WorldWideScience

Sample records for onsite energy yield

  1. On-Site Renewable Energy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes a variety of approaches that local governments can use to advance climate and energy goals by meeting some or all of their electricity needs through on-site renewable energy generation.

  2. On-site energy consumption at softwood sawmills in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Loeffler; Nathaniel Anderson; Todd A. Morgan; Colin B. Sorenson

    2016-01-01

    Total on-site energy requirements for wood product manufacturing are generally not well understood or publicly available, particularly at subregional scales, such as the state level. This article uses a mail survey of softwood sawmills in Montana to develop a profile of all on-site energy consumption. Energy use is delineated by fuel type on a production basis...

  3. Economic competitiveness of fuel cell onsite integrated energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbacher, G.

    1983-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of fuel cell onsite integrated energy systems (OS/IES) in residential and commercial buildings is examined. The analysis is carried out for three different buildings with each building assumed to be at three geographic locations spanning a range of climatic conditions. Numerous design options and operating strategies are evaluated and two economic criteria are used to measure economic performance. In general the results show that fuel cell OS/IES's are competitive in most regions of the country if the OS/IES is properly designed. The preferred design is grid connected, makes effective use of the fuel cell's thermal output, and has a fuel cell powerplant sized for the building's base electrical load.

  4. On-site energy consumption and selected emissions at softwood sawmills in the southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Loeffler; Nathaniel Anderson; Todd A. Morgan; Colin B. Sorenson

    2016-01-01

    Presently there is a lack of information describing US southwestern energy consumption and emissions generated from the sawmilling industry. This article uses a mail survey of softwood sawmills in the states of Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico to develop a profile of on-site energy consumption and selected emissions for the industry. Energy consumption is...

  5. Fuel cell on-site integrated energy system parametric analysis of a residential complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    The use of phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant to provide all the electricity required by an 81-unit garden apartment complex is studied. Byproduct heat is recovered and provides some of the heat required by the complex. The onsite integrated energy system contains energy conversion equipment including combinations of compression and absorption chillers, heat pumps, electric resistance heaters, and thermal storage. The annual fuel requirement for several onsite integrated energy systems as well as the fuel cell breakeven cost for one specific system were calculated. It is found that electrical efficiency cannot be traded off against thermal efficiency without paying a penalty in system efficiency.

  6. On-Site or Off-Site Renewable Energy Supply Options?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund;

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a Net Zero Energy Building (Net ZEB) encompasses two options of supplying renewable energy, which can offset energy use of a building, in particular on-site or off-site renewable energy supply. Currently, the on-site options are much more popular than the off-site; however, taking...... into consideration the limited area of roof and/or façade, primarily in the dense city areas, the Danish weather conditions, the growing interest and number of wind turbine co-ops, the off-site renewable energy supply options could become a meaningful solution for reaching ‘zero’ energy goal in the Danish context....... Therefore, this paper deploys the life cycle cost analysis and takes the private economy perspective to investigate the life cycle cost of different renewable energy supply options, and to identify the costoptimal combination between energy efficiency and renewable energy generation. The analysis includes...

  7. On-Site Renewable Energy and Green Buildings: A System-Level Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Sami G; Bilec, Melissa M

    2016-05-03

    Adopting a green building rating system (GBRSs) that strongly considers use of renewable energy can have important environmental consequences, particularly in developing countries. In this paper, we studied on-site renewable energy and GBRSs at the system level to explore potential benefits and challenges. While we have focused on GBRSs, the findings can offer additional insight for renewable incentives across sectors. An energy model was built for 25 sites to compute the potential solar and wind power production on-site and available within the building footprint and regional climate. A life-cycle approach and cost analysis were then completed to analyze the environmental and economic impacts. Environmental impacts of renewable energy varied dramatically between sites, in some cases, the environmental benefits were limited despite the significant economic burden of those renewable systems on-site and vice versa. Our recommendation for GBRSs, and broader policies and regulations, is to require buildings with higher environmental impacts to achieve higher levels of energy performance and on-site renewable energy utilization, instead of fixed percentages.

  8. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program - Part IV: Onsite review handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Onsite Review Handbook contains criteria to be used in evaluating the management systems required for initial or continued participation in the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP), verifying and calculating rates of injury experience, the Onsite Review report format, and sample questions to be used during onsite interviews. This document should be used in conjunction with the first three DOE-VPP manuals (Part I: Program Elements, Part II: Procedures Manual, and Part III: Application Guidelines). This document is intended to assist Onsite Review team members and DOE contractors in evaluating safety and health programs, and to serve as guidance for DOE-VPP participants in performing their required annual evaluation. Requests for additional information or any questions may be addressed to a DOE-VPP Coordinator in the Office of Occupational Safety and Health Policy. The term contractor used throughout this document refers to an applicant to, or a participant in, the DOE-VPP. The term subcontractor refers to any organization that is contracted by the applicant or participant to do work at the site under review. The DOE-VPP Onsite Review Criteria contained in Appendix A provide guidance for evaluating a site`s implementation of the program requirements given in Part I: Program Elements. The program requirements are in bold italicized type, followed by guidance for ensuring implementation. Part I should be consulted for a complete description of the program requirements. These criteria should be used by team members whenever possible, but are not intended to be all inclusive. Determination of adequate implementation of the DOE-VPP requirements is at the team members` discretion. Guidance for calculating recordable injury and lost workday incidence rates is contained in Appendix B. The OSHA injury/illness records review and the associated calculations should be performed by Onsite Review Team members during the pre-onsite planning visit.

  9. Agile sustainable communities. On-site renewable energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Woodrow W. II. [A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management, University of California, Riverside (United States); Eisenberg, Larry [Los Angeles Community College District (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Smart and sustainable campuses demand three components. First, there is the need to have a Strategic Master Plan (SMP) for all infrastructures that include energy, transportation, water, waste and telecommunications along with the traditional dimensions of research, curricula, outreach and assessments. Secondarily, there is the array of issues pertaining to the sitting of buildings and overall facility master planning which must be addressed from the perspective of 'green' energy, efficient orientation and be designed for multiple-use by the academic and local community. Thirdly, the development of sustainable buildings in one area that is compact and walkable campuses thus enable a range of transportation choices leads to reduced energy consumption. Historically, college campuses were often like towns and villages in that they are self-sustaining for family, business and recreational activities. Any sustainable smart campus is a vibrant, 'experiential' applied educational model that should catalyze creative learning. More significantly, today, campuses and communities must be secure in terms of not only their own energy use and needs, but also for the resource demands of their power. Otherwise, the community(s) will never be secure economically or politically. Recognizing global warming and climate change, in the spring of 2001, the Board of Trustee (BOT) for the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) took the critical initial policy steps to turn these sustainable developments into goals. For example, the LACCD decided to have new 'green' buildings to replace or renovate existing ones. The building program led to sustainable communities that included recycling, product reuse from waste as well as smart growth in terms of reduced energy use, efficiency and the use of telecommunication and wireless systems. The paper focuses primarily on the energy programs for the LACCD campuses. The paper considers the overall energy

  10. Forest treatment residues for thermal energy compared with disposal by onsite burning: Emissions and energy return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Greg; Calkin, David [Human Dimensions Science Program, Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, PO Box 7669, 200 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59807 (United States); Loeffler, Dan [The University of Montana, College of Forestry and Conservation, PO Box 7669, 200 East Broadway Street, Missoula, MT 59807 (United States); Chung, Woodam [The University of Montana, College of Forestry and Conservation, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Mill residues from forest industries are the source for most of the current wood-based energy in the US, approximately 2.1% of the nation's energy use in 2007. Forest residues from silvicultural treatments, which include limbs, tops, and small non-commercial trees removed for various forest management objectives, represent an additional source of woody biomass for energy. We spatially analyzed collecting, grinding, and hauling forest residue biomass on a 515,900 ha area in western Montana, US, to compare the total emissions of burning forest residues in a boiler for thermal energy with the alternatives of onsite disposal by pile-burning and using either natural gas or 2 distillate oil to produce the equivalent amount of useable energy. When compared to the pile-burn/fossil fuel alternatives, carbon dioxide emissions from the bioenergy alternative were approximately 60%, methane emissions were approximately 3%, and particulate emissions less than 10 {mu}m were 11% and 41%, respectively, for emission control and no-control boilers. Emissions from diesel consumption for collecting, grinding, and hauling biomass represented less than 5% of the total bioenergy emissions at an average haul distance of 136 km. Across the study area, an average 21 units of bioenergy were produced for each unit of diesel energy used to collect, grind, and haul biomass. Fossil fuel energy saved by the bioenergy alternative relative to the pile-burn/fossil fuel alternatives averaged 14.7-15.2 GJ t{sup -1} of biomass. (author)

  11. [On-site measurement of landfill gas yield and verification of IPCC model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xing-Bao

    2009-11-01

    In order to obtain the accurate yield of landfill gas in Yulongkeng Landfill, Shenzhen, improved pumping test was conducted. The methane production rates of the influence region were figured out as 14.67 x 10(-5), 9.46 x 10(-5), 9.55 x 10(-5), and 4.28 x 10(-5) m3/(t x h), respectively. According to the methane production rate, the whole methane yield of Yulongkeng Landfill in 2005 was 322 m3/h, which indicated that Yulongkeng Landfill had went into stationary phase and the recycle of landfill gas was not valuable. IPCC model was verified by the measured data. Degradation half life of the waste was the key parameter concerned to the prediction accuracy of IPCC model. In China, the degradable waste in municipal solid waste was mainly kitchen waste leading to a short degradation period, which caused the degradation half life was shorter than the proposed value in IPCC model. For the improvement in prediction accuracy of landfill gas yield, the model parameters should be adopted reasonably based on a full survey of waste characterization in China, which will boost the applicability of IPCC model.

  12. Reducing Demand Charges and Onsite Generation Variability Using Behind-the-Meter Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu P.; Myers, Kurt S.; Bush, Jason W.

    2017-04-01

    Electric utilities in the United States are increasingly employing demand charges and/or real-time pricing. This directive is bringing potential opportunities in deploying behindthe-meter energy storage (BMES) systems for various grid functionalities. This study quantifies techno-economic benefits of BMES in reducing demand charge and smoothing load/generation intermittencies, and determines how those benefits vary with onsite distributed photovoltaic. We proposed a two-stage control algorithm, whereby the first stage proactively determines costoptimal BMES configuration for reducing peak-demands and demand charges, and the second stage adaptively compensates intermittent generations and short load spikes that may otherwise increase the demand charges. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated through a 24 hours time sweep simulation performed using data from smart microgrid testbed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The simulation results demonstrated that this research provides a simple but effective solution for peak shaving, demand charge reductions, and smoothing onsite PV variability.

  13. Analysis of a fuel cell on-site integrated energy system for a residential complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, S. N.; Maag, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The energy use and costs of the on-site integrated energy system (OS/IES) which provides electric power from an on-site power plant and recovers heat that would normally be rejected to the environment is compared to a conventional system purchasing electricity from a utility and a phosphoric acid fuel cell powered system. The analysis showed that for a 500-unit apartment complex a fuel OS/IES would be about 10% more energy conservative in terms of total coal consumption than a diesel OS/IES system or a conventional system. The fuel cell OS/IES capital costs could be 30 to 55% greater than the diesel OS/IES capital costs for the same life cycle costs. The life cycle cost of a fuel cell OS/IES would be lower than that for a conventional system as long as the cost of electricity is greater than $0.05 to $0.065/kWh. An analysis of several parametric combinations of fuel cell power plant and state-of-art energy recovery systems and annual fuel requirement calculations for four locations were made. It was shown that OS/IES component choices are a major factor in fuel consumption, with the least efficient system using 25% more fuel than the most efficient. Central air conditioning and heat pumps result in minimum fuel consumption while individual air conditioning units increase it, and in general the fuel cell of highest electrical efficiency has the lowest fuel consumption.

  14. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-15

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

  15. On-Site Energy Management by Integrating Campus Buildings and Optimizing Local Energy Systems, Case Study of the Campus in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genku Kayo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work describes the potential study on the impact of energy improvements of existing campus buildings by on-site energy management and operational strategies. The focus buildings in the campus are mainly built in the 1960s, and therefore it is time to carry out renovation work. In connection with renovations, the aim is to improve the energy efficiency of the buildings, and to develop the functionality of the properties to meet the current requirements. Thus, in this study, the potentials of on-site energy generation and sharing in the cluster of campus buildings in Finland were studied. By means of optimisation method, the optimal combined heat and power systems (CHP capacity distribution and operation mode for minimizing annual primary energy consumption were simulated. The results show the integration of buildings has advantage for on-site energy management as 23% of primary energy reduction compared with current situation. Consequently, integrating buildings and optimizing on-site energy management can be one of effective strategies for minimizing primary energy consumption. Furthermore, the study to improve operation strategies of building service system considering current space use in the building clarified that up to 13% of total energy use reduction is expected. The research work also proposes the way of providing environmental information to increase awareness of building energy usage in the campus.

  16. Study of component technologies for fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. D.; Mathias, S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment are integrated with three types of fuel cells. System design and computer simulations are developed to utilize the thermal energy discharge of the fuel in the most cost effective manner. The fuel provides all of the electric needs and a loss of load probability analysis is used to ensure adequate power plant reliability. Equipment cost is estimated for each of the systems analyzed. A levelized annual cost reflecting owning and operating costs including the cost of money was used to select the most promising integrated system configurations. Cash flows are presented for the most promising 16 systems. Several systems for the 96 unit apartment complex (a retail store was also studied) were cost competitive with both gas and electric based conventional systems. Thermal storage is shown to be beneficial and the optimum absorption chiller sizing (waste heat recovery) in connection with electric chillers are developed. Battery storage was analyzed since the system is not electric grid connected. Advanced absorption chillers were analyzed as well. Recommendations covering financing, technical development, and policy issues are given to accelerate the commercialization of the fuel cell for on-site power generation in buildings.

  17. Optimal Diagnostic Yield Achieved With On-site Pathology Evaluation of Fine-Needle Aspiration-Assisted Core Biopsies for Pediatric Osseous Lesions: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kalyani; Kinnear, Darryl; Quintanilla, Norma M; Hicks, John; Castro, Eumenia; Curry, Choladda; Dormans, John; Ashton, Daniel J; Hernandez, J Alberto; Wu, Hao

    2017-05-01

    - Image-guided, fine-needle aspiration-assisted core needle biopsy with an on-site evaluation by a pathologist (FNACBP) of osseous lesions is not a common practice in pediatric institutions. - To evaluate the diagnostic adequacy and accuracy of FNACBP for pediatric osseous lesions and to compare the adequacy with procedures that do not use fine-needle aspiration. - Six-year, retrospective review of 144 consecutive children biopsied for osseous lesions with and without fine-needle aspiration assistance. - Pathologic diagnosis was achieved in 79% (57 of 72) of the core biopsies without an on-site evaluation, 78% (32 of 41) of the open biopsies (9 with intraoperative consultation), and 97% (30 of 31) of the FNACBPs as the initial diagnostic procedure. Three FNACBP cases were preceded by nondiagnostic open biopsies. Among 34 lesions sampled by FNACBP, 33 (97%) succeeded with diagnostic tissue, with most (30 of 33; 91%) being neoplasms, including 16 malignant (48%), 13 benign (39%), and 1 indeterminate (3%) lesions. The most-common diagnoses were osteosarcoma (9 of 33; 27%) and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (7 of 33; 21%). In cases with follow-up information available, 93% (28 of 30) of the FNACBP-rendered diagnoses were clinically useful, allowing initiation of appropriate therapy. The FNACBP procedure had 100% specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value for all 14 malignant lesions, with the sensitivity being 88% in benign lesions. Most FNACBP procedures (32 of 34; 94%) yielded adequate material for ancillary testing. A gradual upward trend was observed for the choice of FNACBP as an initial diagnostic procedure for osseous lesions. - The FNACBP procedure yields sufficient material for diagnosis and ancillary studies in pediatric, osseous lesions and may be considered an initial-diagnostic procedure of choice.

  18. A meta-analysis of endoscopic ultrasound–fine-needle aspiration compared to endoscopic ultrasound–fine-needle biopsy: diagnostic yield and the value of onsite cytopathological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ali; Grimm, Ian S.; Ali, Bilal; Nollan, Richard; Tombazzi, Claudio; Ismail, Mohammad Kashif; Baron, Todd H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is variable, and partly dependent upon rapid onsite evaluation (ROSE) by a cytopathologist. Second generation fine-needle biopsy (FNB) needles are being increasingly used to obtain core histological tissue samples. Aims Studies comparing the diagnostic yield of EUS guided FNA versus FNB have reached conflicting conclusions. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the diagnostic yield of FNA with FNB, and specifically evaluating the diagnostic value of ROSE while comparing the two types of needles. Methods We searched several databases from inception to 10 April 2016 to identify studies comparing diagnostic yield of second generation FNB needles with standard FNA needles. Risk ratios (RR) were calculated for categorical outcomes of interest (diagnostic adequacy, diagnostic accuracy, and optimal quality histological cores obtained). Standard mean difference (SMD) was calculated for continuous variables (number of passes required for diagnosis). These were pooled using random effects model of meta-analysis to account for heterogeneity. Meta-regression was conducted to evaluate the effect of ROSE on various outcomes of interest. Results Fifteen studies with a total of 1024 patients were included in the analysis. We found no significant difference in diagnostic adequacy [RR 0.98 (0.91, 1.06), (I 2 = 51 %)]. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), by meta-regression, in the absence of ROSE, FNB showed a relatively better diagnostic adequacy. For solid pancreatic lesions only, there was no difference in diagnostic adequacy [RR 0.96 (0.86, 1.09), (I 2 = 66 %)]. By meta-regression, in the absence of ROSE, FNB was associated with better diagnostic adequacy (P = 0.02). There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy [RR 0.99 (0.95, 1.03), (I 2 = 27 %)] or optimal quality core histological sample

  19. Electronic couplings and on-site energies for hole transfer in DNA: Systematic quantum mechanical/molecular dynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2008-03-01

    The electron hole transfer (HT) properties of DNA are substantially affected by thermal fluctuations of the π stack structure. Depending on the mutual position of neighboring nucleobases, electronic coupling V may change by several orders of magnitude. In the present paper, we report the results of systematic QM/molecular dynamic (MD) calculations of the electronic couplings and on-site energies for the hole transfer. Based on 15ns MD trajectories for several DNA oligomers, we calculate the average coupling squares ⟨V2⟩ and the energies of basepair triplets XG +Y and XA +Y, where X, Y =G, A, T, and C. For each of the 32 systems, 15 000 conformations separated by 1ps are considered. The three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush method is used to derive electronic couplings for HT between neighboring basepairs. The adiabatic energies and dipole moment matrix elements are computed within the INDO/S method. We compare the rms values of V with the couplings estimated for the idealized B-DNA structure and show that in several important cases the couplings calculated for the idealized B-DNA structure are considerably underestimated. The rms values for intrastrand couplings G-G, A-A, G-A, and A-G are found to be similar, ˜0.07eV, while the interstrand couplings are quite different. The energies of hole states G+ and A+ in the stack depend on the nature of the neighboring pairs. The XG +Y are by 0.5eV more stable than XA +Y. The thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure facilitate the HT process from guanine to adenine. The tabulated couplings and on-site energies can be used as reference parameters in theoretical and computational studies of HT processes in DNA.

  20. Electronic couplings and on-site energies for hole transfer in DNA: systematic quantum mechanical/molecular dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2008-03-21

    The electron hole transfer (HT) properties of DNA are substantially affected by thermal fluctuations of the pi stack structure. Depending on the mutual position of neighboring nucleobases, electronic coupling V may change by several orders of magnitude. In the present paper, we report the results of systematic QM/molecular dynamic (MD) calculations of the electronic couplings and on-site energies for the hole transfer. Based on 15 ns MD trajectories for several DNA oligomers, we calculate the average coupling squares V(2) and the energies of basepair triplets XG(+)Y and XA(+)Y, where X, Y=G, A, T, and C. For each of the 32 systems, 15,000 conformations separated by 1 ps are considered. The three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush method is used to derive electronic couplings for HT between neighboring basepairs. The adiabatic energies and dipole moment matrix elements are computed within the INDO/S method. We compare the rms values of V with the couplings estimated for the idealized B-DNA structure and show that in several important cases the couplings calculated for the idealized B-DNA structure are considerably underestimated. The rms values for intrastrand couplings G-G, A-A, G-A, and A-G are found to be similar, approximately 0.07 eV, while the interstrand couplings are quite different. The energies of hole states G(+) and A(+) in the stack depend on the nature of the neighboring pairs. The XG(+)Y are by 0.5 eV more stable than XA(+)Y. The thermal fluctuations of the DNA structure facilitate the HT process from guanine to adenine. The tabulated couplings and on-site energies can be used as reference parameters in theoretical and computational studies of HT processes in DNA.

  1. An optimization methodology for the design of renewable energy systems for residential net zero energy buildings with on-site heat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Christian; Bojesen, Carsten; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2011-01-01

    The concept of net zero energy buildings (NZEB) has received increased attention throughout the last years. A well adapted and optimized design of the energy supply system is crucial for the performance of such buildings. This paper aims at developing a method for the optimal sizing of renewable...... energy supply systems for residential NZEB involving on-site production of heat and electricity in combination with electricity exchanged with the public grid. The model is based on linear programming and determines the optimal capacities for each relevant supply technology in terms of the overall system...

  2. Rapid on-site evaluation has high diagnostic yield differentiating adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma of non-small cell lung carcinoma, not otherwise specified subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Betul; Khoor, Andras; Bulut, Tangul; Nassar, Aziza

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) on the differential diagnosis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS). Biopsied cases diagnosed as NSCLC-NOS with ROSE during 2004 through 2008 were retrieved. Diagnostic confirmation was done with immunohistochemistry (IHC) involving thyroid transcription factor-1 and p63 immunostains. For the study, 106 cases were available. The final diagnoses rendered were squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) (n = 39) and adenocarcinoma (AC) (n = 67). Cytologic, histologic, and IHC concordance for these diagnoses occurred in 75 cases (70.8 %), of which 56 (52.8%) were AC and 19 (17.9%) were SqCC. Cytologic, histologic, and IHC discordance was found in 31 cases (29.2%). Of these 31 cases, 11 NSCLC-NOS diagnoses histologically corresponded to 1 SqCC plus 4 ACs, and 4 favor SqCC plus 2 ACs; the former 5 NSCLC-NOS cases classified correctly through cytology, as well as IHC. However, IHC was not available for the latter 6 NSCLC-NOS cases that were also classified correctly through cytology. In addition, only 3 NSCLC-NOS diagnoses cytologically corresponded to 3 favor SqCC histologically, in which IHC was not available, and for 2 cases that both corresponded to favor SqCC and favor AC histologically and cytologically. In the other 15 cases, histology labeled 4 cases NSCLC-NOS and misclassified 2 cases; cytology labeled 1 case NSCLC-NOS and misclassified 13 cases. ROSE has high diagnostic yield over subclassification of NSCLC-NOS. We recommend allocating a cytotechnologist for specimen adequacy and a cytopathologist for cytologic diagnosis.

  3. Maximum energy yield approach for CPV tracker design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaiturriaga, E.; González, O.; Castro, M.

    2012-10-01

    Foton HC Systems has developed a new CPV tracker model, specially focused on its tracking efficiency and the effect of the tracker control techniques on the final energy yield of the system. This paper presents the theoretical work carried out into determining the energy yield for a CPV system, and illustrates the steps involved in calculating and understanding how energy consumption for tracking is opposed to tracker pointing errors. Additionally, the expressions to compute the optimum parameters are presented and discussed.

  4. Energy Dependence of Air Fluorescence Yield measured by AIRFLY

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M

    2007-01-01

    In the fluorescence detection of ultra high energy (> 10**18 eV) cosmic rays, the number of emitted fluorescence photons is assumed to be proportional to the energy deposited in air by shower particles. We have performed measurements of the fluorescence yield in atmospheric gases excited by electrons over energies ranging from keV to hundreds of MeV in several accelerators. We found that within the measured energy ranges the proportionality holds at the level of few %.

  5. On-Site or Off-Site Renewable Energy Supply Options?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2012-01-01

    into consideration the limited area of roof and/or façade, primarily in the dense city areas, the Danish weather conditions, the growing interest and number of wind turbine co-ops, the off-site renewable energy supply options could become a meaningful solution for reaching ‘zero’ energy goal in the Danish context...

  6. Evaluation of biomass combustion based energy systems by cumulative energy demand and energy yield coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.; Oser, M.

    2004-07-01

    This final report prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Task 32 presents a method for a comparison of different energy systems with respect to the overall energy yield during their life cycles. For this purpose, the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) based on primary energy and the Energy Yield Factor (EYC) are introduced and determined for the following scenarios: Log wood, wood chips, and wood pellets for residential heating and - except for log wood - also for district heating. As an alternative to heat production, power production via combustion and use of the electricity for decentralised heat pumps is also looked at. The evaluation and comparison of both the EYC for all fuels and the EYC{sub N}R for the non-renewable part enables a ranking of energy systems without a subjective weighing of non-renewable and renewable fuels to be made. For a sustainable energy supply, it is proposed to implement renewable energy systems in future which achieve an energy yield EYC{sub N}R of at least greater than 2 but favourably greater than 5. The evaluation of the different scenarios presented is proposed as the future basis for the choice of the most efficient energy systems based on biomass combustion.

  7. Impacts of variability in cellulosic biomass yields on energy security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Kimberley A; Matthews, H Scott; Griffin, W Michael; Anex, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The practice of modeling biomass yields on the basis of deterministic point values aggregated over space and time obscures important risks associated with large-scale biofuel use, particularly risks related to drought-induced yield reductions that may become increasingly frequent under a changing climate. Using switchgrass as a case study, this work quantifies the variability in expected yields over time and space through switchgrass growth modeling under historical and simulated future weather. The predicted switchgrass yields across the United States range from about 12 to 19 Mg/ha, and the 80% confidence intervals range from 20 to 60% of the mean. Average yields are predicted to decrease with increased temperatures and weather variability induced by climate change. Feedstock yield variability needs to be a central part of modeling to ensure that policy makers acknowledge risks to energy supplies and develop strategies or contingency plans that mitigate those risks.

  8. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  9. Utilisation of biomass gasification by-products for onsite energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakalis, S; Sotiropoulos, A; Moustakas, K; Malamis, D; Baratieri, M

    2016-06-01

    Small scale biomass gasification is a sector with growth and increasing applications owing to the environmental goals of the European Union and the incentivised policies of most European countries. This study addresses two aspects, which are at the centre of attention concerning the operation and development of small scale gasifiers; reuse of waste and increase of energy efficiency. Several authors have denoted that the low electrical efficiency of these systems is the main barrier for further commercial development. In addition, gasification has several by-products that have no further use and are discarded as waste. In the framework of this manuscript, a secondary reactor is introduced and modelled. The main operating principle is the utilisation of char and flue gases for further energy production. These by-products are reformed into secondary producer gas by means of a secondary reactor. In addition, a set of heat exchangers capture the waste heat and optimise the process. This case study is modelled in a MATLAB-Cantera environment. The model is non-stoichiometric and applies the Gibbs minimisation principle. The simulations show that some of the thermal energy is depleted during the process owing to the preheating of flue gases. Nonetheless, the addition of a secondary reactor results in an increase of the electrical power production efficiency and the combined heat and power (CHP) efficiency. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Predicting the macroseismic intensity from early radiated P wave energy for on-site earthquake early warning in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondi, P.; Picozzi, M.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2015-10-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) are potentially effective tools for risk mitigation in active seismic regions. The present study explores the possibility of predicting the macroseismic intensity within EEW timeframes using the squared velocity integral (IV2) measured on the early P wave signals, a proxy for the P wave radiated energy of earthquakes. This study shows that IV2 correlates better than the peak displacement measured on P waves with both the peak ground velocity and the Housner Intensity, with the latter being recognized by engineers as a reliable proxy for damage assessment. Therefore, using the strong motion recordings of the Italian Accelerometric Archive, a novel relationship between the parameter IV2 and the macroseismic intensity (IM) has been derived. The validity of this relationship has been assessed using the strong motion recordings of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Strong Motion Data and Osservatorio Sismico delle Strutture databases, as well as, in the case of the MW 6, 29 May 2012 Emilia earthquake (Italy), comparing the predicted intensities with the ones observed after a macroseismic survey. Our results indicate that P wave IV2 can become a key parameter for the design of on-site EEWS, capable of proving real-time predictions of the IM at target sites.

  11. Guide to purchasing green power. Renewable electricity, renewable energy certificates and on-site renewable generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-09-30

    The Guide to Purchasing Green Power is intended for organizations that are considering the merits of buying green power as well as those that have decided to buy it and want help doing so. The Guide was written for a broad audience, including businesses, government agencies, universities, and all organizations wanting to diversify their energy supply and to reduce the environmental impact of their electricity use.The Guide provides an overview of green power markets and describes the necessary steps to buying green power. This section summarizes the Guide to help readers find the information they need.

  12. Systematics of photopion reaction yields at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-03-01

    Our development in radiochemical measurements of photopion yields from complex nuclei ranging from {sup 7}Li to {sup 209}Bi at intermediate energies is reviewed. It has been found from systematized yields with respect to photon-energies, types of photopion reaction and target masses that (1) photons responsible for the ({gamma}, {pi}{sup +}), ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}) and ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}xn) reactions upto x=9 are mostly of energies lower than 400 MeV but higher than 140 MeV (pion rest mass), (2) ({gamma}, {pi}{sup +}) and ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}) yields are independent of target mass (A{sub t}) heavier than A{sub t}{approx}30, and the yield ratio of Y({gamma}, {pi}{sup -})/Y({gamma}, {pi}{sup +}) is 5-6 irrespective of photon energies concerned, and (3) the yield variations of ({gamma}, {pi}{sup -}xn) reactions are well expressed as functions of (N/Z) of targets and neutron multiplicity. These findings appear to imply requirements of new concepts on neutron density distributions and photonuclear processes in complex nuclei. (author)

  13. Annual energy yield of the fluorescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Hellenbrand, G.F.M.G. [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Bende, E.E.; Burgers, A.R.; Slooff, L.H. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    Fluorescent solar concentrators are but one candidate for lowering the costs of photovoltaic technology. State-of-the-art device conversion efficiencies are around 4%, and the device configuration can be optimized in terms of Euro per Watt. This paper aims to estimate the annual energy yield of such an optimized device configuration, using a detailed minutely spectral irradiance data set, describing a full year in the Netherlands, in combination with a ray-tracing model of the fluorescent solar concentrator. The spectral dataset is modeled using experimentally determined global, direct, and diffuse irradiation data on a minutely basis. Performance variations during the day for a number of typical days are investigated, i.e., for a clear summer day, a cloudy summer day, a clear winter day, and a cloudy winter day, using a ray-trace model of the fluorescent solar concentrator. Also, monthly aggregated spectra are used, as well as an annually aggregated spectrum to determine monthly and annual energy yields, respectively. As a result of a cost-per-unit-of-power optimization study, an optimum size of 23x23x0.1 cm{sup 3} was used, and an annual energy yield of 41.3 kWh/m{sup 2} could be estimated; this is 4.7 times lower than the annual energy yield of a state-of-the-art silicon solar cell.

  14. A study of the energy yield criterion of geomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Hong; Zheng Yingren; Feng Xiating; Zeng Jing

    2010-01-01

    The study results of the internal friction character of geomaterials conclude that the internal friction exists in mechanical elements all the time having a direction opposite to the shear stress,and the deformation failure mechanism of geomaterials greatly differs from that of metals.For metals,the failure results from shear stresses make the crystal structure slip;whereas for geomaterials,owing to its attribute of granular structures,their deformation follows the friction law,it is the co-action of shear stresses and perpendicular stresses that makes grains overcome the frictions between them,thus leading to the final failure of relative sliding.Therefore,on the basis of the cognition above,a triple shear energy criterion is proposed.Its corresponding Drucker-Prager criterion for geomaterials is also given.The new criterion can be rewritten to the Mohr-Coulomb criterion by neglecting the effect of the intermediate principal stress,and to the Mises criterion by not taking the internal friction angle into consideration.Then the studies of yield criteria commonly used are conducted systematical]y from the points of stress,strain and energy of geomaterials.The results show that no matter which expression form of stress,strain or energy is used for the yield criterion,the essence is the same and the triple shear energy yield criterion is the unified criterion of materials.Finally,the experimental verification is conducted in connection with the practical application of the triple shear energy yield criterion in an engineering project,and the calculation result shows that the Mohr-Coulomb criterion which only takes the single shear surface into account is more conservative than the energy criterion that does consider the effect of triple shear surfaces.

  15. The Titan haze revisted: Magnetospheric energy sorces quantitative tholin yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Mcdonald, Gene D.; Sagan, Carl

    1994-01-01

    We present laboratory measurements of the radiation yields of complex organic solids produced from N2/CH4 gas mixtures containing 10 or 0.1% CH4. These tholins are thought to resemble organic aerosols produced in the atmospheres of Titan, Pluto, and Triton. The tholin yields are large compared to the total yield of gaseous products: nominally, 13 (C + N)/100 eV for Titan tholin and 2.1 (C + N)/100 eV for Triton tholin. High-energy magnetospheric electrons responsible for tholin production represents a class distinct from the plasma electrons considered in models of Titan's aiglow. Electrons with E greater than 20 keV provide an energy flux approximately 1 x 10(exp -2) erg/cm/sec, implying from our measured tholin yields a mass flux of 0.5 to 4.0 x 10(exp -14) g/sq cm/sec of tholin. (The corresponding thickness of the tholin sedimentary column accumulated over 4 Gyr on Titan's surface is 4 to 30 m). This figure is in agreement with required mass fluxes computed from recent radiative transfer and sedimentation models. If, however, theses results, derived from experiments at approximately 2 mb, are applied to lower pressure levels toward peak auroral electron energy deposition and scaled with pressure as the gas-phase organic yields, the derived tholin mass flux is at least an order of magnitude less. We attrribute this difference to the fact that tholin synthesis occurs well below the level of maximum electron energy depositon and to possible contributions to tholis from UV-derived C2-hydrocarbons. We conclude that Tita tholin, produced by magnetospheric electrons, is alone sufficient to supply at least a significant fraction of Titan's haze-a result consistent with the fact that the optical properties of Titan tholin, among all proposed material, are best at reproducing Titan's geometric albedo spectrum from near UV to mid-IR in light-scattering models.

  16. Potential Energy Surfaces and Quantum Yields for Photochromic Diarylethene Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hatakeyama

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Photochromic diarylethenes (DAEs are among the most promising molecular switching systems for future molecular electronics. Numerous derivatives have been synthesized recently, and experimental quantum yields (QYs have been reported for two categories of them. Although the QY is one of the most important properties in various applications, it is also the most difficult property to predict before a molecule is actually synthesized. We have previously reported preliminary theoretical studies on what determines the QYs in both categories of DAE derivatives. Here, reflecting theoretical analyses of potential energy surfaces and recent experimental results, a rational explanation of the general guiding principle for QY design is presented for future molecular design.

  17. Signal yields, energy resolution, and recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Bramante, R.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gibson, K. R.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Ihm, M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Phelps, P.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks in the dark-matter-search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector. Liquid xenon charge and light yields for electronic recoil energies between 5.2 and 661.7 keV are measured, as well as the energy resolution for the LUX detector at those same energies. Additionally, there is an interpretation of existing measurements and descriptions of electron-ion recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon as limiting cases of a more general liquid xenon recombination fluctuation model. Measurements of the standard deviation of these fluctuations at monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks exhibit a linear dependence on the number of ions for energy deposits up to 661.7 keV, consistent with previous LUX measurements between 2 and 16 keV with 3H. We highlight similarities in liquid xenon recombination for electronic and nuclear recoils with a comparison of recombination fluctuations measured with low-energy calibration data.

  18. GeologicSoils_ONSITE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — ONSITE is a pre-selected subset of SSURGO certified soil data depicting onsite sewage disposal ratings of Vermont soils. The SSURGO county coverages were joined to...

  19. Signal yields, energy resolution, and recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Araújo, H M; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, E P; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, T P; Boulton, E M; Bramante, R; Brás, P; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Currie, A; Cutter, J E; Davison, T J R; Dobi, A; Dobson, J E Y; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B N; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C R; Hanhardt, M; Haselschwardt, S J; Hertel, S A; Hogan, D P; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ignarra, C M; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Ji, W; Kamdin, K; Kazkaz, K; Khaitan, D; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lenardo, B G; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Manalaysay, A; Mannino, R L; Marzioni, M F; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J A; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H N; Neves, F; O'Sullivan, K; Oliver-Mallory, K C; Palladino, K J; Pease, E K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Rhyne, C; Shaw, S; Shutt, T A; Silva, C; Solmaz, M; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stephenson, S; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D J; Taylor, W C; Tennyson, B P; Terman, P A; Tiedt, D R; To, W H; Tripathi, M; Tvrznikova, L; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Webb, R C; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Xu, J; Yazdani, K; Young, S K; Zhang, C

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks in the dark-matter-search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector. Liquid xenon charge and light yields for electronic recoil energies between 5.2 and 661.7 keV are measured, as well as the energy resolution for the LUX detector at those same energies. Additionally, there is an interpretation of existing measurements and descriptions of electron-ion recombination fluctuations in liquid xenon as limiting cases of a more general liquid xenon re- combination fluctuation model. Measurements of the standard deviation of these fluctuations at monoenergetic electronic recoil peaks exhibit a linear dependence on the number of ions for energy deposits up to 661.7 keV, consistent with previous LUX measurements between 2-16 keV with $^3$H. We highlight similarities in liquid xenon recombination for electronic and nuclear recoils with a comparison of recombination fluctuations measured...

  20. Enhanced biogas yield from energy crops with rumen anaerobic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochazka, Jindrich; Zabranska, Jana; Dohanyos, Michal [Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Environmental Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Mrazek, Jakub; Strosova, Lenka; Fliegerova, Katerina [Laboratory of Anaerobic Microbiology, Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics, CAS, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-06-15

    Anaerobic fungi (AF) are able to degrade crop substrates with higher efficiency than commonly used anaerobic bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate ways of use of rumen AF to improve biogas production from energy crops under laboratory conditions. In this study, strains of AF isolated from feces or rumen fluid of cows and deer were tested for their ability to integrate into the anaerobic bacterial ecosystem used for biogas production, in order to improve degradation of substrate polysaccharides and consequently the biogas yield. Batch culture, fed batch culture, and semicontinuous experiments have been performed using anaerobic sludge from pig slurry fermentation and different kinds of substrates (celluloses, maize, and grass silage) inoculated by different genera of AF. All experiments showed a positive effect of AF on the biogas yield and quality. AF improved the biogas production by 4-22%, depending on the substrate and AF species used. However, all the cultivation experiments indicated that rumen fungi do not show long-term survival in fermenters with digestate from pig slurry. The best results were achieved during fed batch experiment with fungal culture Anaeromyces (KF8), in which biogas production was enhanced during the whole experimental period of 140 days. This result has not been achieved in semicontinuous experiment, where increment in biogas production in fungal enriched reactor was only 4% after 42 days. (copyright 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Energy Efficiency Analysis and Modeling the Relationship between Energy Inputs and Wheat Yield in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakher Kardoni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is the dominant cereal crop constituting the first staple food in Iran. This paper studies the energy consumption patterns and the relationship between energy inputs and yield for Wheat production in Iranian agriculture during the period 1986 – 2008. The results indicated that total energy inputs in irrigated and dryland wheat production increased from 29.01 and 9.81 GJ ha-1 in 1986 to 44.67 and 12.35 GJ ha-1 in 2008, respectively. Similarly, total output energy rose from 28.87 and 10.43 GJ ha-1 in 1986 to 58.53 and 15.77 GJ ha-1 in 2008, in the same period. Energy efficiency indicators, input– output ratio, energy productivity, and net energy have improved over the examined period. The results also revealed that nonrenewable, direct, and indirect energy forms had a positive impact on the output level. Moreover, the regression results showed the significant effect of irrigation water and seed energies in irrigated wheat and human labor and fertilizer in dryland wheat on crop yield. Results of this study indicated that improvement of fertilizer efficiency and reduction of fuel consumption by modifying tillage, harvest method, and other agronomic operations can significantly affect the energy efficiency of wheat production in Iran.

  2. 6. Kassel symposium on energy system engineering. On-site energy generation using renewable energy sources. Proceedings 2001; 6. Kasseler Symposium: Energie-Systemtechnik. Erneuerbare Energien und rationelle Energieverwendung. Innovative Energiewandler. Tagungsband 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caselitz, P. (comp.)

    2001-07-01

    The sixth Kassel symposium on energy system engineering. On-site energy generation using renewable energy sources focuses on the subject of innovative energy converter. The status and the development of generally known technologies is not only supposed to be reported on but also some conversion methods, which are currently not too well known. The changed frame conditions in the field of energy economy cause some systems, which have already been developed, to appear in a new light. The first talk of this symposium does not really discuss a method of energy conversion compared to the other talks. It rather describes a scenario that focuses on silicium as future energy carrier. Further contributions report on new, innovative concepts for electrical partial systems of wind and water power plants with variable revolution. Modern design methods for water turbines are presented with the example of hydraulic turbo-engines. Three contributions present the current status of technology and perspectives in the field of photovoltaics, thermal photovoltaics as well as new developments in the field of solarthermal systems. Talks about micro gas turbines and fuel cells discuss the use of these systems in dual purpose power plants and in the field of energy supply for houses. Information about modern steam engines and the use of Stirling engines in the field of biomass utilization complete the subject range of this symposium. (orig.) [German] Das 6. Kasseler Symposium zur Nutzung erneuerbarer Energien und rationellen Energieverwendung widmet sich dem Thema Innovative Energiewandler. Dabei soll nicht nur ueber den Stand und die Entwicklung weithin bekannter Technologien berichtet werden. Vorgestellt werden auch einige Konversionsverfahren, deren Bekanntheitsgrad heute noch gering ist. Auch lassen die veraenderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Energiewirtschaft einige im Prinzip entwickelte Systeme moeglicherweise in einem neuen Licht erscheinen. Der erste Beitrag des Symposiums setzt

  3. Energy yields in intensive and extensive biomass production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonhebel, S.

    2002-01-01

    As for agricultural crops, biomass crops can be grown in intensive production systems (external inputs such as pesticides and artificial fertilisers) or extensive systems with few external inputs. The choice between an intensive or extensive production system has consequences for yields. A method is

  4. Evolution of isotopic fission-fragment yields with excitation energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazin D.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Two fission experiments have been performed at GANIL using 238U beams at different energies and light targets. Different fissioning systems were produced with excitation energies from 10 to 230 MeV and their decay by fission was investigated with GANIL spectrometers. Preliminary fission-fragment isotopic distributions have been obtained. The evolution with impinging energy of their properties, the neutron excess and the width of the neutron-number distributions, gives important insights into the dynamics of fusion-fission mechanism.

  5. Effects of Genotype by Environment Interactions on Milk Yield, Energy Balance, and Protein Balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerda, B.; Ouweltjes, W.; Sebek, L.B.J.; Windig, J.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in genetic merit for milk yield are associated with increases in mobilization of body reserves. This study assessed the effects of genotype by environment (GxE) interactions on milk yield and energy and protein balances. Heifers (n = 100) with high or low genetic merit for milk yield were

  6. A New Approach for Offshore Wind Farm Energy Yields Calculation with Mixed Hub Height Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Hu, Weihao; Soltani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for calculating the energy yields of offshore wind farm with mixed types of wind turbines is proposed. The Jensen model is selected as the base and developed to a three dimension wake model to estimate the energy yields. Since the wind turbines are with different...... hub heights, the wind shear effect is also taken into consideration. The results show that the proposed wake model is effective in calculating the wind speed deficit. The calculation framework is applicable for energy yields calculation in offshore wind farms....

  7. Anaerobic digestion of industrial hemp-effect of harvest time on methane energy yield per hectare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuger, E.; Escobar, F.; Bjoernsson, L. [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Prade, T.; Svensson, S.-E.; Englund, J.-E. [Department of Agriculture-Farming Systems, Technology and Product Quality, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 104, SE-230 53 Alnarp (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    There is a worldwide emphasis to increase the share of renewable transportation fuels. When using agricultural land for production of renewable transportation fuels, the energy output per hectare for different crops and transportation fuels is a crucial factor. In this study, the gross methane energy yield per hectare from anaerobic digestion of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), was determined at four different harvest times between July and October in Southern Sweden, a cold climate region. The biomass yield was determined for three years and the methane yield was determined for two years through the biochemical methane potential test. The highest biomass yield, 16 tonnes dry matter per hectare on an average, and the highest methane energy yield per hectare was achieved when the hemp was harvested in September or October, with an average gross methane energy yield of 136 {+-} 24 GJ per hectare. There was no significant difference in the specific methane yield between the harvest times; the average being 234 {+-} 35 m{sup 3} per tonne volatile solids. Biogas from hemp turned out to be a high yielding alternative to the currently dominating renewable transportation fuels produced from crops grown in Sweden: ethanol from wheat and biodiesel from rapeseed. (author)

  8. Yield-Energy Evaluation of 85Kr of 239Pu+n Fission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The yields of 85Kr, the important production of the 239Pu fission, were re-evaluated over the incident neutron energy 1-15 MeV, based upon all the experimental data. The yields as function of energ

  9. Neutron and fission yields from high-energy deuterons in infinite /sup 238/U targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfield, E.

    1965-06-28

    Early work on the interaction of high energy deuterons with large /sup 238/U targets is reexamined and current theoretical study is discussed. Results of fission and neutron yield calculations are compared with experiment. (SDF)

  10. A Novel Energy Yields Calculation Method for Irregular Wind Farm Layout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Hu, Weihao; Soltani, Mohsen;

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing size of offshore wind farm, the impact of the wake effect on energy yields become more and more evident. The Seafloor topography would limit the layout of the wind farm so that irregular layout is usually adopted inlarge scale offshore wind farm. However, the calculation...... for the energy yields in irregular wind farm considering wake effect would be difficult.In this paper, a mathematical model which includes the impacts of the variation of both wind direction and velocityon wake effect is established. Based on the wake model, a binary matrix method is proposed for the energy...... yields calculation forirregular wind farms.The results show that the proposed wake model is effective in calculating the wind speeddeficit. The calculation framework is applicable for energy yields calculation in irregular wind farms....

  11. Role of energy cost in the yield of cold ternary fission of 252Cf

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Kunhikrishnan; K P Santhosh

    2013-01-01

    The energy costs in the cold ternary fission of 252Cf for various light charged particle emission are calculated by includingWong's correction for Coulomb potential. Energy cost is found to be higher in cold fission than in normal fission. It is found that energy cost always increases with decrease in experimental yield in all the light charged particle emissions. The higher ground state deformation of the fragments, the odd–even effect and the enhanced yield in the octupole region observed in cold fission are found to be consistent with the concept of energy cost.

  12. Onsite transportation of radioactive materials at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, R.

    2015-03-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Transportation Safety Document (TSD) defines the onsite packaging and transportation safety program at SRS and demonstrates its compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) transportation safety requirements, to include DOE Order 460.1C, DOE Order 461.2, Onsite Packaging and Transfer of Materials of National Security Interest, and 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management (Subpart B).

  13. The dependence of cumulative 238U(n,f) fission yield on incident-neutron energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Na; ZHONG Chunlai; MA Liyong; CHEN Zhongjing; LI Xiangqing; LIU Tingjin; CHEN Jinxiang; FAN Tieshuan

    2009-01-01

    This work is aim at studying the dependence of fission yields on incident neutron energy,so as to produce evaluated yield sets of the energy dependence.Experimental data at different neutron energies for gas fission products 85m,87,88Kr and 138Xe resulting from the 238U(n,f) reaction are processed using codes AVERAGE for weighed average and ZOTT for simultaneous evaluation.Energy dependence of the cumulative fission product yields on the incident neutron is presented.The evaluated curve of product yield is compared with the results calculated by the TALYS-0.64 code.The present evaluation is consistent with other main libraries in error permission.The fit curve of 87,88Kr can be recommended to predict the unmeasured fission yields.Comparisons of the evaluated energy dependence curves with theoretical calculated results show that the predictions using purely theoretical model for the fission process are not sufficiently accurate and reliable for the calculations of the cumulative fission yields for the 238U(n,f).

  14. Sputtering yields of carbon based materials under high particle flux with low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Nagase, A.; Dairaku, M.; Akiba, M.; Araki, M.; Okumura, Y.

    1995-04-01

    A new ion source which can produce high particle flux beams at low energies has been developed. This paper presents preliminary results on the sputtering yield of the carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFCs) measured with the new ion source. The sputtering yields of 1D and 2D CFCs, which are candidate materials for the divertor armour tiles, have been measured by the weight loss method under the hydrogen and deuterium particle fluxes of 2 ˜ 7 × 10 20/m 2 s at 50 ˜ 150 eV. Preferential sputtering of the matrix was observed on CFCs which included the matrix of 40 ˜ 60 w%. The energy dependence of the sputtering yields was weak. The sputtering yields of CFCs normally irradiated with deuterium beam were from 0.073 to 0.095, and were around three times larger than those with hydrogen beam.

  15. Biogas production from high-yielding energy crops in boreal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppala, M.

    2013-11-01

    In this thesis, the methane production potential of traditional and novel energy crops was evaluated in boreal conditions. The highest methane yield per hectare was achieved with maize (4 000-9 200 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1} a{sup -1}) and the second highest with brown knapweed (2 700-6 100 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1} a{sup -1}). Recently, the most feasible energy crop, grass, produced 1 200-3 600 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1} a{sup -1}. The specific methane yields of traditional and novel energy crops varied from 170-500 l kg{sup -1} volatile solid (VS). The highest specific methane yields were obtained with maize, while the novel energy crops were at a lower range. The specific methane yields decreased in the later harvest time with maize and brown knapweed, and the specific methane yield of the grasses decreased from the 1st to 2nd harvests. Maize and brown knapweed produced the highest total solid (TS) yields per hectare 13-23 tTS ha{sup -1}, which were high when compared with the TS yields of grasses (6-13 tTS ha{sup -1}). The feasibility of maize and brown knapweed in co-digestion with liquid cow manure, in continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR), was evaluated. According to the CSTR runs, maize and brown knapweed are suitable feeds and have stable processes, producing the highest methane yields (organic loading rate 2 kgVS m{sup -3}d{sup -1}), with maize at 259 l kgVS{sup -1} and brown knapweed at 254 l kgVS{sup -1}. The energy balance (input/output) of the cultivation of the grasses, maize and brown knapweed was calculated in boreal conditions, and it was better when the digestate was used as a fertilizer (1.8-4.8 %) than using chemical fertilizers (3.7-16.2 %), whose production is the most energy demanding process in cultivation. In conclusion, the methane production of maize, grasses and novel energy crops can produce high methane yields and are suitable feeds for anaerobic digestion. The cultivation managements of maize and novel energy crops for

  16. Biofuels from pyrolysis in perspective: trade-offs between energy yields and soil-carbon additions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Dominic; Lehmann, Johannes; Fisher, Elizabeth M; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-06-03

    Coproduction of biofuels with biochar (the carbon-rich solid formed during biomass pyrolysis) can provide carbon-negative bioenergy if the biochar is sequestered in soil, where it can improve fertility and thus simultaneously address issues of food security, soil degradation, energy production, and climate change. However, increasing biochar production entails a reduction in bioenergy obtainable per unit biomass feedstock. Quantification of this trade-off for specific biochar-biofuel pathways has been hampered by lack of an accurate-yet-simple model for predicting yields, product compositions, and energy balances from biomass slow pyrolysis. An empirical model of biomass slow pyrolysis was developed and applied to several pathways for biochar coproduction with gaseous and liquid biofuels. Here, we show that biochar production reduces liquid biofuel yield by at least 21 GJ Mg(-1) C (biofuel energy sacrificed per unit mass of biochar C), with methanol synthesis giving this lowest energy penalty. For gaseous-biofuel production, the minimum energy penalty for biochar production is 33 GJ Mg(-1) C. These substitution rates correspond to a wide range of Pareto-optimal system configurations, implying considerable latitude to choose pyrolysis conditions to optimize for desired biochar properties or to modulate energy versus biochar yields in response to fluctuating price differentials for the two commodities.

  17. Yield of OH radicals in water under heavy ion irradiation. Dependence on mass, specific energy, and elapsed time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dependence of yields of OH (hydroxyl) radicals on the mass and specific energy of heavy ions and elapsed time after irradiation was investigated, to understand chemical reactions of aqueous solutions. The yields of irradiation products of phenol, super-linearly increased with the incident energy of He, C, and Ne ions ranging from 2 to 18 MeV/u. The yields of the OH radicals were estimated by analyzing the yields of the irradiation products of phenol.The yields of the OH radicals increased with the specific energy for each ion, but decreased both with the mass of each ion at the same specific energy and elapsed time after irradiation.

  18. Teaching the relation between solar cell efficiency and annual energy yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sark, Wilfried G J H M van [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-05-16

    To reach a sustainable world the use of renewable energy sources is imperative. Photovoltaics (PV) is but one of the technologies that use the power of the sun and its deployment is growing very fast. Several master programs have been developed over the world, including Utrecht University, that teach these technologies. Within the framework of a course on energy conversion technologies, we have developed a classroom problem that focuses on the difference between PV efficiency and annual yield for the two locations: the Utrecht University campus and the African Sahara desert. In spreadsheet format, students calculate annual yield, and they find a best method to do so. The exercise can be done in about three hours, and students will learn that the annual yield in the Sahara is only twice that at Utrecht University,.

  19. Revealing the Mechanism of Low-Energy Electron Yield Enhancement from Sensitizing Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey V; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    We provide a physical explanation for enhancement of the low-energy electron production by sensitizing nanoparticles due to irradiation by fast ions. It is demonstrated that a significant increase in the number of emitted electrons arises from the collective electron excitations in the nanoparticle. We predict a new mechanism of the yield enhancement due to the plasmon excitations and quantitatively estimate its contribution to the electron production. Revealing the nanoscale mechanism of the electron yield enhancement, we provide an efficient tool for evaluating the yield of emitted electron from various sensitizers. It is shown that the number of low-energy electrons generated by the gold and platinum nanoparticles of a given size exceeds that produced by the equivalent volume of water and by other metallic (e.g., gadolinium) nanoparticles by an order of magnitude. This observation emphasizes the sensitization effect of the noble metal nanoparticles and endorses their application in novel technologies of ca...

  20. Monte Carlo analysis of accelerator-driven systems studies on spallation neutron yield and energy gain

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Westmeier, W; Bamblevski, V P; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A N; Wan, J S; Odoj, R

    2001-01-01

    The neutron yield in the interaction of protons with lead and uranium targets has been studied using the LAHET code system. The dependence of the neutron multiplicity on target dimensions and proton energy has been calculated and the dependence of the energy amplification on the proton energy has been investigated in an accelerator-driven system of a given effective multiplication coefficient. Some of the results are compared with experimental findings and with similar calculations by the DCM/CEM code of Dubna and the FLUKA code system used in CERN. (14 refs).

  1. X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Bondar, A; Dolgov, A; Shekhtman, L; Sokolov, A

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide reference data on X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid Ar to the studies in the field of Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) for rare-event experiments, based on noble-gas liquids. We present the results of two related researches. First, the X-ray recombination coefficients in the energy range of 10-1000 keV and ionization yields at different electric fields are determined in liquid Ar, based on the results of a dedicated experiment. Second, the energy spectra of pulsed X-rays in liquid Ar in the energy range of 15-40 keV, obtained in given experiments including that with the two-phase CRAD, are interpreted and compared to those calculated using a dedicated computer program, to correctly determine the incident X-ray energy. The X-ray recombination coefficients and ionization yields have for the first time been presented for liquid Ar in systematic way.

  2. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Goetzke, L W; Anthony, M; Plante, G; Weber, M

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV/cm. Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anti-correlated above 3 keV, and that the field dependence becomes negligible below 6 keV. However, below 3 keV we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  3. X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dolgov, A. [Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-21

    The main purpose of this work is to provide reference data on X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid Ar to the studies in the field of Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) for rare-event and other experiments, based on liquid Ar detectors. We present the results of two related researches. First, the X-ray recombination coefficients in the energy range of 10–1000 keV and ionization yields at different electric fields, between 0.6 and 2.3 kV/cm, are determined in liquid Ar based on the results of a dedicated experiment. Second, the energy spectra of pulsed X-rays in liquid Ar in the energy range of 15−40 keV, obtained in given experiments including that with the two-phase CRAD, are interpreted and compared to those calculated using a computer program, to correctly determine the absorbed X-ray energy. The X-ray recombination coefficients and ionization yields have for the first time been presented for liquid Ar in systematic way.

  4. Effects of fatty acid supplements on milk yield and energy balance of lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvatine, K J; Allen, M S

    2006-03-01

    Saturated and unsaturated fatty acid supplements (FS) were evaluated for effects on yield of milk and milk components, concentration of milk components including milk fatty acid profile, and energy balance. Eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated cows and 8 noncannulated cows were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design experiment with 21-d periods. Treatments were control and a linear substitution of 2.5% fatty acids from saturated FS (SAT; prilled, hydrogenated free fatty acids) for partially unsaturated FS (UNS; calcium soaps of long-chain fatty acids). The SAT treatment did not change milk fat concentration, but UNS linearly decreased milk fat in cannulated cows and tended to decrease milk fat in noncannulated cows compared with control. Milk fat depression with UNS corresponded to increased concentrations of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid and trans C18:1 fatty acids in milk. Milk fat profile was similar for SAT and control, but UNS decreased concentration of short- and medium-chain FA. Digestible energy intake tended to decrease linearly with increasing unsaturated FS in cannulated and noncannulated cows. Increasing unsaturated FS linearly increased empty body weight and net energy gain in cannulated cows, whereas increasing saturated FS linearly increased plasma insulin. Efficiency of conversion of digestible energy to milk tended to decrease linearly with increasing unsaturated FS for cannulated cows only. Addition of SAT provided little benefit to production and energy balance, whereas UNS decreased energy intake and milk energy yield.

  5. A new formula for sputtering yield as function of ion energies at normal incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, Kh. I.; Shaltout, A. A.; Ali, S. S.; Boutros, R. M.; El-behery, K. M.; El-Sayed, Z. A.

    2010-04-01

    The statistical ellipsoidal construction has been reconstructed into the statistical conicoidal construction, to describe the sputtering yield, at normal incidence, for various ion energies. The most important advantage of the new volume is the developing of a simple-single equation to describe the sputtering-energy relationship. Its parameters have been pictorially predicted from the conicoidal representation. A correction term [1-( E th/E i) 1/ Ω] was added to the present new equation to describe the threshold energy ( E th) of sputtering. The developed equation could be applied to all available ion/target combinations, over a broadened range of energy for low and heavy ion-masses. The new equation has been differentiated with respect to energy giving rise to a relation between the threshold energy and maximum energy, at which the maximum sputtering yield occurs. It was found that, the obtained theoretical sputtering data for low and heavy ions satisfactorily approaches the available experimental data and works well at the threshold regime. It should be mentioned that the conicoidal model is not only of interest for analytical glow discharge method but also for ion beam method for the sputtering process, where low and high sputtering values could occur.

  6. Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

    2007-03-31

    Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

  7. Development of High Yield Feedstocks and Biomass Conversion Technology for Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Andrew G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Crow, Susan [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); DeBeryshe, Barbara [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ha, Richard [Hamakua Springs County Farms, Hilo, HI (United States); Jakeway, Lee [Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company, Puunene, HI (United States); Khanal, Samir [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Nakahata, Mae [Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company, Puunene, HI (United States); Ogoshi, Richard [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Shimizu, Erik [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Stern, Ivette [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turano, Brian [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turn, Scott [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Yanagida, John [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This project had two main goals. The first goal was to evaluate several high yielding tropical perennial grasses as feedstock for biofuel production, and to characterize the feedstock for compatible biofuel production systems. The second goal was to assess the integration of renewable energy systems for Hawaii. The project focused on high-yield grasses (napiergrass, energycane, sweet sorghum, and sugarcane). Field plots were established to evaluate the effects of elevation (30, 300 and 900 meters above sea level) and irrigation (50%, 75% and 100% of sugarcane plantation practice) on energy crop yields and input. The test plots were extensive monitored including: hydrologic studies to measure crop water use and losses through seepage and evapotranspiration; changes in soil carbon stock; greenhouse gas flux (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from the soil surface; and root morphology, biomass, and turnover. Results showed significant effects of environment on crop yields. In general, crop yields decrease as the elevation increased, being more pronounced for sweet sorghum and energycane than napiergrass. Also energy crop yields were higher with increased irrigation levels, being most pronounced with energycane and less so with sweet sorghum. Daylight length greatly affected sweet sorghum growth and yields. One of the energy crops (napiergrass) was harvested at different ages (2, 4, 6, and 8 months) to assess the changes in feedstock characteristics with age and potential to generate co-products. Although there was greater potential for co-products from younger feedstock, the increased production was not sufficient to offset the additional cost of harvesting multiple times per year. The feedstocks were also characterized to assess their compatibility with biochemical and thermochemical conversion processes. The project objectives are being continued through additional support from the Office of Naval Research, and the Biomass Research and Development

  8. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor.

  9. 5. Kassel symposium on energy systems engineering: On-site energy generation using renewable energy sources. Proceedings 2000; 5. Kasseler Symposium: Energie-Systemtechnik. Erneuerbare Energien- und rationelle Energieverwendung. Dezentrale Energieversorgung mit hohem regenerativen Anteil. Tagungsband 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R. (comp.)

    2000-07-01

    The focal topic of the 5th Kassel Symposium on Energy Systems Engineering was ''Decentralised energy supply with a high share of renewable energies''. The contributions covered a wide range of issues including the potential of renewable energies, supply and operating concepts, components, systems engineering and future perspectives. [German] Das 5. Kasseler Symposium Energie-Systemtechnik legt seinen Schwerpunkt auf das Thema: 'Dezentrale Energieversorgung mit hohem regenerativem Anteil'. Es spannt hierzu einen Bogen von den Potenzialen der Erneuerbaren Energien ueber Versorgungs- und Betriebsfuehrungskonzepte sowie Komponenten und Systemtechnik bis hin zu zukuenftigen Perspektiven. (orig.)

  10. Training Centers for Onsite Wastewater Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsite wastewater training centers offer classes, demonstration projects and research facilities for onsite industry professionals. Classes include wastewater management, new technologies and pre-licensing.

  11. Mapping Alfalfa Yield Using an Energy Monitoring System on a Rectangular Hay Baler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hooshmand

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The most advanced part of precision agriculture technology is yield monitoring of grain and non-grain crops. In this study, the horizontal pressing force of baling plunger and the angular position of the plunger connecting rod were simultaneously measured by installing a load cell and a shaft encoder on the connecting rod and plunger flywheel of a small rectangular baler, respectively. The signals of these sensors were processed in an electronic board and the output data were recorded on a portable computer for monitoring and further analysis. Before baling the harvested alfalfa from the test field, random samples were collected and weighted to obtain a referenced measure of the yield variation along the entire field. Comparing the yield data with the pressing energy and angular position data indicated a good correlation between the throughput rate of the baler and the horizontal force imparted on the baler plunger. The estimated crop yield variations were geo-referenced by using a GPS receiver. By combining the output data of the installed sensors and the positioning data, the yield map of the test field was prepared.

  12. Model of Yield Response of Corn to Plant Population and Absorption of Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Allen R.; Scholtz, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha−1 and g plant−1) on plant population (plants m−2). Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L.) grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Ym (Mg ha−1) for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m2 plant−1) for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, xc = 1/c (plants m−2). The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of xc were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species. PMID:21297960

  13. Model of yield response of corn to plant population and absorption of solar energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen R Overman

    Full Text Available Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha(-1 and g plant(-1 on plant population (plants m(-2. Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L. grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Y(m (Mg ha(-1 for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m(2 plant(-1 for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, x(c = 1/c (plants m(-2. The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of x(c were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species.

  14. Investigating energy partitioning during photosynthesis using an expanded quantum yield convention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Peers, Graham; Li, Zhirong; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2009-02-01

    In higher plants, regulation of excess absorbed light is essential for their survival and fitness, as it enables avoidance of a build up of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species. Regulation processes (known as non-photochemical quenching; NPQ) can be monitored by steady-state fluorescence on intact plant leaves. Pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence have been used for over 20 years to evaluate the amount of NPQ and photochemistry (PC). Recently, a quantum yield representation of NPQ ( ΦNPQ), which incorporates a variable fraction of open reaction centers, was proposed by Hendrickson et al. [L. Hendrickson, R.T. Furbank, W.S. Chow, Photosynth. Res. 82 (2004) 73]. In this work we extend the quantum yield approach to describe the yields of reversible energy-dependent quenching ( ΦqE), state transitions to balance PC between photosystems II and I ( ΦqT), and photoinhibition quenching associated with damaged reaction centers ( ΦqI). We showed the additivity of the various quantum yield components of NPQ through experiments on wild-type and npq1 strains of Arabidopsis thaliana. The quantum yield approach enables comparison of ΦqE with data from a variety of techniques used to investigate the mechanism of qE. We showed that ΦqE for a series of A. thaliana genotypes scales linearly with the magnitude of zeaxanthin cation formation, suggesting that charge-transfer quenching is largely responsible for qE in plants.

  15. Enhancing biomass energy yield from pilot-scale high rate algal ponds with recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates the effect of recycling on biomass energy yield in High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs). Two 8 m(3) pilot-scale HRAPs treating primary settled sewage were operated in parallel and monitored over a 2-year period. Volatile suspended solids were measured from both HRAPs and their gravity settlers to determine biomass productivity and harvest efficiency. The energy content of the biomass was also measured. Multiplying biomass productivity and harvest efficiency gives the 'harvestable biomass productivity' and multiplying this by the energy content defines the actual 'biomass energy yield'. In Year 1, algal recycling was implemented in one of the ponds (HRAPr) and improved harvestable biomass productivity by 58% compared with the control (HRAPc) without recycling (HRAPr: 9.2 g/m(2)/d; HRAPc: 5.8 g/m(2)/d). The energy content of the biomass grown in HRAPr, which was dominated by Pediastrun boryanum, was 25% higher than the control HRAPc which contained a mixed culture of 4-5 different algae (HRAPr: 21.5 kJ/g; HRAPc: 18.6 kJ/g). In Year 2, HRAPc was then seeded with the biomass harvested from the P. boryanum dominated HRAPr. This had the effect of shifting algal dominance from 89% Dictyosphaerium sp. (which is poorly-settleable) to over 90% P. boryanum in 5 months. Operation of this pond was then switched to recycling its own harvested biomass, which maintained P. boryanum dominance for the rest of Year 2. This result confirms, for the first time in the literature, that species control is possible for similarly sized co-occurring algal colonies in outdoor HRAP by algal recycling. With regard to the overall improvement in biomass energy yield, which is a critical parameter in the context of algal cultivation for biofuels, the combined improvements that recycling triggered in biomass productivity, harvest efficiency and energy content enhanced the harvested biomass energy yield by 66% (HRAPr: 195 kJ/m(2)/day; HRAPc: 118 kJ/m(2)/day). Copyright © 2013

  16. Slow pyrolysis of rice straw: analysis of products properties, carbon and energy yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinje; Lee, Yongwoon; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Young-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Among many uses of rice straw, application of its biochar from pyrolysis to the soil is receiving greater interest for increased crop productivity and sequestration of CO2. This study investigated slow pyrolysis of rice straw at 300-700°C to characterize the yields and detailed composition of the biochar, bio-oil and non-condensable gases. Biochar was analyzed for pH, microscopic surface area and pore volume distribution. Although the mass yield for the organic fraction was only about 25% above 500°C, biochar was the primary product of pyrolysis containing 40% of energy and 45% of carbon from the straw. The utilization of by-products (bio-oil and gases) as energy resources was essential, since the sum of energy yield was about 60%. The gases could be burned to produce the heat for an auto-thermal pyrolysis process, but the heat balance was significantly influenced by the moisture content of the raw material.

  17. Holographic lens spectrum splitting photovoltaic system for increased diffuse collection and annual energy yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorndran, Shelby D.; Wu, Yuechen; Ayala, Silvana; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2015-09-01

    Concentrating and spectrum splitting photovoltaic (PV) modules have a limited acceptance angle and thus suffer from optical loss under off-axis illumination. This loss manifests itself as a substantial reduction in energy yield in locations where a significant portion of insulation is diffuse. In this work, a spectrum splitting PV system is designed to efficiently collect and convert light in a range of illumination conditions. The system uses a holographic lens to concentrate shortwavelength light onto a smaller, more expensive indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) PV cell. The high efficiency PV cell near the axis is surrounded with silicon (Si), a less expensive material that collects a broader portion of the solar spectrum. Under direct illumination, the device achieves increased conversion efficiency from spectrum splitting. Under diffuse illumination, the device collects light with efficiency comparable to a flat-panel Si module. Design of the holographic lens is discussed. Optical efficiency and power output of the module under a range of illumination conditions from direct to diffuse are simulated with non-sequential raytracing software. Using direct and diffuse Typical Metrological Year (TMY3) irradiance measurements, annual energy yield of the module is calculated for several installation sites. Energy yield of the spectrum splitting module is compared to that of a full flat-panel Si reference module.

  18. Calculation of Apparent Activation Energy of Coal Oxidation at Low Temperatures by Measuring CO Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By analyzing previous studies on activation energy of coal oxidation at low temperatures, a theoretical calculation model of apparent activation energy is established. Yield of CO is measured by using the characteristic detector of coal oxidation at 30-90 ℃. The impact of parameters, such as airflow and particle size, on activation energies is analyzed. Finally, agreement was obtained between activation energies and the dynamic oxygen absorbed in order to test the accuracy of the model. The results show that: 1) a positive exponential relation between concentration of CO and temperature in the process of the experiment is obtained: increases are almost identical and the initial CO is low; 2) the apparent activation energies increase gradually with the sizes of particle at the same airflow, but the gradients increase at a decreasing rate; 3) the apparent activation energies increase linearly with airflow. For the five coal particles, the differences among the energies are relatively high when the airflow was low, but the differences were low when the airflow was high; 4) the optimum sizes of particle, 0.125-0.25 mm, and the optimum volume of airflow, 100 mL/min, are determined from the model; 5) the apparent activation energies decrease with an increase in oxygen absorbed. A negative exponential relation between the two is obtained.

  19. Metabolic energy-based modelling explains product yielding in anaerobic mixed culture fermentations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca González-Cabaleiro

    Full Text Available The fermentation of glucose using microbial mixed cultures is of great interest given its potential to convert wastes into valuable products at low cost, however, the difficulties associated with the control of the process still pose important challenges for its industrial implementation. A deeper understanding of the fermentation process involving metabolic and biochemical principles is very necessary to overcome these difficulties. In this work a novel metabolic energy based model is presented that accurately predicts for the first time the experimentally observed changes in product spectrum with pH. The model predicts the observed shift towards formate production at high pH, accompanied with ethanol and acetate production. Acetate (accompanied with a more reduced product and butyrate are predicted main products at low pH. The production of propionate between pH 6 and 8 is also predicted. These results are mechanistically explained for the first time considering the impact that variable proton motive potential and active transport energy costs have in terms of energy harvest over different products yielding. The model results, in line with numerous reported experiments, validate the mechanistic and bioenergetics hypotheses that fermentative mixed cultures products yielding appears to be controlled by the principle of maximum energy harvest and the necessity of balancing the redox equivalents in absence of external electron acceptors.

  20. Characteristics of persistent spin current components in a quasi-periodic Fibonacci ring with spin-orbit interactions: Prediction of spin-orbit coupling and on-site energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Moumita; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we investigate the behavior of all three components of persistent spin current in a quasi-periodic Fibonacci ring subjected to Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. Analogous to persistent charge current in a conducting ring where electrons gain a Berry phase in presence of magnetic flux, spin Berry phase is associated during the motion of electrons in presence of a spin-orbit field which is responsible for the generation of spin current. The interplay between two spin-orbit fields along with quasi-periodic Fibonacci sequence on persistent spin current is described elaborately, and from our analysis, we can estimate the strength of any one of two spin-orbit couplings together with on-site energy, provided the other is known.

  1. High-Yield Lithium-Injection Fusion-Energy (HYLIFE) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blink, J.A.; Hogam, W.J.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, E.R.; Pitts, J.H. (comps.)

    1985-12-23

    The High-Yield Lithium-Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept to convent inertial confinement fusion energy into electric power has undergone intensive research and refinement at LLNL since 1978. This paper reports on the final HYLIFE design, focusing on five major areas: the HYLIFE reaction chamber (which includes neutronics, liquid-metal jet-array hydrocynamics, and structural design), supporting systems, primary steam system and balance of plant, safety and environmental protection, and costs. An annotated bibliography of reports applicable to HYLIFE is also provided. We conclude that HYLIFE is a particularly viable concept for the safe, clean production of electrical energy. The liquid-metal jet array, HYLIFE's key design feature, protects the surrounding structural components from x-rays, fusion fuel-pellet debris, neutron damage and activation, and high temperatures and stresses, allowing the structure to last for the plant's entire 30-year lifetime without being replaced. 127 refs., 18 figs.

  2. Determination of the shape factor of (90)Sr by means of the cutoff energy yield method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau Carles, A; Kossert, K; Grau Malonda, A

    2008-01-01

    Usually, Kurie plots are used to analyze beta-spectra shape-factor functions measured by means of semiconductor and magnetic spectrometers. A drawback of these techniques is the occurrence of self-absorption within the samples through which the emission spectrum is altered. In liquid-scintillation samples self-absorption does not occur, but the poor energy resolution makes the analysis of the spectra difficult. To overcome this problem, two resolution-invariant observables are used for determining the shape-factor function of (90)Sr: (1) the maximum point energy and (2) the cutoff energy yield. The measured shape-factor function of (90)Sr agrees with the one which is predicted by theory for the first-forbidden unique transition.

  3. Metabolic engineering of biomass for high energy density: oilseed-like triacylglycerol yields from plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhercke, Thomas; El Tahchy, Anna; Liu, Qing; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Shrestha, Pushkar; Divi, Uday K; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Mansour, Maged P; Nichols, Peter D; James, Christopher N; Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D; Beaudoin, Frederic; Ruiz-López, Noemi; Larkin, Philip J; de Feyter, Robert C; Singh, Surinder P; Petrie, James R

    2014-02-01

    High biomass crops have recently attracted significant attention as an alternative platform for the renewable production of high energy storage lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG). While TAG typically accumulates in seeds as storage compounds fuelling subsequent germination, levels in vegetative tissues are generally low. Here, we report the accumulation of more than 15% TAG (17.7% total lipids) by dry weight in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) leaves by the co-expression of three genes involved in different aspects of TAG production without severely impacting plant development. These yields far exceed the levels found in wild-type leaf tissue as well as previously reported engineered TAG yields in vegetative tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana and N. tabacum. When translated to a high biomass crop, the current levels would translate to an oil yield per hectare that exceeds those of most cultivated oilseed crops. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and mass spectrometry imaging confirmed the accumulation of TAG within leaf mesophyll cells. In addition, we explored the applicability of several existing oil-processing methods using fresh leaf tissue. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of a vegetative plant oil production platform and provide for a step change in the bioenergy landscape, opening new prospects for sustainable food, high energy forage, biofuel and biomaterial applications.

  4. Naked oats: metabolisable energy yield from a range of varieties in broilers, cockerels and turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, M G; Valentine, J; Cowan, A; Wade, A; McNeill, L; Bernard, K

    2008-05-01

    1. Naked oats belong to the same species as 'common oats', Avena sativa, but have a non-lignified husk which readily becomes detached during harvesting. The absence of the indigestible husk can be predicted to give an increased metabolisable energy (ME) content for poultry. 2. Measurements of true metabolisable energy (TME(N)) were performed on 3-week-old broiler chicks (Cobb males), adult cockerels (ISA Brown, greater than one year old) and 7-week-old turkeys (BUT T8 males). The measurements were repeated in 2000, 2001 and 2002, with some measurements on a subset of varieties in 2004. 3. High-oil naked oat lines yielded 12% more energy (TME(N)) than wheat. Naked oats, excluding the experimental high-oil lines, yielded 8.5% more energy than simultaneously assayed wheat samples. 4. In samples from the 2004 harvest, conventional oats gave TME(N) values about 13% lower than those of wheat. 5. The addition of beta-glucanase produced an increase of about 4% in the apparent metabolisable energy (AME) of oats for broiler chickens. This effect was associated with a 70% decrease in the jejunal viscosity of broilers receiving a 500 g/kg naked-oat diet. 6. The oil content of naked oats was about 5 times greater than that of wheat, with the high-oil lines rising to more than 6 times greater. Naked oats had a lower starch content than wheat but not sufficiently lower to negate the energy benefits of the higher oil content. The crude protein (CP) contents of naked oats were similar to those of wheat, with the high-oil varieties tending to be higher in CP also.

  5. Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

  6. Investigating energy partitioning during photosynthesis using an expanded quantum yield convention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Tae Kyu [Department of Chemistry, Hildebrand B77, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Avenson, Thomas J. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 (United States); Peers, Graham; Li Zhirong [Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 (United States); Dall' Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto [Department of Science and Technology, University of Verona, Verona 37134 (Italy); Niyogi, Krishna K. [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, 111 Koshland Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3102 (United States)], E-mail: niyogi@nature.berkeley.edu; Fleming, Graham R. [Department of Chemistry, Hildebrand B77, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: GRFleming@lbl.gov

    2009-02-23

    In higher plants, regulation of excess absorbed light is essential for their survival and fitness, as it enables avoidance of a build up of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species. Regulation processes (known as non-photochemical quenching; NPQ) can be monitored by steady-state fluorescence on intact plant leaves. Pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence have been used for over 20 years to evaluate the amount of NPQ and photochemistry (PC). Recently, a quantum yield representation of NPQ ({phi}{sub NPQ}), which incorporates a variable fraction of open reaction centers, was proposed by Hendrickson et al. [L. Hendrickson, R.T. Furbank, W.S. Chow, Photosynth. Res. 82 (2004) 73]. In this work we extend the quantum yield approach to describe the yields of reversible energy-dependent quenching ({phi}{sub qE}), state transitions to balance PC between photosystems II and I ({phi}{sub qT}), and photoinhibition quenching associated with damaged reaction centers ({phi}{sub qI}). We showed the additivity of the various quantum yield components of NPQ through experiments on wild-type and npq1 strains of Arabidopsis thaliana. The quantum yield approach enables comparison of {phi}{sub qE} with data from a variety of techniques used to investigate the mechanism of qE. We showed that {phi}{sub qE} for a series of A. thaliana genotypes scales linearly with the magnitude of zeaxanthin cation formation, suggesting that charge-transfer quenching is largely responsible for qE in plants.

  7. Yield-Energy Dependence for 147Nd and 144Ce Under Strong Neutron Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN; Jing; LIU; Ting-jin; SUN; Zheng-jun; SHU; Neng-chuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>The data of the fission product yield play an important role in the nuclear science technology and nuclear engineering because they are the key data in the calculation of the decay heat, shield design, nuclear verification, radiochemistry reprocessing and nuclear safety, etc. Especially, it is the essential data in fission power estimation for a fission device. It is well known that there exists a consecutive neutron spectrum with the energy from 1 keV to 15 MeV for a fission-fusion device. So in order to estimate the

  8. Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mtunzi Busiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy of photovoltaic modules drops by 0.5% for each degree increase in temperature. Direct water cooling of photovoltaic modules was found to give improved electrical and thermal yield. A prototype was put in place to analyse the field data for a period of a year. The results showed an initial high performance ratio and electrical power output. The monthly energy saving efficiency of the directly water cooled module was found to be approximately 61%. The solar utilisation of the naturally cooled photovoltaic module was found to be 8.79% and for the directly water cooled module its solar utilisation was 47.93%. Implementation of such systems on households may reduce the load from the utility company, bring about huge savings on electricity bills and help in reducing carbon emissions.

  9. Energy Yield Prediction of Offshore Wind Farm Clusters at the EERA-DTOC European Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantero, E.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2014-01-01

    third-party models. Wake models have been benchmarked on the Horns Rev and, currently, on the Lilgrund wind farm test cases. Dedicated experiments from ‘BARD Offshore 1’ wind farm will using scanning lidars will produce new data for the validation of wake models. Furthermore, the project includes power...... plant interconnection and energy yield models all interrelated with a simplified cost model for the evaluation of layout scenarios. The overall aim is to produce an efficient, easy to use and flexible tool - to facilitate the optimised design of individual and clusters of offshore wind farms......, the offshore wind resource assessment process has been reviewed as well as the sources of uncertainty associated to each step. Methodologies for the assessment of offshore gross annual energy production are analyzed based on the Fino 1 test case. Measured data and virtual data from Numerical Weather Prediction...

  10. Study of Relationship Between Neutron Energy and Fission Yields of 95Zr, 140Ba and 147Nd From 235U

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This work measures fission yields of 235U induced by neutrons with energy of thermal, 3.0, 5.0, 5.5, 8.0 and 14.8 MeV. The main purpose is to study the relationship between neutron energy and fission fields of 95Zr,140Ba and 147Nd from 235U by measuring the radioactivity of foil with direct gamma spectrometry. The fission yields induced by fast neutrons are get by fast-thermal-ratio method which based on yields from thermal neutrons, yields by thermal neutron are come from absolute measurement. Since fast-thermal-ratio method eliminates uncertainties of gamma intensity, gamma

  11. Analysis of the binder yield energy test as an indicator of fatigue behaviour of asphalt mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Johan; Mturi, Georges A. J.; Komba, Julius; Du Plessis, Louw

    2017-09-01

    Empirical binder testing has increasingly failed to predict pavement performance in South Africa, with fatigue cracking being one of the major forms of premature pavement distress. In response, it has become a national aspiration to incorporate a performance related fatigue test into the binder specifications for South Africa. The Binder Yield Energy Test (BYET) was the first in a series of tests analysed for its potential to predict the fatigue performance of the binder. The test is performed with the dynamic shear rheometer, giving two key parameters, namely, yield energy and shear strain at maximum shear stress (γτmax). The objective of the investigation was to perform a rudimentary evaluation of the BYET; followed by a more in-depth investigation should the initial BYET results prove promising. The paper discusses the results generated from the BYET under eight different conditions, using six different binders. The results are then correlated with four point bending beam fatigue test results obtained from asphalt mix samples that were manufactured from the same binders. Final results indicate that the BYET is not ideal as an indicator of fatigue performance.

  12. Radiatively corrected lepton energy distributions in top quark decays t {yields} bW{sup +} {yields} b(l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}) and t {yields} bH{sup +} {yields} b({tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) and single charged prong energy distributions from subsequent {tau}{sup +} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kuraev, Eduard A.; Bystritskiy, Yury M. [JINR-BLTP, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    We calculate the QED and QCD radiative corrections to the charged lepton energy distributions in the dominant semileptonic decays of the top quark t{yields}bW{sup +}{yields}b(l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}) (l=e,{mu},{tau}) in the standard model (SM), and for the decay t{yields}bH{sup +}{yields}b({tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) in an extension of the SM having a charged Higgs boson H{sup {+-}} with m{sub H}{sup {+-}}{sup <}m{sub t}-m{sub b}. The QCD corrections are calculated in the leading and next-to-leading logarithmic approximations, but the QED corrections are considered in the leading logarithmic approximation only. These corrections are numerically important for precisely testing the universality of the charged current weak interactions in t-quark decays. As the {tau}{sup +} leptons arising from the decays W{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and H{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} are predominantly left- and right-polarised, respectively, influencing the energy distributions of the decay products in the subsequent decays of the {tau}{sup +}, we work out the effect of the radiative corrections on such distributions in the dominant (one-charged prong) decay channels {tau}{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}},{rho}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}},a{sub 1}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}} and l{sup +}{nu}{sub l} anti {nu}{sub {tau}}. The inclusive {pi}{sup +} energy spectra in the decay chains t{yields}b(W{sup +},H{sup +}){yields}b({tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}){yields}b({pi}{sup +} anti {nu}{sub {tau}}{nu}{sub {tau}}+X) are calculated, which can help in searching for the induced H{sup {+-}} effects at the Tevatron and the LHC. (orig.)

  13. Creation of High-Yield Polyhydroxyalkanoates Engineered Strains by Low Energy Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shiquan; Cheng, Ying; Zhu, Suwen; Cheng, Beijiu

    2008-12-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), as a candidate for biodegradable plastic materials, can be synthesized by numerous microorganisms. However, as its production cost is high in comparison with those of chemically synthesized plastics, a lot of research has been focused on the efficient production of PHAs using different methods. In the present study, the mutation effects of PHAs production in strain pCB4 were investigated with implantation of low energy ions. It was found that under the implantation conditions of 7.8 × 1014 N+/cm2 at 10 keV, a high-yield PHAs strain with high genetic stability was generated from many mutants. After optimizing its fermentation conditions, the biomass, PHAs concentration and PHAs content of pCBH4 reached 2.26 g/L, 1.81 g/L, and 80.08% respectively, whereas its wild type controls were about 1.24 g/L, 0.61 g/L, and 49.20%. Moreover, the main constituent of PHAs was identified as poly-3-hydroxybutyrates (PHB) in the mutant stain and the yield of this compound was increased up to 41.33% in contrast to that of 27.78% in the wild type strain.

  14. Creation of High-Yield Polyhydroxyalkanoates Engineered Strains by Low Energy Ion Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shiquan; CHENG Ying; ZHU Suwen; CHENG Beijiu

    2008-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), as a candidate for biodegradable plastic materials, can be synthesized by numerous microorganisms. However, as its production cost is high in comparison with those of chemically synthesized plastics, a lot of research has been focused on the efficient production of PHAs using different methods. In the present study, the mutation effects of PHAs production in strain pCB4 were investigated with implantation of low energy ions. It was found that under the implantation conditions of 7.8×1014 N+/cm2 at 10 keV, a high-yield PHAs strain with high genetic stability was generated from many mutants. After optimizing its fermentation conditions, the biomass, PHAs concentration and PHAs content of pCBH4reached 2.26 g/L, 1.81 g/L, and 80.08% respectively, whereas its wild type controls were about 1.24 g/L, 0.61 g/L, and 49.20%. Moreover, the main constituent of PHAs was identified as poly-3-hydroxybutyrates (PHB) in the mutant stain and the yield of this compound was increased up to 41.33% in contrast to that of 27.78% in the wild type strain.

  15. Theoretical and experimental studies of the neutron rich fission product yields at intermediate energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Äystö J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method to measure the fission product independent yields employing the ion guide technique and a Penning trap as a precision mass filter, which allows an unambiguous identification of the nuclides is presented. The method was used to determine the independent yields in the proton-induced fission of 232Th and 238U at 25 MeV. The data were analyzed with the consistent model for description of the fission product formation cross section at the projectile energies up to 100 MeV. Pre-compound nucleon emission is described with the two-component exciton model using Monte Carlo method. Decay of excited compound nuclei is treated within time-dependent statistical model with inclusion of the nuclear friction effect. The charge distribution of the primary fragment isobaric chain was considered as a result of frozen quantal fluctuations of the isovector nuclear density. The theoretical predictions of the independent fission product cross sections are used for normalization of the measured fission product isotopic distributions.

  16. Efficient on-site construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Hvam, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This research aims to analyse the implementation of a German platform for housing projects through a successful case on modern methods of construction featuring efficient on-site construction. Through continuous development, the platform has been carefully designed to suit a carefully s...

  17. YIELD OF ENERGY AND PROTEIN FROM GRAIN MAIZE HYBRIDS USING AGROTECHNICAL SYSTEM, OPTIMAL FOR THE CONDITIONS IN THE PLOVDIV REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANYA DELIBALTOVA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The yields of metabolizable energy for ducks and protein, so as the multiplication effect by different varieties of maize have been investigated. For the conditions in the Plovdiv region the hybrid PR35P12 had the highest yield of crude protein - 1368 kg/ha, and metabolizable energy – AME- 171,5 GJ/ha and TME – 181,3 GJ/ha. The highest multiplication effect (protein yield/crude protein applied by seed material – showed hybrid PR35P12 - +403.3.

  18. Feasibility of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) for onsite sanitation and resource recovery (nutrients, energy and water) in urban slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Robert A; Ozcan, Onur Y; Ozcan, Onur O; Calabria, Jorge L; Dick, George H; Yeh, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Slums are challenging locations for sanitation technologies. High population densities, a lack of water and electricity infrastructure, and space constraints combine to ensure that many traditional waste treatment technologies fail when implemented in this context. This paper proposes the use of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) for slum sanitation. AnMBRs allow for localized water reuse, high quality treatment, and energy production at the point of treatment. A water, energy, nutrient, and mass balance was conducted on a theoretical AnMBR directly coupled to a public toilet. The combined system would be capable of recycling its water for use in toilet flushing and would be capable of providing enough energy to power both the toilet and AnMBR operation. The addition of food waste to the feed would help to ensure process stability and energy production by the AnMBR. Ammonia accumulation within the system would have to be managed through struvite precipitation, ion exchange, oxidation, plant uptake or other means. Generated biogas can be converted into heat and/or electricity using small scale gas generators. AnMBR technology has high potential for success in slum settings, if considerations for maintenance and supplies are made as part of the design and system delivery.

  19. 42 CFR 424.517 - Onsite review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Onsite review. 424.517 Section 424.517 Public... Billing Privileges § 424.517 Onsite review. (a) CMS reserves the right, when deemed necessary, to perform onsite review of a provider or supplier to verify that the enrollment information submitted to CMS or...

  20. Genetic correlation between days until start of luteal activity and milk yield, energy balance, and live weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, R.F.; Oldenbroek, J.K.; Gaast, van der H.J.; Werf, van der J.H.J.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate genetic correlations among fertility and measures of energy balance, dry matter intake, and live weight (change). Data from 622 first lactation cows (fed ad libitum a complete ration) included milk, fat, and protein yields; energy balance; and live weights

  1. INCREASING YIELDS AND BROADENING MARKETS: PROCESS INNOVATIONS IN THE MANUFACTURING OF ENERGY-SAVING WINDOW GLAZINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop and implement advanced thin film process technology which would significantly improve the manufacturability of both static and dynamic high performance energy saving coatings for windows. The work done has been aimed at improvements to the process that will result in increases in yield, and this was divided into four main areas, dealing with improvements in substrate preparation methods, reductions in the incidence of problems caused by particulate contamination, use of in-situ optical monitoring to improve process control, and overall system integration to enable simplified, and therefore lower cost operation. Significant progress has been made in each of the areas. In the area of substrate preparation, the enhanced washing techniques which have been developed, in combination with a new inspection technique, have resulted in significant reductions in the number of EC devices which are rejected because of substrate problems. Microscopic inspection of different defects in electrochromic devices showed that many were centered on particles. As a result, process improvements aimed at reducing the incidence of particles throughout the entire process have been implemented. As a result, the average number of defects occurring per unit area has been significantly reduced over the period of this project. The in-situ monitoring techniques developed during this project have become an indispensable part of the processing for EC devices. The deposition of several key layers is controlled as a result of in-situ monitoring, and this has facilitated significant improvements in uniformity and repeatability. Overall system integration has progressed to the stage where the goal of a closed-loop monitoring and control system in within reach, and it is anticipated that this will be achieved during the scale-up phase. There has been a clear increase in the yield occurring over the period of this project (Sept 1999 to September 2003), which is

  2. Energy dependence of sputtering yields of Be, Be-C and Be-W films by Be{sup +}-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, S.N.; Guseva, M.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Neumoin, V.E.; Stoljarova, V.G. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The energy dependence measurements of Be, Be-C and Be-W deposited layer sputtering yields by Be{sup +}-ions were performed. The ion energy was varied in the range (0.3-5.0) keV. The temperature in the process of irradiation was sustained at the level of 670 K. The mixed layers were prepared by simultaneous sputtering of pair targets, Be and C, Be and W, and Be-targets with Ar{sup +}- and Be{sup +}-ions and codeposition of the sputtered atoms on silicon collectors The codeposited layer thickness was changed in the range of (500-1000) nm. The content of oxigen in the Be, Be-C, Be-W deposited layers did not exceed 20 at.%. The mixed layer sputtering yields were compared with the experimental and calculated data, obtained for the self-sputtering yields of beryllium and carbon. It was found that the sputtering yields of the Be-C and Be deposited layers by Be{sup +}-ions in the energy range (0.3-5.0) keV are within the range between the corresponding self-sputtering yields for Be and C. The sputtering yields for the mixture Be-W are close to the corresponding self-sputtering yields of beryllium. (author)

  3. Wind shear coefficients, roughness length and energy yield over coastal locations in Southern Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Giovanni [Research National Council-Institute for Biometeorology (CNR-IBIMET), Via Caproni 8, 50145 Firenze (Italy); Secci, Sauro [Fedi Impianti Srl, Via Caduti di Cefalonia, 31, 50127 Firenze (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    In the present work a computation of wind shear coefficients (WSCs) based on 1-h measured wind data has been performed by three stations located over coastal sites in Southern Italy, i.e., Brindisi (BR), Portoscuso (PS) and Termini Imerese (TI). Wind observations have been collected through a 6-year period (January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2002) by wind mast recording at the same two sensor heights (i.e., 10 and 50 m AGL), thus enabling a proper wind profile analysis. WSC overall mean values were found to be 0.271 at BR, 0.232 at PS, and 0.150 at TI. In addition, a detailed analysis has been carried out to describe the WSC yearly, monthly and diurnal variation, as well as by wind direction. The characteristics of z{sub 0} surface roughness length have been also investigated as an estimate for neutral stability conditions only, resulting in overall mean values of 0.526 m at BR, 0.287 m at PS, and 0.027 m at TI. The z{sub 0} variation by year, month and hour of the day, as well as by wind direction, has been analysed, too. The European ''Corine Land Cover 2000'' classification of the study areas has been employed to deeply investigate the land use influence on both WSC and z{sub 0} characteristics as a function of wind direction. Based on temperature and pressure surface measurements, the computation of site-specific mean air density as well as monthly variation has been also performed. Site-related 50-m wind resource has been assessed by means of wind roses and wind speed frequency distributions, as well as Weibull's parameters. The potential turbine-converted wind energy yield has been also investigated, enabling to detect, for each site, the most suitable 50-m hub height turbine model regardless of its rated power. Furthermore, a number of comparisons have been made to assess the discrepancy in 50-m energy yield resulting if using data extrapolated from 10 m, both with 0.143 default and overall mean WSC value, instead of actually 50-m

  4. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for the reversible reaction H + O2 yields HO2(asterisk) yields OH + O. III - Computed points to define a global potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Duchovic, Ronald J.

    1991-01-01

    Computed energies and geometries are reported which, combined with previously published calculations, permit a global representation of the potential energy surface for the reaction H + O2 yields HO2(asterisk) yields OH + O. These new calculations characterize the potential energy surface (PES) for all H atom angles of approach to O2 and for the region of the inner repulsive wall. The region of the T-shaped H-O2 exchange saddle point is connected with the constrained energy minimum (CEM) path, and a new collinear H-O2 exchange saddle point is characterized which lies only 9 kcal/mol above the H + O2 asymptote. A vibrational analysis which utilizes local cubic and quartic polynomial representations of the PES along the CEM path has been carried out. Optimal geometries, energies, and harmonic frequencies are reported along with anharmonic analyses for the O2 and OH asymptotes and for the HO2 minimum region of the PES.

  5. Example of garbage recycling. Pt. 1. On-site energy recovery by microbial treatment of garbage at a shopping mall; Namagomi recycle jirei. 1. Tenpo deno namagomi recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, M.; Tatara, M.; Togo, Y. [Kajima Technical Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-08-05

    A total treatment and energy recovery system for garbage was developed, and has been installed at 2 large-scale shopping malls. The system consists of garbage separation-pretreatment process, thermophilic methane fermentation process, biogas utilization process and secondary treatment system for fermentation effluent. Operational data of the past 2.5 years indicate that the system produces ca. 210 {approx} 240 m{sup 3} of biogas (ca. 66 % methane content) per 1,000 kg garbage treated per day, which is used as a hotwater boiler fuel on the sites. A demonstration project on fuel cell power generation by using the biogas has also been successfully conducted in a pilot-scale garbage treatment system. (author)

  6. Energy inputs-yield relationship and sensitivity analysis of pistachio (Pistacia vera L. production in Markazi Region of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Keshavarz Afshar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pistachio is considered as an important agricultural commodity in Iran and ranks top amongst all exported agricultural products. Conducting an overall energy audit and economic analysis of pistachio production can provide useful information to help implement management strategies for improving energy efficiency. A study was conducted during 2009 and 2010 to evaluate the overall energy inputs and outputs and to perform an economic analysis of pistachio production in the Iranian province of Markazi. The results revealed that the total energy input for pistachio production was 54305 MJ ha-1. Electricity, followed by diesel fuel and nitrogen fertilizer application were the highest contributors to energy input in pistachio orchards. The contribution of direct energy was higher than indirect energy and share of non-renewable energy was more than renewable energy. Net energy, energy use efficiency, energy productivity and specific energy were 7522 MJ ha-1, 0.86, 0.08 kg MJ-1 and 13.69 MJ kg-1, respectively. Econometric model based on Cobb-Douglas function indicated that impacts of electricity, diesel fuel and chemical fertilizer energy inputs on pistachio yield were positive while the impact of machinery was negative. The marginal physical productivity (MPP value for diesel fuel was the highest among other variables, followed by energy inputs related to the chemicals and irrigation water. The results revealed that production of pistachios in Markazi Province, under current management practices, are not energy efficient and efforts should be made to improve energy use efficiency.

  7. New measurement on photon yields from air and the application to the energy estimation of primary cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Nagano, M; Sakaki, N; Ando, K

    2004-01-01

    The air fluorescence technique is used to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR), and to estimate their energy. Of fundamental importance is the photon yield due to excitation by electrons, in air of various densities and temperatures. After our previous report, the experiment has been continued using a Sr90 $\\beta$ source to study the pressure dependence of photon yields for radiation in nitrogen and dry air. The photon yields in 15 wave bands between 300 nm and 430 nm have been determined. The total photon yield between 300 nm and 406 nm (used in most experiments) in air excited by a 0.85 MeV electron is 3.81+-0.13 (+-13 % systematics) photons per meter at 1013 hPa and 20 $^{\\circ}$C. The air density and temperature dependencies of 15 wave bands are given for application to UHECR observations.

  8. On the energy deposition by electrons in air and the accurate determination of the air-fluorescence yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arqueros F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainty in the absolute value of the air-fluorescence yield still puts a severe limit on the accuracy in the primary energy of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. The precise measurement of this parameter in laboratory is in turn conditioned by a careful evaluation of the energy deposited in the experimental collision chamber. In this work we discuss on the calculation of the energy deposition and its accuracy. Results from an upgraded Monte Carlo algorithm that we have developed are compared with those obtained using Geant4, showing excellent agreement. These updated calculations of energy deposition are used to apply some corrections to the available measurements of the absolute fluorescence yield, allowing us to obtain a reliable world average of this important parameter.

  9. Net energy yield and carbon footprint of summer corn under different N fertilizer rates in the North China Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhan-biao; WEN Xin-ya; ZHANG Hai-lin; LU Xiao-hong; CHEN Fu

    2015-01-01

    Excessive use of N fertilizer in intensive agriculture can increase crop yield and at the same time cause high carbon (C) emissions. This study was conducted to determine optimized N fertilizer application for high grain yield and lower C emissions in summer corn (Zea mays L.). A ifeld experiment, including 0 (N0), 75 (N75), 150 (N150), 225 (N225), and 300 (N300) kg N ha–1 treatments, was carried out during 2010–2012 in the North China Plain (NCP). The results showed that grain yield, input energy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and carbon footprint (CF) were al increased with the increase of N rate, except net energy yield (NEY). The treatment of N225 had the highest grain yield (10 364.7 kg ha–1) and NEY (6.8%), but the CF (0.25) was lower than that of N300, which indicates that a rate of 225 kg N ha–1 can be optimal for summer corn in NCP. Comparing GHG emision compontents, N fertilizer (0–51.1%) was the highest and fol owed by electricity for irrigation (19.73–49.35%). We conclude that optimazing N fertilizer application rate and reducing electricity for irrigation are the two key measures to increase crop yield, improve energy efifciency and decrease GHG emissions in corn production.

  10. The realistic energy yield potential of GaAs-on-Si tandem solar cells: a theoretical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haohui; Ren, Zekun; Liu, Zhe; Aberle, Armin G; Buonassisi, Tonio; Peters, Ian Marius

    2015-04-06

    Si based tandem solar cells represent an alternative to traditional compound III-V multijunction cells as a promising way to achieve high efficiencies. A theoretical study on the energy yield of GaAs on Si (GaAs/Si) tandem solar cells is performed to assess their energy yield potential under realistic illumination conditions with varying spectrum. We find that the yield of a 4-terminal contact scheme with thick top cell is more than 15% higher than for a 2-terminal scheme. Furthermore, we quantify the main losses that occur for this type of solar cell under varying spectra. Apart from current mismatch, we find that a significant power loss can be attributed to low irradiance seen by the sub-cells. The study shows that despite non-optimal bandgap combination, GaAs/Si tandem solar cells have the potential to surpass 30% energy conversion efficiency.

  11. Site-Specific Management of Miscanthus Genotypes for Combustion and Anaerobic Digestion: A Comparison of Energy Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Andreas; Nunn, Christopher; Iqbal, Yasir; Van der Weijde, Tim; Wagner, Moritz; Özgüven, Mensure; Tarakanov, Ivan; Kalinina, Olena; Trindade, Luisa M; Clifton-Brown, John; Lewandowski, Iris

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, the perennial C4 grass miscanthus is currently mainly cultivated for energy generation via combustion. In recent years, anaerobic digestion has been identified as a promising alternative utilization pathway. Anaerobic digestion produces a higher-value intermediate (biogas), which can be upgraded to biomethane, stored in the existing natural gas infrastructure and further utilized as a transport fuel or in combined heat and power plants. However, the upgrading of the solid biomass into gaseous fuel leads to conversion-related energy losses, the level of which depends on the cultivation parameters genotype, location, and harvest date. Thus, site-specific crop management needs to be adapted to the intended utilization pathway. The objectives of this paper are to quantify (i) the impact of genotype, location and harvest date on energy yields of anaerobic digestion and combustion and (ii) the conversion losses of upgrading solid biomass into biogas. For this purpose, five miscanthus genotypes (OPM 3, 6, 9, 11, 14), three cultivation locations (Adana, Moscow, Stuttgart), and up to six harvest dates (August-March) were assessed. Anaerobic digestion yielded, on average, 35% less energy than combustion. Genotype, location, and harvest date all had significant impacts on the energy yield. For both, this is determined by dry matter yield and ash content and additionally by substrate-specific methane yield for anaerobic digestion and moisture content for combustion. Averaged over all locations and genotypes, an early harvest in August led to 25% and a late harvest to 45% conversion losses. However, each utilization option has its own optimal harvest date, determined by biomass yield, biomass quality, and cutting tolerance. By applying an autumn green harvest for anaerobic digestion and a delayed harvest for combustion, the conversion-related energy loss was reduced to an average of 18%. This clearly shows that the delayed harvest required to maintain biomass quality

  12. Energy transfer and light yield properties of a new highly loaded indium(III) β-diketonate organic scintillator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C.; Hartmann, F. X.; Motta, D.; Schoenert, S.

    2007-02-01

    We present combined experimental and model studies of the light yield and energy transfer properties of a newly developed high light yield scintillator based on indium(III)-tris(2,4-pentanedionate) in a 2-(4-biphenyl)-5-phenyloxazole (BPO), methoxybenzene organic liquid; of interest to the detection of solar electron neutrino oscillations. Optical measurements are made to understand the energy transfer properties and a model is advanced to treat the unusual conditions of high metal and fluor loadings. Such scintillator types are of interest to the exploration of novel luminescent materials and the development of large-scale detectors for studying fundamental properties of naturally occurring neutrinos.

  13. Onsite Waste Water Treatment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs have evolved from the pit privies used widely throughout history to installations capable of producing a disinfected effluent that is fit for human consumption. Although achieving such a level of effluent quality is seldom necessary, the ability of onsite systems to remove settles able solids, floatable grease and scum, nutrients, and pathogens. From wastewater discharges defines their importance in protecting human health and environmental resources. In the modern era, the typical onsite system has consisted primarily of a septic tank and a soil absorption field, also known as a subsurface wastewater infiltration system, or SWIS. In this manual, such systems are referred to as conventional systems. Septic tanks remove most settle able and floatable material and function as an anaerobic bioreactor that promotes partial digestion of retained organic matter. Septic tank effluent, which contains significant concentrations of pathogens and nutrients, has traditionally been discharged to soil, sand, or other media absorption fields (SWISs for further treatment through biological processes, adsorption, filtration, and infiltration into underlying soils. Conventional systems work well if they are installed in areas with appropriate soils and hydraulic capacities; designed to treat the incoming waste load to meet public health, ground water, and surface water performance standards; installed properly; and maintained to ensure long-term performance. These criteria, however, are often not met. Only about one-third of the land area in the United States has soils suited for conventional subsurface soil absorption fields. System densities in some areas exceed the capacity of even suitable soils to assimilate wastewater flows and retain and transform their contaminants. In addition, many systems are located too close to ground water or surface waters and others, particularly in rural areas with newly installed public

  14. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Sinke, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance

  15. Leptin concentrations in relation to energy balance, milk yield, intake, live weight and estrus in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefers, S.C.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Pas, te M.F.W.; Delavaud, C.; Chilliard, Y.; Lende, van der T.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe fluctuations in leptin concentrations during late pregnancy and lactation and to investigate how those fluctuations are related to energy balance, milk yield, milk components, dry matter intake, live weight, first postpartum luteal activity, and first obse

  16. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.; Sinke, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance

  17. Training Artisans On-Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoghogho Ogbeifun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The decline in apprenticeship in both the public and private sectors, the increasing use of sub-contractors as well as the uncoordinated approach in the informal sector are contributing factors to the shortage of skilled artisans in the construction industry. Artisans training can be introduced and implemented through the adoption of progressive implementation of construction processes commencing work from areas requiring low skill demands to areas of high skill demand. The success of this principle hinges on the collaborative effort of the key project stakeholders. The client should be willing to absorb extra cost and delays in the project; the design and contract documentation should facilitate on-site training, and  the consultant actively guide the contractor and the construction processes to achieve the training objectives. The exploratory research method was adopted in this study and research revealed that this principle was used in a project in the UK and in the development of infrastructure in the tourism industry of South Africa .It is being recommended that the principle be adapted by the public sector for the development of small size infrastructures that can be repeated in many places. This will boost the quality and quantity of artisans, enhance employability, reduce rural urban migration and alleviate poverty.Keywords: Skilled artisans, on-site training, progressive construction processes, project stakeholders, contract documentation. 

  18. Quantifying the yield of perennial grasses grown as a biofuel for energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.G. (Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    Combustible biomass fuels may be produced on set-aside land by growing cops that produce a heavy yield of dry matter. Two promising candidate species are Miscanthus and Switchgrass. Establishment of both species was slow and weeds may cause problems. Yields were low because of the short growing period in the first season. Nitrate leaching under Miscanthus suggested that N levels were too high relative to the crops development. (Author)

  19. Effects on the Milk Yield caused by an AMS Energy Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Gräf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific experiments within the design approach “Integrated Dairy Farming – Stable 4.0” have been carried out to investigate cattle behavior in an AMS under a power cut of limited time. Milk yield and animal welfare were under particular focus. The results show various reactions under stress and, in particular, we observed a decrease in milk yield, not only of individual animals but also of the whole herd.

  20. Analysis of methane yields from energy crops and agricultural by-products and estimation of energy potential from sustainable crop rotation systems in EU-27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Alexander; Leonhartsberger, Christian; Amon, Barbara; Amon, Thomas [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Division of Agricultural Engineering, Vienna (Austria); Boesch, Peter; Friedl, Anton [Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    Currently an increasing demand for renewable energy can be observed. A part of this demand could be covered by the production of energy from agrarian biomass. Due to the limited availability of arable land, food and feed production are starting to compete for agrarian resources. A way out of this dilemma is to develop concepts that are based on otherwise unused agrarian biomass like straw and include new technologies for the fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. In this paper, the energy potentials of two different cropping systems are compared. In the energy-based crop rotation system all crops were used either for biogas or ethanol production. In the biorefinery-based approach, the various crops were used in cascades for the production of food as well as feed. Experimental laboratory work and field trials were combined to calculate energy and biomass yields of the crops under investigation. The results demonstrate that steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw led to a 30% increase in the specific methane yield. The calculated energy output of the biorefinery-based crop rotation system amounted to a total of 126 GJ ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}. Extrapolating this energy output to the total arable land of the EU-27 member states, 13,608 PJ of energy could be produced. Therefore, biorefinery-based crop rotation systems could provide approximately three times more energy to the European population than energy-based crop rotation systems. (orig.)

  1. Annual energy yield of different photovoltaic technologies at different climatic conditions; Jahresenergieertraege unterschiedlicher Photovoltaik-Technologien bei verschiedenen klimatischen Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinsser, Bastian

    2010-10-04

    It is very important for engineers as well as for investors to know which amount of energy E [kWh] a photovoltaic (PV) system produces under real operating conditions. In most cases the costs [Euroct/kWh] for the solar electricity are the main question. Most data sheets contain the efficiency of the PV modules only for standard test conditions (STC) in the laboratory. In reality higher module temperatures, lower irradiation G and a modified spectrum of the irradiation G change the standard test conditions efficiency. However, standard test conditions never appear at real live in Germany. In southern countries, which have more sun, the operation conditions differ much more from standard test conditions. Therefore, the effects on the annual energy yield are even bigger. To answer the question which PV technology gives the highest energy yield at specific climate conditions, this thesis set up thirteen PV systems using different technologies in Stuttgart, Nicosia, and Cairo. An extensive data acquisition is added to monitor weather and system data. Mono- and multicrystalline silicon (Si) as well as several thin film technologies like amorphous silicon, Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2} (CIGS), and CdTe are investigated. First the thesis extracts the temperature and low light behavior from the measured field data. At the end it models the PV systems to forecast the annual energy yield EJahr and compares with the measured values. The analysis of the field data reconfirms the better temperature behavior of the thin film technologies reported in literature. The HIT technology exhibits a better low light behavior, than the crystalline Si technologies, which all show a similar low light behavior. In the field the CIGS technology shows a contrary low light behavior compared to the laboratory. Field data show, that amorphous Si and CdTe technologies have a much better low light behavior than the crystalline Si technologies. The tolerances of the nominal power PSTC have the biggest influence

  2. Effects of energy level in finisher diets and slaughter age of on the performance and carcass yield in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R de Albuquerque

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Male broilers were used to evaluate the effects of different energy levels in finisher diets and age of slaughter on performance, production pattern and carcass yield. Experimental design was a 2x3 factorial arrangement: energy level (ME in the finisher diet (3,200 and 3,600 kcal ME/kg and age of slaughter (42, 49 and 56 days, resulting in six treatments with four replicates. The finisher diet was fed only in the last week of the growing period. Characteristics evaluated were feed consumption (FC, body weight gain (WG, feed conversion (FC, energy intake (EI, caloric conversion (CC, efficiency production index, production pattern, and carcass yield. The results showed better WG and CC for broilers fed 3,200 kcal ME/kg finisher diet. Broilers slaughtered at 42 and 49 days of age had better performance and higher annual production than broilers slaughtered at 56 days of age. Carcass yield was influenced by slaughter age and better breast yield was seen at 49 and 56 days than at 42 days of age. It was concluded that 3,200 kcal ME/kg induced the best overall performance. Poultry houses were efficiently used when broilers were slaughtered at 42 days of age. Meat:bone ratio was improved for broilers slaughtered at 49 and 56 days of age.

  3. Mass yields and kinetic energy of fragments from fission of highly-excited nuclei with A≲220

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Margitych, T. O.; Sedykh, I. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the potential energy surface of the two separated fragments has the saddle point, which takes place at small distance between the surfaces of well-deformed fragments. The height of this two-body saddle point is larger than the height of one-body fission barrier for nuclei with A ≲ 220. The mass yields of the fission fragments, which are appearing at the fission of nuclei with A ≲ 220, are related to the number of states of the two-fragment systems at the two-body saddle points. The characteristics of kinetic energy of fragments are described by using the trajectory motion equations with the dissipation terms. The Gaussian distribution of the final kinetic energy around the classical value of this energy induced by the stochastic fluctuations is taken into account at an evaluation of the total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments.

  4. Optimizing energy yields in black locust through genetic selection: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongarten, B.C.; Merkle, S.A. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). School of Forest Resources

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the magnitude of improvement in biomass yield of black locust possible through breeding, and to determine methods for efficiently capturing the yield improvement achievable from selective breeding. To meet this overall objective, six tasks were undertaken to determine: (1) the amount and geographic pattern of natural genetic variation, (2) the mating system of the species, (3) quantitative genetic parameters of relevant traits, (4) the relationship between nitrogen fixation and growth in black locust, (5) the viability of mass vegetative propagation, and (6) the feasibility of improvement through genetic transformation.

  5. An energy balance approach for mapping crop waterstress and yield impacts over the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a growing demand for timely, spatially distributed information regarding crop condition and water use to inform agricultural decision making and yield forecasting efforts. Remote sensing of land-surface temperature has proven valuable for mapping evapotranspiration (ET) and crop stress from...

  6. Green-cane harvest of sugarcane effects on biomass and energy yields and nutrient removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane yields in Louisiana can approach 40 dry Mg ha-1, making sugarcane an attractive biofuel feedstock as well as a profitable sugar crop. Existing technology used in green-cane harvesting can be used to allow chopper harvester extractor fans to remove variable amounts of extraneous leaf materi...

  7. Effect of dry period length and dietary energy source on energy balance, milk yield, and milk composition of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegsel, van A.T.M.; Remmelink, G.J.; Jorjong, S.; Fievez, V.; Kemp, B.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dry period length and dietary energy source in early lactation on milk production, feed intake, and energy balance (EB) of dairy cows. Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (60 primiparous and 108 multiparous) were randomly assigned to dry period len

  8. Effect of dry period length and dietary energy source on energy balance, milk yield, and milk composition of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegsel, van A.T.M.; Remmelink, G.J.; Jorjong, S.; Fievez, V.; Kemp, B.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dry period length and dietary energy source in early lactation on milk production, feed intake, and energy balance (EB) of dairy cows. Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (60 primiparous and 108 multiparous) were randomly assigned to dry period

  9. Homogeneity analysis of high yield manufacturing process of mems-based pzt thick film vibrational energy harvesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Anders; Xu, Ruichao; Pedersen, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a high yield wafer scale fabrication of MEMS-based unimorph silicon/PZT thick film vibrational energy harvesters aimed towards vibration sources with peak frequencies in the range of a few hundred Hz. By combining KOH etching with mechanical front side protection, SOI wafer...... to accurately define the thickness of the silicon part of the harvester and a silicon compatible PZT thick film screen-printing technique, we are able to fabricate energy harvesters on wafer scale with a yield higher than 90%. The characterization of the fabricated harvesters is focused towards the full wafer....../mass-production aspect; hence the analysis of uniformity in harvested power and resonant frequency....

  10. Biomass yield and energy analysis of soybean production in relation to fertilizer-NPK and organic manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, K.G.; Hati, K.M.; Misra, A.K. [Division of Soil Physics, Indian Institute of Soil Science (ICAR), Nabibagh, Berasia Road, Bhopal 462 038, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2009-12-15

    The study attempts to quantify the root biomass and density, nodulation, crop biomass and grain yield of soybean, to analyze crop growth and energy (renewable and non-renewable) inputs in relation to fertilizer-NPK and organic manure. Observations were recorded from soybean grown with no fertilizer, NPK and NPK + FYM (farmyard manure). The root biomass (BM{sub root}) increased significantly with NPK + FYM compared to NPK and control. The trend of BM{sub root} was best fitted with a third order polynomial. Root length density was higher in NPK + FYM. Biomass of stem, petiole and leaf were significantly greater in NPK + FYM than other treatments, relative contribution to total biomass at physiological maturity were stem 29%, petiole 9%, leaf 17% and pod 46%; quadratic regression models best represented the stem, petiole and leaf biomass data. A maximum LAI of 4.88, total biomass of 633 g m{sup -2} at maturity, CGR of 18.4 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} were recorded in NPK + FYM. Grain yields increased by 72.5 and 98.5%, and stover yields by 56.0 and 94.8% in NPK and NPK + FYM, respectively over control. Though the total energy input in NPK + FYM was greater than those in NPK and control, the share of renewable energy was much higher with greater net energy output and non-renewable energy productivity in NPK + FYM than NPK. The use efficiency of non-renewable energy was also higher in NPF + FYM. Thus, a combination of NPK-fertilizer and organic manure (FYM) could be the viable nutrient management option for soybean production. (author)

  11. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) sample pig transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCOY, J.C.

    1999-03-16

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides a technical evaluation of the Sample Pig Transport System as compared to the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1, Change 1, Chapter III. The evaluation concludes that the package is acceptable for the onsite transport of Type B, fissile excepted radioactive materials when used in accordance with this document.

  12. Influence of collision energy on cross section and stereodynamical properties for the reaction H + OCl {yields} OH + Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shengwen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116021 (China); Wang Yunhui [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lu Ruifeng, E-mail: rflu@mail.njust.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2012-06-19

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first QCT investigation for the reaction H + OCl {yields} OH + Cl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of collision energy on scalar properties including reaction probability and the integral cross-section. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full information about stereodynamics of product alignment and orientation. - Abstract: The quasi-classical trajectory calculations are carried out for the reaction H + OCl {yields} OH + Cl on the singlet ground state potential energy surface. The reaction probability for total angular momentum J = 0 and the integral cross section as a function of collision energy are presented. Furthermore, the product rotational alignment has been obtained, and the value tends to decrease with the increasing of collision energy with fluctuations. To investigate the collision-energy-dependent effects on chemical stereodynamics, the four generalized polarization-dependent differential cross sections (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 00}/d{omega}{sub t}), (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 20}/d{omega}{sub t}), (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 22+}/d{omega}{sub t}) and (2{pi}/{sigma})(d{sigma}{sub 21-}/d{omega}{sub t}), the distribution P({theta}{sub r}) of the angle between j Prime -k and the angle distribution P({phi}{sub r}) in terms of k-k Prime -j Prime correlation have also been calculated.

  13. Smoothed Biasing Forces Yield Unbiased Free Energies with the Extended-System Adaptive Biasing Force Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Adrien; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-12-27

    We report a theoretical description and numerical tests of the extended-system adaptive biasing force method (eABF), together with an unbiased estimator of the free energy surface from eABF dynamics. Whereas the original ABF approach uses its running estimate of the free energy gradient as the adaptive biasing force, eABF is built on the idea that the exact free energy gradient is not necessary for efficient exploration, and that it is still possible to recover the exact free energy separately with an appropriate estimator. eABF does not directly bias the collective coordinates of interest, but rather fictitious variables that are harmonically coupled to them; therefore is does not require second derivative estimates, making it easily applicable to a wider range of problems than ABF. Furthermore, the extended variables present a smoother, coarse-grain-like sampling problem on a mollified free energy surface, leading to faster exploration and convergence. We also introduce CZAR, a simple, unbiased free energy estimator from eABF trajectories. eABF/CZAR converges to the physical free energy surface faster than standard ABF for a wide range of parameters.

  14. Measure of the e+e-{yields}bb Cross Section at the LEP Energies; Medida de la seccion eficaz e''+e''-{yields}bb a las Energias de LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arce Dubois, P.

    1992-07-01

    In the present work I analyse the data collected during 1990 by the L3 detector, situated in the electron-positron collider LEP. After selecting the events e''+e''-{yields} bb through their semileptonic decays into muons, I calculate the cross section for the process e''+e''- {yields} bb at different energy points around the mass of the vectorial boson Z, and I measure some parameters of the Standard Model, namely, the Br(b{yields}{mu} ),{gamma}{sub z}n-{yields}bb/{gamma}{sub z}n{yields}had and {gamma}{sub z}n{yields}bb{gamma}{sub z}n{yields}e''+e''-. (Author) 26 refs.

  15. Milk yield and milk composition responses to change in predicted net energy and metabolizable protein: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J B; Friggens, N C; Chapoutot, P; Van Laar, H; Sauvant, D

    2016-12-01

    Using a meta-analysis of literature data, this study aimed to quantify the dry matter (DM) intake response to changes in diet composition, and milk responses (yield, milk component yields and milk composition) to changes in dietary net energy for lactation (NEL) and metabolizable protein (MP) in dairy cows. From all studies included in the database, 282 experiments (825 treatments) with experimentally induced changes in either NEL or MP content were kept for this analysis. These treatments covered a wide range of diet characteristics and therefore a large part of the plausible NEL and MP contents and supplies that can be expected in practical situations. The average MP and NEL contents were, respectively (mean±SD), 97±12 g/kg DM and 6.71±0.42 MJ/kg DM. On a daily supply basis, there were high between-experiment correlations for MP and NEL above maintenance. Therefore, supplies of MP and NEL above maintenance were, respectively, centred on MP supply for which MP efficiency into milk protein is 0.67, and NEL above maintenance supply for which the ratio of NEL milk/NEL above maintenance is 1.00 (centred variables were called MP67 and NEL100). The majority of the selected studies used groups of multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows in mid lactation, milked twice a day. Using a mixed model, between- and within-experiment variation was split to estimate DM intake and milk responses. The use of NEL100 and MP67 supplies substantially improved the accuracy of the prediction of milk yield and milk component yields responses with, on average, a 27% lower root mean square error (RMSE) relative to using dietary NEL and MP contents as predictors. For milk composition (g/kg), the average RMSE was only 3% lower on a supply basis compared with a concentration basis. Effects of NEL and MP supplies on milk yield and milk component yields responses were additive. Increasing NEL supply increases energy partitioning towards body reserve, whereas increasing MP supply increases the

  16. Low cost drip irrigation: Impact on sugarcane yield, water and energy saving in semiarid tropical agro ecosystem in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, U; Jayakumar, M; Marimuthu, S

    2016-12-15

    Low cost drip irrigation (LCDI) has been a recent introduction to India and it may be an inexpensive means of expanding irrigation into uncultivated areas, thereby increasing land productivity. This paper is structured into two phases. The first phase, presents an assessment of different irrigation methods (LCDI, conventional drip irrigation (CDI) with single row and paired row, siphon and flood irrigation) on sugarcane production. The results showed that cane yield and water productivity was significantly increased in both plant and ratoon crop of sugarcane owing to the methods of irrigation. Among the methods, LCDI recorded 118.6tha(-1) of cane yield and it was on par with the single row CDI, which recorded the highest mean yield of 120.4tha(-1) and both are found to be significantly superior to the rest of the treatments. The lowest yield was recorded in the treatment of flood irrigation (94.40tha(-1)). Benefit Cost Ratio analysis confirmed that LCDI performed better compared to other irrigation methods. The second phase deals with the farmer participatory research demonstrations at multi location on evaluation of LCDI with flood irrigation. LCDI out performed flood irrigation under all the locations in terms of sugarcane yield, soil moisture content, postharvest soil fertility, reduction in nutrient transport to surface and ground water, water and energy saving. These results suggest that LCDI is a feasible option to increase the sugarcane production in water scarcity areas of semiarid agro ecosystems, and have long-term sustained economic benefits than flood irrigation in terms of water productivity, energy saving and environmental sustainability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Bio-productivity on Bio-energy Yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J. J. Janssens

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The principal photosynthetic pathways convert solar energy differently depending on the environmental conditions and the plant morphotype. Partitioning of energy storage within crops will vary according to environmental and seasonal conditions as well. Highest energy concentration is found in terpens like latex and, to a lesser extent, in lipids. Ideally, we want plant ingredients with high energy content easily amenable to ready-to-use bio-fuel. Generally, these crops are adapted to drier areas and tend to save on eco-volume space. Competition with food crops could be avoided by fetching energy from cheap agricultural by-products or waste products such as bagasse in the sugar cane. This would in fact mean that reducing power of agricultural residues should be extracted from the biomass through non-photosynthetic processes like animal ingestion or industrial bio-fermentation. Conversion and transformation efficiencies in the production chain are illustrated for some relevant crops in the light of the maximum power theorem.

  18. Energy Yield Determination of Concentrator Solar Cells using Laboratory Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F.; Garcia, Ivan; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-14

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used to predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted. temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  19. Energy Yield prediction of offshore wind farm clusters at the EERA–DTOC European project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantero, E.; Sanz, J.; Lozano, S.;

    A new integrated design tool for optimization of offshore wind farm clusters is under development in the European Energy Research Alliance – Design Tools for Offshore wind farm Cluster project (EERA DTOC). The project builds on already established design tools from the project partners and possibly...... of uncertainty associated to each step. Methodologies for the assessment of offshore gross annual energy production are analyzed based on the Fino 1 test case. Measured data and virtual data from Numerical Weather Prediction models have been used to calculate long term mean wind speed, vertical wind profile...

  20. Statistical hadronization model analysis of hadron yields in p + Nb and Ar + KCl at SIS18 energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakishiev, G.; Arnold, O.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Destefanis, M.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gilardi, C.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lange, J. S.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Mihaylov, D.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmah, A.; Schuldes, H.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wisniowski, M.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The HADES data from p + Nb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s_{NN}} = 3.2 GeV are analyzed employing a statistical hadronization model. The model can successfully describe the production yields of the identified hadrons π0, η, Λ, K 0 s, ω with parameters T_{chem} = (99± 11) MeV and μb = (619± 34) MeV, which fit well into the chemical freeze-out systematics found in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, we reanalyze our previous HADES data from Ar + KCl collisions at √{s_{NN}} = 2.6 GeV with an updated version of the model. We address equilibration in heavy-ion collisions by testing two aspects: the description of yields and the regularity of freeze-out parameters from a statistical model fit as a function of colliding energy and system size. Despite its success, the model fails to describe the observed Ξ- yields in both, p + Nb and Ar + KCl . Special emphasis is put on feed-down contributions from higher-lying resonance states as a possible explanation for the observed excess.

  1. Flavor-dependent eigenvolume interactions in hadron resonance gas and its implications for hadron yields at LHC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Alba, P; Gorenstein, M I; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    We study the eigenvolume effects in the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model on hadron yields at zero chemical potential. Using different mass-volume relations for strange and nonstrange hadrons we observe a remarkable improvement in the quality of the fit of the mean hadron multiplicities measured by the ALICE Collaboration in the central Pb+Pb collisions at the collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 2.76$~TeV. The fit within the point-particle HRG yields $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 27.1 / 8$ while the corresponding calculation within the eigevolume HRG with smaller radii for heavier strange hadrons yields a remarkably small $\\chi^2 / N_{\\rm dof} \\simeq 0.42 / 6$. This effect appears to be rather insensitive to the details in the implementation of the HRG model, including the variations in the hadron list, as well the variations in the excluded-volume mechanism. Our result shows that there are no anomalies in the description of the heavy-ion hadron yield data at LHC within the HRG model, as long as physical exte...

  2. Energy yield prediction of offshore wind farm clusters at the EERA-DTOC European project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantero, E.; Sanz, J.; Lorenzo, S.

    A new integrated design tool for optimization of offshore wind farm clusters is under development in the European Energy Research Alliance – Design Tools for Offshore wind farm Cluster project (EERA DTOC). The project builds on already established design tools from the project partners and possib...

  3. Energy yield prediction of offshore wind farm clusters at the EERA-DTOC European project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantero, E.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2013-01-01

    A new integrated design tool for optimization of offshore wind farm clusters is under development in the European Energy Research Alliance – Design Tools for Offshore wind farm Cluster project (EERA DTOC). The project builds on already established design tools from the project partners and possib...

  4. Teaching the Relation between Solar Cell Efficiency and Annual Energy Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, Wilfried G. J. H. M.

    2007-01-01

    To reach a sustainable world the use of renewable energy sources is imperative. Photovoltaics (PV) is but one of the technologies that use the power of the sun and its deployment is growing very fast. Several master programs have been developed over the world, including Utrecht University, that teach these technologies. Within the framework of a…

  5. Energy dependence of 238U fission yields investigated in inverse kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselsky M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The production cross sections of neutron-rich fission residues produced in reactions induced by a 238U beam impinging onto Pb and Be targets were investigated at the Fragment Separator (FRS at GSI using the inverse kinematic technique. These data allowed us to discuss the optimum energies in fission for producing the most neutron-rich residues.

  6. Four-terminal organic solar cell modules with increased annual energy yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehlhaar, R.; Cheyns, D.; Willigenburg, L. van; Hadipour, A.; Gilot, J.; Radbeh, R.; Aernouts, T.

    2013-01-01

    The authors present experimental results on mechanically stacked organic solar modules and their advantage over standard tandem architectures. A four-terminal configuration of two single junction modules with complementary absorbing active layers uses the more efficient energy conversion of a tandem

  7. Teaching the Relation between Solar Cell Efficiency and Annual Energy Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, Wilfried G. J. H. M.

    2007-01-01

    To reach a sustainable world the use of renewable energy sources is imperative. Photovoltaics (PV) is but one of the technologies that use the power of the sun and its deployment is growing very fast. Several master programs have been developed over the world, including Utrecht University, that teach these technologies. Within the framework of a…

  8. Four-terminal organic solar cell modules with increased annual energy yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehlhaar, R.; Cheyns, D.; Willigenburg, L. van; Hadipour, A.; Gilot, J.; Radbeh, R.; Aernouts, T.

    2013-01-01

    The authors present experimental results on mechanically stacked organic solar modules and their advantage over standard tandem architectures. A four-terminal configuration of two single junction modules with complementary absorbing active layers uses the more efficient energy conversion of a tandem

  9. Energy yield prediction of offshore wind farm clusters at the EERA-DTOC European project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantero, E.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2013-01-01

    A new integrated design tool for optimization of offshore wind farm clusters is under development in the European Energy Research Alliance – Design Tools for Offshore wind farm Cluster project (EERA DTOC). The project builds on already established design tools from the project partners and possibly...

  10. Studies on Mutation Breeding of High-Yielding Xylanase Strains by Low-Energy Ion Beam Implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichang; YAO Jianming; YU Zhengling

    2007-01-01

    As a new mutagenetic method,low-energy ion implantation has been used widely in many research areas in recent years.In order to obtain some industrial strains with high xylanase yield,the wild type strain Aspergillus niger A3 was mutated by means of nitrogen ions implantation (10 keV,2.6 × 1014~1.56 × 1015 ions/cm2) and a mutant N212 was isolated subsequently.However,it was found that the initial screening means of the high-yielding xylanase strains such as transparent halos was unfit for first screening.Compared with that of the wild type strain,xylanase production of the mutant N212 was increased from 320 IU/ml to 610 IU/ml,and the optimum fermentation temperature was increased from 28 ℃ to 30 ℃.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF MINIMUM TILLAGE SYSTEMS UPON THE SOIL PROPERTIES, YIELD AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN SOME ARABLE CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor RUSU

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the influence of the conventional ploughing tillage technology in comparison with the minimum tillage, upon the soil properties, weed control, yield and energy efficiency in the case of maize (Zea mays L., soyabean (Glycine hispida L. and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. in a three years crop rotation. For all cultures within the crop rotation, the weed encroachment is maximum for the disc harrow and rotary harrow soil tillage, followed by the chisel and paraplow. The weed encroachment is minimum for the conventional ploughing tillage technology. The results of investigations showed that the yield is a conclusion soil tillage systems influence on soil properties, plant density assurance and on weed control.

  12. Four-terminal organic solar cell modules with increased annual energy yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhaar, Robert; Cheyns, David; Van Willigenburg, Luuk; Hadipour, Afshin; Gilot, Jan; Radbeh, Roshanak; Aernouts, Tom

    2013-10-01

    The authors present experimental results on mechanically stacked organic solar modules and their advantage over standard tandem architectures. A four-terminal configuration of two single junction modules with complementary absorbing active layers uses the more efficient energy conversion of a tandem structure without the necessity of matching currents or voltages of electrically connected subcells. The presented combination of semitransparent and opaque solar cells consists of solution processed polymer-fullerene blends as active materials. A cost-effective mechanical scribing process is applied for the patterning of the deposited layers. The best devices have an efficiency of over 6.5% on an aperture area of 16 cm2 which equals a gain of 30% over the best single junction module fabricated by the same process. Optical simulations demonstrate a 32% increased annual energy output of a mechanically stacked device in comparison to a monolithic tandem structure using an equivalent geometry.

  13. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C. [Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS, Utrecht (Netherlands); Sinke, W.C. [Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS, Utrecht (Netherlands); Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance intensity data of rendered images back into numerical data. To ensure accurate results, the solar irradiation data used as input is compared to numerical data obtained from rendered images, showing excellent agreement. As expected, also ray-tracing precision in the CAD software proves to be very high. To demonstrate PV energy yield simulations using this innovative concept, solar radiation time course data of a few days was modeled in 3-D to simulate distributions of irradiance incident on flat, single- and double-bend shapes and a PV powered computer mouse located on a window sill. Comparisons of measured to simulated PV output of the mouse show that also in practice, simulation accuracies can be very high. Theoretically, this concept has great potential, as it can be adapted to suit a wide range of solar energy applications, such as sun-tracking and concentrator systems, Building Integrated PV (BIPV) or Product Integrated PV (PIPV). However, graphical user interfaces of 'CAD-PV' software tools are not yet available. (author)

  14. Development of a CSP plant energy yield calculation tool applying predictive models to analyze plant performance sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Lukas; Peniche, Ricardo; Sommer, Lutz; Kather, Alfons

    2017-06-01

    At early project stages, the main CSP plant design parameters such as turbine capacity, solar field size, and thermal storage capacity are varied during the techno-economic optimization to determine most suitable plant configurations. In general, a typical meteorological year with at least hourly time resolution is used to analyze each plant configuration. Different software tools are available to simulate the annual energy yield. Software tools offering a thermodynamic modeling approach of the power block and the CSP thermal cycle, such as EBSILONProfessional®, allow a flexible definition of plant topologies. In EBSILON, the thermodynamic equilibrium for each time step is calculated iteratively (quasi steady state), which requires approximately 45 minutes to process one year with hourly time resolution. For better presentation of gradients, 10 min time resolution is recommended, which increases processing time by a factor of 5. Therefore, analyzing a large number of plant sensitivities, as required during the techno-economic optimization procedure, the detailed thermodynamic simulation approach becomes impracticable. Suntrace has developed an in-house CSP-Simulation tool (CSPsim), based on EBSILON and applying predictive models, to approximate the CSP plant performance for central receiver and parabolic trough technology. CSPsim significantly increases the speed of energy yield calculations by factor ≥ 35 and has automated the simulation run of all predefined design configurations in sequential order during the optimization procedure. To develop the predictive models, multiple linear regression techniques and Design of Experiment methods are applied. The annual energy yield and derived LCOE calculated by the predictive model deviates less than ±1.5 % from the thermodynamic simulation in EBSILON and effectively identifies the optimal range of main design parameters for further, more specific analysis.

  15. Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value; Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-15

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. This research has been highlighted in the Green Chemistry journal article mentioned above and a milestone report, and is based on the work the researchers are doing for the AOP projects Algal Biomass Conversion and Algal Biofuels Techno-economic Analysis. That work has demonstrated an advanced process for algal biofuel production that captures the value of both the algal lipids and carbohydrates for conversion to biofuels.  With this process, as much as 150 GGE/ton of biomass can be produced, 2-3X more than can be produced by terrestrial feedstocks.  This can also reduce the cost of biofuel production by as much as 40%. This also represents the first ever design case for the algal lipid upgrading pathway.

  16. Effect of a strong magnetic field on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekerzhitskii, V.S. [Pushkin Pedagogical Institute, Brest (Belarus)

    1995-01-01

    According to modern concepts, the electron-neutron-nuclear (Aen) phase of dense highly degenerate matter can be realized in the shells of neutron stars. This phase has relatively stable and absolutely stable states of thermodynamic equilibrium. Strong magnetic fields can exist in neutron stars. For this reason, analysis of their effect on the characteristics of the Aen phase is of great interest. It is specially important to study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the energy yield of nuclear reactions in dense nuclear matter because the transition to the absolute equilibrium state proceeds through these reactions.

  17. A Modified activation method for reaction total cross section and yield measurements at low astrophysically relevant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemov, S.V., E-mail: artemov@inp.uz [Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Igamov, S.B.; Karakhodjaev, A.A.; Radyuk, G.A.; Tojiboyev, O.R.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Ergashev, F.Kh.; Nam, I.V. [Institute of Nuclear Physics of Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Aliev, M.K.; Kholbaev, I.; Rumi, R.F.; Khalikov, R.I.; Eshkobilov, Sh.Kh.; Muminov, T.M. [Research Institute of Applied Physics, National University of Uzbekistan, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2016-07-21

    The activation method is proposed for collection of the sufficient statistics during the investigation of the nuclear astrophysical reactions at low energies with the short-living residual nuclei formation. The main feature is a multiple cyclical irradiation of a target by an ion beam and measurement of the radioactivity decay curve. The method was tested by the yield measurement of the {sup 12}C(p,γ){sup 13}N reaction with detecting the annihilation γγ- coincidences from {sup 13}N(β{sup +}ν){sup 13}C decay at the two-arm scintillation spectrometer.

  18. Beam Energy Scaling of Ion-Induced Electron Yield from K+ Ions Impact on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kireeff-Covo, Michel; Barnard, John J; Bieniosek, Frank; Celata, C M; Cohen, Ronald; Friedman, Alex; Grote, D P; Kwan, Joe W; Lund, Steven M; Molvik, Arthur; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Vujic, Jasmina L; Westenskow, Glen

    2005-01-01

    The cost of accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) can be reduced by using the smallest possible clearance between the beam and the wall from the beamline. This increases beam loss to the walls, generating ion-induced electrons that could be trapped by beam space charge potential into an "electron cloud," which can cause degradation or loss of the ion beam. In order to understand the physical mechanism of production of ion-induced electrons we have measured impact of K+ ions with energies up to 400 KeV on stainless steel surfaces near grazing incidence, using the ion source test stand (STS-500) at LLNL. The electron yield will be discussed and compared with experimental measurements from 1 MeV K+ ions in the High-Current Experiment at LBNL.*

  19. Investigations for Improvement of Energy Yield of Rotor-blades from the 1.5 MW Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaresque, N.; Bicker, S.; Dollinger, C.; Fandrich, A.; Gatz, S.; Hölling, M.; Irschik, K.; Reichstein, T.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; von Zengen, C.

    2016-09-01

    In a combined approach of extensive measurement and accompanying simulation a wind turbine blade used in the 1.5 MW class was investigated for improvement of aerodynamic properties and especially the energy yield. One blade was dismantled and its geometry was locally measured by a specially designed laser scanning-system. From this geometry data set five 2D wind tunnel models were manufactured and measured in the wind tunnel of Deutsche Wind Guard Engineering GmbH at Bremerhaven, Germany. In addition, extensive CFD investigations were performed to investigate the usefulness of so-called aerodynamic devices like vortex generators, Gurney flaps and others for improving energy yield. As a result it could be shown that the aerodynamic efficiency of the manufactured blades - if measured in terms of lift-to-drag ratio - is at a high level but still can be further improved. 3D CFD investigations were able to show the influence of Gurney flaps and boundary layer fences and their interactions.

  20. Hybridizing rapidly exploring random trees and basin hopping yields an improved exploration of energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christine-Andrea; Dreyfus, Tom; Robert, Charles H; Cazals, Frédéric

    2016-03-30

    The number of local minima of the potential energy landscape (PEL) of molecular systems generally grows exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom, so that a crucial property of PEL exploration algorithms is their ability to identify local minima, which are low lying and diverse. In this work, we present a new exploration algorithm, retaining the ability of basin hopping (BH) to identify local minima, and that of transition based rapidly exploring random trees (T-RRT) to foster the exploration of yet unexplored regions. This ability is obtained by interleaving calls to the extension procedures of BH and T-RRT, and we show tuning the balance between these two types of calls allows the algorithm to focus on low lying regions. Computational efficiency is obtained using state-of-the art data structures, in particular for searching approximate nearest neighbors in metric spaces. We present results for the BLN69, a protein model whose conformational space has dimension 207 and whose PEL has been studied exhaustively. On this system, we show that the propensity of our algorithm to explore low lying regions of the landscape significantly outperforms those of BH and T-RRT.

  1. A clustering approach for the analysis of solar energy yields: A case study for concentrating solar thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruchena, Carlos M. Fernández; García-Barberena, Javier; Guisado, María Vicenta; Gastón, Martín

    2016-05-01

    The design of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSTP) systems requires a detailed knowledge of the dynamic behavior of the meteorology at the site of interest. Meteorological series are often condensed into one representative year with the aim of data volume reduction and speeding-up of energy system simulations, defined as Typical Meteorological Year (TMY). This approach seems to be appropriate for rather detailed simulations of a specific plant; however, in previous stages of the design of a power plant, especially during the optimization of the large number of plant parameters before a final design is reached, a huge number of simulations are needed. Even with today's technology, the computational effort to simulate solar energy system performance with one year of data at high frequency (as 1-min) may become colossal if a multivariable optimization has to be performed. This work presents a simple and efficient methodology for selecting number of individual days able to represent the electrical production of the plant throughout the complete year. To achieve this objective, a new procedure for determining a reduced set of typical weather data in order to evaluate the long-term performance of a solar energy system is proposed. The proposed methodology is based on cluster analysis and permits to drastically reduce computational effort related to the calculation of a CSTP plant energy yield by simulating a reduced number of days from a high frequency TMY.

  2. Growth and characterization of potassium strontium iodide: A new high light yield scintillator with 2.4% energy resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stand, L., E-mail: lstand@utk.edu [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhuravleva, M.; Lindsey, A. [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Melcher, C.L. [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-21

    A new ternary metal halide scintillator, potassium strontium iodide, activated with divalent europium (KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu) has been discovered. This material has a monoclinic crystal structure with a density of 4.39 g/cm{sup 3}. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates a congruent melting point of 470 °C and suggests that this compound has no solid–solid phase transitions. As is the case with most metal halides, the material is hygroscopic, and it has some internal radioactivity due to the presence of {sup 40}K. Single crystals of KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5} doped with 4% Eu{sup 2+} were grown in evacuated quartz ampoules via the Bridgman technique. The X-ray excited emission spectrum consisted of a single peak at ~445 nm due to the 5d–4f transition in Eu{sup 2+}. The measured light yield is ~94,000 photons/MeV with an energy resolution of 2.4% at 662 keV. The crystal has an excellent proportionality response over a wide range of energies from 14 keV to 1275 keV. - Highlights: • New Eu{sup 2+}-doped scintillators KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}. • Single crystals of KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu 4% were grown using the Bridgman technique. • This new material exhibit excellent properties for X-ray and gamma-ray detections. • Light yield of 94,000 ph/MeV and energy resolution of 2.4% at 662 keV.

  3. Assessment of On-Site Power Opportunities in the Industrial Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryson, T.

    2001-10-08

    The purpose of this report is to identify the potential for on-site power generation in the U.S. industrial sector with emphasis on nine industrial groups called the ''Industries of the Future'' (IOFs) by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Through its Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), the DOE has teamed with the IOFs to develop collaborative strategies for improving productivity, global competitiveness, energy usage and environmental performance. Total purchases for electricity and steam for the IOFs are in excess of $27 billion annually. Energy-related costs are very significant for these industries. The nine industrial groups are (1) Agriculture (SIC 1); (2) Forest products; (3) Lumber and wood products (SIC 24); (4) Paper and allied products (SIC 26); (5) Mining (SIC 11, 12, 14); (6) Glass (SIC 32); (7) Petroleum (SIC 29); (8) Chemicals (SIC 28); and (9) Metals (SIC 33): Steel, Aluminum, and Metal casting. Although not currently part of the IOF program, the food industry is included in this report because of its close relationship to the agricultural industry and its success with on-site power generation. On-site generation provides an alternative means to reduce energy costs, comply with environmental regulations, and ensure a reliable power supply. On-site generation can ease congestion in the local utility's electric grid. Electric market restructuring is exacerbating the price premium for peak electricity use and for reliability, creating considerable market interest in on-site generation.

  4. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + O2 yields HO2(asterisk) yields HO + O. II - The potential for H atom exchange in HO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    The results of CASSCF multireference contracted CI calculations with large ANO basis sets are presented for the exchange region of the HO2 potential-energy surface. The saddle point for H atom exchange is about 13 kcal/mol below the energy of H + O2; therefore, this region of the surface should be accessible during H + O2 recombination and methathesis reactions.

  5. Search for Dark Matter and Large Extra Dimensions in pp Collisions Yielding a Photon and Missing Transverse Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cerny, Karel; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Fischer, David; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Krajczar, Krisztian; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; 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Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Visca, Lorenzo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Nelson, Randy; Pellett, Dave; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lueking, Lee; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Chung, Kwangzoo; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Richards, Alan; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for new physics in the final state containing a photon and missing transverse energy. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns collected in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV by the CMS experiment. The observed event yield agrees with standard-model expectations for photon plus missing transverse energy events. Using models for production of dark-matter particles (chi), we set 90% confidence level (CL) upper limits of 13.6--15.4 femtobarns on chi production in the photon plus missing transverse energy state. These provide the most sensitive upper limits for spin-dependent chi-nucleon scattering for chi masses between 1 and 100 GeV. For spin-independent contributions, the present limits are extended to chi masses below 3.5 GeV. For models with 3--6 large extra dimensions, our data exclude extra-dimensional Planck scales between 1.65 and 1.71 TeV at 95% CL.

  6. A Study of Mutation Breeding of High-Yielding Tryptophanase Escherichia coli by Low-Energy N+ Ion Beam Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Min; Yao, Jianming; Wang, Dongmei

    2009-12-01

    Low energy ion beam has been widely applied in microbe breeding, plant breeding, gene transfer and cell modification. In this study, the Escherichia coli (E.coli) strain producing tryptophanase was irradiated by a low energy nitrogen ion beam with an energy of 10 keV at a fluence of 13 × 1014 N+/cm2 when glycerin at a 15% concentration was used as a protector. The effect on the biomass of E. coli after N+ implantation was analyzed in detail by statistic methods. The screening methods used in this study were proven to be effective. After continuous mutagenicity, a high-yield tryptophanase strain was selected and both its biomass and enzymatic activity were higher than those of the parent strain. The results of scale-up production showed that the biomass could reach wet weight 8.2 g/L and 110 g L-tryptophan could be formed in the volume of the 1l enzymatic reaction system.

  7. Localization in the Anderson model with long-range correlated hopping and on-site disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfallahzadeh, Shiva; Anvari, Mehrnaz; Ekhtiary, Niko; Esmailpour, Ayoub; Rahimi Tabar, M. Reza

    2015-01-01

    We study the metal-insulator transition in one-dimensional Anderson binary alloy with long-range disordered hopping integrals and on-site energies using the transfer matrix method. In this model, the on-site energies and hopping integrals are distributed randomly with long-range correlations characterized by power spectrum of the type ?, with different exponents ? and ?, respectively. We determine the critical value of long-range correlation exponent of hopping integral ? in the presence of only off-diagonal disorder in which the transition from localized to extended states occurs in thermodynamic limit. When both of the on-site energies and hopping integrals are disordered, there are two parameters ? and ? that control the metal-insulator transition in the system. We draw the phase diagram which separates the localized regime from extended one and it shows the critical values of ? for a given value of ?.

  8. Comparison of Resource and Energy Yield Assessment Procedures 2011-2015: What have we learned and what needs to be done?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Nielsen, Morten; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    and energy yield assessment procedure: Site wind observation, long-term extrapolation, vertical extrapolation, horizontal extrapolation, wake modelling, technical losses estimation, uncertainty estimation and calculation. For each step and each wind farm a summary is given of the magnitude of the effects......From 2011 to 2015, the European Wind Energy Association arranged four open exercises to benchmark the wind resource and wind farm energy yield assessment procedures of the wind energy industry. Two case studies were for land-based Scottish wind farms in hilly to complex terrain, and two case...

  9. A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-02-21

    The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass

  10. Growth and characterization of potassium strontium iodide: A new high light yield scintillator with 2.4% energy resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stand, L.; Zhuravleva, M.; Lindsey, A.; Melcher, C. L.

    2015-04-01

    A new ternary metal halide scintillator, potassium strontium iodide, activated with divalent europium (KSr2I5:Eu) has been discovered. This material has a monoclinic crystal structure with a density of 4.39 g/cm3. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates a congruent melting point of 470 °C and suggests that this compound has no solid-solid phase transitions. As is the case with most metal halides, the material is hygroscopic, and it has some internal radioactivity due to the presence of 40K. Single crystals of KSr2I5 doped with 4% Eu2+ were grown in evacuated quartz ampoules via the Bridgman technique. The X-ray excited emission spectrum consisted of a single peak at ~445 nm due to the 5d-4f transition in Eu2+. The measured light yield is ~94,000 photons/MeV with an energy resolution of 2.4% at 662 keV. The crystal has an excellent proportionality response over a wide range of energies from 14 keV to 1275 keV.

  11. Mass and nuclear charge yields for sup 237 Np(2n sub th ,f) at different fission fragment kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, G.; Barreau, G.; Sicre, A.; Doan, T.P.; Audouard, P.; Leroux, B. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, 33 - Gradignan (France)); Arafa, W.; Brissot, R.; Bocquet, J.P. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France). Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires); Faust, H. (Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Koczon, P.; Mutterer, M. (Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Goennenwein, F. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Asghar, M. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Algiers (Algeria). Inst. de Physique); Quade, U.; Rudolph, K. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.)); Engelhardt, D. (Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.)); Piasecki, E. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland))

    1990-09-03

    The recoil mass separator LOHENGRIN of the Laue-Langevin Institute Grenoble has been used to measure for the first time, the yields of light fission fragments from the fissioning system: {sub 93}{sup 239}Np; this odd-Z nucleus is formed after double thermal neutron capture in a {sub 93}{sup 237}Np target. The mass distributions were measured for different kinetic energies between 92 and 115.5 MeV, but the nuclear charge distributions were determined only up to 112 MeV. These distributions are compared to the distributions obtained for the even-even system {sub 94}{sup 240}Pu. At high kinetic energy, the mass distribution shows a prominent peak around mass number A{sub L}=106. These cold fragmentations are discussed in terms of a calculation based on a scission point model extrapolated to the cold fission case. As expected for an odd-Z fissioning nucleus, the nuclear charge distributions do not reveal any odd-even effect. The global neutron odd-even effect is found to be (8.1{plus minus}1.5)%. A simple model has been used to show that most of the neutron odd-even effect results from prompt neutron evaporation from the fragments. (orig.).

  12. Lyman- photodissociation of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b): Quantum yield and translational energy of hydrogen atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Almuth Laeuter; Hans-Robert Volpp; Jai P Mittal; Rajesh K Vatsa

    2007-07-01

    The collision-free, room temperature gas-phase photodissociation dynamics of CH3CFCl2 (HCFC-141b) was studied using Lyman- laser radiation (121.6 nm) by the laser photolysis/laserinduced fluorescence `pump/probe’ technique. Lyman- radiation was used both to photodissociate the parent molecule and to detect the nascent H atom products via (22P → 12S) laser-induced fluorescence. Absolute H atom quantum yield, H = (0.39 ± 0.09) was determined by calibration method in which CH4 photolysis at 121.6 nm was used as a reference source of well-defined H atom concentrations. The line shapes of the measured H atom Doppler profiles indicate a Gaussian velocity distribution suggesting the presence of indirect H atom formation pathways in the Lyman- photodissociation of CH3CFCl2. The average kinetic energy of H atoms calculated from Doppler profiles was found to be T(lab) = (50 ± 3) kJ/mol. The nearly statistical translational energy together with the observed Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution indicates that for CH3CFCl2 the H atom forming dissociation process comes closer to the statistical limit.

  13. The impact of silicon solar cell architecture and cell interconnection on energy yield in hot & sunny climates

    KAUST Repository

    Haschke, Jan

    2017-03-23

    Extensive knowledge of the dependence of solar cell and module performance on temperature and irradiance is essential for their optimal application in the field. Here we study such dependencies in the most common high-efficiency silicon solar cell architectures, including so-called Aluminum back-surface-field (BSF), passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC), passivated emitter rear totally diffused (PERT), and silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. We compare measured temperature coefficients (TC) of the different electrical parameters with values collected from commercial module data sheets. While similar TC values of the open-circuit voltage and the short circuit current density are obtained for cells and modules of a given technology, we systematically find that the TC under maximum power-point (MPP) conditions is lower in the modules. We attribute this discrepancy to additional series resistance in the modules from solar cell interconnections. This detrimental effect can be reduced by using a cell design that exhibits a high characteristic load resistance (defined by its voltage-over-current ratio at MPP), such as the SHJ architecture. We calculate the energy yield for moderate and hot climate conditions for each cell architecture, taking into account ohmic cell-to-module losses caused by cell interconnections. Our calculations allow us to conclude that maximizing energy production in hot and sunny environments requires not only a high open-circuit voltage, but also a minimal series-to-load-resistance ratio.

  14. Calculation of total free energy yield as an alternative approach for predicting the importance of potential chemolithotrophic reactions in geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; McDonald, Austin I; Hedlund, Brian P

    2012-08-01

    To inform hypotheses regarding the relative importance of chemolithotrophic metabolisms in geothermal environments, we calculated free energy yields of 26 chemical reactions potentially supporting chemolithotrophy in two US Great Basin hot springs, taking into account the effects of changing reactant and product activities on the Gibbs free energy as each reaction progressed. Results ranged from 1.2 × 10(-5) to 3.6 J kg(-1) spring water, or 3.7 × 10(-5) to 11.5 J s(-1) based on measured flow rates, with aerobic oxidation of CH(4) or NH4 + giving the highest average yields. Energy yields calculated without constraining pH were similar to those at constant pH except for reactions where H(+) was consumed, which often had significantly lower yields when pH was unconstrained. In contrast to the commonly used normalization of reaction chemical affinities per mole of electrons transferred, reaction energy yields for a given oxidant varied by several orders of magnitude and were more sensitive to differences in the activities of products and reactants. The high energy yield of aerobic ammonia oxidation is consistent with previous observations of significant ammonia oxidation rates and abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea in sediments of these springs. This approach offers an additional lens through which to view the thermodynamic landscape of geothermal springs.

  15. Organic contaminants in onsite wastewater treatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, K.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.

    2007-01-01

    Wastewater from thirty onsite wastewater treatment systems was sampled during a reconnaissance field study to quantify bulk parameters and the occurrence of organic wastewater contaminants including endocrine disrupting compounds in treatment systems representing a variety of wastewater sources and treatment processes and their receiving environments. Bulk parameters ranged in concentrations representative of the wide variety of wastewater sources (residential vs. non-residential). Organic contaminants such as sterols, surfactant metabolites, antimicrobial agents, stimulants, metal-chelating agents, and other consumer product chemicals, measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were detected frequently in onsite system wastewater. Wastewater composition was unique between source type likely due to differences in source water and chemical usage. Removal efficiencies varied by engineered treatment type and physicochemical properties of the contaminant, resulting in discharge to the soil treatment unit at ecotoxicologically-relevant concentrations. Organic wastewater contaminants were detected less frequently and at lower concentrations in onsite system receiving environments. Understanding the occurrence and fate of organic wastewater contaminants in onsite wastewater treatment systems will aid in minimizing risk to ecological and human health.

  16. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for 235U (n ,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; McCutchan, E. A.; Johnson, T. D.; Dimitriou, P.

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 235U 235 fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of 86Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.

  17. Effects of Fission Yield Data in the Calculation of Antineutrino Spectra for ^{235}U(n,fission) at Thermal and Fast Neutron Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonzogni, A A; McCutchan, E A; Johnson, T D; Dimitriou, P

    2016-04-01

    Fission yields form an integral part of the prediction of antineutrino spectra generated by nuclear reactors, but little attention has been paid to the quality and reliability of the data used in current calculations. Following a critical review of the thermal and fast ENDF/B-VII.1 ^{235}U fission yields, deficiencies are identified and improved yields are obtained, based on corrections of erroneous yields, consistency between decay and fission yield data, and updated isomeric ratios. These corrected yields are used to calculate antineutrino spectra using the summation method. An anomalous value for the thermal fission yield of ^{86}Ge generates an excess of antineutrinos at 5-7 MeV, a feature which is no longer present when the corrected yields are used. Thermal spectra calculated with two distinct fission yield libraries (corrected ENDF/B and JEFF) differ by up to 6% in the 0-7 MeV energy window, allowing for a basic estimate of the uncertainty involved in the fission yield component of summation calculations. Finally, the fast neutron antineutrino spectrum is calculated, which at the moment can only be obtained with the summation method and may be relevant for short baseline reactor experiments using highly enriched uranium fuel.

  18. The effect of a combined biological and thermo-mechanical pretreatment of wheat straw on energy yields in coupled ethanol and methane generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuretzbacher, Franz; Blomqvist, Johanna; Lizasoain, Javier; Klietz, Lena; Potthast, Antje; Horn, Svein Jarle; Nilsen, Paal J; Gronauer, Andreas; Passoth, Volkmar; Bauer, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol and biogas are energy carriers that could contribute to a future energy system independent of fossil fuels. Straw is a favorable bioenergy substrate as it does not compete with food or feed production. As straw is very resistant to microbial degradation, it requires a pretreatment to insure efficient conversion to ethanol and/or methane. This study investigates the effect of combining biological pretreatment and steam explosion on ethanol and methane yields in order to improve the coupled generation process. Results show that the temperature of the steam explosion pretreatment has a particularly strong effect on possible ethanol yields, whereas combination with the biological pretreatment showed no difference in overall energy yield. The highest overall energy output was found to be 10.86 MJ kg VS(-1) using a combined biological and steam explosion pretreatment at a temperature of 200°C.

  19. Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

  20. Translational energy distribution from C sub 2 H sub 2 + hv(193. 3 nm) yields C sub 2 H + H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segall, J.; Wen, Y.; Lavi, R.; Singer, R.; Wittig, C. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-10-17

    The authors report the center-of-mass translational energy distribution for 193.3-nm photolysis of expansion-cooled C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, using high-n Rydberg-level excitation of nascent H atoms to facilitate high-resolution time-of-flight measurements. The observed resolution of {approximately}200 cm{sup {minus}1} is presently limited by the ArF photolysis laser, whose band width is approximately 200 cm{sup {minus}1}. The reported distribution clearly resolves a C{sub 2}H bending progression (v{sub 2}{approximately}400 cm{sup {minus}1}), which reflects the trans-bent C{sub 2}H{sub 2} excited state. A definitive assignment of all features is still not possible on the basis of currently available information of C{sub 2}H. These measurements yield an upper bound to D{sub 0} of 131.8 {plus minus} 0.5 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}.

  1. Search for dark matter and large extra dimensions in pp collisions yielding a photon and missing transverse energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Cerny, K; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins, M; De Jesus Damiao, D; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, S; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Avila, C; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Weber, M; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Davids, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H

    2012-06-29

    Results are presented from a search for new physics in the final state containing a photon (γ) and missing transverse energy (E[combininb /](T)). The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb(-1) collected in pp collisions at √[s]=7 TeV by the CMS experiment. The observed event yield agrees with standard-model expectations for the γ+E[combininb /](T) events. Using models for the production of dark-matter particles (χ), we set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits of 13.6-15.4 fb on χ production in the γ+E[combininb /](T) state. These provide the most sensitive upper limits for spin-dependent χ-nucleon scattering for χ masses (M(χ)) between 1 and 100 GeV. For spin-independent contributions, the present limits are extended to M(χ)<3.5 GeV. For models with 3-6 large extra dimensions, our data exclude extra-dimensional Planck scales between 1.64 and 1.73 TeV at 95% C.L.

  2. Statistical model analysis of hadron yields in proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions at SIS 18 energies

    CERN Document Server

    Agakishiev, G; Balanda, A; Belver, D; Belyaev, A; Berger-Chen, J C; Blanco, A; Böhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Castro, E; Chernenko, S; Destefanis, M; Dohrmann, F; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzon, J A; Gernhäuser, R; Gilardi, C; Göbel, K; Golubeva, M; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krasa, A; Krizek, F; Krücken, R; Kuc, H; Kühn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lange, J S; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Moriniere, E; Mousa, J; Müntz, C; Münzer, R; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Rehnisch, L; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Scheib, T; Schmah, A; Schuldes, H; Schwab, E; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wendisch, C; Wisniowski, M; Wüstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y

    2015-01-01

    The HADES data from p+Nb collisions at center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 3.2 GeV are analyzed by employing a statistical model. Accounting for the identified hadrons $\\pi^0$, $\\eta$, $\\Lambda$, $K^{0}_{s}$, $\\omega$ allows a surprisingly good description of their abundances with parameters $T_{chem}=(99\\pm11)$ MeV and $\\mu_{b}=(619\\pm34)$ MeV, which fits well in the chemical freeze-out systematics found in heavy-ion collisions. In supplement we reanalyze our previous HADES data from Ar+KCl collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 2.6 GeV with an updated version of the statistical model. We address equilibration in heavy-ion collisions by testing two aspects: the description of yields and the regularity of freeze-out parameters from a statistical model fit. Special emphasis is put on feed-down contributions from higher-lying resonance states which have been proposed to explain the experimentally observed $\\Xi^-$ excess present in both data samples.

  3. Evaluation of Yields of γ-Rays Produced by Electrons from Gas Jets Irradiated by Low-Energy Laser Pulses: Towards “Virtual Radioisotopes”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2011-04-01

    Electron generation from a gas jet irradiated by low-energy femtosecond laser pulses is studied as a promising source of ˜1 MeV radiation for radioisotope-free γ-ray imaging systems: “virtual radioisotopes”. The yield of γ-rays in the 0.5-2 MeV range produced by low-average-power lasers and gas targets exceeds the yields from solid tape targets up to 2 orders of magnitude; it can be competitive with the yield from conventional radioisotopes used in industrial applications.

  4. Determination of the biogas and methane yield of selected energy crops. [NAchWAchsende ROhstoffe]; Ermittlung der Biogas- und Methanausbeute ausgewaehlter Nawaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohl, Susanne

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this paper is the characterization of substrate quality and methane yield of different energy crops, which were cultivated in Schleswig-Holstein. The specific methane production of 224 variants was determined in with Hohenheim biogas yield test (HBT), 72 variants were investigated in a common batch test. The specific methane production (HBT) is 359-371 l{sub N}/kg{sub oDM} for wheat, 358-378 l{sub N}/kg{sub oDM} for maize and 341-372 l{sub N}/kg{sub oDM} for perennial ryegrass. The results for the specific methane production are due to a systematic offset in the batch experiment always below those of the HBT. Silages achieve higher gas yields than fresh substrates. The mass losses, which occur during ensiling, were compensated due to the higher gas yields. Maize is compared with other energy crops superior in terms of the yield per hectare. The experimentally determined methane yields showed a good agreement with calculated theoretical methane yields (method of WEIssBACH 2008, 2009).

  5. Criteria for onsite transfers of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opperman, E.K.; Jackson, E.J.; Eggers, A.G.

    1992-12-31

    A general description of the requirements for making onsite transfers of radioactive material is provided in Chapter 2, along with the required sequencey of activities. Various criteria for package use are identified in Chapters 3-13. These criteria provide protection against undue radiation exposure. Package shielding, containment, and surface contamination requirements are established. Criteria for providing criticality safety are enumerated in Chapter 6. Criteria for providing hazards information are established in Chapter 13. A glossary is provided.

  6. The On-Site Analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; De Cesare, Giovanni; De Rosa, Adriano; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Borkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Colomé, Pep; Reyes, Raquel de los; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Gotz, Diego; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Inoue, Susumu; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Flour, Thierry Le; Lindemann, Rico; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Markoff, Sera; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Oya, Igor; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rosen, Simon; Ribo, Marc; Tacchini, Alessandro; Schüssler, Fabian; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Wegner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the largest ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatories. The On-Site Analysis will be the first CTA scientific analysis of data acquired from the array of telescopes, in both northern and southern sites. The On-Site Analysis will have two pipelines: the Level-A pipeline (also known as Real-Time Analysis, RTA) and the level-B one. The RTA performs data quality monitoring and must be able to issue automated alerts on variable and transient astrophysical sources within 30 seconds from the last acquired Cherenkov event that contributes to the alert, with a sensitivity not worse than the one achieved by the final pipeline by more than a factor of 3. The Level-B Analysis has a better sensitivity (not be worse than the final one by a factor of 2) and the results should be available within 10 hours from the acquisition of the data: for this reason this analysis could be performed at the end of an observation or next morning. The latency (in part...

  7. Analysis of methane potentials of steam-exploded wheat straw and estimation of energy yields of combined ethanol and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Alexander; Bösch, Peter; Friedl, Anton; Amon, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Agrarian biomass as a renewable energy source can contribute to a considerable CO(2) reduction. The overriding goal of the European Union is to cut energy consumption related greenhouse gas emission in the EU by 20% until the year 2020. This publication aims at optimising the methane production from steam-exploded wheat straw and presents a theoretical estimation of the ethanol and methane potential of straw. For this purpose, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different time/temperature combinations. Specific methane yields were analyzed according to VDI 4630. Pretreatment of wheat straw by steam explosion significantly increased the methane yield from anaerobic digestion by up to 20% or a maximum of 331 l(N)kg(-1) VS compared to untreated wheat straw. Furthermore, the residual anaerobic digestion potential of methane after ethanol fermentation was determined by enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw using cellulase. Based on the resulting glucose concentration the ethanol yield and the residual sugar available for methane production were calculated. The theoretical maximum ethanol yield of wheat straw was estimated to be 0.249 kg kg(-1) dry matter. The achievable maximum ethanol yield per kg wheat straw dry matter pretreated by steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis was estimated to be 0.200 kg under pretreatment conditions of 200 degrees C and 10 min corresponding to 80% of the theoretical maximum. The residual methane yield from straw stillage was estimated to be 183 l(N)kg(-1) wheat straw dry matter. Based on the presented experimental data, a concept is proposed that processes wheat straw for ethanol and methane production. The concept of an energy supply system that provides more than two forms of energy is met by (1) upgrading obtained ethanol to fuel-grade quality and providing methane to CHP plants for the production of (2) electric energy and (3) utility steam that in turn can be used to operate distillation columns in the

  8. Energetic conversion of European semi-natural grassland silages through the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass: energy yields and the fate of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgen, Frank; Bühle, Lutz; Donnison, Iain; Heinsoo, Katrin; Wachendorf, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Twelve European habitat types were investigated to determine the influence of the IFBB technique (integrated generation of biogas and solid fuel from biomass) on the fate of organic compounds and energy yields of semi-natural grassland biomass. Concentration of organic compounds in silage and IFBB press cake (PC), mass flows within that system and methane yields of IFBB press fluids (PF) were determined. The gross energy yield of the IFBB technique was calculated in comparison to hay combustion (HC) and whole crop digestion (WCD). The IFBB treatment increased fibre and organic matter (OM) concentrations and lowered non-fibre carbohydrates and crude protein concentrations. The PF was highly digestible irrespective of habitat types, showing mean methane yields between 312.1 and 405.0 LN CH4 kg(-1) VS. Gross energy yields for the IFBB system (9.75-30.19MWh ha(-1)) were in the range of HC, outperformed WCD and were influenced by the habitat type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Production yields of {sup Nat}Zn(p,x){sup 67}Ga reaction in the energy range of 1.6 to 2.5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, J A; Miranda, P A; Cancino, S A; Morales, J R; Dinator, M I [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: javier.wachter@gmail.com

    2008-11-01

    Production yield of the {sup 67}Ga (t{sub 1/2} = 78.3hr.)radionuclide was measured by the {sup Nat}Zn(p,x){sup 67} Ga reaction in the energy range from 1.6 to 2.5 MeV. These results are the first reported at energies under 3 MeV. The overall uncertainty of these measurements are around 7%.

  10. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Energy Recovery from Co-Feeding of Cotton Gin Trash, Cow Manure, and Microalgae: A Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usman Hanif

    Full Text Available The intensive search of new and cleaner energy catches interest in recent years due to huge consumption of fossil fuels coupled with the challenge of energy and environmental sustainability. Production of renewable and environmentally benign energy from locally available raw materials is coming in the frontline. In this work, conversion of the combined biomass (cotton gin trash, cow manure, and Microalgae [Nannochloropsis oculata] through batch pyrolysis has been investigated. The effect of temperature to the production of energy fuels such as bio-oil, char, and biogas have been simulated considering the yield and energy content as responses. Result of the investigation generally revealed that the proportions of the different biomass did not significantly affect the product yield and energy recovery. Significant effect of temperature is evident in the simulation result of energy recovery whereby maximum conversion was achieved at 400°C for char (91 wt%, 600°C for syngas (22 wt%, and 551°C for bio-oil (48 wt%. Overall energy conversion efficiency of 75.5% was obtained at 589°C in which 15.6 MJ/kg of mixed biomass will be elevated to pyrolysis products.

  11. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Energy Recovery from Co-Feeding of Cotton Gin Trash, Cow Manure, and Microalgae: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad Usman; Capareda, Sergio C.; Iqbal, Hamid; Arazo, Renato Ortiz; Baig, Muhammad Anwar

    2016-01-01

    The intensive search of new and cleaner energy catches interest in recent years due to huge consumption of fossil fuels coupled with the challenge of energy and environmental sustainability. Production of renewable and environmentally benign energy from locally available raw materials is coming in the frontline. In this work, conversion of the combined biomass (cotton gin trash, cow manure, and Microalgae [Nannochloropsis oculata]) through batch pyrolysis has been investigated. The effect of temperature to the production of energy fuels such as bio-oil, char, and biogas have been simulated considering the yield and energy content as responses. Result of the investigation generally revealed that the proportions of the different biomass did not significantly affect the product yield and energy recovery. Significant effect of temperature is evident in the simulation result of energy recovery whereby maximum conversion was achieved at 400°C for char (91 wt%), 600°C for syngas (22 wt%), and 551°C for bio-oil (48 wt%). Overall energy conversion efficiency of 75.5% was obtained at 589°C in which 15.6 MJ/kg of mixed biomass will be elevated to pyrolysis products. PMID:27043929

  12. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Energy Recovery from Co-Feeding of Cotton Gin Trash, Cow Manure, and Microalgae: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad Usman; Capareda, Sergio C; Iqbal, Hamid; Arazo, Renato Ortiz; Baig, Muhammad Anwar

    2016-01-01

    The intensive search of new and cleaner energy catches interest in recent years due to huge consumption of fossil fuels coupled with the challenge of energy and environmental sustainability. Production of renewable and environmentally benign energy from locally available raw materials is coming in the frontline. In this work, conversion of the combined biomass (cotton gin trash, cow manure, and Microalgae [Nannochloropsis oculata]) through batch pyrolysis has been investigated. The effect of temperature to the production of energy fuels such as bio-oil, char, and biogas have been simulated considering the yield and energy content as responses. Result of the investigation generally revealed that the proportions of the different biomass did not significantly affect the product yield and energy recovery. Significant effect of temperature is evident in the simulation result of energy recovery whereby maximum conversion was achieved at 400°C for char (91 wt%), 600°C for syngas (22 wt%), and 551°C for bio-oil (48 wt%). Overall energy conversion efficiency of 75.5% was obtained at 589°C in which 15.6 MJ/kg of mixed biomass will be elevated to pyrolysis products.

  13. Experimental Neutron-Induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Simutkin, V D; Blomgren, J; Österlund, M; Bevilacqua, R; Ryzhov, I V; Tutin, G A; Yavshits, S G; Vaishnene, L A; Onegin, M S; Meulders, J P; Prieels, R

    2013-01-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For the peak neutron energies at 33, 45 and 60 MeV, the details of the data analysis and the experimental results have been published before and in this work we present data analysis in the low-energy tail of the neutron energy spectra. The preliminary measurement results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  14. Slope stability and bearing capacity of landfills and simple on-site test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, Atsushi; Doi, Yoichi; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2017-07-01

    This study discusses strength characteristics (slope stability, bearing capacity, etc.) of waste landfills through on-site tests that were carried out at 29 locations in 19 sites in Japan and three other countries, and proposes simple methods to test and assess the mechanical strength of landfills on site. Also, the possibility of using a landfill site was investigated by a full-scale eccentric loading test. As a result of this, landfills containing more than about 10 cm long plastics or other fibrous materials were found to be resilient and hard to yield. An on-site full scale test proved that no differential settlement occurs. The repose angle test proposed as a simple on-site test method has been confirmed to be a good indicator for slope stability assessment. The repose angle test suggested that landfills which have high, near-saturation water content have considerably poorer slope stability. The results of our repose angle test and the impact acceleration test were related to the internal friction angle and the cohesion, respectively. In addition to this, it was found that the air pore volume ratio measured by an on-site air pore volume ratio test is likely to be related to various strength parameters.

  15. Variation on biomass yield and morphological traits of energy grasses from the genus Miscanthus during the first years of crop establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jezowski, S.; Glowacka, K.; Kaczmarek, Z. [Institute of Plant Genetics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Strzeszynska 34, 60-479 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-02-15

    This study presents the results of investigations of variation, genotype x year interactions and genotype x year x location interactions for the yield and morphological traits of several selected clones of energy grasses of the genus Miscanthus. The analyses were performed on the best clones of selected hybrid plants, which were obtained within the species M. sinensis or are the result of interspecific hybridization of M. sinensis and M. sacchariflorus. Analyses were conducted on the basis of three-year field trials at two locations. The young plants produced from in vitro cultures were planted at a density of one plant per m{sup 2}. The early stages of plant development, from planting until peak yield in the third year of cultivation, were analysed. Statistical analyses performed on the yield and morphological traits as well as changes in these characteristics over the successive years of the study showed considerable genotypic variation for traits under study. Moreover, significant genotype x year interactions as well as genotype x year x location interactions were observed in terms of yield and morphological traits. Based on the collective results of the study, we suggest that apart from M. x giganteus particularly hybrids of M. sinensis x M. sacchariflorus, should be taken into consideration in genetic and breeding studies on the improvement of yield from energy grasses of the genus Miscanthus. (author)

  16. National onsite wastewater treatment: A national small flows clearinghouse summary of onsite systems in the United States, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angoli, T.

    1998-07-01

    In 1994, the National Small Flows Clearinghouse undertook the project of learning about the status of onsite systems across the country by contacting those in the local and state public health agencies who work with these systems every day. Approximately 3,500 agencies were sent a questionnaire containing questions about onsite systems. The project objectives included determining the following for each state for the year 1993: the number of new onsite systems permitted; reasons for permit denial; number of onsite systems reported to have failed; reasons for system failure; new onsite system construction/installation cost; how often onsite system inspections are performed; and who has responsibility for onsite system maintenance. The most common reasons given for permit denial were inadequate lot size, high water table, poor/inadequate soils, shallow bedrock, and central sewer availability. Health departments attributed failure of onsite systems to the following factors: age, unsuitable soils, lack of maintenance/pumping, high groundwater table, and excessive water use. Many health departments noted a correlation between failing systems and either inadequate or nonexistent regulations. One recurring observation made by the local health departments was that sites which previously would never have been considered for onsite system use are now being purchased, planned, and developed with onsite wastewater treatment in mind.

  17. Developing an in-Field Yield Monitoring System and Predicting Some Nutritional Quality Properties of Alfalfa Using Shear and Compressive Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M Maharlooei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precision Agriculture is continuously trying to address the sources and factors affecting the in-field variability and taking appropriate managerial decisions. One of the popular research focuses in the recent three decades has been on the development of new approaches to making yield variability maps. Advancement in development of sensors and the importance of quality factor in high value crops has motivated scientists to investigate real-time and nondestructive testing methods. This study tried to introduce and evaluate a new approach to concurrent yield mapping and to estimate some nutritional qualitative factors of alfalfa production. In this study, yield quantity was determined by measurement of added hay slice in every hay compression cycle by employing a new star wheel and integrating its output with positioning data from Global Positioning System. To predict some nutritional quality properties, measurement of specific shear energy applied on the cutting blade and compressive energy on plunger head of a hay baler in field conditions were also evaluated. The results of statistical analysis of yield quantity measurement data showed a very good correlation between the suggested approach and yield mass (r=0.96 and R2=0.92. The results of using specific shear energy for estimation of crude fiber and cumulative index RFV with regard to field conditions were rated as acceptable. Using specific compression energy was suitable only for estimating the dry matter. None of the suggested methods was able to estimate the hay crude protein. Further investigations at more extensive variations of quality indices and alfalfa varieties are suggested.

  18. O(n,x. gamma. ) reaction cross section for incident neutron energies between 6. 5 and 20. 0 MeV. [Yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, G.L.; Chapman, G.T.

    1979-09-01

    Differential cross sections for the neutron-induced gamma-ray production from oxygen were measured for incident neutron energies between 6.5 and 20.0 MeV. The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to provide the neutrons and a NaI spectrometer to detect the gamma rays at 125/sup 0/. The data presented are the double differential cross section, d/sup 2/sigma/d..cap omega..dE, for gamma-ray energies between 1.6 and 10.6 MeV for coarse intervals in incident neutron energy. The integrated yield for gamma rays of energies greater than 1.6 MeV with higher resolution in the neutron energy is also presented. The experimental results are compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). 34 references.

  19. Experimental and computer simulation study of radionuclide yields in the ADT materials irradiated with intermediate energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titarenko, Yu.E.; Shvedov, O.V.; Batyaev, V.F. [Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-11-01

    The results of measurements and computer simulations of the yields of residual product nuclei in {sup 209}Bi, {sup 208,207,206,nat}Pb, {sup 65,63}Cu, {sup 59}Co thin targets irradiated by 0.13, 1.2 and 1.5 GeV protons are presented. The yields were measured by direct high-precision {gamma}-spectrometry. The process was monitored by the {sup 27}Al(p,x){sup 24}Na reaction. 801 cross sections are presented and used in comparisons between the reaction yields obtained experimentally and simulated by the HETC, GNASH, LAHET, INUCL, CEM95, CASCADE, NUCLEUS, YIELDX, QMD and ALICE codes. (author)

  20. The Brookside Farm Wetland Ecosystem Treatment (WET System: A Low-Energy Methodology for Sewage Purification, Biomass Production (Yield, Flood Resilience and Biodiversity Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian C. Abrahams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater from domestic developments, farms and agro-industrial processing can be sources of pollution in the environment; current wastewater management methods are usually machine-based, and thus energy consuming. When Permaculture Principles are used in the creation of water purification and harvesting systems, there can be multiple environmental and economic benefits. In the context of energy descent, it may be considered desirable to treat wastewater using minimal energy. The constructed wetland design presented here is a low-entropy system in which wastewater is harvested and transformed into lush and productive wetland, eliminating the requirement for non-renewable energy in water purification, and also maximising benefits: biodiversity, flood resilience and yield. In permaculture design, the high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorous compounds in sewage are viewed as valuable nutrients, resources to be harvested by a constructed wetland ecosystem and converted into useful yield. Similarly, rainwater runoff is not viewed as a problem which can cause flooding, but as a potential resource to be harvested to provide a yield. This paper presents a case study, with both water quality and productivity data, from Brookside Farm UK, where the use of Permaculture Design Principles has created a combined wastewater management and purification system, accepting all site water.

  1. 77 FR 70478 - RG Steel Wheeling, LLC, Wheeling Office, A Division Of RG Steel, LLC, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ..., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Pro Unlimited and Green Energy Initiatives LLC, Including Workers...-site leased workers from Pro Unlimited and Green Energy Initiatives, LLC, Wheeling, West Virginia (TA-W... their wages reported through a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name...

  2. YIELDS OF IONS AND EXCITED STATES IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS EXPOSED TO X-RAYS OF 1 TO 30 KEV ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    1999-08-18

    When x-rays from a synchrotron source are absorbed in a liquid, the x-ray energy (E{sub x}) is converted by the photoelectric effect into the kinetic energy of the electrons released. For hydrocarbons, absorption by the K-electrons of carbon dominates. Thus the energy of the photoelectron (E{sub pe}) is E{sub x}-E{sub b}, where E{sub b} is the K-shell binding energy of carbon. Additional electrons with energy equal to E{sub b} is released in the Auger process that fills the hole in the K-shell. These energetic electrons will produce many ionizations, excitations and products. The consequences of the high density of ionizations and excitations along the track of the photoelectron and special effects near the K-edge are examined here.

  3. 2009 Melbourne metropolitan sewerage strategy: a portfolio of decentralised and on-site concept designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, V; Jackson, D W; Khalifé, M

    2010-01-01

    The bulk and retail water companies of the greater Melbourne area are developing the 2009 Metropolitan Sewerage Strategy to provide sustainable sewerage services to 2060. The objective of the strategy is to establish long term principles and near term actions to produce a robust sewage management system for Melbourne. Melbourne's existing sewerage system is largely centralised and discharges to two major treatment plants. Several small satellite treatment plants service local urban areas generally more distant from the centralised system. Decentralised and on-site wastewater systems are options for future sewage management and could play a role in local recycling. A portfolio of 18 on-site and decentralised concept designs was developed, applicable to the full range of urban development types in Melbourne. The concepts can be used in evaluation of metropolitan system configurations as part of future integrated water cycle planning. The options included secondary and tertiary treatment systems incorporating re-use of water for non potable uses, urine separation, black and greywater separation and composting toilets. On-site and cluster treatment systems were analysed. Each option is described by its indicative capital and operating costs, energy use and water and nutrient balances. This paper summarises and compares the portfolio mix of decentralized and on-site options in Melbourne's context.

  4. Impact of the atmospheric conditions to the bandgap engineering of multi-junction cells for optimization of the annual energy yield of CPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kenji; Lee, Kan-Hua; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2017-09-01

    The spectrum influence on the CPV multi-junction cell is not only responsible for the air mass but significantly influenced by the fluctuation of the atmospheric parameters. The Monte Carlo simulation assuming the best and worst conditions of the distribution of parameters was examined to the CPV multi-junction cells. It was shown both aerosol density and water precipitation affects to the optimum bandgap design. The optimum bandgap set in the area of the worst aerosol density was significantly different from those of the best area. Even though the bandgap was designed maximizing the annual energy yield in a set of annual data, the fluctuation of the atmospheric parameters affects the annually mean efficiency to ±5 % (best area) and ± 9 % (worst area). Considering this considerable influence on the annual energy yield of the CPV multi-junction cell, with junctions connected in series, the best number of the junctions was 4 and more than five junctions were not better for the annual energy yield.

  5. Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat andpower applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; HamachiLaCommare, Kristina

    2004-11-30

    While demand for electricity continues to grow, expansion of the traditional electricity supply system, or macrogrid, is constrained and is unlikely to keep pace with the growing thirst western economies have for electricity. Furthermore, no compelling case has been made that perpetual improvement in the overall power quality and reliability (PQR)delivered is technically possible or economically desirable. An alternative path to providing high PQR for sensitive loads would generate close to them in microgrids, such as the Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid. Distributed generation would alleviate the pressure for endless improvement in macrogrid PQR and might allow the establishment of a sounder economically based level of universal grid service. Energy conversion from available fuels to electricity close to loads can also provide combined heat and power (CHP) opportunities that can significantly improve the economics of small-scale on-site power generation, especially in hot climates when the waste heat serves absorption cycle cooling equipment that displaces expensive on-peak electricity. An optimization model, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), developed at Berkeley Lab identifies the energy bill minimizing combination of on-site generation and heat recovery equipment for sites, given their electricity and heat requirements, the tariffs they face, and a menu of available equipment. DER-CAM is used to conduct a systemic energy analysis of a southern California naval base building and demonstrates atypical current economic on-site power opportunity. Results achieve cost reductions of about 15 percent with DER, depending on the tariff.Furthermore, almost all of the energy is provided on-site, indicating that modest cost savings can be achieved when the microgrid is free to select distributed generation and heat recovery equipment in order to minimize its over all costs.

  6. 7 CFR 205.403 - On-site inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Certification § 205.403 On-site inspections. (a) On-site inspections....

  7. Effects of dietary energy and lysine levels on growth performance and carcass yields of Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 days of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z G; Rasolofomanana, T J; Tang, J; Jiang, Y; Xie, M; Yang, P L; Hou, S S

    2017-09-01

    A 2 × 6 factorial experiment, using 2 dietary apparent metabolizable energy (AME) levels (2,750 and 3,050 Kcal/kg) and 6 supplemental lysine (Lys) levels (0, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30, 0.40, and 0.50%), was conducted to study the effects of dietary energy and lysine levels on growth performance and carcass yields of Pekin ducks from hatch to 21 d of age. A total of 576 one-day-old male White Pekin ducks was randomly allotted to 12 dietary treatments, each containing 6 replicate pens with 8 birds per pen. At 21 d of age, body weight gain, feed intake, and feed/gain were measured, and then 2 ducks selected randomly from each pen were slaughtered to evaluate the yields of abdominal fat, breast meat, and leg meat. As a result, birds that were fed basal diets with no Lys supplementation showed growth depression, and significant positive effects of dietary Lys supplementation on body weight gain (P energy levels did not affect overall body weight gain (P > 0.05), but feed intake (P = 0.001) and feed/gain (P = 0.009) decreased significantly between the groups. Dietary Lys levels influenced the yields of breast (P energy levels had a significant positive effect only on abdominal fat yield (P = 0.014). The interaction between dietary energy and Lys influenced body weight gain of ducks significantly (P = 0.004). According to the broken-line regression analysis, Lys requirements of Pekin ducks for weight gain at 2,750 and 3,050 Kcal of AME/kg were 0.94 and 0.98%, respectively. It suggested that Lys requirement was higher at 3,050 Kcal of AME/kg than at 2,750 Kcal of AME/kg. Dietary energy content determined feed intake of the ducks, and high-energy diets will require a higher amino acid concentration to compensate for a lower feed intake. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. 1000kW on-site PAFC power plant development and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satomi, Tomohide; Koike, Shunichi [Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA), Osaka (Japan); Ishikawa, Ryou [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) have been conducting a joint project on development of a 5000kW urban energy center type PAFC power plant (pressurized) and a 1000kW on-site PAFC power plant (non-pressurized). The objective of the technical development of 1000kW on-site PAFC power plant is to realize a medium size power plant with an overall efficiency of over 70% and an electrical efficiency of over 36%, that could be installed in a large building as a cogeneration system. The components and system integration development work and the plant design were performed in 1991 and 1992. Manufacturing of the plant and installation at the test site were completed in 1994. PAC test was carried out in 1994, and generation test was started in January 1995. Demonstration test is scheduled for 1995 and 1996.

  9. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment on biogas yield and specific energy in anaerobic digestion of fruit and vegetable wholesale market wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhaneh Zeynali

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic pre-treatment has been considered as an environmentally friendly process for enhancing the biodegradability of organic matter in anaerobic digestion. However the consumed energy during the pre-treatment is a matter of challenge especially where energy generation is the main purpose of a biogas plant. The aim of the present work was to study the efficiency of ultrasonic pre-treatment in enhancement of biogas production from fruits and vegetable wholesale market waste. Three sonication times (9, 18, 27 min operating at 20 kHz and amplitude of 80 μm were used on the substrate. The highest methane yield was obtained at 18 min sonication (2380 kJ kg−1 total solids while longer exposure to sonication led to lower methane yield. This amount of biogas was obtained in 12 d of batch time. The energy content of the biogas obtained from this reactor was two times of the input energy for sonication.

  10. Feasibility Evaluation of an On-site Generator Network by the Cooperative Game Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Taketo; Fujii, Yasumasa; Yamaji, Kenji

    On-site generator, such as CGS (cogeneration system), is allegedly considered to be an effective end-use energy system in order to accomplish primary energy conservation, CO2 emission mitigation and system cost reduction, which characteristics eventually improve the whole performance of an existing energy system for the future. Considering the drawback of installing an end-use CGS into the customer with small or middle scale floor space, however, it is difficult to achieve those distinctive features because the thermal-electricity ratio of CGS does not always be in agreement with that of customer energy demand. In order to overcome that matching deficiency, it is hence better to organize an on-site generator network based on mutual electricity and heating transmission. But focusing on some cogenerators underlying their behaviors on maximizing their own profits, this on-site network, which situation corresponds to a grand coalition, is not necessarily established because of each cogenerator’s motivation to form a partial coalition and acquire its own profit as much as possible. In this paper, we attempt to analyze the optimal operation of an on-site generator network and identify by applying the nucleolus of the cooperative game theory the optimal benefit allocation strategy in order for the cogenerators to construct the network. Regarding the installation site of this network, the center of Tokyo area is assumed, which locational information includes floor space and so forth through a GIS (geographic information system) database. The results from the nucleolus suggest that all districts should impartially obtain the benefit from organizing network for the purpose of jointly attaining the system total cost reduction.

  11. Hydrogen and methane production by co-digestion of waste activated sludge and food waste in the two-stage fermentation process: substrate conversion and energy yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyuan; Li, Ruying; Ji, Min; Han, Li

    2013-10-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to produce hydrogen and methane from waste activated sludge and food waste by two-stage mesophilic fermentation. Hydrogen and methane production, energy yield, soluble organic matters, volatile solid removal efficiency and carbon footprint were investigated during two-stage digestion at various food waste proportions. The highest energy yield reached 14.0 kJ/g-VS at the food waste proportion of 85%, with hydrogen and methane yields of 106.4 ml-H2/g-VS and 353.5 ml-CH4/g-VS respectively. The dominant VFA composition was butyrate for co-digestion and sole food waste fermentation, whereas acetate was dominate in VFA for sole waste activated sludge fermentation. The VS removal efficiencies of co-digestion were 10-77% higher than that of waste activated sludge fermentation. Only 0.1-3.2% of the COD in feedstock was converted into hydrogen, and 14.1-40.9% to methane, with the highest value of 40.9% in methane achieved at food waste proportion of 85%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off

  13. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  14. On energy consumption for size-reduction and yields from subsequent enzymatic saccharification of pretreated lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Zhu; Junyong Zhu; Roland Gleisner; X.J. Pan

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of chemical pretreatment and disk-milling conditions on energy consumption for size-reduction and the efficiency of enzymatic cellulose saccharification of a softwood. Lodgepole pine wood chips produced from thinnings of a 100-year-old unmanaged forest were pretreated by hot-water, dilute-acid, and two SPORL processes (Sulfite...

  15. Determination of renewable energy yield from mixed waste material from the use of novel image analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagland, S T; Dudley, R; Naftaly, M; Longhurst, P J

    2013-11-01

    Two novel techniques are presented in this study which together aim to provide a system able to determine the renewable energy potential of mixed waste materials. An image analysis tool was applied to two waste samples prepared using known quantities of source-segregated recyclable materials. The technique was used to determine the composition of the wastes, where through the use of waste component properties the biogenic content of the samples was calculated. The percentage renewable energy determined by image analysis for each sample was accurate to within 5% of the actual values calculated. Microwave-based multiple-point imaging (AutoHarvest) was used to demonstrate the ability of such a technique to determine the moisture content of mixed samples. This proof-of-concept experiment was shown to produce moisture measurement accurate to within 10%. Overall, the image analysis tool was able to determine the renewable energy potential of the mixed samples, and the AutoHarvest should enable the net calorific value calculations through the provision of moisture content measurements. The proposed system is suitable for combustion facilities, and enables the operator to understand the renewable energy potential of the waste prior to combustion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific opinion on niacin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism: evaluation of a health claim pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to niacin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism. The Panel considers that niacin, the food constituent that is the subject of the health claim, is sufficiently characterised. Contribution to normal energy......-yielding metabolism is a beneficial physiological effect. The Panel has previously assessed a claim on niacin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism with a favourable outcome. The target population was the general population. The Panel considers that the role of niacin in contributing to normal energy......-yielding metabolism applies to all ages, including infants and young children (from birth to three years). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of niacin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism. The following wording reflects...

  17. An innovative experimental setup for the measurement of sputtering yield induced by keV energy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salou, P.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Langlinay, T.; Lelièvre, D.; Ban-d’Etat, B. [CIMAP (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCBN), Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2013-09-15

    An innovative experimental equipment allowing to study the sputtering induced by ion beam irradiation is presented. The sputtered particles are collected on a catcher which is analyzed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy without breaking the ultra high vacuum (less than 10{sup −9} mbar), avoiding thus any problem linked to possible contamination. This method allows to measure the angular distribution of sputtering yield. It is now possible to study the sputtering of many elements such as carbon based materials. Preliminary results are presented in the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and tungsten irradiated by an Ar{sup +} beam at 2.8 keV and 7 keV, respectively.

  18. Tungsten oxide thin film exposed to low energy He plasma: Evidence for a thermal enhancement of the erosion yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, H.; Addab, Y.; Maan, A.; Duran, J.; Donovan, D.; Pardanaud, C.; Ibrahim, M.; Cabié, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten oxide thin films (about 75 nm in thickness) produced by thermal oxidation of tungsten substrates were exposed to low energy He plasma (≈20 eV/He) with a flux of 2.5 × 1018 m-2 s-1 at two temperatures: room temperature and 673 K. The structure and morphology modifications which occur after this He bombardment and annealing treatments was studied using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Due to the low fluence (4 × 1021 m-2) and low ion energy, we have observed only few morphology modifications after He plasma exposure at room temperature. On the contrary, at 673 K, a change in the layer color is observed associated to an important erosion. Detailed analyses before/after exposure and before/after annealing allow us to describe the He interaction with the oxide layer, its erosion and structural modification at the atomic and micrometer scale.

  19. Energy landscape analysis of native folding of the prion protein yields the diffusion constant, transition path time, and rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Gupta, Amar Nath; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-09-04

    Protein folding is described conceptually in terms of diffusion over a configurational free-energy landscape, typically reduced to a one-dimensional profile along a reaction coordinate. In principle, kinetic properties can be predicted directly from the landscape profile using Kramers theory for diffusive barrier crossing, including the folding rates and the transition time for crossing the barrier. Landscape theory has been widely applied to interpret the time scales for protein conformational dynamics, but protein folding rates and transition times have not been calculated directly from experimentally measured free-energy profiles. We characterized the energy landscape for native folding of the prion protein using force spectroscopy, measuring the change in extension of a single protein molecule at high resolution as it unfolded/refolded under tension. Key parameters describing the landscape profile were first recovered from the distributions of unfolding and refolding forces, allowing the diffusion constant for barrier crossing and the transition path time across the barrier to be calculated. The full landscape profile was then reconstructed from force-extension curves, revealing a double-well potential with an extended, partially unfolded transition state. The barrier height and position were consistent with the previous results. Finally, Kramers theory was used to predict the folding rates from the landscape profile, recovering the values observed experimentally both under tension and at zero force in ensemble experiments. These results demonstrate how advances in single-molecule theory and experiment are harnessing the power of landscape formalisms to describe quantitatively the mechanics of folding.

  20. Comparison of carrier multiplication yields in PbS and PbSe nanocrystals: The role of competing energy-loss processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, John T.; Padilha, Lazaro A.; Qazilbash, M. M.; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Midgett, Aaron G; Luther, Joseph M; Beard, Matthew C; Nozik, Arthur J; Klimov, Victor I.

    2012-02-08

    Infrared band gap semiconductor nanocrystals are promising materials for exploring generation III photovoltaic concepts that rely on carrier multiplication or multiple exciton generation, the process in which a single high-energy photon generates more than one electron–hole pair. In this work, we present measurements of carrier multiplication yields and biexciton lifetimes for a large selection of PbS nanocrystals and compare these results to the well-studied PbSe nanocrystals. The similar bulk properties of PbS and PbSe make this an important comparison for discerning the pertinent properties that determine efficient carrier multiplication. We observe that PbS and PbSe have very similar biexciton lifetimes as a function of confinement energy. Together with the similar bulk properties, this suggests that the rates of multiexciton generation, which is the inverse of Auger recombination, are also similar. The carrier multiplication yields in PbS nanocrystals, however, are strikingly lower than those observed for PbSe nanocrystals. We suggest that this implies the rate of competing processes, such as phonon emission, is higher in PbS nanocrystals than in PbSe nanocrystals. Indeed, our estimations for phonon emission mediated by the polar Fröhlich-type interaction indicate that the corresponding energy-loss rate is approximately twice as large in PbS than in PbSe.

  1. Effect of oral mineral and energy supplementation on blood mineral concentrations, energetic and inflammatory profile, and milk yield in dairy cows affected with dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaquen, M; Galvão, K N; Coleman, A E; Santos, J E P; Goff, J P; Risco, C A

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of mineral/energy supplementation of dairy cows with dystocia on blood mineral concentrations, energetic and inflammatory profiles, and milk yield. Multiparous Holstein cows with dystocia were randomly assigned into two groups, (1) treated with a mineral/energy supplement (DME, n= 18) and (2) not treated (DNT, n= 22). A group of cows with normal parturition were randomly selected and were left untreated (NNT, n= 25). Cows in DME received an oral drench of 110 g of calcium and 400 g of propionate as calcium propionate plus 110 g potassium chloride and 150 g of magnesium sulfate administered within 6 h of calving and again 3 days post-partum. Compared to cows with a normal parturition, dystocic cows had decreased plasma calcium concentrations, increased plasma haptoglobin, decreased milk yield at 1 day post-partum, and tended to have increased rectal temperatures from 1 to 12 days post-partum. Compared with cows in DNT, those in DME had decreased plasma calcium concentrations and increased plasma magnesium concentrations 2 and 3 days post-partum, and a tendency for an increase in rectal temperature from 1 to 12 days post-partum. Dystocia is detrimental to calcium homeostasis post-partum, but mineral/energy supplementation as undertaken in this study is not recommended for use in cows with dystocia.

  2. Energy dependence of fission product yields from 235U, 238U, and 239Pu with monoenergetic neutrons between thermal and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Krishichayan; Tonchev, Anton; Tornow, Werner; Stoyer, Mark; Vieira, David; Wilhelmy, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of two months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. Preliminary results from thermal irradiations at the MIT research reactor will also be presented and compared to present data and evaluations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory through NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance grant No. DE-FG52-09NA29465, DE-FG52-09NA29448 and Office of Nuclear Physics Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  3. On-site wastewater technologies in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, G; Dallas, S; Anda, M; Mathew, K

    2001-01-01

    Domestic wastewater reuse is currently not permitted anywhere in Australia but is widely supported by the community, promoted by researchers, and improvised by up to 20% of householders. Its widespread implementation will make an enormous contribution to the sustainability of water resources. Integrated with other strategies in the outdoor living environment of settlements in arid lands, great benefit will be derived. This paper describes six options for wastewater reuse under research by the Remote Area Developments Group (RADG) at Murdoch University and case studies are given where productive use is being made for revegetation and food production strategies at household and community scales. Pollution control techniques, public health precautions and maintenance requirements are described. The special case of remote Aboriginal communities is explained where prototype systems have been installed by RADG to generate windbreaks and orchards. New Australian design standards and draft guidelines for domestic greywater reuse produced by the Western Australian State government agencies for mainstream communities are evaluated. It is recommended that dry composting toilets be coupled with domestic greywater reuse and the various types available in Australia are described. For situations where only the flushing toilet will suffice the unique 'wet composting' system can be used and this also is described. A vision for household and community-scale on-site application is presented.

  4. Enzyme-containing faeces of herbivores increases biogas yield of energy crops; Enzymhaltiger Kot von Pflanzenfressern erhoeht Biogasausbeute aus pflanzlicher Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensel-Gunke, Karen; Schimpf, Ulrike [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Abt. ' ' Biogene Rohstoffe' ' ; Getz, Josephine; Krocker, Manfred [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Tierhaltungssysteme und Verfahrenstechnik

    2013-06-01

    In order to increase the biogas yield of energy crops the degradation of fibrous constituents needs to be improved. In addition to mechanical and chemical procedures of treatment, more attention is given to research regarding enzymatic treatment. Therefore, efforts are concentrating on finding inexpensive sources for enzyme production. One source could be the digestive tract of herbivores which contains microorganisms and enzymes highly specialized in fibre degradation. The influence of such microorganisms and their enzymes on the degradation of maize silage has been demonstrated in anaerobic batch digestion tests using the example of rabbit faeces. (orig.)

  5. Effects of dietary energy intake during gestation and lactation on milk yield and composition of first, second and fourth parity sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Manfred; Jentsch, Werner; Kuhla, Siegfried; Wittenburg, Hildegard; Kreienbring, Fred; Scholze, Helmut; Rudolph, Paul E; Metges, Cornelia C

    2007-12-01

    In order to determine the effects of a varied level of dietary energy intake during pregnancy and lactation on milk yield and composition, first, second and fourth parity sows (Large White x German Landrace) were provided with energy at a level of either: (i) 100% of ME requirement (MEreq) during pregnancy and lactation, (ii) 120% MEreq during pregnancy and 80% during lactation, and (iii) 80% MEreq during pregnancy and 120% during lactation. In spite of equal target levels feed analysis revealed that gestating first parity sows with 120/80 treatment combination and lactating sows of 80/120 treatment combination received 25, and 11-17% more digestible N than in the respective 100/100 treatment combination. Irrespective of this 120/80 sows responded with the highest milk DM, fat, and energy contents, and the lowest lactose concentrations whereas protein levels where not affected, irrespective of parity (p changes ceased at day 7 of lactation with a reduction of milk GE and protein, and an increase of lactose content. Concentrations of threonine, arginine, valine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, cystine, and tryptophan, as well as stearic, oleic, and linoleic acid were higher in colostrum than in milk at later lactation stages. In contrast, laurine, myristic, palmitic, and palmitoleic acids were lower concentrated in colostrum. In conclusion, these results illustrate the importance of body reserve mobilization for milk production in sows and indicate that low energy supply during gestation cannot be compensated by higher energy supply during lactation.

  6. Predictive capability for Z-Petawatt-driven high-energy Kα x-ray yields used to image HEDP experiments on the Z Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Bennett, G. R.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-11-01

    The Z-Petawatt laser (ZPW) will provide a high-energy, ultra-short- duration Kα x-ray source for imaging HEDP experiments on the Z Machine. Crucial to the best imaging performance is the attainment of the highest possible conversion efficiency ɛ of laser energy into Kα x-rays. We test novel target and imaging concepts aimed at dramatically increasing ɛ, which, if realized, would be an outstanding benefit to the quality of our experiments on Z. The measured ɛ in recent ZPW experiments was correctly predicted within the experimental uncertainty, and so provides confidence for our established capability to predict high-energy x-ray yield in other, novel target arrangements for increasing ɛ. Quality and contrast improvements in high- energy x-ray imaging, whether from traditional or novel sources, are directly beneficial to HEDP experimental platforms such as Z and NIF. [4pt] Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. Support provided by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Sandia.

  7. Microbial fuel cell coupled to biohydrogen reactor: a feasible technology to increase energy yield from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, J; Fuentes, L; Cabezas, A; Etchebehere, C

    2017-02-20

    An important pollutant produced during the cheese making process is cheese whey which is a liquid by-product with high content of organic matter, composed mainly by lactose and proteins. Hydrogen can be produced from cheese whey by dark fermentation but, organic matter is not completely removed producing an effluent rich in volatile fatty acids. Here we demonstrate that this effluent can be further used to produce energy in microbial fuel cells. Moreover, current production was not feasible when using raw cheese whey directly to feed the microbial fuel cell. A maximal power density of 439 mW/m(2) was obtained from the reactor effluent which was 1000 times more than when using raw cheese whey as substrate. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing showed that potential electroactive populations (Geobacter, Pseudomonas and Thauera) were enriched on anodes of MFCs fed with reactor effluent while fermentative populations (Clostridium and Lactobacillus) were predominant on the MFC anode fed directly with raw cheese whey. This result was further demonstrated using culture techniques. A total of 45 strains were isolated belonging to 10 different genera including known electrogenic populations like Geobacter (in MFC with reactor effluent) and known fermentative populations like Lactobacillus (in MFC with cheese whey). Our results show that microbial fuel cells are an attractive technology to gain extra energy from cheese whey as a second stage process during raw cheese whey treatment by dark fermentation process.

  8. Procurement Specifications Templates for On-Site Solar Photovoltaic: For Use in Developing Federal Solicitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-01-16

    With the increasing adaption of on-site renewable energy systems designed to feed site loads, there is a critical need to develop tools that allow the federal sector to become a mature and sophisticated consumer. This document is intended to reduce project development and operational risks while increasing the speed at which projects are completed; two necessary components to reach the scale required to meet mandates and achieve cost savings for taxpayers. This guide is intended to act as a living document where lessons learned from the increasing number of projects can be incorporated and provide guidance for efforts. While additional guides will be developed to cover other renewable technologies, this guide covers on-site solar photovoltaic systems with an emphasis on third-party designed, financed, owned, and operated systems.

  9. Yields of nuclear fragments in the interactions of carbon nuclei with a beryllium target at a projectile energy of 0.6 GeV per nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, B. M.; Alexeev, P. N.; Borodin, Yu. A.; Bulychjov, S. A.; Gudima, K. K.; Dukhovskoy, I. A.; Krutenkova, A. P.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martemianov, M. A.; Matsyuk, M. A.; Mashnik, S. G.; Turdakina, E. N.; Khanov, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    The yields of long-lived nuclear fragments at an angle of 3.5° that originate fromthe fragmentation of carbon ions with an energy of T 0 = 0.6 GeV per nucleon on a berylliumtarget were measured in the FRAGMexperiment at the ITEP TWA heavy-ion accelerator. The momentum spectra of these fragments cover both the fragmentation-maximum region and the cumulative region. The respective differential cross sections change by about five orders of magnitude. The momentum distributions of fragments in the laboratory frame and their kinetic-energy distributions in the rest frame of the fragmenting nucleus are used to test the predictions of four models of ion-ion interactions: BC, INCL++, LAQGSM03.03, and QMD.

  10. Determination of Fission Product Yields of 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Neutron Energies from 0.5 to 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Becker, John; Bhatia, Chitra; Bhike, Megha; Fowler, Malcolm; Howell, Calvin; Kelley, John; Stoyer, Mark; Tonchev, Anton; Tornow, Werner; Vieira, Dave; Wilhelmy, Jerry

    2014-03-01

    A joint TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has been formed to study the issue of possible energy dependences for certain fission product isotopes. Work has been carried out at the TUNL 10 MV Tandem accelerator which produces nearly mono-energetic neutrons via either 2H(d,n)3He,3H(d,n)4He,or3H(p,n)3He reactions. Three dual fission ionization chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U and 239Pu thick target foils and thin monitor foils respectively, were exposed to the neutron beams. After irradiation, thick target foils were gamma counted over a period of 1-2 months and characteristic gamma rays from fission products were recorded using HPGe detectors at TUNL's low background counting area. Using the dual fission chambers, relative fission product yield were determined at a high precision of 2-3 % as well as absolute fission product yields at a lower precision of 5-6 %. Preliminary results will be presented for a number of fission product isotopes over the incident neutron energy range of 0.5 to 14.8 MeV.

  11. Energy Dependence of Neutron-Induced Fission Product Yields of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Matthew; Tornow, Werner; Tonchev, Anton; Vieira, Dave; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Arnold, Charles; Fowler, Malcolm; Stoyer, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements have been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission products between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of activation utilizing specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. The dual-fission chambers are back-to-back ionization chambers encasing a target with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the fission rate in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting was performed on well-shield HPGe detectors over a period of 2 months per activation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 4.6 and 14.8 MeV.

  12. Distillate yield improvement using a parabolic dish reflector coupled single slope basin solar still with thermal energy storage using beeswax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aondoyila KUHE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A single slope solar still, integrated with latent heat thermal energy storage system coupled to a parabolic concentrator was designed with the aim of improving productivity. 14 kg of beeswax was used as phase change material (PCM between the absorber plate and the bottom of the still to keep the operating temperature of the still high enough to produce distilled water even during the sunset hours. The bottom of the still is covered by 0.2 m aluminum sheet painted black on the side facing the parabolic concentrator to help in absorbing solar radiation reflected from the parabolic concentrator and conducting same to the PCM. To determine the effect of PCM, a solar still without PCM was used to compare with the solar still with PCM. The temperature of water, air temperature, inner surface glass temperature and outer surface glass temperature were measured. Experimental results show that the effect of thermal storage in the parabolic concentrator-coupled single slope solar still increased the productivity by 62%.

  13. Measurements on the gas desorption yield of the oxygen-free copper irradiated with low-energy Xe10+ and O+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Z. Q.; Li, P.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xie, W. J.; Zheng, W. H.; Liu, X. J.; Chang, J. J.; Luo, C.; Meng, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, Y. M.; Yin, Y.; Chai, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Heavy ion beam lost on the accelerator vacuum wall will release quantity of gas molecules and make the vacuum system deteriorate seriously. This phenomenon is called dynamic vacuum effect, observed at CERN, GSI and BNL, leading to the decrease of beam lifetime when increasing beam intensity. Heavy ion-induced gas desorption, which results in dynamic vacuum effect, becomes one of the most important problems for future accelerators proposed to operate with intermediate charge state beams. In order to investigate the mechanism of this effect and find the solution method for the IMP future project High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF), which is designed to extract 1 × 1011 uranium particles with intermediate charge state per cycle, two dedicated experiment setups have been installed at the beam line of the CSR and the 320 kV HV platform respectively. Recently, experiment was performed at the 320 kV HV platform to study effective gas desorption with oxygen-free copper target irradiated with continuous Xe10+ beam and O+ beam in low energy regime. Gas desorption yield in this energy regime was calculated and the link between gas desorption and electronic energy loss in Cu target was proved. These results will be used to support simulations about dynamic vacuum effect and optimizations about efficiency of collimators to be installed in the HIAF main synchrotron BRing, and will also provide guidance for future gas desorption measurements in high energy regime.

  14. Occurrence and fate of organic contaminants during onsite wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen E; Barber, Larry B; Brown, Gregory K; Siegrist, Robert L

    2006-12-01

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems serve approximately 25% of the U.S. population. However, little is known regarding the occurrence and fate of organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs), including endocrine disrupting compounds, during onsite treatment. A range of OWCs including surfactant metabolites, steroids, stimulants, metal-chelating agents, disinfectants, antimicrobial agents, and pharmaceutical compounds was quantified in wastewater from 30 onsite treatment systems in Summit and Jefferson Counties, CO. The onsite systems represent a range of residential and nonresidential sources. Eighty eight percent of the 24 target compounds were detected in one or more samples, and several compounds were detected in every wastewater sampled. The wastewater matrices were complex and showed unique differences between source types due to differences in water and consumer product use. Nonresidential sources generally had more OWCs at higher concentrations than residential sources. Additional aerobic biofilter-based treatment beyond the traditional anaerobic tank-based treatment enhanced removal for many OWCs. Removal mechanisms included volatilization, biotransformation, and sorption with efficiencies from 99% depending on treatment type and physicochemical properties of the compound. Even with high removal rates during confined unit onsite treatment, OWCs are discharged to soil dispersal units at loadings up to 20 mg/m2/d, emphasizing the importance of understanding removal mechanisms and efficiencies in onsite treatment systems that discharge to the soil and water environments.

  15. Corporate travel medicine: benefit analysis of on-site services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, T S; Spengler, S E; Collins, T R

    2001-01-01

    Corporations with employees who travel internationally address their travel-related medical needs in a variety of ways. Options utilized include corporate medical departments, local health departments, and local clinics, both contracted and independent. A travel clinic at a university medical center routinely provided preventive travel medicine services for many of the local companies. Two of these companies had on-site medical clinics which routinely saw patients for occupational and personal health reasons. At these companies , the university travel clinic assisted in moving employee travel medicine services to the on-site clinic. Direct and indirect costs for new, predeparture employee travel care at each company were compared before, and after, the move on-site. When measured per patient, total cost savings associated with the on-site travel clinic were greater than 15% at both companies (17%, 25%), primarily due to the value of the employees' time saved with decreased travel. Utilization increased at one company by 24% over the first 8 months and lead to higher overall cost, but this cost increase was only 4%. Informal assessments of the value of the on-site service at both companies was uniformly positive. For certain corporate settings, on-site clinics may be effective ways of providing travel medicine services.

  16. Pathogen Treatment Guidance and Monitoring Approaches for On-Site Non-Potable Water (2016 Southwest Onsite Wastewater Conference)

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the reuse of alternative water sources continues to gain popularity, public utilities and other stakeholders are seeking guidance on pathogen treatment requirements and monitoring approaches for nonpotable use of onsite collected waters.  Given that alternative water...

  17. The role of the metastable O2(b{{}^{1}}{\\Sigma}_{\\text {g}}^{+} ) and energy-dependent secondary electron emission yields in capacitively coupled oxygen discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannesdottir, H.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of including the singlet metastable molecule O2(b{{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) in the discharge model of a capacitively coupled rf driven oxygen discharge are explored. We furthermore examine the addition of energy-dependent secondary electron emission yields from the electrodes to the discharge model. The one-dimensional object-oriented particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code oopd1 is used for this purpose, with the oxygen discharge model considering the species {{\\text{O}}2}≤ft({{\\text{X}}3}Σ\\text{g}-\\right) , {{\\text{O}}2}≤ft({{\\text{a}}1}{{Δ }\\text{g}}\\right) , {{\\text{O}}2}≤ft({{\\text{b}}1}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) , O(3P), O(1D), \\text{O}2+ , O+, O-, and electrons. The effects on particle density profiles, the electron heating rate profile, the electron energy probability function and the sheath width are explored including and excluding the metastable oxygen molecules and secondary electron emission. Earlier we have demonstrated that adding the metastable O2(a{{}1}{{Δ }\\text{g}} ) to the discharge model changes the electron heating from having contributions from both bulk and sheath heating to being dominated by sheath heating for pressures above 50 mTorr. We find that including the metastable O2(b{{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) further decreases the ohmic heating and the effective electron temperature in the bulk region. The effective electron temperature in the electronegative core is found to be less than 1 eV in the pressure range 50-200 mTorr which agrees with recent experimental findings. Furthermore, we find that including an energy-dependent secondary electron emission yield for \\text{O}2+ -ions has a significant influence on the discharge properties, including decreased sheath width.

  18. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  19. Using aeroelastic structures with nonlinear switching electronics to increase potential energy yield in airflow: investigating analog control circuitry for automated peak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalca, Alexander G.; Drosinos, Jonathan G.; Grayson, Malika; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-03-01

    Bending piezoelectric transducers have the ability to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations induced by the ambient airflow. Such harvesters can have useful applications in the operation of low power devices, and their relatively small size makes them ideal for use in urban environments over civil infrastructure. One of the areas of focus regarding piezoelectric energy harvesting is the circuit topology used to store the harvested power. This study aims to further investigate the increase in potential energy yield from the piezoelectric harvester by optimizing the circuitry connecting the piezoelectric transducer and the power storage interface. When compared to an optimal resistive load case, it has been shown that certain circuit topologies, specifically synchronized switching and discharging to a storage capacitor through an inductor (SSDCI), can increase the charging power by as much as 400% if the circuit is completely lossless. This paper proposes a strategy for making a self-sufficient SSDCI circuit capable of peak detection for the synchronized switching using analog components. Using circuit simulation software, the performance of this proposed self-sufficient circuit is compared to an ideal case, and the effectiveness of the self-sufficient circuit strategy is discussed based on these simulation results. Further investigation of a physical working model of the new circuit proposal will be developed and experimental results of the circuit's performance obtained and compared to the estimated performance from the model.

  20. ttH, H {yields} WW{sup (*)} analysis at Atlas, LHC and Very Low Energy electron studies of 2004 combined test beam; Analyse ttH,H {yields} WW{sup (*)} avec ATLAS au LHC et etude des electron a tres basses energie dans le test faisceau combine 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H

    2008-06-15

    The Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN is a proton-proton collider with a designed center of mass energy of 14 TeV. ATLAS is a general purpose particle detector located at one of the colliding point of the LHC. Using ATLAS Computing System Commissioning (CSC) Monte Carlo full simulation data of the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} channel, this thesis studies the feasibility of measuring top-quark Yukawa Coupling up to 30 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity, within the intermediate Higgs mass range from 120 to 200 GeV. For the first time, trigger, pileup effects as well as all possible systematic uncertainties are extensively studied. For a Higgs mass of 160 GeV, with the detailed systematics uncertainties studied, the signal significance is shown to exceed 2{sigma} by combining 2 leptons and 3 leptons final states together. The combined branching ratio of {sigma}{sub tt}-bar{sub H}*BR{sub H{yields}WW{sup (*)}} can reach an accuracy of 47%, and gives important information on the top quark Yukawa Coupling. This is the first study of the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} channel based on full simulation data, including a complete and detailed study of the systematic uncertainties. The most difficult part of the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} analysis is to extract signal from an abundant background since the total cross section of signal is only 0.1% of the main background. Moreover, signals have a complex final state of at least 4 jets, 2 leptons, 2 neutrinos, making the Higgs mass reconstruction very difficult. Lepton isolation is one of the most powerful method to suppress reducible backgrounds. This thesis develops a special Cone Isolation procedure, which suppress by a factor 5 the main tt-bar background. Lepton energy scale uncertainty is one of the important systematics for the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} analysis. A good linearity of Very Low Energy (VLE) electrons can improve the performance of estimating electron energy scale. The second part of this thesis

  1. Slow-Injection Growth of Seeded CdSe/CdS Nanorods with Unity Fluorescence Quantum Yield and Complete Shell to Core Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coropceanu, Igor; Rossinelli, Aurelio; Caram, Justin R; Freyria, Francesca S; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2016-03-22

    A two-step process has been developed for growing the shell of CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods. The method combines an established fast-injection-based step to create the initial elongated shell with a second slow-injection growth that allows for a systematic variation of the shell thickness while maintaining a high degree of monodispersity at the batch level and enhancing the uniformity at the single-nanorod level. The second growth step resulted in nanorods exhibiting a fluorescence quantum yield up to 100% as well as effectively complete energy transfer from the shell to the core. This improvement suggests that the second step is associated with a strong suppression of the nonradiative channels operating both before and after the thermalization of the exciton. This hypothesis is supported by the suppression of a defect band, ubiquitous to CdSe-based nanocrystals after the second growth.

  2. On-site enzymes produced from Trichoderma reesei RUT-C30 and Aspergillus saccharolyticus for hydrolysis of wet exploded corn stover and loblolly pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Vandana; Eckard, Anahita D; Teller, Philip; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2014-02-01

    Cellulase production by two filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei RUT-C30 and novel fungal strain, Aspergillus saccharolyticus on pretreated corn stover was investigated. Cellulase production was followed by the hydrolysis of two feedstocks, wet-exploded corn stover (WECS) and wet-exploded loblolly pine (WELP) by on-site produced enzyme cocktails containing cellulase from T. reesei RUT-C30 and β-glucosidase from A. saccharolyticus. The sugar yields using the on-site enzyme cocktails were compared with commercial enzymes preparations, Celluclast 1.5L and Novozym 188 at two substrate concentrations, 5% and 10% (w/w) and enzyme loading at 5 and 15 FPU/g glucan for WECS and WELP. The highest sugar yields were obtained at 5% (w/w) substrate concentration and 15 FPU/g glucan for both feedstocks. Glucose yields of 81% and 88% were obtained from on-site and commercial enzymes, respectively using WECS as feed stock. The sugar yields were 55% and 58% for WELP samples hydrolyzed with on-site and commercial enzymes, respectively.

  3. A business case for on-site generation: The BD biosciences pharmingen project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Ryan; Creighton, Charles; Bailey, Owen; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Deregulation is haltingly changing the United States electricity markets. The resulting uncertainty and/or rising energy costs can be hedged by generating electricity on-site and other benefits, such as use of otherwise wasted heat, can be captured. The Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) of 1978 first invited relatively small-scale generators ({ge} 1 MW) into the electricity market. The advent of efficient and reliable small scale and renewable equipment has spurred an industry that has, in recent years, made even smaller (business scale) electricity generation an economically viable option for some consumers. On-site energy capture and/or conversion, known as distributed energy resources (DER), offers consumers many benefits, such as economic savings and price predictability, improved reliability, control over power quality, and emissions reductions. Despite these benefits, DER adoption can be a daunting move to a customer accustomed to simply paying a monthly utility bill. San Diego is in many ways an attractive location for DER development: It has high electricity prices typical of California and a moderate climate i.e. energy loads are consistent throughout the year. Additionally, the price shock to San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) customers during the summer of 2000 has interested many in alternatives to electricity price vulnerability. This report examines the business case for DER at the San Diego biotechnology supply company, BD Biosciences Pharmingen, which considered DER for a building with 200-300 kW base-load, much of which accommodates the refrigerators required to maintain chemicals. Because of the Mediterranean climate of the San Diego area and the high rate of air changes required due to on-site use of chemicals, modest space heating is required throughout the year. Employees work in the building during normal weekday business hours, and daily peak loads are typically about 500 kW.

  4. Negative energy balance and hepatic gene expression patterns in high-yielding dairy cows during the early postpartum period: a global approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, S D; Waters, S M; Kenny, D A; Diskin, M G; Fitzpatrick, R; Patton, J; Wathes, D C; Morris, D G

    2010-11-15

    In high-yielding dairy cows the liver undergoes extensive physiological and biochemical changes during the early postpartum period in an effort to re-establish metabolic homeostasis and to counteract the adverse effects of negative energy balance (NEB). These adaptations are likely to be mediated by significant alterations in hepatic gene expression. To gain new insights into these events an energy balance model was created using differential feeding and milking regimes to produce two groups of cows with either a mild (MNEB) or severe NEB (SNEB) status. Cows were slaughtered and liver tissues collected on days 6-7 of the first follicular wave postpartum. Using an Affymetrix 23k oligonucleotide bovine array to determine global gene expression in hepatic tissue of these cows, we found a total of 416 genes (189 up- and 227 downregulated) to be altered by SNEB. Network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that SNEB was associated with widespread changes in gene expression classified into 36 gene networks including those associated with lipid metabolism, connective tissue development and function, cell signaling, cell cycle, and metabolic diseases, the three most significant of which are discussed in detail. SNEB cows displayed reduced expression of transcription activators and signal transducers that regulate the expression of genes and gene networks associated with cell signaling and tissue repair. These alterations are linked with increased expression of abnormal cell cycle and cellular proliferation associated pathways. This study provides new information and insights on the effect of SNEB on gene expression in high-yielding Holstein Friesian dairy cows in the early postpartum period.

  5. Projections of long-term changes in solar radiation based on CMIP5 climate models and their influence on energy yields of photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris; Henschel, Florian; Müller, Björn

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally, for the planning and assessment of solar energy systems, the amount of solar radiation (sunlight) incident on the Earth's surface is assumed to be constant over the years. However, with changing climate and air pollution levels, solar resources may no longer be stable over time and undergo substantial decadal changes. Observational records covering the past decades confirm long-term changes in this quantity. Here we examine, how the latest generation of climate models used for the 5th IPCC report projects potential changes in surface solar radiation over the coming decades, and how this may affect, in combination with the expected greenhouse warming, solar power output from photovoltaic (PV) systems. For this purpose, projections up to the mid 21th century from 39 state of the art climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) are analysed globally and for selected key regions with major solar power production capacity. The large model ensemble allows to assess the degree of consistency of their projections. Models are largely consistent in the sign of the projected changes in solar radiation under cloud-free conditions as well as in surface temperatures over most of the globe, while still reasonably consistent over a considerable part of the globe in the sign of changes in cloudiness and associated changes in solar radiation. A first order estimate of the impact of solar radiation and temperature changes on energy yields of PV systems under the RPC8.5 scenario indicates statistically significant decreases in PV outputs in large parts of the world, but notable exceptions with positive trends in parts of Europe and the South-East of China. Projected changes between 2006 and 2049 under the RCP8.5 scenario overall are on the order of 1 % per decade for horizontal planes, but may be larger for tilted or tracked planes as well as on shorter (decadal) timescales. Related References: Wild, M., Folini, D., Henschel, F., and M

  6. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  7. The potential of imposed magnetic fields for enhancing ignition probability and fusion energy yield in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Rhodes, M. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Blackfield, D. T.; Hawkins, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the potential that imposed magnetic fields of tens of Tesla that increase to greater than 10 kT (100 MGauss) under implosion compression may relax the conditions required for ignition and propagating burn in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. This may allow the attainment of ignition, or at least significant fusion energy yields, in presently performing ICF targets on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) that today are sub-marginal for thermonuclear burn through adverse hydrodynamic conditions at stagnation [Doeppner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055001 (2015)]. Results of detailed two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic-burn simulations applied to NIF capsule implosions with low-mode shape perturbations and residual kinetic energy loss indicate that such compressed fields may increase the probability for ignition through range reduction of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction, and potential stabilization of higher-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Optimum initial applied fields are found to be around 50 T. Given that the full plasma structure at capsule stagnation may be governed by three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamics, the formation of closed magnetic field lines might further augment ignition prospects. Experiments are now required to further assess the potential of applied magnetic fields to ICF ignition and burn on NIF.

  8. Optical and adhesive properties of dust deposits on solar mirrors and their effects on specular reflectivity and electrodynamic cleaning for mitigating energy-yield loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Malay; Yellowhair, Julius; Stark, Jeremy; Heiling, Calvin; Hudelson, John; Hao, Fang; Gibson, Hannah; Horenstein, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale solar plants are mostly installed in semi-arid and desert areas. In those areas, dust layer buildup on solar collectors becomes a major cause for energy yield loss. Development of transparent electrodynamic screens (EDS) and their applications for self-cleaning operation of solar mirrors are presented with a primary focus on the removal dust particles smaller than 30 µm in diameter while maintaining specular reflection efficiency electric field charges the deposited particles, lifts them form the substrate by electrostatic forces and propels the dust layer off of the collector's surface by a traveling wave. The cleaning process takes less than 2 minutes; needs energy less than 1 Wh/m2 without requiring any water or manual labor. The reflection efficiency can be restored > 95% of the original clean-mirror efficiency. We briefly present (1) loss of specular reflection efficiency as a function of particle size distribution of deposited dust, and (2) the effects of the electrode design and materials used for minimizing initial loss of specular reflectivity in producing EDS-integrated solar mirrors. Optimization of EDS by using a figure of merit defined by the ratio of dust removal efficiency to the initial loss of specular reflection efficiency is discussed.

  9. A Brown Mesoporous TiO2-x /MCF Composite with an Extremely High Quantum Yield of Solar Energy Photocatalysis for H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong; Qiu, Bocheng; Tian, Baozhu; Anpo, Masakazu; Che, Michel

    2015-04-24

    A brown mesoporous TiO2-x /MCF composite with a high fluorine dopant concentration (8.01 at%) is synthesized by a vacuum activation method. It exhibits an excellent solar absorption and a record-breaking quantum yield (Φ = 46%) and a high photon-hydrogen energy conversion efficiency (η = 34%,) for solar photocatalytic H2 production, which are all higher than that of the black hydrogen-doped TiO2 (Φ = 35%, η = 24%). The MCFs serve to improve the adsorption of F atoms onto the TiO2 /MCF composite surface, which after the formation of oxygen vacancies by vacuum activation, facilitate the abundant substitution of these vacancies with F atoms. The decrease of recombination sites induced by high-concentration F doping and the synergistic effect between lattice Ti(3+)-F and surface Ti(3+)-F are responsible for the enhanced lifetime of electrons, the observed excellent absorption of solar light, and the photocatalytic production of H2 for these catalysts. The as-prepared F-doped composite is an ideal solar light-driven photocatalyst with great potential for applications ranging from the remediation of environmental pollution to the harnessing of solar energy for H2 production.

  10. Energy Independent Agri-Business Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niday, Karen [Cortland County Business Development Corporation, Cortland, NY (United States)

    2011-01-30

    Establish and showcase energy independence at a small to medium scale farm by installing renewable energy equipment that will enable an agribusiness to survive using only energy that is generated onsite

  11. A chlorophyll fluorescence analysis of photosynthetic efficiency, quantum yield and photon energy dissipation in PSII antennae of Lactuca sativa L. leaves exposed to cinnamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of cinnamic acid (CA) on growth, biochemical and physiological responses of Lactuca sativa L. CA (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mM) treatments decreased plant height, root length, leaf and root fresh weight, but it did not affect the leaf water status. CA treatment (1.5 mM) significantly reduced F(v), F(m), photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) and quantum yield of PSII (ΦPSII) photochemistry in L. sativa. The photochemical fluorescence quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were reduced after treatment with 1.5 mM CA. Fraction of photon energy absorbed by PS II antennae trapped by "open" PS II reaction centers (P) was reduced by CA (1.5 mM) while, portion of absorbed photon energy thermally dissipated (D) and photon energy absorbed by PSII antennae and trapped by "closed" PSII reaction centers (E) was increased. Carbon isotope composition ratios (δ(13)C) was less negative (-27.10) in CA (1.5 mM) treated plants as compared to control (-27.61). Carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) and ratio of intercellular CO(2) concentration (ci/ca) from leaf to air were also less in CA treated plants. CA (1.5 mM) also decreased the leaf protein contents of L. sativa as compared to control.

  12. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  13. Estimations of On-site Directional Wave Spectra from Measured Ship Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2006-01-01

    include an quivalence of energy in the governing equations and, as regards the parametric concept, a frequency dependent spreading of the waves is introduced. The paper includes an extensive analysis of full-scale measurements for which the directional wave spectra are estimated by the two ship response......In general, two main concepts can be applied to estimate the on-site directional wave spectrum on the basis of ship response measurements: 1) a parametric method which assumes the wave spectrum to be composed by parameterised wave spectra, or 2) a non-parametric method where the directional wave...

  14. Role of on-site microscopic evaluation of kidney biopsy for adequacy and allocation of glomeruli: comparison of renal biopsies with and without on-site microscopic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, S M; Ockner, D; Qu, H

    2013-12-01

    Evaluation of kidney core biopsies ideally begins with on-site microscopic examination for adequacy and allocation of tissue for light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF) and electron microscopy (EM). However, some renal biopsies are not microscopically evaluated by a pathologist at the time of procedure, and are allocated without on-site evaluation. This study compares the actual outcome of these two techniques. We reviewed the reports of patients who underwent kidney biopsy for medical causes in the past two years. Eighty-eight biopsies had on-site microscopic evaluation by pathologists, and 70 biopsies did not undergo on-site evaluation. For biopsies without on-site evaluation, no glomeruli were seen in 5 (7.14%) cases for LM, 11 (15.71%) cases for IF and 6 (8.57%) cases for EM. In cases with on-site evaluation, the absence of glomeruli was identified in 1 (1.13%) case for LM, 3 (3.4%) for IF and 3 (3.4%) for EM. The biopsies with on-site microscopic evaluation had 5.68% of the cases considered as inadequate, while 22% of biopsies without on-site evaluation were considered inadequate. The biopsies with on-site evaluation tended to have more glomeruli obtained during the procedure (p < 0.0005). Without on-site evaluation, the likelihood of getting an inadequate specimen compared to on-site evaluation is nearly four times greater.

  15. Measurements of yields of fission products in the reaction of {sup 238}U with high-energy p, d and n beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolen, J.A.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    An experiment was performed at the Michigan State University cyclotron to determine the yields of neutron-rich fission products in the reaction of {sup 238}U with 100-MeV neutrons, 200-MeV deuterons and 200-MeV protons. Several 1-mm-thick {sup 238}U foils were irradiated for 100-second intervals sequentially for each configuration and the ten spectra were added for higher statistics. The three successive spectra, each for a 40 s period, were accumulated for each sample. Ten foils were irradiated. Successive spectra allowed us to determine approximate half-lives of the gamma peaks. Several arrangements, which were similar to the setup we plan to use in our radioactive beam proposal, were used for the production of fission products. For the high-energy neutron irradiation, U foils were placed after a 5-inch-long, 1-inch-diameter Be cylinder which stopped the 200-MeV deuteron beam generating 100-MeV neutrons. Arrangements for deuteron irradiation included direct irradiation of U foils, placing U foils after different lengths of (0.5 inch, 1.0 inch and 1.5 inch) 2-inch diameter U cylinder. Since the deuteron range in uranium is 17 mm, some of the irradiations were due to the secondary neutrons from the deuteron-induced fission of U. Similar arrangements were also used for the 200-MeV proton irradiation of the {sup 238}U foils. In all cases, several neutron-rich fission products were identified and their yields determined. In particular, we were able to observe Sn in all the runs and determine its yield. The data show that with our proposed radioactive device we will be able to produce more than 10{sup 12} {sup 132}Sn atoms per second in the target. Assuming an overall efficiency of 1 %, we will be able to deliver one particle nanoampere of {sup 132}Sn beam at a target location. Detailed analysis of the {gamma}-ray spectra is in progress.

  16. Influence of seaweed extract as an organic fertilizer on the growth and yield of Arachis hypogea L. and their elemental composition using SEM–Energy Dispersive Spectroscopic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganapathy Selvam

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: It is suggested that there are considerable gains to be made in increasing yield and stabilizing the yield in environments characterized by terminal requirement for organic and by shortening crop duration nutrient management appear promising.

  17. Effects of genetic selection for milk yield on energy balance, levels of hormones, and metabolites in lactating cattle, and possible links to reduced fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, R.F.; Beerda, B.; Lende, van der T.

    2003-01-01

    Selection for a higher milk yield increases metabolic load via a higher yield per se and/or via physiological processes that facilitate milk yield, and it is difficult to differentiate between these two. Here, we aim to identify important pathways that contribute to the reduction in fertility follow

  18. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, M. E.; Arnold, C. W.; Becker, J. A.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fallin, B.; Fowler, M. M.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Krishichayan; Macri, R.; Rusev, G.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Fission Product Yields (FPY) have historically been one of the most observable features of the fission process. They are known to have strong variations that are dependent on the fissioning species, the excitation energy, and the angular momentum of the compound system. However, consistent and systematic studies of the variation of these FPY with energy have proved challenging. This is caused primarily by the nature of the experiments that have traditionally relied on radiochemical procedures to isolate specific fission products. Although radiochemical procedures exist that can isolate all products, each element presents specific challenges and introduces varying degrees of systematic errors that can make inter-comparison of FPY uncertain. Although of high importance in fields such as nuclear forensics and Stockpile Stewardship, accurate information about the energy dependence of neutron induced FPY are sparse, due primarily to the lack of suitable monoenergetic neutron sources. There is a clear need for improved data, and to address this issue, a collaboration was formed between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure the energy dependence of FPY for 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The measurements have been performed at TUNL, using a 10 MV Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to produce monoenergetic neutrons at energies between 0.6 MeV to 14.8 MeV through a variety of reactions. The measurements have utilized a dual-fission chamber, with thin (10-100 μg/cm2) reference foils of similar material to a thick (100-400 mg) activation target held in the center between the chambers. This method allows for the accurate determination of the number of fissions that occurred in the thick target without requiring knowledge of the fission cross section or neutron fluence on target. Following activation, the thick target was removed from the dual-fission chamber and gamma

  19. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooden, M. E.; Arnold, C. W.; Becker, J. A.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fallin, B.; Fowler, M. M.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Krishichayan,; Macri, R.; Rusev, G.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Fission Product Yields (FPY) have historically been one of the most observable features of the fission process. They are known to have strong variations that are dependent on the fissioning species, the excitation energy, and the angular momentum of the compound system. However, consistent and systematic studies of the variation of these FPY with energy have proved challenging. This is caused primarily by the nature of the experiments that have traditionally relied on radiochemical procedures to isolate specific fission products. Although radiochemical procedures exist that can isolate all products, each element presents specific challenges and introduces varying degrees of systematic errors that can make inter-comparison of FPY uncertain. Although of high importance in fields such as nuclear forensics and Stockpile Stewardship, accurate information about the energy dependence of neutron induced FPY are sparse, due primarily to the lack of suitable monoenergetic neutron sources. There is a clear need for improved data, and to address this issue, a collaboration was formed between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure the energy dependence of FPY for 235U, 238U and 239Pu. The measurements have been performed at TUNL, using a 10 MV Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to produce monoenergetic neutrons at energies between 0.6 MeV to 14.8 MeV through a variety of reactions. The measurements have utilized a dual-fission chamber, with thin (10-100 μg/cm2) reference foils of similar material to a thick (100-400 mg) activation target held in the center between the chambers. This method allows for the accurate determination of the number of fissions that occurred in the thick target without requiring knowledge of the fission cross section or neutron fluence on target. Following activation, the thick target was removed

  20. Moisture content prediction in poultry litter using artificial intelligence techniques and Monte Carlo simulation to determine the economic yield from energy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Contreras, José Octavio; Aguilar-Lasserre, Alberto Alfonso; Méndez-Contreras, Juan Manuel; López-Andrés, Jhony Josué; Cid-Chama, Gabriela

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the economic return of poultry litter combustion in boilers to produce bioenergy (thermal and electrical), as this biomass has a high-energy potential due to its component elements, using fuzzy logic to predict moisture and identify the high-impact variables. This is carried out using a proposed 7-stage methodology, which includes a statistical analysis of agricultural systems and practices to identify activities contributing to moisture in poultry litter (for example, broiler chicken management, number of air extractors, and avian population density), and thereby reduce moisture to increase the yield of the combustion process. Estimates of poultry litter production and heating value are made based on 4 different moisture content percentages (scenarios of 25%, 30%, 35%, and 40%), and then a risk analysis is proposed using the Monte Carlo simulation to select the best investment alternative and to estimate the environmental impact for greenhouse gas mitigation. The results show that dry poultry litter (25%) is slightly better for combustion, generating 3.20% more energy. Reducing moisture from 40% to 25% involves considerable economic investment due to the purchase of equipment to reduce moisture; thus, when calculating financial indicators, the 40% scenario is the most attractive, as it is the current scenario. Thus, this methodology proposes a technology approach based on the use of advanced tools to predict moisture and representation of the system (Monte Carlo simulation), where the variability and uncertainty of the system are accurately represented. Therefore, this methodology is considered generic for any bioenergy generation system and not just for the poultry sector, whether it uses combustion or another type of technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utility of onsite interviews in the pediatric surgery match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downard, Cynthia D; Goldin, Adam; Garrison, Michelle M; Waldhausen, John; Langham, Max; Hirschl, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    The value of onsite interviews for the pediatric surgery match remains undefined despite substantial cost to applicants. This study assesses the impact of onsite interviews on the rank order lists submitted to the match by pediatric surgery residency training program directors (PDs). PDs were asked prospectively to evaluate pediatric surgery residency candidates based solely on their ERAS application and generate a "pre-interview rank list." Interviews were then held based on the usual practice of each program. PDs then submitted de-identified pre-interview and final rank lists. The impact of the interview process upon rank list movement of candidates was assessed. Of 44 programs, 16 (36%) provided data for analysis. Onsite interviews resulted in candidates moving a mean of 5.2 ± 1.2 rank positions, whereas candidates ranked in the first 5 positions moved an average of 4 ± 2 places, 81% of the initial top-ranked candidates moved out of this position, and 36% of top 10 candidates moved out of the top 10. Onsite interviews are high-stakes events which substantially affect the final rank order list in the pediatric surgery match. Programs should take these data into account when determining the number of interview invitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Information model for on-site inspection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, O.H.; Deland, S.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the information model that was jointly developed as part of two FY93 LDRDs: (1) Information Integration for Data Fusion, and (2) Interactive On-Site Inspection System: An Information System to Support Arms Control Inspections. This report describes the purpose and scope of the two LDRD projects and reviews the prototype development approach, including the use of a GIS. Section 2 describes the information modeling methodology. Section 3 provides a conceptual data dictionary for the OSIS (On-Site Information System) model, which can be used in conjunction with the detailed information model provided in the Appendix. Section 4 discussions the lessons learned from the modeling and the prototype. Section 5 identifies the next steps--two alternate paths for future development. The long-term purpose of the On-Site Inspection LDRD was to show the benefits of an information system to support a wide range of on-site inspection activities for both offensive and defensive inspections. The database structure and the information system would support inspection activities under nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional arms control treaties. This would allow a common database to be shared for all types of inspections, providing much greater cross-treaty synergy.

  3. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle " Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  4. Studies on fission with ALADIN. Precise and simultaneous measurement of fission yields, total kinetic energy and total prompt neutron multiplicity at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Taieb, Julien; Chatillon, Audrey; Belier, Gilbert; Boutoux, Guillaume; Ebran, Adeline; Gorbinet, Thomas; Grente, Lucie; Laurent, Benoit; Pellereau, Eric [CEA DAM Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Arpajon (France); Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ayyad, Yassid; Benlliure, Jose; Cortina Gil, Dolores; Caamano, Manuel; Fernandez Dominguez, Beatriz; Paradela, Carlos; Ramos, Diego; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Jose-Luis; Vargas, Jossitt [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, Laurent; Tassan-Got, Laurent [CNRS/IN2P3, IPNO, Orsay (France); Aumann, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Casarejos, Enrique [Universidad de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Farget, Fanny; Rodriguez-Tajes, Carme [CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Heinz, Andreas [Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jurado, Beatriz [CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan (France); Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Kurz, Nikolaus; Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Rossi, Dominic; Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Simon, Haik; Voss, Bernd; Weick, Helmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A novel technique for fission studies, based on the inverse kinematics approach, is presented. Following pioneering work in the nineties, the SOFIA Collaboration has designed and built an experimental set-up dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of isotopic yields, total kinetic energies and total prompt neutron multiplicities, by fully identifying both fission fragments in coincidence, for the very first time. This experiment, performed at GSI, permits to study the fission of a wide variety of fissioning systems, ranging from mercury to neptunium, possibly far from the valley of stability. A first experiment, performed in 2012, has provided a large array of unprecedented data regarding the nuclear fission process. An excerpt of the results is presented. With this solid starter, further improvements of the experimental set-up are considered, which are consistent with the expected developments at the GSI facility, in order to measure more fission observables in coincidence. The completeness reached in the SOFIA data, permits to scrutinize the correlations between the interesting features of fission, offering a very detailed insight in this still unraveled mechanism. (orig.)

  5. Waste of Felling and On-Site Production of Teak Squarewood of the Community Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Budiaman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Major suppliers of teak wood for the raw material of furniture industry in Indonesia are Perum Perhutani, community forests, and private forests.  Community teak forest management produce roundwood or squarewood, in which squarewood is produced on the felling site by the use of chainsaw after felling and bucking activities. Utilization of teak wood from community forest has been practiced for decades, however information on the extent of utilization and the quantity of wood waste have not been published to a greater extent. The present research was intended to determine and analyze the extent of utilization and teak wood waste produced from felling and bucking, and on-site squarewood production of community forests.  Quantification of wood waste from felling and bucking was based on the whole tree method, while that of squarewood production was based on the percentage of yield. It was found that the quantity of teak felling and bucking wood waste in community forest was reaching 28% of felled wood volume that consisted of branch and twig (46.15%, upper trunk (30.77%, short cut off (15.38%, and stumps (7.69%. The largest part of the wood waste of teak felling and bucking satisfied the requirement as raw material of wood working industry according to Indonesian National Standard. On-site production of squarewood increased the quantity of wood waste in the forests (in the form of slabs and sawdust.Keywords: wood waste, felling, bucking, squarewood, community forest

  6. 77 FR 4368 - Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division, Including On-Site Leased..., Diagnostics Division, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Comsys, Apex, Fountain Group, Kelly... location of Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Division. The Department has determined that these...

  7. 75 FR 879 - National Semiconductor Corporation Arlington Manufacturing Site Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration National Semiconductor Corporation Arlington Manufacturing Site... Semiconductor Corporation, Arlington Manufacturing Site, including on-site leased workers from GCA, CMPA, Custom... Mechanical Systems were employed on-site at the Arlington, Texas location of National...

  8. 75 FR 55613 - General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Accretive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, Including On-Site... of General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center, including on-site leased workers from Accretive... location of General Motors Corporation, Renaissance Center. The Department has determined that on-site...

  9. 42 CFR 137.366 - May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.366 May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits? Yes, the Secretary may conduct onsite project... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight...

  10. Global Scale Methane Emissions from On-Site Wastewater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. C.; Guan, K.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Pit latrines and other on-site sanitation methods are important forms of wastewater management at the global scale, providing hygienic and low-cost sanitation for more than 1.7 billion people in developing and middle-income regions. Latrines have also been identified as major sources of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) from the anaerobic decomposition of organic waste in pits. Understanding the greenhouse gas footprint of different wastewater systems is essential for sustainable water resource development and management. Despite this importance, CH4 emissions from decentralized wastewater treatment have received little attention in the scientific literature, and the rough calculations underlying government inventories and integrated assessment models do not accurately capture variations in emissions within and between countries. In this study, we improve upon earlier efforts and develop the first spatially explicit approach to quantifying latrine CH4 emissions, combining a high-resolution geospatial analysis of population, urbanization, and water table (as an indicator of anaerobic decomposition pathways) with CH4 emissions factors from the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. Country-level health and sanitation surveys were used to determine latrine utilization in 2000 and predict usage in 2015. 18 representative countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America were selected for this analysis to illustrate regional variations in CH4 emissions and to include the greatest emitting nations. Our analysis confirms that pit latrines are a globally significant anthropogenic CH4 source, emitting 4.7 Tg CH4 yr-1 in the countries considered here. This total is projected to decrease ~25% by 2015, however, driven largely by rapid urbanization in China and decreased reliance on latrines in favor of flush toilets. India has the greatest potential for large growth in emissions in the post-2015 period, since public health campaigns to end open defecation

  11. Evaluating indigenous grass species as on-site sediment trapping measures, northwest Ethiopian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Mulatie; Keesstra, Saskia; Ritsema, Coen; Stroosnijder, Leo; Baartman, Jantiene

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to evaluate the sediment trapping efficacy (STE) of grass species as an on-site sediment trapping measure, still a lot of grass species are availab1e of which their STE is unknown. Lack of information on the STE of such grass species has a negative influence on their acceptance and practical application by the users. Therefore, this study was conducted at Debre Mewi watershed, northwestern Ethiopian highlands, to evaluate the STE of four locally dominant indigenous grass species (Desho, Senbelet, Akirma and Sebez) and one exotic species (Vetiver) using plot experiments. On average, the annual runoff produced was found to be 79; 64; 69; 71; 74; 75 l m-2, which resulted in 7; 1.7; 2.9; 3.6; 4.5 and 5.6 kg m-2 yr-1 of sediment yield on the Control, Desho, Vetiver, Senbelet, Akirma and Sebez plots, respectively. Desho had a trapping efficacy of 76 % because of its fast growth and lateral spreading nature. Vetiver and Senbelet reduced the transported sediment with 59 % and 49 % STE, respectively. Because of their slow growth nature, Akirma and Sebez showed low STEs, 36 % and 20 %, respectively. The grass species were found to be important sources of livestock feed in addition to trapping sediment and reducing soil loss. Desho, Senbelet, Akirma, Vetiver and Sebez provided 132, 106, 76, 69 and 51 t ha-1 yr-1 fresh biomass, respectively. The indigenous grass species provided a practical means to reduce sediment yield, therefore, it can be concluded that such indigenous grass species can be used as an on-site sediment trapping measure in the northwestern highlands of Ethiopia.

  12. On-site early-warning system for Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Bindi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of an on-site early warning system for Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan is outlined. Several low cost sensors equipped with MEMS accelerometers are installed in eight buildings distributed within the urban area. The different sensing units communicate each other via wireless links and the seismic data are streamed in real-time to the data center using internet. Since each single sensing unit has computing capabilities, software for data processing can be installed to perform decentralized actions. In particular, each sensing unit can perform event detection task and run software for on-site early warning. If a description for the vulnerability of the building is uploaded in the sensing unit, this piece of information can be exploited to introduce the expected probability of damage in the early-warning protocol customized for a specific structure.

  13. The feasibility of mobile computing for on-site inspection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, Karl Emanuel; DeLand, Sharon Marie; Blair, Dianna Sue

    2014-09-01

    With over 5 billion cellphones in a world of 7 billion inhabitants, mobile phones are the most quickly adopted consumer technology in the history of the world. Miniaturized, power-efficient sensors, especially video-capable cameras, are becoming extremely widespread, especially when one factors in wearable technology like Apples Pebble, GoPro video systems, Google Glass, and lifeloggers. Tablet computers are becoming more common, lighter weight, and power-efficient. In this report the authors explore recent developments in mobile computing and their potential application to on-site inspection for arms control verification and treaty compliance determination. We examine how such technology can effectively be applied to current and potential future inspection regimes. Use cases are given for both host-escort and inspection teams. The results of field trials and their implications for on-site inspections are discussed.

  14. {{\\rm{H}}}_{2}\\,X{}^{1}{{\\rm{\\Sigma }}}_{g}^{+}-c{}^{3}{{\\rm{\\Pi }}}_{u} Excitation by Electron Impact: Energies, Spectra, Emission Yields, Cross-sections, and H(1s) Kinetic Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianming; Shemansky, Donald E.; Yoshii, Jean; Liu, Melinda J.; Johnson, Paul V.; Malone, Charles P.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2017-10-01

    The c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state of the hydrogen molecule has the second largest triplet-state excitation cross-section, and plays an important role in the heating of the upper thermospheres of outer planets by electron excitation. Precise energies of the H2, D2, and HD c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u-(v,N) levels are calculated from highly accurate ab initio potential energy curves that include relativistic, radiative, and empirical non-adiabatic corrections. The emission yields are determined from predissociation rates and refined radiative transition probabilities. The excitation function and excitation cross-section of the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state are extracted from previous theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. The emission cross-section is determined from the calculated emission yield and the extracted excitation cross-section. The kinetic energy (E k ) distributions of H atoms produced via the predissociation of the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state, the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u- – b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ dissociative emission by the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole, and the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u – a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ – b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ cascade dissociative emission by the electric dipole are obtained. The predissociation of the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u+ and c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u- states both produce H(1s) atoms with an average E k of ∼4.1 eV/atom, while the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u- – b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ dissociative emissions by the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole give an average E k of ∼1.0 and ∼0.8 eV/atom, respectively. The c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u – a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ – b{}3{{{Σ }}}u+ cascade and dissociative emission gives an average E k of ∼1.3 eV/atom. On average, each H2 excited to the c{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u state in an H2-dominated atmosphere deposits ∼7.1 eV into the atmosphere while each H2 directly excited to the a{}3{{{Σ }}}g+ and d{}3{{{\\Pi }}}u states contribute ∼2.3 and ∼3.3 eV, respectively, to the atmosphere. The spectral distribution of the calculated continuum emission

  15. Study of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} for photon energies up to 2.65 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at ELSA; Untersuchung der Reaktion {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} fuer Photonenenergien bis 2.65 GeV mit dem SAPHIR-Detektor an ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulday, I.

    2004-10-01

    The reaction {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} was measured in the photon energy range from threshold up to 2.65 GeV. The cross section is dominated by the production of the resonances {sigma}(1385), {lambda}(1405) and {lambda}(1520) which decay into {sigma}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Cross sections were obtained as a function of the photon energy and the K{sup +} production angle for the reaction and the resonance production. The cross section for {lambda}(1520) rises up to (0.230{+-}0.029) {mu}b in the photon energy range 1.80yields a slope parameter b=-2.41{+-}0.37 GeV{sup -2}. The polar decay angular distribution is consistent with being flat. (orig.)

  16. Thermalization of oscillator chains with onsite anharmonicity and comparison with kinetic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendl, Christian B; Lu, Jianfeng; Lukkarinen, Jani

    2016-12-01

    We perform microscopic molecular dynamics simulations of particle chains with an onsite anharmonicity to study relaxation of spatially homogeneous states to equilibrium, and directly compare the simulations with the corresponding Boltzmann-Peierls kinetic theory. The Wigner function serves as a common interface between the microscopic and kinetic level. We demonstrate quantitative agreement after an initial transient time interval. In particular, besides energy conservation, we observe the additional quasiconservation of the phonon density, defined via an ensemble average of the related microscopic field variables and exactly conserved by the kinetic equations. On superkinetic time scales, density quasiconservation is lost while energy remains conserved, and we find evidence for eventual relaxation of the density to its canonical ensemble value. However, the precise mechanism remains unknown and is not captured by the Boltzmann-Peierls equations.

  17. Thermalization of oscillator chains with onsite anharmonicity and comparison with kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendl, Christian B.; Lu, Jianfeng; Lukkarinen, Jani

    2016-12-01

    We perform microscopic molecular dynamics simulations of particle chains with an onsite anharmonicity to study relaxation of spatially homogeneous states to equilibrium, and directly compare the simulations with the corresponding Boltzmann-Peierls kinetic theory. The Wigner function serves as a common interface between the microscopic and kinetic level. We demonstrate quantitative agreement after an initial transient time interval. In particular, besides energy conservation, we observe the additional quasiconservation of the phonon density, defined via an ensemble average of the related microscopic field variables and exactly conserved by the kinetic equations. On superkinetic time scales, density quasiconservation is lost while energy remains conserved, and we find evidence for eventual relaxation of the density to its canonical ensemble value. However, the precise mechanism remains unknown and is not captured by the Boltzmann-Peierls equations.

  18. MACSTOR, an on-site, dry, spent-fuel storage system developed by AECL for use by U. S. utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, R.; Feinroth, H.; Pattanyus, P. (AECL Technologies, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The continuing delay in the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain and monitored retrievable storage spent-fuel disposal and storage programs has prompted U.S. utilities to consider expanding on-site storage of spent reactor fuel. Long-term, on-site storage has certain advantages to U.S. utilities since it eliminates the need for costly and difficult shipping and puts control of the spent fuel completely under the direction of the owner-utility. AECL Technologies (AECL), through its research company and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) engineering services division, has been developing on-site storage for Canadian heavy water nuclear plants for almost 20 yr. AECL has developed a design for a dry storage unit, designated MACSTOR (modular air-cooled storage), that can accommodate U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fuel elements and could become a candidate for the U.S. market. This paper describes MACSTOR and its evolution from the original silos and CANSTOR system that was developed and used in Canada. These systems are subject to regulatory controls by the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada and have proven to be safe, convenient, and cost effective.

  19. Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OBRIEN, J.H.

    2000-07-14

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

  20. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) depleted uranium waste boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1997-08-27

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the one-time shipment of ten metal boxes and one wooden box containing depleted uranium material from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the burial grounds in the 200 West Area for disposal. This SEP provides the analyses and operational controls necessary to demonstrate that the shipment will be safe for the onsite worker and the public.

  1. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) disposable solid waste cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, B.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability of the Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) to meet the packaging requirements of HNF-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for the onsite transfer of special form, highway route controlled quantity, Type B fissile radioactive material. This SEP evaluates five shipments of DSWCs used for the transport and storage of Fast Flux Test Facility unirradiated fuel to the Plutonium Finishing Plant Protected Area.

  2. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-29

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

  3. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific opinion on biotin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism: evaluation of a health claim pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked......-yielding metabolism applies to all ages, including infants and young children (from birth to three years). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of biotin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism. The following wording reflects...... the scientific evidence: ‘Biotin contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism.’ The target population is infants and young children up to three years of age....

  4. Glucose as the Sole Metabolic Fuel: The Possible Influence of Formal Teaching on the Establishment of a Misconception about Energy-Yielding Metabolism among Students from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Mauricio R. M. P.; de Oliveira, Gabriel Aguiar; de Sousa, Cristiane Ribeiro; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2008-01-01

    Energy-yielding metabolism is an important biochemistry subject that is related to many daily experiences and health issues of students. An adequate knowledge of the general features of EYM is therefore important, both from an academic and social point of view. In a previous study, we have shown that high-school students present the misconception…

  5. Glucose as the Sole Metabolic Fuel: The Possible Influence of Formal Teaching on the Establishment of a Misconception about Energy-Yielding Metabolism among Students from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Mauricio R. M. P.; de Oliveira, Gabriel Aguiar; de Sousa, Cristiane Ribeiro; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2008-01-01

    Energy-yielding metabolism is an important biochemistry subject that is related to many daily experiences and health issues of students. An adequate knowledge of the general features of EYM is therefore important, both from an academic and social point of view. In a previous study, we have shown that high-school students present the misconception…

  6. Continuous feed, on-site composting of kitchen garbage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eung-Ju; Shin, Hang-Sik; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2002-04-01

    Kitchen garbage generated at a school cafeteria was treated and stabilised in a controlled on-site composting unit for volume reduction and on-site utilisation of processed garbage. The on-site composter was fed with the garbage on a daily basis during the two-months experimental period. Compost was not removed from the unit but was entirely reused as a bulking agent in order to minimise the need for additional bulking agent and compost handling. Performance of the composter tinder this condition was investigated. Most of the easily degradable organic matter (EDM) in the garbage was biodegraded rapidly, and the final product had a low content of EDM. Lipids, total sugar, and hemi-cellulose were degraded 96%, 81%, and 66% respectively. Free air space (FAS) was higher than 0.5 all the time, so accumulation of dry matter in the unit was not significant in reducing reaction efficiency. Other reaction parameters such as pH and MC were kept within a suitable range; however, it was advisable to maintain MC at over 46%. As a result, this method of operation was able to stabilise the garbage with low sawdust demand and little compost production.

  7. Improving the reliability of female fertility breeding values using type and milk yield traits that predict energy status in Australian Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Recio, O; Haile-Mariam, M; Pryce, J E

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to propose changing the selection criteria trait for evaluating fertility in Australia from calving interval to conception rate at d 42 after the beginning of the mating season and (2) to use type traits as early fertility predictors, to increase the reliability of estimated breeding values for fertility. The breeding goal in Australia is conception within 6 wk of the start of the mating season. Currently, the Australian model to predict fertility breeding values (expressed as a linear transformation of calving interval) is a multitrait model that includes calving interval (CVI), lactation length (LL), calving to first service (CFS), first nonreturn rate (FNRR), and conception rate. However, CVI has a lower genetic correlation with the breeding goal (conception within 6 wk of the start of the mating season) than conception rate. Milk yield, type, and fertility data from 164,318 cow sired by 4,766 bulls were used. Principal component analysis and genetic correlation estimates between type and fertility traits were used to select type traits that could subsequently be used in a multitrait analysis. Angularity, foot angle, and pin set were chosen as type traits to include in an index with the traits that are included in the multitrait fertility model: CVI, LL, CFS, FNRR, and conception rate at d 42 (CR42). An index with these 8 traits is expected to achieve an average bull first proof reliability of 0.60 on the breeding objective (conception within 6 wk of the start of the mating season) compared with reliabilities of 0.39 and 0.45 for CR42 only or the current 5-trait Australian model. Subsequently, we used the first eigenvector of a principal component analysis with udder texture, bone quality, angularity, and body condition score to calculate an energy status indicator trait. The inclusion of the energy status indicator trait composite in a multitrait index with CVI, LL, CFS, FNRR, and CR42 achieved a 12-point increase in

  8. The impacts of biomass properties on pyrolysis yields, economic and environmental performance of the pyrolysis-bioenergy-biochar platform to carbon negative energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqin; Dang, Qi; Brown, Robert C; Laird, David; Wright, Mark M

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of biomass properties on the pyrolysis product yields, economic and environmental performance for the pyrolysis-biochar-bioenergy platform. We developed and applied a fast pyrolysis, feedstock-sensitive, regression-based chemical process model to 346 different feedstocks, which were grouped into five types: woody, stalk/cob/ear, grass/plant, organic residue/product and husk/shell/pit. The results show that biomass ash content of 0.3-7.7wt% increases biochar yield from 0.13 to 0.16kg/kg of biomass, and decreases biofuel yields from 87.3 to 40.7 gallons per tonne. Higher O/C ratio (0.88-1.12) in biomass decreases biochar yield and increases biofuel yields within the same ash content level. Higher ash content of biomass increases minimum fuel selling price (MFSP), while higher O/C ratio of biomass decreases MFSP within the same ash content level. The impact of ash and O/C ratio of biomass on GHG emissions are not consistent for all feedstocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of the Z{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} production cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capriotti, Daniele

    2012-06-11

    The subject of this thesis is the measurement of the Z{yields}{tau}{tau} production cross section in protonproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The study of this process is important for several reasons. First, the measurement of the Z boson production in the {tau}{tau} final state confirms the measurements in the electron and muon pair final states providing information about the parton density functions at the energy of the Large Hadron Collider. In addition, the search for a low mass Higgs boson decaying into {tau} lepton pairs requires knowledge of the inclusive Z{yields}{tau}{tau} production cross section. Z{yields}{tau}{tau} production is an important benchmark process for the validation of {tau} lepton reconstruction and identification which is very difficult at a hadron collider. The reconstruction of Z{yields}{tau}{tau} events can be performed in several final states depending on the decay modes of the {tau} leptons. The semi-leptonic final state, where one {tau} lepton decays into an electron or muon and neutrinos and the other one into hadrons plus neutrino, has been investigated in this thesis. The production cross section has been determined for data collected in 2011 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.5 fb{sup -1}. This involved the determination of the muon trigger and reconstruction efficiencies from data and the estimation of the multi-jet background with a data driven technique. The results using the semileptonic final states, {sigma}(pp{yields}Z+X, Z{yields}{tau}{tau})=998.1{+-}23.7(stat){+-}131.9(syst){+-}36.9(lumi) pb ({tau}{sub e}{tau} h channel), {sigma}(pp{yields}Z+X, Z{yields}{tau}{tau})=912.4{+-}15.0(stat){+-}94.7(syst){+-}33.7(lumi) pb ({tau}{sub {mu}}{tau} h channel), can be combined with the measurement in the {tau}{sub e}{tau}{sub {mu}} channel to {sigma}(pp {yields}Z+X, Z{yields}{tau}{tau})=920.6 {+-}16.7(stat){+-}78.1(syst){+-}34.0(lumi) pb

  10. Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Tatsuo [Tokyo Gas Company, LTD, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

  11. Onsite defluoridation system for drinking water treatment using calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elaine Y; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2017-08-28

    Fluoride in drinking water has several effects on teeth and bones. At concentrations of 1-1.5 mg/L, fluoride can strengthen enamel, improving dental health, but at concentrations above 1.5 to 4 mg/L can cause dental fluorosis. At concentrations of 4-10 mg/L, skeletal fluorosis can occur. There are many areas of the world that have excessive fluoride in drinking water, such as China, India, Sri Lanka, and the Rift Valley countries in Africa. Treatment solutions are needed, especially in poor areas where drinking water treatment plants are not available. On-site or individual treatment alternatives can be attractive if constructed from common materials and if simple enough to be constructed and maintained by users. Advanced on-site methods, such as under sink reserve osmosis units, can remove fluoride but are too expensive for developing areas. This paper investigates calcium carbonate as a cost effective sorbent for an onsite defluoridation drinking water system. Batch and column experiments were performed to characterize F(-) removal properties. Fluoride sorption was described by a Freundlich isotherm model, and it was found that the equilibrium time was approximately 3 h. Calcium carbonate was found to have comparable F(-) removal abilities as the commercial ion exchange resins and possessed higher removal effectiveness compared to calcium containing eggshells and seashells. It was also found that the anion Cl- did not compete with F(-) at typical drinking water concentrations, having little impact on the effectiveness of the treatment system. A fluoride removal system is proposed that can be used at home and can be maintained by users. Through this work, we can be a step closer to bringing safe drinking water to those that do not have access to it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinetic-energy-driven enhancement of secondary-electron yields of highly charged ions impinging on thin films of C-60 on Au

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2012-01-01

    The secondary electron yields as a result of slow highly charged ions (Ar4+, Ar13+) impinging on clean Au(111), highly oriented pyrolitic graphite, and thin films of C-60 on Au are presented. In order to investigate the dynamics of the neutralization of the highly charged ions in front of the surfac

  13. Biomass production of herbaceous energy crops in the United States: Field trial results and yield potential maps from the multiyear regional feedstock partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current knowledge of yield potential and best agronomic management practices for perennial bioenergy grasses is primarily derived from small-scale and short-term studies, yet these studies inform policy at the national scale. In an effort to learn more about how bioenergy grasses perform at the farm...

  14. Kinetic-energy-driven enhancement of secondary-electron yields of highly charged ions impinging on thin films of C-60 on Au

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2012-01-01

    The secondary electron yields as a result of slow highly charged ions (Ar4+, Ar13+) impinging on clean Au(111), highly oriented pyrolitic graphite, and thin films of C-60 on Au are presented. In order to investigate the dynamics of the neutralization of the highly charged ions in front of the

  15. Use of Willows in Evapotranspirative Systems for Onsite Wastewater Management – Theory and Experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Hans; Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a method of onsite wastewater treatment and disposal that is an alternative to conventional soil absorption systems, particularly for sites where protecting surface water and ground water is essential or where soil infiltration is not possible. One of the most important...... of the nutrients can be recycled via the plant biomass, and the harvested biomass can serve as a source of bio-energy. In Denmark more than 500 ET systems planted with willows are in operation. The systems generally consist of a 1.5 m deep high-density polyethylene-lined basin filled with soil and planted...... with clones of willow (Salix viminalis L.). The surface area of the systems depends on the amount and quality of the sewage to be treated and the local annual rainfall. A single household in Denmark typically requires between 120 and 300 m2. The annual precipitation at the site of construction is an important...

  16. Density dependence of the yield of hydrated electrons in the low-LET radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C: influence of the geminate recombination of subexcitation-energy electrons prior to thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-21

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yield of hydrated electrons (eaq(-)) in the low-linear energy transfer radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C as a function of water density over the range of ~0.15 to 0.6 g cm(-3). Very good agreement was found between our calculations and picosecond pulse radiolysis experimental data at ~60 ps and 1 ns at high density (>0.35 g cm(-3)). At densities lower than ~0.35 g cm(-3), our eaq(-) yields were lower than the experimental data, especially at ~60 ps. However, if we incorporated into the simulations a prompt geminate electron-cation (H2O˙(+)) recombination (prior thermalization of the electron) that decreased as the density decreased, our computed eaq(-) yields at ~60 ps and 1 ns compared fairly well with the experimental data for the entire density range studied.

  17. Energy resolution and light yield non-proportionality of ZnSe Te scintillator studied by large area avalanche photodiodes and photomultipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Balcerzyk, M; Moszynski, M; Kapusta, M; Szawlowski, M

    2002-01-01

    The ZnSe : Te scintillator has been studied by means of a photomultiplier with an extended bialkali photocathode, a large area avalanche photodiode (LAAPD) and a PIN photodiode. The light output was determined to be 28 300+-1700 photons/MeV. Results indicate good proportionality for light output versus gamma-ray energy. Measurements of the 662 keV gamma-ray energy spectrum recorded using a LAAPD resulted in an energy resolution of 5.4+-0.3%. Based on these results, an intrinsic energy resolution of 3.3+-0.7% has been calculated.

  18. Fission-product yields for thermal-neutron fission of /sup 243/Cm determined from measurements with a high-resolution low-energy germanium gamma-ray detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriman, L.D.

    1984-04-01

    Cumulative fission-product yields have been determined for 13 gamma rays emitted during the decay of 12 fission products created by thermal-neutron fission of /sup 243/Cm. A high-resolution low-energy germanium detector was used to measure the pulse-height spectra of gamma rays emitted from a 77-nanogram sample of /sup 243/Cm after the sample had been irradiated by thermal neutrons. Analysis of the data resulted in the identification and matching of gamma-ray energies and half-lives to individual radioisotopes. From these results, 12 cumulative fission product yields were deduced for radionuclides with half-lives between 4.2 min and 84.2 min. 7 references.

  19. Performance of on-site Medical waste disinfection equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Taghipour; Mina Alizadeh; Reza Dehghanzadeh; Mohammad Reza Farshchian; Mohammad Ganbari; Mohammad Shakerkhatibi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of studies available on the performance of on-site medical waste treatment facilities is rare, to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of onsite medical waste treatment equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A various range of the on-site medical waste disinfection equipment (autoclave, chemical disinfection, hydroclave, and dry thermal treatment) was considered to select 10 out of 22 hospitals in Tabriz to be included in the survey. The...

  20. Linking soil erosion to onsite financial cost: lessons from watersheds in the Blue Nile basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Erkossa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in three watersheds (Dapo, Meja and Mizewa in the Ethiopian part of the Blue Nile Basin to estimate the onsite cost of soil erosion using the productivity change approach, in which crop yield reduction due to plant nutrients lost with the sediment and runoff has been analyzed. For this purpose, runoff measurement and sampling was conducted during the main rainy season of 2011 at the outlet of two to three sub watersheds in each watershed. The sediment concentration of the runoff, and nitrogen and phosphorus content of the runoff and sediment were determined. Crop response functions were developed for the two plant nutrients based on data obtained from the nearest Agricultural Research Centers. The response functions were used to estimate crop yield reduction as a result of the lost N and P assuming there is no compensation through fertilization. The results show a significant yield reduction and resultant financial loss to the farmers. Considering only grain yield of maize (Zea mays, farmers at Dapo annually lose about 220 and USD 150 ha-1 due to the loss of nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. In view of the importance of the crop residues including as feed, the loss can be even greater. The study demonstrated that in addition to the long-term deterioration of land quality, the annual financial loss suffered by farmers is substantial. Therefore, on farm soil and water conservation measures that are suitable in biophysical and socio-economic terms in the landscapes and beyond need to be encouraged.

  1. Phytoremediation as an on-site ex situ remediation option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millard, G. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Maurice, R. [Wardrop Engineering Inc., Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Greenberg, B. [Waterloo Environmental Biotechnology Inc., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In-situ soil remediation techniques often have limited application or long timelines in fine-grained soils. For rapid remediation at fine-grained sites, excavation is still a common technique. However, excavation does not necessarily require landfill disposal of impacted soils. Onsite treatment of hydrocarbon-impacted soils is often a feasible approach. This presentation discussed phytoremediation as an on-site ex-situ remediation option. Phytoremediation involves the attenuation of impacts via the cultivation of suitable plants. The presentation discussed the theory of phytoremediation at hydrocarbon-impacted sites and described a case study at a former Shell-owned facility in southern Manitoba. A feasibility assessment was conducted and the results of excavation activities were outlined. Planting and maintenance activities were described. The presentation provided an update on the remediation progress, the mechanism of remediation, and the benefits of this process. The site was remediated in less than one year, with cost savings as compared to traditional soil disposal. Phytoremediation resulted in reduced greenhouse gas emissions; reduced loading of landfill; reduced impact to local roads; reduced risk to health and safety; and provided the community with an aesthetic site during remediation. tabs., figs.

  2. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg‑1 and 8 μg kg‑1, respectively.

  3. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg−1 and 8 μg kg−1, respectively. PMID:28276454

  4. Use of leaching chambers for on-site sewage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Marseille, J G; Anderson, B C

    2002-03-01

    An innovative chamber system was installed for on-site sewage treatment beneath an active parking lot at a restaurant near Cornwall, Ontario. The configuration of this prototype system used polyethylene leaching chambers over which wastewater was allowed to trickle. The chambers were vented to the surface to provide direct, passive air transfer. This demonstration project was examined as a cost-effective wastewater treatment alternative for a very constrained site. The leaching chambers were installed over a geotextile-covered sand filter bed. Chamber sidewall contact contributed an additional 50% to the total soil contact area hence justification for a footprint reduction. A labile carbon source (sawdust) was added into one half of the bed to encourage dissimilatory denitrification. Average hydraulic loading was 50 l m(-1) day(-1) (5 cm day(-1)). Treatment rates exceeded more than 4 orders of magnitude removal for E. coli; 90% biochemical oxygen demand; ammonium; and 99% total phosphorus. Nitrate-N on the carbon-amended side averaged 0.6 mg l(-1) compared with 8.6 mg l(-1) on the (non-carbon) control side. This project has demonstrated that effective on-site treatment can be accomplished. Flow and load equalization, pulse dosing, chamber venting, phosphorus precipitation, and denitrification were keys to treatment success. Applications include domestic and commercial sites.

  5. A derivation of bulk-motion insensitive implosion metrics inferred from neutron and high-energy x-ray emission in a series of high yield implosions on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, P. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Gaffney, J.; Grim, G. P.; Haan, S.; Hammer, J. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.

    2015-11-01

    A suite of nuclear and x-ray data is used to deduce key implosion performance metrics at stagnation including the hotspot pressure, energy, and the role of alpha heating on producing the observed yield. Key to this analysis is a determination of the burn-averaged temperature of the hot plasma so that the nuclear reactivity and yield can then be used to deduce the plasma density and pressure. In this presentation we examine the systematics of both neutron and high-energy x-ray emission (22 keV x-ray monochromator) from a series of high yield implosions on the NIF. The advantage of incorporating high energy x-rays into the analysis is their insignificant attenuation and insensitivity to bulk flows, thus providing insight as to whether these effects complicate the interpretation of the nuclear data, and that a precipitous drop in their production is expected as the thermal temperature is reduced. A dynamic model for hotspot assembly is developed that incorporates thermal conduction, radiative losses, and alpha heating, which simultaneously matches both neutron and x-ray data with nearly identical nuclear and x-ray derived thermal temperatures. Work performed under the auspices of the USDoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  6. Nonphotochemical quenching of excitation energy in photosystem II. A picosecond time-resolved study of the low yield of chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by single-turnover flash in isolated spinach thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, S; Bruce, D

    1998-08-04

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence emission is widely used as a noninvasive measure of a number of parameters related to photosynthetic efficiency in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. The most important component for the estimation of photochemistry is the relative increase in fluorescence yield between dark-adapted samples which have a maximal capacity for photochemistry and a minimal fluorescence yield (F0) and light-saturated samples where photochemistry is saturated and fluorescence yield is maximal (Fm). However, when photosynthesis is saturated with a short (less than 50 micro(s)) flash of light, which induces only one photochemical turnover of photosystem II, the maximal fluorescence yield is significantly lower (Fsat) than when saturation is achieved with a millisecond duration multiturnover flash (Fm). To investigate the origins of the difference in fluorescence yield between these two conditions, our time-resolved fluorescence apparatus was modified to allow collection of picosecond time-resolved decay kinetics over a short time window immediately following a saturating single-turnover flash (Fsat) as well as after a multiturnover saturating pulse (Fm). Our data were analyzed with a global kinetic model based on an exciton radical pair equilibrium model for photosystem II. The difference between Fm and Fsat was modeled well by changing only the rate constant for quenching of excitation energy in the antenna of photosystem II. An antenna-based origin for the quenching was verified experimentally by the observation that addition of the antenna quencher 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone to thylakoids under Fm conditions resulted in decay kinetics and modeled kinetic parameters very similar to those observed under Fsat conditions in the absence of added quinone. Our data strongly support the origin of low fluorescence yield at Fsat to be an antenna-based nonphotochemical quenching of excitation energy in photosystem II which has not usually been considered explicitly in

  7. On-site cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei 3EMS35 mutant and same vessel saccharification and fermentation of acid treated wheat straw for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Zia-ullah; Syed, Qurat-ul-Ain; Wu, Jing; Athar, Muhammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic raw materials involves process steps like pre-treatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation and distillation. In this study, wheat straw was explored as feedstock for on-site cellulase production by T. reesei 3EMS35 mutant, and as a substrate for second generation bioethanol production from baker yeast. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractography (XRD) of untreated wheat straw (UWS) and acid treated wheat straw (TWS) were done to understand the structural organization and changes in the cellulase accessibility and reactivity. The effect of delignification and structural modification for on-site cellulase enzyme production was comparably studied. The efficiency of crude cellulase enzyme for digestion of UWS and TWS and then production of ethanol from TWS was studied using same-vessel saccharification and fermentation (SVSF) technique, both in shaking flasks as well as in fermenters. Two different methods of operation were tested, i.e. the UWSEnz method, where UWS was used for on-site enzyme production, and TWSEnz method where TWS was applied as substrate for cellullase production. Results obtained showed structural modifications in cellulose of TWS due to delignification, removal of wax and change of crystallinity. UWS was better substrate than TWS for cellulase production due to the fact that lignin did not hinder the enzyme production by fungus but acted as a booster. On-site cellulase enzyme produced by T. reesei 3EMS35 mutant hydrolyzed most of cellulose (91 %) in TWS within first 24 hrs. Shake flasks experiments showed that ethanol titers and yields with UWSEnz were 2.9 times higher compared to those obtained with TWSEnz method respectively. Comparatively, titer of ethanol in shake flask experiments was 10 % higher than this obtained in 3 L fermenter with UWSEnz. Outcomes from this investigation clearly demonstrated the potential of on-site cellulase enzyme production and SVSF for ethanol production

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) POWER PLANT AND IT???S BY PRODUCTS YIELD FOR SMALL ISLANDS IN INDONESIA SEA WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Siahaya, Yusuf; Salam, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Small islands in Indonesia sea water are current heavily dependent of fossil fuels. Environmental concerns at global, regional and local levels, past and recent price hikes in the price of oil among others, have been drives behind a regional wide interest in renewable energy technologies. One of the renewable energy resources is the he temperature difference between the upper layer of warm sea water and the bottom layer of cold sea water. As long as the temperature between the ...

  9. Efficient prediction of (p,n) yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D C; McNaney, J M; Higginson, D P; Beg, F

    2009-09-09

    In the continuous deceleration approximation, charged particles decelerate without any spread in energy as they traverse matter. This approximation simplifies the calculation of the yield of nuclear reactions, for which the cross-section depends on the particle energy. We calculated (p,n) yields for a LiF target, using the Bethe-Bloch relation for proton deceleration, and predicted that the maximum yield would be around 0.25% neutrons per incident proton, for an initial proton energy of 70 MeV or higher. Yield-energy relations calculated in this way can readily be used to optimize source and (p,n) converter characteristics.

  10. Phenomenology of muon-induced neutron yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgin, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The cosmogenic neutron yield Yn characterizes the ability of matter to produce neutrons under the effect of cosmic ray muons with spectrum and average energy corresponding to an observation depth. The yield is the basic characteristic of cosmogenic neutrons. The neutron production rate and neutron flux both are derivatives of the yield. The constancy of the exponents α and β in the known dependencies of the yield on energy Yn∝Eμα and the atomic weight Yn∝Aβ allows one to combine these dependencies in a single formula and to connect the yield with muon energy loss in matter. As a result, the phenomenological formulas for the yields of muon-induced charged pions and neutrons can be obtained. These expressions both are associated with nuclear loss of the ultrarelativistic muons, which provides the main contribution to the total neutron yield. The total yield can be described by a universal formula, which is the best fit of the experimental data.

  11. 能源型甘薯高产栽培技术研究%Research on High Yield Cultivation Techology of Energy Type Ipomoea batatas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史本林; 尤瑞玲; 李红忠

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the yield of Ipomoea batatas Lam., and provide technical support for large-scale production, orthogonal test was applied to study the effects of transplanting time, planting density, ridge width and ridging height on the yield of sweet potato. The result showed that the primary-secondary order of the influencing factors was transplanting time, planting density, ridge width, ridging height. The highest yield was obtained in the fifth combination (transplanting on 20th May, planting density of 4.5 ind./m2, ridge width of 70 cm, ridge height of 40 cm). Timely planting early, proper ridge form and rational fertilization are crucial cultivation and management measures.%为了提高甘薯产量,同时为大规模生产提供技术支持,选取甘薯栽培技术中的移栽时间、种植密度、起垄宽度、起垄高度4个因素,每个因素设3个水平进行正交试验研究.结果表明:各因素对产量指标影响的主次依次为移栽时间、种植密度、起垄宽度、起垄高度;各组合中以第5组合(5月20日移栽,种植密度300株/67 m2,起垄宽度70 cm,起垄高度40 cm)的产量最高.从试验结果来看,适时早插,起垄适当,合理施肥是提高甘薯产量的重要栽培管理措施.

  12. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: On-Site Treatment of Low Level Mixed Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-03-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1292) to evaluate the proposed treatment of low level mixed waste (LLMW) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site). The purpose of the action is to treat LLMW in order to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions specified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the waste acceptance criteria of the planned disposal site(s). Approximately 17,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of LLMW are currently stored at the Site. Another 65,000 m{sup 3}of LLMW are likely to be generated by Site closure activities (a total of 82,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW). About 35,000 m{sup 3} can be directly disposed of off-site without treatment, and most of the remaining 47,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW can be treated at off-site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. However, some LLMW will require treatment on-site, either because it does not meet shipping requirements or because off-site treatment is not available for these particular types of LLMW. Currently, this LLMW is stored at the Site pending the development and implementation of effective treatment processes. The Site needs to treat this LLMW on-site prior to shipment to off-site disposal facilities, in order to meet the DOE long-term objective of clean up and closure of the Site. All on-site treatment of LLMW would comply with applicable Federal and State laws designed to protect public health and safety and to enhance protection of the environment. The EA describes and analyzes the environmental effects of the proposed action (using ten mobile treatment processes to treat waste on-site), and the alternatives of treating waste onsite (using two fixed treatment processes), and of taking no action. The EA was the subject of a public comment period from February 3 to 24, 1999. No written or other comments regarding the EA were received.

  13. Quality and energy yield of modules and photovoltaic plants - Final report; Qualita e resa energetica di moduli ed impianti fotovoltaici. Centrale ISAAC-TISO - Periodo VII: 2003-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianese, D.; Bernasconi, A.; Friesen, G.; Cereghetti, N.; Pola, I.; Bura, E.; Nagel, K.; Pittet, D.; Realini, A.; Pasinelli, P.; Ballerini, N.; Rioggi, S.

    2008-07-01

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reviews work done at the ISAAC-TISO test centre in southern Switzerland. The main objective of the test centre is the evaluation of photovoltaic module quality, i.e. the assessment of the power values declared by the manufacturer, the electrical behaviour and energy production in varying climatic conditions, the stability of these values over time, and module life-span. Up till now, both outdoor and indoor structures for testing the electrical behaviour of modules have been realised. Indoor measurements under standard conditions are carried out using a solar simulator, outdoor measurements are carried out using external stands capable of accommodating 18 pairs of modules. The aim of the test procedure is to verify the actual power of modules; to verify if module guarantees are respected; to observe the behaviour of modules under real climatic conditions; to compare the energy yield of the different types of module; and finally, to develop methods for forecasting energy yield. The test installations are described in detail and various results are presented. Building-integrated photovoltaics is discussed and the mechanical characteristics of various module types are examined.

  14. Reconstructing ancient sustainability: a comparison of onsite and offsite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubos, Carolin; Dreibrodt, Stefan; Horejs, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    With the onset of sedentism humans started to convert their surroundings. Whereas reconstructions of geochemical traces of settlement activity (e.g. Arrhenius, 1931) or man's pressure on the soils of landscapes (e.g. van Andel et al., 1990; Bork, 1998) were carried out at many sites holistic approaches questioning the sustainability of ancient societies are missing so far. A new approach, applied to the multi layered settlement mound "Cukurici Höyük" (western Anatolia, Turkey) aims at comparing land use intensity and settlement intensity. Land use intensity of the former settlers will be described by determining slope instability phases and quantifying slope deposits at hills adjacent to the settlement. Geochemical and physical properties as well as bio remains will be analysed of the dated debris layers onsite and quantified as matter fluxes. Matter accumulation onsite, being an indicator for settlement intensities, is compared to slope instability phases offsite, describing the impact of former settlers on their environment. The approach aims at quantifying historical settlement pressure over several settlement phases and might shed light on different phases of sustainability in ancient Times. The planned project is imbedded within the archaeological project (ERC Project / Austrian Archaeological Institute) which investigates alternating societal systems in a changing environment between 7000 and 3000 BC. Focus is laid on architectural research, archaeobotany, archaeozoology, lithics, metallurgy, and ore deposit. In a first geoarchaeological field campaign differentiable slope deposits could be proved. These contained datable organic material as well as pottery sherds dating to different historical phases. A well-established archaeological chronosequence of settlement layers will provide the onsite framework for this new project. The paper presents preliminary results of the outlined approach. Additionally several geochemical methodologies applied to the debris

  15. Dynamics of Nutrients Transport in Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, G.; De, M.

    2013-05-01

    Domestic wastewater is abundant in nutrients¬ that originate from various activities in the households. In developed countries, wastewater is largely managed by (1) centralized treatment where wastewater from large population is collected, treated, and discharged and (2) onsite treatment where wastewater is collected from an individual house, treated, and dispersed onsite; this system is commonly known as septic system or onsite wastewater treatment system (OWTS) and consist of a septic tank (collects wastewater) and drain-field (disperses wastewater in soil). In areas with porous sandy soils, the transport of nutrients from drain-field to shallow groundwater is accelerated. To overcome this limitation, elevated disposal fields (commonly called mounds) on top of the natural soil are constructed to provide unsaturated conditions for wastewater treatment. Our objective was to study the dynamics of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) transport in the vadose zone and groundwater in traditional and advanced OWTS. Soil water samples were collected from the vadose zone by using suction cup lysimeters and groundwater samples were collected by using piezometers. Collected samples (wastewater, soil-water, groundwater) were analyzed for various water quality parameters. The pH (4.39-4.78) and EC (0.28-0.34 dS/m) of groundwater was much lower than both wastewater and soil-water. In contrast to >50 mg/L of ammonium-N in wastewater, concentrations in all lysimeters (0.02-0.81 mg/L) and piezometers (0.01-0.82 mg/L) were 99% disappeared (primarily nitrified) in the vadose zone (20 mg/L in the vadose zones of traditional systems (drip dispersal and gravel trench). Concentrations of chloride showed a distinct pattern of nitrate-N breakthrough in vadose zone and groundwater; the groundwater nitrate-N was elevated upto 19.2 mg/L after wastewater delivery in tradional systems. Total P in the wastewater was ~10 mg/L, but low in all lysimeters (0.046-1.72 mg/L) and piezometers (0.01-0.78 mg

  16. Anaerobic digestion of straw and corn stover: The effect of biological process optimization and pre-treatment on total bio-methane yield and energy performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Serena; Wei, Qiao; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Dong, Renjie; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a useful method for producing renewable energy/biofuel. Today, biogas production uses a large amount of energy crops (EC), with the effect of increasing AD costs and creating conflict between food/feed vs. energy use. A partial solution to this might be the substitution of EC with agricultural wastes, e.g. straw. Straw and corn stover are widely available in the world and approximately 1600millionMgyear(-1) of these substrates are available. Straw can be useful used for biogas production but its characteristics limit its performance so that sometimes the energetic balance can be negative. In this review, the limits for the conversion of this substrate into biogas were investigated and solutions/proposals for getting higher straw biogas production performance are reported. In addition, energetic balances for untreated and pre-treated substrates are reported, giving indicative evaluations of the sustainability of straw and corn stover use for biogas production.

  17. Yield ratios of identified hadrons in p +p , p +Pb , and Pb +Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng-lan; Wang, Guo-jing; Wang, Rui-qin; Li, Hai-hong; Song, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Yield ratios of identified hadrons observed in high multiplicity p +p and p +Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider show remarkable similarity with those in Pb+Pb collisions, indicating some important and universal underlying dynamics in hadron production for different quark gluon final states. We use the quark combination model to explain the data of yield ratios in these three collision systems. The observed p /π and Λ /Ks0 can be reproduced simultaneously by quark combination, and these two ratios reflect the probability of baryon production at hadronization which is the same in the light sector and strange sector and is roughly constant in p +p , p +Pb , and Pb+Pb collision systems over three orders of magnitude in charged particle multiplicity. The data of Ks0/π , Λ /π , Ξ /π , and Ω /π show a hierarchy behavior relating to the strangeness content and are naturally explained by quark combination both in the saturate stage at high multiplicity and in the increase stage at moderate multiplicity. Our results suggest that the characteristic of quark combination is necessary in describing the production of hadrons in small systems created in p +p and p +Pb collisions.

  18. Analysis and inter-comparison of energy yield of wind turbines in Pakistan using detailed hourly and per minute recorded data sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkawi, A.; Tham, Y.; Muneer, T. [School of Engineering and Built Environment, Napier Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Asif, M. [School of Engineering and Built Environment, Glasgow Caledonian Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Within Pakistan the rather ease of availability of hydrocarbon gas reserves in Balochistan had the effect of delaying the work on feasibility of renewable energy and installation of appropriate pilot projects. However, with a clear sign of depletion of fossil fuels the present government has initiated a major programme of wind speed measurement and installation of large wind farms at locations that have been deemed fit for this purpose. The key force behind the present resurgence of renewable energy activity within Pakistan is the creation of the Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB), established by the Government of Pakistan in 2003. Under the aegis of AEDB wind speed data have been measured over a period of 4 years at a minute's frequency for Southern Pakistan at Gharo. The period of measurement was May 2002-June 2006. The present work aims to explore the potential for using hourly- as opposed to minute-by-minute data for the design of wind energy systems, the former set being much more widely available for a larger number of locations within the developing world. This work has therefore centred on finding the difference in the wind energy production by using: (a) a measured long-term, minute-by-minute data, and comparing this with (b) a concurrent hourly data set. Furthermore, a comparison of the cumulative frequency of wind speed from the latter data sets has also been carried out. It was found that the difference between the annual energy outputs from the latter two data sets was in close agreement with only a % difference. The two cumulative frequency functions were also found to be closely related. These results may be of use for locations close to the equatorial belt where the wind regime is noted for its stable and seasonal character. (author)

  19. A short rotation cultivation for a long-term yield. Energy wood from rapidly growing trees; Kurzer Umtrieb fuer langfristigen Ertrag. Energieholz aus schnell wachsenden Baumsorten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, Frank [KWB Biomasseheizungen, Mertingen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Wood becomes popular ever more. The demand of wood grows while the areas of forest globally shrink at the same time. Therefore, the cultivation of energy wood in short rotation is an important and long-term source of income for surface owners apart from environmental protection and valuable contribution to the sustainable power supply.

  20. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) doorstop samplecarrier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obrien, J.H.

    1997-02-24

    The Doorstop Sample Carrier System consists of a Type B certified N-55 overpack, U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification or performance-oriented 208-L (55-gal) drum (DOT 208-L drum), and Doorstop containers. The purpose of the Doorstop Sample Carrier System is to transport samples onsite for characterization. This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluation necessary to demonstrate that the Doorstop Sample Carrier System meets the requirements and acceptance criteria for both Hanford Site normal transport conditions and accident condition events for a Type B package. This SARP also establishes operational, acceptance, maintenance, and quality assurance (QA) guidelines to ensure that the method of transport for the Doorstop Sample Carrier System is performed safely in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping.

  1. Geochemically induced shifts in catabolic energy yields explain past ecological changes of diffuse vents in the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hentscher Michael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The East Pacific Rise (EPR at 9°50'N hosts a hydrothermal vent field (Bio9 where the change in fluid chemistry is believed to have caused the demise of a tubeworm colony. We test this hypothesis and expand on it by providing a thermodynamic perspective in calculating free energies for a range of catabolic reactions from published compositional data. The energy calculations show that there was excess H2S in the fluids and that oxygen was the limiting reactant from 1991 to 1997. Energy levels are generally high, although they declined in that time span. In 1997, sulfide availability decreased substantially and H2S was the limiting reactant. Energy availability dropped by a factor of 10 to 20 from what it had been between 1991 and 1995. The perishing of the tubeworm colonies began in 1995 and coincided with the timing of energy decrease for sulfide oxidizers. In the same time interval, energy availability for iron oxidizers increased by a factor of 6 to 8, and, in 1997, there was 25 times more energy per transferred electron in iron oxidation than in sulfide oxidation. This change coincides with a massive spread of red staining (putative colonization by Fe-oxidizing bacteria between 1995 and 1997. For a different cluster of vents from the EPR 9°50'N area (Tube Worm Pillar, thermodynamic modeling is used to examine changes in subseafloor catabolic metabolism between 1992 and 2000. These reactions are deduced from deviations in diffuse fluid compositions from conservative behavior of redox-sensitive species. We show that hydrogen is significantly reduced relative to values expected from conservative mixing. While H2 concentrations of the hydrothermal endmember fluids were constant between 1992 and 1995, the affinities for hydrogenotrophic reactions in the diffuse fluids decreased by a factor of 15 and then remained constant between 1995 and 2000. Previously, these fluids have been shown to support subseafloor methanogenesis. Our

  2. Measurement of flux-weighted average cross-sections and isomeric yield ratios for 103Rh(γ,xn) reactions in the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 55 and 60 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakilur Rahman, Md.; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Naik, Haladhara; Nadeem, Muhammad; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Shahid, Muhammad; Yang, Sung-Chul; Cho, Young-Sik; Lee, Young-Ouk; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Woo Lee, Man; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Ro, Tae-Ik

    2016-07-01

    We measured the flux-weighted average cross-sections and the isomeric yield ratios of 99m, g, 100m, g, 101m, g, 102m, gRh in the 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions with the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 55 and 60MeV by the activation and the off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique, using the 100MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Korea. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were calculated by using the computer code TALYS 1.6 based on mono-energetic photons, and compared with the present experimental data. The flux-weighted average cross-sections of 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions in intermediate bremsstrahlung energies are the first time measurement and are found to increase from their threshold value to a particular value, where the other reaction channels open up. Thereafter, it decreases with bremsstrahlung energy due to its partition in different reaction channels. The isomeric yield ratios (IR) of 99m, g, 100m, g, 101m, g, 102m, gRh in the 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions from the present work were compared with the literature data in the 103Rh(d, x), 102-99Ru(p, x) , 103Rh( α, αn) , 103Rh( α, 2p3n) , 102Ru(3He, x), and 103Rh( γ, xn) reactions. It was found that the IR values of 102, 101, 100, 99Rh in all these reactions increase with the projectile energy, which indicates the role of excitation energy. At the same excitation energy, the IR values of 102, 101, 100, 99Rh are higher in the charged particle-induced reactions than in the photon-induced reaction, which indicates the role of input angular momentum.

  3. Measurement of the reaction {gamma}p{yields}K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup +} for photon energies up to 2.65 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at ELSA; Messung der Reaktion {gamma}p {yields} K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup +} fuer Photonenergien bis 2.65 GeV mit dem SAPHIR-Detektor an ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawall, R.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup 0}{sigma}{sup +} was measured with the SAPHIR-detector at ELSA during the run periods 1997 and 1998. Results were obtained for cross sections in the photon energy range from threshold up to 2.65 GeV for all production angles and for the {sigma}{sup +}-polarization. Emphasis has been put on the determination and reduction of the contributions of background reactions and the comparison with other measurements and theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions from on-site wastewater treatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somlai-Haase, Celia; Knappe, Jan; Gill, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    Nearly one third of the Irish population relies on decentralized domestic wastewater treatment systems which involve the discharge of effluent into the soil via a percolation area (drain field). In such systems, wastewater from single households is initially treated on-site either by a septic tank and an additional packaged secondary treatment unit, in which the influent organic matter is converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) by microbial mediated processes. The effluent from the tanks is released into the soil for further treatment in the unsaturated zone where additional CO2 and CH4 are emitted to the atmosphere as well as nitrous oxide (N2O) from the partial denitrification of nitrate. Hence, considering the large number of on-site systems in Ireland and internationally, these are potential significant sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and yet have received almost no direct field measurement. Here we present the first attempt to quantify and qualify the production and emissions of GHGs from a septic tank system serving a single house in the County Westmeath, Ireland. We have sampled the water for dissolved CO2, CH4 and N2O and measured the gas flux from the water surface in the septic tank. We have also carried out long-term flux measurements of CO2 from the drain field, using an automated soil gas flux system (LI-8100A, Li-Cor®) covering a whole year semi-continuously. This has enabled the CO2 emissions from the unsaturated zone to be correlated against different meteorological parameters over an annual cycle. In addition, we have integrated an ultraportable GHG analyser (UGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc.) into the automated soil gas flux system to measure CH4 flux. Further, manual sampling has also provided a better understanding of N2O emissions from the septic tank system.

  5. 78 FR 48468 - Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site... to workers of Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, including on-site leased workers... Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division. The Department has determined that these...

  6. 75 FR 70688 - Actel Corporation, Currently Known as Microsemi Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... On-Site Leased Workers From ATR International, Accountants, Inc. and Accountant Temps Mountain View... International, Accountants, Inc., and Accountant Temps, Mountain View, California. The notice was published in... Microsemi Corporation, including on-site leased workers from ATE International, Accountants, Inc.,...

  7. 42 CFR 488.9 - Onsite observation of accreditation organization operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... evaluation of survey results or the accreditation decision-making process, and interviews with the... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Onsite observation of accreditation organization... PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.9 Onsite observation of accreditation organization operations. As part...

  8. 75 FR 28295 - Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and Spherion Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Cummins Filtration, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower and... workers of Cummins Filtration, including on-site leased workers from Manpower, Lake Mills, Iowa. The... Mills, Iowa location of Cummins Filtration to provide procurement and inventory management services...

  9. Nutrition Program Quality Assurance through a Formalized Process of On-Site Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Joan Doyle; Dollahite, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    A protocol for a systematic onsite review of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education was developed to support quality programming and ensure compliance with state guidelines and federal regulations. Onsite review of local nutrition program operations is one strategy to meet this…

  10. 13 CFR 120.1051 - Frequency of on-site reviews and examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Frequency of on-site reviews and examinations. 120.1051 Section 120.1051 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1051 Frequency of on-site reviews and...

  11. 75 FR 3250 - Glaxosmithkline, Including On-Site Temporary and Leased Workers From Kelly Services, Kelly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... antibiotics for humans and animals. The company reports that on-site leased workers from Dream Clean, Inc..., Pharmasys, Validation System Solutions, Tele-Optics and Dream Clean, Inc., Bristol, TN; Amended... from Dream Clean, Inc. working on-site at the Bristol, Tennessee location of Glaxosmithkline. The...

  12. On-site Testing and PD Diagnosis of High Voltage Power Cables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulski, E.; Cichecki, P.; Wester, F.; Smit, J.J.; Bodega, R.; Hermans, T.J.W.H.; Seitz, P.P.; Quak, B.; De Vries, F.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to after-laying of new-installed high voltage (HV) power cables the use of on-site non-destructive on-site testing and diagnosis of service aged power cables is becoming an important issue to determine the actual condition of the cable systems and to determine the future performances. In

  13. 78 FR 32464 - Amantea Nonwovens, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Express Employment Professionals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration Amantea Nonwovens, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Express... Nonwovens, L.L.C. including on-site leased workers from Express Employment Professionals and The Job Store..., Ohio location of Amantea Nonwovens, L.L.C. The Department has determined that these workers were...

  14. 13 CFR 120.1050 - On-site reviews and examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .../liability management); (4) Earnings; (5) Liquidity; and (6) Compliance with Loan Program Requirements. (c... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1050 On-site reviews and examinations. (a) On-site... operations management; (3) Credit administration; and (4) Compliance with Loan Program Requirements. (b)...

  15. Nutrition Program Quality Assurance through a Formalized Process of On-Site Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Joan Doyle; Dollahite, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    A protocol for a systematic onsite review of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education was developed to support quality programming and ensure compliance with state guidelines and federal regulations. Onsite review of local nutrition program operations is one strategy to meet this…

  16. Thermalization temperature in Pb+Pb collisions at SpS energy from hadron yields and midrapidity $p_{t}$ distributions of hadrons and direct photons

    CERN Document Server

    Peressounko, D Yu; Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of 2+1 Bjorken hydrodynamics we describe simultaneously hadron yields and midrapidity pt distributions of direct photons, unflavored, and strange hadrons measured in Pb+Pb collisions at SpS. We find, that a reasonably quantitative description of these data is possible only if we introduce some radial velocity at the beginning of the one-fluid hydrodynamic stage. We fix uniquely all parameters of this model, and estimate an initial temperature of the just thermalized state T_{in}=(200 +40 -20) MeV in the case of EoS with phase transition to Quark-Gluon Plasma, and T_{in}=(230 +60 -30) MeV in the pure hadronic scenario. We conclude that SpS data considered in our study can not distinguish between a production of QGP, and its absence.

  17. Low-Yield Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Division of Reproductive Health More CDC Sites Low-Yield Cigarettes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... they compensate when smoking them. Smokers Who Use Low-Yield Cigarettes Many smokers consider smoking low-yield ...

  18. Contribution to the study of {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + n and {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + {pi} + n reactions at the energies of the maxima of the {pi}-nucleon interaction in the T = 1/2 state total cross section; Contribution a l'etude des reactions {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + n et {pi}{sup -} + p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + n aux energies des maxima de la section efficace totale de l'interaction {pi}{sup -} nucleon dans l'etat de spin isobarique T = 1/2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turlay, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    In the first part of this experiment, we determined the total cross section for processes yielding only neutral particles, from 300 to 1600 MeV. For this, we counted the number of incident {pi}{sup -}, as defined by a counter telescope, which interact in a liquid-hydrogen target without giving charged particles in a 4{pi} counter surrounding the target. In the second part of this experiment, we have separated the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n and {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} n between 300 and 1100 MeV, by supposing that only these two reactions was realized by placing lead absorbers between the target and 4{pi} counter and by comparing the counting rate for neutral events with and without lead. The transmission thus measured is a function of the average number of photons produced and therefore of the ratio between the two neutral channels, {pi}{sup 0} n and {pi}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} n. In the last section of this work, we discuss the experimental results and compare them to those obtained by other authors in the study of photoproduction and the {pi}-nucleon interaction. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie de cette experience, nous determinons la section efficace totale des processus ne donnant naissance qu'a des particules neutres de 300 et 1 600 MeV. Pour cela nous comptons le nombre de {pi}{sup -}, defini par un telescope incident, qui interagissent dans une cible d'hydrogene liquide sans donner de particules chargees dans un compteur 4{pi} entourant cette cible. Dans la deuxieme partie de l'experience nous avons separe les reactions {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} n et {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} n entre 300 et 1 600 MeV en supposant que seules ces deux voies soient importantes a ces energies. La separation de ces deux reactions a ete realisee en placant des ecrans de plomb entre la cible et le compteur 4 {pi}, et en comparant les traces de comptage des evenements a secondaires neutres

  19. Evaluation of the potential for using old-field vegetation as an energy feedstock: Biomass yield, chemical composition, environmental concerns, and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.W. Jr.

    1990-07-01

    The major focus of current research on production of biomass for use as energy feedstock involves selection of species and genotypes best suited for specific regions of the United States and development of crop management techniques that maximize biomass productivity while minimizing environmental impacts and economic costs. The two experimental sites, and abandoned soybean field (AS) and an abandoned pasture (AP) were studied. At the AS site, the effects of two harvest frequencies (1 or 2 harvests annually), two nitrogen fertilizer treatments (1 or 2 harvests annually), two nitrogen fertilizer treatments (0 or 87 kg{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}), and two phosphorous fertilizer treatments (0 or 111 kg{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}) were determined. At the AP site, the effects of two harvest treatments (1 or 2 harvests annually), two fertilizer treatments (56:56:135 kg of N:P:K{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}), and two lime treatments (0 or 4600 kg{center dot}ha{sup {minus}1}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}) were determined. At both sites, treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block 2 {times} 2 {times} 2 factorial experiment. The results of this research indicated that old-field vegetation is: (1) sufficiently productive to provide significant quantities of energy feedstock; (2) chemically suitable as an energy feedstock; (3) environmentally benign with respect to impacts related to soil erosion and nutrient depletion; (4) relatively unresponsive to fertilizer and lime inputs; and (5) economically competitive with other biomass energy feedstock candidates. 38 refs., 8 figs., 68 tabs.

  20. High-yield harvest of nanofibers/mesoporous carbon composite by pyrolysis of waste biomass and its application for high durability electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Tian, Ke; He, Yan-Rong; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-12-02

    Disposal and recycling of the large scale biomass waste is of great concern. Themochemically converting the waste biomass to functional carbon nanomaterials and bio-oil is an environmentally friendly apporach by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution caused by open burning. In this work, we reported a scalable, "green" method for the synthesis of the nanofibers/mesoporous carbon composites through pyrolysis of the Fe(III)-preloaded biomass, which is controllable by adjustment of temperature and additive of catalyst. It is found that the coupled catalytic action of both Fe and Cl species is able to effectively catalyze the growth of the carbon nanofibers on the mesoporous carbon and form magnetic nanofibers/mesoporous carbon composites (M-NMCCs). The mechanism for the growth of the nanofibers is proposed as an in situ vapor deposition process, and confirmed by the XRD and SEM results. M-NMCCs can be directly used as electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage without further separation, and exhibit favorable energy storage performance with high EDLC capacitance, good retention capability, and excellent stability and durability (more than 98% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles). Considering that biomass is a naturally abundant and renewable resource (over billions tons biomass produced every year globally) and pyrolysis is a proven technique, M-NMCCs can be easily produced at large scale and become a sustainable and reliable resource for clean energy storage.

  1. Laboratory and clinical evaluation of on-site urine drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Carlsson, Sten; Tusic, Marinela; Olsson, Robert; Franzen, Lisa; Hulten, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Products for on-site urine drug testing offer the possibility to perform screening for drugs of abuse directly at the point-of-care. This is a well-established routine in emergency and dependency clinics but further evaluation of performance is needed due to inherent limitations with the available products. Urine drug testing by an on-site product was compared with routine laboratory methods. First, on-site testing was performed at the laboratory in addition to the routine method. Second, the on-site testing was performed at a dependency clinic and urine samples were subsequently sent to the laboratory for additional analytical investigation. The on-site testing products did not perform with assigned cut-off levels. The subjective reading between the presence of a spot (i.e. negative test result) being present or no spot (positive result) was difficult in 3.2% of the cases, and occurred for all parameters. The tests performed more accurately in drug negative samples (specificity 96%) but less accurately for detecting positives (sensitivity 79%). Of all incorrect results by the on-site test the proportion of false negatives was 42%. The overall agreement between on-site and laboratory testing was 95% in the laboratory study and 98% in the clinical study. Although a high degree of agreement was observed between on-site and routine laboratory urine drug testing, the performance of on-site testing was not acceptable due to significant number of false negative results. The limited sensitivity of on-site testing compared to laboratory testing reduces the applicability of these tests.

  2. First results from the microwave air yield beam experiment (MAYBE: Measurement of GHz radiation for ultra-high energy cosmic ray detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzi V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of microwave emission from an electron-beam induced air plasma performed at the 3 MeV electron Van de Graaff facility of the Argonne National Laboratory. Results include the emission spectrum between 1 and 15 GHz, the polarization of the microwave radiation and the scaling of the emitted power with respect to beam intensity. MAYBE measurements provide further insight on microwave emission from extensive air showers as a novel detection technique for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

  3. Retraction - Request that it is necessary to retract paper: Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module DOI:10.2298/TSCI130118144M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Dr. Simeon Oka, Editor-in-chief of the journal THERMAL SCIENCE request that it is necessary to retract paper Thermal and electrical energy yield analysis of a directly water cooled photovoltaic module DOI:10.2298/TSCI130118144M by Mtunzi Busiso, Meyer Edson L., Michael Simon published in the journal Thermal Science, Vol. 20, Year 2016, No. 1, pp. 155-163 since, by technical error of the Editorial stuff, this paper has already been published in the journal THERMAL SCIENCE, Supplement 2, 2015, Vol. 19, pp. S547-S555. Link to the retracted article 2016 Volume 20, Issue 1, Pages: 155-163

  4. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  5. The Cherenkov Telescope Array On-Site integral sensitivity: observing the Crab

    CERN Document Server

    Fioretti, Valentina; Schussler, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the future large observatory in the very high energy (VHE) domain. Operating from 20 GeV to 300 TeV, it will be composed of tens of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) displaced in a large area of a few square kilometers in both the southern and northern hemispheres. The CTA/DATA On-Site Analysis (OSA) is the system devoted to the development of dedicated pipelines and algorithms to be used at the CTA site for the reconstruction, data quality monitoring, science monitoring and realtime science alerting during observations. The OSA integral sensitivity is computed here for the most studied source at Gamma-rays, the Crab Nebula, for a set of exposures ranging from 1000 seconds to 50 hours, using the full CTA Southern array. The reason for the Crab Nebula selection as the first example of OSA integral sensitivity is twofold: (i) this source is characterized by a broad spectrum covering the entire CTA energy range; (ii) it represents, at the time of writing, the standar...

  6. 75 FR 11921 - Heritage Aviation, Ltd., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Global Technical Services and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Heritage Aviation, Ltd., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Global... workers of Heritage Aviation, including on-site leased workers from Heritage Aviation, Ltd, including on... leased from Global Inc., were employed on-site at the Grand Prairie, Texas location of Heritage...

  7. 75 FR 453 - FLSMidth, Inc., Cement Division, Product Engineering, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Aerotek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ...., Cement Division, Product Engineering, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Aerotek Contract Engineering..., applicable to workers of FLSmidth, Inc., Cement Division, Product Engineering, including on-site leased...-site leased workers from Clarke Consulting, Inc. were also employed on-site at FLSmidth, Inc.,...

  8. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  9. Acoustical analysis of trained and untrained singers onsite before and after prolonged voice use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christophe E.

    Controlled acoustic environments are important in voice research. Recording environment affects the quality of voice recordings. While sound booths and anechoic chambers are examples of controlled acoustic environments widely used in research, they are both costly and not portable. The long-term goal of this project is to compare the voice usage and efficiency of trained and untrained singers onsite immediately before and after vocal performance. The specific goal of this project is the further of development a Portable Sound Booth (PSB) and standardization of onsite voice recording procedures under controlled conditions. We hypothesized that the simple and controlled acoustic environment provided by the PSB would enable consistent reliable onsite voice recordings and the immediate differences as a consequence of voice usage were measurable. Research has suggested that it would be possible to conduct onsite voice recordings. Proof of concept research titled "Construction and Characterization of a Portable Sound Booth for Onsite Measurement" was conducted before initiating the full research effort. Preliminary findings revealed that: (1) it was possible to make high-quality voice recordings onsite, (2) the use of a Portable Sound Booth (PSB) required further acoustic characterization of its inherent acoustic properties, and (3) testable differences before and after performance were evident. The specific aims were to (1) develop and refine onsite objective voice measurements in the PSB and (2) evaluate use of the PSB to measure voice quality changes before and after voice usage.

  10. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for cesium chloride capsules with type W overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, J.C.

    1997-09-15

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) documents the evaluation of a new basket design and overpacked cesium chloride capsule payload for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask in accordance with the onsite transportation requirements of the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping manual, WHC-CM-2-14. This design supports the one-time onsite shipment of 16 cesium chloride capsules with Type W overpacks from the 324 Building to the 224T Building at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The SEP is valid for a one-time onsite shipment or until August 1, 1998, whichever occurs first.

  11. A potentiometric biosensor for rapid on-site disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Alexey; Gray, Darren W; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Shields, Niall; Montrose, Armelle; Creedon, Niamh; Lovera, Pierre; O'Riordan, Alan; Mooney, Mark H; Vogel, Eric M

    2016-05-15

    Quantitative point-of-care (POC) devices are the next generation for serological disease diagnosis. Whilst pathogen serology is typically performed by centralized laboratories using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA), faster on-site diagnosis would infer improved disease management and treatment decisions. Using the model pathogen Bovine Herpes Virus-1 (BHV-1) this study employs an extended-gate field-effect transistor (FET) for direct potentiometric serological diagnosis. BHV-1 is a major viral pathogen of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD), the leading cause of economic loss ($2 billion annually in the US only) to the cattle and dairy industry. To demonstrate the sensor capabilities as a diagnostic tool, BHV-1 viral protein gE was expressed and immobilized on the sensor surface to serve as a capture antigen for a BHV-1-specific antibody (anti-gE), produced in cattle in response to viral infection. The gE-coated immunosensor was shown to be highly sensitive and selective to anti-gE present in commercially available anti-BHV-1 antiserum and in real serum samples from cattle with results being in excellent agreement with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and ELISA. The FET sensor is significantly faster than ELISA (disease intervention. This sensor technology is versatile, amenable to multiplexing, easily integrated to POC devices, and has the potential to impact a wide range of human and animal diseases.

  12. Canon multifunction copier machines – now with onsite support!

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Following a retendering process in 2012, the IT Department is pleased to announce that leased multifunction copier machines are now covered by onsite support, provided by Canon technicians via the CERN Service Desk support system.   You can now contact the Service Desk regarding any problems or requests for toner: Telephone: 77777 Email: Service-Desk@cern.ch Please remember to quote the machine printer name and/or serial number (marked on the side of the machine). The following submission forms are available online: Report a failure with a printer or copier Request for network printer or copier installation or move Request toner/ink for my printer or copier The website below details the range of models available, all of which include print, photocopy and scan-to-mail functions as standard. These multifunction copier machines are leased subject to a monthly charge (minimum of 48 months) plus a “per click” charge to cover consumables (except staples), leaving you noth...

  13. Benefits of On-Site Management of Environmental Restoration Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, Michael J. ,P.E.; Wood, Craig, R.E.M.; Kwiecinski, Daniel, P.E.; Alanis, Saul

    2003-02-27

    As Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) began assessing options under which to conduct the remediation of environmental restoration sites, it became clear that the standard routes for permanent disposal of waste contaminated with hazardous materials would be difficult. Publicly, local citizens' groups resisted the idea of large volumes of hazardous waste being transported through their communities. Regulations for the off-site disposal are complicated due to the nature of the environmental restoration waste, which included elevated tritium levels. Waste generated from environmental restoration at SNL/NM included debris and soils contaminated with a variety of constituents. Operationally, disposal of environmental restoration waste was difficult because of the everchanging types of waste generated during site remediation. As an alternative to standard hazardous waste disposal, SNL/NM proposed and received regulatory approval to construct a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU). By containing the remediation wastes on-site, SNL/NM's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program managed to eliminate transportation concerns from the public, worked with regulatory agencies to develop a safe, permanent disposal, and modified the waste disposal procedures to accommodate operational changes. SNL/NM accomplished the task and saved approximately $200 million over the life of the CAMU project, as compared to off-site disposal options.

  14. On-site digital heritage inventory development at Bat, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y.; Miki, T.; Kuronuma, T.; Oguchi, T.

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports on the on-site development of a local-scale digital heritage inventory (DHI) of the Bronze Age site at Bat in the interior of Oman. The goal of this inventory project was to share geospatial and archaeological information of tombs and other built structures with researchers and government agents to conduct cultural heritage management, scientific research, outreach, and education. To this end, the Bat Digital Heritage Inventory (BatDHI) was compiled at the local office by incorporating previous survey records, which were concurrently crosschecked and updated by ground-truth surveys. The current version of the BatDHI was implemented using a combination of a network-access-ready database application, open source geographical information system, and web-based map engine. This system assisted both fieldwork and management works including decision making and planning. This inventory project exemplified a transdisciplinary research, in which researchers and societal stakeholders collaborated for co-design of research agendas, co-production of knowledge, and co-dissemination of outcomes.

  15. Religious building energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielvogel, L.G.; Rudin, A.

    1988-02-01

    The Interfaith Coalition on Energy (ICE) was organized in 1980 by the Philadelphia area religious community and, funded in 1982 by local private foundations and corporations, began an energy management program for religious buildings whose utility bills are paid by congregations. Since that time, ICE has completed on-site energy audits for 226 congregations with a total of 546 buildings. Each audit report contains a description of the facilities and their energy systems, a baseline year of energy data, a computation of energy use per square foot, and a list of recommendations to reduce energy costs in order of simple payback.

  16. A Generalized Yield Criterion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shijian YUAN; Dazhi XIAO; Zhubin HE

    2004-01-01

    A generalized yield criterion is proposed based on the metal plastic deformation mechanics and the fundamental formula in theory of plasticity. Using the generalized yield criterion, the reason is explained that Mises yield criterion and Tresca yield criterion do not completely match with experimental data. It has been shown that the yield criteria of ductile metals depend not only on the quadratic invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor J2, but also on the cubic invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor J3 and the ratio of the yield stress in pure shear to the yield stress in uniaxial tension k/σs. The reason that Mises yield criterion and Tresca yield criterion are not in good agreement with the experimental data is that the effect of J3 and k/σs is neglected.

  17. Measurement of flux-weighted average cross-sections and isomeric yield ratios for {sup 103}Rh(γ, xn) reactions in the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 55 and 60 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakilur Rahman, Md.; Kim, Kwangsoo; Kim, Guinyun; Nadeem, Muhammad; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Shahid, Muhammad [Kyungpook National University, Department of Physics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Naik, Haladhara [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiochemistry Division, Mumbai (India); Yang, Sung-Chul; Cho, Young-Sik; Lee, Young-Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Nuclear Data Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Woo Lee, Man; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Yang, Gwang-Mo [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Research Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ro, Tae-Ik [Dong-A University, Department of Materials Physics, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    We measured the flux-weighted average cross-sections and the isomeric yield ratios of {sup 99m,g,100m,g,101m,g,102m,g}Rh in the {sup 103}Rh(γ, xn) reactions with the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 55 and 60 MeV by the activation and the off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique, using the 100 MeV electron linac at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Korea. The flux-weighted average cross-sections were calculated by using the computer code TALYS 1.6 based on mono-energetic photons, and compared with the present experimental data. The flux-weighted average cross-sections of {sup 103}Rh(γ, xn) reactions in intermediate bremsstrahlung energies are the first time measurement and are found to increase from their threshold value to a particular value, where the other reaction channels open up. Thereafter, it decreases with bremsstrahlung energy due to its partition in different reaction channels. The isomeric yield ratios (IR) of {sup 99m,g,100m,g,101m,g,102m,g}Rh in the {sup 103}Rh(γ, xn) reactions from the present work were compared with the literature data in the {sup 103}Rh(d, x), {sup 102-99}Ru(p, x), {sup 103}Rh(α, αn), {sup 103}Rh(α, 2p3n), {sup 102}Ru({sup 3}He, x), and {sup 103}Rh(γ, xn) reactions. It was found that the IR values of {sup 102,101,100,99}Rh in all these reactions increase with the projectile energy, which indicates the role of excitation energy. At the same excitation energy, the IR values of {sup 102,101,100,99}Rh are higher in the charged particle-induced reactions than in the photon-induced reaction, which indicates the role of input angular momentum. (orig.)

  18. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting for Roadways

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Haocheng

    2015-01-01

    Energy harvesting technologies have drawn much attention as an alternative power source of roadway accessories in different scales. Piezoelectric energy harvesting consisting of PZT piezoceramic disks sealed in a protective package is developed in this work to harness the deformation energy of pavement induced by traveling vehicles and generate electrical energy. Six energy harvesters are fabricated and installed at the weigh station on I-81 at Troutville, VA to perform on-site evaluation. T...

  19. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  20. Wackenhut Services, Incorporated: Report from the DOE Voluntary Protection Program onsite review, August 10--14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of Wackenhut Services, Inc. (WSI) at Savannah River Site (SRS), conducted August 10-14, 1998. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements to determine its success in implementing the five DOE-VPP tenets. The Team determined that WSI has met in varying degrees, all the tenets of the DOE-VPP. In every case, WSI programs and procedures exceed the level or degree necessary for compliance with existing standards, DOE Orders, and guidelines. In addition, WSI has systematically integrated their occupational safety and health (OSH) program into management and work practices at all levels. WSI`s efforts toward implementing the five major DOE-VPP tenets are summarized.

  1. Blue-yellow photoluminescence from Ce{sup 3+} {yields} Dy{sup 3+} energy transfer in HfO{sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+}:Dy{sup 3+} films deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Martinez, R. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Lira, A.C. [Unidad Academica Profesional Nezahualcoyotl, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Av. Bordo de Xochiaca s/n, Nezahualcoyotl, Estado de Mexico 57000 (Mexico); Speghini, A. [DiSTeMeV, Universita di Verona, and INSTM, UdR Verona, Via Della Pieve 70, I-37029 San Floriano (Verona) (Italy); Falcony, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Caldino, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-02-10

    Research highlights: > A blue-yellow emission phosphor excited with UV radiation can be manufactured with CeCl{sub 3} and DyCl{sub 3} doped HfO{sub 2} films deposited at 300 deg. C by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique. > The addition of DyCl{sub 3} in the HfO{sub 2}:CeCl{sub 3} film leads to a non-radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} under Ce{sup 3+} excitation at 280 nm. > The efficiency of this transfer increases up to 86 {+-} 3% for the film with the highest Dy{sup 3+} content. > The possibility of achieving the coordinates of ideal white light with increasing the concentration of dysprosium is demonstrated. - Abstract: HfO{sub 2} films codoped with Ce{sup 3+} and several concentrations of Dy{sup 3+} have been processed by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique. Emissions from Dy{sup 3+} ions centred at 480 and 575 nm associated with the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} {yields} {sup 6}H{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} {yields} {sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transitions, respectively, have been observed upon UV excitation via a non-radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} ions. Such energy transfer via an electric dipole-quadrupole interaction appears to be the most probable transfer mechanism. The efficiency of this transfer increases up to 86 {+-} 3% for the film with the highest Dy{sup 3+} content (1.9 {+-} 0.1 at.% as measured from EDS). The possibility of achieving the coordinates of ideal white light with increasing the concentration of dysprosium is demonstrated.

  2. Efeito de diferentes níveis de proteína e energia sobre o rendimento de carcaça de codornas européias Effect of protein and energy levels on carcass yield of European quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S.S. Corrêa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o rendimento de carcaça de codornas européias de corte (Coturnix coturnix coturnix no 42º dia de idade, alimentadas com dietas contendo quatro níveis de proteína e dois níveis de energia. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente ao acaso, com seis repetições e oito codornas por unidade experimental. Os tratamentos constituíram de um fatorial 2×4, ou seja, dois níveis de energia (2900 e 3100kcal EM/kg e quatro níveis de proteína (22, 24, 26 e 28% proteína bruta na dieta. As variáveis estudadas foram: peso vivo, peso de carcaça, rendimento de carcaça, peso de coxa, rendimento de coxa, peso de peito, rendimento de peito, peso de gordura abdominal, rendimento de gordura abdominal, peso de vísceras comestíveis e rendimento de vísceras comestíveis. Não houve efeito significativo dos níveis de energia e nem dos níveis de proteína sobre nenhuma das características de carcaça analisada.The effect of protein and energy levels on 42nd day carcass yield of European quails (Coturnix coturnix coturnix was evaluated. A completely randomized design with five replicates and eight quails per experimental unit was used. The treatment consist on diets with two energy metabolic levels (2900 and 3100kcal EM/kg and four protein levels (22, 24, 26 and 28% of crude protein. The traits analyzed were body weight and weight and yield of carcass, tight, breast, fat and edible viscera. No significant effects of crude protein and metabolic energy levels on carcass traits were found.

  3. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  4. 76 FR 2144 - Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on December 6, 2010, applicable to workers of Quest Diagnostics, Inc... on-site at the West Norriton, Pennsylvania location of Quest Diagnostics, Inc.,...

  5. 78 FR 8587 - Thomson Reuters, Finance Operations & Technology Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration Thomson Reuters, Finance Operations & Technology Division, Including... Worker Adjustment Assistance on August 2, 2012, applicable to workers of Thomson Reuters, Finance... that workers of Thomson Reuters, Finance Operations & Technology Division, including on-site...

  6. A sensitive rapid on-site immunoassay for heavy metal contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, R.; Blake, D.; Flowers, G.

    1996-05-02

    This project concerns the development of immunoassays for heavy metals that will permit the rapid on-site analysis of specific heavy metals, including lead and chromium in water and soil samples. 2 refs.

  7. Medical complications and outcomes at an onsite rehabilitation unit for older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulroy, M

    2013-09-01

    The rehabilitation of older patients in Ireland after an acute medical event occurs at dedicated onsite hospital units or at offsite centres. Information on medical complications and outcomes is inadequate.

  8. On-site toxicity of irrigation drainwater from Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge to aquatic organisms

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The toxicity of water from seven locations in the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area was evaluated in a series of on-site tests conducted over a 10 day period with...

  9. 75 FR 11922 - Apria Healthcare, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Corestaff, Ultimate Staffing (Roth...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ..., Ultimate Staffing (Roth Staffing Companies), and Aerotek, Cromwell, CT; Amended Certification Regarding... a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account for Roth Staffing Companies. The Department has... from Ultimate Staffing (Roth Staffing Companies) and Aerotek working on-site at the...

  10. 78 FR 66779 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant... Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, including on-site leased workers from Diversified Management...: All workers of United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant,......

  11. Field Sampling and Selecting On-Site Analytical Methods for Explosives in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this issue paper is to provide guidance to Remedial Project Managers regarding field sampling and on-site analytical methods fordetecting and quantifying secondary explosive compounds in soils.

  12. 75 FR 49526 - Halliburton Company, Duncan Mfg., Including On-Site Leased Workers from Express Personnel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Halliburton Company, Duncan Mfg., Including On-Site Leased Workers... Company, Technology and Engineering Division, Finance and Administration Division, Duncan, OK; Amended.... Workers of Halliburton Company, Technology and Engineering Division, and Finance and...

  13. 78 FR 1265 - Dana Holding Corporation; Power Technologies Group Division; Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Dana Holding Corporation; Power Technologies Group Division; Including... Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (subject firm). The worker group includes on-site leased... Company, Power Technologies Group Division, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who were engaged in employment...

  14. 75 FR 71464 - Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups... Moosic, PA, Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups Including On-Site Leased... of MetLife, Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups, Moosic, Pennsylvania...

  15. 76 FR 18754 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Onsite Environmental Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... TGP's Northeast Supply Diversification Project under consideration in Docket No. CP11-30-000. These onsite reviews will assist staff in completing its evaluation of the environmental impacts of...

  16. 77 FR 70484 - Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... COMMISSION Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments... Power Systems to Verify Proper Load Group Assignments, Electrical Separation, and Redundancy.'' DG-1294... encompass preoperational testing of electrical power systems used to meet current Station...

  17. Application of On-Site Wastewater Treatment in Ireland and Perspectives on Its Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata Dubber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The wastewater of one third of Ireland’s population is treated on-site using domestic treatment systems (DWWTSs that usually consist of a septic tank and soil attenuation system. Within the past four years, the legislative framework for these systems has undergone a major change with a registration and inspection regime being introduced to identify legacy sites that will require remediation work, particularly in areas of the country underlain by subsoils of very low permeability. Against this background this study aims to assess the overall sustainability of existing DWWTSs as well as alternative treatment and disposal options. The results show that main CO2eq emissions are from the methane production in septic tanks. The reduced methane production in mechanically aerated secondary treatment systems was found to counterbalance the related emissions due to the additional energy requirements. In contrast, septic tank systems have the lowest construction and operational costs representing the most economically sustainable solution. Pressurised disposal systems are slightly more expensive but have the potential to reduce environmental impact on surface water and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Clustered decentralised treatment solutions could be environmentally and economically sustainable but ownership, management and related financial and legal issues will need to be addressed and developed.

  18. Project VISION (Very Intensive Scientific Intercurricular On-Site Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Gustavo A.

    1999-01-01

    Project VISION (Very Intensive Scientific Intercurricular On-Site Education) is a joint effort among NASA/John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida International University, Universidad del Turabo, Miami-Dade County Public Schools and the Caguas/Gurabo Public Schools in Puerto Rico. The project's main mission is to institutionalize change among the elementary and middle school science and math teachers at participating schools so that their students receive continuously enriched instruction in the principles of science and math through the use of hands-on and minds-on experiments called learning modules. These leaming modules incorporate the national science and math education standards provided by the National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessments and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, respectively. The use of learning modules that require hands-on and minds-on activities in a classroom setting garners great enthusiasm and motivation on the part of the target students for the understanding of the lesson's underlying math and science principles. With this enthusiasm and motivation, comes acceptance, attention, participation, discipline, acquiescence, and collaboration. Additionally, the use of hands-on activities may also require learning through a gamut of senses. Not only can the student use his/her eyes and ears during these activities, but most times, they can also use their senses of touch, smell, and taste, as well as intuition. Learning is, therefore, achieved using most or all the human senses. The combination of motivation/enthusiasm and the use of multiple senses creates an ideal environment conducive to leaming at a profound level.

  19. Theoretical Study of Secondary Electron Yield in Energy Range of 10 ~ 30 keV%10~30 keV二次电子发射系数的表达式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢爱根; 王祖松; 刘战辉; 詹煜; 吴红艳

    2013-01-01

    Here we addressed the theoretical subject of the secondary electron emission,in the energy range of 10 ~30keY.First,the formulae of the maximum second electron yield (δm),and the average number of secondary electrons released per primary electron with fairly high incident energy (δPE) were derived,respectively.Next,a general expression of δ in terms of the variables,including δm,atomic number,atomic weight,material density,back-scattering coefficient (γ),back-scattering coefficient at high energy (η),parameter A,energy exponent (n),and the incident energy of primary electron,was obtained,on the basis of the influence of δm and δPE on the secondary electron yield at high energy (δ).The parameter A and energy exponent n,in the energy range of 10 ~ 30 keV for some emitters of interest,were modeled and calculated with the software package ESTAR.The experimentally measured and calculated results of δ with the general formula were compared.The comparison result shows that when it comes to the secondary electron emission in the energy range of 10~ 30 keV,the newly-developed general formula of δ works fairly well for metals,semi-metals and element semiconductors.%根据二次电子发射的主要物理过程和特性,推导出最大二次电子发射系数(δm)的表达式.还推导出平均每个高能原电子发射的二次电子数(δPE)的表达式.根据δPE、δm和高能二次电子发射系数(δ)之间的关系,推导出以δm、原子序数、原子质量数、物质密度、背散射系数、高能背散射系数、参数A、能量幂次(n)和原电子入射能量为变量δ的通式.用ESTR程序计算出一些材料的10~ 30 keV能量范围内的参数A和n.用该通式计算出δ并与相应的实验值进行了比较,结果表明,成功地推导出金属、半金属和元素半导体10~ 30 keV的δ通式.

  20. Benchmarking of RESRAD-OFFSITE : transition from RESRAD (onsite) toRESRAD-OFFSITE and comparison of the RESRAD-OFFSITE predictions with peercodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Biwer, B.

    2006-05-22

    The main purpose of this report is to document the benchmarking results and verification of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code as part of the quality assurance requirements of the RESRAD development program. This documentation will enable the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its licensees and other stakeholders to use the quality-assured version of the code to perform dose analysis in a risk-informed and technically defensible manner to demonstrate compliance with the NRC's License Termination Rule, Title 10, Part 20, Subpart E, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E); DOE's 10 CFR Part 834, Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment''; and other Federal and State regulatory requirements as appropriate. The other purpose of this report is to document the differences and similarities between the RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes so that users (dose analysts and risk assessors) can make a smooth transition from use of the RESRAD (onsite) code to use of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code for performing both onsite and offsite dose analyses. The evolution of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code from the RESRAD (onsite) code is described in Chapter 1 to help the dose analyst and risk assessor make a smooth conceptual transition from the use of one code to that of the other. Chapter 2 provides a comparison of the predictions of RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE for an onsite exposure scenario. Chapter 3 documents the results of benchmarking RESRAD-OFFSITE's atmospheric transport and dispersion submodel against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) CAP88-PC (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) and ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex-Long Term) models. Chapter 4 documents the comparison results of the predictions of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code and its submodels with the predictions of peer models. This report was prepared

  1. Influence of seaweed extract as an organic fertilizer on the growth and yield ofArachis hypogeaL. and their elemental composition usingSEM-EnergyDispersiveSpectroscopic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Ganapathy Selvam; K. Sivakumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect ofSeaweedLiquidFertilizer(SLF) of the red seaweedHypnea musciformis(Wulfen)Lamouroux(H. musciformis). on the growth, biochemical and pigment characteristics ofArachis hypogea(A. hypogea).Methods:Experiments were conducted on ground nut to study the potential red alga ofH. musciformis as a biofertilizer.The seeds were sown in soil andSLF were added to soil bed in five different concentrations separately(1%,2%, 4%,6% and8% w/v).Results:The2% concentration of water extract showed better results of growth parameters, biochemical and pigments constitutions.Among the different concentrations ofSLF investigated, the plants that received with2%SLF showed maximum germination percentage, fresh weight, dry weight, root and shoot length, number of branches, leaf area, root nodules and content of total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a and b, protein, carbohydrate and lipid were observed at2% concentration ofSLF.The leaf of2%SLF treated A. hypogea has subjected toScanningElectronMicroscopy withEnergyDispersive spectroscopic analysis, it revealed that the presence of ten elements in the following order:Ca>P>N>Na>K>Mg>Mn>S>Fe>Zn in treated andCa>N>P>Na>Mg>Mn>K>Zn>S>Fe in control plant.The data generated from study reveal that SLF ofH. musciformiscould be used as foliar spray at low concentration of2% to maximize the growth and yield of A. hypogeaand also increase the number of stomata in the leaf.Conclusion:It is suggested that there are considerable gains to be made in increasing yield and stabilizing the yield in environments characterized by terminal requirement for organic and by shortening crop duration nutrient management appear promising.

  2. Correlations between polarisation states of W particles in the reaction e {sup -}e{sup +}{yields}W{sup -}W{sup +} at LEP2 energies 189-209 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J.; Antilogus, P.; Augustin, J.E.; Baubillier, M.; Berggren, M.; Silva, W. da; Kapusta, F.; Savoy-Navarro, A. [Univ. Paris VI et VII, LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Castro, N.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Goncalves, P.; Moreno, S.; Onofre, A.; Peralta, L.; Pimenta, M.; Tome, B.; Veloso, F. [FCUL, LIP, IST, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Adam, W.; Buschbeck, B.; Leder, G.; Liko, D.; MacNaughton, J.; Mandl, F.; Mitaroff, W.; Strauss, J. [Oesterr. Akad. d. Wissensch., Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, Vienna (Austria); Adzic, P.; Fanourakis, G.; Kokkinias, P.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Nassiakou, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Zupan, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, P.O. Box 60228, Athens (Greece); Albrecht, T.; Allmendinger, T.; Apel, W.D.; Boer, W. de; Feindt, M.; Haag, C.; Hauler, F.; Hennecke, M.; Jungermann, L.; Kerzel, U.; Moch, M.; Rehn, J.; Sander, C.; Stanitzki, M.; Weiser, C. [Universitaet Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Postfach 6980, Karlsruhe (Germany); Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Ask, S.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Battaglia, M.; Camporesi, T.; Carena, F.; Charpentier, P.; Chierici, R.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Collins, P.; Elsing, M.; Foeth, H.; Gavillet, P.; Holt, P.J.; Joram, C.; Kjaer, N.J.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Pape, L.; Parzefall, U.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Rebecchi, P.; Schwickerath, U.; Spassov, T.; Treille, D.; Van Eldik, J.; Van Vulpen, I.; Wicke, D. [CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Allport, P.P.; Booth, P.S.L.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, J.N.; King, B.T.; Nulty, R.Mc; Palacios, J.P.; Tobin, M.; Washbrook, A.J. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Amaldi, U.; Bonesini, M.; Calvi, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Paganoni, M.; Pullia, A.; Tabarelli, T.; Tonazzo, A. [Univ. di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); INFN-MILANO, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy)] [and others

    2009-10-15

    In a study of the reaction e {sup -}e{sup +}{yields}W{sup -}W{sup +} with the DELPHI detector, the probabilities of the two W particles occurring in the joint polarisation states transverse-transverse (TT), longitudinal-transverse plus transverse-longitudinal (LT) and longitudinal-longitudinal (LL) have been determined using the final states WW{yields}l{nu}q anti q(l=e,{mu}). The two-particle joint polarisation probabilities, i.e. the spin density matrix elements {rho}{sub TT}, {rho}{sub LT}, {rho}{sub LL}, are measured as functions of the W{sup -} production angle, {theta}{sub W{sup -}}at an average reaction energy of 198.2 GeV. Averaged over all cos {theta}{sub W}{sup -}, the following joint probabilities are obtained: anti {rho}{sub TT}=(67{+-}8)%, anti {rho}{sub LT}=(30{+-}8)%, anti {rho}{sub LL}=(3{+-}7)%. These results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 63.0%, 28.9% and 8.1%, respectively. The related polarisation cross-sections {sigma}{sub TT}, {sigma}{sub LT} and {sigma}{sub LL} are also presented. (orig.)

  3. Development of Amorphous/Microcrystalline Silicon Tandem Thin-Film Solar Modules with Low Output Voltage, High Energy Yield, Low Light-Induced Degradation, and High Damp-Heat Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, tandem amorphous/microcrystalline silicon thin-film solar modules with low output voltage, high energy yield, low light-induced degradation, and high damp-heat reliability were successfully designed and developed. Several key technologies of passivation, transparent-conducting-oxide films, and cell and segment laser scribing were researched, developed, and introduced into the production line to enhance the performance of these low-voltage modules. A 900 kWp photovoltaic system with these low-voltage panels was installed and its performance ratio has been simulated and projected to be 92.1%, which is 20% more than the crystalline silicon and CdTe counterparts.

  4. Measurement of the yields of positively charged particles at an angle of 35 Degree-Sign in proton interactions with nuclear targets at an energy of 50 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammosov, V. V.; Antonov, N. N. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Baldin, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Viktorov, V. A.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gapienko, G. S.; Golovin, A. A.; Gres, V. N.; Ivanilov, A. A.; Koreshev, V. I.; Korotkov, V. A.; Mysnik, A. I.; Prudkoglyad, A. F.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Semak, A. A., E-mail: Artem.Semak@ihep.ru; Terekhov, V. I.; Uglekov, V. Ya.; Ukhanov, M. N.; Chujko, B. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Shimanskii, S. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Momentum spectra of cumulative particles in the region of high transverse momenta (P{sub T}) in pA {yields} h{sup +} + X reactions were obtained for the first time. The experiment in which this was done was performed at the SPIN setup (Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino) in a beam of 50-GeV protons interacting with C, Al, Cu, and W nuclei. Positively charged particles were detected at a laboratory angle of 35 Degree-Sign and in the transverse-momentum range between 0.6 and 3.7 GeV/c. A strong dependence of the particle-production cross section on the atomic number was observed. A comparison with the results of calculations based on the HIJING and UrQMD models was performed in the subcumulative region.

  5. Yield stress fluids slowly yield to analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, D.; Denn, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    We are surrounded in everyday life by yield stress fluids: materials that behave as solids under small stresses but flow like liquids beyond a critical stress. For example, paint must flow under the brush, but remain fixed in a vertical film despite the force of gravity. Food products (such as mayon

  6. 低能离子注入诱变选育盐霉素高产菌株%Breeding of High-Yield Salinomycin-Producing Streptomyces albus Strain by Low Energy N + Ion Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武利勤; 苗凤香; 顾海科; 尚宏忠

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究N+离子注入对白色链霉菌的诱变效应,同时筛选高产盐霉素的变异菌株.[方法]利用不同剂量的氮离子对白色链霉菌S-11-04菌株进行诱变处理,研究低能氮离子注入对其存活率、菌落形状及产盐霉素能力的影响.[结果]低能氮离子注入对白色链霉菌的诱变效应显著,试验得到了13株盐霉素产量较高的突变菌株,其中N3-6菌株经连续传代4次,遗传稳定性较好,其摇瓶发酵水平较对照提高了41%,发酵生产后平均发酵水平提高了20.5%.[结论]离子注入诱变是获得高产盐霉素突变菌株的有效方法.%[ Objective] This study aimed to explore the mutagenesis effects of N+ ion beam irradiation on Streptomyces albus and obtain high-yield salinomycin-producing strain. [Method] Streptomyces albus strain S-ll-04 was mutated with different doses of N+ implantation. The effects of low energy N+ implantation on the survival rate, colony shape and salinomycin-producing ability were investigated. [ Result] The results showed that low energy N+ implantation can efficiently improve the positive mutation rate of Streptomyces albus; 13 mutant strains with high yield of salinomycin were isolated; mutant strain N3-6 has good inheritance and fermentation stability with four continuous generations, and the litres of salinomycin were increased by 41% in the shake-flask cukure and 20. 5% in mass production compared with the control. [Conclusion] N+ ion beam irradiation is an effective method to obtain high-yield salinomycin-producing Streptomyces albus strain.

  7. Renewable Energy Requirement Guidance for EPACT 2005 and EO 13423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Describes what counts toward the federal goals, the definition of "new" for renewable power/renewable energy certificate (REC) purchases, and what types of on-site projects will get double credit (Section 203 (C)).

  8. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to

  9. Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...meet an emerging national crisis (war), emergency (natural disaster), or major impact event (Y2K). Certain resources are generally critical to the

  10. REPORT OF ON-SITE INSPECTION WORKSHOP-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J J

    2009-07-07

    The central issue addressed by this workshop was the task of making the on-site inspection (OSI) part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification system operationally ready at entry into force of the Treaty. It is recognized, and this was emphasized by the 2008 OSI Integrated Field Exercise (IFE), that it is not possible to develop every part of the OSI regime simultaneously. Therefore, it is necessary to prioritize the approach to OSI readiness. The reviews of the IFE have pointed to many elements of OSI readiness that still need development. The objective of this workshop was to provide priorities for the path forward for Working Group B to consider. Several critical areas have been identified that are related to the development of OSI readiness: (1) Technology development: Priorities are radionuclide and noble gas sampling and analysis, visual observation, multispectral/infrared imaging methods, active seismic methods and the recognition of the importance of signatures. (2) Organizational development: Priorities are health and safety, the Operations Support Centre, the Equipment Storage and Maintenance Facility, information technology data flow and communications. (3) Resources: The expertise to develop key parts of the OSI regime is not available within the current OSI Division staff. To develop these aspects of the regime will require more staff or supplements to the staff with cost-free experts or other means. Aspects of the system that could benefit from more staff include radionuclide and noble gas detection methods, data flow and communications, visual observation, multispectral/infrared methods and health and safety. As the path forward, participants of this workshop recognized a need to optimize the development of OSI priorities. The outcome of this workshop is to suggest for consideration an operational approach to OSI readiness that utilizes results of an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of OSI elements versus their relative

  11. Ultra-Portable Solar-Powered 3D Printers for Onsite Manufacturing of Medical Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Julielynn Y

    2015-09-01

    The first space-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer is powered by solar photovoltaics. This study seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of using solar energy to power a FDM 3D printer to manufacture medical resources at the Mars Desert Research Station and to design an ultra-portable solar-powered 3D printer for off-grid environments. Six solar panels in a 3×2 configuration, a voltage regulator/capacitor improvised from a power adapter, and two 12V batteries in series were connected to power a FDM 3D printer. Three designs were printed onsite and evaluated by experts post analogue mission. A solar-powered 3D printer composed of off-the-shelf components was designed to be transported in airline carry-on luggage. During the analogue mission, the solar-powered printer could only be operated for 3D printer was designed that could print an estimated 16 dental tools or 8 mallet finger splints or 7 scalpel handles on one fully charged 12V 150Wh battery with a 110V AC converter. It is feasible to use solar energy to power a 3D printer to manufacture functional and personalized medical resources at a Mars analogue research station. Based on these findings, a solar-powered suitcase 3D printing system containing solar panels, 12V battery with charge controller and AC inverter, and back-up solar charge controller and inverter was designed for transport to and use in off-grid communities.

  12. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of nitrogen in air. Consequences on the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Mesure precise du rendement absolu de la fluorescence de l'azote dans l'air. Consequences sur la detection des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefeuvre, G

    2006-07-15

    The study of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 20} eV) requires to determine the energy with much more precision than what is currently achieved. The shower of particles created in the atmosphere can be detected either by sampling particle on the ground, or by detecting the fluorescence induced by the excitation of nitrogen by shower electrons. At present, the measurement of the fluorescence is the simplest and the most reliable method, since it does not call upon hadronic physics laws at extreme energies, a field still inaccessible to accelerators. The precise knowledge of the conversion factor between deposited energy and the number of fluorescence photons produced (the yield) is thus essential. Up to now, it has been determined with an accuracy of 15 % only. This main goal of this work is to measure this yield to better than 5 per cent. To do this, 1 MeV electrons from a radioactive source excite nitrogen of the air. The accuracy has been reached thanks to the implementation of a new method for the absolute calibration of the photomultipliers detecting the photons, to better than 2 per cent. The fluorescence yield, measured and normalized to 0.85 MeV, 760 mmHg and 15 Celsius degrees, is (4.23 {+-} 0.20) photons per meter, or (20.46 {+-} 0.98) photons per deposited MeV. In addition, and for the first time, the absolute fluorescence spectrum of nitrogen excited by a source has been measured with an optical grating spectrometer. (author)

  13. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to pantothenic acid and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked......-yielding metabolism is a beneficial physiological effect for infants and young children. A claim on pantothenic acid and normal energy-yielding metabolism in the general population has already been assessed with a favourable outcome. The Panel notes that the role of pantothenic acid in normal energy......-yielding metabolism applies to all ages, including infants and young children (from birth to three years). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of pantothenic acid and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism....

  14. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kokoulina, E

    2015-01-01

    First results of study of a soft photon yield at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  15. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoulina, E.

    2016-01-01

    First results of the study of a soft photon yield in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by the SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  16. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokoulina E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First results of the study of a soft photon yield in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by the SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  17. The Cherenkov Telescope array on-site integral sensitivity: observing the Crab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, Valentina; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Schüssler, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the future large observatory in the very high energy (VHE) domain. Operating from 20 GeV to 300 TeV, it will be composed of tens of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) displaced in a large area of a few square kilometers in both the southern and northern hemispheres. Thanks to the wide energy coverage and the tremendous boost in effective area (10 times better than the current IACTs), for the first time a VHE observatory will be able to detect transient phenomena in short exposures. The CTA/DATA On-Site Analysis (OSA) is the system devoted to the development of dedicated pipelines and algorithms to be used at the CTA site for the reconstruction, data quality monitoring, science monitoring and realtime science alerting during observations. The minimum exposure required to issue a science alert is not a general requirement of the observatory but is a function of the astrophysical object under study, because the ability to detect a given source is determined by the integral sensitivity which, in addition to the CTA Monte Carlo simulations, providing the energy-dependent instrument response (e.g. the effective area and the background rate), requires the spectral distribution of the science target. The OSA integral sensitivity is computed here for the most studied source at Gamma-rays, the Crab Nebula, for a set of exposures ranging from 1000 seconds to 50 hours, using the full CTA Southern array. The reason for the Crab Nebula selection as the first example of OSA integral sensitivity is twofold: (i) this source is characterized by a broad spectrum covering the entire CTA energy range; (ii) it represents, at the time of writing, the standard candle in VHE and it is often used as unit for the IACTs sensitivity. The effect of different Crab Nebula emission models on the CTA integral sensitivity is evaluated, to emphasize the need for representative spectra of the CTA science targets in the evaluation of the OSA use cases. Using

  18. A novel fixed fibre biofilm membrane process for on-site greywater reclamation requiring no fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabornig, Simon; Podmirseg, Sabine Marie

    2015-03-01

    On-site greywater treatment and reuse in urban areas bears the potential to reduce huge quantities of wastewater and lower freshwater shortages. Until now dissemination of small, single household applications has been rather limited as simple and high quality water producing, but also cost-effective treatment units have not been developed so far. This paper proposes a new process, based on a concurrently working hollow-fibre membrane as fixed biofilm support and filtration device. Bioreactor characteristics, influence of different aeration rates, membrane flux development, as well as structure and composition of biofilm were monitored to evaluate the performance of the tested pilot unit. The introduced process achieved international water reuse guidelines, worked soundly and could, compared to conventional micro MBR, significantly reduce energy demand (greywater treatment and provides valuable design data for future optimization and systematic analysis.

  19. Process Design and Economics of On-Site Cellulase Production on Various Carbon Sources in a Softwood-Based Ethanol Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Barta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On-site cellulase enzyme fermentation in a softwood-to-ethanol process, based on SO2-catalysed steam pretreatment followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, was investigated from a techno-economic aspect using Aspen Plus© and Aspen Icarus Process Evaluator© softwares. The effect of varying the carbon source of enzyme fermentation, at constant protein and mycelium yields, was monitored through the whole process. Enzyme production step decreased the overall ethanol yield (270 L/dry tonne of raw material in the case of purchased enzymes by 5–16 L/tonne. Capital cost was found to be the main cost contributor to enzyme fermentation, constituting to 60–78% of the enzyme production cost, which was in the range of 0.42–0.53 SEK/L ethanol. The lowest minimum ethanol selling prices (4.71 and 4.82 SEK/L were obtained in those scenarios, where pretreated liquid fraction supplemented with molasses was used as carbon source. In some scenarios, on-site enzyme fermentation was found to be a feasible alternative.

  20. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to glucose and contribution to energy-yielding metabolism pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    effect is “supports normal physical activity”. The proposed target population is healthy, active, as well as endurance trained, men and women. The Panel notes that the claimed effect refers to the contribution of the food constituent to energy-yielding metabolism in active individuals. Energy...

  1. Performance of on-site Medical waste disinfection equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Hassan; Alizadeh, Mina; Dehghanzadeh, Reza; Farshchian, Mohammad Reza; Ganbari, Mohammad; Shakerkhatibi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of studies available on the performance of on-site medical waste treatment facilities is rare, to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of onsite medical waste treatment equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A various range of the on-site medical waste disinfection equipment (autoclave, chemical disinfection, hydroclave, and dry thermal treatment) was considered to select 10 out of 22 hospitals in Tabriz to be included in the survey. The apparatus were monitored mechanically, chemically, and biologically for a six months period in all of the selected hospitals. Results: The results of the chemical monitoring (Bowie-Dick tests) indicated that 38.9% of the inspected autoclaves had operational problems in pre-vacuum, air leaks, inadequate steam penetration into the waste, and/or vacuum pump. The biological indicators revealed that about 55.55% of the samples were positive. The most of applied devices were not suitable for treating anatomical, pharmaceutical, cytotoxic, and chemical waste. Conclusion: Although on-site medical waste treating facilities have been installed in all the hospitals, the most of infectious-hazardous medical waste generated in the hospitals were deposited into a municipal solid waste landfill, without enough disinfection. The responsible authorities should stringently inspect and evaluate the operation of on-site medical waste treating equipment. An advanced off-site central facility with multi-treatment and disinfection equipment and enough capacity is recommended as an alternative.

  2. Evaluation of a human on-site urine multidrug test for emergency use with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitler, Joan B

    2009-01-01

    A rapid, human on-site urine multidrug test was used to screen canine urine samples for the presence of five illegal drugs and drugs from three commonly abused drug classes. Each sample was sent to a toxicology laboratory for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) validation. On-site test results and GC/MS assays confirmed that the human on-site test kit did identify barbiturates, opiates, benzodiazepines, and amphetamines/methamphetamines in urine from dogs that had received these common illicit drugs/drug classes either intravenously and/or orally. However, neither the on-site test kit nor the GC/MS individual assays for marijuana or methadone, a synthetic opiate, were effective in identifying marijuana and methadone in urine from dogs with suspected or known exposure. No index of suspicion was seen for exposure to phencyclidines or cocaine during the study period, and no exposures were indicated by the on-site test results. Overall, the test is a rapid, readily available, affordable, and useful complement to the veterinarian's clinical consideration and professional judgment.

  3. Performance of on-site Medical waste disinfection equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Taghipour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of studies available on the performance of on-site medical waste treatment facilities is rare, to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of onsite medical waste treatment equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A various range of the on-site medical waste disinfection equipment (autoclave, chemical disinfection, hydroclave, and dry thermal treatment was considered to select 10 out of 22 hospitals in Tabriz to be included in the survey. The apparatus were monitored mechanically, chemically, and biologically for a six months period in all of the selected hospitals. Results: The results of the chemical monitoring (Bowie-Dick tests indicated that 38.9% of the inspected autoclaves had operational problems in pre-vacuum, air leaks, inadequate steam penetration into the waste, and/or vacuum pump. The biological indicators revealed that about 55.55% of the samples were positive. The most of applied devices were not suitable for treating anatomical, pharmaceutical, cytotoxic, and chemical waste. Conclusion: Although on-site medical waste treating facilities have been installed in all the hospitals, the most of infectious-hazardous medical waste generated in the hospitals were deposited into a municipal solid waste landfill, without enough disinfection. The responsible authorities should stringently inspect and evaluate the operation of on-site medical waste treating equipment. An advanced off-site central facility with multi-treatment and disinfection equipment and enough capacity is recommended as an alternative.

  4. Performance of on-site Medical waste disinfection equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipour, Hassan; Alizadeh, Mina; Dehghanzadeh, Reza; Farshchian, Mohammad Reza; Ganbari, Mohammad; Shakerkhatibi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of studies available on the performance of on-site medical waste treatment facilities is rare, to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of onsite medical waste treatment equipment in hospitals of Tabriz, Iran. Methods: A various range of the on-site medical waste disinfection equipment (autoclave, chemical disinfection, hydroclave, and dry thermal treatment) was considered to select 10 out of 22 hospitals in Tabriz to be included in the survey. The apparatus were monitored mechanically, chemically, and biologically for a six months period in all of the selected hospitals. Results: The results of the chemical monitoring (Bowie-Dick tests) indicated that 38.9% of the inspected autoclaves had operational problems in pre-vacuum, air leaks, inadequate steam penetration into the waste, and/or vacuum pump. The biological indicators revealed that about 55.55% of the samples were positive. The most of applied devices were not suitable for treating anatomical, pharmaceutical, cytotoxic, and chemical waste. Conclusion: Although on-site medical waste treating facilities have been installed in all the hospitals, the most of infectious-hazardous medical waste generated in the hospitals were deposited into a municipal solid waste landfill, without enough disinfection. The responsible authorities should stringently inspect and evaluate the operation of on-site medical waste treating equipment. An advanced off-site central facility with multi-treatment and disinfection equipment and enough capacity is recommended as an alternative.

  5. Microbial Community Profiles in Wastewaters from Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Jałowiecki

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the potential of community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs methodology as an assay for characterization of the metabolic diversity of wastewater samples and to link the metabolic diversity patterns to efficiency of select onsite biological wastewater facilities. Metabolic fingerprints obtained from the selected samples were used to understand functional diversity implied by the carbon substrate shifts. Three different biological facilities of onsite wastewater treatment were evaluated: fixed bed reactor (technology A, trickling filter/biofilter system (technology B, and aerated filter system (the fluidized bed reactor, technology C. High similarities of the microbial community functional structures were found among the samples from the three onsite wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, as shown by the diversity indices. Principal components analysis (PCA showed that the diversity and CLPPs of microbial communities depended on the working efficiency of the wastewater treatment technologies. This study provided an overall picture of microbial community functional structures of investigated samples in WWTPs and discerned the linkages between microbial communities and technologies of onsite WWTPs used. The results obtained confirmed that metabolic profiles could be used to monitor treatment processes as valuable biological indicators of onsite wastewater treatment technologies efficiency. This is the first step toward understanding relations of technology types with microbial community patterns in raw and treated wastewaters.

  6. Microbial Community Profiles in Wastewaters from Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałowiecki, Łukasz; Chojniak, Joanna Małgorzata; Dorgeloh, Elmar; Hegedusova, Berta; Ejhed, Helene; Magnér, Jörgen; Płaza, Grażyna Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the potential of community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) methodology as an assay for characterization of the metabolic diversity of wastewater samples and to link the metabolic diversity patterns to efficiency of select onsite biological wastewater facilities. Metabolic fingerprints obtained from the selected samples were used to understand functional diversity implied by the carbon substrate shifts. Three different biological facilities of onsite wastewater treatment were evaluated: fixed bed reactor (technology A), trickling filter/biofilter system (technology B), and aerated filter system (the fluidized bed reactor, technology C). High similarities of the microbial community functional structures were found among the samples from the three onsite wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), as shown by the diversity indices. Principal components analysis (PCA) showed that the diversity and CLPPs of microbial communities depended on the working efficiency of the wastewater treatment technologies. This study provided an overall picture of microbial community functional structures of investigated samples in WWTPs and discerned the linkages between microbial communities and technologies of onsite WWTPs used. The results obtained confirmed that metabolic profiles could be used to monitor treatment processes as valuable biological indicators of onsite wastewater treatment technologies efficiency. This is the first step toward understanding relations of technology types with microbial community patterns in raw and treated wastewaters. PMID:26807728

  7. Pi-EEWS: a low cost prototype for on-site earthquake early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Vera, Angel; Morgado, Arturo; Rioja, Carlos; Davila, Jose Martin; Cabieces, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA), with the participation of the Cadiz University (UCA), have been developed the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS (regional approach) based on the SeisComP3 software package. This development has been done in the frame of the Spanish ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) projects, and now a days it is being tested in real time for south Iberia. Additionally, the ALERTES-SC3 system integrates an on-site EEWS software, developed by ROA-UCA, which is running for testing in real time in some seismic broad band stations of the WM network. Regional EEWS are not able to provide alerts in the area closet to the epicentre (blind zone), so a dense on-site EEWS is necessary. As it was mentioned, ALERTES-SC3 inludes the on-site software running on several WM stations but a more dense on-site stations are necessary to cover the blind zones. In order to densify this areas, inside of the "blind zones", a low cost on-site prototype "Pi-EEWS", based on a Raspberry Pi card and low cost acelerometers. In this work the main design ideas, the components and its capabilities will be shown.

  8. Nucleosynthetic Yields from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rockefeller, Gabriel; Young, Patrick; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hungerford, Aimee; Pignatari, Marco; Magkotsios, Georgios; Timmes, Francis X

    2008-01-01

    The "collapsar" engine for gamma-ray bursts invokes as its energy source the failure of a normal supernova and the formation of a black hole. Here we present the results of the first three-dimensional simulation of the collapse of a massive star down to a black hole, including the subsequent accretion and explosion. The explosion differs significantly from the axisymmetric scenario obtained in two-dimensional simulations; this has important consequences for the nucleosynthetic yields. We compare the nucleosynthetic yields to those of hypernovae. Calculating yields from three-dimensional explosions requires new strategies in post-process nucleosynthesis; we discuss NuGrid's plan for three-dimensional yields.

  9. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to glucose and contribution to energy-yielding metabolism pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Dextro Energy GmbH & Co. KG submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Germany, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health...... claim related to glucose and “it is metabolised within body’s normal energy metabolism”. The scope of the application was proposed to fall under a health claim based on newly developed scientific evidence. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is glucose, which is sufficiently...... in energy-yielding metabolism as a source of energy. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the intake of glucose and contribution to energy-yielding metabolism. The following wording reflects the scientific evidence: “glucose contributes to energy...

  10. 76 FR 27365 - West, A Thomson Reuters Business, Thomson Reuters Legal Division, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ..., Including On-Site Leased Workers From ADECCO, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding... former workers of West, A Thomson Reuters Business, Thomson Reuters Legal Division, Albuquerque,...

  11. Flared natural gas-based onsite atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) for oilfield operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikramanayake, Enakshi D.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-03-01

    Natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars is flared annually, which leads to resource waste and environmental issues. This work introduces and analyzes a novel concept for flared gas utilization, wherein the gas that would have been flared is instead used to condense atmospheric moisture. Natural gas, which is currently being flared, can alternatively power refrigeration systems to generate the cooling capacity for large scale atmospheric water harvesting (AWH). This approach solves two pressing issues faced by the oil-gas industry, namely gas flaring, and sourcing water for oilfield operations like hydraulic fracturing, drilling and water flooding. Multiple technical pathways to harvest atmospheric moisture by using the energy of natural gas are analyzed. A modeling framework is developed to quantify the dependence of water harvest rates on flared gas volumes and ambient weather. Flaring patterns in the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Bakken Shale in North Dakota are analyzed to quantify the benefits of AWH. Overall, the gas currently flared annually in Texas and North Dakota can harvest enough water to meet 11% and 65% of the water consumption in the Eagle Ford and the Bakken, respectively. Daily harvests of upto 30 000 and 18 000 gallons water can be achieved using the gas currently flared per well in Texas and North Dakota, respectively. In fifty Bakken sites, the water required for fracturing or drilling a new well can be met via onsite flared gas-based AWH in only 3 weeks, and 3 days, respectively. The benefits of this concept are quantified for the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales. Assessments of the global potential of this concept are presented using data from countries with high flaring activity. It is seen that this waste-to-value conversion concept offers significant economic benefits while addressing critical environmental issues pertaining to oil-gas production.

  12. Comparison of conventional vs. modular hydrogen refueling stations and on-site production vs. delivery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ethan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    To meet the needs of public and private stakeholders involved in the development, construction, and operation of hydrogen fueling stations needed to support the widespread roll-out of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles, this work presents publicly available station templates and analyses. These ‘Reference Stations’ help reduce the cost and speed the deployment of hydrogen stations by providing a common baseline with which to start a design, enable quick assessment of potential sites for a hydrogen station, identify contributors to poor economics, and suggest areas of research. This work presents layouts, bills of materials, piping and instrumentation diagrams, and detailed analyses of five new station designs. In the near term, delivered hydrogen results in a lower cost of hydrogen compared to on-site production via steam methane reforming or electrolysis, although the on-site production methods have other advantages. Modular station concepts including on-site production can reduce lot sizes from conventional assemble-on-site stations.

  13. On-Site Inspection RadioIsotopic Spectroscopy (Osiris) System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Gus J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Egger, Ann E. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Krebs, Kenneth M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Milbrath, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, D. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Warren, G. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilmer, N. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We have designed and tested hardware and software for the acquisition and analysis of high-resolution gamma-ray spectra during on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The On-Site Inspection RadioIsotopic Spectroscopy—Osiris—software filters the spectral data to display only radioisotopic information relevant to CTBT on-site inspections, e.g.,132I. A set of over 100 fission-product spectra was employed for Osiris testing. These spectra were measured, where possible, or generated by modeling. The synthetic test spectral compositions include non-nuclear-explosion scenarios, e.g., a severe nuclear reactor accident, and nuclear-explosion scenarios such as a vented underground nuclear test. Comparing its computer-based analyses to expert visual analyses of the test spectra, Osiris correctly identifies CTBT-relevant fission product isotopes at the 95% level or better.The Osiris gamma-ray spectrometer is a mechanically-cooled, battery-powered ORTEC Transpec-100, chosen to avoid the need for liquid nitrogen during on-site inspections. The spectrometer was used successfully during the recent 2014 CTBT Integrated Field Exercise in Jordan. The spectrometer is controlled and the spectral data analyzed by a Panasonic Toughbook notebook computer. To date, software development has been the main focus of the Osiris project. In FY2016-17, we plan to modify the Osiris hardware, integrate the Osiris software and hardware, and conduct rigorous field tests to ensure that the Osiris system will function correctly during CTBT on-site inspections. The planned development will raise Osiris to technology readiness level TRL-8; transfer the Osiris technology to a commercial manufacturer, and demonstrate Osiris to potential CTBT on-site inspectors.

  14. YIELD OF AMARANTH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. (Received 28 ... properties, growth and shoot yield of large-green leafy amaranth (Amaranth sp.). Soil moisture ... microorganisms which stimulate the physical processes ... to plants and, consequently, crop establishment ... sustainable soil structure.

  15. 6 Grain Yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluate new interspecific genotypes for intensified double cropping of irrigated rice. The experimental ... the performance of the new irrigated .... nursing at a spacing of 20 cm between plants ..... if new technologies, comprising high yielding.

  16. 50 kW on-site concentrating solar photovoltaic power system. Phase I: design. Final report, 1 June 1978-28 February 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittman, P F

    1979-03-30

    This contract is part of a three phase program to design, fabricate, and operate a solar photovoltaic electric power system with concentrating optics. The system will be located beside a Local Operating Headquarters of the Georgia Power Company in Atlanta, Georgia and will provide part of the power for the on-site load. Fresnel lens concentrators will be used in 2-axis tracking arrays to focus solar energy onto silicon solar cells producing a peak power output of 56 kW. The present contract covers Phase I which has as its objective the complete design of the system and necessary subsystems.

  17. Integrated airlift bioreactor system for on-site small wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S L; Li, F; Qiao, Y; Yang, H G; Ding, F X

    2005-01-01

    An integrated airlift bioreactor system was developed, which mainly consists of a multi-stage loop reactor and a gas-liquid-solid separation baffle and possesses dual functions as bioreactor and settler. This integrated system was used for on-site treatment of industrial glycol wastewater in lab-scale. The strategy of gradually increasing practical wastewater concentration while maintaining the co-substrate glucose wastewater concentration helped to accelerate the microbial acclimation process. Investigation of microbial acclimation, operation parameters evaluation and microbial observation has demonstrated the economical and technical feasibility of this integrated airlift bioreactor system for on-site small industrial wastewater treatment.

  18. Initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA Fragmentation patterns depend on linear energy transfer in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Yamada, Shinya; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono, Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    The ability of ion beams to kill or mutate plant cells is known to depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions, although the mechanism of damage is poorly understood. In this study, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were quantified by a DNA fragment-size analysis in tobacco protoplasts irradiated with high-LET ions. Tobacco BY-2 protoplasts, as a model of single plant cells, were irradiated with helium, carbon and neon ions having different LETs and with gamma rays. After irradiation, DNA fragments were separated into sizes between 1600 and 6.6 kbp by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Information on DNA fragmentation was obtained by staining the gels with SYBR Green I. Initial DSB yields were found to depend on LET, and the highest relative biological effectiveness (about 1.6) was obtained at 124 and 241 keV/microm carbon ions. High-LET carbon and neon ions induced short DNA fragments more efficiently than gamma rays. These results partially explain the large biological effects caused by high-LET ions in plants.

  19. Optimization of production yields, radionuclidic purity and hotcell shielding of SPECT and PET radionuclides produced by proton irradiation in variable energy 30 MeV cyclotrons--Part 67Ga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam-Rebeles, R; Van den Winkel, P; De Vis, L

    2007-09-01

    Optimization of the production parameters (incident and exit proton energy, thickness of the (68)Zn target layer, decay time to start chemical processing of an irradiated target after the end of bombardment) and of the thickness of the lead shield of the processing hotcell for the cyclotron production of (67)Ga by the (68)Zn(p,2n) threshold reaction are accomplished by powerful divide et impera and binary search algorithms with the Pharmacopoeia radionuclidic purity of the (67)Ga-citrate radiopharmaceutical at a reference time and the locally accepted dose rate level for the controlled area as boundary conditions. Two sets of equations are presented (one associated with the maximum production rate, the other with the use of a minimum target layer thickness) that allow the expression of the optimized production parameters, the radionuclide yields satisfying the Pharmacopoeia requirements at the start of distribution and the necessary shielding as a function of the required activity at the start of distribution and of the maximum allowable beam current on target.

  20. Characterization and remediation of soil prior to construction of an on-site disposal facility at Fernald

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Jones, G. [Fluor Daniel Fernald, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Janke, R. [Dept. of Energy (United States); Nelson, K. [Jacobs Engineering (United States)

    1998-03-01

    During the production years at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), the soil of the site and the surrounding areas was surficially impacted by airborne contamination. The volume of impacted soil is estimated at 2.2 million cubic yards. During site remediation, this contamination will be excavated, characterized, and disposed of. In 1986 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) covering environmental impacts associated with the FMPC. A site wide Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) was initiated pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (CERCLA). The DOE has completed the RI/FS process and has received approval of the final Records of Decision. The name of the facility was changed to the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) to emphasize the change in mission to environmental restoration. Remedial actions which address similar scopes of work or types of contaminated media have been grouped into remedial projects for the purpose of managing the remediation of the FEMP. The Soil Characterization and Excavation Project (SCEP) will address the remediation of FEMP soils, certain waste units, at- and below-grade material, and will certify attainment of the final remedial limits (FRLs) for the FEMP. The FEMP will be using an on-site facility for low level radioactive waste disposal. The facility will be an above-ground engineered structure constructed of geological material. The area designated for construction of the base of the on-site disposal facility (OSDF) is referred to as the footprint. Contaminated soil within the footprint must be identified and remediated. Excavation of Phase 1, the first of seven remediation areas, is complete.

  1. The Use of the Hanford Onsite Packaging and Transportation Safety Program to Meet Cleanup Milestones Under the Hanford Site Cleanup 2015 Vision and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - 12403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavender, John C. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, W. Scott [Areva Federal Services, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Macbeth, Paul J.; Self, Richard J. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); West, Lori D. [Materials and Energy Corporation, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Site presents unique challenges in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) 2015 Cleanup Vision. CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), its subcontractors, and DOE-RL were challenged to retrieve, transport and remediate a wide range of waste materials. Through a collaborative effort by all Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members, disposition pathways for diverse and seemingly impossible to ship wastes were developed under a DOE Order 460.1C-compliant Hanford Onsite Transportation Safety Program. The team determined an effective method for transporting oversized compliant waste payloads to processing and disposition facilities. The use of the onsite TSD packaging authorizations proved to be vital to safely transporting these materials for processing and eventual final disposition. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provided additional resources to expedite planning and execution of these important cleanup milestones. Through the innovative and creative use of the TSD, the Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members have developed and are executing an integrated project plan that enables the safe and compliant transport of a wide variety of difficult-to-transport waste items, accelerating previous cleanup schedules to meet cleanup milestones. (authors)

  2. Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, K.

    2012-05-01

    Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

  3. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to riboflavin (vitamin B2) and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific...... effect for infants and young children. A claim on riboflavin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism in the general population has already been assessed with a favourable outcome. The Panel notes that the role of riboflavin on normal energy-yielding metabolism applies to all ages, including...... infants and young children (from birth to three years). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of riboflavin and contribution to normal energy-yielding metabolism....

  4. Comparison of fuel-cell and diesel integrated energy systems and a conventional system for a 500-unit apartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, S. N.; Maag, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical and thermal energy utilization efficiencies of a 500 unit apartment complex are analyzed and compared for each of three energy supply systems. Two on-site integrated energy systems, one powered by diesel engines and the other by phosphoric-acid fuel cells were compared with a conventional system which uses purchased electricity and on-site boilers for heating. All fuels consumed on-site are clean, synthetic fuels (distillate fuel oil or pipeline quality gas) derived from coal. Purchased electricity was generated from coal at a central station utility. The relative energy consumption and economics of the three systems are analyzed and compared.

  5. 76 FR 35025 - Nokia, Inc.; a Subsidiary of Nokia Group; Including On-Site Leased Workers From ATC Logistics and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Nokia, Inc.; a Subsidiary of Nokia Group; Including On-Site Leased... to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance on February 15, 2011, applicable to workers of Nokia, Inc., a subsidiary of Nokia Group, including on-site leased workers from ATC Logistics and...

  6. 77 FR 3499 - Sony Electronics, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Selectremedy Park Ridge, NJ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ...] Sony Electronics, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Selectremedy Park Ridge, NJ; Amended... of Sony Electronics, Inc., SEL Headquarters, including on-site leased workers of SelectRemedy, StaffMark, and Payrolling.com , San Diego, California (TA-W-71,501); Sony Electronics, Inc., including...

  7. 76 FR 16447 - ETHICON, a Subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Temporary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration ETHICON, a Subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson Including On-Site Leased... Johnson & Johnson, including on-site leased workers from Kelly Temporary Services, San Angelo, Texas. The... certification of eligibility to apply for adjustment assistance was issued for all workers of ETHICON, A Johnson...

  8. 75 FR 11919 - Smith and Nephew, Inc., Wound Management-Largo Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Smith and Nephew, Inc., Wound Management-Largo Division, Including On... workers of Smith and Nephew, Inc., Wound Management-Largo Division, Largo, Florida, including on-site... were employed on-site at the Largo, Florida location of Smith and Nephew, Inc., Wound...

  9. 75 FR 76038 - Zach System Corporation a Subdivision of Zambon Company, SPA Including On-Site Leased Workers of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... On-Site Leased Workers of Turner Industries and Go Johnson, La Porte, TX; Amended Certification... Corporation, a subdivision of Zach System SPA, La Porte, Texas, including on-site leased workers from Turner Industries and Go Johnson, La Porte, Texas. The Department's notice of determination was published in...

  10. 77 FR 21588 - Hart and Cooley, Inc., A Subsidiary of Tomkins, PLC Including On-Site Leased Workers from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hart and Cooley, Inc., A Subsidiary of Tomkins, PLC Including On- Site... subsidiary of Tomkins, PLC, including on-site leased workers from Reliable, Masiello Employment Services... workers from Hart and Cooley, Inc., a subsidiary of Tomkins, PLC, including on-site leased workers...

  11. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....212 Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment... hazardous waste permit or interim status as soon as it arrives in the on-site treatment, storage or disposal... permitted treatment, storage or disposal facility. (e) If the unwanted material is a hazardous waste, the...

  12. 76 FR 29274 - Superior Technical Resources and Bestway, Inc., Leased Workers Working On-Site at OSRAM Sylvania...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Superior Technical Resources and Bestway, Inc., Leased Workers Working..., applicable to workers of Superior Technical Resources, leased workers working on-site at OSRAM Sylvania... workers of Superior Technical Resources and Bestway, Inc. working on-site at OSRAM Sylvania, Consumer...

  13. 75 FR 45158 - Holcim (US) Inc. Corporate Division Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Office Team...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Holcim (US) Inc. Corporate Division Including On-Site Leased Workers... to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance on May 20, 2010, applicable to workers of Holcim (US) Inc... Services were employed on-site at the Dundee, Michigan location of Holcim (US) Inc., Corporate...

  14. 75 FR 38128 - Ceva Freight, LLC, Dell Logistics Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Prologistix and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Ceva Freight, LLC, Dell Logistics Division, Including On-Site Leased..., LLC, Dell Logistics Division, including on-site leased workers from Prologistix, Winston-Salem, North..., Dell Logistics Division. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under...

  15. 75 FR 41522 - Novell, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Affiliated Computer Services, Inc., (ACS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Computer Services, Inc., (ACS), Provo, UT; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker... reports that workers leased from Affiliated Computer Services, Inc., (ACS) were employed on-site at the...., (ACS) working on-site at the Provo, Utah location of Novell, Inc. The amended notice applicable to...

  16. 77 FR 75447 - Worley Parsons, Accounts Payable, a Subsidiary of Worley Parsons Corporation, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Worley Parsons, Accounts Payable, a Subsidiary of Worley Parsons...; Worley Parsons, Accounts Payable, a Subsidiary of Worley Parsons Corporation, Including On-Site Leased..., Accounts Payable, a subsidiary of Worley Parsons Corporation, including on-site leased workers from...

  17. 77 FR 3499 - FCI USA, LLC Corporate Administrative Division Including On-Site Leased Workers From JFC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration FCI USA, LLC Corporate Administrative Division Including On-Site Leased Workers From JFC Including Teleworkers Located Throughout the United States Reporting to Etters..., applicable to workers of FCI USA, LLC, Corporate Administrative Division, including on-site leased...

  18. 75 FR 20386 - Trane a Subsidiary of Ingersoll Rand Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek, Express...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration Trane a Subsidiary of Ingersoll Rand Including On-Site Leased Workers..., 2010, applicable to workers of Trane, a subsidiary of Ingersoll Rand, including on-site leased workers... subsidiary of Ingersoll Rand. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under...

  19. 75 FR 26793 - Beam Global Spirits & Wine, Including On-Site Leased Workers from Adecco, St. Elizabeth Business...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Global Spirits & Wine, Including On-Site Leased Workers from Adecco, St. Elizabeth Business Health... Assistance on March 26, 2010, applicable to workers of Beam Global Spirits & Wine, including on-site leased... company reports that workers leased from St. Elizabeth Business Health, Guardsmark, and Lab Support...

  20. 76 FR 45879 - Cinram Manufacturing, LLC, a Subsidiary of Cinram International, Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ..., Including On-Site Leased Workers From OneSource Staffing Solutions, Canteen, Division of Compass Group and... Canteen, a division of Compass Group. The Department's amended Notice was published in the Federal... Cinram International, including on-site leased workers from OneSource Staffing Solutions, Canteen,...

  1. 76 FR 13668 - Cinram Manufacturing, LLC, a Subsidiary of Cinram International, Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ..., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Onesource Staffing Solutions and Canteen, Division of Compass Group... of the subject firm. The company reports that workers leased from Canteen, a division of Compass... certification to include workers leased from Canteen, a division of Compass Group working on-site at...

  2. 30 CFR 285.710 - When conducting onsite installation inspections, what must the CVA or project engineer do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., what must the CVA or project engineer do? 285.710 Section 285.710 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT... § 285.710 When conducting onsite installation inspections, what must the CVA or project engineer do? To comply with § 285.708(a)(4), the CVA or project engineer must make periodic onsite inspections while...

  3. 30 CFR 285.709 - When conducting onsite fabrication inspections, what must the CVA or project engineer verify?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., what must the CVA or project engineer verify? 285.709 Section 285.709 Mineral Resources MINERALS... Verification Agent § 285.709 When conducting onsite fabrication inspections, what must the CVA or project engineer verify? (a) To comply with § 285.708(a)(3), the CVA or project engineer must make periodic onsite...

  4. 75 FR 69470 - JL French Automotive Castings, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Labor Ready and Seek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration JL French Automotive Castings, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers... Worker Adjustment Assistance on November 4, 2009, applicable to workers of JL French Automotive Castings... workers leased from Seek Staffing, were employed on-site at the Sheboygan, Wisconsin location of JL...

  5. 42 CFR 412.532 - Special payment provisions for patients who are transferred to onsite providers and readmitted to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transferred to onsite providers and readmitted to a long-term care hospital. 412.532 Section 412.532 Public... Hospitals § 412.532 Special payment provisions for patients who are transferred to onsite providers and... policies, including outliers and transfers, under the acute care hospital inpatient prospective payment...

  6. 77 FR 6587 - PHB Die Casting a Subsidiary of PHB, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Concepts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Workers From Career Concepts and Volt Services, Including a Contract Worker From Burns Industrial Group... subsidiary of PHB, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Career Concepts and Volt Services, Fairview... Casting, a subsidiary of PHB, Inc., Fairview, Pennsylvania, including on-site leased workers from...

  7. 75 FR 21663 - Maysteel, LLC Including On-Site Leased Workers From Staff One, Badger Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek, QPS, and Service First, Menomonee Falls, WI; Amended Certification Regarding..., including on-site leased workers from Staff One, Badger Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek, and QPS, Menomonee Falls... Maysteel, LLC, including on-site leased workers from Staff One, Badger Tech, Boyd Hunter, Seek, QPS,...

  8. 76 FR 79221 - Android Industries Belvidere, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From QPS Employment Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Employment and Training Administration Android Industries Belvidere, LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers... Android Industries Belvidere, LLC, including on-site leased workers from QPS Employment Group and Spherion... Android Industries Belvidere, LLC. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently...

  9. 75 FR 34180 - Paris Accessories, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Job Connections, New Smithsville...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... Register on April 23, 2010 (75 FR 21363). In the request for reconsideration, the petitioner stated that... Employment and Training Administration Paris Accessories, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Job... determine that workers of Paris Accessories, Inc., New Smithsville, Pennsylvania, including on-site...

  10. Develop and test fuel cell powered on-site integrated total energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, A.; Werth, J.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication and testing of a 25kW phosphoric acid fuel cell system aimed at stationary applications, and the technology development underlying that system. The 25kW fuel cell ran at rated power in both the open and closed loop mode in the summer of 1988. Problems encountered and solved include acid replenishment leakage, gas cross-leakage and edge-leakage in bipolar plates, corrosion of metallic cooling plates and current collectors, cooling groove depth variations, coolant connection leaks, etc. 84 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Ecosystem Viable Yields

    CERN Document Server

    De Lara, Michel; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Tam, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook to restore and exploit their stocks at maximum sustainable yield (MSY), a concept and practice without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model. Acknowledging this gap, we propose a definition of "ecosystem viable yields" (EVY) as yields compatible i) with biological viability levels for all time and ii) with an ecosystem dynamics. To the difference of MSY, this notion is not based on equilibrium, but on viability theory, which offers advantages for robustness. For a generic class of multispecies models with harvesting, we provide explicit expressions for the EVY. We apply our approach to the anchovy--hake couple in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem between the years 1971 and 1981.

  12. 77 FR 59986 - General Motors Vehicle Manufacturing Including On-Site Leased Workers from Aerotek, Kelly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration General Motors Vehicle Manufacturing Including On-Site Leased Workers from Aerotek, Kelly Services, Voith Industrial Services, Shreveport Ramp Services, Dana Holding Corporation, The Landing of GM, Filtration Services...

  13. 77 FR 62535 - General Motors Vehicle Manufacturing Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek, Kelly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration General Motors Vehicle Manufacturing Including On-Site Leased Workers From Aerotek, Kelly Services, Voith Industrial Services, Shreveport Ramp Services, Dana Holding Corporation, the Landing Of GM, Filtration Services...

  14. The interactive on-site inspection system: An information management system to support arms control inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLand, S.M.; Widney, T.W.; Horak, K.E.; Caudell, R.B.; Grose, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    The increasing use of on-site inspection (OSI) to meet the nation`s obligations with recently signed treaties requires the nation to manage a variety of inspection requirements. This document describes a prototype automated system to assist in the preparation and management of these inspections.

  15. 75 FR 76487 - Haldex Brake Corporation, Commercial Vehicle Systems, Including On-Site Leased Workers of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ...-Site Leased Workers of Johnston Integration Technologies, a Subsidiary of Johnston Companies, Iola, KS... company reports that workers leased from Johnston Integration Technologies, a subsidiary of Johnston... from Johnston Integration Technologies, a subsidiary of Johnston Companies working on-site at the...

  16. 40 CFR 266.108 - Small quantity on-site burner exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.108... burn hazardous waste in an on-site boiler or industrial furnace are exempt from the requirements of...

  17. 75 FR 62423 - Barnstead Thermolyne Corporation, a Subsidiary of Thermo Fisher Scientific, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ...] Barnstead Thermolyne Corporation, a Subsidiary of Thermo Fisher Scientific, Including On-Site Leased Workers... subsidiary of Thermo Fisher Scientific, including on- site leased workers from Sedona Staffing, Dubuque, Iowa... Thermolyne Corporation, a subsidiary of Thermo Fisher Scientific. The Department has determined that...

  18. 75 FR 35901 - On-Site Completion of Construction of Manufactured Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... Manufactured Homes; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 120 / Wednesday, June 23, 2010... On-Site Completion of Construction of Manufactured Homes AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary... establishing uniform procedures by which manufacturers could complete construction of their homes at the...

  19. Onsite wastewater system nitrogen contributions to groundwater in coastal North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, C P; O'Driscoll, M A; Deal, N E; Lindbo, D L; Thieme, S C; Zarate-Bermudez, M A

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the study described in this article was to evaluate the nitrogen contributions from two onsite wastewater systems (sites 1 and 2) to groundwater and adjacent surface waters in coastal Beaufort County, North Carolina. Groundwater levels and water quality parameters including total nitrogen, nitrogen species, temperature, and pH were monitored from October 2009 to May 2010. Nitrogen was also tested in groundwater from deeper irrigation or drinking water wells from the two sites and six additional neighboring residences. Mean total nitrogen concentrations in groundwater beneath onsite wastewater systems 1 and 2 were 34.3 +/- 16.7 mg/L and 12.2 +/- 2.9 mg/L, respectively, and significantly higher than background groundwater concentrations (Groundwater in the deeper wells appeared not to be influenced by the onsite systems. Groundwater nitrogen concentrations typically decreased with distance down-gradient from the systems, but were still elevated relative to background conditions more than 15 m from the systems and near the estuary. This was a pioneering effort to better understand the link of onsite systems, the fate of nitrogen in the environment, and public health.

  20. On-Site Enzyme Production by Trichoderma asperellum for the Degradation of Duckweed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Lasse; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Grell, Morten Nedergaard

    2015-01-01

    The on-site production of cell wall degrading enzymes is an important strategy for the development of sustainable bio-refinery processes. This study concerns the optimization of production of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by Trichoderma asperellum. A comparative secretome analysis...

  1. On-Site Enzyme Production by Trichoderma asperellum for the Degradation of Duckweed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Lasse; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Grell, Morten Nedergaard

    2015-01-01

    The on-site production of cell wall degrading enzymes is an important strategy for the development of sustainable bio-refinery processes. This study concerns the optimization of production of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by Trichoderma asperellum. A comparative secretome analysis...

  2. 76 FR 14101 - Commercial Furniture Group, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Staffing Solutions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... commercial wood furniture. The Department's Notice was published in the Federal Register on May 28, 2010 (75... Employment and Training Administration Commercial Furniture Group, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Staffing Solutions; Morristown, TN; Commercial Furniture Group, Inc., Chicago, IL;...

  3. 78 FR 8586 - PEPSICO, Inc., Business & Information Solutions (BIS) Division Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Including On-Site Leased Workers From Procurestaff, Cognizant, Infosys, Wipro, and TCS; Plano, TX; PEPSICO... workers of PepsiCo, Inc., Business & Information Solutions (BIS) Division, Plano, Texas (PepsiCo-BIS-Plano... reviewed the certification for workers and former workers of PepsiCo-BIS-Plano. The Department has...

  4. Reducing Transfers of Children in Family Foster Care through Onsite Mental Health Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Carmen; Levine, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a successful pilot project in New York City that effectively reduced the number of transfers or replacements of children in family foster care through the placement of mental health clinicians onsite at two foster care agencies. (Contains 2 tables and 2 footnotes.)

  5. 40 CFR 279.23 - On-site burning in space heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false On-site burning in space heaters. 279... burning in space heaters. Generators may burn used oil in used oil-fired space heaters provided that: (a) The heater burns only used oil that the owner or operator generates or used oil received from...

  6. 78 FR 54487 - Abbott Laboratories; Diagnostic-Hematology; Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Workers From Manpower Service Group and ATR International; Santa Clara, California; Amended Certification..., Santa Clara, California. The Department's notice of determination was published in the Federal Register... from ATR International were employed on-site at the Santa Clara, California location of...

  7. Large-scale tomo-PIV for on-site drag analysis in speed sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, W.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry is proposed as a tool for the on-site aerodynamic investigation in speed sports. The ring-of-fire concept is presented, which relies upon a tomographic PIV system used during the training of athletes in speed sports. The system consists of a short t

  8. 76 FR 72978 - Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... Canteen, Fort Smith, AR; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment..., and Canteen were employed on-site at the Fort Smith, Arkansas location of Whirlpool Corporation. The... to include workers leased from IBM Corporation, TEK Systems, Penske Logistics, Eurest, and...

  9. Pathogen Treatment Guidance and Monitoring Approaches fro On-Site Non-Potable Water Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    On-site non-potable water reuse is increasingly used to augment water supplies, but traditional fecal indicator approaches for defining and monitoring exposure risks are limited when applied to these decentralized options. This session emphasizes risk-based modeling to define pat...

  10. Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, A.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Craig, H.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Portland, OR (United States). Oregon Operations Office; Jenkins, T.F. [Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab., Hanover, NH (United States); Sisk, W.E. [Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

  11. Enhanced On-Site Waste Management of Plasterboard in Construction Works: A Case Study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jiménez-Rivero

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On-site management of construction waste commonly determines its destination. In the case of plasterboard (PB, on-site segregation becomes crucial for closed-loop recycling. However, PB is commonly mixed with other wastes in Spain. In this context, the involvement of stakeholders that can contribute to reversing this current situation is needed. This paper analyzes on-site waste management of PB in Spain through a pilot study of a construction site, with the main objective of identifying best practices to increase waste prevention, waste minimization, and the recyclability of the waste. On-site visits and structured interviews were conducted. The results show five management stages: PB distribution (I; PB installation (II; Construction waste storage at the installation area (III; PB waste segregation at the installation area (IV and PB waste transfer to the PB container and storage (V. The proposed practices refer to each stage and include the merging of Stages III and IV. This measure would avoid the mixing of waste fractions in Stage III, maximizing the recyclability of PB. In addition, two requisites for achieving enhanced management are analyzed: ‘Training and commitment’ and ‘fulfilling the requirements established by the current regulation’. The results show that foremen adopted a more pessimistic attitude than installers towards a joint commitment for waste management. Moreover, not all supervisors valued the importance of a site waste management plan, regulated by the Royal Decree 105/2008 in Spain.

  12. 75 FR 41895 - Whirlpool Corporation, Evansville Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Andrews...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Workers From Andrews International, Inc., M.H. Equipment, and Kenco Logistics Services, LLC, Evansville..., Evansville Division, including on-site leased workers from Andrews International, Inc., Kenco Logistics... notice was published in the Federal Register on March 5, 2010 (75 FR 10321). The notice was amended...

  13. NATIONAL RESEARCH NEEDS CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: RISK-BASED DECISION MAKING FOR ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Research Needs Conference Proceedings consist of a description of the background for the project and a series of white papers on the topics of integrated risk assessment/management for decentralized wastewater systems, design and performance of onsite soil adsorption systems,...

  14. 75 FR 63508 - Warner Chilcott Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco Engineering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Warner Chilcott Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers... Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Norwich, New York. The notice was published in the Federal Register on September 23, 2010... of the subject firm. The workers were engaged in employment related to the supply of...

  15. Rapid on-site evaluation of axillary fine-needle aspiration cytology in breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D P

    2012-06-01

    Axillary ultrasonography (AUS) and fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) can establish axillary lymph node status before surgery, although this technique is hampered by poor adequacy rates. To achieve consistently high rates of FNAC adequacy, rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) of FNAC samples was introduced.

  16. Utilization of Online Training for On-Site Clinical Supervisors: One University's Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy G.; Schnurman-Crook, Abrina

    2001-01-01

    The need to train on-site clinical supervisors often clashes with the practicality of time constraints of a variety of counseling professionals, as well as a significant geographical separation. This article is an overview of how one university developed online training to provide supervision training to clinical supervisors unable to attend live…

  17. Limitations of on-site dairy farm regulatory debits as milk quality predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Darand L; Stiegert, Kyle; Ingham, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, compliance with grade A raw fluid milk regulatory standards is assessed via laboratory milk quality testing and by on-site inspection of producers (farms). This study evaluated the correlation between on-site survey debits being marked and somatic cell count (SCC) or standard plate count (SPC) laboratory results for 1,301 Wisconsin grade A dairy farms in 2012. Debits recorded on the survey form were tested as predictors of laboratory results utilizing ordinary least squares regression to determine if results of the current method for on-site evaluation of grade A dairy farms accurately predict SCC and SPC test results. Such a correlation may indicate that current methods of on-site inspection serve the primary intended purpose of assuring availability of high-quality milk. A model for predicting SCC was estimated using ordinary least squares regression methods. Step-wise selected regressors of grouped debit items were able to predict SCC levels with some degree of accuracy (adjusted R2=0.1432). Specific debit items, seasonality, and farm size were the best predictors of SCC levels. The SPC data presented an analytical challenge because over 75% of the SPC observations were at or below a 25,000 cfu/mL threshold but were recorded by testing laboratories as at the threshold value. This classic censoring problem necessitated the use of a Tobit regression approach. Even with this approach, prediction of SPC values based on on-site survey criteria was much less successful (adjusted R2=0.034) and provided little support for the on-site survey system as a way to inform farmers about making improvements that would improve SPC. The lower level of correlation with SPC may indicate that factors affecting SPC are more varied and differ from those affecting SCC. Further, unobserved deficiencies in postmilking handling and storage sanitation could enhance bacterial growth and increase SPC, whereas postmilking sanitation will have no effect on SCC because

  18. Experimental Study on Yield of High Energy γ-ray in d-d Fusion Reaction%氘-氘聚变反应高能γ射线产额的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏晓斌; 侯龙; 张凯; 黄正德; 夏海鸿

    2016-01-01

    本文对低能D(d ,γ)4 He聚变反应进行了实验研究。由于D(d ,γ)4 He聚变反应γ射线的产额低、能量高、本底大,实验采用大NaI‐塑料闪烁体反康谱仪,以提高探测效率并降低宇宙线的影响;采用脉冲束飞行时间方法区分中子和γ射线,以减小中子和宇宙线本底的影响。实验测量了300 keV d束轰击厚D靶和薄D靶两种情况下的γ数据。在计算反应产生23.8 M eV的高能γ峰面积时,采用了拟合法扣除本底。实验测得,对厚靶,D(d ,γ)4 He反应截面为2.47×10-37 m2;对薄靶,D(d ,γ)4 He反应截面为4.36×10-37 m2。%The D(d ,γ)4 He fusion reaction at low energy was studied in this paper .Due to the small yields ,the high energy and the strong background of γ‐ray ,a big NaI‐plastic scintillator anti‐Compton spectrometer was employed to increase the detect effi‐ciency and reduce the impact of the cosmic rays ,and the method of the time‐of‐flight (TOF) was used to discriminate neutron and gamma to reduce the background of neutron and cosmic rays .The thick and thin deuterium‐loaded titanium target experi‐ments were performed at Ed =300 keV .The background was subtracted by our fitting method .T he cross section is 2.47 × 10-37 m2 for the thick target and 4.36 × 10-37 m2 for the thin target .

  19. A Comparison of Online versus On-site Training in Health Research Methodology: A Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchanaraksa Sukon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distance learning may be useful for building health research capacity. However, evidence that it can improve knowledge and skills in health research, particularly in resource-poor settings, is limited. We compared the impact and acceptability of teaching two distinct content areas, Biostatistics and Research Ethics, through either on-line distance learning format or traditional on-site training, in a randomized study in India. Our objective was to determine whether on-line courses in Biostatistics and Research Ethics could achieve similar improvements in knowledge, as traditional on-site, classroom-based courses. Methods Subjects: Volunteer Indian scientists were randomly assigned to one of two arms. Intervention: Students in Arm 1 attended a 3.5-day on-site course in Biostatistics and completed a 3.5-week on-line course in Research Ethics. Students in Arm 2 attended a 3.5-week on-line course in Biostatistics and 3.5-day on-site course in Research Ethics. For the two course formats, learning objectives, course contents and knowledge tests were identical. Main Outcome Measures: Improvement in knowledge immediately and 3-months after course completion, compared to baseline. Results Baseline characteristics were similar in both arms (n = 29 each. Median knowledge score for Biostatistics increased from a baseline of 49% to 64% (p Conclusion On-line and on-site training formats led to marked and similar improvements of knowledge in Biostatistics and Research Ethics. This, combined with logistical and cost advantages of on-line training, may make on-line courses particularly useful for expanding health research capacity in resource-limited settings.

  20. A comparison of online versus on-site training in health research methodology: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rakesh; Gupte, Nikhil; Kass, Nancy; Taylor, Holly; Ali, Joseph; Bhan, Anant; Aggarwal, Amita; Sisson, Stephen D; Kanchanaraksa, Sukon; McKenzie-White, Jane; McGready, John; Miotti, Paolo; Bollinger, Robert C

    2011-06-17

    Distance learning may be useful for building health research capacity. However, evidence that it can improve knowledge and skills in health research, particularly in resource-poor settings, is limited. We compared the impact and acceptability of teaching two distinct content areas, Biostatistics and Research Ethics, through either on-line distance learning format or traditional on-site training, in a randomized study in India. Our objective was to determine whether on-line courses in Biostatistics and Research Ethics could achieve similar improvements in knowledge, as traditional on-site, classroom-based courses. Volunteer Indian scientists were randomly assigned to one of two arms. Students in Arm 1 attended a 3.5-day on-site course in Biostatistics and completed a 3.5-week on-line course in Research Ethics. Students in Arm 2 attended a 3.5-week on-line course in Biostatistics and 3.5-day on-site course in Research Ethics. For the two course formats, learning objectives, course contents and knowledge tests were identical. Improvement in knowledge immediately and 3-months after course completion, compared to baseline. Baseline characteristics were similar in both arms (n = 29 each). Median knowledge score for Biostatistics increased from a baseline of 49% to 64% (p platforms for both Biostatistics (16% vs. 12%; p = 0.59) and Research Ethics (17% vs. 13%; p = 0.14). On-line and on-site training formats led to marked and similar improvements of knowledge in Biostatistics and Research Ethics. This, combined with logistical and cost advantages of on-line training, may make on-line courses particularly useful for expanding health research capacity in resource-limited settings.

  1. Crop yields in intercropping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract

    Intercropping, the cultivation of two or more crop species simultaneously in the same field, has been widely practiced by smallholder farmers in developing countries and is gaining increasing interest in developed countries. Intercropping can increase the yield per

  2. Crop yields in intercropping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract

    Intercropping, the cultivation of two or more crop species simultaneously in the same field, has been widely practiced by smallholder farmers in developing countries and is gaining increasing interest in developed countries. Intercropping can increase the yield per

  3. Study of an aquifer contaminated by ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE): site characterization and on-site bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Durand, Jonathan; Cheucle, Mathilde; Rosell, Mònica; Michelland, Rory Julien; Tracol, Jean-Philippe; Le Roux, Françoise; Grundman, Geneviève; Atteia, Olivier; Richnow, Hans H; Dumestre, Alain; Benoit, Yves

    2012-01-30

    Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) was detected at high concentration (300mgL(-1)) in the groundwater below a gas-station. No significant carbon neither hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ETBE was detected along the plume. ETBE and BTEX biodegradation capacities of the indigenous microflora Pz1-ETBE and of a culture (MC-IFP) composed of Rhodococcus wratislaviensis IFP 2016, Rhodococcus aetherivorans IFP 2017 and Aquincola tertiaricarbonis IFP 2003 showed that ETBE and BTEX degradation rates were in the same range (ETBE: 0.91 and 0.83 mg L(-1)h(-1) and BTEX: 0.64 and 0.82 mg L(-1)h(-1), respectively) but tert-butanol (TBA) accumulated transiently at a high level using Pz1-ETBE (74 mg L(-1)). An on-site pilot plant (2m(3)) filled with polluted groundwater and inoculated by MC-IFP, successfully degraded four successive additions of ETBE and gasoline. However, an insignificant ETBE isotopic fractionation was also accompanying this decrease which suggested the involvement of low fractionating-strains using EthB enzymes, but required of additional proofs. The ethB gene encoding a cytochrome P450 involved in ETBE biodegradation (present in R. aetherivorans IFP 2017) was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) on DNA extracted from water sampled in the pilot plant which yield up to 5×10(6) copies of ethB gene per L(-1).

  4. Succinic acid production from fruit and vegetable wastes hydrolyzed by on-site enzyme mixtures through solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessie, Wubliker; Zhang, Wenming; Xin, Fengxue; Dong, Weiliang; Zhang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Min

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a novel biorefinery concept of succinic acid (SA) production from fruit and vegetable wastes (FVWs) hydrolyzed by crude enzyme mixtures through solid state fermentation was designed. Enzyme complex solid mashes from various types of FVWs were on-site produced through solid-state fermentation by Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae. This solid was then added to FVW suspensions and undergo hydrolysis reaction to generate fermentable sugars and other essential nutrients for bacterial growth and product formation. The subsequent fungal hydrolysis produced 12.00g/L glucose and 13.83g/L fructose using 10% mass ratio (w/v) of FVW. Actinobacillus succinogenes used this FVW hydrolysate as the sole feedstock and produced 27.03g/L of succinic acid with high yield and productivity of 1.18gSA/g sugar and 1.28gL(-1)h(-1), respectively. This work demonstrated that FVWs can be biotransformed to value added products which have considerable potential economics and environmental meaning. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Technical Feasibility Study for Zero Energy K-12 Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldwasser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Torcellini, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Studer, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This technical feasibility study provides documentation and research results supporting a possible set of strategies to achieve source zero energy K-12 school buildings as defined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) zero energy building (ZEB) definition (DOE 2015a). Under this definition, a ZEB is an energy-efficient building in which, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy.

  6. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  7. Mobile Energy Laboratory Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Batishko, C.R.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Stoops, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked to plan and implement a framework for measuring and analyzing the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application on federal facilities as part of its overall technical support to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) Procedures establish guidelines for specific activities performed by PNL staff. PNL provided sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment for on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. Specially trained engineers and technicians were provided to conduct tests in a safe and efficient manner with the assistance of host facility staff and contractors. Reports were produced to describe test procedures, results, and suggested courses of action. These reports may be used to justify changes in operating procedures, maintenance efforts, system designs, or energy-using equipment. The MEL capabilities can subsequently be used to assess the results of energy conservation projects. These procedures recognize the need for centralized NM administration, test procedure development, operator training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests fbr MEL use and the economies available by having trained, full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. DOE will assign new equipment and upgrade existing equipment as new capabilities are developed. The equipment and trained technicians will be made available to federal agencies that provide funding for the direct costs associated with MEL use.

  8. Yield Mapping in Salix; Skoerdekartering av salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christoffer; Gilbertsson, Mikael; Rogstrand, Gustav; Thylen, Lars

    2004-09-01

    The most common species for energy forest production is willow. Willow is able to produce a large amount of biomass in a short period of time. Growing willow has a potential to render a good financial result for the farmer if cultivated on fields with the right conditions and plenty of water. Under the right conditions growing willow can give the farmer a net income of 3,000 SEK (about 430 USD) per hectare and year, which is something that common cereal crops cannot compete with. However, this is not the common case since willow is often grown as a substitute crop on fields where cereal crop yield is low. The aim of this study was to reveal if it is possible to measure yield variability in willow, and if it is possible to describe the reasons for yield variation both within the field but also between different fields. Yield mapping has been used in conventional farming for about a decade. The principles for yield mapping are to continuously measure the yield while registering location by the use of GPS when harvesting the field. The collected data is then used to search for spatial variations within the field, and to try to understand the reasons for this variation. Since there is currently no commercial equipment for yield mapping in willow, a yield mapping system had to be developed within this project. The new system was installed on a Claas Jaguar harvester. The principle for yield mapping on the Claas Jaguar harvester is to measure the distance between the feeding rollers. This distance is correlated to the flow through the harvester. The speed and position of the machine was registered using GPS. Knowing the working width of the harvester this information was used to calculate the yield. All collected data was stored on a PDA computer. Soil samples were also collected from the yield mapped fields. This was to be able to test yield against both physical and chemical soil parameters. The result shows that it is possible to measure spatial variations of yield in

  9. Yield performances and nutritional contents of three oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... The total fresh mushroom yields obtained ... The yield of P. ostreatus was 17.9 g and the lowest yield was ... chemical composition analysis the fruiting bodies of mushrooms were ... Energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, dietary fibre, moisture, ash (g in 100 g ... In P. eryngii and P. sajor-caju the highest amount.

  10. Estimating Corporate Yield Curves

    OpenAIRE

    Antionio Diaz; Frank Skinner

    2001-01-01

    This paper represents the first study of retail deposit spreads of UK financial institutions using stochastic interest rate modelling and the market comparable approach. By replicating quoted fixed deposit rates using the Black Derman and Toy (1990) stochastic interest rate model, we find that the spread between fixed and variable rates of interest can be modeled (and priced) using an interest rate swap analogy. We also find that we can estimate an individual bank deposit yield curve as a spr...

  11. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

  12. Utility of rapid on-site cytologic evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumo, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Sasada, Shinji; Chavez, Christine; Nakai, Toshiyuki; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    The utility of rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions. Consecutive patients who underwent endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions at our hospital between September 2012 and July 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Cytology slides were air-dried, and modified Giemsa (Diff-Quik) staining was used for rapid on-site evaluation. Additional smears were prepared for Papanicolaou staining and tissue samples were placed in formalin for histologic evaluation. The results of rapid on-site evaluation were compared with the final diagnoses of endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath. A total of 718 cases were included in the study population. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions was 88.6%, 65.9%, 81.2%, 77.7% and 80.1%, respectively. There were no procedure-related deaths. Rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath had high sensitivity for peripheral pulmonary lesions. When carrying out rapid on-site evaluation of transbronchial biopsy samples from peripheral pulmonary lesions, careful interpretation and clinical correlation are necessary.

  13. Provision of onsite HIV Services in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Programs: A Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletraris, Lydia; Roman, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The provision of HIV education and testing in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs is an important public health strategy for reducing HIV incidence. For many at-risk individuals, SUD treatment represents the primary point of access for testing and receiving HIV-related services. This study uses two waves of nationally representative data of 265 privately-funded SUD treatment programs in the U.S. to examine organizational and patient characteristics associated with offering a dedicated HIV/AIDS treatment track, onsite HIV/AIDS support groups, and onsite HIV testing. Our longitudinal analysis indicated that the majority of treatment programs reported providing education and prevention services, but there was a small, yet significant, decline in the number of programs providing these services. Programs placed more of an emphasis on providing information on the transmission of HIV rather than on acquiring risk-reduction skills. There was a notable and significant increase (from 26.0% to 31.7%) in programs that offered onsite HIV testing, including rapid HIV testing, and an increase in the percentage of patients who received testing in the programs. Larger programs were more likely to offer a dedicated HIV/AIDS treatment track and to offer onsite HIV/AIDS support groups, while accredited programs and programs with a medical infrastructure were more likely to provide HIV testing. The percentage of injection drug users was positively linked to the availability of specialized HIV/AIDS tracks and HIV/AIDS support groups, and the percentage of female clients was associated with the availability of onsite support groups. The odds of offering HIV/AIDS support groups were also greater in programs that had a dedicated LGBT track. The findings suggest that access to hospitals and medical care services is an effective way to facilitate adoption of HIV services and that programs are providing a needed service among a group of patients who have a heightened risk of HIV

  14. Comparison of Onsite Versus Online Chart Reviews as Part of the American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Heron, Dwight E; Mundt, Arno J; Yashar, Catheryn; Feigenberg, Steven; Koltis, Gordon; Regine, William F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Patel, Shilpen; Sharma, Navesh; Hebert, Mary; Wallis, Norman; Kuettel, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Accreditation based on peer review of professional standards of care is essential in ensuring quality and safety in administration of radiation therapy. Traditionally, medical chart reviews have been performed by a physical onsite visit. The American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program has remodeled its process whereby electronic charts are reviewed remotely. Twenty-eight radiation oncology practices undergoing accreditation had three charts per practice undergo both onsite and online review. Onsite review was performed by a single reviewer for each practice. Online review consisted of one or more disease site-specific reviewers for each practice. Onsite and online reviews were blinded and scored on a 100-point scale on the basis of 20 categories. A score of less than 75 was failing, and a score of 75 to 79 was marginal. Any failed charts underwent rereview by a disease site team leader. Eighty-four charts underwent both onsite and online review. The mean scores were 86.0 and 86.9 points for charts reviewed onsite and online, respectively. Comparison of onsite and online reviews revealed no statistical difference in chart scores ( P = .43). Of charts reviewed, 21% had a marginal (n = 8) or failing (n = 10) score. There was no difference in failing charts ( P = .48) or combined marginal and failing charts ( P = .13) comparing onsite and online reviews. The American College of Radiation Oncology accreditation process of online chart review results in comparable review scores and rate of failing scores compared with traditional on-site review. However, the modern online process holds less potential for bias by using multiple reviewers per practice and allows for greater oversight via disease site team leader rereview.

  15. Screening for potential fermentative hydrogen production from black water and kitchen waste in on-site UASB reactor at 20 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luostarinen, S; Pakarinen, O; Rintala, J

    2008-06-01

    The potential of black water and a mixture of black water and kitchen waste as substrates for on-site dark fermentative hydrogen production was screened in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors at 20 degrees C. Three different inocula were used with and without heat treatment. With glucose, the highest specific hydrogenogenic activity was 69 ml H2 g volatile solids(-1) d(-1) in batch assays and the highest hydrogen yield 0.44 mol H2 mol glucose(-1) in upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor. The mixture of black water and kitchen waste degraded readily into volatile fatty acids in the reactors, thus showing potential for hydrogen production. In the conditions applied, however, the highest end product was propionate and no hydrogen was produced. Black water alone apparently contained too little readily soluble carbohydrates for hydrogen producing bacteria, and little VFA and no hydrogen was produced.

  16. Energy manager design for microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    On-site energy production, known as distributed energy resources (DER), offers consumers many benefits, such as bill savings and predictability, improved system efficiency, improved reliability, control over power quality, and in many cases, greener electricity. Additionally, DER systems can benefit electric utilities by reducing congestion on the grid, reducing the need for new generation and transmission capacity, and offering ancillary services such as voltage support and emergency demand response. Local aggregations of distributed energy resources (DER) that may include active control of on-site end-use energy devices can be called microgrids. Microgrids require control to ensure safe operation and to make dispatch decisions that achieve system objectives such as cost minimization, reliability, efficiency and emissions requirements, while abiding by system constraints and regulatory rules. This control is performed by an energy manager (EM). Preferably, an EM will achieve operation reasonably close to the attainable optimum, it will do this by means robust to deviations from expected conditions, and it will not itself incur insupportable capital or operation and maintenance costs. Also, microgrids can include supervision over end-uses, such as curtailing or rescheduling certain loads. By viewing a unified microgrid as a system of supply and demand, rather than simply a system of on-site generation devices, the benefits of integrated supply and demand control can be exploited, such as economic savings and improved system energy efficiency.

  17. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to glucose and contribution to energy-yielding metabolism pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claim related to glucose and “contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism during exercise”. The scope of the application was proposed to fall under a health claim based on newly developed scientific evidence. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is glucose, which......Following an application from Dextro Energy GmbH & Co. KG, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Germany, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health...... is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect is “contributes to normal energy-yielding metabolism during exercise”. The proposed target population is healthy, active, as well as endurance trained, men and women. The Panel notes that the claimed effect refers to the contribution of the food constituent...

  18. Comparison of central adjudication of outcomes and onsite outcome assessment on treatment effect estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndounga Diakou, Lee A ymar; Trinquart, Ludovic; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2016-01-01

    assessed by onsite assessors versus by AC, and 2) treatment effect estimates according to the blinding status of the onsite assessor as well as the process used to select events to adjudicate. SEARCH METHODS: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, Psyc......BACKGROUND: Assessment of events by adjudication committees (ACs) is recommended in multicentre randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, its usefulness has been questioned. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to compare 1) treatment effect estimates of subjective clinical events......INFO, CINAHL and Google Scholar (25 August 2015 as the last updated search date), using a combination of terms to retrieve RCTs with commonly used terms to describe ACs. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all reports of RCTs and the published RCTs included in reviews and meta-analyses that reported the same...

  19. Analysis of acoustic-seismic coupling behaviour for CTBT on-site inspection performance improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Knoop, Jan-Frederik [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    After teleseismic detection of a big underground explosion, during on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) weak seismic signals from aftershocks are to be detected. These, however, can be masked by soil vibrations which are caused by acoustic waves which couple to the ground. To analyse the coupling behaviour between acoustic waves and soil vibrations several experiments with different acoustic sources (helicopters, firecrackers, loudspeaker) were performed. Of special interest is the influence of surface waves, excited in a larger area around the sensor, which can superpose constructively at the position of the sensor and can increase the measured seismic signal. A better understanding of the acoustic-seismic coupling can be used to develop guidelines for seismic aftershock measurements, such as a suitable sensor setup, with the goal of reducing or even preventing disturbing signals to improve the performance of on-site inspections for the CTBT.

  20. Field sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods for explosives in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, A.B.; Craig, H.D.; Jenkins, T.F.; Sisk, W.E.

    1996-12-01

    A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling because of the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult because of the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of the samples, and extracting larger samples. This publication is intended to provide guidance to Remedial Project Managers regarding field sampling and on-site analytical methods for detecting and quantifying secondary explosive compounds in soils, and is not intended to include discussions of the safety issues associated with sites contaminated with explosive residues.