and baffles, whereas the granular solid stopsflowing downward when the flow of fluidizing gas is shut off.

  10. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  11. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  12. The First Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    On December 2, 1942, in a racquet court underneath the West Stands of Stagg Field at the University of Chicago, a team of scientists led by Enrico Fermi created the first controlled, self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. This updated and revised story of the first reactor (or "pile") is based on postwar interviews (as told to Corbin…

  13. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  14. Chromatographic and Related Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-07

    special information about effects of surface heteroge- neity in the methanation reaction. Studies of an efficient multicolumn assembly for measuring...of organic basic catalysts such as pyridine and 4-methylpicoline. It was demonstrated that the chromatographic reactor gave special information about...Programmed Reaction to obtain special information about surface heterogeneity in the methanation reaction. Advantages of stopped flow over steady state

  15. New concepts for shaftless recycle reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berty, J.M.; Berty, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    Berty Reaction Engineers, Ltd. (BREL) is developing two new laboratory recycle reactors, the ROTOBERTY and the TURBOBERTY. These new reactors are basically improved versions of the original Berty reactor. To understand why the reactors have the features that they do, it is first necessary to briefly review laboratory reactors in general and specifically the original Berty reactor.

  16. 奥普尔HA202提高早花菜心产量的作用%Effects on OPAL HA202 Raising the Yield of Early Flower Brossica Chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈跃进; 陈勇; 任敬民; 胡民强; 周娜芳

    2008-01-01

    用奥普尔(OPAL)HA202对早花菜心进行浸种和喷叶,以提高菜心产量.结果表明:施用OPAL HA202的菜心小区平均产量834g,比施用清水的对照增产41.4%,增产极显著,因为OPAL HA202增加了菜心的株高、叶片开展度、茎粗和茎叶干物重.与之对比施用吲哚丁酸(IBA)的菜心小区平均产量675g,比清水对照增产14.4%,增产不显著.

  17. Modeling Chemical Reactors I: Quiescent Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Michoski, C E; Schmitz, P G

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a fully generalized quiescent chemical reactor system in arbitrary space $\\vdim =1,2$ or 3, with $n\\in\\mathbb{N}$ chemical constituents $\\alpha_{i}$, where the character of the numerical solution is strongly determined by the relative scaling between the local reactivity of species $\\alpha_{i}$ and the local functional diffusivity $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(\\alpha)$ of the reaction mixture. We develop an operator time-splitting predictor multi-corrector RK--LDG scheme, and utilize $hp$-adaptivity relying only on the entropy $\\mathscr{S}_{\\mathfrak{R}}$ of the reactive system $\\mathfrak{R}$. This condition preserves these bounded nonlinear entropy functionals as a necessarily enforced stability condition on the coupled system. We apply this scheme to a number of application problems in chemical kinetics; including a difficult classical problem arising in nonequilibrium thermodynamics known as the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction where we utilize a concentration-dependent diffusivity tensor $\\mathscr{D}_{ij}(...

  18. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The global late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling (~3.0–2.0 million years ago, Ma concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS, off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM. Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (δ30Si record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in δ30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest δ30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher δ30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilization in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Plio/Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.0–2.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling.

  19. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  20. Plasmon-Sensitized Graphene/TiO2 Inverse Opal Nanostructures with Enhanced Charge Collection Efficiency for Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppella, Ramireddy; Kochuveedu, Saji Thomas; Kim, Heejun; Jeong, Myung Jin; Marques Mota, Filipe; Park, Jong Hyeok; Kim, Dong Ha

    2017-03-01

    In this contribution we have developed TiO2 inverse opal based photoelectrodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting devices, in which Au nanoparticles (NPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been strategically incorporated (TiO2@rGO@Au). The periodic hybrid nanostructure showed a photocurrent density of 1.29 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V vs RHE, uncovering a 2-fold enhancement compared to a pristine TiO2 reference. The Au NPs were confirmed to extensively broaden the absorption spectrum of TiO2 into the visible range and to reduce the onset potential of these photoelectrodes. Most importantly, TiO2@rGO@Au hybrid exhibited a 14-fold enhanced PEC efficiency under visible light and a 2.5-fold enrichment in the applied bias photon-to-current efficiency at much lower bias potential compared with pristine TiO2. Incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency measurements highlighted a synergetic effect between Au plasmon sensitization and rGO-mediated facile charge separation/transportation, which is believed to significantly enhance the PEC activity of these nanostructures under simulated and visible light irradiation. Under the selected operating conditions the incorporation of Au NPs and rGO into TiO2 resulted in a remarkable boost in the H2 evolution rate (17.8 μmol/cm(2)) compared to a pristine TiO2 photoelectrode reference (7.6 μmol/cm(2)). In line with these results and by showing excellent stability as a photoelectrode, these materials are herin underlined to be of promising interest in the PEC water splitting reaction.

  1. Slow photon amplification of gas-phase ethanol photo-oxidation in titania inverse opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovic, Vedran; Idriss, Hicham; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe the successful fabrication of six titania inverse opal (TiO2 IO) photocatalysts with fcc[1 1 1] pseudo photonic band gaps (PBGs) tuned to span the UV-vis region. Photocatalysts were fabricated by a colloidal crystal templating and sol-gel approach - a robust and highly applicable bottom-up scheme which allowed for precise control over the geometric and optical properties of the TiO2 IO photocatalysts. Optical properties of the TiO2 IO thin films were investigated in detail by UV-vis transmittance and reflectance measurements. The PBG along the fcc[1 1 1] direction in the TiO2 IOs was dependent on the inter-planar spacing in the [1 1 1] direction, the incident angle of light and the refractive index of the medium filling the macropores in the IOs, in agreement with a modified Bragg's law expression. Calculated photonic band structures for the photocatalysts revealed a PBG along the Γ → L direction at a/λ ∼ 0.74, in agreement with the experimental optical data. By coupling the low frequency edge of the PBG along the [1 1 1] direction with the electronic absorption edge of anatase TiO2, a two-fold enhancement in the rate of gas phase ethanol photo-oxidation in air was achieved. This enhancement appears to be associated with a 'slow photon' effect that acts to both enhance TiO2 absorption and inhibit spontaneous emission (i.e. suppress electron-hole pair recombination).

  2. Synthesis and Photocatalytic Property of ZnO/TiO2 Inverse Opals Films with Controllable Composition and Topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Xu; Bei-fang Yang; Zheng-ping Fu; Mei-wang Wen; Yong-xun Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A novel method to fabricate composition- and topology-controlled ZnO/TiO2 inverse opals (IO) films using a positive sacrificial ZnO IO template has been developed.This method includes a two-step process,preparation of ZnO IO by a simple electrochemical deposition using a self-assembly polystyrene colloidal crystal template and preparation of ZnO/TiO2IO by a liquid phase deposition (LPD) process at room temperature.The composition and topology of ZnO/TiO2 IO can be easily controlled by changing the duration of the LPD.After 20 min LPD process,a ZnO/TiO2 composite IO with non-close-packed face-centered cubic air sphere array was obtained.Prolonging the duration to 60 min,a pure TiO2 IO (TIO-LPD60)with obviously thickened walls was formed.The formation mechanism for the compositional and topological variation was discussed.A preliminary study on UV photocatalytic property of the samples for degradation of methylene blue reveals that the composition and topology significantly influenced the photocatalytic activity of the IO film.The ZnO/TiO2 composite IO demonstrates a higher degree of activity than both pure ZnO and pure TiO2 IO,although they have a similar IO wall thickness. Moreover,with increasing IO wall thickness from ~52 nm to ~90 nm,TIO-LPD60 exhibits the highest level of photocatatytic performance.

  3. Dip-in Indicators for Visual Differentiation of Fuel Mixtures Based on Wettability of Fluoroalkylchlorosilane-Coated Inverse Opal Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Abootaleb; Qiu, Shuang; Wong, Michael C K; Li, Paul C H

    2015-12-30

    We have developed the dip-in indicator based on the inverse opal film (IOF) for visual differentiation of organic liquid mixtures, such as oil/gasoline or ethanol/gasoline fuel mixtures. The IOF consists of a three-dimensional porous structure with a highly ordered periodic arrangement of nanopores. The specularly reflected light at the interface of the nanopores and silica walls contributes to the structural color of the IOF film. This color disappears when the nanopores are infiltrated by a liquid with a similar refractive index to silica. The disappearance of the structural color provides a means to differentiate various liquid fuel mixtures based on their wettability of the nanopores in the IOF-based indicators. For differentiation of various liquid mixtures, we tune the wettability threshold of the indicator in such a way that it is wetted (color disappears) by one liquid but is not wetted by the other (color remains). Although colorimetric differentiation of liquids based on IOF wettability has been reported, differentiation of highly similar liquid mixtures require complicated readout approaches. It is known that the IOF wettability is controlled by multiple surface properties (e.g., oleophobicity) and structural properties (e.g., neck angle and film thickness) of the nanostructure. Therefore, we aim to exploit the combined tuning of these properties for differentiation of fuel mixtures with close compositions. In this study, we have demonstrated that, for the first time, the IOF-based dip-in indicator is able to detect a slight difference in the fuel mixture composition (i.e., 0.4% of oil content). Moreover, the color/no-color differentiation platform is simple, powerful, and easy-to-read. This platform makes the dip-in indicator a promising tool for authentication and determination of fuel composition at the point-of-purchase or point-of-use.

  4. Inverse opal-inspired, nanoscaffold battery separators: a new membrane opportunity for high-performance energy storage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Choi, Keun-Ho; Yu, Hyung Kyun; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Joo Sung; Lee, Sang-Young

    2014-08-13

    The facilitation of ion/electron transport, along with ever-increasing demand for high-energy density, is a key to boosting the development of energy storage systems such as lithium-ion batteries. Among major battery components, separator membranes have not been the center of attention compared to other electrochemically active materials, despite their important roles in allowing ionic flow and preventing electrical contact between electrodes. Here, we present a new class of battery separator based on inverse opal-inspired, seamless nanoscaffold structure ("IO separator"), as an unprecedented membrane opportunity to enable remarkable advances in cell performance far beyond those accessible with conventional battery separators. The IO separator is easily fabricated through one-pot, evaporation-induced self-assembly of colloidal silica nanoparticles in the presence of ultraviolet (UV)-curable triacrylate monomer inside a nonwoven substrate, followed by UV-cross-linking and selective removal of the silica nanoparticle superlattices. The precisely ordered/well-reticulated nanoporous structure of IO separator allows significant improvement in ion transfer toward electrodes. The IO separator-driven facilitation of the ion transport phenomena is expected to play a critical role in the realization of high-performance batteries (in particular, under harsh conditions such as high-mass-loading electrodes, fast charging/discharging, and highly polar liquid electrolyte). Moreover, the IO separator enables the movement of the Ragone plot curves to a more desirable position representing high-energy/high-power density, without tailoring other battery materials and configurations. This study provides a new perspective on battery separators: a paradigm shift from plain porous films to pseudoelectrochemically active nanomembranes that can influence the charge/discharge reaction.

  5. Preparation of 3D Colloidal Crystal Film and Gold-Infiltrated Silica Artificial Opals%3D胶状晶体膜及其渗透金的氧化硅人工蛋白石的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文江; 谢飞

    2007-01-01

    A free-standing 3D colloidal crystal film (opal) was fabricated at a water-air interface using purified monodispersed SiO2 colloids. The gold/silica opal was obtained through the infiltration of gold nanoparticles by electroplating. The transmission and reflection spectra of the gold/silica composite opal show a red shift with increasing electroplating time.SEM images show that gold nanoparticles can be directly deposited on the surface of silica spheres in the opaline structure. Gold/silica composite opal film could provide a simple way to tune opal properties through controlling the amount of gold in the silica opal.%用纯的单分散氧化硅胶体微球作为基质,在水-空气界面构筑无载体三维有序胶质晶体膜.该高度有序三维周期性结构具有明显的光学衍射现象.利用电沉积的方法将纳米金渗透到这种人工蛋白石的空隙中,构成gold/silica复合蛋白石材料.详细研究了该复合蛋白石的透射光谱和反射光谱,用扫描电镜观察了复合蛋白石结构的形貌特征,并对渗透金后蛋白石的光谱移动进行了分析.

  6. Reactor monitoring using antineutrino detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, N. S.

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the antineutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Measurements made with antineutrino detectors could therefore offer an alternative means for verifying the power history and fissile inventory of a reactor as part of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and/or other reactor safeguards regimes. Several efforts to develop this monitoring technique are underway worldwide.

  7. Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

    1980-05-09

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  8. Methanogenesis in Thermophilic Biogas Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    Methanogenesis in thermophilic biogas reactors fed with different wastes is examined. The specific methanogenic activity with acetate or hydrogen as substrate reflected the organic loading of the specific reactor examined. Increasing the loading of thermophilic reactors stabilized the process...... as indicated by a lower concentration of volatile fatty acids in the effluent from the reactors. The specific methanogenic activity in a thermophilic pilot-plant biogas reactor fed with a mixture of cow and pig manure reflected the stability of the reactor. The numbers of methanogens counted by the most...... against Methanothrix soehngenii or Methanothrix CALS-I in any of the thermophilic biogas reactors examined. Studies using 2-14C-labeled acetate showed that at high concentrations (more than approx. 1 mM) acetate was metabolized via the aceticlastic pathway, transforming the methyl-group of acetate...

  9. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  10. MEANS FOR COOLING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J.A.

    1957-11-01

    A design of a reactor is presented in which the fuel elements may be immersed in a liquid coolant when desired without the necessity of removing them from the reactor structure. The fuel elements, containing the fissionable material are in plate form and are disposed within spaced slots in a moderator material, such as graphite to form the core. Adjacent the core is a tank containing the liquid coolant. The fuel elements are mounted in spaced relationship on a rotatable shaft which is located between the core and the tank so that by rotation of the shaft the fuel elements may be either inserted in the slots in the core to sustain a chain reaction or immersed in the coolant.

  11. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  12. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, A. C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we ...

  13. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, B.L.

    1963-12-31

    A system for maintaining the alignment of moderator block structures in reactors is presented. Integral restraining grids are placed between each layer of blocks in the moderator structure, at the top of the uppermost layer, and at the bottom of the lowermost layer. Slots are provided in the top and bottom surfaces of the moderator blocks so as to provide a keying action with the grids. The grids are maintained in alignment by vertical guiding members disposed about their peripheries. (AEC)

  14. BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, T.P.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

  15. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  16. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  17. Determination of the mass and width of the W-boson using the semileptonic decay channel with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, Cornelius Fritz

    2004-01-01

    Diese Arbeit ist eine Weiterentwicklung der beim OPAL-Experiment verwendeten Faltungsmethode zur Bestimmung der Masse des geladenen Eichbosons der schwachen Wechselwirkung. Die Methode wurde ausgeweitet auf eine gleichzeitige Bestimmung der Masse Mw und der Zerfallsbreite Gw des W-Boson genannten Eichbosons. Analysiert wurden dazu Daten, die mit dem OPAL-Experiment in den Jahren 1997 bis 2000 aufgezeichnet wurden. Von den möglichen Zerfällen der erzeugten W-Bosonpaare werden nur semileptonische betrachtet, bei denen ein W-Boson hadronisch in ein Quark-Antiquark-Paar zerfällt und das andere in ein geladenes Lepton und ein Neutrino. In der Faltungsmethode werden die aus der Detektorauflösung resultierenden Fehler der einzelnen Ereignisse berücksichtigt. Dazu wird eine Funktion P(m) für jedes Ereignis ermittelt, welche die Wahrscheinlichkeit angibt, daß die produzierten W-Bosonen eine mittlere Masse m haben. Diese sogenannte Ereigniswahrscheinlichkeitsdichte wird mit einer Physikfunktion PF(m;Mw,Gw) gefal...

  18. Opal-replaced "Phenocrysts" in Fresh Pumice from 1817 Phreatomagmatic Deposits from Kawah Ijen, East Java, Indonesia: Implications for Eruptive Timescales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Wright, H. M. N.; van Hinsberg, V.; Berlo, K.; Iacovino, K.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2016-12-01

    Pumice: Opal-replaced plagioclase and pyroxene are in apparently unaltered dacite pumice from the 1817 phreatomagmatic eruption at Kawah Ijen, an arc volcano with a hyperacidic crater lake. Some remnants of replaced phenocrysts are visible as cores within the euhedral opalcrysts (0.01 to 3 mm in size). The pumice matrix glass is microlite-free and shows no evidence of alteration. Fresh non-opaline phenocryst phases include pyroxene, Fe-Ti oxide, apatite, and sulfide. FTIR and TCEA analyses demonstrate that the opal contains > 2-4 wt.% H2O. D/H ratios range from -115 to -155 ‰, far below meteoric or crater lake waters ( 0) or the bulk dacite (-86±3), and higher in oxygen 18/16 than the pumice (12.6 vs. 7.2 ‰). Other opaline material is found as layered colloidal lithics ( 750°C for <24 hours, caused the opalcrysts to dehydrate and convert to crystalline SiO2 forms. The origin of the opalcrysts remains confounding, and we continue to explore options for their origin.

  19. Photonic crystal heterostructures fabricated by TiO2 and ZnO inverse opals using colloidal crystal template with single kind of microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongna; Fu, Ming; Wang, Jigang; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2012-09-01

    The fabrication of photonic crystal heterostructures is important for the applications in the fields of integrated photonic crystal chips, multi-frequency optical Bragg filters or mirrors. However, multiple steps of self-assembly process of microspheres are always employed in the fabrication of photonic crystal heterostructures, which may produce lattice mismatches of colloidal crystals. Therefore, photonic crystal heterostructures fabricated by using colloidal crystal template with single kind of microspheres were investigated in this paper. A colloidal crystal template with uniform periodicity was firstly formed by monodispersed polystyrene microsphere. Then ZnO was electrodeposited into the interstices of the template. The thickness of ZnO was controlled to be less than the thickness of the template by varying the deposition time. After the TiO2 precursor was filled into the top voids in the template, the polystyrene colloidal crystal template was removed and photonic crystal heterostructures fabricated by ZnO and TiO2 were formed. Both the dielectric constant and the periodicity of the two parts of the heterostructures are different due to the shrinkage of the sol-gel process. The ZnO/TiO2 heterostructures have a broad photonic stop band which is the superposition of photonic stop bands of ZnO inverse opals and TiO2 inverse opals.

  20. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01

    During the 1960's and early 70's the author performed extensive design studies, analyses, and tests aimed at thermionic reactor concepts that differed significantly from those pursued by other investigators. Those studies, like most others under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC and DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsorship, were terminated in the early 1970's. Some of this work was previously published, but much of it was never made available in the open literature. U.S. interest in thermionic reactors resumed in the early 80's, and was greatly intensified by reports about Soviet ground and flight tests in the late 80's. This recent interest resulted in renewed U.S. thermionic reactor development programs, primarily under Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship. Since most current investigators have not had an opportunity to study all of the author's previous work, a review of the highlights of that work may be of value to them. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling. Where the author's concepts differed from the later Topaz-2 design was in the relative location of the emitter and the collector. Placing the fueled emitter on the outside of the cylindrical diodes permits much higher axial conductances to reduce ohmic

  1. New reactors for laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berty, J.M.

    1978-02-01

    Recent developments in design of laboratory and bench-scale reactors reflect mostly the developments in reaction engineering; that is the improved understanding of physical and chemical rate limiting processes, their interactions, and their effects on commercial-scale reactor performance. Whether a laboratory reactor is used to study the fundamentals of a commercial process or for pure scientific interest, it is important to know what physical or chemical process is limiting or influencing the rate and selectivity. To clarify this, a definition is required of the regime where physical influences exist, and study the intrinsic kinetics at conditions where physical processes do not affect the rate. Reactors are illustrated whose design was influenced by the above considerations. These reactors produce results which are independent of the reactors in which they were measured, and which can be scaled up with up-to-date reaction engineering techniques.

  2. Spiral-shaped disinfection reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2015-08-20

    This disclosure includes disinfection reactors and processes for the disinfection of water. Some disinfection reactors include a body that defines an inlet, an outlet, and a spiral flow path between the inlet and the outlet, in which the body is configured to receive water and a disinfectant at the inlet such that the water is exposed to the disinfectant as the water flows through the spiral flow path. Also disclosed are processes for disinfecting water in such disinfection reactors.

  3. Turning points in reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  4. Acceptability of reactors in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1981-04-01

    Reactors are the key to our future expansion into space. However, there has been some confusion in the public as to whether they are a safe and acceptable technology for use in space. The answer to these questions is explored. The US position is that when reactors are the preferred technical choice, that they can be used safely. In fact, it dies not appear that reactors add measurably to the risk associated with the Space Transportation System.

  5. Hydrogen Production in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M; Uenosono, C.

    1993-01-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated.

  6. Fast reactor programme in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Chellapandi; P R Vasudeva Rao; Prabhat Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Role of fast breeder reactor (FBR) in the Indian context has been discussed with appropriate justification. The FBR programme since 1985 till 2030 is highlighted focussing on the current status and future direction of fast breeder test reactor (FBTR), prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) and FBR-1 and 2. Design and technological challenges of PFBR and design and safety targets with means to achieve the same are the major highlights of this paper.

  7. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Petr; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  8. Accelerator based fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Chao, Alexander Wu

    2017-08-01

    A feasibility study of fusion reactors based on accelerators is carried out. We consider a novel scheme where a beam from the accelerator hits the target plasma on the resonance of the fusion reaction and establish characteristic criteria for a workable reactor. We consider the reactions d+t\\to n+α,d+{{}3}{{H}\\text{e}}\\to p+α , and p+{{}11}B\\to 3α in this study. The critical temperature of the plasma is determined from overcoming the stopping power of the beam with the fusion energy gain. The needed plasma lifetime is determined from the width of the resonance, the beam velocity and the plasma density. We estimate the critical beam flux by balancing the energy of fusion production against the plasma thermo-energy and the loss due to stopping power for the case of an inert plasma. The product of critical flux and plasma lifetime is independent of plasma density and has a weak dependence on temperature. Even though the critical temperatures for these reactions are lower than those for the thermonuclear reactors, the critical flux is in the range of {{10}22}-{{10}24}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-2}~{{\\text{s}}-1} for the plasma density {ρt}={{10}15}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} in the case of an inert plasma. Several approaches to control the growth of the two-stream instability are discussed. We have also considered several scenarios for practical implementation which will require further studies. Finally, we consider the case where the injected beam at the resonance energy maintains the plasma temperature and prolongs its lifetime to reach a steady state. The equations for power balance and particle number conservation are given for this case.

  9. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  10. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  11. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

  12. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and

  13. Changes and influencing factors in biogenic opal export productivity in the Bering Sea over the last 4.3 Ma: Evidence from the records at IODP Site U1340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Muhong; Zhang, Lanlan; Su, Xiang; Xiang, Rong

    2016-08-01

    We reconstructed changes in biogenic opal export productivity (BOEP) in the southern Bering Sea (BS) over the last ˜4.3 Ma, based on mass accumulation rate (MAR) of biogenic opal from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1340. The results show that the BOEP in the BS was high and variable between ˜4.3 and ˜1.9 Ma, extremely low and relatively stable from ˜1.9 to ˜1.1 Ma, and then fluctuated frequently (generally high during interglacials and low during glacials) during the last ˜1.1 Ma. One interval of enhanced BOEP from ˜4.3 to ˜3.2 Ma is a response to the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene "Biogenic Bloom Event." Another interval from ˜2.8 to ˜1.9 Ma correlates with global opal burial shifting from high-latitude oceans to upwelling-influenced regions following the intensification of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG). Whereas, the increase in BS opal export productivity during the last ˜1.1 Ma tends to be a "local" phenomenon. Overall, the BOEP shows a similar trend and good correspondence to the input of the Alaskan Stream (AS), which can be traced using the Na2O/K2O ratio. We thus conclude that the AS may be the direct, and primary factor on BOEP variability in the BS during the last ˜4.3 Ma. In addition, although the poor correlation between opal MAR and volcanic glass suggests that BOEP variability was not controlled by long-term variations in the volcanism or ash abundance, increased ash abundance indicated by high contents of volcanic glasses was also a possible reason for enhanced BOEP during the period from ˜4.3 to ˜3.2 Ma and the last ˜0.5 Ma.

  14. Reactor Physics Analysis Models for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    2007-10-15

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analysis is typically performed in three steps. At first, macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice is produced by modeling the reference fuel channel. Secondly macroscopic cross-sections of reactivity devices in the reactor are generated. The macroscopic cross-sections of a reactivity device are calculated as incremental cross-sections by subtracting macroscopic cross-sections of a three-dimensional lattice without reactivity device from those of a three-dimensional lattice with a reactivity device. Using the macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice and incremental cross-sections of the reactivity devices, reactor physics calculations are performed. This report summarizes input data of typical CANDU reactor physics codes, which can be utilized for the future CANDU reactor physics analysis.

  15. Reactor Physics Analysis Models for a CANDU Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok

    2007-10-15

    Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor physics analysis is typically performed in three steps. At first, macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice is produced by modeling the reference fuel channel. Secondly macroscopic cross-sections of reactivity devices in the reactor are generated. The macroscopic cross-sections of a reactivity device are calculated as incremental cross-sections by subtracting macroscopic cross-sections of a three-dimensional lattice without reactivity device from those of a three-dimensional lattice with a reactivity device. Using the macroscopic cross-sections of the reference lattice and incremental cross-sections of the reactivity devices, reactor physics calculations are performed. This report summarizes input data of typical CANDU reactor physics codes, which can be utilized for the future CANDU reactor physics analysis.

  16. 反蛋白石结构光子晶体及其应用的研究∗%Research and Application of Inverse Opal Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单晶; 谭天亚; 张春玉; 步秋雨; 韩亚洲; 季亚楠; 张帆; 梅勇; 徐攀峰; 王绩伟

    2016-01-01

    反蛋白石结构光子晶体因具有完全光子带隙、制备材料广泛、特殊的周期结构、大的比表面积和连通的孔洞结构,近年来在自发辐射的调制、提高光催化反应速率和染料敏化太阳能电池反应速率等领域成为研究热点之一,并且在光、电、催化、传感、显示、检测等领域有着巨大的应用价值。介绍了反蛋白石结构光子晶体的基本概念及制备方法,阐述了反蛋白石结构在材料自发辐射的调制、能量传递的调制、促进物理化学反应、外界环境响应材料等方面的作用及其应用。%Inverse opal structure with the properties of complete photonic band gap,extensive preparation ma-terials,periodic structure,large specific surface area and connected holes has great importance in the domains of spon-taneous emission modulation,enhancing efficiency of photocatalysis and improving photielectric conversion efficiency of the dye sensitized cell in recent years.This structure has high value and huge potential in optics,electronics,catal-ysis,sensor,display,detection and so on.This paper introduces the basic concepts of inverse opal structure and de-scribes several applications of inverse opal structure,such as preparation method,spontaneous emission modulation, energy transfer modulation,promoting physical reactions,promoting chemical reactions and external environmental response materials.

  17. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  18. Thermochemical reactor systems and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinski, Wojciech; Davidson, Jane Holloway; Chase, Thomas Richard

    2016-11-29

    Thermochemical reactor systems that may be used to produce a fuel, and methods of using the thermochemical reactor systems, utilizing a reactive cylindrical element, an optional energy transfer cylindrical element, an inlet gas management system, and an outlet gas management system.

  19. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor.

  20. Studies on a membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, K.; Govind, R.

    1988-10-01

    Simulation is used to evaluate the performance of a catalytic reactor with permeable wall (membrane reactor) in shifting the equilibrium of three reversible reactions (cyclohexane dehydrogenation, hydrogen iodide decomposition, and propylene disproportionation). It is found that the preferred choice of cocurrernt or countercurrent operation is dependent on the physical properties and operating conditions. Methods of enhancing conversion are suggested and temperature effects are discussed.

  1. Thermochemical reactor systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Wojciech; Davidson, Jane Holloway; Chase, Thomas Richard

    2016-11-29

    Thermochemical reactor systems that may be used to produce a fuel, and methods of using the thermochemical reactor systems, utilizing a reactive cylindrical element, an optional energy transfer cylindrical element, an inlet gas management system, and an outlet gas management system.

  2. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  3. Metallic fuels for advanced reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, W. J.; Porter, D. L.; Chang, Y. I.; Hayes, S. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Burkes, D. E.; Lee, C. B.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Somers, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. This paper presents an evaluation of metallic alloy fuels. Early US fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high fissile density and compatibility with sodium. The goal of fast reactor fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. This will provide a mechanism for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Metal fuels are candidates for this application, based on documented performance of metallic fast reactor fuels and the early results of tests currently being conducted in US and international transmutation fuel development programs.

  4. A model of reactor kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.S.; Thompson, B.R.

    1988-09-01

    The analytical model of nuclear reactor transients, incorporating both mechanical and nuclear effects, simulates reactor kinetics. Linear analysis shows the stability borderline for small power perturbations. In a stable system, initial power disturbances die out with time. With an unstable combination of nuclear and mechanical characteristics, initial disturbances persist and may increase with time. With large instability, oscillations of great magnitude occur. Stability requirements set limits on the power density at which particular reactors can operate. The limiting power density depends largely on the product of two terms: the fraction of delayed neutrons and the frictional damping of vibratory motion in reactor core components. As the fraction of delayed neutrons is essentially fixed, mechanical damping largely determines the maximum power density. A computer program, based on the analytical model, calculates and plots reactor power as a nonlinear function of time in response to assigned values of mechanical and nuclear characteristics.

  5. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  6. Unsteady processes in catalytic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matros, Yu.Sh.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years a realization has occurred that reaction and reactor dynamics must be considered when designing and operating catalytic reactors. In this book, the author has focussed on both the processes occurring on individual porous-catalyst particles as well as the phenomena displayed by collections of these particles in fixed-bed reactors. The major topics discussed include the effects of unsteady-state heat and mass transfer, the influence of inhomogeneities and stagnant regions in fixed beds, and reactor operation during forced cycling of operating conditions. Despite the title of the book, attention is also paid to the determination of the number and stability of fixed-bed steady states, with the aim of describing the possibility of controlling reactors at unstable steady states. However, this development is somewhat dated, given the recent literature on multiplicity phenomena and process control.

  7. Antineutrino Monitoring of Thorium Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A; Norman, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuels types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring.Thorium molten salt reactors (MSR) breed U-233, that if diverted constitute an IAEA direct use material. The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of U-233 has been determined, the feasibility of detecting the diversion of a significant quantity, 8 kg of U-233, within the IAEA timeliness goal of 30 days has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario at a 25 meter standoff by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos. It was found that the diversion of a signifi...

  8. A Lesson from Opal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiper, Anne M.

    1987-01-01

    A five-year-old hearing impaired girl who arrives at a residential school for the deaf without having had the opportunity to learn to communicate goes through the early stages of writing development. Similarities between the developmental stages of oral and written language and the importance of providing behavior models are discussed. (VW)

  9. OPAL Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    around April at about 150 grams/m2 (Figure 8). Without training it peaks at about 300 grams/m2. Now, trade the hot dry year for a cool wet year...be spelled out to provide contex- tual meaning to the programmer. They can take any, or a mix, of sever- al forms. Often the first letter in a string

  10. Studies on Inverse Opal and Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Photonic Crystals%反Opal及二维非线性光子晶体的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪培根; 程丙英; 张道中

    2006-01-01

    通过向SiO2 Opal模板中填充钛酸乙酯制备TiO2光子晶体,观测到光子晶体带隙位置的移动达62nm,并发现光子晶体的有序度随填充率的升高而下降.向聚苯乙烯Opal模板中填充钛酸乙酯,制备成当时填充率最高、带隙最短的紫外波段TiO2反Opal光子晶体(中心波长~380nm),并根据测量的其透射谱估算出其填充率约为12%,即Opal模板孔隙的50%被填充.本文还对二维PPLN光子晶体进行了研究.建立了一套高压极化装置和电压数据采集装置,通过外加电场极化法成功制备出了具有正方形和矩形两种晶格形状二维PPLN光子晶体.利用二维PPLN的二阶准相位匹配,测量了其对1.064μm激光的二次谐波转换效率,并研究了晶体的温度、激光的入射角度及占空比对二次谐波转换效率的影响.利用矩形晶格实现了多方向、多波长倍频高效输出.%In this paper, we report some results on inverse opal photonic crystal and two-dimensional periodically poled lithium niobate photonic crystal. First, the process of infiltrating TiO2 into SiO2 Opal was systematically studied. Because of the infiltration of TiO2, the gap of SiO2 Opal was shifted to longer wavelength and a maximum shift of 62nm was observed. Furthermore, an inverse TiO2 Opal with larger filling fraction, ~ 12%, was fabricated, whose band gap in the Γ-L direction is located in the ultraviolet region ( ~ 380nm). Then two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals of lithium nlobate with uniform square lattices were fabricated by applying external electric fields. The variations of second-harmonic output with crystal temperatures, incident angles and reversed duty cycles were measured. Red, yellow,green, blue, and violet coherent radiations were generated in the nonlinear photonic crystal with rectangular lattice in the collinearly and non-collinearly quasi-phase matching geometries. The results showed that two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal

  11. Optimization of lasing in an inverted-opal titania photonic crystal cavity as an organic solid-state dye-doped laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dingke; Chen, Shijian; Jiang, Maohua; Ye, Lijuan

    2014-11-10

    Lasing performance of a dye-doped laser by encapsulating orange fluorescent dye 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM) with different concentrations in a highly ordered three-dimensional (3D) inverted-opal titania (TiO2) photonic crystal (PC) microcavity was studied. The lasing threshold and laser quality were improved by optimizing the concentration of the laser dye DCM. When the concentration of DCM is optimized to 10-4  mol/l, the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of DCM is sufficient to achieve lasing emission and meanwhile no fluorescence quantum quenching occurs. Therefore, the emission spectrum was greatly narrowed and the threshold was significantly improved, which reached 0.8  mJ pulse-1 cm-2. Our findings are promising results toward the realization of fabricating a highly efficient low-threshold organic laser.

  12. Search for R-parity violating decays of supersymmetric particles in final states with jets and leptons using the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Mutter, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Of all the data of the years 1998 to 2000 taken with the OPAL detector at the e+e-- collider LEP at CERN, final states with jets and leptons have been analysed. A search for decays of new particles postulated by supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics has been performed. Only decays violating the quantum number R-parity (Rp) that is introduced in supersymmetric models have been investigated. The violation of Rp leads to experimental signatures that are in general completely different from those in the Rp conserving case. If Rp is violated, processes that lead to a rapid decay of the proton might be possible. In order to avoid such processes, in most investigations Rp is assumed to be conserved. However, there is no theoretically compelling reason for this assumption. Therefore, the possibility of R-parity violation should also be considered.

  13. Determination of {alpha}{sub S} using OPAL hadronic event shapes at {radical}(s)= 91-209{proportional_to}GeV and resummed NNLO calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbiendi, G.; Braibant, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Ciocca, C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, M.; Fabbri, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Mader, W.; Mes, H.; Renkel, P. [Univ. di Bologna (Italy); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Ainsley, C.; Batley, R.J.; Carter, J.R.; Hill, J.C.; Tasevsky, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J. [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Aakesson, P.F.; Barberio, E.; Burckhart, H.J.; Roeck, A. de; Wolf, E.A. de; Ferrari, P.; Frey, A.; Gruwe, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkings, R.; Heuer, R.D.; McKenna, J.; Neal, H.A.; Pilcher, J.E.; Plane, D.E.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Sachs, K.; Schaile, A.D.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schumacher, M.; Sherwood, P.; Stroehmer, R.; Torrence, E.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Etzion, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Trigger, I. [Tel Aviv Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Anagnostou, G.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Hawkes, C.M.; Jovanovic, P.; Nanjo, H.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Wermes, N. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Anderson, K.J.; Gupta, A.; Meijers, F.; O' Neale, S.W.; Pasztor, G.; Sobie, R.; Tarem, S. [Univ. of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Inst. and Dept. of Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Asai, S.; Ishii, K.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Komamiya, S.; Martin, A.J.; Meyer, N.; Miller, D.J.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Oh, A.; Runge, K.; Thomson, M.A.; Tsur, E.; Wolf, G. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Kobe Univ. (Japan); Axen, D.; Loebinger, F.K.; Mashimo, T. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Physics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, I.; Karlen, D.; Keeler, R.K.; Maettig, P.; Rembser, C.; Skuja, A. [Univ. of Victoria (Canada); Barillari, T.; Bethke, S.; Kluth, S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Pooth, O.; Schaile, O. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    2011-09-15

    Hadronic event shape distributions from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation measured by the OPAL experiment at centre-of-mass energies between 91 GeV and 209 GeV are used to determine the strong coupling {alpha}{sub S}. The results are based on QCD predictions complete to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and on NNLO calculations matched to the resummed next-to-leading-log-approximation terms (NNLO + NLLA). The combined NNLO result from all variables and centre-of-mass energies is while the combined NNLO + NLLA result is The completeness of the NNLO and NNLO + NLLA results with respect to missing higher order contributions, studied by varying the renormalization scale, is improved compared to previous results based on NLO or NLO + NLLA predictions only. The observed energy dependence of {alpha}{sub S} agrees with the QCD prediction of asymptotic freedom and excludes the absence of running. (orig.)

  14. Adaptive optics correction into single mode fiber for a low Earth orbiting space to ground optical communication link using the OPALS downlink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Malcolm W; Morris, Jeffery F; Kovalik, Joseph M; Andrews, Kenneth S; Abrahamson, Matthew J; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-12-28

    An adaptive optics (AO) testbed was integrated to the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) ground station telescope at the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) as part of the free space laser communications experiment with the flight system on board the International Space Station (ISS). Atmospheric turbulence induced aberrations on the optical downlink were adaptively corrected during an overflight of the ISS so that the transmitted laser signal could be efficiently coupled into a single mode fiber continuously. A stable output Strehl ratio of around 0.6 was demonstrated along with the recovery of a 50 Mbps encoded high definition (HD) video transmission from the ISS at the output of the single mode fiber. This proof of concept demonstration validates multi-Gbps optical downlinks from fast slewing low-Earth orbiting (LEO) spacecraft to ground assets in a manner that potentially allows seamless space to ground connectivity for future high data-rates network.

  15. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

  16. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  17. Neutronic Reactor Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi, Enrico; Zinn, Walter H.

    The argument of the present Patent is a radiation shield suitable for protection of personnel from both gamma rays and neutrons. Such a shield from dangerous radiations is achieved to the best by the combined action of a neutron slowing material (a moderator) and a neutron absorbing material. Hydrogen is particularly effective for this shield since it is a good absorber of slow neutrons and a good moderator of fast neutrons. The neutrons slowed down by hydrogen may, then, be absorbed by other materials such as boron, cadmium, gadolinium, samarium or steel. Steel is particularly convenient for the purpose, given its effectiveness in absorbing also the gamma rays from the reactor (both primary gamma rays and secondary ones produced by the moderation of neutrons). In particular, in the present Patent a shield is described, made of alternate layers of steel and Masonite (an hydrolized ligno-cellulose material). The object of the present Patent is not discussed in any other published paper.

  18. Neutrino Experiments at Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reines, F.; Gurr, H. S.; Jenkins, T. L.; Munsee, J. H.

    1968-09-09

    A description is given of the electron-antineutrino program using a large fission reactor. A search has been made for a neutral weak interaction via the reaction (electron antineutrino + d .> p + n + electron antineutrino), the reaction (electron antineutrino + d .> n + n + e{sup +}) has now been detected, and an effort is underway to observe the elastic scattering reaction (electron antineutrino + e{sup -} .> electron antineutrino + e{sup -}) as well as to measure more precisely the reaction (electron antineutrino + p .> n + e{sup+}). The upper limit on the elastic scattering reaction which we have obtained with our large composite NaI, plastic, liquid scintillation detector is now about 50 times the predicted value.

  19. Highly active surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on gold nanoparticles infiltrated into SiO{sub 2} inverse opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankudze, Bright; Philip, Anish [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, F1-80101, Joensuu (Finland); Pakkanen, Tuula T., E-mail: Tuula.Pakkanen@uef.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, F1-80101, Joensuu (Finland); Matikainen, Antti; Vahimaa, Pasi [Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, F1-80101, Joensuu (Finland)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • SERS substrates prepared by infiltration of nanoparticles into SiO{sub 2} inverse opal. • The SERS substrate gives an enhancement factor of 10{sup 7} for 4-aminothiophenol. • The sensitivity of the substrate is mainly attributed to gold nanoparticle clusters. - Abstract: SiO{sub 2} inverse opal (IO) films with embedded gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) application are reported. SiO{sub 2} IO films were loaded with AuNPs by a simple infiltration in a single cycle to form Au-SiO{sub 2} IOs. The optical property and the morphology of the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates were characterized; it was observed that they retained the Bragg diffraction of SiO{sub 2} IO and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of AuNPs. The SERS property of the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates were studied with methylene blue (MB) and 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP). The SERS enhancement factors were 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 6} for 4-ATP and MB, respectively. A low detection limit of 10{sup −10} M for 4-ATP was also obtained with the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrate. A relative standard deviation of 18.5% for the Raman signals intensity at 1077 cm{sup −1} for 4-ATP shows that the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates have good signal reproducibility. The results of this study indicate that the Au-SiO{sub 2} IO substrates can be used in sensing and SERS applications.

  20. Enhanced recycling of organic matter and Os-isotopic evidence for multiple magmatic or meteoritic inputs to the Late Permian Panthalassic Ocean, Opal Creek, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Henderson, Charles M.; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2015-02-01

    The geochemical record for the Permian-Triassic boundary in northern latitudes is essential to evaluation of global changes associated with the most profound extinction of life on Earth. We present inorganic and organic geochemical data, and Re-Os isotope systematics in a critical stratigraphic interval of pre- and post-extinction Upper Permian-Lower Triassic sediments from Opal Creek, western Canada (paleolatitude of ∼30°N). We document significant and long-lived changes in Panthalassa seawater chemistry that were initiated during the first of four magmatic or meteoritic inputs to Late Permian seawater, evidenced by notable decreases of Os isotopic ratios upsection. Geochemical signals indicate establishment of anoxic bottom waters shortly after regional transgression reinitiated sedimentation in the Late Permian. Euxinic signals are most prominent in the Upper Permian sediments with low organic carbon and high sulfur contents, and gradually wane in the Lower Triassic. The observed features may have been generated in a strongly euxinic ocean in which high bacterioplankton productivity sustained prolific microbial sulfate reduction in the sediment and/or water column, providing hydrogen sulfide to form pyrite. This scenario requires nearly complete anaerobic decomposition of predominantly labile marine organic matter (OM) without the necessity for a complete collapse of primary marine productivity. Similar geochemical variations could have been achieved by widespread oxidation of methane by sulfate reducers after a methanogenic burst in the Late Permian. Both scenarios could have provided similar kill mechanisms for the latest Permian mass extinction. Despite the moderate thermal maturity of the section, OM in all studied samples is dominantly terrestrial and/or continentally derived, recycled and refractory ancient OM. We argue that, as such, the quantity of the OM in the section mainly reflects changes in terrestrial vegetation and/or weathering, and not in

  1. Reactor service life extension program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

    1990-12-31

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

  2. Reactor service life extension program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

  3. Assessment of torsatrons as reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Painter, S.L. (Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia))

    1992-12-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R[sub 0] = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B[sup 0] = 4.8-7.5 T, B[sub max] (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions.

  4. Safety of VVER-440 reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Safety of VVER-440 Reactors endeavours to promote an increase in the safety of VVER-440 nuclear reactors via the improvement of fission products limitation systems and the implementation of special non-destructive spectroscopic methods for materials testing. All theoretical and experimental studies performed the by author over the last 25 years have been undertaken with the aim of improving VVER-440 defence in depth, which is one of the most important principle for ensuring safety in nuclear power plants. Safety of VVER-440 Reactors is focused on the barrier system through which the safety pri

  5. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  6. Reactor neutrons in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifarth, René; Glorius, Jan; Göbel, Kathrin; Heftrich, Tanja; Jentschel, Michael; Jurado, Beatriz; Käppeler, Franz; Köster, Ulli; Langer, Christoph; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Weigand, Mario

    2017-09-01

    The huge neutron fluxes offer the possibility to use research reactors to produce isotopes of interest, which can be investigated afterwards. An example is the half-lives of long-lived isotopes like 129I. A direct usage of reactor neutrons in the astrophysical energy regime is only possible, if the corresponding ions are not at rest in the laboratory frame. The combination of an ion storage ring with a reactor and a neutron guide could open the path to direct measurements of neutron-induced cross sections on short-lived radioactive isotopes in the astrophysically interesting energy regime.

  7. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  8. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  9. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  10. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  11. Breeder Reactors, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Walter, III; Turner, Stanley E.

    The theory of breeder reactors in relationship to a discussion of fission is presented. Different kinds of reactors are characterized by the cooling fluids used, such as liquid metal, gas, and molten salt. The historical development of breeder reactors over the past twenty-five years includes specific examples of reactors. The location and a brief…

  12. Evolution of the tandem mirror reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, G.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1982-03-09

    We discuss the evolution of the tandem mirror reactor concept from the original conceptual reactor design (1977) through the first application of the thermal barrier concept to a reactor design (1979) to the beginning of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (1982).

  13. FASTER Test Reactor Preconceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The FASTER test reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  14. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  15. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  16. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase 1 effort was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) Reactor concept. Unlike...

  17. Thermal Analysis for Mobile Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Mobile reactor design in the paper is consisted of two grades of thermal electric conversion. The first grade is the thermionic conversion inside the core and the second grade is thermocouple conversion

  18. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) reactor to efficiently extract oxygen from lunar regolith. Unlike state-of-the-art carbothermal...

  19. Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring nuclear reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactor beneath Staggs Field in 1942. In the story of their discovery, there are important lessons to be learned about scientific inquiry and scientific discovery. Now, there is evidence to suggest that the Earth's magnetic field and Jupiter's atmospheric turbulence are driven by planetary-scale nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating classroom discussions about the nature and implications of planetary energy sources and about the geomagnetic field. But more importantly, the subject can help to bring into focus the importance of discussing, debating, and challenging current thinking in a variety of areas.

  20. Reactor containment research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, N. A.

    1963-06-15

    An outline is given of containment concepts, sources and release rates of energy, responses of containment structures, effects of projectiles, and leakage rates of radioisotopes, with particular regard to major reactor accidents. (T.F.H.)

  1. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Hunter, C.H.; Marter, W.L.; Moyer, R.A.

    1989-12-01

    This volume is a reactor operation environmental information document for the Savannah River Plant. Topics include meteorology, surface hydrology, transport, environmental impacts, and radiation effects. 48 figs., 56 tabs. (KD)

  2. Advanced Catalytic Hydrogenation Retrofit Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinaldo M. Machado

    2002-08-15

    Industrial hydrogenation is often performed using a slurry catalyst in large stirred-tank reactors. These systems are inherently problematic in a number of areas, including industrial hygiene, process safety, environmental contamination, waste production, process operability and productivity. This program proposed the development of a practical replacement for the slurry catalysts using a novel fixed-bed monolith catalyst reactor, which could be retrofitted onto an existing stirred-tank reactor and would mitigate many of the minitations and problems associated with slurry catalysts. The full retrofit monolith system, consisting of a recirculation pump, gas/liquid ejector and monolith catalyst, is described as a monolith loop reactor or MLR. The MLR technology can reduce waste and increase raw material efficiency, which reduces the overall energy required to produce specialty and fine chemicals.

  3. Unique features of space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    Space reactors are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K.

  4. Jules Horowitz Reactor, basic design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Chantoin, P.; Guigon, B.; Bravo, X.; Germain, C.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P

    2003-07-01

    Since the shutdown of the SILOE reactor in 1997, the OSIRIS reactor has ensured the needs regarding technological irradiation at CEA including those of its industrial partners and customers. The Jules Horowitz Reactor will replace it. It has the ambition to provide the necessary nuclear data and maintain a fission research capacity in Europe after 2010. This capacity should be service-oriented. It will be established in Cadarache. The Jules Horowitz reactor will also: - represent a significant step in term of performances and experimental capabilities, - be designed with a high flexibility, in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and be able to accommodate future requirements, - reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. This paper will present the main functionalities and the design options resulting from the 'preliminary design' studies. (authors)

  5. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas

  6. Reactor antineutrinos and nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    Short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments successfully measured the neutrino parameters they set out to measure, but they also identified a shape distortion in the 5-7 MeV range as well as a reduction from the predicted value of the flux. Nuclear physics input into the calculations of reactor antineutrino spectra needs to be better refined if this anomaly is to be interpreted as due to sterile neutrino states.

  7. Microchannel Reactors for ISRU Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon; Ward, Benjamin J.

    2005-02-01

    Affordable planning and execution of prolonged manned space missions depend upon the utilization of local resources and the waste products which are formed in manned spacecraft and surface bases. Successful in-situ resources utilization (ISRU) will require component technologies which provide optimal size, weight, volume, and power efficiency. Microchannel reactors enable the efficient chemical processing of in situ resources. The reactors can be designed for the processes that generate the most benefit for each mission. For instance, propellants (methane) can be produced from carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using the Sabatier reaction and ethylene can be produced from the partial oxidation of methane. A system that synthesizes ethylene could be the precursor for systems to synthesize ethanol and polyethylene. Ethanol can be used as a nutrient for Astrobiology experiments, as well as the production of nutrients for human crew (e.g. sugars). Polyethylene can be used in the construction of habitats, tools, and replacement parts. This paper will present recent developments in miniature chemical reactors using advanced Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and microchannel technology to support ISRU of Mars and lunar missions. Among other applications, the technology has been demonstrated for the Sabatier process and for the partial oxidation of methane. Microchannel reactors were developed based on ceramic substrates as well as metal substrates. In both types of reactors, multiple layers coated with catalytic material are bonded, forming a monolithic structure. Such reactors are readily scalable with the incorporation of extra layers. In addition, this reactor structure minimizes pressure drop and catalyst settling, which are common problems in conventional packed bed reactors.

  8. The resonance absorption controlled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R.

    1977-07-01

    In this report a new method of reactor control based on tho isotopic moderator composition variation is studied, taking as a reference a D{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O system. With this method an spectacular increment in the burn-up degree and a sensible reduction of the conventional control system is obtained. An important part of this work has been the detailed analysis of the parameters affecting the neutron spectrum in a heterogeneous reactor. (Author) 50 refs.

  9. Calculation of reactor antineutrino spectra in TEXONO

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Dong Liang; Mao Ze Pu; Wong, T H

    2002-01-01

    In the low energy reactor antineutrino physics experiments, either for the researches of antineutrino oscillation and antineutrino reactions, or for the measurement of abnormal magnetic moment of antineutrino, the flux and the spectra of reactor antineutrino must be described accurately. The method of calculation of reactor antineutrino spectra was discussed in detail. Furthermore, based on the actual circumstances of NP2 reactors and the arrangement of detectors, the flux and the spectra of reactor antineutrino in TEXONO were worked out

  10. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashige, Kengo

    1996-06-21

    In an LMFBR type reactor, partitions are disposed to a coolant channel at positions lower than the free liquid level, and the width of the partitions is adapted to have a predetermined condition. Namely, when low temperature fluid overflowing the wall of the coolant channel, flows down and collided against the free liquid surface in the coolant channel, since the dropping speed thereof is reduced abruptly, large pressure waves are caused by kinetic force of the low temperature fluid. However, if appropriate numbers of partitions having an appropriate shape are formed, the dropping speed of the low temperature fluid is moderated to reduce the pressure waves. In addition, since the pressure waves are dispersed to the circumferential and lateral directions of the coolant flow channel respectively, the propagation of the pressure waves can be prevented effectively. Further, when the flow of the low temperature fluid is changed to the circumferential direction, for example, by earthquakes, since the partitions act as members resisting against the circumferential change of the low temperature fluid, the change of the direction can be suppressed. (N.H.)

  11. Reactor Simulator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  12. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  13. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II.

  14. Modification of ZnS-inserting layer in the TiO2 inverse opal-based photoanode to enhance the efficiency of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fei; Wan, Xiangyu; Mei, Xingan; Fan, Runzhou; Yan, Xuemin; Wan, Li; Shi, Dean; Xiong, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Modification of ZnS-inserting layer in the titanium dioxide (TiO2) inverse opal-based photoanode was investigated, and it is an effective and easy approach to enhance the efficiency of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). The introduction of ZnS between TiO2 and quantum dots (QDs) not only enhanced the light harvesting of QDs on its top, but also lessened the charge-transfer resistances at the TiO2/QD/electrolyte interfaces. The TiO2 inverse opal-based QDSSCs increased the energy conversion efficiency by modifying the ZnS-inserting layer in the photoanode, particularly the CdS/CdSe QD co-sensitized solar cells which attained 79% rate of increase in cell efficiency.

  15. Innovative hybrid biological reactors using membranes; Reactores biologico hibrido innovadores utilizando membranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez, R.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. de; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.; Tejero, I.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present two lines of research on hybrid reactors including the use of membranes, although with different functions: RBPM, biofilm reactors and membranes filtration RBSOM, supported biofilm reactors and oxygen membranes. (Author) 14 refs.

  16. Spéciation de l'uranium dans l'environnement : application aux opales de Nopal I (Mexique et aux résidus miniers de Gunnar (Canada)

    OpenAIRE

    Othmane, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the processes of uranium migration and sequestration is an important issue for the prediction of radionuclide retardation in the vicinity of uranium mine tailings sites or for the safety assessment of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories. Uranium speciation, controlled by biotic and abiotic factors, represents a key parameter for the control of uranium transfer in the environment. This study firstly deals with uranium speciation in opals from the Nopal I uranium depos...

  17. Establishment of licensing process for development reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik (and others)

    2006-02-15

    A study on licensing processes for development reactors has been performed to prepare the licensing of development reactors developed in Korea. The contents and results of the study are summarized as follows. The licensing processes for nuclear reactors in Korea, U.S.A., Japan, France, U.K., Canada, and IAEA were surveyed and analyzed to obtain technical bases necessary for establishing licensing processes applicable to development reactors in Korea. Based on the technical bases obtained the above analysis, the purpose, power output, and design characteristics of development reactors were analyzed in detail. The analysis results suggested that development reactors should be classified as a new reactor category (called as 'development reactor') separated from the current reactor categories such as the research reactor and the power reactor. Therefore, it is proposed to establish a new reactor category classified as 'development reactor' for the development reactors. And licensing processes, including licensing technical requirements, licensing document requirements, and other regulatory requirements, were also proposed for the development reactors. In order to institutionalize the licensing processes developed in this study, it is necessary to revise the current laws. Therefore, draft provisions of Atomic Energy Act, Enforcement Decree of the Atomic Energy Act, and Enforcement Regulation of the Atomic Energy Act have been developed for the preparation of the future legalization of the licensing processes proposed for the development reactors. Conclusively, a proposal of licensing processes and draft provisions of laws have been developed for the development reactors. The results proposed in this study can be applied directly to the licensing of the future development reactors. Furthermore, they will also contribute to establishing successfully the licensing processes of the development reactors.

  18. Repairing liner of the reactor; Reparacion del liner del reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-07-15

    Due to the corrosion problems of the aluminum coating of the reactor pool, a periodic inspections program by ultrasound to evaluate the advance grade and the corrosion speed was settled down. This inspections have shown the necessity to repair some areas, in those that the slimming is significant, of not making it can arrive to the water escape of the reactor pool. The objective of the repair is to place patches of plates of 1/4 inch aluminum thickness in the areas of the reactor 'liner', in those that it has been detected by ultrasound a smaller thickness or similar to 3 mm. To carry out this the fuels are move (of the core and those that are decaying) to a temporary storage, the structure of the core is confined in a tank that this placed inside the pool of the reactor, a shield is placed in the thermal column and it is completely extracted the water for to leave uncover the 'liner' of the reactor. (Author)

  19. Reactor Simulator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise Jon

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz. Keywords: fission, space power, nuclear, liquid metal, NaK.

  20. Etude de la Production des Mesons d* Sur le PIC de Resonance du Boson Z Observes AU Lep avec le Detecteur Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przysiezniak, Helenka

    L'etude de la production des mesons D* est effectuee a partir d'evenements multihadroniques rm Z^0to q| q, avec des donnees prises en 1990, 1991 et 1992 avec le detecteur OPAL au LEP. La notation q definit les quarks des cinq saveurs pouvant etre observees au LEP: up (u), down (d), strange (s), charme (c), beaute (b). Les D* et les correlations D*-leptons sont identifiees et ces dernieres servent a effecteur une separation claire entre les evenements rm Z^0to b| b et Z^0to c| c. On mesure la distribution de la variable de fragmentation x_{rm D^ *}=E_{rm D^*}/E _{rm faisceau} pour les D* produits dans les evenements rm Z^0 to c| c. Elle est notee f _{rm cto D^*}. Ce resultat est a la base d'une publication OPAL (1), avec trois autres methodes de separation etudiees en parallele, donnat la premiere mesure OPAL de f _{rm cto D^*} qui soit independante de toute modelisation de la fragmentation des quarks lourds, ainsi qu'une mesure de Gamma_{rm c| c} parmi les plus precises effectuees a ce jour, ou Gamma_{rm c| c} est la largeur partielle de la desintegration du Z^0 en une paire cc. En ce qui concerne les resultats obtenus dans le cadre de cette these, la valeur moyenne de la distribution f_ {rm cto D^*}, notee cto D^*}>, est donnee par:cto D^*}>=0.530+/-0.027 +/-0.022ou la premiere erreur est statistique, et la seconde est systematique. On mesure aussi le taux de production des mesons D*, donnee par: {Gamma({rm Z^0to D^ *}X)overGamma_{rm hadrons}}=0.207+/-0.007+/-0.017 ou Gamma_{rm hadrons } est la largeur totale de la desintegration du Z^0 en paires de qq des cinq saveurs. La separation entre evenements rm Z^0to b| b et Z^0 to c| c, dans lesquels sont produits des D* se desintegrant selon rm D^ *to D^0pito (Kpi)pi, nous donne:(DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI)La variable de fragmentation x_ {rm cto D^*} est utilisee pour tester les modeles des processes perturbatifs et non-perturbatifs qui entrent en jeu lors de la fragmentation des quarks b et c

  1. Reactivity determination in accelerator driven reactors using reactor noise analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ljiljana 1

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Feynman-alpha and Rossi-alpha methods are used in traditional nuclear reactors to determine the subcritical reactivity of a system. The methods are based on the measurement of the mean value, variance and the covariance of detector counts for different measurement times. Such methods attracted renewed attention recently with the advent of the so-called accelerator driven reactors (ADS proposed some time ago. The ADS systems, intended to be used either in energy generation or transuranium transmutation, will use a subcritical core with a strong spallation source. A spallation source has statistical properties that are different from those traditionally used by radioactive sources. In such reactors the monitoring of the subcritical reactivity is very important, and a statistical method, such as the Feynman-alpha method, is capable of resolving this problem.

  2. Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical pr...

  3. Heterogeneous Transmutation Sodium Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. E. Bays

    2007-09-01

    The threshold-fission (fertile) nature of Am-241 is used to destroy this minor actinide by capitalizing upon neutron capture instead of fission within a sodium fast reactor. This neutron-capture and its subsequent decay chain leads to the breeding of even neutron number plutonium isotopes. A slightly moderated target design is proposed for breeding plutonium in an axial blanket located above the active “fast reactor” driver fuel region. A parametric study on the core height and fuel pin diameter-to-pitch ratio is used to explore the reactor and fuel cycle aspects of this design. This study resulted in both non-flattened and flattened core geometries. Both of these designs demonstrated a high capacity for removing americium from the fuel cycle. A reactivity coefficient analysis revealed that this heterogeneous design will have comparable safety aspects to a homogeneous reactor of comparable size. A mass balance analysis revealed that the heterogeneous design may reduce the number of fast reactors needed to close the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle.

  4. Entropy Production in Chemical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Diego; Razzitte, Adrián C.

    2017-06-01

    We have analyzed entropy production in chemically reacting systems and extended previous results to the two limiting cases of ideal reactors, namely continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and plug flow reactor (PFR). We have found upper and lower bounds for the entropy production in isothermal systems and given expressions for non-isothermal operation and analyzed the influence of pressure and temperature in entropy generation minimization in reactors with a fixed volume and production. We also give a graphical picture of entropy production in chemical reactions subject to constant volume, which allows us to easily assess different options. We show that by dividing a reactor into two smaller ones, operating at different temperatures, the entropy production is lowered, going as near as 48 % less in the case of a CSTR and PFR in series, and reaching 58 % with two CSTR. Finally, we study the optimal pressure and temperature for a single isothermal PFR, taking into account the irreversibility introduced by a compressor and a heat exchanger, decreasing the entropy generation by as much as 30 %.

  5. Simplifying Microbial Electrosynthesis Reactor Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloelle G.S. Giddings

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrosynthesis, an artificial form of photosynthesis, can efficiently convert carbon dioxide into organic commodities; however, this process has only previously been demonstrated in reactors that have features likely to be a barrier to scale-up. Therefore, the possibility of simplifying reactor design by both eliminating potentiostatic control of the cathode and removing the membrane separating the anode and cathode was investigated with biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which reduces carbon dioxide to acetate. In traditional ‘H-cell’ reactors, where the anode and cathode chambers were separated with a proton-selective membrane, the rates and columbic efficiencies of microbial electrosynthesis remained high when electron delivery at the cathode was powered with a direct current power source rather than with a poteniostat-poised cathode utilized in previous studies. A membrane-less reactor with a direct-current power source with the cathode and anode positioned to avoid oxygen exposure at the cathode, retained high rates of acetate production as well as high columbic and energetic efficiencies. The finding that microbial electrosynthesis is feasible without a membrane separating the anode from the cathode, coupled with a direct current power source supplying the energy for electron delivery, is expected to greatly simplify future reactor design and lower construction costs.

  6. Hanford reactor and separations facility advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-06-27

    This document describes the advantages and limitations of Hanford production facilities. In addition to summarizing the technical parameters of the reactors and separations plants and their mechanical features, the unique aspects of these facilities to the production of special materials in which the Commission may be interested have been discussed. As the primary difference between the B-C-D-DR-F-H reactors and the K reactors and the K reactors is in the number and length of process channels. This report is addressed primarily to the 2000-tube reactors. K reactor characteristics are within the range of lattice and flexibility parameters described.

  7. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Miyadera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  8. Fast breeder reactors an engineering introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, A M

    1981-01-01

    Fast Breeder Reactors: An Engineering Introduction is an introductory text to fast breeder reactors and covers topics ranging from reactor physics and design to engineering and safety considerations. Reactor fuels, coolant circuits, steam plants, and control systems are also discussed. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with a brief summary of the history of fast reactors, with emphasis on international and the prospect of making accessible enormous reserves of energy. The next chapter deals with the physics of fast reactors and considers calculation methods, flux distribution,

  9. A tubular focused sonochemistry reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU GuangPing; LIANG ZhaoFeng; LI ZhengZhong; ZHANG YiHui

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new sonochemistry reactor, which consists of a cylindrical tube with a certain length and piezoelectric transducers at tube's end with the longitudinal vibration. The tube can effectively transform the longitudinal vibration into the radial vibration and thereby generates ultrasound. Furthermore, ultrasound can be focused to form high-intensity ultrasonic field inside tube. The reactor boasts of simple structure and its whole vessel wall can radiate ultrasound so that the electroacoustic transfer efficiency is high. The focused ultrasonic field provides good condition for sonochemical reaction. The length of the reactor can be up to 2 meters, and liquids can pass through it continuously, so it can be widely applied in liquid processing such as sonochemistry.

  10. A compact Tokamak transmutation reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuLi-Jian; XiaoBing-Jia

    1997-01-01

    The low aspect ration tokamak is proposed for the driver of a transmutation reactor.The main parameters of the reactor core,neutronic analysis of the blanket are given>the neutron wall loading can be lowered from the magnitude order of 1 MW/m2 to 0.5MW/m2 which is much easier to reach in the near future,and the transmutation efficiency (fission/absorption ratio)is raised further.The blanket power density is about 200MW/m3 which is not difficult to deal with.The key components such as diverter and center conductor post are also designed and compared with conventional TOkamak,Finally,by comparison with the other drivers such as FBR,PWR and accelerator,it can be anticipated that the low aspect ratio transmutation reactor would be one way of fusion energy applications in the near future.

  11. Plasma reactor waste management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

    1992-01-01

    The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

  12. Investigation of KW reactor incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturges, D G [USAEC Hanford Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Hauff, T W; Greager, O H [General Electric Co., Richland, WA (United States). Hanford Atomic Products Operation

    1955-02-11

    The new KW reactor was placed in operation on January 4, 1955, and had been running at relatively low power levels for only 17 hours when it was shut down because of a process tube water leak which appeared to be associated with a slug rupture. After several days of unrewarding effort to remove the slugs and tube by customary methods, it developed that considerable melting of the tube and slugs had taken place. It was then evident that removal of the stuck mass and repairs to the damaged tube channel would require unusual measures that were certain to extend the reactor outage for several weeks. This report documents the work and findings of the Committee which investigated the KW reactor incident. Its content represents unanimous agreement among the three Committee members.

  13. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  14. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-12-31

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels.

  15. Utilisation of thorium in reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Shivakumar, V.; Saha, D.

    2008-12-01

    India's nuclear programme envisages a large-scale utilisation of thorium, as it has limited deposits of uranium but vast deposits of thorium. The large-scale utilisation of thorium requires the adoption of closed fuel cycle. The stable nature of thoria and the radiological issues associated with thoria poses challenges in the adoption of a closed fuel cycle. A thorium fuel based Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being planned to provide impetus to development of technologies for the closed thorium fuel cycle. Thoria fuel has been loaded in Indian reactors and test irradiations have been carried out with (Th-Pu) MOX fuel. Irradiated thorium assemblies have been reprocessed and the separated 233U fuel has been used for test reactor KAMINI. The paper highlights the Indian experience with the use of thorium and brings out various issues associated with the thorium cycle.

  16. External fuel thermionic reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondt, J. F.; Peelgren, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    Thermionic reactors are prime candidates for nuclear electric propulsion. The national thermionic reactor effort is concentrated on the flashlight concept with the external-fuel concept as the backup. The external-fuel concept is very adaptable to a completely modular power subsystem which is attractive for highly reliable long-life applications. The 20- to 25-cm long, externally-fueled converters have been designed, fabricated, and successfully tested with many thermal cycles by electrical heating. However, difficulties have been encountered during encapsulation for nuclear heated tests and none have been started to date. These nuclear tests are required to demonstrate the concept feasibility.

  17. Analysis of Adiabatic Batch Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erald Gjonaj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A mixture of acetic anhydride is reacted with excess water in an adiabatic batch reactor to form an exothermic reaction. The concentration of acetic anhydride and the temperature inside the adiabatic batch reactor are calculated with an initial temperature of 20°C, an initial temperature of 30°C, and with a cooling jacket maintaining the temperature at a constant of 20°C. The graphs of the three different scenarios show that the highest temperatures will cause the reaction to occur faster.

  18. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  19. Reactor shutdown delays medical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A longer-than-expected maintenance shutdown of the Canadian nuclear reactor that produces North America's entire supply of molybdenum-99 - from which the radioactive isotopes technetium-99 and iodine-131 are made - caused delays to the diagnosis and treatment of thousands of seriously ill patients last month. Technetium-99 is a key component of nuclear-medicine scans, while iodine-131 is used to treat cancer and other diseases of the thyroid. Production eventually resumed, but only after the Canadian government had overruled the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), which was still concerned about the reactor's safety.

  20. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin