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Sample records for onset juvenile idiopathic

  1. Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-09-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a systemic inflammatory disease which has up to now been classified as a category of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, in this context, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it may rather be part of the spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders. The disease is in fact unique with regard to the other JIA categories, in terms of clinical manifestations, prognosis, and response to conventional immunosuppressant therapies. It is characterized clinically by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash, and serositis. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of SoJIA, and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. However, complications of SoJIA, including macrophage activation syndrome, limitations in functional outcome by arthritis and long-term damage from chronic inflammation continue to be a major issue in patients' care. Recent advances on the pathogenesis and treatment have revolutionized the care and prognosis of this potentially life-threatening pediatric condition.

  2. AA amyloidosis associated with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Saha, Abhijeet; Chopra, Yogiraj; Theis, Jason D; Vrana, Julie A; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2013-10-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome due to renal AA amyloidosis. The AA amyloidosis was associated with a 3-year history of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The presence of serum amyloid A protein was confirmed by laser microdissection of Congo Red-positive glomeruli and vessels followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; this analysis excluded hereditary and familial amyloidosis. Aggressive management of the systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis resulted in improvement in clinical and laboratory parameters. The case represents an unusual cause of nephrotic syndrome in children. Early diagnosis of renal amyloidosis and management of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis is paramount to preventing progression of kidney disease.

  3. Distinct synovial immunopathologic characteristics of juvenile-onset spondylarthritis and other forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kruithof; V. van den Bossche; L. de Rycke; B. Vandooren; R. Joos; J.D. Canete; P.P. Tak; A.M.H. Boots; E.M. Veys; D. Baeten

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the synovial immunopathologic features of juvenile-onset spondylarthritis (SpA) in relation to adult SpA and other forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods. Synovial biopsy samples were obtained from 10 patients with juvenile-onset SpA, 23 with adult SpA, 19 w

  4. Discrimination of acute lymphoblastic leukemia from systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis at disease onset

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    Mirian S. Tamashiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess clinical and laboratory features that differentiate acute lymphoblastic leukemia from systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis at disease onset. METHODS: Fifty-seven leukemia patients with musculoskeletal involvement, without blasts on peripheral blood and without glucocorticoid therapy at disease onset and 102 systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients (International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria were retrospectively evaluated. The following features were examined: fever, rheumatoid rash, arthritis, limb pain, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, pericarditis, myocarditis, pleuritis, weight loss, bleeding, anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and lactic dehydrogenase levels. RESULTS: The median age at disease onset was significantly higher in leukemia patients than in those with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (5.8 vs. 3.8 years. In addition, the frequencies of limb pain, hepatomegaly, weight loss and hemorrhagic manifestations were significantly higher in leukemia patients than in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients (70% vs. 1%, 54% vs. 32%, 30% vs. 8%, and 9% vs. 0%, respectively. Likewise, the frequencies of anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and high lactic dehydrogenase levels were statistically higher in leukemia patients than in patients with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (88% vs. 57%, 39% vs. 1%, 60% vs. 1%, 77% vs. 1%, and 56% vs. 14%, respectively. Remarkably, multivariate analysis revealed that limb pain (OR = 553; 95% CI =46.48-6580.42 and thrombocytopenia (OR = 754.13; 95% CI =64.57-8806.72 were significant independent variables that differentiated leukemia from systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The R2 of the Nagelkerke test was 0.91, and the Kaplan-Meier survival curves were similar for acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with and without limb pain. CONCLUSION: Our study

  5. Fever of unknown origin in a patient of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Vinod Kolar Vishwanath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a potentially fatal condition characterized by pathologic immune activation, which can complicate infections, childhood systemic rheumatologic diseases and malignancies. Here we report a case of reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis [macrophage activation syndrome] complicating systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which was treated successfully with dexamethasone and cyclosporine. Reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis or macrophage activation syndrome should be considered in patients of juvenile idiopathic arthritis with prolonged fever of unknown origin and cytopenias. Early diagnosis with high index of suspicion and prompt, aggressive treatment are needed for successful outcomes.

  6. Complicated uveitis in late onset juvenile idiopathic psoriatic arthritis.

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    Bravo Ljubetic, L; Peralta Calvo, J; Larrañaga Fragoso, P

    2016-04-01

    A 6 year-old girl with juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) and bilateral complicated anterior uveitis developed several ocular complications that required 5 surgical procedures. Despite the aggressive course of ocular inflammation, her visual acuity remained good. Arthritis (main criterion for the diagnosis of JPsA) appeared years after ocular involvement. She showed a good anti-tumour necrosis factor initial response. The definitive diagnosis of JPsA was established years after the onset of symptoms. In addition, the patient maintained a good visual acuity, despite its complicated disease course. Finally, she showed a good clinical response to adalimumab. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic onset of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Jain, Deepak; Aggarwal, Hari K; Rao, Avinash; Mittal, Anshul; Jain, Promil

    2016-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is defined as arthritis affecting one or more joint usually in the juvenile age group (< 16 years of age) with or preceded by fever of at least 2 weeks duration that is documented to be daily ("quotidian") for at least 3 days which may be associated with evanescent (non-fixed) erythematous rash or generalized lymph node enlargement or hepatomegaly/splenomegaly/both or serositis. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of sJIA marked by sudden onset of non-remitting high fever, profound depression in all three blood cell lines (i.e. leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum liver enzyme levels. In children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the clinical picture may mimic sepsis or an exacerbation of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 16-year-old female patient presenting with high grade fever with joint pains and generalized weakness which proved to be systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome after ruling out all other differential diagnoses and responded well to intravenous steroids.

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore; Martini, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterised by arthritis of unknown origin with onset before age of 16 years. Pivotal studies in the past 5 years have led to substantial progress in various areas, ranging from disease classification to new treatments. Gene expres

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  10. The role of heme oxygenase-1 in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Takahashi, Akitaka; Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Nakajima, Shoko; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    We have determined the serum levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in 56 patients with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) and compared these with serum HO-1 levels in healthy controls and patients with other pediatric rheumatic diseases. Serum HO-1 levels were measured by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum HO-1 level in s-JIA patients during the active phase was 123.6 +/- 13.83 ng/ml, which was significantly higher than that in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (p-JIA), Kawasaki disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or mixed connective tissue disease (P < 0.0005). The serum levels of HO-1, cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with s-JIA were also assessed at both the active and inactive phases. The serum HO-1 level in patients with s-JIA in the active phase was found to be significantly greater than that in patients with the disease in the inactive phase (P < 0.0001). An assessment of the relationships between serum HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters or cytokines in patients with s-JIA did not reveal any strong correlations. These results suggest that the serum level of HO-1 may be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis of s-JIA. Further study will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism of HO-1 production and to clarify the role of HO-1 in the disease process.

  11. Macrophage activation syndrome associated with hepatitis a virus in a child with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report

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    Mohammad Imnul Islam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage Activation Syndrome (MAS is a rare but a grave complication of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SOJIA. It occurs as a result of immune dysfunction of macrophages and T lymphocyte. A twelve-year old boy diagnosed case of SOJIA presented with high grade fever, diffuse abdominal pain, vomiting and jaundice. He had high ALT, abnormal coagulation profile and Anti HA V IgM was positive. He had also high ferritin and triglyceride level which were very much suggestive for MAS. Infection especially Epstein Barr Virus, Herpes viruses and drugs are the common triggers for the development of MAS in association with SOJIA patients. MAS associated with hepatitis A virus are very rare. Only a few case reports are available in the literature. Considering its rarity and grave prognosis we are reporting a case of hepatitis A associated Macrophages Activation Syndrome in a systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  12. Long-term results after Boston brace treatment in late-onset juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

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    Lange, Johan Emil; Steen, Harald; Gunderson, Ragnhild; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2011-01-01

    Background It is recommended that research in patients with idiopathic scoliosis should focus on short- and long-term patient-centred outcome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate outcome in patients with late-onset juvenile or adolescent idiopathic scoliosis 16 years or more after Boston brace treatment. Methods 272 (78%) of 360 patients, 251 (92%) women, responded to follow-up examination at a mean of 24.7 (range 16 - 32) years after Boston brace treatment. Fifty-eight (21%) patient...

  13. Long-term results after Boston brace treatment in late-onset juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gunderson Ragnhild; Steen Harald; Lange Johan; Brox Jens

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It is recommended that research in patients with idiopathic scoliosis should focus on short- and long-term patient-centred outcome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate outcome in patients with late-onset juvenile or adolescent idiopathic scoliosis 16 years or more after Boston brace treatment. Methods 272 (78%) of 360 patients, 251 (92%) women, responded to follow-up examination at a mean of 24.7 (range 16 - 32) years after Boston brace treatment. Fifty-eight (21%...

  14. Coronary artery abnormalities in children with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Lefèvre-Utile, Alain; Galeotti, Caroline; Koné-Paut, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Still's disease (Systemic-onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: SoJIA) is characterised by high-spiking daily fevers, arthritis and evanescent rashes. Diagnosis of Still's disease is often challenging. Infectious diseases and other inflammatory conditions, especially in young children, Kawasaki disease may look similar. Clinicians often rely on echocardiographic evidence of coronary artery abnormalities to differentiate between Kawasaki disease and Still's disease. Coronary artery dilation would typically favour the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. We present four children with Still's disease and coronary artery abnormalities who were initially misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease. The first patient had pericarditis and an irregular wall of the left coronary artery, without dilation on echocardiography. The second patient had a left coronary artery dilatation and a pericarditis. The third patient had thickened left coronary artery walls, and the fourth patient had a hyperechogenicity of the left and right coronary arteries. They received IVIG without success. The diagnosis of Still's disease was made secondary with evidence of persistent arthritis. All but one patient finally needed biologic treatments. Coronary abnormalities may be observed during various febrile conditions and do not exclude the diagnosis of Still's disease. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term results after Boston brace treatment in late-onset juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

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    Gunderson Ragnhild

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recommended that research in patients with idiopathic scoliosis should focus on short- and long-term patient-centred outcome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate outcome in patients with late-onset juvenile or adolescent idiopathic scoliosis 16 years or more after Boston brace treatment. Methods 272 (78% of 360 patients, 251 (92% women, responded to follow-up examination at a mean of 24.7 (range 16 - 32 years after Boston brace treatment. Fifty-eight (21% patients had late-onset juvenile and 214 had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. All patients had clinical and radiological examination and answered a standardised questionnaire including work status, demographics, General Function Score (GFS (100 - worst possible and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI (100 - worst possible, EuroQol (EQ-5D (1 - best possible, EQ-VAS (100 - best possible, and Scoliosis Research Society - 22 (SRS - 22 (5 - best possible. Results The mean age at follow-up was 40.4 (31-48 years. The prebrace major curve was in average 33.2 (20 - 57°. At weaning and at the last follow-up the corresponding values were 28.3 (1 - 58° and 32.5 (7 - 80°, respectively. Curve development was similar in patients with late-onset juvenile and adolescent start. The prebrace curve increased > 5° in 31% and decreased > 5° in 26%. Twenty-five patients had surgery. Those who did not attend follow-up (n = 88 had a lower mean curve at weaning: 25.4 (6-53°. Work status was 76% full-time and 10% part-time. Eighty-seven percent had delivered a baby, 50% had pain in pregnancy. The mean (SD GFS was 7.4 (10.8, ODI 9.3 (11.0, EQ-5D 0.82 (0.2, EQ-VAS 77.6 (17.8, SRS-22: pain 4.1 (0.8, mental health 4.1 (0.6, self-image 3.7 (0.7, function 4.0 (0.6, satisfaction with treatment 3.7 (1.0. Surgical patients had significantly reduced scores for SRS-physical function and self-image, and patients with curves ≥ 45° had reduced self-image. Conclusion Long-term results were

  16. Long-term results after Boston brace treatment in late-onset juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

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    Lange, Johan Emil; Steen, Harald; Gunderson, Ragnhild; Brox, Jens Ivar

    2011-08-31

    It is recommended that research in patients with idiopathic scoliosis should focus on short- and long-term patient-centred outcome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate outcome in patients with late-onset juvenile or adolescent idiopathic scoliosis 16 years or more after Boston brace treatment. 272 (78%) of 360 patients, 251 (92%) women, responded to follow-up examination at a mean of 24.7 (range 16 - 32) years after Boston brace treatment. Fifty-eight (21%) patients had late-onset juvenile and 214 had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. All patients had clinical and radiological examination and answered a standardised questionnaire including work status, demographics, General Function Score (GFS) (100 - worst possible) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (100 - worst possible), EuroQol (EQ-5D) (1 - best possible), EQ-VAS (100 - best possible), and Scoliosis Research Society - 22 (SRS - 22) (5 - best possible). The mean age at follow-up was 40.4 (31-48) years. The prebrace major curve was in average 33.2 (20 - 57)°. At weaning and at the last follow-up the corresponding values were 28.3 (1 - 58)° and 32.5 (7 - 80)°, respectively. Curve development was similar in patients with late-onset juvenile and adolescent start. The prebrace curve increased > 5° in 31% and decreased > 5° in 26%. Twenty-five patients had surgery. Those who did not attend follow-up (n = 88) had a lower mean curve at weaning: 25.4 (6-53)°. Work status was 76% full-time and 10% part-time. Eighty-seven percent had delivered a baby, 50% had pain in pregnancy. The mean (SD) GFS was 7.4 (10.8), ODI 9.3 (11.0), EQ-5D 0.82 (0.2), EQ-VAS 77.6 (17.8), SRS-22: pain 4.1 (0.8), mental health 4.1 (0.6), self-image 3.7 (0.7), function 4.0 (0.6), satisfaction with treatment 3.7 (1.0). Surgical patients had significantly reduced scores for SRS-physical function and self-image, and patients with curves ≥ 45° had reduced self-image. Long-term results were satisfactory in most braced patients and

  17. Acute-onset opioid-induced hyperalgesia in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Vijayan, Vini; Moran, Ryan; Elder, Melissa E; Sukumaran, Sukesh

    2012-10-01

    We describe a child with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presenting with severe diffuse pain refractory to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and high-dose opioids. Her JIA involved her knees and ankles and was mildly active on etanercept and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. At presentation, she complained of hip pain progressing to severe diffuse pain and allodynia involving her extremities. No abnormalities were seen in her laboratory parameters and imaging of her lower extremities. After appreciating no substantial benefit by increasing her opioids, her opioids were tapered and discontinued, and this was followed by significant alleviation in her pain, and a diagnosis of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) was made. Despite reports in adults, the phenomenon of OIH has been reported infrequently in children. To our knowledge, OIH has not been described in children with rheumatologic conditions. We recommend investigating the possibility of OIH when treating a child with JIA and severe refractory pain.

  18. Validity of a three-variable Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score in children with new-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Mcerlane, Flora; Beresford, Michael W; Baildam, Eileen M; Chieng, S E Alice; Davidson, Joyce E; Foster, Helen E; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Lunt, Mark; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, Wendy; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the validity and feasibility of the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS) in the routine clinical setting for all juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) disease categories and explore whether exclusion of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) from JADAS (the ‘JADAS3’) influences correlation with single markers of disease activity. Methods JADAS-71, JADAS-27 and JADAS-10 were determined at baseline for an inception cohort of children with JIA in the Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study. JADAS3-71, JADAS3-27 and JADAS3-10 were determined using an identical formula but with exclusion of ESR. Correlation of JADAS with JADAS3 and single measures of disease activity/severity were determined by category. Results Of 956 eligible children, sufficient data were available to calculate JADAS-71, JADAS-27 and JADAS-10 at baseline in 352 (37%) and JADAS3 in 551 (58%). The median (IQR) JADAS-71, JADAS-27 and JADAS-10 for all 352 children was 11 (5.9–18), 10.4 (5.7–17) and 11 (5.9–17.3), respectively. Median JADAS and JADAS3 varied significantly with the category (Kruskal–Wallis p=0.0001), with the highest values in children with polyarticular disease patterns. Correlation of JADAS and JADAS3 across all categories was excellent. Correlation of JADAS71 with single markers of disease activity/severity was good to moderate, with some variation across the categories. With the exception of ESR, correlation of JADAS3-71 was similar to correlation of JADAS-71 with the same indices. Conclusions This study is the first to apply JADAS to all categories of JIA in a routine clinical setting in the UK, adding further information about the feasibility and construct validity of JADAS. For the majority of categories, clinical applicability would be improved by exclusion of the ESR. PMID:23256951

  19. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  20. Extremely elevated IL-18 levels may help distinguish systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis from other febrile diseases

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    Y. Xia

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to explore whether IL-18 can be a serological marker for the diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA. A total of 23 sJIA patients (13 males, median age 8.2, 20 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients, 18 patients with severe infections (SIF, 26 Kawasaki disease (KD patients, 18 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients, and 25 healthy control patients were selected for this study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs were used to determine the serum concentrations of the S100A8, S100A9, and IL-6 proteins. The serum IL-18 levels were detected by a cytometric bead array (CBA. The serum IL-6 concentrations in various disease groups were significantly higher than that in the healthy control group. The IL-6 concentrations exhibited no significant difference between disease groups. The S100A8 level in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those of the ALL, JIA, and healthy control groups but showed no significant difference compared to the SIF and KD groups. The S100A9 serum concentration in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those in the ALL and healthy control groups and exhibited no significant difference from the SIF, KD, and JIA groups. The IL-18 level of the sJIA group was significantly higher than that of the other febrile disease groups. The IL-18 serum concentration may be used as a biological serum marker to distinguish sJIA from other febrile diseases.

  1. Extremely elevated IL-18 levels may help distinguish systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis from other febrile diseases

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    Xia, Y.; Cui, P.; Li, Q.; Liang, F.; Li, C.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore whether IL-18 can be a serological marker for the diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). A total of 23 sJIA patients (13 males, median age 8.2), 20 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 18 patients with severe infections (SIF), 26 Kawasaki disease (KD) patients, 18 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, and 25 healthy control patients were selected for this study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to determine the serum concentrations of the S100A8, S100A9, and IL-6 proteins. The serum IL-18 levels were detected by a cytometric bead array (CBA). The serum IL-6 concentrations in various disease groups were significantly higher than that in the healthy control group. The IL-6 concentrations exhibited no significant difference between disease groups. The S100A8 level in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those of the ALL, JIA, and healthy control groups but showed no significant difference compared to the SIF and KD groups. The S100A9 serum concentration in the sJIA group was significantly higher than those in the ALL and healthy control groups and exhibited no significant difference from the SIF, KD, and JIA groups. The IL-18 level of the sJIA group was significantly higher than that of the other febrile disease groups. The IL-18 serum concentration may be used as a biological serum marker to distinguish sJIA from other febrile diseases. PMID:28225869

  2. HLA-B27 predicts a more extended disease with increasing age at onset in boys with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Berntson, Lillemor; Damgård, Michael; Andersson-Gäre, Boel

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous condition with very few clinical and laboratory signs that can help predict the course and severity of the disease in the individual patient. The cell-surface antigen HLA-B27 is well known to be associated with spondyloarthropathies...... to a population-based study as possible. METHODS: We studied an incidence-based cohort of 305 patients collected prospectively in 3 Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark). Clinical and serological data of the first 3 years of the disease were collected. RESULTS: HLA-B27 was found to be positive in 25.......5% of the patients, and we found a higher proportion of HLA-B27-positive boys with older age at disease onset (p=0.034). Regression analysis showed a correlation of 0.7 in the HLA-B27-positive boys, pointing to a higher risk of more joint involvement with older age at disease onset. By Fisher's exact test...

  3. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

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    Herlin, Troels

    2002-08-19

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In addition to the clinical characteristics, genetic and biochemical differences suggest that JIA could be regarded as a general term covering various diseases. Complications described are uveitis, temporomandibular joint affection and growth disturbances. The therapeutic strategy should be planned individually according to age, subtype and disease activity and carried out as teamwork with several specialties. Drugs showing significant effectiveness in controlled studies are primarily methotrexate and sulphasalazine. An immunomodulating agent, etanercept, a soluble TNF alpha-receptor fusion protein, has shown a promising effect in severe polyarticular JIA refractory to methotrexate treatment.

  4. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Krupa H Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  5. Genetics in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Heleen Marion

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a non-common disease in children that can persist into adulthood. JIA is considered to be an auto-immune disease. Genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis. In a new cohort of JIA patients from North-West European descent genetic candidate gene associatio

  6. A pruritic linear urticarial rash, fever, and systemic inflammatory disease in five adolescents: adult-onset still disease or systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis sine arthritis?

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    Prendiville, Julie S; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Crawford, Richard I

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic rash of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a transient erythematous eruption associated with a quotidian spiking fever. Usually asymptomatic, it can be pruritic, with dermatographism at sites of scratching or pressure. An illness similar to this entity in adults is designated adult-onset Still disease. The relationship between the pediatric and adult disease is uncertain and differences in case definition have evolved. Specifically, a sustained arthritis for at least 6 weeks is required for a diagnosis of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whereas transient arthritis and arthralgia are accepted criteria in adult-onset Still disease. We describe five patients less than 16 years of age who presented with an acute illness characterized by fever and a distinctive skin eruption. Intense pruritus and linear erythematous lesions flared with a spiking fever, usually in the late afternoon and evening. Periorbital edema/erythema and nonlinear urticarial lesions were also seen. Two children had splinter hemorrhages of the nail beds and one girl developed a fixed, scaling, pigmented, linear eruption. Severe malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and leukocytosis were present in every patient. Other systemic manifestations included sore throat, transient arthritis, abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, hyperferritinemia, and hepatic dysfunction. No patient had a sustained arthritis. The course of the disease was variable. One patient, diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome, recovered on oral naproxen. Two patients responded to systemic corticosteroid therapy. One girl developed status epilepticus and died from aspiration and asphyxia. A boy with severe hepatitis developed renal failure and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and was treated with plasmapheresis, dialysis, and systemic corticosteroids; he had recurrent episodes of rash and fever into adult life. These children did not fulfill the case definition of systemic

  7. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    ... Physical Therapy Regular Exercise en español Artritis idiopática juvenil It may begin with a swollen knuckle, a ... may suddenly appear and disappear, developing in one area and then another. High fevers that tend to ...

  8. The Toll-like receptor 4 agonist MRP8/14 protein complex is a sensitive indicator for disease activity and predicts relapses in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzinger, D.; Frosch, M.; Kastrup, A.; Prince, F.H.; Otten, M.H.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W. van; Cate, R. ten; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Hansmann, S.; Moncrieffe, H.; Ursu, S.; Wedderburn, L.R.; Roth, J.; Foell, D.; Wittkowski, H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of myeloid-related protein 8 and 14 complex (MRP8/14) serum concentrations is a potential new tool to support the diagnosis of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) in the presence of fever of unknown origin. OBJECTIVE: To test the ability of MRP8/14 serum concentr

  9. TNF-alpha promoter gene polymorphisms in Spanish children with persistent oligoarticular and systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Modesto, C; Patiño-García, A; Sotillo-Piñeiro, E; Merino, J; García-Consuegra, J; Merino, R; Rua, M J; Sierrasesúmaga, L; Arnal, C

    2005-01-01

    To explore the possible association/s of the first reported tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alphaTNF-) alpha promoter gene polymorphisms -308, -238, -376 and -163 (G-->A) with systemic (SoJIA) and oligoarticular subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA); and to test the association between these polymorphisms and the class I/class II HLA alleles in our population. The patient group comprised 29 oligoarticular and 26 systemic Caucasian Spanish children with JIA; 68 healthy volunteers from the same ethnic group and geographical region served as controls. HLA alleles were determined using low-resolution polymerase chain reaction (PCR). TNF-alpha promoter gene polymorphisms were screened using PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), followed, if positive, by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis for identification. No statistical association was found between the four polymorphisms studied and JIA. However, the -308 G-->A polymorphism (TNF A2) tended to be more frequent in patients with SoJIA than in the oligoarticular group. TNF A2 was strongly associated with the extended haplotype A1B8DR3 (p = 0.003), and the tandem polymorphism -238/-376 in the presence of B18 and DR3. The TNF A2 allele was more frequent in SoJIA than in the oligoarticular group. TNF A2 can help to create a more inflammatory milieu in this JIA subtype, in combination with other polymorphisms involved in regulatory sequences of key molecules in the inflammatory response. The association of the -308 and -238/-376 polymorphisms with specific alleles of the HLA is reconfirmed.

  10. Impact of Antiinflammatory Treatment on the Onset of Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Longitudinal Analysis From a Nationwide Pediatric Rheumatology Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Sandra; Niewerth, Martina; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Minden, Kirsten; Klotsche, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Objective Based on a nationwide database, this study analyzed the influence of methotrexate (MTX), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, and a combination of the 2 medications on uveitis occurrence in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Data from the National Paediatric Rheumatological Database in Germany were used in this study. Between 2002 and 2013, data from JIA patients were annually documented at the participating pediatric rheumatologic sites. Patients with a JIA disease duration of uveitis was evaluated by discrete‐time survival analysis. Results A total of 3,512 JIA patients (mean ± SD age 8.3 ± 4.8 years, 65.7% female, 53.2% antinuclear antibody positive, and mean ± SD age at arthritis onset 7.8 ± 4.8 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean ± SD total followup time was 3.6 ± 2.4 years. Uveitis developed in a total of 180 patients (5.1%) within 1 year after arthritis onset. Uveitis onset after the first year was observed in another 251 patients (7.1%). Disease‐modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment in the year before uveitis onset significantly reduced the risk for uveitis as follows: MTX: hazard ratio (HR) 0.63, P = 0.022; TNF inhibitors: HR 0.56, P uveitis risk (HR 0.29, P uveitis onset. Early MTX use within the first year of disease and the combination of MTX with a TNF inhibitor had the highest protective effect. PMID:26212111

  11. Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Although the use of corticosteroids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is now much more limited owing to the availability of methotrexate and biological agents, there are clinical scenarios where it is still indicated. For example, corticosteroids may be indicated for intraarticular injections to prevent joint deformities, as a "bridge" drug to relieve symptoms in polyarticular disease while waiting for methotrexate and biologics to exert their full therapeutic effects, and in the treatment of chronic iridocyclitis, macrophage activation syndrome, and systemic JIA, although the advent of interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 blockers has greatly reduced the latter indication.

  12. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Karl [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Radiology Department, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Over the past decade there have been considerable changes in the classification and imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology now has a considerable role in the management of JIA, the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. The different imaging modalities available, their role and limitations are discussed in this article and the various disease features that the radiologist should be aware of are described. An approach to the imaging of the child with joint disease and in the monitoring of disease complications are also discussed. (orig.)

  13. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  14. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze u

  15. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothova (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  16. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  17. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, A.-M.J.W. (Anne-Mieke J. W.); Vernie, L.A. (Lenneke A.); A. Rothová (Aniki); Doe, P.V.D. (Patricia V. D.); L.I. Los (Leonoor I.); N.E. Schalij-Delfos (Nicoline); J.H. de Boer (Joke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was

  18. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, AJW; Vernie, Lenneke A; Rothova, Aniki; V D Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; de Boer, Joke H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140201890

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze

  19. Impact of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Associated Uveitis in Early Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasnoot, Anne-Mieke J. W.; Vernie, Lenneke A.; Rothova, Aniki; van der Doe, Patricia; Los, Leonoor I.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; de Boer, Joke H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Typically juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis (further referred as 'JIA-uveitis') has its onset in childhood, but some patients suffer its, sometimes visual threatening, complications or ongoing disease activity in adulthood. The objective of this study was to analyze u

  20. Managing juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Madeleine J; Dick, Andrew D; Lee, Richard J W; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Carreño, Ester; Guly, Catherine M; Ross, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral chronic anterior uveitis is an extra-articular feature of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Although figures vary, uveitis occurs in approximately 11%-13% of patients with this disease and is most commonly associated with the female gender, oligoarthritis, and presence of antinuclear antibodies. The disease has an insidious onset and is often asymptomatic. Managing patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis remains challenging as the disease may prove to be refractory to traditional treatment regimens. Stepwise immunomodulatory therapy is indicated, with new biologic drugs being used last in cases of refractory uveitis. Small scale studies and practice have provided the evidence to undertake randomized control trials to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapies, such as infliximab and adalimumab. These have demonstrated promising results, with further data awaited from ongoing trials for adalimumab (as SYCAMORE and ADJUVITE trials). Lower grade evidence is supporting the use of newer biologics such as rituximab, daclizumab, tocilizumab, and abatacept in those cases refractory to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy.

  1. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia presenting as Juvenile Idiopathic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia presenting as Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in a Nigerian boy. ... lead to delay in commencing appropriate treatment. ... of two months duration, had an elevated Rheumatoid factor and X-ray findings suggestive of ...

  3. Onset of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis with both anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor in a 3-year-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Kozo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes 3 year old girl with the unusual presentation of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies and a positive rheumatoid factor (RF. She was initially treated with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; ibuprofen followed by methotrexate (MTX, 10 mg/m2/week and prednisolone (0.25 mg/kg/day, but these treatments were ineffective. Administration of tocilizumab, a humanized antihuman interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, promptly improved her clinical manifestations, and she has been in complete remission (DAS28

  4. Late Onset Juvenile Xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punithwavathy K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19 year old female was seen with multiple skin coloured and hyperpigmented macules, discrete as well as grouped papules and nodules of varying sizes distributed over the face, neck, extensor and flexor aspects of both upper and lower extremities including joints. The trunk was spared. Some of the lesions showed features of spontaneous regression. Investigations confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile xanthogranuloma. Lesions regressed satisfactorily with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy.

  5. Biological agents in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarilyo, Gil; Tarp, Simon; Foeldvari, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Although various biological agents are in use for polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA), head-to-head trials comparing the efficacy and safety among them are lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of biological agents in pJIA using all currently...

  6. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  7. The human microbiome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, Anouk; ter Haar, Nienke M.; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J.; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The pathogenesis of JIA is thought to be the result of a combination of host genetic and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to JIA remain to be unravelled. The

  8. The human microbiome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, Anouk; ter Haar, Nienke M.; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J.; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The pathogenesis of JIA is thought to be the result of a combination of host genetic and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to JIA remain to be unravelled. The

  9. Analysis of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Immunization Schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Namazova-Baranova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The connection between vaccination and autoimmune diseases (and rheumatic pathology in particular is still a subject of discussions. When discussing the possibility of vaccinating rheumatic patients we should take into account the ultra high dangers that infectious diseases pose for such patients, including those that can be prevented by vaccination. We should also take into account the experience of using various vaccine types in rheumatic patients, which illustrates of their high safety profile.Objective: Our aim was to study the immunization schedule in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods: The evaluation of vaccine history and other anamnestic data in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients was based on individual medical records (individual child’s card/preventive vaccination certificate, as well as questionnaires filled by mothers.Results: It has been determined that a significant proportion of children with vaccination schedule deviations are juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients. Almost one in four children with a confirmed rheumatic diagnosis has not been immunized against the major vaccine-preventable diseases. In one non-vaccinated group, there was a case of juvenile arthritis onset after recovering from measles. A small number of patient mothers connects the manifestation of rheumatic diseases with vaccination.Conclusion: Violations of vaccination status in JIA patients require corrections according to the results of clinical studies and the recommendations of international experts.

  10. Superior oblique tendon (Brown’s syndrome as the presenting finding in childhood onset HLA-B27-related enthesitis and juvenile idiopathic oligoarticular arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pham

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report two patients who presented with Brown’s syndrome. The first is a 7-year-old boy who at the time of his diagnosis was also found to have enthesitis and HLA-B27 positivity. The second patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown’s syndrome at 13 months of age. At age 7 she developed a persistent oligoarticular arthritis and unilateral anterior iritis consistent with the oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopatic Arthritis (JIA phenotype. These cases highlight ophthalmologic findings and diagnostic considerations with respect to Brown’s syndrome and associated childhood onset rheumatologic disease.

  11. JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The prevalence of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is 0.86 per 1000 children. Subcutaneous nodules have been reported in 5% to 10% of children with JIA. Approximately 90% of patients with RA and subc utaneous nodules test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF, and approximately 40% o f all RF-seropositive patients with RA have subcutaneous nodules, whereas only 6% in volvement is seen in seronegative cases. We hereby report a case of atypical Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in a 6 year old, female child with joint pain & myalgia along with subcutaneous nodules over the dorsum of feet, hands and elbows. Joint pain initial ly involving the left ankle, slowly progressed to involve the knee, shoulder, wrist, metacar pophalangeal and interphalangeal joints over a period of one year. Joint involvement was not symmetric. RF was Negative. Fundoscopy examination was normal. Histopathological examinat ion revealed a central zone of Fibrinoid necrosis surrounded by epithelioid h istiocytes and occasional lymphocytes. Differential diagnosis of Rheumatoid Nodule (R N or Subcutaneous Granuloma Annulare (SGA or Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum was made. In light of clinicopathological findings, both SGA and NLD were ruled out a nd the diagnosis of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis presenting as RF-negative polyarthritis was made.

  12. The Etiology of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato; Bosco, Annalisa; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Over the years, the commonly used term to describe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has changed. By definition, JIA includes all types of arthritis with no apparent cause, lasting more than 6 weeks, in patients aged less than 16 years at onset. JIA pathogenesis is still poorly understood: the interaction between environmental factors and multiple genes has been proposed as the most relevant working mechanism to the development of JIA. The concept that various microbes that colonize or infect not only the mucosal surfaces, like the oral cavity, but also the airways and gut might trigger autoimmune processes, resulting in chronic arthritides, and JIA was first drafted at the outset of last century. JIA development might be initiated and sustained by the exposure to environmental factors, including infectious agents which affect people at a young age, depending on the underlying genetic predisposition to synovial inflammation. Many data from patients with JIA suggest a scenario in which different external antigens incite multiple antigen-specific pathways, cytotoxic T cell responses, activation of classical complement cascade, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In this review, emphasis is paid not only to the potential role of parvovirus B19 and Epstein-Barr virus in primis but also to the general involvement of different bacteria as Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp., Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Bartonella henselae, and Streptococcus pyogenes for the development of immune-mediated arthritides during childhood. No unequivocal evidence favoring or refuting these associations has been clearly proved, and today, the strict definition of JIA etiology remains unknown. The infection can represent a random event in a susceptible individual, or it can be a necessary factor in JIA development, always in combination with a peculiar genetic background. Further studies are needed in order to address the unsolved questions

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the paediatric perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Alison [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Department of Adolescent Rheumatology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); McDonagh, Janet E. [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Institute of Child Health, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Paediatric rheumatology is a relatively new specialty that has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. There have been major advances, which have included improvements in the classification and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The former has led to enhanced international collaboration with disease registries, multicentre research and the development of new therapeutic agents. This has resulted in improved disease control and remission induction in many. There is, however, still significant morbidity associated with JIA during childhood, adolescence and adulthood, and challenges for the future include early identification of those with a poorer prognosis, appropriate administration of safe therapies and optimizing outcomes as young people move through adolescence into adulthood. (orig.)

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a clinical overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J

    2000-02-01

    The chronic arthritides in childhood remain a poorly understood group of conditions. Their classification has been a source of much confusion over the years with differences in terminology between Europe and North America. A significant step forward in paediatric rheumatology has been the recent development of an internationally agreed classification system which uses the overall term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The various subtypes of JIA and their clinical features are described, together with an overview of their differential diagnosis, complications and outcomes. An outline of current management strategies is given and potential future developments highlighted.

  15. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Marco; Lelieveld, O T H M; van der Net, J; Engelbert, R H H; Helders, P J M; Takken, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To compare the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) with healthy controls, to determine if there were differences based on disease onset type, and to examine the relationship between aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in childre

  16. Intraveous gammaglobulin for the treatment of juvenil idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lòpez Ortíz Daniela Jazmin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a growing interest in autoimmune and auto-inflammatory diseases, both entities involving a therapeutic challenge even though more sophisticated therapeutic options have been developed. According to this, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is an example of this challenge, with proven autoimmune mechanisms as in positive rheumatoid factor arthritis; and autoinflammatory mechanisms in systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. For both damage mechanisms, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG has been used as a successful immunomodulator. The treatment with IVIG for JIA and associated features as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS has shown to be beneficial. Nevertheless more studies are required to support its usefulness, as well as clinical trials to document the IVIG effectiveness in comparison with the rest of therapeutic agents used. Despite its cost, the IVIG is well tolerated and should be considered useful in combination with other drugs as part of the JIA treatment, especially in those patients with associated threatening-life systemic complications or with high risk of infection. The present review pretends to expose, according to previous references from various authors, that IVIG is an alternative therapeutic option in these cases.

  17. Clinical Orofacial Examination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Twilt, Marinka; Spiegel, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    review. The level of evidence for the 5 recommendations was derived primarily from descriptive studies, such as cross-sectional and case-control studies. CONCLUSION: Five recommendations are proposed for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA to improve the clinical practice and aid standardized......OBJECTIVE: To develop international consensus-based recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), for use in clinical practice and research. METHODS: Using a sequential phased approach, a multidisciplinary task force developed and evaluated...... a set of recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA. Phase 1: A Delphi survey was conducted among 40 expert physicians and dentists with the aim of identifying and ranking the importance of items for inclusion. Phase 2: The task force developed consensus about the domains...

  18. Uveíte na artrite idiopática juvenil Uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    üente na população de pacientes com AIJ associada com uveíte (60% do que naqueles sem uveíte (12% (pObjective: to evaluate the frequency of chronic anterior uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and its association with the presence of antinuclear antibodies. Patients and methods: we retrospectively studied 72 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. All of them were submitted to slit-lamp examination of the anterior chamber at diagnosis. Both antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor were determined. Patients with positive results for antinuclear antibodies were evaluated every three months and those with negative results were assessed every six months.Results: forty patients were male (55.5% and 36 were Caucasoid (50%. The mean age at the onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 6.4 years (range = 1 to 14 years and the mean age at the beginning of the study was 10.4 years (1 to 19 years. According to the type of disease at onset, 32 were pauciarticular (44.4% (17 boys and 15 girls, 30 were polyarticular (41.6% (17 boys and 13 girls and 10 were systemic (14% (6 boys and 4 girls. We observed chronic anterior uveitis in five patients (6.5% (mean age = 11.4 years. Among them, four (80% had pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis at disease onset (three girls with type I juvenile idiopathic arthritis and positive antinuclear antibodies and one boy with type I juvenile idiopathic arthritis and negative antinuclear antibodies and one girl with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (negative antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. In this group, the mean age at the onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 5.1 years and the mean age of uveitis onset was 9 years. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 3/5 patients (60% with uveitis. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 12% of the patients without uveitis (n = 67. Among the patients with uveitis, three had only one flare and the other two had four flares with cataract. The

  19. Cardiac involvement in adult and juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, TThomas W; Diederichsen, L. P.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) include the main subgroups polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), inclusion body myositis (IBM) and juvenile DM ( JDM). The mentioned subgroups are characterised by inflammation of skeletal muscles leading to muscle weakness and other organs can also...

  20. Anti-type II collagen antibodies, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF are associated with joint damage, assessed eight years after onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Nordal, Ellen; Fasth, Anders; Aalto, Kristiina; Herlin, Troels; Nielsen, Susan; Rygg, Marite; Zak, Marek; Rönnelid, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Early appearance of antibodies specific for native human type II collagen (anti-CII) characterizes an early inflammatory and destructive phenotype in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and anti-CCP in serum samples obtained early after diagnosis, and to relate the occurrence of autoantibodies to outcome after eight years of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The Nordic JIA database prospectively included JIA patients followed for eight years with data on remission and joint damage. From this database, serum samples collected from 192 patients, at a median of four months after disease onset, were analysed for IgG anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and IgG anti-CCP. Joint damage was assessed based on Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index for Articular damage (JADI-A), a validated clinical instrument for joint damage. Elevated serum levels of anti-CII occurred in 3.1%, IgM RF in 3.6%, IgA RF in 3.1% and anti-CCP in 2.6% of the patients. Occurrence of RF and anti-CCP did to some extent overlap, but rarely with anti-CII. The polyarticular and oligoarticular extended categories were overrepresented in patients with two or more autoantibodies. Anti-CII occurred in younger children, usually without overlap with the other autoantibodies and was associated with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) early in the disease course. All four autoantibodies were significantly associated with joint damage, but not with active disease at the eight-year follow up. Anti-CII, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF detected early in the disease course predicted joint damage when assessed after eight years of disease. The role of anti-CII in JIA should be further studied.

  1. Clinical outcome measures in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, Alessandro; Giancane, Gabriella; Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Davì, Sergio; Calandra, Serena; Lanni, Stefano; Ravelli, Angelo

    2016-04-18

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), as a chronic condition, is associated with significant disease- and treatment-related morbidity, thus impacting children's quality of life. In order to optimize JIA management, the paediatric rheumatologist has begun to regularly use measurements of disease activity developed, validated and endorsed by international paediatric rheumatology professional societies in an effort to monitor the disease course over time and assess the efficacy of therapeutic interventions in JIA patients.A literature review was performed to describe the main outcome measures currently used in JIA patients to determine disease activity status.The Juvenile Disease Activity Score (JADAS), in its different versions (classic JADAS, JADAS-CRP and cJADAS) and the validated definitions of disease activity and response to treatment represent an important tool for the assessment of clinically relevant changes in disease activity, leading more and more to a treat-to-target strategy, based on a tight and thorough control of the patient condition. Moreover, in recent years, increasing attention on the incorporation of patient-reported or parent-reported outcomes (PRCOs), when measuring the health state of patients with paediatric rheumatic diseases has emerged.We think that the care of JIA patients cannot be possible without taking into account clinical outcome measures and, in this regard, further work is required.

  2. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis.

  3. "Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Lynn Moore

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract for invited review in Molecular Mechanisms of Immune Complex Pathophysiology thematic issue to be published in Frontiers in Immunology. Immune Complexes(ICin Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA Terry L. Moore, MD, FAAP, FACR, MACR Professor of Internal Medicine,Pediatrics, and Molecular Biology and Immunology Director of Adult and Pediatric Rheumatology Saint Louis University School of Medicine Saint Louis, Missouri 631`04,USA Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. ICs have been detected in patients’ sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column,C1q solid phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these IC s have shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF, isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated (CCP peptide antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We

  4. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kobus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child’s health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity.The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  5. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  6. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required.

  7. The human microbiome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Anouk; Ter Haar, Nienke M; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-09-20

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The pathogenesis of JIA is thought to be the result of a combination of host genetic and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to JIA remain to be unravelled. The microbiome has received increasing attention as a potential contributing factor to the development of a wide array of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Also in JIA, there is accumulating evidence that the composition of the microbiome is different from healthy individuals. A growing body of evidence indeed suggests that, among others, the microbiome may influence the development of the immune system, the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and the differentiation of T cell subsets. In turn, this might lead to dysregulation of the immune system, thereby possibly playing a role in the development of JIA. The potential to manipulate the microbiome, for example by faecal microbial transplantation, might then offer perspectives for future therapeutic interventions. Before we can think of such interventions, we need to first obtain a deeper understanding of the cause and effect relationship between JIA and the microbiome. In this review, we discuss the existing evidence for the involvement of the microbiome in JIA pathogenesis and explore the potential mechanisms through which the microbiome may influence the development of autoimmunity in general and JIA specifically.

  8. Diagnosis and classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Eli M; Berkun, Yackov

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the term Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) comprises not one disease but several. Moreover, recent studies strongly suggest that some of these clinico-pathophysiologic entities appear to cross current diagnostic categories. The ultimate goal of the JIA classification is to facilitate development of better, more specific therapy for different forms of disease though improved understanding of pathophysiology. The past two decades have witnessed significant advances in treatment and improved outcomes for many children with chronic arthritis. However, understanding of the basic biologic processes underlying these diseases remains far from complete. As a result, even the best biologic agents of today represent "halfway technologies". Because they do not treat fundamental biologic processes, they are inherently expensive, need to be given for a long time in order to ameliorate the adverse effects of chronic inflammation, and do not cure the disease. Pediatric rheumatology is now entering an era in which diagnostic categories may need to change to keep up with discovery. A more precise, biologically based classification is likely to contribute to development of more specific and improved treatments for the various forms of childhood arthritis. In this review, we discuss how genetic, gene expression, and immunologic findings have begun to influence how these diseases are understood and classified.

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sarah L N; Sen, Ethan S; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2016-04-27

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood, with JIA-associated uveitis its most common extra-articular manifestation. JIA-associated uveitis is a potentially sight-threatening condition and thus carries a considerable risk of morbidity. The aetiology of the condition is autoimmune in nature with the predominant involvement of CD4(+) T cells. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, particularly regarding interplay between genetic and environmental factors. JIA-associated uveitis comes in several forms, but the most common presentation is of the chronic anterior uveitis type. This condition is usually asymptomatic and thus screening for JIA-associated uveitis in at-risk patients is paramount. Early detection and treatment aims to stop inflammation and prevent the development of complications leading to visual loss, which can occur due to both active disease and burden of disease treatment. Visually disabling complications of JIA-associated uveitis include cataracts, glaucoma, band keratopathy and macular oedema. There is a growing body of evidence for the early introduction of systemic immunosuppressive therapies in order to reduce topical and systemic glucocorticoid use. This includes more traditional treatments, such as methotrexate, as well as newer biological therapies. This review highlights the epidemiology of JIA-associated uveitis, the underlying pathogenesis and how affected patients may present. The current guidelines and criteria for screening, diagnosis and monitoring are discussed along with approaches to management.

  10. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  11. Tocilizumab in the treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Miho Murakami,1 Minako Tomiita,2,3 Norihiro Nishimoto11Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, 2Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, 3Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Chiba Children's Hospital, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis is one of the common rheumatic diseases in childhood and characterized by spiking fever, evanescent skin rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and serositis, in addition to arthritis. Children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis often show growth retardation and developmental abnormality, as well as macrophage activation syndrome, a life-threatening complication. Overproduction of interleukin-6 is pathologically responsible for the systemic inflammatory manifestations and abnormal laboratory results with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Thus, tocilizumab, a humanized antihuman interleukin-6 receptor antibody, has been developed as a therapeutic agent for the disease. A series of clinical studies have demonstrated the excellent efficacy and safety of tocilizumab for patients with active disease. Tocilizumab was approved for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Japan in 2008 and in the European Union and the United States in 2011.Keywords: systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, tocilizumab, antihuman interleukin-6 receptor antibody, biologics

  12. How to make an early and accurate diagnosis of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis%幼年特发性关节炎全身型早期诊断标准探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷蕾; 周纬; 金燕樑; 李怀远; 周征宇; 黄华

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过回顾性分析与比较幼年特发性关节炎全身型(systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis,SOJIA)与其他疾病引起的发热待查患儿的临床特点及实验室检查结果,来获得鉴别诊断的临界值,以提高早期诊断SOJIA的准确性.方法 收集不明原因发热患儿共124例,记录患儿持续发热达2~4周时的临床特点和实验室检查结果,并随访1年以上.对资料完整的病例采用SPSS16.0软件进行单因素分析,对有统计学意义的单因素进行受试者工作特征曲线(ROC)分析,然后对有意义的临床特点和实验室检查结果进行联合分析.结果 诊断明确且资料完整者共96例,其中33例为SOJIA,19例为其他自身免疫性疾病,25例为血液/肿瘤疾病,19例为感染性疾病.当血清铁蛋白(SF)≥545.75 ng/ml时,可以将SOJIA与其他自身免疫性疾病区分的灵敏度为97.0%,特异度为100%,若以出现皮疹或关节肿/痛加上血小板计数≥217×109/L或C3≥1.275 g/L作为标准,其区分SOJIA和血液肿瘤疾病的灵敏度为100%,特异度为96%.若以SF≥441.7ng/ml加上出现皮疹或关节肿/痛,那么其区分SOJIA和感染性疾病的灵敏度和特异度均可达到100%.结论 结合发热待查患儿的临床特点及实验室检查结果可提高早期诊断SOJIA的准确性.%Objective To identify the cut-off points for differential diagnosis to increase the accuracy of early diagnosis for systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SOJIA) by retrospectively analysis on the patients with SOJIA and the patients with fever of unknown origin. Methods One hundred and twenty-four patients with fever of unknown origin were enrolled in this study. The clinical features and the results of laboratory tests of the patients with persistent fever for 2 to 4 weeks were recorded completely and they were then followed up for more than one year. The data were analysed by single factor analysis using SPSS16.0. The areas under

  13. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Terry L

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients' sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA.

  14. Muscle involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindehammar, H; Lindvall, B

    2004-12-01

    An observational study of changes in muscle structure and the relation to muscle strength in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Fifteen children and teenagers (eight girls and seven boys) with JIA, aged 9-19 yr (mean age 16.1), were studied. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the anterior tibial muscle and were examined using histopathological and immunohistochemical methods. Muscle fibre types were classified and fibre areas measured. As markers of inflammation, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were analysed. Results were compared with biopsies from the gastrocnemius muscle in 33 young (19-23 yr) healthy controls. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strengths were measured in ankle dorsiflexion. Strength was compared with reference values for healthy age-matched controls. Nerve conduction velocities were recorded in the peroneal and sural nerves. Four of the 15 muscle biopsies were morphologically normal. Eleven biopsies showed minor unspecific changes. Two of these also showed minor signs of inflammation. MHC class II expression was found in 4/15 patients, which was significantly more than in the healthy controls (P = 0.0143). The expression of MHC class I and MAC did not differ from that in the controls. The mean area of type I fibres was lower than that of type IIA fibres in 12/13 biopsies. Muscle strength was significantly reduced in the patient group. There was a significant positive correlation between muscle fibre area and muscle strength. Nerve conduction studies were normal in all cases. Changes in leg muscle biopsies appear to be common in children and teenagers with JIA. The presence of inflammatory cells in the muscle and expression of MHC class II on muscle fibres may be a sign of inflammatory myopathy. There are no findings of type II muscle fibre hypotrophy or neuropathy, as in adults with RA.

  15. Exercise testing and fitness training in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh-Grewal, D.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is the commonest rheumatic disease of childhood affecting 1:1000 children under the age of 16 years. Children with JIA have long been sidelined from physical activity due to active disease or irrational concerns that activity may in some way worsen disease. Children

  16. Temporomandibular Involvement and Craniofacial Development in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Twilt (Marinka)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractJuvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a generalised autoimmune disease, which starts in childhood. JIA is one of the most frequent occurring autoimmune diseases in childhood, and concerns approximately 1 in a 1000 children. JIA is a heterogeneous group of conditions divided into seve

  17. Mechanisms of disease and therapy in severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vastert, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes results of translational research (both bench to bedside as reverse translation from bedside back to the bench) in severe Juvenile idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). It focuses on understanding critical immunological features of both systemic and polyarticular JIA and relates this to

  18. Imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis with a focus on ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Boesen, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    Early therapeutic intervention and use of new highly efficacious treatments have improved the outcome in many patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but have also led to the need for more precise methods to evaluate disease activity. In adult rheumatology, numerous studies have establ...

  19. The adolescent experience in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A narrative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, C.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304820369

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation focused on the self-experience of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Although the etiology and nosology of JIA and CFS are fundamentally different, some commonalities in the emotional experience of adolescents dealing with these

  20. Physical activity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, Otto; Armbrust, Wineke; van Leeuwen, M.A.; Duppen, N.; Geertzen, J.H.; Sauer, P.J.; van Weert, E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore physical activity (PA) in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with a healthy population and to examine associations between PA and disease-related factors. METHODS: Total energy expenditure (TEE), activity-related energy expenditure (AEE), PA level, an

  1. Exercise testing and fitness training in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh-Grewal, D.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is the commonest rheumatic disease of childhood affecting 1:1000 children under the age of 16 years. Children with JIA have long been sidelined from physical activity due to active disease or irrational concerns that activity may in some way worsen disease. Children wit

  2. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Susan;

    2012-01-01

    The wrist region is one of the most complex joints of the human body. It is prone to deformity and functional impairment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and is difficult to examine clinically. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasonography (US) with Doppler in diagnosis...

  3. Randomized Trial of Tocilizumab in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Brunner, Hermine I.; Ruperto, Nicolino; Kenwright, Andrew; Wright, Stephen; Calvo, Inmaculada; Cuttica, Ruben; Ravelli, Angelo; Schneider, Rayfel; Woo, Patricia; Wouters, Carine; Xavier, Ricardo; Zemel, Lawrence; Baildam, Eileen; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Dolezalova, Pavla; Garay, Stella M.; Merino, Rosa; Joos, Rik; Grom, Alexei; Wulffraat, Nico; Zuber, Zbigniew; Zulian, Francesco; Lovell, Daniel; Martini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most severe subtype of JIA; treatment options are limited. Interleukin-6 plays a pathogenic role in systemic JIA. METHODS We randomly assigned 112 children, 2 to 17 years of age, with active systemic JIA (duration of >= 6 months and inad

  4. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis – epidemiology and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberle EJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Edward J Oberle, Julia G Harris, James W VerbskyDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a group of disorders characterized by arthritis persisting for at least 6 weeks with onset before the age of 16 years. Within this cluster of conditions, the polyarticular form (involving more than four joints within the first 6 months is further divided based on the presence of rheumatoid factor. Children with polyarticular JIA pose unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges compared to children with involvement of fewer joints. Polyarticular JIA patients tend to have a more refractory course and therefore are at increased risk for joint damage, resulting in poorer functional outcomes and decreased quality of life. Although the ability to treat this disorder continues to improve, especially with the advent of biologic agents, there is still much about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of polyarticular JIA that is unknown. The epidemiology of polyarticular JIA varies worldwide with a vast difference in reported cases between different global regions as well as within individual countries. Several genetic risk loci have been identified conferring increased susceptibility to JIA, many within the human leukocyte antigen region. Beyond the genome, environmental factors also seem to contribute to the etiology of polyarticular JIA. This review article will focus on the epidemiology and current treatments of polyarticular JIA and briefly discuss genetic and environmental influences on the pathogenesis of JIA as well as new and emerging therapies.Keywords: juvenile arthritis, polyarticular, epidemiology, treatment, rheumatology

  5. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis - epidemiology and management approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Edward J; Harris, Julia G; Verbsky, James W

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of disorders characterized by arthritis persisting for at least 6 weeks with onset before the age of 16 years. Within this cluster of conditions, the polyarticular form (involving more than four joints within the first 6 months) is further divided based on the presence of rheumatoid factor. Children with polyarticular JIA pose unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges compared to children with involvement of fewer joints. Polyarticular JIA patients tend to have a more refractory course and therefore are at increased risk for joint damage, resulting in poorer functional outcomes and decreased quality of life. Although the ability to treat this disorder continues to improve, especially with the advent of biologic agents, there is still much about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of polyarticular JIA that is unknown. The epidemiology of polyarticular JIA varies worldwide with a vast difference in reported cases between different global regions as well as within individual countries. Several genetic risk loci have been identified conferring increased susceptibility to JIA, many within the human leukocyte antigen region. Beyond the genome, environmental factors also seem to contribute to the etiology of polyarticular JIA. This review article will focus on the epidemiology and current treatments of polyarticular JIA and briefly discuss genetic and environmental influences on the pathogenesis of JIA as well as new and emerging therapies.

  6. IL-1 inhibition in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Giancane

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA is the form of childhood arthritis whose treatment is most challenging. The demonstration of the prominent involvement of interleukin (IL-1 in disease pathogenesis has provided the rationale for the treatment with biologic medications that antagonize this cytokine. The three IL-1 blockers that have been tested so far (anakinra, canakinumab and rilonacept have all been proven effective and safe, although only canakinumab is currently approved for use in sJIA. The studies on IL-1 inhibition in sJIA published in the past few years suggest that children with fewer affected joints, higher neutrophil count, younger age at disease onset, shorter disease duration, or, possibly, higher ferritin level may respond better to anti-IL-1 treatment. In addition, it has been postulated that use of IL-1 blockade as first-line therapy may take advantage of a window of opportunity, in which disease pathophysiology can be altered to prevent the occurrence of chronic arthritis. In this review, we analyze the published literature on IL-1 inhibitors in sJIA and discuss the rationale underlying the use of these medications, the results of therapeutic studies, and the controversial issues.

  7. Altered signaling in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaubas, Claudia; Wong, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yujuan; Nguyen, Khoa D; Lee, Justin; Milojevic, Diana; Shenoi, Susan; Stevens, Anne M; Ilowite, Norman; Saper, Vivian; Lee, Tzielan; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2016-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by systemic inflammation and arthritis. Monocytes are implicated in sJIA pathogenesis, but their role in disease is unclear. The response of sJIA monocytes to IFN may be dysregulated. We examined intracellular signaling in response to IFN type I (IFNα) and type II (IFNγ) in monocytes during sJIA activity and quiescence, in 2 patient groups. Independent of disease activity, monocytes from Group 1 (collected between 2002 and 2009) showed defective STAT1 phosphorylation downstream of IFNs, and expressed higher transcript levels of SOCS1, an inhibitor of IFN signaling. In the Group 2 (collected between 2011 and 2014), monocytes of patients with recent disease onset were IFNγ hyporesponsive, but in treated, quiescent subjects, monocytes were hyperresponsive to IFNγ. Recent changes in medication in sJIA may alter the IFN hyporesponsiveness. Impaired IFN/pSTAT1 signaling is consistent with skewing of sJIA monocytes away from an M1 phenotype and may contribute to disease pathology.

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  9. Clinical efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis%麦考酚酸酯治疗幼年特发性关节炎全身型的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩彤昕; 李彩凤; 王江; 邝伟英; 周怡芳; 邓江红

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the treatment of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA).Methods Thirty-five patients with a confirmed diagnosis of SoJIA who had received initial treatment were randomly divided into control (n=15),MMF1 (n=7) and MMF2 groups (n=13).The control group received conventional treatment,the MMF1 group received MMF after 2 weeks of conventional treatment that had not led to remission,and the MMF2 group received combination therapy with non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs,prednisone and MMF.Symptoms,signs,laboratory indices,and adverse events were observed after 2,4,and 12 weeks of treatment,and follow-up was performed for 3-6 months.Results Before treatment,the MMF2 group had a significantly longer disease course than the control group (P<0.05).After 2 weeks of treatment,the MMF1 and MMF2 groups had a significantly lower prednisone dose and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) than the control group (P<0.05).The MMF1 group had significantly higher body temperature than the other two groups (P<0.05).After 4 weeks of treatment,the MMF1 group had a significantly lower prednisone dose and ESR than the control group (P<0.05).The MMF2 group had a significantly lower prednisone dose,body temperature (recovery to normal),white blood cell count,ESR and serum ferritin concentration than the control group (P<0.05).Body temperature was significantly lower in the MMF2 group than in the MMF1 group (P<0.05).No adverse events were observed in either the MMF1 or MMF2 groups during treatment.Conclusions Combination therapy with MMF can lead to better control of the patient's condition,more rapid relief of clinical symptoms and reduced glucocorticoid dose.The therapy with MMF is safe in children.%目的 评价麦考酚酸酯(mycophenolate mofetil,MMF)治疗幼年特发性关节炎全身型(system onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis,SoJIA)的临床疗效.方法 35例确诊为SoJIA并初

  10. Updates on the risk markers and outcomes of severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Han, Sheila T; Yeh, Steven; Vogler, Larry B

    2013-01-01

    Uveitis is the most common extra-articular manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is the most common systemic cause of uveitis in children. Known risk factors for uveitis include antinuclear antibody seropositivity, young age of arthritis onset, specific juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtype and short duration of disease. Risk markers for severe ocular disease include gender, age and complications at initial visit. Due to the risk for vision-compromising sequelae such as cataracts, band keratopathy, glaucoma, vision loss and blindness, an understanding of the risk factors for uveitis development and severe ocular disease is crucial to help prevent serious visual disability and complications. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of uveitis, known risk factors for uveitis development and severe visual outcome, and addresses the need for additional biomarkers of uveitis risk, prognosis and remission. PMID:24187594

  11. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... resonance imaging findings of temporomandibular joint inflammation among juvenile ... The mean total MRI score was significantly higher in patients with active ... Clinical signs of TMJ arthritis can be used as filter for MRI examination TMJ is ...

  12. Treatment of refractory juvenile idiopathic arthritis via pulse therapy using methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Caroline Monteiro de Castro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with refractory juvenile idiopathic arthritis can benefit from aggressive therapy. CASE REPORT: We followed the clinical course of 4 patients (2 male, 2 female aged 9.1-17.8 years (mean of 14.5 years with polyarticular onset of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and one 16-year-old boy with juvenile spondyloarthropathy associated with inflammatory bowel disease. All the juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology. All patients had unremitting arthritis despite maximum therapy. All patients began receiving treatment using intravenous cyclophosphamide at 500-750 mg/m² and intravenous methylprednisolone at 30 mg/kg, for 3 days monthly (1 g maximum. The patients received between 3 and 11 monthly treatments, and/or 3-5 treatments every two months for 12 months, according to the severity of the disease and/or response to the therapy. All but one patient were evaluated retrospectively at the start (time 0 and 6 months (time 1, and 12 months (time 2 after the beginning of the treatment. A rapid and clinically significant suppression of systemic and articular manifestations was seen in all patients. Our results showed the favorable effect of this treatment on the clinical and some laboratory manifestations of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  13. Canakinumab for the treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grom, Alexei A

    2014-11-01

    The introduction of methotrexate in the 1980s and of TNF-inhibiting agents and abatacept in the late 1990s led to a dramatic improvement in the outcomes of non-systemic categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. By contrast, the same treatment approaches had no strong impact on the outcome of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA), and the main effective treatment in these patients remained glucocorticoids with their known side effects. Encouraging findings in small studies involving SJIA patients treated with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors led to large Phase III trials, and the results in these trials provide hope that substantial joint damage and disability seen in the majority of patients with persistent SJIA can be prevented. The purpose of this review is to discuss the safety and efficacy of the IL-1 and IL-6 inhibiting agents in SJIA with the main focus on canakinumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody.

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the new world of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostring, Genevieve Tyra; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2013-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis results in significant pain and disability in both children and adults. Advances in treatment resulting in improved long-term outcomes have occurred; however, an emphasis on early and aggressive diagnosis and management hopes to improve outcomes further. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis remains a clinical diagnosis of exclusion, but further research may delineate biological markers associated with the disease and its subtypes. Therapy for patients includes intra-articular steroid injections, disease modifying agents such as methotrexate and biological agents. Biological agents have provided exciting new therapeutic options in the last decade; however, long-term side effects of modulating the immune system are not yet fully understood. Systemic steroids may also be required but their long-term use is avoided. Uveitis needs to be screened for in all of those with the diagnosis. Multidisciplinary team care is required in managing these young people.

  15. [Current therapy of polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospach, A; Rühlmann, J M; Weller-Heinemann, F

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in infancy and childhood. Approximately 20 % of patients with JIA suffer from the polyarticular form of the disease, which causes a substantial disease burden and long-term sequelae. Therapeutic approaches have used steroids and conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) but over the last decade new drugs have become available for the treatment of JIA, in particular biologic DMARD. This article summarizes the current therapy options for polyarticular JIA.

  16. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated with Fahr′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Dundar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral symmetric calcification involving striatum pallidum with or without deposits in the dentate nucleus, thalamus and white matter is commonly referred to as Fahr′s syndrome. Symptoms of the disorder may include deterioration of motor function, spasticity, spastic paralysis, dysarthria, dementia, seizures, headache and athetosis. The clinical and imaging abnormalities are restricted to the central nervous system (CNS. We report an unusual association of Fahr′s syndrome with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a girl.

  17. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C

    2000-02-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis.

  18. Concurrence of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Abdelghani Kaouther

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 21-year-old female patient known to have Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA who later developed multiple sclerosis (MS. The disease was documented on the brain and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and the visual evoked potential. Our case emphasizes the need to evaluate the symptoms and brain MRI carefully. The concurrence of MS and JIA is uncommon. The possible relationship between the 2 diseases was discussed.

  19. Clinical and Serological Findings in Juvenile Patients with Idiopathic Arthritis in Southwestern of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Alyasin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to describe clinical features and serological findings of children with idiopathic arthritis in south-western Iran.Methods: This descriptive study included 60 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who were referred to a pediatric rheumatology clinic at a university hospital during 6-month period. Initial manifestations, first laboratory tests and clinical course of patients were reviewed.Results: Sixty children (32 boys and 28 girls with idiopathic arthritis ranged in age from 1.5 to 16 years. The mean age at the first presentation was 4.92 years (SD= 3.68. Oligoarthritis was the most common subtype in 27 (45%, followed by systemic- onset in 17 (28.3% and polyarthritis in 16 (26.7% of patients. The most commonly involved joints were knee 53(88.3%, ankle 28(46.6% and wrist 27(45%. Uveitis was detected in two patients, and positivity for ANA titer was revealed in one patient. Conclusions: In this study, the pattern of most clinical features in different subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis resembles to other studies. Positive ANA was less; however, the low numbers of Iranian patients with uveitis was noteworthy.

  20. Biological therapies for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Lessons from the adult and pediatric experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Stoll

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthew L Stoll, Alisa C GotteDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: Biologics have advanced the therapy of adult and pediatric arthritis. They have been linked to rare serious adverse outcomes, but the actual risk of these events is controversial in adults, and largely unknown in pediatrics. Because of the paucity of safety and efficacy data in children, pediatric rheumatologists often rely on the adult literature. Herein, we reviewed the adult and pediatric literature on five classes of medicines: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab. For efficacy, we reviewed randomized controlled studies in adults, but did include lesser qualities of evidence for pediatrics. For safety, we utilized prospective and retrospective studies, rarely including reports from other inflammatory conditions. The review included studies on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis, as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Overall, we found that the TNF inhibitors have generally been found safe and effective in adult and pediatric use, although risks of infections and other adverse events are discussed. Anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab have also shown positive results in adult trials, but there is minimal pediatric data published with the exception of small studies involving the subgroup of children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in whom anakinra and tocilizumab may be effective therapies.Keywords: juvenile idiopathic arthritis, biologics, rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Bone mineral density in young females with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Study of bone mineral density (BMD in young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is important because long-term administration of glucocorticoids and the presence of chronic systemic inflammation can lead to loss of bone tissue in young people with chronic inflammatory disease in anamnesis. Objective: the study of BMD in young female with juvenile onset of JIA. Materials and methods. Ninety-nine female patients aged 19 to 39 years were divided into two groups: І — 59 healthy young female, ІІ — 40 young female with JIA. The following parameters were evaluated: the age of the disease onset, the duration of delayed diagnosis, disease duration, the ILAR-variant in the disease onset, the BMD in different areas and their T and Z scores. Results. It was found that the onset of JIA was at the age of 11.16  ±  4.34 years, it took 23.52 ± 21.37 months from the beginning of the first clinical manifestations to the time of diagnosis, the disease duration was 11.9 ± 9.4 years, persistant oligoarthritis was detected in 25  % of patients, RF-negative polyarthritis in 22.5  %, extended oligoarthritis in 10  %, RF-positive polyarthritis in 10  %, systemic-onset JIA in 12.5  %, enthesitis-related JIA in 15  %, undifferentiated arthritis in 10  %, psoriatic arthritis in 5  % of patients. BMD (p < 0.000001, T (p = 0.00001 and Z scores in the lumbar spine were lower in female with JIA than in healthy people. Femoral neck BMD (p < 0.000001 and T score (p = 0.00002, total body BMD (p < 0.000001, T- (p = 0.00009 and Z-scores (p < 0.000001 were lower in patients with JIA than in healthy people. However, ultradistal forearm BMD in the female patients differed from healthy ones’ only in T and Z scores (p = 0.004. Z score < –2 SD in young adults was detected in 40  % of patients in the lumbar spine, in 24  % of patients in the femoral neck, in 35.5 % of patients in the total body and in 52.9  % of patients in ultra

  2. Bone mineral density in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sušić Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is well known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA as a chronic inflammatory disease with onset during the childhood, beside other complication, can lead to bone metabolism disturbance and osteoporosis. Objective. To assess bone mineral density (BMD in children with JIA and to identify factors playing role in bone mineral disturbance. Methods. Seventy-five patients (26 male and 49 female average disease duration 7.2 (2.4-16.8 years, and 73 age matched healthy control subjects (29 male and 44 female participated in the study. Mean age of the groups was about 14.5 years. BMD was determined by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA of the lumbar spine (L2-L4. For further analysis we used the absolute value of BMD, expressed as g/cm2, Z score expressed as SD (relative value as standard deviation decline of normal BMD values of referent Italian population with identical age and gender, bone mineral content (BMC as g/cm, and corrected BMD - BMDv as g/cm3. Results. Z score in the group of patients was significantly lower (-1.02±1.6 in comparison to the control group (-0.09±1.4; p<0.001. BMD, BMDv and BMC were also statistically lower in patients with JIA. The lowest Z score was found in patients with systemic onset (-2.63 SD. Z score showed a statistically significant positive correlation with arthritis course (polyarticular course had lower Z score, body mass index and standard deviation score for height and weight. Statistically significant negative correlation was detected in regard to Z score and glucocorticoid (GC treatment duration, GC cumulative dose, number of joints with limited range of motion, radiological stage and functional class. Conclusion. The results showed a decreased BMD in patients with JIA in comparison to the control group. Systemic onset, polyarthritis, longer treatment with GC and higher cumulative dosage, as well as higher damage level (functional status and radiological stage are factors playing negative role

  3. Intraspinal anomalies in early-onset idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, E A C; Oxenham, M; Lam, K S

    2017-06-01

    In the United Kingdom, lower incidences of intraspinal abnormalities in patients with early onset idiopathic scoliosis have been observed than in studies in other countries. We aimed to determine the rates of these abnormalities in United Kingdom patients diagnosed with idiopathic scoliosis before the age of 11 years. This retrospective study of patients attending an urban scoliosis clinic identified 71 patients satisfying a criteria of: clinical diagnosis of idiopathic scoliosis; age of onset ten years and 11 months or less; MRI screening for intraspinal abnormalities. United Kingdom census data combined with patient referral data was used to calculate incidence. Mean age at diagnosis was six years with 39 right-sided and 32 left-sided curves. Four patients (5.6%) were found to have intraspinal abnormalities on MRI. These consisted of: two combined Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformations with syrinx; one syrinx with a low lying conus; and one isolated syrinx. Overall annual incidence of early onset idiopathic scoliosis was one out of 182 000 (0.0006%). This study reports the lowest rates to date of intraspinal anomalies in patients with early onset idiopathic scoliosis, adding to knowledge regarding current incidences of these abnormalities as well as any geographical variation in the nature of the disease. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:829-33. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, Liam Z; McClymont, Liusaidh; Beggs, Ian; Gaston, Paul; Salter, Donald M

    2017-05-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old man diagnosed with adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip. Chondrolysis of the hip is a disorder most frequently seen in children who have suffered with slipped capital femoral epiphyses. Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip is extremely rare and to our knowledge, its onset has never been documented in adults aged over 20. With reference to the available medical literature, we summarise the current clinical management of this unusual but important cause of young adult hip pain.

  5. Hypoglycemia and hemostatic parameters in juvenile-onset diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Nielsen, J D;

    1980-01-01

    Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous infusion of insulin in six juvenile-onset diabetic subjects. Hemostatic parameters were assessed before insulin infusion and 0, 1, and 2 h after discontinuation of insulin infusion. The onset of hypoglycemia coincided with an enhancement of ADP-induced plat......Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous infusion of insulin in six juvenile-onset diabetic subjects. Hemostatic parameters were assessed before insulin infusion and 0, 1, and 2 h after discontinuation of insulin infusion. The onset of hypoglycemia coincided with an enhancement of ADP...... potentially lead to intravascular coagulation in juvenile-onset diabetic patients....

  6. An intra-articular ganglion cyst in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Donna Y; Yee, Keolamau; Burkhalter, William; Okimoto, Kelley Chinen; Kon, Kevin; Kurahara, David K

    2014-01-01

    We report an intra-articular ganglion cyst (IAGC) presenting as knee pain and a mass in a patient with longstanding Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). We could not find a similar case of an IAGC occurring in the knee of JIA patients in the literature. IAGC may need to be included as a possibility in patients with inflammatory arthritis with new-onset knee pain, especially in those with a palpable mass. MRI was useful in distinguishing IAGC from more worrisome causes of a knee mass. Orthopedic input was helpful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition, methotrexate therapy was effective in bringing about a long-lasting remission.

  7. Substance use and sexual function in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon van Weelden

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use and sexual function in adolescent juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and healthy controls. Methods: 174 adolescents with pediatric rheumatic diseases were selected. A cross-sectional study with 54 JIA patients and 35 controls included demographic/anthropometric data and puberty markers assessments, physician-conducted CRAFFT (car/relax/alone/forget/friends/trouble screen tool for substance abuse/dependence high risk and a questionnaire that evaluated sexual function, bullying and alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use. Clinical/laboratorial data and treatment were also assessed in JIA. Results: The median current age was similar between JIA patients and controls [15(10–19 vs. 15(12–18 years, p = 0.506]. Frequencies of alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use were high and similar in both JIA and controls (43% vs. 46%, p = 0.829. However, age at alcohol onset was significantly higher in those with JIA [15(11–18 vs. 14(7–18 years, p = 0.032], particularly in polyarticular onset (p = 0.040. High risk for substance abuse/dependence (CRAFFT score ≥ 2 was found in both groups (13% vs. 15%, p = 1.000, likewise bullying (p = 0.088. Further analysis of JIA patients regarding alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use showed that the median current age [17(14–19 vs. 13(10–19years, p < 0.001] and education years [11(6–13 vs. 7(3–12years, p < 0.001] were significant higher in those that used substances. Sexual activity was significantly higher in the former group (48% vs. 7%, p < 0.001. A positive correlation was evidenced between CRAFFT score and current age in JIA patients (p = 0.032, r = +0.296. Conclusion: A high risk for substance abuse/dependence was observed in both JIA and controls. JIA substance users were more likely to have sexual intercourse. Therefore, routine screening is suggested in all visits of JIA adolescents.

  8. Substance use and sexual function in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weelden, Marlon; Lourenço, Benito; Viola, Gabriela R; Aikawa, Nadia E; Queiroz, Lígia B; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use and sexual function in adolescent juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and healthy controls. 174 adolescents with pediatric rheumatic diseases were selected. A cross-sectional study with 54 JIA patients and 35 controls included demographic/anthropometric data and puberty markers assessments, physician-conducted CRAFFT (car/relax/alone/forget/friends/trouble) screen tool for substance abuse/dependence high risk and a questionnaire that evaluated sexual function, bullying and alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use. Clinical/laboratorial data and treatment were also assessed in JIA. The median current age was similar between JIA patients and controls [15(10-19) vs. 15(12-18) years, p=0.506]. Frequencies of alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use were high and similar in both JIA and controls (43% vs. 46%, p=0.829). However, age at alcohol onset was significantly higher in those with JIA [15(11-18) vs. 14(7-18) years, p=0.032], particularly in polyarticular onset (p=0.040). High risk for substance abuse/dependence (CRAFFT score≥2) was found in both groups (13% vs. 15%, p=1.000), likewise bullying (p=0.088). Further analysis of JIA patients regarding alcohol/tobacco/illicit drug use showed that the median current age [17(14-19) vs. 13(10-19)years, p<0.001] and education years [11(6-13) vs. 7(3-12)years, p<0.001] were significant higher in those that used substances. Sexual activity was significantly higher in the former group (48% vs. 7%, p<0.001). A positive correlation was evidenced between CRAFFT score and current age in JIA patients (p=0.032, r=+0.296). A high risk for substance abuse/dependence was observed in both JIA and controls. JIA substance users were more likely to have sexual intercourse. Therefore, routine screening is suggested in all visits of JIA adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The number and the size of joints matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Wernroth, Lisa; Fasth, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA.......Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA....

  10. Proposed outcome measures for prospective clinical trials in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Foeldvari, Ivan; Edelsten, Clive

    2012-01-01

    To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis.......To develop a set of core outcome measures for use in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis....

  11. [Pain and coping strategies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, Troels; Thastum, Mikael

    2008-02-18

    Pain is one of the primary symptoms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). JIA patients have reduced pain tolerance and pain threshold compared to healthy controls. In children with JIA the greater use of coping strategies such as problem-solving, positive self-statements and distraction consistently have predicted less arthritis-related pain, even after controlling for relevant medical and demographic variables. Interventions specifically designed to modify maladaptive pain coping strategies and pain-related health beliefs may be effective in reducing pain in children with JIA.

  12. Methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: towards tailor-made treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćalasan, Maja Bulatović; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2014-07-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the key treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Nevertheless, MTX is not always sufficiently efficacious and can lead to adverse effects, which compromises complete disease control. In such cases, combination therapies with biologicals are given, even at MTX start, before knowing the patients' MTX response. Ideally, clinicians should be able to practice precision medicine by knowing before or early after MTX start, which patients will benefit from MTX only and which patients will not, thus requiring addition of biologicals. To make such tailor-made treatment decisions, clinicians require tools to optimize MTX treatment. In this review, we focus on tools for tailor-made MTX treatment in JIA.

  13. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions.

  14. [Juvenil idiopathic arthritis. Part 1: diagnosis, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espada, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is not a single disease and constitutes an heterogeneous group of illnesses or inflammatory disorders. This new nomenclature encompasses different disease categories, each of which has different presentation, clinical signs, symptoms, and outcome. The cause of the disease is still unknown but both environmental and genetic factors seem to be related to its pathogenesis. Is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. In this article, clinical manifestation, new classification and approach to diagnosis are reviewed.

  15. Update on Genetic Susceptibility and Pathogenesis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Herlin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a multifactorial disease with a pathogenesis which remains inexplicable. However, genome-wide association studies brought forward within recent years have discovered several new susceptibility genes, and accumulating evidence supports genetic variability as playing a key role in JIA development. This review summarises the present knowledge of human leukocyte antigen (HLA and non-HLA polymorphisms conferring disease susceptibility, and discusses the areas in JIA genetics, which are still to be investigated in order to apply JIA genetics in a clinical setting.

  16. Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis in a Child with Recurrent Macrophage Activation Syndrome Secondary to Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Adrovic, Amra

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome, a severe complication of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other inflammatory diseases, represents one of the most important rheumatological emergencies. Delayed diagnosis could lead to life-threatening complications. Pulmonary hemosiderosis has been classically characterized by a triad of anemia, hemoptysis, and lung infiltrates on chest radiogram. Although the majority of patients of pulmonary hemosiderosis are considered idiopathic, secondary hemosiderosis associated with known diseases could be seen. In this case report, we aimed to present gradually increased pulmonary manifestations due to pulmonary hemosiderosis with recurrent macrophage activation syndrome attacks in a child with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  17. Tocilizumab: The evidence for its place in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels Herlin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Troels HerlinDepartment of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, DenmarkIntroduction: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is one of the most common chronic diseases with childhood onset. It comprises different subtypes of which the systemic onset subtype is often resistant to treatment. With the advent of biological treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα-inhibitors, the clinical outcome of JIA has improved considerably, but only for subtypes other than systemic JIA. Substantial evidence shows that the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 plays a pivotal role in systemic JIA. The blockage of IL-6 action by tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6-receptor monoclonal antibody, could therefore be an effective treatment of systemic JIA.Aims: The purpose of this article was to review the clinical trials of tocilizumab and to discuss its place in the treatment of JIA with the focus on the systemic onset of disease. Evidence review: Two phase II studies and one phase III clinical trial of tocilizumab demonstrating the clinical efficacy and safety in systemic onset JIA have been published. Within those studies, sustained and high response rates of clinical improvement have been achieved with American College of Rheumatology Pediatric criteria (ACRPed 30, 50, and 70 observed in 98%, 94%, and 90% of patients, respectively, after 48 weeks. One study regarding the clinical efficacy of tocilizumab for the treatment of oligo- and polyarticular JIA has been presented only as a conference abstract.Place in therapy: The very promising results seen so far in patients with severe systemic JIA and acceptable tolerability gives tocilizumab a central role in the future therapy in controlling this disease. No other biological therapy has achieved similar high response rates when treating with tocilizumab 8 mg/kg every two weeks to patients with systemic onset JIA, but direct comparison of the efficacy of different biological agents are not

  18. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region. This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  19. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  20. The Clinical Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N.; Huber, Adam M.; Malley, James D.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their similarity to the adult clinical subgroups is unknown. We enrolled 436 patients with JIIM, including 354 classified as JDM, 33 as JPM, and 49 as JCTM, in a nationwide registry study. The aim of the study was to compare demographics; clinical features; laboratory measures, including myositis autoantibodies; and outcomes among these clinical subgroups, as well as with published data on adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) enrolled in a separate natural history study. We used random forest classification and logistic regression modeling to compare clinical subgroups, following univariate analysis. JDM was characterized by typical rashes, including Gottron papules, heliotrope rash, malar rash, periungual capillary changes, and other photosensitive and vasculopathic skin rashes. JPM was characterized by more severe weakness, higher creatine kinase levels, falling episodes, and more frequent cardiac disease. JCTM had more frequent interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, arthralgia, and malar rash. Differences in autoantibody frequency were also evident, with anti-p155/140, anti-MJ, and anti-Mi-2 seen more frequently in patients with JDM, anti-signal recognition particle and anti-Jo-1 in JPM, and anti-U1-RNP, PM-Scl, and other myositis-associated autoantibodies more commonly present in JCTM. Mortality was highest in patients with JCTM, whereas hospitalizations and wheelchair use were highest in JPM patients. Several demographic and clinical

  1. The importance of an ophthalmologic examination in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis occurs within the first year of arthritis onset in 73% of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) considered at risk. The intraocular inflammation is characterized by an insidious onset and a silent and chronic clinical course capable of producing significant visual loss due to complications such as: cataract formation, secondary glaucoma, maculopathy and optic neuropathy. The absence of initial signs and symptoms, along with a deficient ophthalmic monitoring produce a delay in diagnosis with serious consequences. It has been estimated that 47% of JIA patients at risk for developing uveitis are legally blind (20/200 or worse) at least in one eye at the time of their first visit to the ophthalmologist. To reduce ocular complications and improve their visual outcome, it is necessary that rheumatologists refer all patients recently diagnosed (within the first month) with JIA for an ophthalmic evaluation, and maintain periodical follow-up visits based on classification and risk category of the disease.

  2. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis complicated by amyloidosis with secondary nephrotic syndrome - effective treatment with tocilizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata; Jednacz, Ewa; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    A case report of a boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the age of 2 years, generalized onset, complicated by nephrotic syndrome due to secondary type A amyloidosis is presented. In the patient the disease had an especially severe course, complicated by frequent infections, making routine treatment difficult. Amyloidosis was diagnosed in the 5(th) year of the disease based on a rectal biopsy. Since the disease onset the boy has been taking prednisolone and sequentially cyclosporine A, methotrexate, chlorambucil, etanercept, and cyclophosphamide. Clinical and laboratory remission was observed after treatment with tocilizumab. After 42 months of treatment with tocilizumab the boy's condition is good. There is no pain or joint edema, and no signs of nephrotic syndrome.

  3. "Petrified ears" with idiopathic adult-onset pituitary insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal Gogate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available "Petrified ears" or calcification of auricular cartilage is an uncommonly reported condition. The most common causes of this phenomenon are local trauma, frost bite, and inflammation. Adrenal insufficiency is the most frequent systemic disease associated with auricular calcification. We present a case of idiopathic adult-onset pituitary insufficiency with hypocortisolism and bilateral auricular calcification. Recognition of the association between auricular calcification and adrenal insufficiency can be an important step toward the identification of a life-threatening cortisol deficiency.

  4. Biological therapies for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Lessons from the adult and pediatric experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Matthew L; Gotte, Alisa C

    2008-06-01

    Biologics have advanced the therapy of adult and pediatric arthritis. They have been linked to rare serious adverse outcomes, but the actual risk of these events is controversial in adults, and largely unknown in pediatrics. Because of the paucity of safety and efficacy data in children, pediatric rheumatologists often rely on the adult literature. Herein, we reviewed the adult and pediatric literature on five classes of medicines: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab. For efficacy, we reviewed randomized controlled studies in adults, but did include lesser qualities of evidence for pediatrics. For safety, we utilized prospective and retrospective studies, rarely including reports from other inflammatory conditions. The review included studies on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis, as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Overall, we found that the TNF inhibitors have generally been found safe and effective in adult and pediatric use, although risks of infections and other adverse events are discussed. Anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab have also shown positive results in adult trials, but there is minimal pediatric data published with the exception of small studies involving the subgroup of children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in whom anakinra and tocilizumab may be effective therapies.

  5. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol.

  6. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment and Management of Pain in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Jennifer N Stinson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a common chronic childhood illness. Pain is the most common and distressing symptom of JIA. Pain has been found to negatively impact all aspects of functioning, including physical, social, emotional and role functions. Children with arthritis continue to experience clinically significant pain despite adequate doses of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-inflammatory agents. The present article reviews the prevalence and nature of pain in JIA, the biopsychosocial factors that contribute to the pain experience, current approaches to assessing pain in this population, and ways of managing both acute and persistent pain using pharmacological, physical and psychological therapies. Finally, new approaches to delivering disease self-management treatment for youth with JIA using the Internet will be outlined.

  8. Secondary Osteoporosis in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Kristyna Brabnikova Maresova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is associated with focal (joint erosion and juxtaarticular osteopenia and systemic bone loss (generalized osteopenia or reduction of bone mass density. Pathophysiology of bone loss is multifactorial and involves particularly proinflammatory cytokines and deleterious effects of glucocorticoid therapy. Clinical studies in patients with JIA indicate excessive activation of osteoclastogenesis and reduction of bone formation. Reduction of physical activity, muscle atrophy caused by high disease activity, and compulsory restriction in movements are also associated with bone loss. In patients with JIA, the disease can be complicated by growth cartilage involvement and systemic or local growth retardation. In the absence of preventive measures, fragility fractures can occur even at an early age.

  9. EFFICACY OF ETANERCEPT IN TREATMENT OF VARIOUS TYPES OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

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    O. Yu. Konopel'ko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess efficacy and safety of etanercept in treatment of various types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children under conditions of real clinical practice. Patients and methods: 52 children were included into the study, among them 16 were with systemic and 36 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. Results: etanercept treatment was the most efficient in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvement. In 6 and 12 months of the treatment 50 and 70% improvement according to the ACRpedi criteria were established in 31/36 (86% and 28/36 (78% of the patients, respectively. In 24 months in 5 (29% of 17 children remained in the study remission stage of the diseases was confirmed. Conclusions: etanercept treatment was not associated with significant unfavorable effects, which allows to recommend this drug for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis without extra-articular involvent and resistant to standard anti-rheumatic therapy.

  10. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: A case report and review of the literature

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    Ahmet Imerci

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: With this report, we would like to raise awareness about a possible association of persistent fractures with this rare metabolic disorder, Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis, which should be included in differential diagnosis of patients with persistent appendicular skeleton fractures.

  11. Nephrotic syndrome due to immunoglobulin M mesangial glomerulonephritis preceding juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, Luis E; Alvarado, Caupolican; Cuttica, Rubén J; Balestracci, Alejandro; Zardini, Marta; Lago, Néstor

    2013-05-21

    The association between nephrotic syndrome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis have rarely been described in pediatric patients. We report a child with steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome, with frequent relapses, who presented with a new relapse of nephrotic syndrome associated with arthritis and uveitis at 21 months in remission after treatment with chlorambucil. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was diagnosed and kidney biopsy examination showed mesangial glomerulonephritis with immunoglobulin M deposits. To our knowledge, only 2 cases of nephrotic syndrome preceding juvenile idiopathic arthritis have been reported, one without histopathology assessment and the other with minimal change disease. Although mesangial glomerulonephritis with nephrotic syndrome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis could have been coincidental, the immune pathogenic mechanism accepted for both diseases suggests they could be related.

  12. Advances in the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kate; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent advances in the management strategies of polyarticular course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify unanswered questions and avenues for further research. Recent findings There is evidence for an early, aggressive, treat-to-target approach for polyarticular JIA. Clinical disease activity criteria have been recently defined and validated, including criteria for inactive disease and the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS). There is a need for evidence-based, defined disease targets and biomarkers for prediction of response, including targets for remission induction, and guidelines on drug withdrawal. Recent treatment consensus plans and guidelines are discussed and compared, including the 2015 NHS England clinical policy statement, the 2014 Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) treatment plans and the 2011 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines. Evidence for new agents such as tocilizumab, rituximab, golimumab, ustekinumab, certolizumab and tofacitinib is promising: the recent clinical trials are summarized here. Stratification of individual patient treatment remains a goal, and predictive biomarkers have been shown to predict success in the withdrawal of methotrexate therapy. Summary There are promising advances in the treatment approaches, disease activity criteria, clinical guidelines, pharmaceutical choices and individually stratified therapy choices for polyarticular JIA. PMID:26147756

  13. CLINICAL CASE OF TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY IN A PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

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    E. I. Alexeeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of successful application of a monoclonal antibodies drug to interleukin 6 receptors (tocilizumab at severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis with the development of secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. Tocilizumab treatment secured a decrease in clinical and laboratory parameters of the disease activity, life quality improvement, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hemophagocytic syndrome remission and allowed avoiding the per os prescription of glucocorticoids.

  14. [Guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of oligoarticular and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader-Meunier, B; Wouters, C; Job-Deslandre, C; Cimaz, R; Hofer, M; Pillet, P; Quartier, P

    2010-07-01

    A guideline group of pediatric rheumatologist experts elaborated guidelines related to the management of idiopathic juvenile arthritis in association with the Haute Autorité de santé (HAS). A systematic search of the literature published between 1998 and August 2008 and indexed in Pubmed was undertaken. Here, we present the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment in oligoarticular and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (except for spondylarthropathy and rheumatoid arthritis).

  15. Early Illness Features Associated with Mortality in the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Adam M.; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Lachenbruch, Peter A.; Lee, Julia A.; Katz, James D.; Targoff, Ira N.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Because juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are potentially life-threatening systemic autoimmune diseases, we examined risk factors for JIIM mortality. Methods Mortality status was available for 405 patients (329 juvenile dermatomyositis [JDM], 30 juvenile polymyositis [JPM], 46 juvenile connective tissue disease–associated myositis [JCTM]) enrolled in nationwide protocols. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated using United States population statistics. Cox regression was used to assess univariable associations with mortality, and random survival forest (RSF) classification and Cox regression for multivariable associations. Results Of 17 deaths (4.2% overall mortality), 8 (2.4%) were in JDM patients. Death was related to the pulmonary system, primarily interstitial lung disease (ILD), in 7 patients, gastrointestinal in 3, multisystem in 3, and of unknown etiology in 4 patients. The SMR for JIIM overall was 14.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 12.2, 16.5] and 8.3 [95% CI 6.4, 10.3] for JDM. The top mortality risk factors in the univariable analysis included clinical subgroup (JCTM, JPM), anti-synthetase autoantibodies, older age at diagnosis, ILD and Raynaud’s phenomenon at diagnosis. In multivariable analyses, clinical subgroup, illness severity at onset, age at diagnosis, weight loss and delay to diagnosis were the most important predictors from RSF; clinical subgroup and illness severity at onset were confirmed by multivariable Cox regression. Conclusions Overall mortality was higher in JIIM patients, and several early illness features were identified as risk factors. Clinical subgroup, anti-synthetase autoantibodies, older age at diagnosis, and ILD are also recognized as mortality risk factors in adult myositis. PMID:24151254

  16. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs

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    Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Margariti, Persefoni N.; Astrakas, Loukas; Kosta, Paraskevi [Medical School University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Ioannina (Greece); Karali, Aikaterini; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Siamopoulou, Antigoni [University of Ioannina, Department of Child Health, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2009-03-15

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset. (orig.)

  17. Four gases report of macrophage activation syndrome with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children%幼年特发性关节炎全身型合并巨噬细胞活化综合征4例报告并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠晓君; 郭宏湘; 彭韶

    2008-01-01

    目的 总结巨噬细胞活化综合征(macrophage activation syndrome,MAS)的临床特征及误诊原因,以提高对该病的认识.方法 回顾性分析54例幼年特发性关节炎全身型(systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis,SO-JIA)合并MAS患儿的临床症状、体征、辅助检查及病情进展、诊断、治疗及预后.结果 54例SOJIA患儿中4例并发MAS(7.4%).临床特征有:持续高热、肝脾淋巴结增大、肝功能急剧恶化、皮肤黏膜易出血、外周血三系减少、中枢神经系统功能障碍、血沉进行性下降.结论 MAS是SOJIA的一个致死性并发症,起病突然,进展迅速,病死率高.在临床工作中需提高对其的认识,避免误诊.

  18. 全身型幼年特发性关节炎患儿自身抗体和炎性细胞因子研究%Autoantibodies and inflammatory cytokines in children with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏国新; 陈茜璐; 刘燕婕

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of autoantibodies and inflammatory cytokines in children with system‐onset ju‐venile idiopathic arthritis (So‐JIA) .Methods Serum concentrations of autoantibodies and inflammatory cytokines were measured in children with So‐JIA at active phase or remission phase by using indirect immunofluorescence method and enzyme‐linked immu‐nosorbent assay .Healthy children were enrolled as control group .Results The assay positivity of antikeratin antibody (AKA) and anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti‐CCP) was 29 .4% and 47 .1% in active phase group ,and was 17 .2% and 27 .6% in remission group .The differences between the two groups were significant (P0 .05) .Conclusion AKA and anti‐CCP might be with high diagnostic specificity to So‐JIA ,but the sensitivity could be low ,and combined detection could increase the diagnostic positivity .Inflammatory cytokines ,such as IL‐6 and IL‐17 ,might be associated with the activity of So‐JIA ,which could be important biomarkers of So‐JIA .%目的:探讨自身抗体和炎性细胞因子在全身型幼年特发性关节炎(So‐JIA )中的变化。方法分别采用间接免疫荧光法和酶联免疫吸附法检测活动期、缓解期So‐JIA患儿血清抗角蛋白抗体(AKA)、抗环瓜氨酸肽抗体(抗CCP抗体)、白细胞介素‐17(IL‐17)和白细胞介素‐6(IL‐6)的表达水平。以健康儿童作为健康对照组进行比较。结果活动期组血清AKA、抗CCP抗体阳性率分别为29.4%、47.1%,缓解期组分别为17.2%、27.6%,活动期组均高于缓解期组(P<0.05)。So‐JIA组AKA的灵敏度和特异度分别为21.1%和97.2%,抗CCP抗体的灵敏度和特异度分别为41.3%和91.9%,抗CCP抗体的灵敏度高于AKA。活动期组抗CCP抗体、IL‐17、IL‐6水平均高于健康对照组和缓解期组(P<0.05);缓解期组抗CCP抗体、IL‐17

  19. Causes of uveitis in children without juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Engelhard SB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Engelhard, Asima Bajwa, Ashvini K ReddyDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to report the demographics, disease characteristics, treatments, and visual outcomes of pediatric uveitis patients without juvenile idiopathic arthritis managed in a tertiary medical center.Methods: A retrospective, observational study was performed in pediatric uveitis patients without juvenile idiopathic arthritis and aged 0–18 years, who were seen at the University of Virginia from 1984 to 2014.Results: Thirty-nine pediatric uveitis patients (57 eyes were identified. The patient population was 51.28% female, 51.28% Caucasian, and 33.33% African American. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.11 years. The mean number of visits to the clinic was 10.41. Of 57 eyes, 31 (54.39% had anterior uveitis, 12 (21.05% had intermediate uveitis, nine (15.79% had posterior uveitis, and five (8.77% had panuveitis. The leading diagnoses were traumatic uveitis (25.64%, undifferentiated anterior uveitis (17.95%, undifferentiated intermediate uveitis (15.38%, HLA-B27-associated anterior uveitis (7.69%, and herpetic anterior uveitis (7.69%. Systemic associations included sarcoidosis, ulcerative colitis, and psoriatic arthritis (n=3. The most common treatment modalities included local steroids (66.67%, systemic steroids (23.08%, and antimetabolites (20.51%. Ocular hypertension was found in five (12.82% patients. Ocular surgery was performed in six (15.38% patients. Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA at baseline across all anatomical locations was 0.458 logMAR, and was 0.411 logMAR at final follow-up. Mean BCVA improved during follow-up in all but the anterior uveitis group. The mean baseline intraocular pressure was 14.27 mmHg, and was 14.22 mmHg at final follow-up.Conclusion: Uveitis in childhood is a vision-threatening group of inflammatory

  20. Challenges in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis with etanercept

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    Clare E Pain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clare E Pain, Liza J McCannAlder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Eaton Road, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Biologic agents have been designed with the help of immunological studies to target particular areas of the immune system which are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. Etanercept is a soluble anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α agent licensed for the treatment of active poly-articular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in children aged 4 to 17 years who have failed to respond to methotrexate alone, or who have been intolerant of methotrexate. The safety and efficacy of etanercept in this patient group has been established by one randomized controlled trial and several longitudinal studies. This, together with the fact that until recently etanercept was the only anti-TNF licensed in JIA, has made it the most common first choice biologic for many clinicians. However, there are still many unanswered questions about etanercept, including its efficacy and safety in different subtypes of JIA, in children under 4 years of age and in those with uveitis. There are still concerns about the long term safety of TNF antagonists in the pediatric age group and unanswered questions about increased risks of malignancy and infection. Although adult studies are useful to improve understanding of these risks, they are not a substitute for good quality pediatric research and follow-up studies. Adult trials often include greater numbers of patients. However, they evaluate a different population and drug behavior may vary in children due to differences in metabolism, growth and impact on a developing immune system. In addition, rheumatoid arthritis is a different disease than JIA. Clinicians need to carefully weigh up the risk benefit ratio of anti-TNF use in children with JIA and push for robust clinical trials to address the questions that remain unanswered. This article summarizes the evidence available for use of etanercept in children

  1. Immunogenetics of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Aimee O; Prahalad, Sampath

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory arthropathy of childhood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is believed to be a complex genetic trait influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Twin and family studies suggest a substantial role for genetic factors in the predisposition to JIA. Describing the genetics is complicated by the heterogeneity of JIA; the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) has defined seven categories of JIA based on distinct clinical and laboratory features. Utilizing a variety of techniques including candidate gene studies, the use of genotyping arrays such as Immunochip, and genome wide association studies (GWAS), both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA susceptibility loci associated with JIA have been described. Several of these polymorphisms (e.g. HLA class II, PTPN22, STAT4) are shared with other common autoimmune conditions; other novel polymorphisms that have been identified may be unique to JIA. Associations with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA are the best characterized. A strong association between HLA DRB1:11:03/04 and DRB1:08:01, and a protective effect of DRB1:15:01 have been described. HLA DPB1:02:01 has also been associated with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA. Besides PTPN22, STAT4 and PTPN2 variants, IL2, IL2RA, IL2RB, as well as IL6 and IL6R loci also harbor variants associated with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA. RF-positive polyarticular JIA is associated with many of the shared epitope encoding HLA DRB1 alleles, as well as PTPN22, STAT4 and TNFAIP3 variants. ERA is associated with HLA B27. Most other associations between JIA categories and HLA or non-HLA variants need confirmation. The formation of International Consortia to ascertain and analyze large cohorts of JIA categories, validation of reported findings in independent cohorts, and functional studies will enhance our understanding of the genetic

  2. New onset of idiopathic bilateral ear tics in an adult.

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    Agrawal, Amit; Shrestha, Rabin

    2009-04-01

    Tic disorders are commonly considered to be childhood syndromes. Newly presenting tic disorders during adulthood are uncommon and mostly described in relation to an acquired brain lesion or as incidental tics, particularly in context with other neurological or psychiatric diseases. Tic disorder involving the ears is extremely uncommon with only few studies in English literature. In the present case, we describe an adult patient with new-onset idiopathic tics disorder involving both ears, causing social embarrassment. In addition, our patient had recent onset of the tics without any childhood or family history of tic disorders. The single most important component of management is an accurate diagnosis. At the same time, tics should be differentiated from other movement disorders such as chorea, stereotypy, and dystonias.

  3. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis overview and involvement of the temporomandibular joint: prevalence, systemic therapy.

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    Carrasco, Ruy

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the many joints involved in the inflammatory arthritides. As imaging of joints has developed, so have the data regarding extent and prevalence of TMJ involvement in these diseases. TMJ disease is especially prevalent in juvenile arthritis. The adult and pediatric inflammatory arthritides share common pathophysiology but are still markedly different. The preponderance of TMJ arthritis research exists in juvenile arthritis. This article discusses classification, treatment, and TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  4. EXPERIENCE WITH ABATACEPT IN TREATMENT OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

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    Margarita Fedorovna Dubko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent interest to Abatacept (ABA keeps growing due to continuous inflow of consistent efficacy and safety data from successful clinical trials. The objective of our retrospective trial was to evaluate ABA efficacy and safety in treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in biologic-naive patients. 20 patients aged 3—17 y.o. were included into the study. All included cases had a long duration of the disease, high values of clinical and laboratory indicators of JIA activity corresponding to moderate and severe course of arthritis. 70% achieved improvement in ACR 30 after average 8 months treatment with ABA (duration range 3—20 mo. Best clinical responses were observed in patients with systemic JIA subtype (but without obvious clinical manifestations in all 3 cases out of 3 included, and polyarticular subtype — in 9 patients out of 11. 6 patients (30,0% discontinued treatment. Main reasons for discontinuing treatment were absence or lack of efficacy — in 4 cases, poor adherence — in 1 case, and adverse reactions — in 1 case. Hopefully these data will help practicing physicians with adequate choice of treatment.

  5. Radiological improvement by tocilizumab in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Tozawa, Yusuke; Fujita, Shouji; Abe, Shuji; Kitamura, Koichi; Kobayashi, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in biologic therapy have enabled reduction of the progression of destructive arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis. Once destroyed, however, the affected bones and cartilage are not fully repaired. We describe the case of an 8-year-old girl with anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA)-positive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (p-JIA). Destructive arthritis progressed during combination therapy with infliximab, methotrexate, mizoribine and prednisolone. Clinical remission was achieved, however, after switching the biologic agent to tocilizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to interleukin-6 receptor. Both bone erosion and bone marrow edema on magnetic resonance imaging were repaired in association with restoration of joint spaces. Furthermore, there was no relapse of arthritis on weekly methotrexate alone for 2 years after discontinuation of the tocilizumab. Tocilizumab led to radiological repair of both bone and cartilage destruction and long-term biologics-free remission in a patient with ACPA-positive p-JIA, and should be considered for tumor necrosis factor inhibitor-resistant cases.

  6. Adalimumab for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

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    Magli, Adriano; Forte, Raimondo; Navarro, Pasqualina; Russo, Giustina; Orlando, Francesca; Latanza, Loredana; Alessio, Maria

    2013-06-01

    To assess the long-term outcomes and complications of patients with uveitis from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treated with adalimumab. Prospective interventional case series. All patients who underwent treatment with adalimumab for JIA and anterior uveitis were prospectively included in the study. The anterior chamber inflammation was evaluated according to the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature criteria. Twenty-one patients (16 females, five males, 38 eyes) were included in the study. Mean age of patients at referral was 11.1 ± 3.8 (5-17) years. Before initiation of treatment, mean duration of arthritis was 7.0 ± 5.5 (median, 6) months, mean duration of uveitis was 7.0 ± 4.4 (median, 7) months. Oligoarticular arthritis was present in 15 cases (71 %), polyarticular arthritis in six cases (28 %). After a mean follow-up of 18.2 ± 7.7 (9-41) months, resolution of anterior chamber inflammation was obtained in 29/38 eyes (76 %). The anterior uveitis flare rate during the 12 months prior to enrollment was 1.6 ± 0.4/year, and was reduced during adalimumab treatment to 0.7 ± 0.3/year (p0.05). Adalimumab showed to be effective and relatively safe for treatment of JIA-associated uveitis.

  7. Metabolism of glycosaminoglycans in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Katarzyna Winsz-Szczotka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a non-homogeneous autoimmune children’s disease which, despite the applied therapy, has a progressive character with recurrences, leading to damage of joint structures. Progressive wearing of the joint cartilage in the course of JIA, which results from the imbalance between the biological strength of the cartilage, its function and exerted pressure forces, is linked to metabolic disorders of extracellular matrix (ECM components. Among the latter compounds, the proteoglycan (PG aggrecan plays a particular role in maintaining the mechanical-immunological properties of the cartilage. These functions are directly related to chains of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, covalently linked to the core protein of PGs. Therefore, every change of GAGs metabolism linked to an increase of the rate of degradation or with a decrease of their biosynthesis may have pathological consequences. In this paper we aim to describe plausible mechanisms leading to observed disorders of aggrecan transformation in children, which are reflected in the profile of plasma GAGs. Therefore, we describe the plausible role of factors related to catabolism and synthesis of PGs/GAGs as well as the contribution of immunological processes to shaping the changes of extracellular matrix components in the course of JIA.

  8. [Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis : Optimization of immunomodulatory therapy].

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    Heiligenhaus, A; Tappeiner, C; Walscheid, K; Heinz, C

    2016-05-01

    Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA-associated uveitis) is a vision-threatening disorder with a high complication rate. Besides early diagnosis within screening programs an adequate therapy is essential for improvement of the long-term prognosis. Corticosteroid therapy is often insufficient. In addition to conventional immunosuppression, immunomodulatory drugs, so-called biologicals, are novel highly effective treatment modalities. A systematic search of the literature was carried out for biologicals currently used in the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. Review of current publications, summary of treatment guidelines and discussion of treatment options for therapy refractive patients. In accordance with the current recommendations tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are administered if uveitis inactivity cannot be achieved with topical corticosteroids and in the next stage with immunosuppressants (methotrexate preferred). According to the currently available data adalimumab is then preferred. When the effectiveness of TNF inhibitors ceases during long-term administration and/or recurrences, other biological response modifiers are attractive treatment options (e. g. lymphocyte inhibitors or specific receptor antagonists). The TNF inhibitors are of major importance for the treatment of JIA-associated uveitis. Prospective studies and registries would be desirable in order to be able to compare the value of TNF inhibitors and other biologicals and for optimization of treatment recommendations.

  9. A comprehensive review of the genetics of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Glass David N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common chronic arthropathy of childhood which is believed to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The progress in identifying genes underlying JIA susceptibility using candidate gene association studies has been slow. Several associations between JIA and variants in the genes encoding the human leukocyte antigens (HLA have been confirmed and replicated in independent cohorts. However it is clear that genetic variants outside the HLA also influence susceptibility to JIA. While a large number of non-HLA candidate genes have been tested for associations, only a handful of reported associations such as PTPN22 have been validated. In this review we discuss the principles behind genetic studies of complex traits like JIA, and comprehensively catalogue non-HLA candidate-gene association studies performed in JIA to date and review several validated associations. Most candidate gene studies are underpowered and do not detect associations, and those that do are often not replicated. We also discuss the principles behind genome-wide association studies and discuss possible implications for identifying genes underlying JIA. Finally we discuss several genetic variants underlying multiple clinically distinct autoimmune phenotypes.

  10. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1960–2013

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    Krause, Megan L.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Michet, C. John; Mason, Thomas; Muskardin, Theresa Wampler; Matteson, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Olmsted County, Minnesota in 1994–2013 and trends in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) in 1960–2013. Methods Cases of arthritis in 1994–2013 were identified by diagnosis code with medical chart review to confirm diagnosis separately for JIA and JRA. Overall incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were age and sex adjusted to the 2010 US white population. Comparisons were made with an earlier (1960–1993) cohort from this same population. Results Seventy-one incident cases of JIA in 1994–2013 were identified, with an overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence rate of 10.3 per 100,000 (95% CI 7.9–12.7). Forty-two (59%) were female, with an incidence of 12.4 per 100,000 (95% CI 8.6–16.2), as compared to 8.3 per 100,000 (95% CI 5.2–11.3) in males. The most common subtype was oligoarthritis (63%). The mean ± SD age at diagnosis was 8.2 ± 5.3 years. The prevalence of JIA on January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2010 was 51.0 per 100,000 (95% CI 25.2–76.8) and 57.6 per 100,000 (95% CI 31.0–94.5), respectively. When the annual incidence of JRA was compared over time from 1960 to 2013, there was no significant change in incidence overall; however, the incidence decreased among females (P = 0.003). A cyclic pattern of incidence was observed, with peaks approximately every 10 years. Similar to the findings with regard to incidence, prevalence did not change overall, but decreased among females (P = 0.048). There were 4 deaths in the cohort of JRA patients diagnosed in 1960–2013; the standardized mortality ratio was 1.50 (95% CI 0.41–3.83). Conclusion Incidence of juvenile arthritis overall in Olmsted County, Minnesota has not changed significantly in the past 53 years. A consistent cyclic pattern was noted. PMID:26316119

  11. Serum microRNAs as Potential Biomarkers of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

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    Kamiya, Yasuko; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kawano, Yoshihiko; Torii, Yuka; Kawabe, Shinji; Iwata, Naomi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression of targeted mRNAs, which are important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. MiRNAs may have the potential to serve as biomarkers of disease. We evaluated serum levels of selected miRNAs and their associations with disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Sera and peripheral blood leukocytes were collected from patients with JIA (8 systemic onset, 16 polyarthritis) and healthy controls. Levels of miR-16, miR-132, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 were quantified. Levels of miR-223 in sera were significantly higher in patients in the active phase of systemic onset JIA than in controls. MiRNAs of peripheral blood leukocytes did not exhibit any difference between patients with JIA and controls. In both systemic onset JIA and polyarthritis patients, levels of miR-223 and miR-16 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate and matrix metalloproteinase-3, respectively. MiR-146a and miR-223 in polyarthritis showed correlations with matrix metalloproteinase-3. Expressions of miRNAs were altered in patients with JIA. Serum levels of miR-223 may be a potential disease biomarker. Investigation of miRNAs could be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of JIA and could aid in the identification of additional disease biomarkers.

  12. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

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    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  13. O adulto com artrite idiopática juvenil poliarticular The adult patient with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Liz Wallin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Crianças com a forma poliarticular da artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ, ao entrarem na idade adulta, têm um quadro similar ao de pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR de início no adulto. No presente estudo comparam-se características clínicas e imunológicas desses dois grupos de pacientes. Para isso, foram estudados vinte adultos com AIJ poliarticular e cinquenta pacientes com AR (pareados para sexo e tempo de duração de doença, para presença de autoanticorpos, nódulos subcutâneos, síndrome de Sjögren secundária, hipotireoidismo e para a determinação de índices funcionais e antropométricos. Encontraram-se, nesses dois grupos, características similares, exceto pela presença de fator reumatoide (menor no grupo de AIJ poliarticular; P = 0,026 e menor IMC nos pacientes com AIJ poliarticular (P When children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA reach adulthood, they have a condition similar to that of patients with adult onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA. In the present study, the clinical and immunological characteristics of these two groups of patients are compared. The presence of autoantibodies, subcutaneous nodules, secondary Sjögren syndrome, and hypothyroidism, was determined in 20 adult patients with polyarticular JIA and in 50 patients with RA (paired for gender and duration of the disease, as well as the determination of functional and anthropometric indexes. Both groups had similar characteristics, except for the presence of rheumatoid factor (lower in the polyarticular JIA group; P = 0.026 and lower BMI in patients with polyarticular JIA (P < 0.001.

  14. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Vaid, Yoginder N; Dunnavant, F Daniel; Royal, Stuart A; Beukelman, Timothy; Stoll, Matthew L; Cron, Randy Q

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is extremely common but frequently asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast remains the gold standard for identifying TMJ arthritis in JIA. A reliable scoring system with published MRI examples of typical acute and chronic TMJ arthritis changes will be invaluable for future prospective treatment trials of TMJ arthritis in JIA. MRIs were collected from routine clinical studies assessing TMJ arthritis in JIA. Representative images were selected for publication to depict acute (synovial fluid, bone marrow edema, and synovial enhancement) and chronic (pannus, disc derangement, and condylar head flattening and erosions) TMJ arthritis findings. A preliminary MRI-based scoring system for assessing degrees of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis was developed and tested for inter- and intrareader reliability. TMJ MRIs representative of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis in JIA were selected from among thousands taken (>500 TMJ MRI studies annually at Children's of Alabama) since September 2007. Moreover, computed tomography scans depicting select bony changes (osteophyte formation, micrognathia) were chosen for publication. A description of the MRI protocol for assessing TMJ arthritis is included. A preliminary scoring system weighted for degree of acute and chronic TMJ arthritis MRI findings was found to have substantial inter- and intrareader reliability. A published set of MRIs depicting representative acute and chronic changes will help establish a standardized scoring system to assess TMJ arthritis in children with JIA. Future validation will aid in assessing improvement during treatment trials of TMJ arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis outcome and prognosis according to catamnesis evaluation

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    O V Semenova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study outcome and prognosis in pts with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Material and methods. 239 JIA pts with disease duration of 10 years and more were analyzed. 80 children and adolescents before 18 years old (66 girls and 14 boys were included in group 1. Arthritis clinical and laboratory activity, radiological stage and functional status according to Steinbroker and CHAQ questionnaire were assessed. 159 grown up pts (109 female and 50 male suffering from JIA from childhood were included in group 2. They were examined using Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and a specially developed social status questionnaire. Results. Half pts of group 1 had recurrence of the disease during examination but activity in most cases did not exceed stage I or 2 (54% and 31% respectively. Joint destructive changes were revealed in 50% of pts. 80% of pts had radiological signs of secondary osteoarthritis. Amyloidosis was revealed in 2 from 27 pts with systemic type of JIA. 68% of pts had 1 or 2 functional class. 1/3 of pts did not have functional limitations (CHAQ=0. 13% of pts had maximal disability with CHAQ ranging from 2,1 to 3,0 (pts with polyarticular and systemic types of JIA. Most grown up pts (59% considered their health as good. Substantial part of them worked or learned. 10 pts did not worked because of the disease (1,5%. 61% of pts did not have functional limitations (HAQ=0. 32% of pts were disabled. Most of them had 3 or 2 disability degree and had possibility to work. Conclusion. Substantial part of pts with longstanding JIA have stabilization of the disease or remission. Recurrent course of the disease was characterized by decrease of activity. Most children and grown ups with longstanding disease have relatively benign functional outcome. Pts with polyarticular and systemic types of JIA require especial attention because they have maximal risk of joint destruction with severe disability.

  16. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in the Era of International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Yosef

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Improved understanding of its pathogenesis has led to international cooperation in clinical studies. Multicenter, international collaborations and research facilitate rapid enrollment of enough patients to enable a variety of studies, including those of epidemiology, diagnostic and classification criteria, genetic disease predisposition, pathogenesis, outcomes, and treatment protocols. In the last 20 years, the vision of the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organization (PRINTO) has become a reality of worldwide collaboration in pediatric rheumatology research, including North American and European research groups. Major advances have been made in treating systemic JIA and its main complication, macrophage-activating syndrome (MAS). Single Hub and Access Point to Pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) is a project of the European Society of Pediatric Rheumatology with the goal of improving clinical care. Based on evidence in the scientific literature, position papers regarding optimal clinical approaches and care have been published. Formal, validated assessment tools to evaluate response to treatment have been developed. Recommendations have been established to encourage international research collaborations, especially in light of major advances achieved in the genetics of pediatric rheumatologic diseases and the need to share biological samples among different countries and continents. Every participating country has disease information available for patients and families. Additionally, educational programs and updated syllabi for pediatric rheumatology have been written to promote similar, high-level academic training in different countries. These efforts have resulted in significant improvements in treatment and in patient prognosis. However, improved cooperation is needed to enhance research with biological and genetic samples. The Israeli Research Group for

  17. Incidence of herpes zoster infections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients.

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    Nimmrich, S; Horneff, G

    2015-03-01

    The risk of herpes zoster among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exposed to biologics has not been evaluated. We determined incidence rates of herpes zoster among children with JIA in correlation with medication at time of occurrence and total drug exposure. The German biologics register database was used to identify patients with herpes zoster. Crude infection rates and incidence ratios (IRR) were compared to published rates. Demographics and overall exposure and particular exposure time to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and biologics were analyzed. The JIA cohort included 3,042 patients with 5,557.9 person-years of follow-up; 1,628 have used corticosteroids, 2,930 methotrexate and 1,685 etanercept. In total, 17 herpes zoster events have been documented [6/1,000 patients (3.5-9.0); 3.1/1,000 patient-years (1.9-4.9)]. Thus, the incidence rate in JIA patients was higher than expected [IRR 2.9 (1.8-4.5), p herpes zoster. Compared to the healthy population, a significant higher IRR is observed in JIA patients who received a monotherapy with etanercept or in combination with steroids and methotrexate, but not in JIA patients exposed to methotrexate without biologics. In comparison with our control group of patients treated with methotrexate, the IRR was higher for exposure to etanercept monotherapy and combination of etanercept and corticosteroids irrespective of methotrexate use. A generally higher incidence rate in JIA patients treated with etanercept was observed. No serious or refractory manifestations occurred.

  18. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in the Era of International Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Uziel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Improved understanding of its pathogenesis has led to international cooperation in clinical studies. Multicenter, international collaborations and research facilitate rapid enrollment of enough patients to enable a variety of studies, including those of epidemiology, diagnostic and classification criteria, genetic disease predisposition, pathogenesis, outcomes, and treatment protocols. In the last 20 years, the vision of the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organization (PRINTO has become a reality of worldwide collaboration in pediatric rheumatology research, including North American and European research groups. Major advances have been made in treating systemic JIA and its main complication, macrophage-activating syndrome (MAS. Single Hub and Access Point to Pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE is a project of the European Society of Pediatric Rheumatology with the goal of improving clinical care. Based on evidence in the scientific literature, position papers regarding optimal clinical approaches and care have been published. Formal, validated assessment tools to evaluate response to treatment have been developed. Recommendations have been established to encourage international research collaborations, especially in light of major advances achieved in the genetics of pediatric rheumatologic diseases and the need to share biological samples among different countries and continents. Every participating country has disease information available for patients and families. Additionally, educational programs and updated syllabi for pediatric rheumatology have been written to promote similar, high-level academic training in different countries. These efforts have resulted in significant improvements in treatment and in patient prognosis. However, improved cooperation is needed to enhance research with biological and genetic samples. The Israeli Research

  19. Incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Catalonia (Spain).

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    Modesto, C; Antón, J; Rodriguez, B; Bou, R; Arnal, C; Ros, J; Tena, X; Rodrigo, C; Rotés, I; Hermosilla, E; Barceló, P

    2010-11-01

    To ascertain the incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Catalonia (autonomous region in northeast Spain), examined according to the currently established disease subtypes. Before initiating the study, we conducted an educational programme on paediatric rheumatology, addressed to all general paediatricians in Catalonia. A 2-year (2004-2006), prospective, population-based study was then carried out to determine the incidence of JIA. Prospective and retrospective data retrieval was performed to calculate prevalence. The International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR, Edmonton revision) classification criteria were applied. Over the study period, 145 new cases of JIA were diagnosed. The mean annual incidence was 6.9/10⁵ children aged less than 16 years (range 5.8-8.1 years; 9.0 years for girls and 4.8 years for boys). On separate analysis of patients ≤ 6 and > 6 years, the distribution in younger children was found to be similar for both girls and boys, whereas in older children, most girls belonged to the oligoarthritis and polyarthritis subgroups, and boys to the enthesitis-related arthritis and undifferentiated subgroups. The calculated prevalence of JIA (31 October 2006) was 39.7 (36.1-43.7)/10⁵ children younger than 16. The relative risk of girls having JIA was 2.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-2.7, p population-based study on the epidemiology of JIA in Catalonia. Incidence and prevalence rates are lower than those reported for several areas in Nordic countries of Europe. Oligoarthritis was the most common subtype.

  20. Sleep Fragmentation and Biomarkers in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

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    Ward, Teresa M; Yuwen, Weichao; Voss, Joachim; Foell, Dirk; Gohar, Faekah; Ringold, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    (1) To compare sleep (nighttime sleep duration and sleep efficiency) and sleep fragmentation (movement and fragmentation index), as measured by actigraphy, and symptoms (pain and fatigue) in 8- to 14-year-old children with polyarticular and extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and (2) to examine the associations between sleep fragmentation (movement and fragmentation index) and the calcium-binding protein biomarkers S100A12 and myeloid-related protein (MRP8/14). Participants included 40 children with extended oligoarticular (n = 15) or polyarticular (n = 25) JIA and their parents. Serum protein samples were obtained during routine rheumatology clinic visits. Children completed the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale and daily pain and sleep diaries and wore actigraphy monitors for 9 consecutive days. Parents completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Of the 40 children, 68% scored above the CSHQ clinical cutoff score for sleep disturbances. Mean nighttime sleep duration was 7.5 hr, and mean sleep efficiency was 85.3%. Group differences were not found for nighttime sleep duration, sleep efficiency, movement and fragmentation index, or S100A12 and MRP8/14 protein concentrations. In a stepwise regression, medications, joint count, and movement and fragmentation index explained 21% of the variance in MRP8/14 concentration. Decreased nighttime sleep duration, poor sleep efficiency, and fragmented sleep were observed in our sample, regardless of JIA category. Sleep fragmentation was a significant predictor of MRP8/14 protein concentration. Additional research is needed to understand the interrelations among sleep fragmentation, effects of medication, and S100A12 and MRP8/14 protein biomarkers in JIA. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  2. Clinical Case of Tocilizumab Use in a Patient with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Y. M. Spivakovskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of using genetically engineered biopharmaceutical tocilizumab in a child with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. On the initial stage, the treatment was characterized by resistance to high doses of glucocorticoids and cytostatic drugs. Successful termination of visceral and articular manifestations of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and normalization of laboratory indicators of disease activity in the setting of use of interleukin 6 receptor blocker were described. We observed stable improvement of the child’s condition during a year-long follow-up in the setting of the selected anti-inflammatory therapy pattern. 

  3. 血清铁蛋白对幼年特发性关节炎全身型活动性及预后判断的价值%Value of serum ferritin in measuring the activation and prognosis in systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周怡芳; 李彩凤; 王江; 韩彤昕; 邝伟英; 邓江红; 张俊梅; 檀晓华

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究血清铁蛋白(SF)与全身型幼年特发性关节炎(SOJIA)疾病活动性是否相关,能否根据SF在SOJIA病程中的变化初步判断疾病活动性及预后.方法 选取2005年9月至2012年12月北京儿童医院风湿免疫科SOJIA患儿92例,其中合并巨噬细胞活化综合征(MAS)25例,多关节型幼年特发性关节炎(JIA)33例,少关节型JIA 30例.同时选取健康儿童47名及急性感染性疾病患儿30例分别作为正常对照组和感染对照组.用化学发光法分别对所有对象血样本进行SF检测.JIA各组及感染组同时检测白细胞、血红蛋白、血小板、C反应蛋白及红细胞沉降率.SOJIA缓解期复查上述指标.将结果进行统计学分析.结果 活动期SOJIA患儿SF水平(555±2037) g/L,明显高于正常对照组、感染对照组及其他类型JIA,均P<0.01;缓解期SF明显下降.并发MAS的SOJIA患儿SF水平为(12 707 ±6789) μg/L,显著高于未并发MAS的活动期SOJIA,差异有统计学意义.结论 SF水平与SOJIA活动性相关,对疾病活动性及预后判断有重要指导意义.%Objective To explore the correlation of serum ferritin (SF) and systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SOJIA) so as to determine the prognostic values of SF for SOJIA.Methods All samples were collected from 92 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients at Beijing Children's Hospital between February 2005 to September 2012.Their age range was 2-15 years.There were maerophage activation syndrome (MAS,n =25),polyartieular JIA (n =33) and oligoartieular JIA (n =30).And 47 healthy children and another 30 with acute infective diseases were selected as control groups respectively.Blood samples were collected and SF was measured in different disease phases.Other parameters include leucocyte,hemoglobin,platelet,C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate.Statistics of SF level at different groups as well as at different disease phases were performed.Results The SF level of

  4. One case report of systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with atlantoaxial subluxation as the initial manifesta-tion%以寰枢关节半脱位为首发表现的全身型幼年特发性关节炎1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林芝; 李志辉; 张翼; 张良; 寻劢

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨以寰枢关节半脱位为首发症状的全身型幼年特发性关节炎(SoJIA)临床特点。方法回顾性分析1例以寰枢关节半脱位为首发症状的SoJIA患儿的临床资料。结果患儿,男,9岁,以颈部活动障碍为首发症状,病程第3天出现发热,第23天病情迅速进展,红细胞、血小板、血红蛋白急剧下降,凝血功能障碍,双肺大量渗出;彩色超声示腹腔、胸腔、心包等多浆膜腔积液,根据2001年国际风湿病学会联盟修订标准,确诊SoJIA合并巨噬细胞活化综合征,予血液灌流、滤过,并予甲基泼尼松龙联合环孢素A治疗,病情缓解。结论对于无明显骨骼畸形或急性炎症等诱因情况而出现的自发性寰枢关节脱位伴全身症状的患儿,应警惕全身型幼年特发性关节炎可能。%Objective To explore the clinical features of systemic onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) with atlantoaxial subluxation as the initial manifestation. Methods The clinical data from one SoJIA patient with atlantoaxial subluxation as the initial manifestation were retrospectively analyzed. Results A 9-year-old boy presented the head and neck movement disorder as the ifrst symptom, developed fever on the third day, then rapidly progressed on 23rd day, with a sharp decline in red blood cell, platelet, and hemoglobin, blood coagulation dysfunction, and a large number of bilateral pulmonary exudation. Ultrasonography showed excess lfuid in abdomen, chest, and pericardium. According to the 2001 version of the revised International College of Rheumatology standard, the diagnosis of SoJIA combined macrophage activation syndrome was conifrmed. Then treated with hemoperfusion, ifltration, and methylprednisolone combined with cyclosporine A, the disease was in remission. Conclusion For children with spontaneous atlantoaxial subluxation accompanied by the systemic symptoms, with no obvious skeletal deformity or acute

  5. Ongoing disease activity and changing categories in a long-term nordic cohort study of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordal, Ellen; Zak, Marek; Aalto, Kristiina

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe disease characteristics, long-term course and outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in a population-based setting. METHODS: Consecutive cases of JIA from defined geographical areas of Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway with disease onset...... repeated visits with last visit more than seven years after disease onset (median 98 months, range 84-147). Changes in ILAR category occurred in 10.8% of the children, in addition to extended oligoarthritis developing in 34.8% of the oligoarticular group. Disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD......), including biologic medications, were used in 58.0% of the children during the observation period. Ongoing disease activity was mostly mild, but 22.9% developed some JIA-related damage. At the last follow-up, remission off medication was found in 42.4% of the children, 8.9% were in remission on medication...

  6. Case reports Juvenile idiopathic arthritis complicated by amyloidosis with secondary nephrotic syndrome – effective treatment with tocilizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kwiatkowska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A case report of a boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the age of 2 years, generalized onset, complicated by nephrotic syndrome due to secondary type A amyloidosis is presented. In the patient the disease had an especially severe course, complicated by frequent infections, making routine treatment difficult. Amyloidosis was diagnosed in the 5th year of the disease based on a rectal biopsy. Since the disease onset the boy has been taking prednisolone and sequentially cyclosporine A, methotrexate, chlorambucil, etanercept, and cyclophosphamide. Clinical and laboratory remission was observed after treatment with tocilizumab. After 42 months of treatment with tocilizumab the boy’s condition is good. There is no pain or joint edema, and no signs of nephrotic syndrome.

  7. Application of the Yamaguchi criteria for classification of “suspected” systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA

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    Kumar Sharath

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with sJIA may have a delayed onset of arthritis and so fail to fulfil the ILAR criteria for sJIA. This study was undertaken to determine whether the Yamaguchi criteria (for adult onset Still’s disease is useful in classification of children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA particularly in “pre-arthritic”, pure systemic, phase of the illness. A secondary objective was to determine the time delay between disease onset and onset of arthritis in our sJIA cohort. Methods Retrospective chart review all patients with a diagnosis of systemic juvenile arthritis in our department from Jan 1, 2004 to Jan 1, 2010. Results Twenty boys and eleven girls formed the study cohort. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with “suspected” sJIA due to typical systemic features but an absence of arthritis. Overall, the Yamaguchi criteria was fulfilled in a higher number of patients in the study (n=23 as compared to the ILAR criteria (n=18. Among the 13 “suspected” sJIA patients, 12 fulfilled the Yamaguchi criteria. Overall, either ILAR criteria or Yamaguchi criteria was fulfilled in 30 patients (96.8% of patients. The degree of association between the two criteria was poor (Phi coefficient = -0.352, p=0.05. Eleven out of eighteen patients with arthritis gave a history of delay in onset of arthritis (range=15 days to more than a year; median=30 days. Thus a total of 24 patients (75% had a delay in onset of arthritis at onset of disease. Conclusion Patients with sJIA can have a significant period during their course (particularly at onset when they do not have arthritis. The Yamaguchi criteria may be useful in this subset of patients in the “pre-arthritic” phase of the disease. Future criteria should incorporate the strengths of both, the Yamaguchi and the ILAR criteria.

  8. Are Bicipital Synovial Cysts in Children with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis still a Significant Clinical Challenge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvsgaard, Nini; Herlin, Troels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large synovial cysts are rarely seen in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. When they do appear, they usually appear in the popliteal space (Baker’s cyst). Less commonly, they occur in the antecubital area or as bicipital synovial cysts. Bicipital synovial cysts present as a sudden...

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, Otto; van Brussel, Marco; Takken, Tim; van Weert, Ellen; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Armbrust, Wineke

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and to assess associations between disease-related variables and aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity. METHODS: Of 25 p

  10. Early predictors of prognosis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijkhuizen, E. H. Pieter; Wulffraat, NM

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is subdivided into seven categories. Even within these categories, the prognosis varies markedly. To start appropriate treatment in patients with JIA and to inform patients and their parents correctly, it is essential to know the individual prognosis, p

  11. Depression, anxiety and pain in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetić, Branimir; Aukst-Margetić, Branka; Bilić, Ernest; Jelusić, Marija; Tambić Bukovac, Lana

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess relations among depression, anxiety and pain in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Pain was measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS), and depression and anxiety with depression and anxiety subscales from the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSC-C). Pain perception was significantly correlated with depression scores.

  12. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis.

  13. Delayed clinical response in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with etanercept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Marieke H; Prince, Femke H M; Twilt, Marinka; van Rossum, Marion A J; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Koopman-Keemink, Yvonne; Wulffraat, Nico M; Gorter, Simone L; Ten Cate, Rebecca; van Suijlekom-Smit, Lisette W A

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate response in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who failed to meet response criteria after 3 months of etanercept treatment. METHODS: This was a prospective ongoing multicenter observational study of all Dutch patients with JIA using etanercept. Response accordin

  14. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and juvenile idiopathic arthritis: is there an association with disease activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    To examine the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), to determine the prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency [25(OH)D=19 ng/ml] and insufficiency [25(OH)D 20-29 ng/ml], and to determine factors associated with ...

  15. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part I: Clinical classifications and radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals at the developmental age. Radiography is the primary modality employed in the diagnostic imaging in order to identify changes typical of this disease entity and rule out other bone-related pathologies, such as neoplasms, posttraumatic changes, developmental defects and other forms of arthritis. The standard procedure involves the performance of comparative joint radiographs in two planes. Radiographic changes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis are detected in later stages of the disease. Bone structures are assessed in the first place. Radiographs can also indirectly indicate the presence of soft tissue inflammation (i.e. in joint cavities, sheaths and bursae) based on swelling and increased density of the soft tissue as well as dislocation of fat folds. Signs of articular cartilage defects are also seen in radiographs indirectly - based on joint space width changes. The first part of the publication presents the classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and discusses its radiographic images. The authors list the affected joints as well as explain the spectrum and specificity of radiographic signs resulting from inflammatory changes overlapping with those caused by the maturation of the skeletal system. Moreover, certain dilemmas associated with the monitoring of the disease are reviewed. The second part of the publication will explain issues associated with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, which are more and more commonly applied in juvenile idiopathic arthritis for early detection of pathological features as well as the disease complications.

  16. The evaluation of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients : are current ophthalmologic screening guidelines adequate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reininga, J K; Los, L I; Wulffraat, N M; Armbrust, W

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine in our juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) population: 1) the prevalence and characteristics of uveitis, 2) the complications and outcome of uveitis, 3) prognostic factors, and 4) the adequacy of the current ophthalmologic screening guidelines. METHOD

  17. The clinical course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis in childhood and puberty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Maretta; Ayuso, Viera Kalinina; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Los, Leonoor I.; Rothova, Aniki; de Boer, Joke H.

    2012-01-01

    Aim The long-term course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis is not known yet. This study investigates the course and activity of JIA-associated uveitis in childhood and puberty. Design Retrospective study of the clinical data of 62 JIA patients with uveitis. The main outcome m

  18. Uveitis in childhood : Complications and treatment with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the development of complications in childhood uveitis and to evaluate the treatment options for these mostly sight-threatening conditions with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. The second aim was to investigate whi

  19. The clinical course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis in childhood and puberty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeve, Maretta; Ayuso, Viera Kalinina; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Los, Leonoor I.; Rothova, Aniki; de Boer, Joke H.

    2012-01-01

    Aim The long-term course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis is not known yet. This study investigates the course and activity of JIA-associated uveitis in childhood and puberty. Design Retrospective study of the clinical data of 62 JIA patients with uveitis. The main outcome m

  20. Uveitis in childhood : Complications and treatment with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the development of complications in childhood uveitis and to evaluate the treatment options for these mostly sight-threatening conditions with emphasis on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. The second aim was to investigate whi

  1. The evaluation of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients : are current ophthalmologic screening guidelines adequate?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reininga, J K; Los, L I; Wulffraat, N M; Armbrust, W

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine in our juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) population: 1) the prevalence and characteristics of uveitis, 2) the complications and outcome of uveitis, 3) prognostic factors, and 4) the adequacy of the current ophthalmologic screening guidelines. METHOD

  2. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part I: Clinical classifications and radiographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals at the developmental age. Radiography is the primary modality employed in the diagnostic imaging in order to identify changes typical of this disease entity and rule out other bone-related pathologies, such as neoplasms, posttraumatic changes, developmental defects and other forms of arthritis. The standard procedure involves the performance of comparative joint radiographs in two planes. Radiographic changes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis are detected in later stages of the disease. Bone structures are assessed in the first place. Radiographs can also indirectly indicate the presence of soft tissue inflammation (i.e. in joint cavities, sheaths and bursae based on swelling and increased density of the soft tissue as well as dislocation of fat folds. Signs of articular cartilage defects are also seen in radiographs indirectly – based on joint space width changes. The first part of the publication presents the classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and discusses its radiographic images. The authors list the affected joints as well as explain the spectrum and specificity of radiographic signs resulting from inflammatory changes overlapping with those caused by the maturation of the skeletal system. Moreover, certain dilemmas associated with the monitoring of the disease are reviewed. The second part of the publication will explain issues associated with ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, which are more and more commonly applied in juvenile idiopathic arthritis for early detection of pathological features as well as the disease complications.

  3. An evaluation of dry eye symptoms and signs in a cohort of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisu M Kotaniemi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaisu M Kotaniemi1, Pirjo M Salomaa1, Kristiina Sihto-Kauppi1, Hanna M Säilä2, Markku J Kauppi31Department of Ophthalmology;2Pediatric Rheumatology;3Rheumatology, Rheumatism Foundation Hospital, Heinola, FinlandObjective: To determine the prevalence of dry eye symptoms and signs in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA.Patients and methods: A total of 192 children with JIA: 48 oligo-, 39 extended oligo-, 79 polyarthritis, and 26 with other types of arthritis (eight juvenile spondyloarthritis, five juvenile psoriatic arthritis, three mixed connective tissue diseases, two systemic onset arthritis, and eight undetermined arthritis were interviewed for dry eye symptoms and tested with Schirmer test with anesthetic. Two thirds of the patients were female and the mean age of the patients was 13.1 years (range 10–16 and the mean duration of arthritis was six years (SD 4, 4. Thirty-one percent of the patients had a history of uveitis. Dry eye was defined as Schirmer test score ≤5 mm in five minutes. The type of arthritis, a history of uveitis, and the ocular and systemic medication used were evaluated for their correlation with dry eye symptoms and signs by using chi-square tests and the Mann–Whitney Monte Carlo analysis.Results: Altogether 17% of this cohort had decreased basal tear secretion. The most common symptoms of dry eye were discharge secretion, itching, and watering. The intensity of symptoms and signs did not correlate. The type of arthritis, a history or presence of uveitis, and the medication used did not correlate with the occurrence of dry eyes.Conclusion: Dry eye symptoms and signs are common in JIA, and Schirmer test with anesthetic is a useful tool in evaluating these patients.Keywords: dry eyes, Schirmer test, juvenile idiopathic arthritis

  4. Differential cytokine profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes revealed by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ham, Henk-Jan; de Jager, Wilco; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Prakken, Berent J; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-08-01

    With the introduction of high-throughput biomarker measurements, traditional analysis of these markers is increasingly difficult. Using samples from a diverse group of patients, we tested the applicability of cluster analysis to these data. Using this method, we aim to visualize some of the patterns specific to certain disease groups. In particular, we focus on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), a multifactorial autoimmune disorder that ultimately leads to chronic inflammation of the joints. Cytokine measurements were performed using multiplex immunoassays. Using heuristic clustering methods, we set out to compare the pattern of 30 cytokines in plasma and SF of JIA, RA, OA, or diabetes type II patients and healthy controls. Analysis shows that oligo- and polyarticular JIA have similar biomarker profiles, both in plasma and SF. Systemic onset JIA (SoJIA) has a profile distinct from other JIA subtypes, suggesting that they involve different inflammatory processes. SoJIA samples do, however, cluster together with RA in SF, suggesting that these two conditions have similar cytokine profiles. Furthermore, we identify several clusters of ILs and chemokines that are co-expressed, suggesting that they are co-regulated. We show that previously undetected clusters of cytokines and patients can be identified by applying cluster analysis to multiplex data. Cytokine clusters identified in plasma and SF samples were quite different, which underscore the differential cytokine signalling in these two compartments, and suggest that plasma samples may not be suitable for estimating joint biomarker profiles and inflammation.

  5. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamooda, Mohamed; Fouad, Hala; Galal, Nermeen; Sewelam, Nadia; Megahed, Dina

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of present study was to access the prevalence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), and to investigate the clinical significance and diagnostic value of the anti-CCP antibodies in correlation with age, sex & activity. This case-control study was performed on 50 patients with JIA in addition to 40 sex and age-matched children as a control group. The participants were recruited from rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Cairo University Specialized Pediatric Hospital. Patients were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, routine laboratory investigations and x-rays on involved joints. Both patients and controls underwent assay of anti-CCP antibodies by AxSYM Anti-CCP IgG Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay (MEIA) which is a semi-quantitative determination of the IgG class of autoantibodies specific to cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) in patients' serum or plasma. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, ANOVA, and independent-samples t-test by SPSS version 15. Anti-CCP positivity was identified amongst patients with JIA, particularly those JIA patients experiencing RF positive polyarticular disease onset. Above all, it is important that anti-CCP positivity and bone erosions, degree of joint damage, and ESR levels were significantly correlated. Anti-CCP could be utilized as a valuable marker in the polyarticular form of JIA to direct early, and could be aggressive therapeutic intervention.

  6. Effectiveness and safety of TNF inhibitors in adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McErlane, Flora; Foster, Helen E; Lunt, Mark; Watson, Kath D; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) continue to have active disease into adulthood. Adults with JIA are a heterogeneous group, and the effects of tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapies are not well described. This analysis aims to describe treatment outcomes among patients with JIA starting TNFi for the first time in adulthood. Methods Patients with arthritis onset polyarticular JIA were compared with a cohort (weighted for age and gender) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results In 443 adults with JIA starting a first TNFi, disease activity over 1 year improved across all measures. There were 58 first serious infections (IR 22.3/1000 pyrs); 4 cardiovascular events (IR 1.4/1000 pyrs); 11 uveitis events (IR 4.0/1000 pyrs) and 16 malignancies (IR 3.9/1000 pyrs). Compared with the weighted RA cohort, disease activity improvement was similar; malignancy rates were lower and uveitis rates much higher. While crude IR were similar, JIA patients had a lower risk of serious infection (HR 0.5 (95% CI 0.3 to 0.9)). Conclusions This is the largest study to describe disease activity and safety outcomes in adults with JIA receiving TNFi. Disease activity improved after 1 year in all disease patterns, suggesting TNFi is an effective therapy in this population. PMID:27843575

  7. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamooda, Mohamed; Fouad, Hala; Galal, Nermeen; Sewelam, Nadia; Megahed, Dina

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of present study was to access the prevalence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), and to investigate the clinical significance and diagnostic value of the anti-CCP antibodies in correlation with age, sex & activity. Methods This case-control study was performed on 50 patients with JIA in addition to 40 sex and age-matched children as a control group. The participants were recruited from rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Cairo University Specialized Pediatric Hospital. Patients were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, routine laboratory investigations and x-rays on involved joints. Both patients and controls underwent assay of anti-CCP antibodies by AxSYM Anti-CCP IgG Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay (MEIA) which is a semi-quantitative determination of the IgG class of autoantibodies specific to cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) in patients’ serum or plasma. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, ANOVA, and independent-samples t-test by SPSS version 15. Results Anti-CCP positivity was identified amongst patients with JIA, particularly those JIA patients experiencing RF positive polyarticular disease onset. Above all, it is important that anti-CCP positivity and bone erosions, degree of joint damage, and ESR levels were significantly correlated. Conclusion Anti-CCP could be utilized as a valuable marker in the polyarticular form of JIA to direct early, and could be aggressive therapeutic intervention. PMID:27790341

  8. The early magnetic resonance imaging features of the knee in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Karl; Wittkop, Berndt; Haigh, Fiona; Ryder, Clive; Gardner-Medwin, Janet M

    2002-06-01

    AIMS: Early diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) facilitates earlier more aggressive therapy, and improved outcome. Recognition of the features of early, untreated JIA on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will improve disease detection and expedite treatment. This study aims to highlight the relevant MRI features. METHODS: MRI examinations of the knee joint were performed on 11 children with clinically confirmed, early, untreated JIA. The MRI images were obtained at a mean of 2 months after symptom onset and independently evaluated by two consultant paediatric radiologists. RESULTS: Abnormalities were found on all MRI examinations. Synovial hypertrophy, joint effusions, popliteal lymph nodes and soft tissue swelling were present in all patients. Gadolinium DTPA enhancement improved the detection of synovial hyperplasia. Metaphyseal splaying and condylar overgrowth were seen in five cases (41%), oedema of the lateral collateral ligament in two cases (18%) and superficial cartilage thinning in one case. Bony erosions and deep cartilage destruction were not demonstrated. CONCLUSION: MRI of the knee joint identifies early joint changes which are distinct from those in later disease. The presence of these features should alert the radiologist to the possible diagnosis of JIA and post gadolinium DTPA sequences should be performed. Gadolinium DPTA enhancement increases the sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory changes in JIA. Johnson, K. et al. (2002)

  9. PHARMACOECONOMIC ISSUES OF ADALIMUMAB THERAPY IN JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Simpson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common type of arthritis in children and is associated with reduced quality of life and increased health care costs. Objective. To evaluate the cost effectiveness of the tumour necrosis factor inhibitor adalimumab (ADA vs. non-biologic therapy for the treatment of JIA in Russian children and adolescents. Materials and Methods. A Markov model was developed on the basis of the DE038 clinical trial, which compared ADA plus methotrexate (MTX vs. placebo plus MTX for the treatment of JIA in children aged 4–17 years. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed from the standpoint of the Russian health care system and society as a whole. Base case analyses followed 11-year-old patients with JIA for a period of 7 years (until the age of 18 years or over an expected lifetime. Additional analyses followed patients aged 7 years at treatment initiation for a period of 11 years or over a simulated lifetime. The cost of treating severe JIA was assumed to be the same as reported in a published investigation. The cost of ADA therapy was based on the expected cost assuming inclusion in the List of Vital and Essential Medicinal Products. This took into account the Value Added Tax and a 10% trade mark-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Results and Discussion. Over a 7-year time horizon, the incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR for ADA vs. conventional nonbiologic therapy in the treatment of JIA in 11-year-old patients was 1,571,500 roubles/QALY when using a health care system perspective and 1,515,000 roubles/QALY when using a societal perspective. Over a simulated patient lifetime, the corresponding ICURs were 286,300 roubles/QALY and 275,300 roubles/QALY, respectively. Over an 11-year time horizon, the ICUR for ADA vs. conventional non-biologic therapy in the treatment of JIA in patients aged 7 years at the start of therapy was 852,400 roubles/QALY when

  10. Juvenile onset ankylosing spondylitis with ankylosing tarsitis: a rare combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, A B; Hasan, S A; Abdullah, A M; Azad, S A; Khan, E H; Khasru, M R

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is the most common whereas ankylosing tarsitis is the least common subgroup of juvenile onset spondyloarthritides. In our recent study a male presented with ankle joint pain and swelling with limited movements and characteristic radiological changes including; periarticular swelling, thickened heel pad, hyperostosis and reduced ankle, calcaneo-cuboid and talo-navicular joint space for ankylosing tarsitis. He also had persistent inflammatory low back pain with radiological sacroilitis satisfying the clinical features for ankylosing spondylitis. The patient was treated with different anti-inflammatory agents including intra-articular methyl-prednisolone with short-term relief. Associated back pain was improved with spine mobilizing exercise.

  11. The Pattern of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in a Single Tertiary Center in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Al-Hemairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most common chronic arthritis in children. Our aim is to describe demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics and treatment of JIA patients followed up in Pediatric Rheumatology clinic in a tertiary center in Saudi Arabia. Methods. Medical records of all patients who are followed up between January 2007 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected about demographic, clinical, and laboratory features and treatment. Results. Total patients were 82, males were 31 (37.8%, and mean age of JIA onset was 7.1 ± 3.6 yr. Mean follow-up duration was 2.67±1.6 yr. Systemic onset JIA (SoJIA was the commonest (36.5%, followed by polyarticular in 29.2% and oligoarticular in 28%. Large and small joints are involved in 76 (92% and 30 (36.6%, respectively. Main extra-articular feature was fever in 34 (41.4%. Uveitis was diagnosed in 7 (8.5% and in 5 (21.7% of oligoarticular JIA. Anemia was found in 49 (59.7%, high ESR in 45 (54.8%, and leukocytosis and thrombocytosis in 33 (40.2%. Positive ANA was found in 30 (36.5% mainly in oligoarticular subtype as 12 (52% patients (out of 23 had this positive test. 9 patients (10.9% required NSAIDs only, 6 patients (7.3% required NSAIDs and intra-articular steroids only, and 19 (23% required NSAIDs, methotrexate, steroids, and biologics. Conclusion. SoJIA is the most common JIA subtype in our study. A population based rather than a single center study will give more details about JIA characteristics in Saudi Arabia

  12. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  13. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatovic, M.; Heijstek, M.W.; Verkaaik, M.; Dijkhuizen, E.H. van; Armbrust, W.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Kamphuis, S.; Kuis, W.; Egberts, T.C.; Sinnema, G.; Rademaker, C.M.A.; Wulffraat, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  14. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatović, Maja; Heijstek, Marloes W; Verkaaik, Marleen; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Kuis, Wietse; Egberts, Toine C G; Sinnema, Gerben; Rademaker, Carin M A; Wulffraat, Nico M

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  15. Predictors of poor response to methotrexate in polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis: analysis of the PRINTO methotrexate trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilca, I.; Munitis, P.G.; Pistorio, A.; Ravelli, A.; Buoncompagni, A.; Bica, B.; Campos, L.; Häfner, R.; Hofer, M.; Ozen, S.; Huemer, C.; Bae, S.C.; Sztajnbok, F.; Arguedas, O.; Foeldvari, I.; Huppertz, H.I.; Gamir, M.L.; Magnusson, B.; Dressler, F.; Uziel, Y.; van Rossum, M.A.J.; Hollingworth, P.; Cawkwell, G.; Martini, A.; Ruperto, N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether baseline demographic, clinical, articular and laboratory variables predict methotrexate (MTX) poor response in polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Methods Patients newly treated for 6 months with MTX enrolled in the Paediatric Rheumatology Internationa

  16. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  17. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): a screening study to measure class II skeletal pattern, TMJ PDS and use of systemic corticosteroids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mandall, Nicky A

    2010-03-01

    To screen patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) to determine (i) the severity of their class II skeletal pattern; (ii) temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms and (iii) use of systemic corticosteroids.

  18. Síndrome de ativação macrofágica associada com artrite idiopática juvenil sistêmica Macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Artur A. Silva

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as características da síndrome de ativação macrofágica associada a artrite idiopática juvenil. DESCRIÇÃO DOS CASOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente os prontuários de 462 pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. Destes, sete (1,5% pacientes desenvolveram síndrome de ativação macrofágica; todos tinham a forma sistêmica da doença. A mediana de idade de início da artrite idiopática juvenil foi de 3 anos e 10 meses, e a mediana do tempo de duração da artrite idiopática juvenil antes da síndrome de ativação macrofágica foi de 8 anos e 4 meses. Todos os pacientes apresentaram febre, icterícia, hepatoesplenomegalia, sangramentos, pancitopenia e elevação das enzimas hepáticas e dos tempos de coagulação e bilirrubina direta. Três casos apresentaram infecções associadas e um caso desenvolveu a síndrome de ativação macrofágica 2 semanas após a introdução de sulfasalazina. Três pacientes morreram. Proliferação macrofágica e hemofagocitose foram evidenciadas em cinco. A terapêutica da síndrome de ativação macrofágica incluiu pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona em todos, ciclosporina em três, plasmaférese em dois e gamaglobulina endovenosa em dois. COMENTÁRIOS: A síndrome de ativação macrofágica é uma complicação da artrite idiopática juvenil sistêmica com alta morbidade e mortalidade.OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of macrophage activation syndrome associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. DESCRIPTION: This is a retrospective study involving 462 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Seven (1.5% of those patients suffered from systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis and developed macrophage activation syndrome. The median age of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis onset was 3 years and 10 months and the median duration of juvenile idiopathic arthritis before macrophage activation syndrome was 8 years and 4 months. All of them presented with fever

  19. Therapy progress of juvenile idiopathic arthritis%幼年特发性关节炎的治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光陵; 茅松

    2013-01-01

    幼年特发性关节炎是小儿最常见的慢性风湿免疫性疾病,起病方式不同,临床表现各异,预后较差.有关幼年特发性关节炎的研究已成为近年来结缔组织病的重要研究课题,并且随着医疗水平的提高,对于该病治疗的研究越来越多.%Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic imnuro-rheumatic disease in children with different type of onset and varies clinical manifestation as well as poor prognosis.The research on the JIA have become the important subject of the connective disease.This paper has reviewed the different therapeutic methods of JIA.

  20. What does it mean to grow up with juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Allied Health Professionals in Rheumatology (AHP) Abstracts 27. Paediatric rheumatology EULAR2010-AHP-2198 WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO GROW UP WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS? D. Hilderson 1, 2,*, L. Eyckmans 1, R. Westhovens 3, C. Wouters 4, P. Moons 2 1Department of Paediatrics, 3Rheumatology, Department of Musculoskeletal Sciences, 4Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, 2Centre for Health Services and Nursing Research, Katholieke Universiteit ...

  1. TOTAL JOINT REPLACEMENT OF THE LOWER EXTREMITY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Стюарт Б. Гудмэн

    2014-01-01

    Joint replacement of the lower extremity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is becoming more commonly performed worldwide. These young adults experience severe pain and disability from end-stage arthritis, and require joint replacement of the hip or knee to alleviate pain, and restore ambulation and function. These procedures are very challenging from the anesthesia and surgical point of view, due to small overall proportions, numerous bony and other deformities and soft tissue contractur...

  2. [Two pairs of brothers with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina M V; Rios, Gabriela; Castro, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in two pairs of brothers followed in the department of pediatric rheumatology, Universidade Federal da Bahia. Genetic involvement in JIA pathogenesis is clear and the risk of recurrence among siblings supports this contribution. An important landmark of this discovery involves the acknowledgment of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism contribution to JIA development susceptibility. Despite many advances, the numerous available studies cannot explain several implicit mechanisms in JIA pathogenesis yet.

  3. Emotion Regulation Predicts Pain and Functioning in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: An Electronic Diary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Connelly, Mark; Bromberg, Maggie H.; Anthony, Kelly K.; Gil, Karen M.; Franks, Lindsey; Schanberg, Laura E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study utilized e-diaries to evaluate whether components of emotion regulation predict daily pain and function in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods 43 children ages 8–17 years and their caregivers provided baseline reports of child emotion regulation. Children then completed thrice daily e-diary assessments of emotion, pain, and activity involvement for 28 days. E-diary ratings of negative and positive emotions were used to calculate emotion variability...

  4. POSSIBLE PARENTERAL METHOTREXATE APPLICATION IN THE TREATMENT OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. М. Spivakovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a case of using methotrexate for subcutaneous injection in a rated dose of 12.5 mg / m2 of body surface per week when treating a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. When switching to the parenteral route of administration, methotrexate ensured the development of joint syndrome remission, normalization of laboratory indices of disease activity, and improvement of joint functions. After 6 months the inactive disease stage was detected, and after 12 months — remission.

  5. Overlapping juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bazsó, Anna; Sevcic, Krisztina; Orbán, Ilonka; Poór, Gyula; Balogh, Zsolt; Kiss, Emese

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hereby, we report the case of a 12-year-old girl developing oligoarthritis and progressing into a polyarticular form. Rheumatoid factor was positive, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was diagnosed. After a poor response to DMARDs, an anti-TNF agent (infliximab) was initiated, but to be discontinued due to an allergic reaction. The same complication was observed with the fully human derivative, adalimumab. At the age of 22, the patient presented septicemia with sever...

  6. Variables with prognostic value in the onset of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Amaro Bogaz; André Souza de Albuquerque Maranhão; Daniel Paganini Inoue; Flavia Alencar de Barros Suzuki; Norma de Oliveira Penido

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The establishment of an individualized prognostic evaluation in patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) remains a difficult and imprecise task, due mostly to the variety of etiologies. Determining which variables have prognostic value in the initial assessment of the patient would be extremely useful in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To establish which variables identifiable at the onset of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hear...

  7. MRI assessment of tenosynovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: inter- and intra-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambot, Karen; Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Damasio, Maria Beatrice [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Desgranges, Marie; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Quartier, Pierre [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Immunology, Hematology and Rheumatology, APHP French Reference Center ' ' Arthrites juveniles' ' , Paris (France); Malattia, Clara [University of Genoa, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Paediatrics, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Elie, Caroline [Paris Descartes University, Department of Biostatistics, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    There is sparse knowledge about grading tenosynovitis using MRI. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a tenosynovitis MRI scoring system in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and wrist involvement were enrolled in two paediatric centres, from October 2006 to January 2010. The extensor (compartments II, IV and VI) and flexor tendons were assessed for the presence of tenosynovitis on T1-weighted postcontrast fat-saturated MR images and were scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (moderate to severe) by two observers independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement was assessed. Ninety children (age range: 5-18.5 years) were included, of whom 34 had tenosynovitis involving extensors and 28 had tenosynovitis involving flexors. A total of 360 tendon areas were analysed, of which 114 had tenosynovitis (86/270 extensors and 28/90 flexors). Intra-reader 1 agreement was excellent for the extensors (k = 0.82-0.91) and for the flexors (k = 0.85); intra-reader 2 agreement was moderate to good for the extensors (k = 0.51-0.72) and good for the flexors (k = 0.64). Inter-reader agreement was good for the extensors (k = 0.69-0.73) and moderate for the flexors (k = 0.49). The proposed MRI scoring system for the assessment of wrist tenosynovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis appears feasible with an observer agreement sufficient for clinical use. (orig.)

  8. Macrophage activation syndrome in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytaç, Selin; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Ünal, Şule; Bilginer, Yelda; Çetin, Mualla; Tuncer, Murat; Gümrük, Fatma; Özen, Seza

    2016-10-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a hyper-inflammatory disorder secondary to a rheumatic disease such as systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to present the characteristics of our pediatric MAS patients. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, treatment, and outcome of 34 patients (28 SJIA; six SLE; 37 MAS episodes) followed at a tertiary health center between 2009 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age at MAS onset was 11 years. More SJIA patients had MAS at disease onset than SLE patients (53.6 vs. 16.7 %). Fever, high C-reactive protein and hyperferritinemia were present in all MAS episodes. Rash was less (p = 0.03), and fatigue was more frequent (p = 0.042) in SLE than SJIA patients. All received corticosteroids. Cyclosporine was given in 74.2 % of SJIA-MAS; 66.7 % of SLE-MAS episodes. Intravenous immunoglobulin, anakinra, or etoposide was administered during 67.7; 41.9; 32.3 % of SJIA-MAS and 33.3; 33.3; 50 % of SLE-MAS episodes, respectively. Plasmapheresis was performed during 41.9 % of SJIA-MAS and 33.3 % of SLE-MAS episodes. The mortality rate was 11.8 % (n = 4;3 SJIA, 1 SLE). Hepatosplenomegaly was more frequent (p = 0.005), and plasmapheresis was performed more frequently (p = 0.021) in the patients who died compared to the cured patients. The median duration between symptom onset and admission to our hospital was longer among the patients who died (16.5 vs. 7 days; p = 0.049). Our patients' characteristics were similar to the reported cases, but our mortality rate is slightly higher probably due to late referral to our center. Early diagnosis and effective treatment are crucial to prevent mortality.

  9. [Three cases with familial Mediterranean fever misdiagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Zhang, Y; Wang, W; Zhong, L Q; Song, H M

    2017-05-04

    Objective: To explore the key points of diagnosis and treatment of familial Mediterranean fever(FMF). Method: The clinical data of 3 cases with FMF misdiagnosed as Juvenile idiopathic arthritis(JIA)seen from January 2014 to June 2016 in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were retrospectively collected. The clinical manifestations, gene mutation characteristics, treatment and prognosis were also evaluated. Result: Two cases were male and 1 was female. The mean age of onset was 17 months (3 months to 36 months), while the average age of diagnosis was 6 years and 8 months (24 months to 11 years). All the 3 cases presented with periodic fever, red rash and arthritis.Two of them suffered from anemia, 2 of them showed lymphadenopathy, and 1 of them presented with hepatosplenomegaly. All of the 3 cases were diagnosed as JIA by excluding infectious diseases and neoplastic diseases and respondiug poorly to anti-infection treatment, but they benefitted little from glucocorticoids and a variety of immunosuppressive therapy. The mutations of MEFV gene were found in 3 cases by gene detection, and all of them were complex heterozygous mutations. Four reported pathogenic mutations were found: R202Q, E148Q, L110P, P369S. All the 3 cases are currently receiving oral colchicine (in accordance with the initial dose of children under the age of 5 recommended ≤ 0.5 mg/d, 5 to 10 years old children 0.5-1.0 mg/d, 10 years old children and older children 1.0-1.5 mg / d) , and the symptoms were significantly improved. Conclusion: The familial Mediterranean fever can be characterized by repeated remittent fever, red rash, arthritis, and is easy to be confused with JIA in clinical manifestation.In this paper, 3 cases were diagnosed as complex heterozygous MEFV gene mutation by gene analysis.During the 6 months follow-up, all of the 3 patients responded well to colchicine.

  10. B-cell Lineage Study in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Asgarian-Omran

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common rheumatic disease in children. The exact causes of disease are still poorly understood. It seems that B cells have several functions in JIA, including production of autoantibodies, antigen presentation, production of cytokines, and activation of T cells. Here, we aimed to evaluate B-cell lineage and its precursors in the bone marrow of patients with JIA. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with JIA were enrolled in this study. JIA is subdivided into three groups of Pauciarticular, Polyarticular, and Systemic JIA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were separated. Then we analyzed the immunophenotype of the JIA patients by flow cytometry. After separation, the mononuclear cells were stained specific for B cell lineage [CD10, CD19 and CD20], T cell lineage [CD3] and non specific lineage [CD34, HLA-DR and TdT]. Findings: Flow cytometric study of bone marrow showed that JIA patients had low level of CD10, CD19, and CD20. Polyarticular patients had lower level of D10, CD19, and CD20 than pauciarticular JIA patients and systemic onset JIA patients had lower levels than both of them. Conclusion: Decreasing of B cell precursor in bone marrow is one of mechanisms for pathogenesis of JIA and the more decreased B cell precursors in bone marrow are, the worst severity of the disease is. Significant differences in CD10 content of bone marrow were detected between the polyarticular and pauciarticular groups.So, it seems that polyarticular JIA patients had lower percentage of pre B cell stage.

  11. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAJAFI, Mohammad Reza; NAJAFI, Mohammad Amin; SAFAEI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients’ demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. Materials & Methods From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. Results JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). Conclusion A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME. PMID:27247579

  12. Association of Family History of Epilepsy with Earlier Age Onset of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Safaei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is supposedly the most frequent subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of JME and comparison of patients' demographics as well as timeline of the disease between positive family history epileptic patients (PFHE) and negative family history epileptic patients (NFHE) among sample of Iranian epileptic patients. From Feb. 2006 to Oct. 2009, 1915 definite epileptic patients (873 females) referred to epilepsy clinics in Isfahan, central Iran, were surveyed and among them, 194 JME patients were diagnosed. JME was diagnosed by its specific clinical and EEG criteria. Patients were divided into two groups as PFHE and NFHE and data were compared between them. JME was responsible for 10% (194 patients) of all types of epilepsies. Of JME patients, 53% were female. In terms of family history of epilepsy, 40% were positive. No significant differences was found between PFHE and NFHE groups as for gender (P>0.05). Age of epilepsy onset was significantly earlier in PFHE patients (15 vs. 22 yr, P<0.001). Occurrence of JME before 18 yr old among PFHE patients was significantly higher (OR=2.356, P=0.007). A family history of epilepsy might be associated with an earlier age of onset in patients with JME.

  13. A case of adult onset disseminated juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havva Hilal Ayvaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JX is a rare, benign, non-Langerhans histiocytic proliferative disease that etiology is unknown. It is usually seen in children and infants. JX in adult is very rare. A 41-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with papules on her face, torso and extremities. A few lesions had occured 3 years ago on her face, they disseminated all over her body after having a traffic accident one year ago which for she had operations and she also concurrently was diagnosed asdiabetes mellitus (DM. Based on clinical and histopathological findings, the diagnosis of JX was made. There is no systemic involvement of JX detected. JX seen in adults are very rare and usually associated with hematological malignancy. The present case is a rare adult onset disseminated JX case without malignancy

  14. Validation and clinical significance of the childhood myositis assessment scale for assessment of muscle function in the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, AM; Feldman, BM; Rennebohm, RM; Hicks, JE; Lindsley, CB; Perez, MD; Zemel, LS; Wallace, CA; Ballinger, SH; Passo, MH; Reed, AM; Summers, RM; Katona, IM; Miller, FW; Lachenbruch, PA; Rider, LG; White, P.H.

    Objective. To examine the measurement characteristics of the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) in children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (juvenile IIM), and to obtain preliminary data on the clinical significance of CMAS scores. Methods. One hundred eight children with

  15. Prospective Prediction of Juvenile Homicide/Attempted Homicide among Early-Onset Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglivio, Michael T.; Wolff, Kevin T.

    2017-01-01

    While homicide perpetrated by juveniles is a relatively rare occurrence, between 2010 and 2014, approximately 7%–8% of all murders involved a juvenile offender. Unfortunately, few studies have prospectively examined the predictors of homicide offending, with none examining first-time murder among a sample of adjudicated male and female youth. The current study employed data on 5908 juvenile offenders (70% male, 45% Black) first arrested at the age of 12 or younger to prospectively examine predictors of an arrest for homicide/attempted homicide by the age of 18. Among these early-onset offenders, males, Black youth, those living in households with family members with a history of mental illness, those engaging in self-mutilation, and those with elevated levels of anger/aggression (all measured by age 13) were more likely to be arrested for homicide/attempted homicide by age 18. These findings add to the scant scientific literature on the predictors of homicide, and illustrate potential avenues for intervention. PMID:28212340

  16. Prospective Prediction of Juvenile Homicide/Attempted Homicide among Early-Onset Juvenile Offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Baglivio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While homicide perpetrated by juveniles is a relatively rare occurrence, between 2010 and 2014, approximately 7%–8% of all murders involved a juvenile offender. Unfortunately, few studies have prospectively examined the predictors of homicide offending, with none examining first-time murder among a sample of adjudicated male and female youth. The current study employed data on 5908 juvenile offenders (70% male, 45% Black first arrested at the age of 12 or younger to prospectively examine predictors of an arrest for homicide/attempted homicide by the age of 18. Among these early-onset offenders, males, Black youth, those living in households with family members with a history of mental illness, those engaging in self-mutilation, and those with elevated levels of anger/aggression (all measured by age 13 were more likely to be arrested for homicide/attempted homicide by age 18. These findings add to the scant scientific literature on the predictors of homicide, and illustrate potential avenues for intervention.

  17. 幼年特发性关节炎全身型反复发作患儿临床特点及治疗探讨%The exploration of the clinical features and treatments of children's recurrent systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    狄亚珍; 吴菱; 李蕴言; 马田瑞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features and treatments of children's recurrent systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SOJIA). Methods To retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 27 cases of children with SOJIA, which were divided into two groups. The non-recurrent SOJIA children were referred to as A group, and the recurrent SOJIA children were referred to as B group. The therapy of hormones in combination with methotrexate (MTX) was as the basic program. Follow up of A and B group more than 1 year. Results Before treatment, the incidence of serous effusion B group (100%) was significantly higher than A group (33.3%), the difference of the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). Before treatment and after 3 weeks treatment, among the laboratory parameters of IgM, SF, NT-pro BNT, CK of A, B groups were statistically significant (P<0.05); the difference of B groups were significantly higher than A group (t=2.83-7.23, All P<0.05). The application rate of MTX, the proportion of following of the principle of the withdrawal and reduction of hormones and MTX were statistically significant (Both P<0.05). Conclusions Serous effusion, the high levels of IgM, SF, NT-proBNT、 CK of peripheral blood, use of hormones alone, and too short treatment of combation drugs may be the reason of the recurrent attacks of SOJIA.%目的 探讨幼年特发性关节炎全身型 (SOJIA) 反复发作的临床特点及治疗方法.方法 回顾性分析27例SOJIA的临床资料,将27例SOJIA分为2组,无反复发作者为A组,反复发作者为B组,以激素和甲氨喋呤 (MTX) 联合治疗作为基本方案.随访1年以上.结果治疗前,B组患儿的浆膜腔积液发生率 (100%) 明显高于A组 (33.3%),差异有统计学意义(P <0.05).治疗前和治疗3周时,B组患儿的外周血IgM、铁蛋白 (SF)、NT-pro BNT、CK水平均高于A组,差异均有统计学意义(t =2.83~7.23,P 均<0.05).两组患儿MTX应用率和遵照激素联合MTX治疗的减量

  18. CSF analysis differentiates multiple-system atrophy from idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdo, W.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Munneke, M.; Geel, W.J.A. van; Bloem, B.R.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differentiating idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA) from ataxia due to the cerebellar subtype of multiple-system atrophy (MSA-C) can be difficult in the early stages of the disease METHODS: The authors analyzed the levels of various CSF biomarkers in 27 patients with MSA-C

  19. High risk of adrenal insufficiency in adults previously treated for idiopathic childhood onset growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Martin; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Svendsen, Ole Lander;

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to reevaluate a group of adults treated for idiopathic childhood onset GH deficiency (GHD) after 18 yr without GH treatment. Twenty-six (11 females) patients participated. All but two had isolated GHD. Childhood diagnosis was established by insulin tolerance test (ITT). The patients w...

  20. Cognitive Dysfunction and Brain Volume Abnormalities in New-Onset Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological function and quantitataive volumetric measurement of grey and white matter of cerebrum were determined in 53 children (ages 8-18 years with recent-onset idiopathic epilepsy and compared to controls in a study at University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  1. Cognitive Dysfunction and Brain Volume Abnormalities in New-Onset Idiopathic Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    Neuropsychological function and quantitataive volumetric measurement of grey and white matter of cerebrum were determined in 53 children (ages 8-18 years) with recent-onset idiopathic epilepsy and compared to controls in a study at University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  2. Prognosis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy 45 years after onset: seizure outcome and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Philine; Schmitz, Bettina; Holtkamp, Martin; Janz, Dieter

    2013-12-10

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is the most common idiopathic generalized epilepsy subsyndrome, contributing to approximately 3% to 11% of adolescent and adult cases of epilepsy. However, little is known about the long-term medical evolution of this clinical entity. The aim of this study was to analyze long-term outcome in a clinically well-defined series of patients with JME for seizure evolution and predictors of seizure outcome. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed seizure outcome in 66 patients who had JME, were treated at the Department of Neurology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and were initially diagnosed by a single senior epileptologist. After a mean follow-up time of 44.6 years (20-69 years), 59.1% of patients remained free of seizures for at least 5 years before the last contact. Among the seizure-free patients, 28 (71.8%) were still taking antiepileptic drugs and 11 (28.2%) were off medication for at least the last 5 years. We identified manifestation of additional absence seizures at onset of JME as an independent predictor of an unfavorable outcome regarding seizure freedom. A significant proportion of patients with JME were seizure-free and off antiepileptic drug therapy in the later course of their disorder. Patients with JME and additional absence seizures might represent a different JME subtype with a worse outcome.

  3. Kre-Celazine(®) as a viable treatment for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis/juvenile idiopathic arthritis - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golini, Jeff; Jones, Wendy Lou

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether an oral, non-prescription, nutritional supplement compound composed of a proprietary alkali-buffered creatine monohydrate and cetylated fatty acids mixture (Kre-Celazine(®)) was efficacious in reducing or eliminating refractory pain and inflammation, without untoward effects, in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA), which is also called Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). JRA/JIA is a patho-physiologically complex, chronic childhood autoimmune inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Numerous studies have unsuccessfully attempted to pinpoint a possible common initiation event. Officially considered an affliction of children below the age of 16 years, an initial diagnosis has been confirmed in infants less than 1 year old, to individuals older then 17 years. In this study, sixteen juveniles, ages 7 through 16 years, experiencing long-standing, unremitting pain and inflammation despite previous use of prescription anti-inflammatory drugs and NSAIDs, were enrolled in a 30-day, open-label clinical study and treated with Kre-Celazine. Efficacy of this nutritional supplement was determined by the juvenile's personal physician and based on observations of the following: (1) significant reduction or elimination of palpable signs of inflammation; (2) renormalization of range of motion; (3) reduction or absence of perceived pain as reported to the physician by the patient; (4) renormalization of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values. In addition, the individual's previous steroid or non-steroidal anti-inflamatory medication(s) were reduced or eliminated in a stepwise progressive fashion during the study.

  4. Surgical management of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient with multiple joint involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel, Matthew P; Figgie, Mark P

    2014-10-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is recognized as a heterogenous group of disorders in which the common factor is persistent arthritis in at least 1 joint occurring before the age of 16 years. Although conservative management with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs can be effective, approximately 10% of JIA patients have end-stage degenerative changes requiring total hip arthroplasties (THAs) and total knee arthroplasties (TKAs). This article discusses the overall epidemiology, coordination of care, and medical and surgical management of JIA patients undergoing THA and TKA.

  5. Premature subclinical atherosclerosis in children and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C; Karup Pedersen, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is associated with early subclinical signs of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation per se may be an important driver but other known risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin insensitivity, a physically inactive lifestyle......, were considered.We found 13 descriptive cross sectional studies with healthy controls, one intervention study and two studies on adults diagnosed with JIA. Only one study addressed obesity, and physical activity (PA) has only been assessed in one study on adults with JIA and only by self...

  6. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  7. Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: the value of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of muscle involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Odete Esteves Hilário

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: One of the major current challenges related to juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is the search for highly sensitive and specific non-invasive methods for diagnosis as well as for follow-up. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to describe typical magnetic resonance imaging findings and to investigate the usefulness of this method in detecting active muscle disease in juvenile dermatomyositis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus patients. DESIGN: Transverse study, blinded assessment. SETTING: University referral unit (Pediatric Rheumatology section, Department of Pediatrics, Universidade Federal de São Paulo / Escola Paulista de Medicina. SAMPLE: Thirteen patients (9 girls with dermatomyositis, as well as 13 patients (12 girls with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus and 10 normal children (5 girls, were enrolled in the study. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Qualitative and quantitative analyses of gluteus maximus, quadriceps, adductors and flexors were performed and evaluated by two radiologists, blinded to all clinical information. Spin-echo in T1, DP, T2 and IR was used in all MRI images. RESULTS: The different muscle groups presented non-uniform involvement in the patients. The patients with dermatomyositis presented acute and chronic muscular alterations, while those with lupus presented only chronic myopathy, especially atrophy. In the dermatomyositis group, the major alterations were found in the gluteus and flexor regions (signal intensity and fat replacement. The signal intensity was increased in all acute myopathies. CONCLUSION: The qualitative and quantitative resonance analyses are useful in detecting clinically active disease in patients with dermatomyositis.

  8. Fever as an initial manifestation of enthesitis-related arthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruru Guo

    Full Text Available We wished to determine the prevalence of fever as one of the first symptoms of the enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also, we wished to ascertain if ERA patients with fever at disease onset differed from those without fever.Consecutive cases of ERA were diagnosed and followed in a retrospective observational study from 1998 to 2013. Information about clinical/laboratory data, medications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and disease activity during the study period was also recorded.A total of 146 consecutive ERA patients were assessed. Among them, 52 patients (35.6% had fever as one of the first symptoms at disease onset. Compared with ERA patients without fever at disease onset, patients with fever had significantly more painful joints (3.5 vs. 2.8, more swollen joints (1.1 vs. 0.8, and more enthesitis (1.0 vs. 0.4 (p<0.05 for all comparisons. Patients with fever had significantly higher mean values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, platelet count, and child health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ scores (40.8 vs. 26.4 mm/h; 20.7 vs. 9.7 mg/dL; 353.2×109/L vs. 275.6×109/L; 1.0 vs. 0.8, respectively; all p<0.05. During two-year follow-up, CHAQ score, number of flares, as well as the number of patients treated with oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and combination therapy with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, were significantly higher in ERA patients with fever.Fever was a frequent manifestation of ERA. ERA patients with fever had more active disease at disease onset and poorer outcomes than ERA patients without fever.

  9. [Change in condylar and mandibular morphology in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: cone beam volumetric imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagiola, Umberto; Mercatali, Lorenzo; Bellintani, Claudio; Fodor, Attila; Farronato, Giampietro; Lőrincz, Adám

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to show the importance of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography to volumetrically quantify TMJ damage in patients with JIA, measuring condylar and mandibular real volumes. 34 children with temporomandibular involvement by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were observed by Cone Beam Computerized Tomography. 4 were excluded because of several imaging noises. The mandible was isolated from others craniofacial structures; the whole mandibular volume and its components' volumes (condyle, ramus, hemibody, hemisymphysis on right side and on left side) has been calculated by a 3D volume rendering technique. The results show a highly significant statistical difference between affected side volumetric values versus normal side volumetric values above all on condyle region (P < 0.01), while they don't show any statistical differences between right side versus left side. The Cone Beam Computerized Tomography represents a huge improvement in understanding of the condyle and mandibular morphological changes, even in the early stages of the Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. The JIA can lead in children to temporomandibular joint damage with facial development and growth alterations.

  10. Identification of dendritic cells in the blood and synovial fluid of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Tuszkiewicz-Misztal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Childhood chronic arthritis of unknown etiology is known collectively as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and consists of heterogeneous subtypes with unique clinical patterns of disease. JIA is the commonest rheumatic disease in children and may still result in significant disability, with joint deformity, growth impairment, and persistence of active arthritis into adulthood. Basic research is rather focused on rheumatoid arthritis, and this lead to small number of publications considering JIA. In this study we examine, by flow cytometry, the expression of dendritic cells (DCs in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of children with active JIA in a group of 220 patients. We reveal a significant decrease in the percentage of immature DCs in the blood of patients compared to control children. Surprisingly, we found higher percentages of mature circulating dendritic cells. Both populations of DCs, immature and mature, were accumulated in patients’ synovial fluid. We also confirmed the presence of CD206+/CD209+ in JIA samples, which can represent a population of macrophages with dendritic cells morphology. Our results support the thesis that dendritic cells are crucial in the induction and maintenance of autoimmune response and local inflammation during juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 188–199

  11. Nocardia brasiliensis infection mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a 4-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Nitin; Adib, Navid; Grimwood, Keith

    2013-11-01

    Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes that cause pneumonia and disseminated disease in immunocompromised patients. They can also cause localized cutaneous and soft tissue infections in healthy people after direct percutaneous inoculation. Nocardia arthritis is rare in both forms of the disease. Here we present the first published case of a child with septic arthritis caused by N brasiliensis. Importantly, this otherwise well 4-year-old girl had no known history of trauma but presented with transient cutaneous lesions and a 6-week history of arthritis involving the right fourth digit proximal interphalangeal joint without accompanying fever or raised systemic inflammatory markers. She received a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and underwent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant therapy. After 2 months she developed frank septic arthritis, which necessitated a surgical joint washout, from which an intraoperative swab grew N brasiliensis. The patient received 6 months of high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and remains well more than 4 years after treatment. This unusual case highlights the importance of considering an indolent infection from slow-growing organisms, including Nocardia, when diagnosing the oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is especially relevant when a single joint is involved and response to antiinflammatory therapy is suboptimal because antiinflammatory agents may mask evolving signs of infection.

  12. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semeraro F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Semeraro,1 Barbara Arcidiacono,2 Giuseppe Nascimbeni,1 Martina Angi,1 Barbara Parolini,2 Ciro Costagliola31Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, S. Anna Hospital, Brescia, Italy; 3Eye Clinic, Department of Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, ItalyAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds.Keywords: adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab

  13. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Sauer, Alexander; Koestler, Herbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Holl-Wieden, Annette [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany); Neubauer, Henning [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    MRI of synovitis relies on use of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) visualises thickened synovium but is of limited use in the presence of joint effusion. To investigate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted MRI with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for diagnosing synovitis in the knee joint of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Twelve consecutive children with confirmed or suspected juvenile idiopathic arthritis (10 girls, median age 11 years) underwent MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and DWI at 1.5 T. Read-out segmented multi-shot DWI was acquired at b values of 0 s/mm{sup 2}, 200 s/mm{sup 2}, 400 s/mm{sup 2} and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. We calculated the IVIM parameters perfusion fraction (f) and tissue diffusion coefficient (D). Diffusion-weighted images at b=800 s/mm{sup 2}, f parameter maps and post-contrast T1-weighted images were retrospectively assessed by two independent readers for synovitis using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system. Seven (58%) children showed synovial hypertrophy on contrast-enhanced imaging. Diagnostic ratings for synovitis on DWI and on f maps were fully consistent with contrast-enhanced imaging, the diagnostic reference. Two children had equivocal low-confidence assessments on DWI. Median f was 6.7±2.0% for synovitis, 2.1±1.2% for effusion, 5.0±1.0% for muscle and 10.6±5.7% for popliteal lymph nodes. Diagnostic confidence was higher based on f maps in three (25%) children and lower in one child (8%), as compared to DWI. DWI with IVIM reliably visualises synovitis of the knee joint. Perfusion fraction maps differentiate thickened synovium from joint effusion and hence increase diagnostic confidence. (orig.)

  14. Temporomandibular joint involvement in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis : reliability and validity of a screening protocol for the rheumatologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenks, Michel H.; Giancane, G; de Leeuw, Rob R. J.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; van Es, Robert J. J.; Koole, Ron; van Bruggen, H. Willemijn; Wulffraat, NM

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be involved leading to pain, dysfunction and growth disturbances of the mandible and associated structures. There may be value to a three minute screening protocol allowing the rheumatologist to detect TMJ invol

  15. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatovic, M.; Heijstek, M.W.; Verkaaik, M.; Dijkhuizen, E.H. van; Armbrust, W.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Kamphuis, S.; Kuis, W.; Egberts, T.C.; Sinnema, G.; Rademaker, C.M.A.; Wulffraat, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS) que

  16. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatović, Maja; Heijstek, Marloes W; Verkaaik, Marleen; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Kuis, Wietse; Egberts, Toine C G; Sinnema, Gerben; Rademaker, Carin M A; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS) que

  17. Facial morphology in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and moderate to severe temporomandibular joint involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to (1) assess lateral facial morphology in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and moderate to severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement, (2) compare the lateral facial morphology of these subjects with and without TMJ...

  18. Long-term follow-up on effectiveness and safety of etanercept in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : the Dutch national register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, F H M; Twilt, M; ten Cate, R; van Rossum, M A J; Armbrust, W; Hoppenreijs, E P A H; van Santen-Hoeufft, M; Koopman-Keemink, Y; Wulffraat, N M; van Suijlekom-Smit, L W A

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We undertook an observational study to obtain a complete overview of the long-term effectiveness and safety of etanercept in patients with different juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) subtypes. METHODS: At baseline we collected patient and disease characteristics of all Dutch patients wi

  19. Long-term follow-up on effectiveness and safety of etanercept in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : the Dutch national register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, F. H. M.; Twilt, M.; ten Cate, R.; van Rossum, M. A. J.; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, E. P. A. H.; van Santen-Hoeufft, M.; Koopman-Keemink, Y.; Wulffraat, N. M.; van Suijlekom-Smit, L. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We undertook an observational study to obtain a complete overview of the long-term effectiveness and safety of etanercept in patients with different juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) subtypes. Methods: At baseline we collected patient and disease characteristics of all Dutch patients wi

  20. Long-term follow-up on effectiveness and safety of etanercept in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the Dutch national register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, F.H.M.; Twilt, M.; ten Cate, R.; van Rossum, M.A.J.; Armbrust, W.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; van Santen-Hoeufft, M.; Koopman-Keemink, Y.; Wulffraat, N.M.; van Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We undertook an observational study to obtain a complete overview of the long-term effectiveness and safety of etanercept in patients with different juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) subtypes. METHODS: At baseline we collected patient and disease characteristics of all Dutch patients wi

  1. Radiologic features in juvenile idiopathic arthritis - A first step in the development of a standardized assessment method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, MAJ; Zwinderman, AH; Dijkmans, BAC; van Soesbergen, RM; Fiselier, TJW; Franssen, MJAM; ten Cate, R; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Wulffraat, NM; Kuis, W; van Luijk, WHJ; Oostveen, JCM; Dijkstra, PF

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To describe radiologic features of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in a standardized manner, to test the reliability and feasibility of this description, and to correlate these features with clinical signs as a first step in the development of a standardized assessment m

  2. Combined pre-injection wrist and ankle MRI protocol and steroid joint injections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Graham, T.B. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Precise localization of affected compartments of the wrist and ankle in children with an established diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is clinically challenging. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experience utilizing a pre-injection MRI protocol of the wrist and ankle for localizing disease activity followed by fluoroscopically guided joint injections in children with JIA. (orig.)

  3. Force transmission through the juvenile idiopathic arthritic wrist : a novel approach using a sliding rigid body spring model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manal, K; Lua, XP; Nieuwenhuis, MK; Helders, PJM; Buchanan, TS

    2002-01-01

    Force transmission across the wrist during a grasping maneuver of the hand was simulated for three children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and for one healthy age-matched child. Joint reaction forces were estimated using a series of springs between articulating bones. This method (i.e., ri

  4. Facial Asymmetry Evaluation in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients Based On Cone-Beam Computed Tomography And 3D Photography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Economou, Stalo; Stoustrup, Peter Bangsgaard; Kristensen, Kasper Dahl

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to assess the degree of and correlation between facial hard and soft tissue asymmetry in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, identify valid soft tissue points for clinical examination and assess the smallest clinical detectable level of dentofacial asymmetr...

  5. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). METHODS: A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of

  6. Long-term ocular complications in aphakic versus pseudophakic eyes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijssens, K. M.; Los, L. I.; Rothova, A.; Schellekens, P. A. W. J. F.; van de Does, P.; Stilma, J. S.; de Boer, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the long-term follow-up of aphakic and pseudophakic eyes of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis with a special interest in whether intraocular lens implantation increases the risk of developing ocular complications. Methods Data were obtained from the

  7. A decade of biologic treatment observation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Lessons learned from the Dutch ABC Register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Otten (Marieke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSince 1999, the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been extended with a new category of drugs: biologic agents (also known as biologicals or biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs). Biologic agents consist of natural proteins, like antibodies and cytokines, and

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis%幼年特发性关节炎分类

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何晓琥

    2003-01-01

    @@ 为了便于对儿童时期关节炎的免疫遗传学、流行病学、转归和治疗方案实施等方面进行国际间协作研究,国际风湿病学联盟儿科常委专家组举行了三次会议进行讨论,将儿童时期不明原因的关节肿胀持续6周以上这类关节炎的分类统一起来,定名为幼年特发性关节炎(juvenile idiopathic arthritis, JIA),从而取代了原有的美国应用的幼年类风湿关节炎(juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, JRA)和欧洲应用的幼年慢性关节炎(juvenile chronic arthritis, JCA)这两个分类标准.现将JIA分类标准介绍如下(此标准于1994年制订,1997年修改,2001年正式通过).

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  10. Psoriasis and associated variables in classification and outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - an eight-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, Maria; Aalto, Kristiina; Fasth, Anders; Herlin, Troels; Nielsen, Susan; Nordal, Ellen; Peltoniemi, Suvi; Rygg, Marite; Zak, Marek; Berntson, Lillemor

    2017-02-22

    To study the impact of psoriasis and features associated with psoriasis on classification and outcome in a population-based follow-up cohort of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In all, 440 children with JIA were followed for a median of 8 years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data for remission was available for 427 of these children. The presence of psoriasis, psoriasis-like rash, dactylitis, nail pitting, enthesitis, tenosynovitis and heredity was assessed in relation to ILAR classification and remission. Clinical findings associated with psoriasis developed consecutively during the 8-year period. Six of 14 children with psoriasis were not classified as juvenile psoriatic arthritis according to the ILAR criteria at 8 year follow-up. Dactylitis was more common in children with early onset of JIA. After 8 years we found a cumulative median number of eleven arthritic joints in children with psoriasis or psoriasis-like rash compared with six in the rest of the cohort (p = 0.02). Also, the chance for not being in remission after 8 years increased significantly in patients with psoriasis, psoriasis-like rash or at least two of: 1) first-degree heredity for psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis, 2) dactylitis or 3) nail pitting, compared with the rest of the group (OR 3.32, p = 0.010). Our results indicate a more severe disease over time in psoriasis-associated JIA, as features of psoriasis develop during the disease course. This group is a major challenge to encompass in a future JIA classification in order to facilitate early tailored treatment.

  11. A case of juvenile idiopathic polyarticular arthritis complicated by IgA deficiency in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hisashi; Suzuki, Kazunori; Nagao, Ryuhei; Tsuyuki, Kazumitsu; Hoshika, Akinori

    2011-08-01

    Chronic arthritis may occur in association with antibody deficiency and chromosomal aberrations. This report presents the case of a 6-year-old girl with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome and chronic arthritis. The onset of arthritis occurred at 4 years of age. The chronic arthritis course has been the polyarticular type. Neither antinuclear antibody nor rheumatoid factor was detected. Serum IgA was extremely low. She was diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic polyarticular arthritis (JIA) complicated by IgA deficiency in the 22q11 deletion syndrome. There is an increased prevalence of chronic arthritis in association with 22q11 deletion syndrome with IgA deficiency, but the reasons for this association are unknown. This study evaluated the possible correlation between cytokines and the susceptibility to chronic arthritis in the 22q11 deletion syndrome with IgA deficiency. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-8, IL-6, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 suggests that T and B cells, macrophages and neutrophils modulate joint inflammation by an immune response. And the presence of IL-10 and IL-5 might suggest that the synovitis is associated with JIA and IgA deficiency.

  12. Rituximab use in young adults diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis unresponsive to conventional treatment: report of 6 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Ana Paula; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Barbosa, Cássia Maria Passarelli Lupoli; Fraga, Melissa Mariti; Len, Claudio Arnaldo; Terreri, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. Without an effective therapy, patients may progress quickly to functional disability. Recently, depletion of B cells emerged as a new approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including JIA. We describe six cases of JIA patients followed at a referral center for Rheumatology and Pediatric Rheumatology, submitted to treatment with rituximab (RTX) after refractoriness to three anti-TNF agents. Patients received RTX cycles with two infusions every six months. Response to treatment was assessed by DAS28, HAQ/CHAQ, and an overall assessment by the doctor and the patient. Of our six patients, four were girls (mean age at onset of disease: 6.1 years; mean disease evolution time: 15.1 years; mean age upon receiving RTX: 21.6 years). Four patients belonged to polyarticular subtype (1 rheumatoid factor [RF]-negative, 3 FR-positive), a patient with systemic JIA subtype with a polyarticular course and arthritis related to enthesitis. Of our six patients, five responded to treatment; and during the course of 12 months, the clinical response was maintained, although not sustained. However, discontinuation by infusion reactions caused the withdrawal of RTX in two patients. The use of RTX in JIA is restricted to cases refractory to other biological agents and, even considering that this study was held in a small number of advanced patients, RTX proved to be an effective therapeutic option.

  13. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maria J.; Mourão, Ana F.; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E.; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry’s disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No “classic” pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292). PMID:28299312

  14. 特发性青少年骨质疏松症%The idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯秀媛; 王永福

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis ( IJO) is a rare primary form of osteoporosis of unknown etiology that develops in a previously healthy child.IJO is characterized by repeated fractures, including vertebral compression fractures.It is usually a self-limiting disease that spontaneously resolves after puberty, but in some cases it may result in severe deformities and functional impairment.There are probably the following reasons about etiological factors and pathogenesis in IJO:1) Imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption;2) Adolescent growth burst and bone mass increase;3) Abnormal metabolic regulation factors of bone;4) Abnormal collagen synthesis.IJO runs an acute course, usually over a period of 2 to 4 years, during which time there is growth arrest and multiple fractures, and then the disease remits.Both the axial and the appendicular skeleton are affected.The severe cases may have fractures of the vertebrae and the long bones, particularly in the metaphyses, that lead to pain in the back, foot, hip and extremities, muscle weakness, limitation of free movement, deformity, and unique gait because of difficulty in walking.The diagnosis of IJO is based both on the exclusion of other diseases and on its own positive features.The diagnosis of IJO is best made from its X-ray features, which include multiple vertebral compression fractures and fractures of the long bones, especially around the weight-bearing joints.Treatment of IJO is extremely complicated.The basic strategy of treatment is to protect the spine and to avoid the occurring of fractures and deformity until remission occurs.Supportive care is instituted promptly in anticipation of spontaneous recovery with the onset of puberty.%特发性青少年骨质疏松症( idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis ,IJO)是一种罕见的发生于先前身体健康的儿童身上的一种病因不明的主要表现为骨质疏松症的疾病。该病以反复发生的骨折为特征,包括脊椎压缩性骨

  15. Age of crime onset and psychopathic traits in female juvenile delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechorro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Rui Abrunhosa; Marôco, João; Nunes, Cristina; Jesus, Saul Neves

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the role of psychopathic traits in the age of crime onset of female juvenile delinquents. Using a sample of 132 young females from the Juvenile Detention Centers of the Portuguese Ministry of Justice and from schools in the Lisbon region, a group of early crime onset (n = 44), a group of late crime onset (n = 44), and a nondelinquent school group (n = 44) were formed. Results showed that early crime onset participants score higher on psychopathy measures, self-reported delinquency, and crime seriousness than late crime onset participants and school participants. Psychopathic-traits scores were significantly associated with age of crime onset, age at first trouble with the law, and frequency and seriousness of crime.

  16. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: an Update on Classification and Treatment with Special Focus on Juvenile Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnini, Ilaria; Vitale, Antonio; Selmi, Carlo; Cimaz, Rolando; Cantarini, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Juvenile inflammatory myopathies represent a heterogeneous group of rare and potentially fatal disorders of unknown aetiology, characterised by inflammation and proximal and symmetric muscle weakness. Beyond many similarities, specific clinical, laboratoristic and histopathologic features underlie different subsets with distinguishing demographic, prognostic and therapeutic peculiarities. Over time, several forms of inflammatory idiopathic myopathies have been described, including macrophagic myofascitis, immune-mediated necrozing myopathy and the spectrum of amyopathic dermatomyositis that include hypomyopathic dermatomyositis, inclusion body myositis and cancer-associated myositis occurring almost exclusively in adults. However, juvenile dermatomyositis is the most frequent in childhood, whereas polymyositis is relatively more frequent in adults. The aetiology is nowadays widely unclear; however, current theories contemplate a combination of environmental triggers, immune dysfunction and specific tissue responses involving muscle, skin and small vessels endothelium in genetically susceptible individuals. Myositis-specific autoantibodies, found almost exclusively in patients with myositis and myositis-associated autoantibodies, detectable both among patients with myositis and in subjects suffering from other autoimmune diseases, have an important clinical role because of their relation to specific clinical features, response to therapy and prognosis. The gold standard treatment for juvenile dermatomyositis is represented by corticosteroids, along with adjunctive steroid-sparing immunosuppressive therapies, which are used to counteract disease activity, prevent mortality, and reduce long-term disability. Further treatment approach such as biologic agents and autologous stem cell transplantation are emerging during the last years, in particular in patients difficult to treat and with poor prognosis. Therefore, a highly medical specialised approach is required for

  17. [Magnetic resonance imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: peculiarities of imaging children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navallas, M; Rebollo Polo, M; Riaza, L; Muchart López, J; Maristany, T

    2013-09-01

    The term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a heterogeneous group of arthritides with no known cause that begin before the age of 16 years and persist for at least 6 weeks. In recent decades, imaging techniques have acquired a fundamental role in the diagnosis and follow-up of JIA, owing to the unification of the different criteria for classification, which has strengthened the research in this field, and to the development of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In this article, we briefly explain what JIA is. Moreover, we describe the role and limitations of plain-film radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Finally, we review the MRI protocol and findings, and we comment on the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. A biopsychosocial investigation of pediatric chronic pain with special focus on juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Johanne Jeppesen

    Our understanding and management of pediatric chronic pain have advanced markedly over the last half century. Chronic pain is pain that persists for a usually more than three months and is highly prevalent in children and adolescents. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can be characterized...... increased quality of life, reductions in anxiety levels and pain catastrophizing, and improvements in adaptive pain cognitions; the latter were expressed as strengthened beliefs in the ability to control pain and self-efficacy. After controlling for disease activity, no differences between the intervention...... and waitlist condition were found in measures of pain and functional disability. The feasibility of the CBT program was supported by a low drop-out rate, and high levels of reported intervention credibility and satisfaction with the treatment. In study 4 differences in pain and health complaints was examined...

  19. Accelerometry-based monitoring of daily physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, M; Twilt, M; Andersen, L B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may cause functional impairment, reduced participation in physical activity (PA) and, over time, physical deconditioning. The aim of this study was to objectively monitor daily free-living PA in 10-16-year-old children with JIA using accelerometry...... with regard to disease activity and physical variables and to compare the data with those from healthy age- and gender-matched controls.Method: Patients underwent an evaluation of disease activity, functional ability, physical capacity, and pain. Accelerometer monitoring was assessed using the GT1M Acti...... range of motion (ROM). No correlation was found between PA and pain scores, functional ability, and hypermobility. Patients with involvement of ankles or hips demonstrated significantly lower levels of PA.Conclusions: Children with JIA are less physically active and have lower physical capacity...

  20. [Presence of riziform bodies in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Leonardo Rodrigues; Sztajnbok, Fernanda Cardoso das Neves; Galvão, Stélio; Lessa, Marise de Araújo; Aymoré, Ierecê Lins; Sztajnbok, Flavio

    2014-10-23

    Riziform bodies are structures formed by fibrin and cells that can be found in the synovial fluid or attached to the synovium, and have this denomination due to its rice grain-like appearance. They have already been described in several diseases such as tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and rarely in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). This is the case of a boy with a 4-month course of chronic monoarthritis of the left knee, with family history of sarcoidosis in which diagnostic investigation showed the presence of these riziform bodies in the synovial biopsy. Diagnostic investigation ruled out sarcoidosis, tuberculosis and malignancies, establishing the diagnosis of JIA. Our objective was to describe what we believe is the 9th case reported on the presence of riziform bodies in JIA, which are probably underdiagnosed, and should be considered mainly in cases of severe arthritis of difficult medical treatment.

  1. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AS A COMPLICATION OF SYSTEMIC JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija Kerin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Abstract Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is a life-threatening complication of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA. MAS is characterized by systemic inflammation caused by excessive or uncontrolled release of proinflammatory cytokines (cytokine storm. The diagnostic hallmark are hemophagocytic macrophages, that could be present in bone marrow, liver, spleen or lymph nodes. Clinical features are similar to a flare of the underlying rheumatic disease which makes early recognition and choice of the appropriate treatment difficult. Diagnosis is made according to the preliminary diagnostic guidelines for MAS complicating SJIA.We report a case of an 11 years old girl with MAS as an initial presentation of SJIA. She was successfully treated with high doses of glucocorticoid and cyclosporine. After discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy she developed a new flare of the disease which was successfully treated with interleukin 1 blocking agent anakinra.         

  2. Cytokine balance and cytokine-driven natural killer cell dysfunction in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avau, Anneleen; Put, Karen; Wouters, Carine H; Matthys, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a severe inflammatory childhood disorder, characterized by a specific pattern of systemic features and a typical cytokine profile. Patients are at risk to develop macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), an acute life-threatening condition defined by excessive proliferation and activation of macrophages and T cells. Defects of unknown cause in the natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic capacity are presumed to underlie the pathogenesis of MAS and have been detected in sJIA patients. Here, we provide an overview of the cytokine profiles in sJIA and related mouse models. We discuss the influence of cytokines on NK cell function, and hypothesize that NK cell dysfunction in sJIA is caused by altered cytokine profiles.

  3. Complications of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: risk factors and management recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Andreas; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Cimaz, Rolando; Hofer, Michaël

    2015-05-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. Systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that SJIA is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of SJIA, and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. However, complications of SJIA, including macrophage activation syndrome, limitations in functional outcome by arthritis and long-term damage from chronic inflammation, continue to be a major issue in SJIA patients' care. Translational research leading to a profound understanding of the cytokine crosstalk in SJIA and the identification of risk factors for SJIA complications will help to improve long-term outcome.

  4. The Role of Gender in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Moradi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uveitis is a common complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA affecting up to 30% of patients with JIA. Although the typical bilateral chronic anterior uveitis associated with the persistent and extended oligoarticular and polyarticular, rheumatoid factor negative variants of JIA occurs predominantly in girls, boys may be more commonly affected in the HLA-B27 positive, enthesitis variant of JIA. While female gender has been associated with the development of the chronic anterior uveitis in children with JIA, the clinical course of JIA-associated uveitis may be worse in boys than in girls. The purpose of this paper is to review the available published literature to determine the role of gender in the clinical presentation and outcomes of patients with JIA-associated uveitis.

  5. Usefulness of Adalimumab in the Treatment of Refractory Uveitis Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-De-Vicuña, Carmen; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Salom, David; Bou, Rosa; Díaz-Cascajosa, Jesus; Cordero-Coma, Miguel; Ortega, Gabriela; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Suarez-De-Figueroa, Marta; Cruz-Martínez, Juan; Fonollosa, Alex; Blanco, Ricardo; García-Aparicio, Ángel María; Benítez-Del-Castillo, Jose M.; Antón, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and associated refractory uveitis. Design. Multicenter, prospective case series. Methods. Thirty-nine patients (mean [SD] age of 11.5 [7.9] years) with JIA-associated uveitis who were either not responsive to standard immunosuppressive therapy or intolerant to it were enrolled. Patients aged 13–17 years were treated with 40 mg of adalimumab every other week for 6 months and those aged 4–12 years received 24 mg/m2 body surface. Results. Inflammation of the anterior chamber (2.02 [1.16] versus 0.42 [0.62]) and of the posterior segment (2.38 [2.97] versus 0.35 [0.71] decreased significantly between baseline and the final visit (P uveitis and may reduce steroid requirement. PMID:24489444

  6. An Unexpected Cause of Knee Pain in a Patient with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Osteoid Osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Eroğlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic diseases may sometimes be underestimated because of the relapsing nature of the disease and thus some newly developing phenomena may be overlooked. In this case we present a 12- year old female patient who was followed up for juvenile idiopathic arthritis and applied to us as an exacerbation of the disease. After initiation of therapy all her complaints but the right knee improved. In the examination of knee, limitation in hip movements was detected. X- ray of the hip revealed a mass neighboring the minor trochanter. On magnetic resonance imaging the mass was detected to be an osteoid osteoma. The patient is free of pain with conservative treatment for tumor after twelve months. It is important to evaluate the patient thoroughly without focusing on a single point and keep in mind that in especially skeletally immature patients hip pain can be felt in the knee.

  7. Changes of Platelet Indices in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Acute Phase and After Two Months Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vakili

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Various indices have been raised as predictors of activity and severity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Objectives This study was conducted to investigate the changes of platelet indices in acute phase and two months after treatment in these patients. Patients and Methods In a cohort study, platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV, platelet distribution width (PDW, plateletcrit (PCT were evaluated in children referred to children’s medical center, Tehran due to juvenile idiopathic arthritis from March 2013 to March 2014 during the acute phase and two months after standard treatment. The statistical data were analyzed by SPSS 19 software, and the significance level was set as P < 0.05. Results In this study, 55 children (24 boys and 31 girls with mean ± SD age of 7.50 ± 3.35 years were studied. The mean ± SD value of platelet count was 441872.7 ± 151836.9 in the acute phase and reached 395418.2 ± 119601.6 two months after treatment (P = 0.01. The mean ± SD PCT in the acute phase of various subtypes of the disease was 0.32 ± 0.11, which reached 0.29 ± 0.10 after treatment (P = 0.09. However, the PDW range in different subtypes of the disease reached 13.4 ± 8.0 from 13.9 ± 2.9 and MPV reached 8.7 ± 0.9 from 8.8 ± 1.1 after treatment, but they were not significantly different from the results in the acute phase (P = 0.5. Conclusions Platelet count is one of the most remarkable indices in JIA. Evaluation of PCT can also help determine the severity of the inflammatory process in the follow-up and treatment process.

  8. Sex differences in metabolic and adipose tissue responses to juvenile-onset obesity in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Bloor, Ian D.; Sébert, Sylvain P.; Saroha, Vivek; Gardner, David S.; Keisler, Duane H.; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael E.; Mahajan, Ravi P.

    2013-01-01

    Sex is a major factor determining adipose tissue distribution and the subsequent adverse effects of obesity-related disease including type 2 diabetes. The role of gender on juvenile obesity and the accompanying metabolic and inflammatory responses is not well established. Using an ovine model of juvenile onset obesity induced by reduced physical activity, we examined the effect of gender on metabolic, circulatory, and related inflammatory and energy-sensing profiles of the major adipose tissu...

  9. Meandering main pancreatic duct as a relevant factor to the onset of idiopathic recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Gonoi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Meandering main pancreatic duct (MMPD, which comprises loop type and reverse-Z type main pancreatic duct (MPD, has long been discussed its relation to pancreatitis. However, no previous study has investigated its clinical significance. We aimed to determine the non-biased prevalence and the effect of MMPD on idiopathic pancreatitis using non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study performed in a tertiary referral center. The study enrolled 504 subjects from the community and 30 patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (7 acute, 13 chronic, and 10 recurrent acute. All subjects underwent MR scanning and medical examination. MMPD was diagnosed when the MPD in the head of pancreas formed two or more extrema in the horizontal direction on coronal images of MR cholangiopancreatography, making a loop or a reverse-Z shaped hairpin curves and not accompanied by other pancreatic ductal anomaly. Statistical comparison was made among groups on the rate of MMPD including loop and reverse-Z subtypes, MR findings, and clinical features. The rate of MMPD was significantly higher for all idiopathic pancreatitis/idiopathic recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP (20%/40%; P<0.001/0.0001; odds ratio (OR, 11.1/29.0 than in the community (2.2% but was not higher for acute/chronic pancreatitis (14%/8%; P = 0.154/0.266. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed MMPD to be a significant factor that induces pancreatitis/RAP (P<0.0001/0.0001; OR, 4.01/26.2. Loop/reverse-Z subtypes were found more frequently in idiopathic RAP subgroup (20%/20%; P = 0.009/0.007; OR, 20.2/24.2 than in the community (1.2%/1.0%. The other clinical and radiographic features were shown not associated with the onset of pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: MMPD is a common anatomical variant and might be a relevant factor to the onset of idiopathic RAP.

  10. The risk factors of macrophage activation syndrome in children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis%全身型幼年特发性关节炎并发巨噬细胞活化综合征的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亚玲; 梁琨; 徐静; 黄永坤; 莫亚雄; 张瑛; 丁臻博

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析全身型幼年特发性关节炎(systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis,SJIA)并发巨噬细胞活化综合征(macrophage activation syndrome,MAS)的危险因素.方法 回顾性分析我院2000年月1月~2009年5月期间诊治的SOJIA和SOJIA-MAS195例患儿的临床及试验室资料,采用Cox模型多因素分析法分析SOJIA发生SOJIA-MAS的危险因素.结果 (1)本组195例SOJIA病例中,MAS的发生率为4.1%(8/195).(2)SOJIA-MAS组患儿热程,肝脾肿大及淋巴结肿大的程度明显高于SOJIA组,差异有统计学意义.(3)SOJIA-MAS组MAS发生前1周平均血小板(PLT)计数、平均白细胞(WBC)计数、血沉(ESR)、血红蛋白(Hb)、血清白蛋白(ALB)、纤维蛋白原(Fib)明显低于SOJIA组患儿,差异有统计学意义;SOJIA-MAS组平均谷丙转氨酶(ALT)、谷草转氨酶(AST)、甘油三酯(TG)、血清铁蛋白(SF)高于SOJIA组,差异有统计学意义;SOJIA-MAS组患儿NK细胞计数明显低于SOJIA组患儿,差异有统计学意义.(4)多因素回归分析显示持续高热,WBC<9×109,PLT<250×109,ESR<10mm/h,Fib<1.5g/L,ALT>55u/L,AST>60u/L,LDH>1000μ/L,Fib>500μg/L,TG≥3mmol/L以及NK细胞计数降低是SOJIA患儿发生MAS的临床危险因素.结论 通过分析SOJIA患儿发生MAS的临床危险因素,确立可能发生MAS的高危人群,对于早期发现及治疗MAS,改善其预后具有重要意义.

  11. Clinical Observation of Employment of Umbilical Cord Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, known as Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, is the most common type of arthritis in children aged under 17. It may cause sequelae due to lack of effective treatment. The goal of this study is to explore the therapeutic effect of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs for JIA. Ten JIA patients were treated with UC-MSCs and received second infusion three months later. Some key values such as 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28, TNF-α, IL-6, and regulatory T cells (Tregs were evaluated. Data were collected at 3 months and 6 months after first treatment. DAS28 score of 10 patients was between 2.6 and 3.2 at three months after infusion. WBC, ESR, and CRP were significantly decreased while Tregs were remarkably increased and IL-6 and TNF-α were declined. Similar changes of above values were found after 6 months. At the same time, the amount of NSAIDS and steroid usage in patients was reduced. However, no significant changes were found comparing the data from 3 and 6 months. These results suggest that UC-MSCs can reduce inflammatory cytokines, improve immune network effects, adjust immune tolerance, and effectively alleviate the symptoms and they might provide a safe and novel approach for JIA treatment.

  12. Variables with prognostic value in the onset of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaz, Eduardo Amaro; Maranhão, André Souza de Albuquerque; Inoue, Daniel Paganini; Suzuki, Flavia Alencar de Barros; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of an individualized prognostic evaluation in patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) remains a difficult and imprecise task, due mostly to the variety of etiologies. Determining which variables have prognostic value in the initial assessment of the patient would be extremely useful in clinical practice. To establish which variables identifiable at the onset of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss have prognostic value in the final hearing recovery. Prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Patients with ISSHL followed by the Department of Otology-Neurotology of a quaternary hospital were included. The following variables were evaluated and correlated with final hearing recovery: age, gender, vertigo, tinnitus, initial degree of hearing loss, contralateral ear hearing, and elapsed time to treatment. 127 patients with ISSHL were evaluated. Rates of absolute and relative recovery were 23.6dB and 37.2% respectively. Complete hearing improvement was observed in 15.7% patients; 27.6% demonstrated significant improvement and improvement was noted in 57.5%. During the onset of ISSHL, the following variables were correlated with a worse prognosis: dizziness, profound hearing loss, impaired hearing in the contralateral ear, and delay to start treatment. Tinnitus at the onset of ISSHL correlated with a better prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Variables with prognostic value in the onset of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

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    Eduardo Amaro Bogaz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The establishment of an individualized prognostic evaluation in patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL remains a difficult and imprecise task, due mostly to the variety of etiologies. Determining which variables have prognostic value in the initial assessment of the patient would be extremely useful in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To establish which variables identifiable at the onset of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss have prognostic value in the final hearing recovery. METHODS: Prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Patients with ISSHL followed by the Department of Otology-Neurotology of a quaternary hospital were included. The following variables were evaluated and correlated with final hearing recovery: age, gender, vertigo, tinnitus, initial degree of hearing loss, contralateral ear hearing, and elapsed time to treatment. RESULTS: 127 patients with ISSHL were evaluated. Rates of absolute and relative recovery were 23.6 dB and 37.2% respectively. Complete hearing improvement was observed in 15.7% patients; 27.6% demonstrated significant improvement and improvement was noted in 57.5%. CONCLUSION: During the onset of ISSHL, the following variables were correlated with a worse prognosis: dizziness, profound hearing loss, impaired hearing in the contralateral ear, and delay to start treatment. Tinnitus at the onset of ISSHL correlated with a better prognosis.

  14. Clinical and genetic study of a juvenile-onset Huntington disease

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    HAO Ying

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant hereditary progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct phenotype characterized by chorea, dementia, cognitive and affective impairment. There are selective neural cell loss and atrophy in the caudate and putamen. Dr. George Huntington firstly described the disease accurately and insightfully, which led to a widespread recognition of the inherited chorea that now bears his name. Huntington disease gene (IT15 locus on chromosome 4p16.3, and encompasses 67 exons with a trinucleotide repeat (CAG in the first exon. The CAG repeat length is highly polymorphic in the population and expanded on at least one chromosome of individuals with HD. Clinically, patient with HD are often onset in adulthood. Juvenile-onset HD is relatively rare. Adult-onset HD patients usually have a CAG expansion from 40 to 55 whereas those with juvenile-onset greater than 60 which are often inherited from the father. We investigated the clinical features of a juvenile-onset case with Huntington disease and dynamic mutation of his family. Methods The CAG repeats of IT15 gene were detected using polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis in 115 individuals with preliminary diagnosis as Huntington disease. The repeat numbers of some samples carried expanded or intermediate alleles were verified by the pMD18-T vector clone sequencing. Results Fragment analysis showed that one juvenile-onset case presenting with cognitive dysfunction and hypokinesis carried 15/68 CAG repeats of IT15. His father carried 17/37 and mother carried 15/17. Conclusion 1 The juvenile-onset case of HD presented with different clinical features compared with adult-onset cases. The typical signs of adult-onset cases include progressive chorea, rigidity and dementia. The most common sign of juvenile-onset Huntington disease is cognitive decline. 2 The dynamic mutation of IT15 gene expansion of the CAG repeats in the

  15. Health Related Quality of Life before, during and after pregnancy in Norwegian women with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a known interaction between pregnancy and rheumatic disease. Women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are concerned about the potential impact of a pregnancy. Therefore, it is important to get more knowledge on how pregnancy affects these womens health related quality of life (HRQL).Purpose: To study changes in HRQL in Norwegian women with RA and JIA before, during and after pregnancy.Methods: A total 35 patients with RA and 27 patients...

  16. Reduced articular cartilage thickness in joints without a history of active arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradsgaard, Dan Østergaard; Spannow, Anne Helene; Heuck, Carsten;

    Background: The functional disability experienced in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is primarily caused by degeneration of the osteocartilaginous structures due to the inflammatory process in the synovium. It is therefore essential for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy to closely monitor...... the structural damage during the disease course. During the past decade musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) has become an established diagnostic method in adult rheumatology and within recent years an increased attention for utilizing US in pediatric rheumatology has emerged. Previously we have found differences...

  17. Pilot study comparing the Childhood Arthritis & Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Consensus Treatment Plans

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yukiko; Grevich, Sriharsha; Beukelman, Timothy; Morgan, Esi; Peter A. Nigrovic; Mieszkalski, Kelly; Graham, T. Brent; Ibarra, Maria; Ilowite, Norman; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa; Onel, Karen; Prahalad, Sampath; Punaro, Marilynn; Ringold, Sarah; Toib, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of studying the comparative effectiveness of the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) consensus treatment plans (CTPs) for systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) using an observational registry. Methods Untreated systemic JIA patients enrolled in the CARRA Registry were begun on one of 4 CTPs chosen by the treating physician and patient/family (glucocorticoid [GC] alone; methotrexate [MTX]???GC; IL1 inhibitor [IL1i]???GC; IL...

  18. An exploration of parents’ preferences for foot care in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a possible role for the discrete choice experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Hendry, G.J.; Turner, D.E.; Gardner-Medwin, J. [JD Research Group; Lorgelly, P.K.; Woodburn, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background:\\ud An increased awareness of patients’ and parents’ care preferences regarding foot care is desirable from a clinical perspective as such information may be utilised to optimise care delivery. The aim of this study was to examine parents’ preferences for, and valuations of foot care and foot-related outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).\\ud \\ud Methods:\\ud A discrete choice experiment (DCE) incorporating willingness-to-pay (WTP) questions was conducted by surveying 42 pa...

  19. Change of natural killer cells CD16+56+ in children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis%幼年特发性关节炎患儿外周血自然杀伤细胞CD16+56+的随访意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚翠婵; 曾华松; 韦茹; 王蓓; 熊小燕

    2009-01-01

    目的:探讨幼年特发性关节炎全身型(systemic onset iuvenile idiopathic arthritis,SOJIA)患儿治疗过程自然杀伤细胞(natural killer cells,NK cells)CD16+56+比率、骨髓细胞形态学等指标的动态变化在提示病情发展、改善预后方面的意义.方法:对我院2006年6月至2008年6月收治的30例SOJIA病例,分析治疗早期及联合治疗后多项炎症指标、外周血NK cells CD16+56+比率、骨髓细胞形态学动态变化与临床表现之间的关系.结果:所有患儿中10例病情反复难治者,均出现非特异性炎症指标升高,9例外周血NK cells CD16+56+比率降低,8例骨髓细胞形态学发生变化(4例发现异形淋巴细胞,4例有吞噬现象).及时采用强联合治疗方案后,8例病情得到控制,2例进展为巨噬细胞活化综合征.结论:SOJIA临床表现多样,实验室指标非特异性指向,治疗中同时警惕NK cells CD16+56+比率和骨髓细胞形态学等变化,及早采用个体化强联合治疗方案,是阻止病情发展,改善预后的关键.

  20. Similarities in speech and white matter characteristics in idiopathic developmental stuttering and adult-onset stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Synnestvedt, Anna; Ostuni, John

    2009-01-01

    Adult-onset stuttering (AS) typically occurs following neurological and/or psychological trauma, considered different from developmental stuttering (DS), which starts during early childhood with few if any new cases reported after adolescence. Here we report four cases of AS, two with apparent psychological trigger and two without, none with evidence of neurological injury, and none conforming to previously reported characteristics of psychogenic stuttering. We asked whether this group of AS would have similar speech and neuroanatomical characteristics to those with DS. We conducted blinded analyses of speech samples in both AS cases and 14 cases of DS on type, frequency, and loci of disfluencies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to compare white matter tracts using fractional anisotropy (FA). We found that AS did not differ significantly from DS in any of the speech characteristics measured. On DTI, DS had significantly increased FA relative to controls in the right superior longitudinal tract. AS cases showed a similar trend for increases in these regions when compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that symptoms of idiopathic stuttering can begin during adulthood, and that similar neuroanatomical differences from controls may be associated with both developmental and adult onset idiopathic stuttering. PMID:20640049

  1. A comparison between nailfold capillaroscopy patterns in adulthood in juvenile and adult-onset systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Boracchi, Patrizia; Gualtierotti, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Qualitative capillaroscopy patterns in juvenile- and adult-onset systemic sclerosis (SSc) were studied in adulthood using data from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) database. METHODS: Data collected between June 2004 and April 2013 were examined with focus...

  2. Sustained-release dexamethasone intravitreal implant in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Nucci, Paolo; Baynes, Kimberly; Lowder, Careen Y; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the results of treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis with the use of intravitreal dexamethasone implant. Sixteen eyes with Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis received intravitreal dexamethasone implant to treat recalcitrant anterior segment inflammation (43.7 %), chronic macular edema (6.2 %), or a combination of both (50 %). One month after injection, mean visual acuity had improvement to 39.6 ± 11 ETDRS letters (p < 0.001). Mean AC cells measure at 1 month was 0.79 and 0.75 at 3 months. One month after injection, there was a significant reduction of central retinal thickness (CRT) to 342.4 ± 79.3 µm (p < 0.01). One month after the second implant, 11 eyes (91.6 %) achieved improved activity of the anterior uveitis, and mean best-corrected visual acuity improved to 44.6 ± 8.1 ETDRS letters (p < 0.01). At 1 month after the second injection, 4/5 eyes had resolution of macular edema with CRT of 250.4 ± 13.7 µm (p < 0.01). Of the 16 eyes, 12 eyes received a second injection at mean of 7.5 ± 3.1 months after the first treatment, and 5 eyes received a third Ozurdex injection on average 7 ± 4.6 months after the second injection. Of the 16 eyes, five eyes were pseudophakic prior to injection. Of the remaining 11 eyes, 8 (73 %) developed worsening posterior subcapsular cataract at a mean of 7.3 ± 1.2 months after the first injection. After the first injection, only one eye required topical antiglaucoma therapy with maximum pressure of 25 mmHg. In patients with recalcitrant JIA-associated active uveitis, injection of sustained-release dexamethasone can achieve control of anterior inflammation and resolution of macular edema.

  3. Correlation analyses of clinical and molecular findings identify candidate biological pathways in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Ling Xuefeng B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians have long appreciated the distinct phenotype of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA compared to polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (POLY. We hypothesized that gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from children with each disease would reveal distinct biological pathways when analyzed for significant associations with elevations in two markers of JIA activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and number of affected joints (joint count, JC. Methods PBMC RNA from SJIA and POLY patients was profiled by kinetic PCR to analyze expression of 181 genes, selected for relevance to immune response pathways. Pearson correlation and Student's t-test analyses were performed to identify transcripts significantly associated with clinical parameters (ESR and JC in SJIA or POLY samples. These transcripts were used to find related biological pathways. Results Combining Pearson and t-test analyses, we found 91 ESR-related and 92 JC-related genes in SJIA. For POLY, 20 ESR-related and 0 JC-related genes were found. Using Ingenuity Systems Pathways Analysis, we identified SJIA ESR-related and JC-related pathways. The two sets of pathways are strongly correlated. In contrast, there is a weaker correlation between SJIA and POLY ESR-related pathways. Notably, distinct biological processes were found to correlate with JC in samples from the earlier systemic plus arthritic phase (SAF of SJIA compared to samples from the later arthritis-predominant phase (AF. Within the SJIA SAF group, IL-10 expression was related to JC, whereas lack of IL-4 appeared to characterize the chronic arthritis (AF subgroup. Conclusions The strong correlation between pathways implicated in elevations of both ESR and JC in SJIA argues that the systemic and arthritic components of the disease are related mechanistically. Inflammatory pathways in SJIA are distinct from those in POLY course JIA, consistent with

  4. Measurement of biomarkers in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and their significant association with disease severity: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, B E; Chauhan, A K; Low, J M; Moore, T L

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients a biomarker panel of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), IgM rheumatoid factor (RF), IgG RF, and IgA RF and compare to the presence of joint erosions (JE), joint space narrowing (JSN), and synovitis in order to evaluate aggressive disease. Sixty-eight JIA patients (19 RF positive polyarthritis, 23 RF negative polyarthritis, 17 persistent oligoarthritis, and 9 systemic-onset) were evaluated using the biomarker panel and compared to 18 healthy controls. All RF isotypes, anti-CCP antibodies, and COMP were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Statistically significant differences and associations were assessed for each biomarker in relation to JE, JSN, and synovitis. Multiple regression analysis was used to find the variables associated with joint damage and synovitis. Patients with JE and JSN had significantly elevated levels of IgA RF, IgM RF, and anti-CCP antibodies. COMP levels were higher in early disease, but also later in disease in patients with no JE or JSN. ESR, CRP, and IgA RF were significantly elevated in patients with active synovitis. Regression analysis showed IgM RF and disease duration to be associated with JE and JSN. Anti-CCP antibodies and COMP were also associated with JSN. CRP and IgA RF were associated with synovitis. Our findings demonstrate the importance of measuring IgM RF and IgA RF by ELISA and anti-CCP antibodies by ELISA, in addition to COMP in the assessment of JIA patients to determine severity of disease.

  5. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in adulthood: fulfilment of classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, long-term outcomes and predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Eusébio, Mónica; M Martins, Fernando; Mourão, Ana Filipa; Furtado, Carolina; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Cordeiro, Inês; Ferreira, Joana; Cerqueira, Marcos; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Santos, Maria José; Melo-Gomes, José A; Fonseca, João Eurico

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine how adult juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients fulfil classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, evaluate their outcomes and determine clinical predictors of inactive disease, functional status and damage. Methods Patients with JIA registered on the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register (Reuma.pt) older than 18 years and with more than 5 years of disease duration were included. Data regarding sociodemographic features, fulfilment of adult classification criteria, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index—articular (JADI-A) and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index—extra-articular (JADI-E) damage index and disease activity were analysed. Results 426 patients were included. Most of patients with systemic JIA fulfilled criteria for Adult Still's disease. 95.6% of the patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis and 57.1% of the patients with RF-negative polyarthritis matched criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 38.9% of the patients with extended oligoarthritis were classified as RA while 34.8% of the patients with persistent oligoarthritis were classified as spondyloarthritis. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis fulfilled criteria for spondyloarthritis in 94.7%. Patients with psoriatic arthritis maintained this classification. Patients with inactive disease had lower disease duration, lower diagnosis delay and corticosteroids exposure. Longer disease duration was associated with higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E. Higher JADI-A was also associated with biological treatment and retirement due to JIA disability and higher JADI-E with corticosteroids exposure. Younger age at disease onset was predictive of higher HAQ, JADI-A and JADI-E and decreased the chance of inactive disease. Conclusions Most of the included patients fulfilled classification criteria for adult rheumatic diseases, maintain active disease and have functional impairment. Younger age at disease onset was predictive

  6. TNF-α Polymorphisms in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Which Potential Clinical Implications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Scardapane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α gene polymorphisms (SNPs influence disease susceptibility and treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is presently uncertain. TNF-α is one of the most important cytokine involved in JIA pathogenesis. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified within the region of the TNF-α gene but only a very small minority have proven functional consequences and have been associated with susceptibility to JIA. An association between some TNF-α SNPs and adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA susceptibility, severity and clinical response to anti-TNF-α treatment has been reported. The most frenquetly studied TNF-α SNP is located at −308 position, where a substitution of the G allele with the rare A allele has been found. The presence of the allele −308A is associated to JIA and to a poor prognosis. Besides, the −308G genotype has been associated with a better response to anti-TNF-α therapy in JIA patients, confirming adult data. Psoriatic and oligoarticular arthritis are significantly associated to the −238 SNP only in some works. Studies considering other SNPs are conflicting and inconclusive. Large scale studies are required to define the contribution of TNF-α gene products to disease pathogenesis and anti-TNF-α therapeutic efficacy in JIA.

  7. Condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis assessed by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, Elisabeth; Kiss, Gabriel; Wouters, Carine; Carels, Carine

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and analysis software. For 20 patients (14 girls and six boys; mean age 11.21 +/- 3.54 years), resultant cross-sectional images of the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were semi-automatically segmented, and exact registration of the right, with respect to the flipped left grey-level condyle, was obtained. Visual inspection of the volume images in 360 degree rotation showed a wide variety of condylar destruction patterns, ranging from small erosions within the cortex to almost complete deformation of the condylar head. Because segmentation was restricted to the delineation of the cortical region, possible changes in the deeper zones were not reproduced. Descriptive statistics [median and interquartile range (IQR)] and diagrams (frequency distribution) were used to assess the results. Initial analysis of condylar volume (including both flipped left and right) showed a median value for volume of 0.844 cm(3) (IQR 0.323), while the median value for volume difference between both condyles was 0.051 cm(3) (IQR 0.098). Analysis of the degree of asymmetry showed a median value of 26.18 per cent (IQR 14.46). Using the CBCT-based method, it was shown that condylar asymmetry was a common feature in children with JIA. The degree of asymmetry was variable, but significant in the majority of the subjects.

  8. Subclinical Cardiovascular System Changes in Obese Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Głowińska-Olszewska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We aimed to determine the prevalence of excess body mass in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA children and to investigate the influence of obesity into the early, subclinical changes in cardiovascular system in these patients. Methods. Fifty-eight JIA patients, aged median 13 years, were compared to 36 healthy controls. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, TNFα, adiponectin were studied together with IMT (intima-media thickness, FMD (flow mediated dilation, and LVMi (left ventricle mass index as surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. Results. Thirteen JIA children (22% were obese and had increased systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA, hsCRP, and IL-6 compared to nonobese JIA and controls. FMD was decreased compared to nonobese JIA and controls, whereas IMT and LVMi were increased. In multivariate regression analysis, TNFα, SDS-BMI, and systolic blood pressure were independent predictors of early CV changes in JIA. Conclusions. Coincident obesity is common in JIA children and is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and increased levels of inflammatory markers leading to early changes in cardiovascular system. Thus, medical care of children with JIA should include strategies preventing cardiovascular disease by maintenance of adequate body weight.

  9. EXPERIENCE OF TREATMENT OF THE TWINS SICK WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS BY ABATACEPT

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    V. A. Kel'tsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of clinical observation over twin brothers (boys E. and N suffering juvenile idiopathic arthritis is presented in the article. Boys fell ill with a difference in 1 year and 5 months at the age of 1 year and 9 months and 3 years 2 months, respectively. The disease proceeded wavily with the periods of remissions and exacerbations. Resistant articulate syndrome developed in July and November, 2009, respectively. Both children received NSAID, methotrexate combination in a dose of 10 mg/m2/week and sulphasalazine in a dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight per day. To the boy E. it was also prescripted prednisolon in a dose of 10 mg per day. Duration of antirheumatic therapy made 7 and 3 months, respectively. The therapy with a blocker of T-lymphocytes costimulation, abatacept, was initiated for the twins due to the inefficiency of treatment by immunodepressants and prednisolon at the boy E. In 6 weeks of the treatment 50% improvement, in 24 weeks — 90% improvement by criteria of the American College of Rheumatologists (ACRpedi were registered. The undesirable phenomena weren’t observed.

  10. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

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    Ang Cui

    Full Text Available Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction. This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples.

  11. Nitrous Oxide sedation for intra-articular injection in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Harel Liora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intra-articular corticosteroid injection in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is often associated with anxiety and pain. Recent reports advocate the use of nitrous oxide (NO, a volatile gas with analgesic, anxiolytic and sedative properties. Objective To prospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of NO analgesia for intra-articular corticosteroid injection in JIA, and to assess patients and staff satisfaction with the treatment. Methods NO was administered to JIA patients scheduled for joint injection. The patient, parent, physician and nurse completed visual-analog scores (VAS (0–10 for pain, and a 5-point satisfaction scale. Change in heart rate (HR during the procedure was recorded in order to examine physiologic response to pain and stress. Patient's behavior and adverse reactions were recorded. Results 54 procedures (72 joints were performed, 41 females, 13 males; 39 Jewish, 13 Arab; mean age was 12.2 ± 4.7 year. The median VAS pain score for patients, parents, physicians and nurses was 3. The HR increased ≥ 15% in 10 patients. They had higher VAS scores as evaluated by the staff. The median satisfaction level of the parents and staff was 3.0 and 5.0 respectively. Adverse reactions were mild. Conclusion NO provides effective and safe sedation for JIA children undergoing intra-articular injections.

  12. Psychological Profile in Children and Adolescents with Severe Course Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Emanuela Russo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most common chronic pediatric rheumatic disease. It is recognized that only reliance on clinical signs of disease outcome is inadequate for understanding the impact of illness and its treatment on child’s life and functioning. There is a need for a multidisciplinary and holistic approach to children with arthritis which considers both physical and emotional functioning. This study investigated the psychosocial functioning of children and adolescent with JIA and the disease-related changes in their family. Methods. The sample consisted of 33 hospitalized patients, aged 6–16 years. Both parents and the children were given a number of questionnaire to fill out. Clinical information was extracted from the interviews. Results. Self-reported psychological functioning (depression, anxiety, and behavior was not different from the normal population; however significant psychological suffering was detected by the clinical interview. Conclusions. Children and adolescents with JIA do not show overt psychopathology by structured assessment; nevertheless a more clinically oriented holistic approach confirms JIA as a disrupting event causing relevant changes in the quality of life of the affected families.

  13. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: treatment with an orthodontic appliance

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    M. Gattinara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: About 65% of children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA shows a more or less marked involvement of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ with altered mandibular growth, resorption of the condyles, occlusary instability, reduced chewing ability and facial dysmorphia. The purpose of our study is to prevent and to treat the progressive evolution of JIA on craniofacial growth and morphology with a functional appliance; surgery should be considered only in so far as the adequacy of TMJ movement is concemed. Methods: From 1992 until now 72 children with proved JIA and TMJ involvement have been treated (50 females, 22 males, aged 6 to 16 years old. TMJ involvement was bilateral in 61% and unilateral in 39% of patients. A diagnostic workup was carried out involving tomograms of TMJ and cephalometric radiograph and analysis. The authors used a bimaxillary activator in the attempt to modify the unfavourable growth pattern and provide a gradual ante-rotation of the jaw. Results: Almost all JIA patients showed satisfactory long term results, easing of pain, reduced skeletal discrepancy, increased function and good facial profile. Conclusions: The long term results of this study indicate that orthopaedic therapy might control the vicious circle of the malocclusion in children with JIA, preventing exacerbation of mandibular clockwise rotation. Surgical intervention for the improvement of TMJ function should be considered only if a severe restricted state is imminent.

  14. Innovations and Challenges by Applying Sublingual Laser Blood Irradiation in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Laura Marinela Ailioaie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual laser blood irradiation (SLBI was applied into a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, aimed at inducing disease remission. 105 children with JIA, without an adequate response to classical treatment, were administrated a disease modifying drug (Methotrexate and were randomly assigned to three groups. Group I (36 patients received SLBI with the Weberneedle Lasershower Mouth Applicator with three wavelengths (635 nm, 536 nm, and 405 nm, 5 mW maximum output power each, in continuous mode, simultaneously, for 20 minutes daily, 7 successive sessions per month, repeated every 7 weeks, for three times. Group II (36 patients received placebo SLBI. Group III (33 patients received only treatment with Methotrexate. Evaluation was performed using American College of Rheumatology Pediatric criteria (ACR Pedi at study enrollment and at 8, 16, 24, and 48 weeks. At the end of study, there was an improvement of the ACR Pedi 30 by 86.11% in SLBI group compared to only 61.11% in Group II, respectively, and 60.6% in Group III (P=0.001, with significant statistical differences. SLBI has reduced the pain, lowered the number of articulations with movement limitation, increased the quality of life, and made it possible to avoid the administration of biological agents.

  15. SIAE Rare Variants in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Primary Antibody Deficiencies

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    Eirini Sevdali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sialic acid acetylesterase (SIAE deficiency was suggested to lower the levels of ligands for sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like receptors, decreasing the threshold for B-cell activation. In humans, studies of rare heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in SIAE gene in common autoimmune diseases, including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, yielded inconsistent results. Considering the distinct pathogenesis of the two main subtypes of JIA, autoinflammatory systemic (sJIA and autoimmune oligo/polyarticular (aJIA, and a predisposition to autoimmunity displayed by patients and families with primary antibody deficiencies (PADs, the aim of our study was to analyze whether SIAE rare variants are associated with both the phenotype of JIA and the autoimmunity risk in families with PADs. A cohort of 69 patients with JIA, 117 healthy children, 54 patients, and family members with PADs were enrolled in the study. Three novel SIAE variants (p.Q343P, p.Y495X, and c.1320+33T>C were found only in patients with aJIA but interestingly also in their healthy relatives without autoimmunity, while none of PAD patients or their relatives carried SIAE defects. Our results show that SIAE rare variants are not causative of autoimmunity as single defects.

  16. Profiling anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Tebo Anne E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA, have high specificity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, phenotypically resemble RA and test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF a characteristic biomarker of RA. We investigated the prevalence of ACPA and its relationship to other serologic markers associated with RA in a well-characterized JIA cohort. Methods Cases were 334 children with JIA, 30 of whom had RF + polyarticular JIA. Sera from all cases and 50 healthy pediatric controls were investigated by ELISA at a single time point for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP IgG, RF IgM, IgA and IgG, anti-RA33 IgG, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA. Comparisons between cases and controls were made using Chi-square or Fisher exact tests and T-tests. Results The prevalence of RF was 8% among controls, and 12% among cases (ns. The prevalence of ACPA was 2% in controls and 14.3% in cases (OR 8.2, p Conclusions ACPAs are detectable in 14% of children with JIA. Children with positive ACPA but negative RF are frequent, and may define a distinct subset of children with JIA. ACPA testing should be included in the classification of JIA.

  17. Body experiences, emotional competence, and psychosocial functioning in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Bomba, Monica; Meini, Antonella; Molinaro, Anna; Cattalini, Marco; Oggiano, Silvia; Fazzi, Elisa; Neri, Francesca; Plebani, Alessandro; Nacinovich, Renata

    2013-08-01

    We investigated self-image, psychological functioning, and quality of life in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Thirty-nine children with JIA were compared with 80 healthy peers. We first administered the Human Figure Drawing Test (HFDT) to all subjects; children also completed standardized questionnaires evaluating health-related quality of life (PEDSQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales) and the main aspects of psychological functioning: anxiety (SAFA-A) and depression (CDI). Parents were asked to complete the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and the PEDSQL 4.0. For each patient with JIA, clinical notes were gathered and a global disease assessment (visual analog scale--VAS) was performed. Compared to healthy peers, patients with JIA reported reduced maturity quotients at HFDT, more depressive traits, greater anxiety, and lower health-related quality of life. Among the subjects with JIA, HFDT revealed that adolescents had a greater impairment in all areas investigated. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the physical well-being rated by VAS and the perception of poorer quality of life in patients, mostly in the psychosocial domains. Children and adolescents with JIA exhibit emotional difficulties and a delay of psychological development leading to low self-esteem, a distorted self-image, more anxiety and depression traits, and a worse quality of life, when compared to healthy subjects.

  18. Gout in a 15-year-old boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case study.

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    Morris, Hallie; Grant, Kristen; Khanna, Geetika; White, Andrew J

    2014-01-06

    Joint pain is a common complaint in pediatrics and is most often attributed to overuse or injury. In the face of persistent, severe, or recurrent symptoms, the differential typically expands to include bony or structural causes versus rheumatologic conditions. Rarely, a child has two distinct causes for joint pain. In this case, an obese 15-year-old male was diagnosed with gout, a disease common in adults but virtually ignored in the field of pediatrics. The presence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) complicated and delayed the consideration of this second diagnosis. Indeed, the absence of gout from this patient's differential diagnosis resulted in a greater than two-year delay in receiving treatment. The patients' BMI was 47.4, and he was also mis-diagnosed with osteochondritis dissecans and underwent medical treatment for JIA, assorted imaging studies, and multiple surgical procedures before the key history of increased pain with red meat ingestion, noticed by the patient, and a subsequent elevated uric acid confirmed his ultimate diagnosis. With the increased prevalence of obesity in the adolescent population, the diagnosis of gout should be an important consideration in the differential diagnosis for an arthritic joint in an overweight patient, regardless of age.

  19. Clinical predictors of temporomandibular joint arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A systematic literature review.

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    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Stoustrup, Peter; Küseler, Annelise; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Twilt, Marika; Herlin, Troels

    2016-06-01

    To assess the level of evidence for subjective and objective parameters in clinical orofacial examination and determine if predictors for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients exist in the current literature. A comprehensive systematic electronic search strategy was performed in all major medical databases in June 2015. Studies were selected independently by two reviewers in accordance with a prespecified protocol and a risk of bias assessment for all included studies. Subjective examination outcome measures assessed were pain, decreased TMJ function, and TMJ sounds. The objective outcome measures assessed were maximal incisor opening, mandibular asymmetric opening, condylar translation, protrusion, myofascial pain on palpation, facial asymmetry, and micro- or retrognathism. The electronic database search identified 345 unique citations. After application of our strict, predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 21 articles were included and data extracted. The study heterogeneity did not allow for meta-analyses. No singular outcome measure can be suggested as a predictor of TMJ involvement in JIA, as sensitivity and/or specificity is too low compared to contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The current low level of evidence and study heterogeneity do not allow us to conclude on singular clinical outcome measures. To increase study comparability, we call for a standardized terminology and evidence-based guidelines for clinical orofacial examination parameters in JIA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characteristics and relationship of periodontal disease with juvenile idiopathic and rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Vahabi, Surena; Rostamian, Abdolrahman; Baniebrahimi, Ghazaleh

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most prevalent chronic inflammatory disease of the joints. It is correlated with periodontal disease due to similar factors that exist in both diseases. The present study assessed the relationship of periodontal disease with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this case-control study, 30 RA and 30 JIA patients along with similar number of matched controls were selected among patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), O'Leary and Bay plaque index (PI) and bleeding on probing (BOP) were determined in cases and controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, number of painful and inflamed joints and severity of disease were evaluated in RA and JIA patients. Mann-Whitney U-test nonparametric, Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficients, and Chi-square tests were used as statistical analysis (α = 0.05). PD (4.17 vs. 3.6 mm; P 4 mm (58.83% vs. 44.33%; P 3 mm (74.13% vs. 64.4%; P disease severity and number of painful and inflamed joints with periodontal factors. In JIA patients, no significant relationships were found between JIA findings and periodontal parameters. Considering the limitations of this study, there was a relationship between RA and periodontal disease. Severity of periodontal disease increases in patients with RA, while no increased risk of periodontal disease or its severity was observed among JIA patients.

  1. A commentary on TREAT: The trial of early aggressive drug therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Baildam Eileen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a category of JIA where multiple joints are affected by chronic inflammation, and where serious and lasting damage to joints is the expected natural history in untreated disease. There is evidence of response to disease-modifying antirheumatic and biologic drugs, but little evidence of permanent remission from any of the existing therapeutic trials. The TREAT trial by Wallace et al., recently published in Arthritis and Rheumatism, used a collaborative multicenter approach to studying early aggressive treatment of polyarticular JIA in an attempt to achieve full clinical inactive disease after 6 months of treatment. The study's main finding that the earlier in the disease course that treatment is started, the better the chance of disease control, has provided evidence that there is a 'window of opportunity' for treating JIA as there is in adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The study provides both a platform and an impetus for concentrating future treatment trials on early rather than established disease and investigating a standard of starting treatment within 10 to 12 weeks.

  2. Increasing feasibility and patient comfort of MRI in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Hemke, Robert [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jan van Breemen Institute, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-04-15

    MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but has practical limitations. Optimizing the scanning protocol is, therefore, necessary to increase feasibility and patient comfort. To determine the feasibility of bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore MRI of knees and to assess the presence of literature-based MRI features in unsedated children with JIA. Children were classified into two clinical subgroups: active arthritis (group 1; n = 29) and inactive disease (group 2; n = 18). MRI features were evaluated using a literature-based score, comprising synovial hypertrophy, cartilage lesions, bone erosions, bone marrow changes, infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity, effusion, tendinopathy and popliteal lymphadenopathy. The MRI examination was successfully completed in all 47 children. No scan was excluded due to poor image quality. Synovial hypertrophy was more frequent in group 1 (36.2%), but was also seen in 19.4% of the knees in group 2. Infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity was more prevalent in group 2 (86.1%; P = 0.008). Reproducibility of the score was good (Cohen kappa, 0.49-0.96). Bilateral non-contrast-enhanced open-bore knee MRI is feasible in the assessment of disease activity in unsedated children with JIA. Signs differing among children with active and inactive disease include infrapatellar fat pad heterogeneity and synovial hypertrophy. (orig.)

  3. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment.

  4. Treatment preferences in juvenile idiopathic arthritis – a comparative analysis in two health care systems

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    Hugle Boris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA may impact on quality of care. The objective of this study was to identify and compare treatment approaches for JIA in two health care systems. Methods Paediatric rheumatologists in Canada (n=58 and Germany/Austria (n=172 were surveyed by email, using case-based vignettes for oligoarticular and seronegative polyarticular JIA. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics; responses were compared using univariate analysis. Results Total response rate was 63%. Physicians were comparable by age, level of training and duration of practice, with more Canadians based in academic centres. For initial treatment of oligoarthritis, only approximately half of physicians in both groups used intra-articular steroids. German physicians were more likely to institute DMARD treatment in oligoarthritis refractory to NSAID (p Conclusions Treatment of oligo- and polyarticular JIA with DMARD is mostly uniform, with availability and funding obviously influencing physician choice. Usage of intra-articular steroids is variable within physician groups. Physiotherapy has a fundamentally different role in the two health care systems.

  5. Assessment of the Body Composition and Parameters of the Cardiovascular Risk in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Ewa Jednacz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to evaluate cardiovascular risk parameters, body mass index (BMI centiles for sex and age, and body fat percentage using the electric bioimpedance method in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. 30 children with JIA participated in the study. A control group included 20 children. Patients were well matched for the age and sex. The body mass and body fat percentage were determined using the segmental body composition analyser; the BMI centiles were determined. All patients had the following parameters determined: lipid profile, hsCRP, homocysteine, and IL-6. The intima media thickness (IMT was measured. Patients with JIA had significantly lower body weight, BMI, and the BMI centile compared to the control group. The IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with JIA compared to the control group. There were no differences between two groups with regard to the lipid profile, % content of the fat tissue, homocysteine levels, hsCRP, and IMT. Further studies are necessary to search for reasons for lower BMI and BMI centile in children with JIA and to attempt to answer the question of whether lower BMI increases the cardiovascular risk in these patients, similarly as in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.

  6. Land-Jump Performance in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A Comparison to Matched Controls

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    Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Melson, Paula G.; Darnell, Shannon C.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if high functioning children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) with minimal disease activity have different biomechanics during high loading tasks compared to controls. Patients were included if they had minimal inflammation documented in one or both knees. Methods. The subject groups consisted of eleven patients with JIA and eleven sex, age, height, and weight matched controls. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetics were calculated during a drop vertical jump maneuver. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) was collected on each patient with JIA. Results. The subjects with JIA had increased knee (P = .011) and hip flexion (P < .001) compared to control subjects. Subjects with JIA also demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments during take-off (P = .028) and ankle plantar flexor moments during landing (P = .024) and take-off (P = .004). In the JIA group, increased hip extensor moments were predictive of increased disability (R2 = .477, SEE = .131). Conclusions. Patients with JIA may demonstrate underlying biomechanical deviations compared to controls. In addition, biomechanical assessment of hip extensor mechanics during dynamic tasks may provide an objective assessment tool to determine overall function in patients with JIA. PMID:20148070

  7. Infrapatellar bursitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case series.

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    Alqanatish, Jubran T; Petty, Ross E; Houghton, Kristin M; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Cairns, Robyn A

    2011-02-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may infrequently present with localized anterior knee pain or swelling, in addition to generalize knee pain induced by JIA. We report five cases of deep infrapatellar bursitis in children with JIA. The clinical features, radiological findings, management, and outcome of five children with JIA and deep infrapatellar bursitis are reviewed. Three boys and two girls with a mean age of 9.8 years (range 6-14 years) were reviewed. Four children had persistent oligoarticular JIA, and one child had extended oligoarticular JIA. The presentation of deep infrapatellar bursitis was variable. In only one patient was the bursal swelling painful. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in four patients and demonstrated coexistent knee joint synovitis in three. Treatment included targeted corticosteroid injections into the deep infrapatellar bursa in two cases with complete resolution. One case was treated with corticosteroid injection by an outside health care provider with poor clinical response. Two cases are being treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. Deep infrapatellar bursitis can occur as an isolated finding or concurrently with knee joint synovitis in patients with JIA. Awareness of this entity is important because direct injection of the bursa may be needed for treatment, as the bursa does not communicate with the knee joint. Furthermore, when bursitis is suspected in JIA, MRI can be helpful to confirm the diagnosis, detect concurrent knee joint synovitis, and exclude other pathologies.

  8. Elevated serum levels of soluble CD154 in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Zeft Andrew S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Cytokines play important roles in mediating inflammation in autoimmunity. Several cytokines are elevated in serum and synovial fluid samples from children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA. Soluble CD154 (sCD154 is elevated in other autoimmune disorders, but has not been characterized in JIA. Our objectives were to determine if sCD154 is elevated in JIA, and to examine correlations between sCD154 and other inflammatory cytokines. Methods Serum from 77 children with JIA and 81 pediatric controls was analyzed for interleukin (IL1β, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL12, IL13, sCD154, interferon-γ (IFNγ, soluble IL2 receptor (sIL2R, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα, using the Luminex Multi-Analyte Profiling system. Differences in levels of cytokines between cases and controls were analyzed. Logistic regression was also performed. Results sCD154 was significantly elevated in cases compared to controls (p Conclusion Serum levels of sCD154, IL1β, IL6, IL8, sIL2R and TNFα are elevated in most JIA subtypes, suggesting a major role for sCD154, and these cytokines and cytokine receptors in the pathogenesis of JIA.

  9. Aerobic capacity and disease activity in children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA

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    van Pelt Philomien A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA progress into adulthood, long-term outcome is determined by disease activity, physical and psychosocial development. Decreased aerobic capacity may play a critical role in health-related outcomes in JIA, since it has been linked with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in late adulthood. The objectives of the current study are to examine the aerobic capacity and its relation to parameters of disease activity in children, adolescents and young adults with JIA. Methods Sixty-three patients with JIA (aged 10–27 years were cross sectional studied regarding their aerobic capacity and correlations were made to demographic, disease-related variables, and medication utilization. in a cross-sectional study group of 63 patients of all subtypes. Patients were divided in three age groups, 10–13 years; 14–17 years and 18–27 years. Results Reduced aerobic capacity is found in clinical remission as well as active disease in all subtypes and all age groups. Aerobic capacity is more impaired in active disease shown by DAS 28, JADAS 27, ESR and serum thrombocyte counts. Lower haemoglobin has a negative impact. Long-term used medication including methotrexate and corticosteroids didn’t influence outcome. There is no association with current sports participation. Conclusion Reduced aerobic capacity is present in children and adolescents with JIA, both in active disease and in patients with remission. Measures of aerobic capacity may serve as important outcome measure in JIA.

  10. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Havemose-Poulsen, Anne; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj; Skjødt, Henrik; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Locht, Henning; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2006-02-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases. The study population consisted of white adults (rheumatoid factors (RFs), and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides. RA patients had a higher percentage of sites with PD>or=4 mm, CAL>or=2 mm, and ABL>or=2 mm compared to controls. The percentage of sites with CAL>or=2 mm significantly correlated with the levels of IgM-RF and IgA-RF. Missing teeth in JIA and RA patients were not lost due to periodontitis. Patients with GAgP showed higher levels of leukocytes, including neutrophils, and CRP compared to controls. In part, JIA and RA patients showed similar results. Young adults with RA may develop periodontal destruction, and these patients require professional attention. Both differences and similarities in periodontal and hematological variables were seen in individuals with periodontitis, JIA, and RA.

  11. Systematic review of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Kemper Alex R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs may improve outcomes compared to conventional therapy (e.g., non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular corticosteroids. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of DMARDs versus conventional therapy and versus other DMARDs. Results A systematic evidence review of 156 reports identified in MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, and by hand searches. There is some evidence that methotrexate is superior to conventional therapy. Among children who have responded to a biologic DMARD, randomized discontinuation trials suggest that continued treatment decreases the risk of having a flare. However, these studies evaluated DMARDs with different mechanisms of action (abatacept, adalimumab, anakinra, etanercept, intravenous immunoglobulin, tocilizumab and used varying comparators and follow-up periods. Rates of serious adverse events are similar between DMARDs and placebo in published trials. This review identified 11 incident cases of cancer among several thousand children treated with one or more DMARD. Conclusions Few data are available to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of either specific DMARDs or general classes of DMARDs. However, based on the overall number, quality, and consistency of studies, there is moderate strength of evidence to support that DMARDs improve JIA-associated symptoms. Limited data suggest that short-term risk of cancer is low.

  12. Temporomandibular joint alterations and their orofacial complications in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Carvalho, Renata Teixeira de; Braga, Flávia Silva Farah Ferreira; Brito, Fernanda; Capelli Junior, Jonas; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo; Sztajnbok, Flávio Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can have alterations in bone metabolism and skeletal growth, as well as damage to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which can generate extra and/or intraoral alterations, resulting in craniofacial disorders. Our goal is to carry out a review of the literature on orofacial alterations in patients with JIA. Among the orofacial disorders in patients with JIA, alterations in mandibular growth, caused by dysfunctions in the TMJ region, seem highly prevalent in these patients. The most often found alterations are: retrognathia, micrognathia, anterior open bite, dental crowding, facial asymmetry and mouth opening limitation. Thus, the rheumatologist becomes a key agent in the early detection of these disorders, helping with patient referral to a dentist. The diagnosis, in turn, should be performed by the orthodontist, using clinical examination and imaging methods, allowing early treatment and a favorable prognosis. TMJ disorders should be treated by a multidisciplinary team, including pharmacological treatment for pain control and dental care through functional appliance and/or orthodontic therapy, physical therapy and sometimes, speech therapy. We conclude that among the orofacial disorders in patients with JIA, alterations in mandibular growth generated by dysfunctions in the TMJ region seem highly prevalent. Such dysfunctions can cause mainly open bite, mandibular retrusion, micrognathia, dental crowding and facial asymmetry. The rheumatologist can detect these alterations at an early stage, with immediate patient referral to a team that should preferably be a multidisciplinary one, consisting of an orthodontist, physical therapist and speech therapist, to reduce future occlusal and mandibular growth complications.

  13. Methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: process to approval for JIA indication in Japan.

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    Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Takuji; Takei, Syuji; Tomiita, Minako; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Fujikawa, Satoshi; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), the primary treatment for the articular-type juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), is effective and brings about radiological improvement. Patient compliance is good, and it is recognized that its known side effects, namely, disruption of liver function and induction of pulmonary lesions, are unlikely to be severe at the low MTX doses that are administered. In Japan, MTX was granted approval in 1999 by the then Ministry of Health and Welfare specifically for treating rheumatoid arthritis in adult patients, allowing it be generally used in medical institutions for patients having National Health Insurance. However, in the pediatric field, its use outside the indications has so far been unavoidable, and has been left to the discretion of the physician. Finally, at the present conference, expansion of the indications of MTX for JIA was approved in Japan. It is noteworthy that this expansion of indications was achieved without requiring clinical trials on children sponsored by the pharmaceutical company: it was achieved rather by collecting necessary information through ongoing efforts (including collection and analysis of information about approval status in foreign countries, adequate evidence from the literature, implementation of a clinical use survey in Japan, etc.). It also merits attention that the maximum dose (10 mg/m2) was set on the basis of pharmacokinetic data from children, rather than relying on the dosing method and dose for adults.

  14. Subclinical cardiovascular system changes in obese patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Bossowski, Artur; Dobreńko, Elżbieta; Hryniewicz, Andrzej; Konstantynowicz, Jerzy; Milewski, Robert; Łuczyński, Włodzimierz; Piotrowska-Jastrzębska, Janina; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of excess body mass in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) children and to investigate the influence of obesity into the early, subclinical changes in cardiovascular system in these patients. Fifty-eight JIA patients, aged median 13 years, were compared to 36 healthy controls. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers (hsCRP, IL-6, TNF α, adiponectin) were studied together with IMT (intima-media thickness), FMD (flow mediated dilation), and LVMi (left ventricle mass index) as surrogate markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. Thirteen JIA children (22%) were obese and had increased systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, HOMA, hsCRP, and IL-6 compared to nonobese JIA and controls. FMD was decreased compared to nonobese JIA and controls, whereas IMT and LVMi were increased. In multivariate regression analysis, TNF α, SDS-BMI, and systolic blood pressure were independent predictors of early CV changes in JIA. Coincident obesity is common in JIA children and is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and increased levels of inflammatory markers leading to early changes in cardiovascular system. Thus, medical care of children with JIA should include strategies preventing cardiovascular disease by maintenance of adequate body weight.

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and athletic participation: are we adequately preparing for sports integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxter, Alysha; Foss, Kim Barber; Melson, Paula; Ford, Kevin R; Shaffer, Michael; Myer, Gregory D

    2012-09-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) now have well-controlled disease due to improved therapies and management strategies. Children with JIA are more active than in the past and often participate in dynamic, high-loading sports. Standard measures of disease control include examination findings, laboratory values, and patient-directed surveys. However, these standards do not address the subtle deficits in biomechanics and neuromuscular control, which could place affected joints at higher risk for injury. Currently, there are limited evidence-based guidelines to structure conditioning recommendations as to the fitness and mechanics needed to provide safe integration into sports in this population; therefore, tools that objectively measure function with high accuracy and precision may be warranted. Previous work using 3-dimensional motion analysis demonstrated usefulness in guiding physical therapy treatment to correct these deficits. The use of a multidisciplinary team, including physical therapy, rheumatology, and sports medicine, is crucial for preparing these children to return to play. We suggest that the child transition into a sport preparatory-conditioning program to address any underlying deficits. A pediatric exercise specialist who is sensitive to the needs of this population can work with a physical therapist to then appropriately integrate the child safely into sport. Encouraging an active lifestyle is vital to the management of JIA and does not worsen the symptoms associated with childhood arthritis.

  16. Comics as an educational tool for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Mendelson, Amir; Rabinowicz, Noa; Reis, Yonit; Amarilyo, Gil; Harel, Liora; Hashkes, Philip J; Uziel, Yosef

    2017-09-02

    This study examined whether the comic book Neta and the Medikidz Explain JIA would improve disease-related knowledge and treatment adherence among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this prospective cohort study, JIA patients answered 20 multiple-choice knowledge questions about their disease, before and after reading the comic book. Demographic, clinical, health-related quality of life and adherence data were recorded and correlated to the responses. We studied 61 patients with a mean age of 14 ± 3.3 (range 8-18) years, 67% female, 83% Jewish and 17% non-Jewish. Thirty-nine percent had oligoarthritis, 13% systemic, 32% polyarthritis 11% psoriatic and 5% enthesitis-related type JIA. The disease was active in 46%, 40% were treated with biologics/disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and 34% were in remission on medication. Among the 53 patients who completed before and after quizzes, average score increased from 63 to 80% (P comic book. Twenty-seven patients who also completed the quiz 1 year after the first reading retained their knowledge (79%). We did not find a statistically significant correlation between knowledge and age, sex, disease subtype, or Child Health Questionnaire quality of life scores. Adherence to medication use, physical therapy and rheumatology clinic visits were high at baseline; thus, these did not change after reading the comic. The comic booklet Neta and the Medikidz Explain JIA is a good educational tool for increasing disease-related knowledge in children with JIA.

  17. Influence of etanercept on leptin and ghrelin secretion in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska-Paszek, Izabela; Grochowska-Niedworok, Elżbieta; Siwiec, Andrzej; Gruenpeter, Anna; Dul, Lechosław; Irzyniec, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    Objective To assess possible changes in leptin and ghrelin secretion due to etanercept in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods 50 patients with JIA and 16 age-matched controls were enrolled into this prospective, cross-sectional study. Serum leptin, total and acyl ghrelin were measured in addition to white blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte counts. Results 25 patients received etanercept and 25 conventional therapies (including methotrexate) for JIA. There was no difference between treatment and control groups in leptin or ghrelin levels and no evidence of a relationship between leptin and ghrelin in patients with JIA. In all children with JIA there was a correlation between leptin and body mass index (BMI). However, compared with children in the conventional treatment group, children in the etanercept group showed a positive correlation between total ghrelin and BMI and those with a low BMI showed a negative correlation between acyl ghrelin and BMI. Conclusion No differences in leptin and ghrelin concentrations were found when patients with JIA and controls were compared or when patients who received etanercept were compared with those who received conventional treatment for JIA.

  18. US findings of metacarpophalangeal joints in children with idiopathic juvenile arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmazyn, Boaz [Riley Hospital for Children, Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Bowyer, Suzanne L.; Murphy Schmidt, Kara; Ballinger, Susan H.; Beam, Thuy T. [Indiana University, Pediatric Rheumatology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Buckwalter, Kenneth [University Hospital, Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Ying, Jun [University of Cincinnati, Biostatistics, Institute for the Study of Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common cause of chronic arthritis in children, with frequent involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ). To compare US findings with those of radiography and clinical examination. All MCPJs in 20 children with JIA (17 females, median age 9.7 years, range 3.6 to 16.8 years) were evaluated clinically and imaged with gray-scale and color Doppler US, and 90 MCPJs were also imaged radiographically. Each MCPJ was graded on physical examination from 0 (normal) to 4 (severe) by the patient's rheumatologist. US demonstrated abnormalities in 64 of 200 MCPJs (32.0%), including pannus vascularity and/or tenosynovitis in 55 joints (27.5%) (pannus vascularity in 43, tenosynovitis in 40) and bone destruction in 25 joints (12.5%). Overall, US abnormalities and physical examination scores were significantly associated (P < 0.001). However, interobserver agreement between US and clinical evaluation was poor (kappa 0.1) and between US and radiography was only fair (kappa 0.4). US of the MCPJ in children with JIA can demonstrate cartilage thinning, bone erosions, and pannus vascularity. Abnormal US findings are significantly correlated with severity of disease as evaluated clinically. (orig.)

  19. Infection-Related Death among Persons with Refractory Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan P.; Wood, Mark; Friswell, Mark; Flood, Terence J.; Foster, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Severe infections are emerging as major risk factors for death among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In particular, children with refractory JIA treated with long-term, multiple, and often combined immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory agents, including the new biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), are at increased risk for severe infections and death. We investigated 4 persons with JIA who died during 1994–2013, three of overwhelming central venous catheter–related bacterial sepsis caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococus or α-hemolytic Streptococcus infection and 1 of disseminated adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection). All 4 had active JIA refractory to long-term therapy with multiple and combined conventional and biological DMARDs. Two died while receiving high-dose systemic corticosteroids, methotrexate, and after recent exposure to anti–tumor necrosis factor-α biological DMARDs, and 2 during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedure. Reporting all cases of severe infections and especially deaths in these children is of paramount importance for accurate surveillance. PMID:27648582

  20. A critical appraisal of radiographic scoring systems for assessment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Babyn, Paul S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Feldman, Brian [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Rheumatology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Population Health Sciences, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    Assessing structural damage to joints over time is essential for evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions for patients with inflammatory arthritis. Although radiography is able to quantify joint damage, the changes found with conventional radiography early in the disease course are nonspecific, and late radiographic changes are often irreversible. Although many clinical trials on drug development for children still use radiographic scales as endpoints for the study, more specific therapies have been developed for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that would enable imaging to ''fine-tune'' patients to placement into specific treatment algorithms. As a result, new imaging scales to identify early abnormalities are clearly needed. Many pediatric rheumatology centers around the world persistently apply adult-designed radiographic scoring systems to evaluate the progression of JIA. Few pediatric-targeted radiographic scales are available for assessment of progression of JIA in growing joints, and the clinimetric and psychometric properties of such scales have been poorly investigated. We present a critique to the evaluative, discriminative, and predictive roles of the van der Heijde modification of Sharp's radiographic method, a scale originally designed to assess damage to joints of adults with rheumatoid arthritis, when it is applied to a pediatric population. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of this radiographic scoring system for assessing growing joints and the ability of MRI to overcome inadequacies of conventional radiography. (orig.)

  1. Algorithm development for corticosteroid management in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis trial using consensus methodology

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    Ilowite Norman T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of background corticosteroid therapy in rheumatology clinical trials poses a major challenge. We describe the consensus methodology used to design an algorithm to standardize changes in corticosteroid dosing during the Randomized Placebo Phase Study of Rilonacept in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Trial (RAPPORT. Methods The 20 RAPPORT site principal investigators (PIs and 4 topic specialists constituted an expert panel that participated in the consensus process. The panel used a modified Delphi Method consisting of an on-line questionnaire, followed by a one day face-to-face consensus conference. Consensus was defined as ≥ 75% agreement. For items deemed essential but when consensus on critical values was not achieved, simple majority vote drove the final decision. Results The panel identified criteria for initiating or increasing corticosteroids. These included the presence or development of anemia, myocarditis, pericarditis, pleuritis, peritonitis, and either complete or incomplete macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. The panel also identified criteria for tapering corticosteroids which included absence of fever for ≥ 3 days in the previous week, absence of poor physical functioning, and seven laboratory criteria. A tapering schedule was also defined. Conclusion The expert panel established consensus regarding corticosteroid management and an algorithm for steroid dosing that was well accepted and used by RAPPORT investigators. Developed specifically for the RAPPORT trial, further study of the algorithm is needed before recommendation for more general clinical use.

  2. Principles on the use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    N. T. Vatutin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the basic principles on the use of imaging studies in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, which have been elaborated by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR jointly with the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society (PreS. These principles will render certain assistance to practitioners in diagnosing and treating patients with JIA. Undoubtedly, there have been no answers to many questions so far. This primarily applies to the necessity of understanding the standards for the possibility to interpret the pathological process, to harmonize the respective MRI protocols, to identify bone marrow edema, erosions, and synovitis, and to determine the suitability of these or those examinations in order to reveal changes in individual joints. There are considerable conceptual differences in approaches to diagnostic techniques in adults and children. The EULAR-PReS experts assume that some studies may be impracticable or economically inaccessible and this may hinder their introduction into clinical practice. However, most techniques, including ultrasonography, are quite affordable. The practical application of these techniques certainly requires a high professionalism of specialists in functional diagnosis and other instrumental studies.

  3. Decreased antioxidant capacity and increased oxidative stress in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Turkan GUNEY

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a common rheumatic disease in children which has three types. Systemic type goes with fever oligoarticular type involving joints are less than five and the polyarticular type more than five joints involved. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in its pathogenesis. The ROS generated damage proteins, lipids and serve to amplify the signaling pathways sustaining the synovitis. Enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase protect cellular systems from ROS. Our hypothesis is; patients with JIA could have defective defense mechanisms against ROS, which can vary from one type to other. Patients and Methods: We investigated antioxidant status including plasma SOD, catalase and serum ceruloplasmin levels in 25 JIA patients. Also, malondialdehyde (MDA, a product generated by the oxygenation of arachidonic acid, levels were measured. Results: Three patients had systemic; 10 with oligoarticular and 12 with polyarticular JİA and control subject number is 20. Plasma SOD and catalase levels were lower, ceruloplasmin and MDA levels were higher were higher in the study group than in controls. There were a negative correlation between catalase, MDA and SOD levels in patients. In between JIA types; the lowest catalase and ceruloplasmin levels were found in oligoarticular type. Conclusively, present study suggested that patients with JIA have decreased antioxidant capacity and defective defense mechanism against ROS and this could be more evident in patients with oligoarticular JIA. In addition, elevated ceruloplasmin levels do not seem to protect against ROS in JIA.

  4. Land-Jump Performance in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA: A Comparison to Matched Controls

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    Kevin R. Ford

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if high functioning children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA with minimal disease activity have different biomechanics during high loading tasks compared to controls. Patients were included if they had minimal inflammation documented in one or both knees. Methods. The subject groups consisted of eleven patients with JIA and eleven sex, age, height, and weight matched controls. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetics were calculated during a drop vertical jump maneuver. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ was collected on each patient with JIA. Results. The subjects with JIA had increased knee (=.011 and hip flexion (<.001 compared to control subjects. Subjects with JIA also demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments during take-off (=.028 and ankle plantar flexor moments during landing (=.024 and take-off (=.004. In the JIA group, increased hip extensor moments were predictive of increased disability (2=.477, =.131. Conclusions. Patients with JIA may demonstrate underlying biomechanical deviations compared to controls. In addition, biomechanical assessment of hip extensor mechanics during dynamic tasks may provide an objective assessment tool to determine overall function in patients with JIA.

  5. Síndrome metabólica e artrite idiopática juvenil Metabolic syndrome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Clarisse de Almeida Zanette

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A Artrite Idiopática Juvenil (AIJ é a artropatia crônica mais prevalente na infância e na adolescência. A prevalência da síndrome metabólica, assim como da obesidade, vem apresentando rápido aumento, atingindo todas as faixas etárias, inclusive a infância. A síndrome metabólica é caracterizada por um conjunto de riscos para doença cardiovascular e diabetes melito tipo 2, abrangendo adiposidade abdominal, resistência à insulina, dislipidemias e hipertensão arterial sistêmica. Além desses componentes, a inflamação tem sido reconhecida cada vez mais como um fator importante na síndrome metabólica e na obesidade, e pacientes com doenças caracterizadas por processos inflamatórios crônicos, como a AIJ, poderiam representar grupos de risco especiais. Os glicocorticoides são utilizados rotineiramente no controle da inflamação da AIJ, em doses elevadas e com uso prolongado. O uso crônico do glicocorticoide pode induzir resistência à insulina, hipertensão arterial sistêmica e obesidade, aumentando o risco de desenvolver síndrome metabólica. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar a literatura sobre a prevalência dos diversos componentes da síndrome metabólica em pacientes com AIJ. Observamos que, nesses pacientes, os dados sobre síndrome metabólica e seus componentes são muito escassos e mais estudos se fazem necessários, tendo em vista o potencial impacto no aumento do risco de doença cardiovascular.Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most prevalent chronic arthropathy in childhood and adolescence. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, as well as obesity, is increasing rapidly in all age groups, including children. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus, including abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Besides those components, inflammation has been increasingly considered as a significant component of

  6. Safety and efficacy of tocilizumab, an anti-IL-6-receptor monoclonal antibody, in patients with polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei; Mori, Masaaki; Miyamae, Takako; Takei, Syuji; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Nerome, Yasuhito; Iwata, Naomi; Murata, Takuji; Miyoshi, Mari; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the safety and efficacy of tocilizumab in polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) with polyarticular or oligoarticular onset. Patients received 8 mg/kg tocilizumab every 4 weeks in the open-label studies: initial study (to week 12) and then an extension study (at least 48 weeks). Nineteen patients intractable to conventional methotrexate therapy were enrolled. Seventeen patients had polyarticular-onset pJIA; two had oligoarticular-onset pJIA. Mean age was 11.6 years; mean disease duration 5.3 years. American College of Rheumatology Pediatric (ACR Pedi) 30, 50, 70, and 90 response rates, respectively, were 94.7%, 94.7%, 57.9%, and 10.5% at week 12, and 100%, 94.1%, 88.2%, and 64.7% at week 48. Mean disease activity score (DAS28) remained below the remission level (2.6) from week 24. Administration was discontinued in two patients during the extension study because the ACR Pedi 50 response was judged insufficient (one patient) and antitocilizumab antibodies developed (one patient). Adverse events were generally mild, and the four serious adverse events resolved spontaneously or with treatment. In conclusion, tocilizumab showed early and sustained efficacy and tolerability for treating intractable pJIA, which suggests that it is a promising new treatment for this disease.

  7. Do Growing Rods for Idiopathic Early Onset Scoliosis Improve Activity and Participation for Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Mathew David; Platinum, Johnson; Askin, Geoffrey Noel; Labrom, Robert; Hutton, Mike; Chan, Daniel; Clarke, Andrew; Stokes, Oliver M; Molloy, Sean; Tucker, Stewart; Lehovsky, Jan

    2017-03-01

    To investigate whether growing rod surgery for children with progressive idiopathic early onset scoliosis (EOS) effects activity and participation, and investigate factors that may affect this. Multicenter retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data on 60 children with idiopathic EOS and significant scoliosis (defined as a Cobb angle >40°). Thirty underwent brace treatment, and 30, growth rod surgery. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded at 1 year. The validated Activities Scale for Kids performance version (ASKp) questionnaire was used to measure activity and participation. In the brace group, Cobb angle increased from 60° to 68°. There was no change in ASKp score. In the operative group, Cobb angle decreased from 67° to 45°. ASKp decreased from 91 to 88 (P 40°), growth rod surgery was associated with a reduction in activity and participation and Cobb angle, whereas brace treatment was associated with an increase in Cobb angle and no change in activity and participation. Pain was the most important factor affecting activity and participation in both groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sex differences in metabolic and adipose tissue responses to juvenile-onset obesity in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, Ian D; Sébert, Sylvain P; Saroha, Vivek; Gardner, David S; Keisler, Duane H; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael E; Mahajan, Ravi P

    2013-10-01

    Sex is a major factor determining adipose tissue distribution and the subsequent adverse effects of obesity-related disease including type 2 diabetes. The role of gender on juvenile obesity and the accompanying metabolic and inflammatory responses is not well established. Using an ovine model of juvenile onset obesity induced by reduced physical activity, we examined the effect of gender on metabolic, circulatory, and related inflammatory and energy-sensing profiles of the major adipose tissue depots. Despite a similar increase in fat mass with obesity between genders, males demonstrated a higher storage capacity of lipids within perirenal-abdominal adipocytes and exhibited raised insulin. In contrast, obese females became hypercortisolemic, a response that was positively correlated with central fat mass. Analysis of gene expression in perirenal-abdominal adipose tissue demonstrated the stimulation of inflammatory markers in males, but not females, with obesity. Obese females displayed increased expression of genes involved in the glucocorticoid axis and energy sensing in perirenal-abdominal, but not omental, adipose tissue, indicating a depot-specific mechanism that may be protective from the adverse effects of metabolic dysfunction and inflammation. In conclusion, young males are at a greater risk than females to the onset of comorbidities associated with juvenile-onset obesity. These sex-specific differences in cortisol and adipose tissue could explain the earlier onset of the metabolic-related diseases in males compared with females after obesity.

  9. High risk of adrenal insufficiency in adults previously treated for idiopathic childhood onset growth hormone deficiency

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    Lange, Martin; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Svendsen, Ole Lander;

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to reevaluate a group of adults treated for idiopathic childhood onset GH deficiency (GHD) after 18 yr without GH treatment. Twenty-six (11 females) patients participated. All but two had isolated GHD. Childhood diagnosis was established by insulin tolerance test (ITT). The patients...... were retested with an ITT to evaluate adult GH status. In five patients, an arginine and a synacthen test were performed instead of an ITT. Eleven of 25 patients had a subnormal cortisol response to ITT or synacthen. Ten patients had a GH peak less than 3.0 microg/liter (0.5. +/- 0.5 microg....../liter), whereas 16 patients displayed a normal GH response (12.3 +/- 10.6 microg/liter) after ITT. IGF-I values were decreased in the patients with a pathological retest as well as in patients with a normal GH response compared with controls (P

  10. The impact of idiopathic childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (GHD) on bone mass in subjects without adult GHD

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    Lange, Martin; Müller, Jørn; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2005-01-01

    Despite seemingly adequate growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood, children with GH deficiency (GHD) have reduced bone mineral density (BMD) at final height. The aim was to evaluate BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in adults treated for idiopathic childhood-onset (CO) GHD, 18 years after...

  11. Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus onset patterns in Vietnamese children

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    Dung, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Loan, Huynh Thoai; Nielsen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Incidence and disease pattern of childhood-onset SLE is reported to differ among ethnic groups. METHODS: To describe disease pattern and 6 month follow-up in a referral based cohort of 45 Vietnamese children with SLE. Forty-five children who were subsequently diagnosed...... sedimentation rate was 83.6 (SD 37.4). The patient age at diagnosis was positively correlated to the SLEDAI (p = 0.034) and ECLAM (p = 0.022). At 6 month follow-up of the 45 children, 15 patients were in complete remission, 5 were in partial remission, 6 had stable disease, 3 had relapsed, 3 had evolving...... disease, 2 had ongoing resistant disease and 4 had died. Seven patients were lost to follow-up. A second renal biopsy showed an improved ISN class in 13 of 15; in 2 cases the ISN class remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Forty-five Vietnamese children with SLE were referred to Ho Chi Minh Children's Hospital...

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

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    Hsin-Hui Yu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA vary widely across the world but data in East Asia is lacking. Uveitis is a serious cause of morbidity in JIA. This study aimed to analyze the incidence and prevalence of JIA, and the characteristics of JIA-associated uveitis in Taiwan. METHODS: A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Each patient was individually tracked from 1999 to 2009 to identify the diagnosis of JIA and uveitis using the International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors and complications of uveitis in patients with JIA. RESULTS: The study cohort had 2636 cases of JIA and included juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (57.7%, enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA (39.2%, and psoriatic arthritis (3.1%. The average annual incidence of JIA and JIA-associated uveitis were 4.93 (range, 3.93-6.23 and 0.25 (range, 0.12-0.37 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. The average period prevalence of JIA was 33.8 cases per 100,000 population. Uveitis occurred in 4.7% of patients with JIA, while JIA-associated uveitis was complicated by cataract (11.2% and glaucoma (24.8%. Enthesitis-related arthritis was significantly associated with uveitis (OR: 3.47; 95% CI: 2.24-5.37 (p<0.0001. Uveitis diagnosed before JIA was the most significant risk factor for complications of glaucoma or cataract (OR: 3.54; 95% CI: 1.44-8.72 (p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of JIA is low but that of JIA-associated uveitis is increasing. Higher percentage of males in patients with ERA and the strong association between ERA and uveitis are unique for children with JIA in Taiwan. Uveitis diagnosed before arthritis is an important risk factor for complications. Continuous ophthalmologic follow-up is needed for children with JIA or uveitis of unknown etiology.

  13. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Li-Chieh; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Lin, Yu-Tsan; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lin, Chang-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2013-01-01

    Objective The incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) vary widely across the world but data in East Asia is lacking. Uveitis is a serious cause of morbidity in JIA. This study aimed to analyze the incidence and prevalence of JIA, and the characteristics of JIA-associated uveitis in Taiwan. Methods A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Each patient was individually tracked from 1999 to 2009 to identify the diagnosis of JIA and uveitis using the International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors and complications of uveitis in patients with JIA. Results The study cohort had 2636 cases of JIA and included juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (57.7%), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) (39.2%), and psoriatic arthritis (3.1%). The average annual incidence of JIA and JIA-associated uveitis were 4.93 (range, 3.93–6.23) and 0.25 (range, 0.12–0.37) cases per 100,000 population, respectively. The average period prevalence of JIA was 33.8 cases per 100,000 population. Uveitis occurred in 4.7% of patients with JIA, while JIA-associated uveitis was complicated by cataract (11.2%) and glaucoma (24.8%). Enthesitis-related arthritis was significantly associated with uveitis (OR: 3.47; 95% CI: 2.24–5.37) (pUveitis diagnosed before JIA was the most significant risk factor for complications of glaucoma or cataract (OR: 3.54; 95% CI: 1.44–8.72) (p = 0.006). Conclusions The incidence of JIA is low but that of JIA-associated uveitis is increasing. Higher percentage of males in patients with ERA and the strong association between ERA and uveitis are unique for children with JIA in Taiwan. Uveitis diagnosed before arthritis is an important risk factor for complications. Continuous ophthalmologic follow-up is needed for children with JIA or uveitis of unknown etiology. PMID:23940609

  14. Agreement between physicians and parents in rating functional ability of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Buoncompagni Antonella

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate concordance between physicians and parents in rating the degree of functional ability of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Methods The attending physician and a parent were asked to rate independently the level of physical functioning of 155 patients with disease duration ≥ 5 years on a 6-point scale ranging from 1 = no disability (i.e. the child can do without difficulty all activities that children of his/her age can do to 6 = severe disability (i.e. all activities are difficult for the child. At study visit, measures of JIA activity and damage were assessed. Agreement was evaluated with weighted kappa (0.80 excellent agreement. Physician/parent evaluations were divided in 3 groups: 1 concordance; 2 parent over-rating = parent assessment over-rated relative to physician assessment; 3 physician over-rating = physician assessment over-rated relative to parent assessment. Factors affecting concordance/discordance were evaluated by means of Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square/Fisher exact test. Results Concordance, parent over-rating and physician over-rating were observed in 107 (69%, 29 (18.7% and 19 (12.3% evaluations, respectively. Kappa value was 0.69. Parent over-rating was associated with greater intensity of pain (p = 0.01 and higher Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (C-HAQ score (p = 0.004, whereas physician over-rating was associated with more severe joint disease (p = 0.04 to Conclusion Physicians and parents revealed fair concordance in rating functional ability of children with JIA. Parent over-rating was associated with greater child's pain and worse C-HAQ score, whereas physician over-rating was associated with greater severity of joint inflammation and damage.

  15. Characteristics and relationship of periodontal disease with juvenile idiopathic and rheumatoid arthritis

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    Surena Vahabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most prevalent chronic inflammatory disease of the joints. It is correlated with periodontal disease due to similar factors that exist in both diseases. The present study assessed the relationship of periodontal disease with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 30 RA and 30 JIA patients along with similar number of matched controls were selected among patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL, O′Leary and Bay plaque index (PI and bleeding on probing (BOP were determined in cases and controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, number of painful and inflamed joints and severity of disease were evaluated in RA and JIA patients. Mann-Whitney U-test nonparametric, Spearman and Pearson′s correlation coefficients, and Chi-square tests were used as statistical analysis (α = 0.05. Results: PD (4.17 vs. 3.6 mm; P 4 mm (58.83% vs. 44.33%; P 3 mm (74.13% vs. 64.4%; P < 0.001, percentage of sites with BOP (9.67% vs. 6.87%; P < 0.0001 and PI index (85.73% vs. 80.63%; P < 0.0001 were significantly higher in RA patients than controls. In this group, direct and significant correlations were found between serologic findings, disease severity and number of painful and inflamed joints with periodontal factors. In JIA patients, no significant relationships were found between JIA findings and periodontal parameters. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, there was a relationship between RA and periodontal disease. Severity of periodontal disease increases in patients with RA, while no increased risk of periodontal disease or its severity was observed among JIA patients.

  16. [Recommendations for the use of methotrexate in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

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    Calvo, I; Antón, J; López Robledillo, J C; de Inocencio, J; Gamir, M L; Merino, R; Lacruz, L; Camacho, M; Rua, M J; Bustabad, S; Díaz Cordovés-Rego, G

    2016-03-01

    To develop a consensus document of recommendations for the use of methotrexate (MTX) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A group of eleven experts proposed several clinical questions on the use of MTX in patients with JIA. A systematic review was conducted and the evidence and recommendations for each question were extracted. The results were discussed and validated by the experts in a work session to establish the final recommendations. MTX is recommended as the first drug for inducing remission in JIA, and its indication should be made according to the clinical category of the patient. Prior to treatment, it is recommended to perform a complete blood count, including white cells, levels of liver enzymes, serum creatinine, and other analytical parameters according to specific risk factors. Treatment should be initiated with a dose of 10-15 mg/m(2)/week. In cases of uveitis or polyarthritis, an initial dose of 15 mg/m(2)/week should be considered. For a better bioavailability and tolerability, it is preferable to administer MTX parenterally if the dose is ≥15 mg/m(2)/week. It is necessary to periodically perform an analytical monitoring of the patient and to assess possible alterations in liver enzymes to make changes if necessary. Combinations with biological agents may be necessary, as well as the concomitant addition of folic or folinic acid. This document describes the main recommendations for the appropriate use of MTX in JIA patients, according to scientific evidence and clinical experience. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Low bone mineral density in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Prevalence and related factors].

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    Galindo Zavala, Rocío; Núñez Cuadros, Esmeralda; Martín Pedraz, Laura; Díaz-Cordovés Rego, Gisela; Sierra Salinas, Carlos; Urda Cardona, Antonio

    2017-02-23

    Height adjustment is currently recommended for Z-score bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. At present there are no studies that evaluate the prevalence of low BMD in paediatric patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) in Spain following current recommendations. To evaluate low BMD in JIA in paediatric patients with JIA in Spain following the latest recommendations, as well as to assess associated factors. Observational cross-sectional study of Spanish JIA patients from 5 to 16 years-old, followed-up in a Paediatric Rheumatology Unit between July 2014 and July 2015. Anthropometric, clinical and treatment data were recorded. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and bone metabolism parameters were collected, and a completed diet and exercise questionnaire was obtained. A total of 92 children participated. The population prevalence estimation of low BMD was less than 5% (95% CI). A significant positive correlation was found in the multiple linear regression analysis between the body mass index percentile (B: 0.021; P<.001) and lean mass index (B: 0.0002; P=.012), and BMD Z-score adjusted for height (Z-SAH). A significant negative correlation was found between fat mass index (B: -0.0001; P=.018) and serum type I collagen N-propeptide (B: -0,0006; P=.036) and Z-SAH. Low BMD prevalence in JIA patients in our population is low. An adequate nutritional status and the prevalence of lean over fat mass seem to promote the acquisition of bone mass. Those JIA patients with lower BMD could be subjected to an increase of bone turnover. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. Ultrasonography and color Doppler of proximal gluteal enthesitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a descriptive study

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    Thomsen Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of enthesitis (insertional inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is difficult to establish clinically and may influence classification and treatment of the disease. We used ultrasonography (US and color Doppler (CD imaging to detect enthesitis at the small and deep-seated proximal insertion of the gluteus medius fascia on the posterior iliac crest where clinical diagnosis is difficult. The findings in JIA patients were compared with those obtained in healthy controls and with the patients' MRI results. Methods Seventy-six proximal gluteus medius insertions were studied clinically (tenderness to palpation of the posterior iliac crest and by US and CD (echogenicity, thickness, hyperemia in 38 patients with JIA and in 38 healthy controls, respectively (median age 13 years, range 7-18 years. In addition, an additional MRI examination of the sacroiliac joints and iliac crests was performed in all patients. Results In patients with focal, palpable tenderness, US detected decreased echogenicity of the entheses in 53% of the iliac crests (bilateral in 37% and unilateral in 32%. US also revealed significantly thicker entheses in JIA patients compared to healthy controls (p Conclusions According to US, the gluteus medius insertion was thicker in JIA patients than in controls, and it was hypoechoic (enthesitis in about half of the patients. These findings may represent chronic, inactive disease in some of the patients, because there was only limited Doppler flow and MRI contrast enhancement. The present study indicates that US can be useful as an adjunct to clinical examination for improved assessment of enthesitis in JIA. This may influence disease classification, ambition to treat, and choice of treatment regimen.

  19. Regular Aerobic Training Combined with Range of Motion Exercises in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Mine Doğru Apti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effects of regular aerobic training combined with range of motion (ROM exercises on aerobic capacity, quality of life, and function in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Methods. Thirty patients with JIA and 20 healthy age-matched controls (mean age ± SD, 11.3 ± 2.4 versus 11.0 ± 2.3, resp.; P>0.05 were included. All patients performed aerobic walking (4 days a week for 8 weeks and active and passive ROM exercises of involved joints. All patients completed the childhood health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ and the child health questionnaire. ROM measurements of joints were performed by using universal goniometer. Aerobic capacity was determined by measuring peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak during an incremental treadmill test. Results. Peak oxygen uptake and exercise duration were significantly lower in JIA group than in controls (32.5 ± 6.6 versus 35.9 ± 5.8 and 13.9 ± 1.9 versus 15.0 ± 2.0, resp.; P<0.05 for both. Eight-week combined exercise program significantly improved exercise parameters of JIA patients (baseline versus postexercise VO2peak and exercise duration, 32.5 ± 6.6 to 35.3 ± 7.9 and 13.9 ± 1.9 to 16.3 ± 2.2, resp.; P<0.001 for both. Exercise intervention significantly improved CHAQ scores in JIA patients (0.77 ± 0.61 to 0.20 ± 0.28, P<0.001. Conclusion. We suggest that regular aerobic exercise combined with ROM exercises may be an important part of treatment in patients with JIA.

  20. Autoimmune Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Two Rare Cases Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Multiple Sclerosis.

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    Dimopoulou, Despoina; Dimosiari, Athina; Mandala, Eudokia; Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Garyfallos, Alaxandros

    2017-01-01

    Secondary thrombotic microangiopathies are associated with several underlying conditions, with most of them being resolved after the treatment of background disease. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare microangiopathy presenting with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neurological deficits, occurring most often in various autoimmune diseases due to inhibition of ADAMTS13 by autoantibodies, as well as in pregnant women with or without an autoimmune substrate. In this article, we report two newly diagnosed TTP cases, who have not been published so far. The first is a 27-year-old woman with a history of polyarticular rheumatoid factor negative juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with thrombocytopenia, anemia, schistocytes on blood smear, headache, and active arthritis. Originally she was treated successfully with plasma exchange, intravenous prednisone, and vincristine, and a few months after the TTP episode, she was commenced on rituximab, resulting in remission of primary disease and no relapse of TTP. The second case refers to a 29-year-old pregnant woman complaining of dizziness and fatigue with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. She was treated with plasma exchanges, intravenous prednisolone, and INN human normal immunoglobulin with full remission of the TTP episode. Six and half years later, she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and was commenced on interferon beta-1 alpha, with no recurrent episode of TTP. These cases broaden the spectrum of autoimmune disorders manifested or complicated clinically by TTP. Furthermore, biological agents such as rituximab appear to be an effective treatment option for refractory cases of TTP related to systemic rheumatic disease, indicating an alternative therapeutic solution in persistent cases of this disorder.

  1. Autoimmune Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Two Rare Cases Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Multiple Sclerosis

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    Despoina Dimopoulou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary thrombotic microangiopathies are associated with several underlying conditions, with most of them being resolved after the treatment of background disease. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare microangiopathy presenting with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neurological deficits, occurring most often in various autoimmune diseases due to inhibition of ADAMTS13 by autoantibodies, as well as in pregnant women with or without an autoimmune substrate. In this article, we report two newly diagnosed TTP cases, who have not been published so far. The first is a 27-year-old woman with a history of polyarticular rheumatoid factor negative juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with thrombocytopenia, anemia, schistocytes on blood smear, headache, and active arthritis. Originally she was treated successfully with plasma exchange, intravenous prednisone, and vincristine, and a few months after the TTP episode, she was commenced on rituximab, resulting in remission of primary disease and no relapse of TTP. The second case refers to a 29-year-old pregnant woman complaining of dizziness and fatigue with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. She was treated with plasma exchanges, intravenous prednisolone, and INN human normal immunoglobulin with full remission of the TTP episode. Six and half years later, she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and was commenced on interferon beta-1 alpha, with no recurrent episode of TTP. These cases broaden the spectrum of autoimmune disorders manifested or complicated clinically by TTP. Furthermore, biological agents such as rituximab appear to be an effective treatment option for refractory cases of TTP related to systemic rheumatic disease, indicating an alternative therapeutic solution in persistent cases of this disorder.

  2. Patterns of compensation of functional deficits of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of pathological syndromes of unknown aetiology, observed at the developmental age. Their common feature is sustained chronic arthritis with flares and remissions. Clinical signs and symptoms include joint pain, periarticular tissue oedema or articular exudate, frequently associated with hypertrophy of the synovial membrane. The intra- and extra-articular structural damage impairs the motion range and smoothness. The disease process may involve any joint. The knee joint is the most frequently affected in oligo- and polyarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine a direct correlation between disorders of knee joint function and the change in the range of motion of the ankle and hip joints of both lower extremities, and the so-called indirect impact of these changes on patients’ posture. Material and methods The study included 36 JIA patients and 56 healthy controls aged 8–16 years. The evaluation was based on physical examination. Results The results showed differences in the values of quality and range of motion between patients and controls. In the patient group pes planovalgus was more frequently associated with knee joint dysfunction along with the inherent restriction of dorsal flexion of the foot. Shortening of the iliotibial band, increased outward rotation of the right lower extremity with enlarged joint contour and augmented inward rotation of the contralateral healthy extremity all proved significant. Changes in motion range in the joints below and over the knee were associated with alterations of antero-posterior spine curvatures and vertebral rotation along the long spinal axis. Based on the results, the mechanism of the compensation is outlined. Conclusions The observed differences in the range and quality of motion in the ankle, hip and spinal joints between patients and healthy children provide evidence that dysfunction of the knee joint affects the function of the other above

  3. Identification of a novel susceptibility locus for juvenile idiopathic arthritis by genome-wide association analysis

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    Hinks, Anne; Barton, Anne; Shephard, Neil; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Cargill, Michele; Wang, Eric; Ke, Xiayi; Kennedy, Giulia C; John, Sally; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Objective Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. Two well-established genetic factors known to contribute to JIA susceptibility, HLA and PTPN22, account for less than half of the genetic susceptibility to disease; therefore, additional genetic factors have yet to be identified. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic search of the genome to identify novel susceptibility loci for JIA. Methods A genome-wide association study using Affymetrix GeneChip 100K arrays was performed in a discovery cohort (279 cases and 184 controls). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing the most significant differences between cases and controls were then genotyped in a validation sample of cases (n = 321) and controls, combined with control data from the 1958 UK birth cohort (n = 2,024). In one region in which association was confirmed, fine-mapping was performed (654 cases and 1,847 controls). Results Of the 112 SNPs that were significantly associated with JIA in the discovery cohort, 6 SNPs were associated with JIA in the independent validation cohort. The most strongly associated SNP mapped to the HLA region, while the second strongest association was with a SNP within the VTCN1 gene. Fine-mapping of that gene was performed, and 10 SNPs were found to be associated with JIA. Conclusion This study is the first to successfully apply a SNP-based genome-wide association approach to the investigation of JIA. The replicated association with markers in the VTCN1 gene defined an additional susceptibility locus for JIA and implicates a novel pathway in the pathogenesis of this chronic disease of childhood. PMID:19116933

  4. Investigation of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease susceptibility loci for association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence suggesting that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) shares many susceptibility loci with other autoimmune diseases. Objective To investigate variants robustly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or coeliac disease (CD) for association with JIA. Methods Sixteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already identified as susceptibility loci for T1D/CD were selected for genotyping in patients with JIA (n=1054) and healthy controls (n=3129). Genotype and allele frequencies were compared using the Cochrane–Armitage trend test implemented in PLINK. Results One SNP in the LPP gene, rs1464510, showed significant association with JIA (ptrend=0.002, OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.30). A second SNP, rs653178 in ATXN2, also showed nominal evidence for association with JIA (ptrend=0.02, OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.25). The SNP, rs17810546, in IL12A showed subtype-specific association with enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) subtype (ptrend=0.005, OR=1.88, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.94). Conclusions Evidence for a novel JIA susceptibility locus, LPP, is presented. Association at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus, previously reported to be associated with JIA in a US series, also supports this region as contributing to JIA susceptibility. In addition, a subtype-specific association of IL12A with ERA is identified. All findings will require validation in independent JIA cohorts. PMID:20647273

  5. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  6. Investigation of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in juvenile idiopathic arthritis confirms high degree of overlap

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    Hinks, Anne; Cobb, Joanna; Sudman, Marc; Eyre, Stephen; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jonathon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Langefeld, Carl D; Glass, David N; Thompson, Susan D; Thomson, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) shares some similar clinical and pathological features with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA); indeed, the strategy of investigating whether RA susceptibility loci also confer susceptibility to JIA has already proved highly successful in identifying novel JIA loci. A plethora of newly validated RA loci has been reported in the past year. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) to determine if they were also associated with JIA. Methods Thirty-four SNP that showed validated association with RA and had not been investigated previously in the UK JIA cohort were genotyped in JIA cases (n=1242), healthy controls (n=4281), and data were extracted for approximately 5380 UK Caucasian controls from the Wellcome Trust Case–Control Consortium 2. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared between cases with JIA and controls using PLINK. A replication cohort of 813 JIA cases and 3058 controls from the USA was available for validation of any significant findings. Results Thirteen SNP showed significant association (p<0.05) with JIA and for all but one the direction of association was the same as in RA. Of the eight loci that were tested, three showed significant association in the US cohort. Conclusions A novel JIA susceptibility locus was identified, CD247, which represents another JIA susceptibility gene whose protein product is important in T-cell activation and signalling. The authors have also confirmed association of the PTPN2 and IL2RA genes with JIA, both reaching genome-wide significance in the combined analysis. PMID:22294642

  7. Usefulness of Adalimumab in the Treatment of Refractory Uveitis Associated with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

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    Carmen García-De-Vicuña

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and associated refractory uveitis. Design. Multicenter, prospective case series. Methods. Thirty-nine patients (mean [SD] age of 11.5 [7.9] years with JIA-associated uveitis who were either not responsive to standard immunosuppressive therapy or intolerant to it were enrolled. Patients aged 13–17 years were treated with 40 mg of adalimumab every other week for 6 months and those aged 4–12 years received 24 mg/m2 body surface. Results. Inflammation of the anterior chamber (2.02 [1.16] versus 0.42 [0.62] and of the posterior segment (2.38 [2.97] versus 0.35 [0.71] decreased significantly between baseline and the final visit (P<0.001. The mean (SD macular thickness at baseline was 304.54 (125.03 μ and at the end of follow-up was 230.87 (31.12 μ (P<0.014. Baseline immunosuppression load was 8.10 (3.99 as compared with 5.08 (3.76 at the final visit (P<0.001. The mean dose of corticosteroids also decreased from 0.25 (0.43 to 0 (0.02 mg (P<0.001. No significant side effects requiring discontinuation of therapy were observed. Conclusion. Adalimumab seems to be an effective and safe treatment for JIA-associated refractory uveitis and may reduce steroid requirement.

  8. Efficacy of rehabilitation therapy on hospital stage of treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    T A Shelepina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess efficacy of hospital stage of treatment including rehabilitation methods in pts with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA evaluating changes of some measures of functional status at admission and at discharge. Material and methods. 56 pts with different variants of JIA admitted to the pediatric department of the Institute of Rheumatology of RAMS and treated with medicaments and rehabilitation methods. Correction of anti-inflammatory therapy influencing functional status (NSAIDs dose increase, intra-articular injections of glucocorticoids was done in 36 pts. In the rest of pts treatment with DMARDs was changed. Mean duration of hospital stay was 20 days. At admission and at discharge following measures were recorded: pain on VAS, dynamometry, 25 m walking time, contracture angle and amplitude of movement of joint causing disability and treated with rehabilitation methods (mean summated measures were assessed, localization was not considered. Results. Significant change of pain (29,04 mm+2,9 mm vs 9,92 mm±l,6 mm, contracture angle (19,33o±l 1,12 о vs 10,33 о ±8,34 о and movement amplitude (71,5 о ±38,52 о vs 90,71 о ±38,52 о. Significant improvement (movement amplitude increase from 68,6±42,4 to 85,3±41,0 and angle of deformation decrease from 15±5,8 to 8,5±7,4 was achieved in 20 pts without correction of treatment influencing functional status. Conclusion. Functional status of pts with JIA improved as a result of complex treatment with medicaments and active rehabilitation methods. Importance of rehabilitation treatment in pts with JIA during hospital stay was shown.

  9. The pathogenesis of oligoarticular/polyarticular vs systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

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    Lin, Yu-Tsan; Wang, Chen-Ti; Gershwin, M Eric; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-06-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has had a long and difficult problem with classification. It is clearly a heterogeneous and multi-factorial autoimmune disease but all too often the distinctions among subtypes were unclear. In fact, there is now increasing evidence of a distinct pathogenesis of oligo/polyarticular JIA compared to systemic JIA. Oligo/polyarticular JIA is an antigen-driven lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune disease with abnormality in the adaptive immune system. Cartilage-derived auto-antigens activate autoreactive T cells including Th1 and Th17 cells with production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17. On the other hand, the inhibition of regulatory T (Treg) cells including natural Foxp3(+) Treg and self-heat shock protein-induced Treg cells with decreased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 results in the loss of immune tolerance. Imbalance between autoreactive Th1/Th17 and Treg cells leads to the failure of T cell tolerance to self-antigens, which contributes to the synovial inflammation of oligo/polyarticular JIA. By contrast, systemic JIA is an autoinflammatory disease with abnormality in the innate immune system. A loss of control of the alternative secretory pathway leading to aberrant activation of phagocytes including monocytes, macrophages and neutrophils seems to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, IL-18 and pro-inflammatory S100-proteins, which contribute to the multisystem inflammation of systemic JIA. Markedly distinct pathogenesis of oligo/polyarticular JIA and systemic JIA implies that they might need different treatment strategies.

  10. Analysis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis in India over the last 16 years

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    Sudharshan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA associated uveitis is one of the most common causes of visual morbidity in children. We report the systemic, clinical and investigational features of a cohort of all cases of JIA associated uveitis seen at our referral uveitis clinic between 1988 and 2004. Study Design: Retrospective case series Materials and Methods: All patients of JIA seen at the uveitis clinic of tertiary eye care hospital, between 1988 and 2004 with minimum follow up of 3 months were included. Complete history and ophthalmic evaluation and findings on each visit were noted. Ocular complications were identified and recorded. Results of laboratory investigations and diagnostic as well as therapeutic procedures were analyzed. A rheumatologist managed systemic status. Results: There were 40 patients (64 eyes with JIA. Thirty four patients (85% had pauciarticular type and 6 patients (15% had polyarticular type of JIA. Complicated cataract and band shaped keratopathy were seen in 38 eyes (63% and 37 eyes (62% respectively. Twenty-two patients (17 bilateral and 5 unilateral were treated with immunosuppressives and in 19 of these patients, the disease went into remission. Twenty-three eyes (38% had improvement in visual acuity while in 27 eyes (45%, the vision remained stable and in 10 eyes (17%, vision deteriorated despite therapy. Conclusion: In India, JIA associated uveitis commonly presented in pauciarticular type with preponderance in males. Rheumatoid arthritis factor and anti nuclear antibodies were not as common as compared to the western population. Among long-term treatment options, immunosuppressives are a better choice. Ocular surgery was performed when mandatory for visual rehabilitation.

  11. Association of interleukin-1 family gene polymorphisms with juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Iranian population.

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    Ziaee, V; Maddah, M; Harsini, S; Rezaei, A; Sadr, M; Zoghi, S; Moradinejad, M H; Rezaei, N

    Cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1), seem to contribute towards the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), so this study was designed to evaluate the associations of IL-1 gene cluster and IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with JIA proneness in Iranian population. Genomic DNA of 55 Iranian patients with JIA and 140 controls were extracted and typed for IL-1α gene at position -889, IL-1β gene at positions -511 and +3962, IL-1R gene at position Pst-I 1970, and interleikin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene at position Mspa-I 11100, using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers method, and compared between patients and controls. The CC genotype of IL-1Ra at Mspa-I 11100 position was found to be more frequent in patients with JIA compared to healthy individuals (P=0.03), although the CT genotype at the same position was significantly higher in the control group in comparison with patients with JIA (P=0.02). No significant differences were observed between the two groups of case and control for IL-1α (-889 C/T), IL-1β (-511 C/T and +3962 C/T) and IL-1R (Pst-1 1970 C/T). The results of the present investigation suggest that certain IL-1Ra gene variants are associated with individuals' susceptibility to JIA. Nevertheless, further studies are required to establish the results of the current study. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Aerobic capacity and disease activity in children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA

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    van Pelt Philomine A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA progress into adulthood, long-term outcome is determined by disease activity, physical and psychosocial development. Decreased aerobic capacity may play a critical role in health-related outcomes in JIA, since it has been linked with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in late adulthood. The objectives of the current study are to examine the aerobic capacity and its relation to parameters of disease activity in children, adolescents and young adults with JIA. Methods Sixty-three patients with JIA (aged 10–27 years were cross sectional studied regarding their aerobic capacity and correlations were made to demographic, disease-related variables, and medication utilization. in a cross-sectional study group of 63 patients of all subtypes. Patients were divided in three age groups, 10–13 years; 14–17 years and 18–27 years. Results Reduced aerobic capacity is found in clinical remission as well as active disease in all subtypes and all age groups. Aerobic capacity is more impaired in active disease shown by DAS 28, JADAS 27, ESR and serum thrombocyte counts. Lower haemoglobin has a negative impact. Long-term used medication including methotrexate and corticosteroids didn’t influence outcome. There is no association with current sports participation. Conclusion Reduced aerobic capacity is present in adolescents and young adults with JIA, both in active disease and in patients with remission. Measures of aerobic capacity may serve as important outcome measure in JIA.

  13. PADI4 and the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Hisa, Kaori; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu D.; Naruto, Takuya; Miyamae, Takako; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Rhoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei; Mori, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Objective Both genetic and environmental factors are associated with susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Many studies have reported that both a ‘shared epitope’ (SE) encoded by several HLA-DRB1 alleles and the peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4) gene polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is uncertain whether JIA and RA share the latter genetic risk factor. Therefore, here we investigated relationships between HLA-SE and PADI4 polymorphisms with clinical subtypes of JIA. Methods JIA patients (39 oligoarthritis, 48 RF-positive polyarthritis, 19 RF-negative polyarthritis and 82 systemic) and 188 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. Three PADI4 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs2240340, rs2240337 and rs1748033, were genotyped using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. Results Frequencies of the HLA-SE were higher in RF-positive polyarticular JIA than in healthy controls. RF-positive polyarticular JIA was associated with HLA-SE (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.5–11.9, pc < 0.001). No associations were found between clinical subtypes of JIA and PADI4 allele frequency. Nonetheless, rs2240337 in the PADI4 gene was significantly associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA)-positivity in JIA. The A allele at rs2240337 was a significant risk factor for ACPA positivity in JIA (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.71–23.7 pc = 0.03). Conclusion PADI4 gene polymorphism is associated with ACPA-positivity in JIA. The association of HLA-SE with RF-positive polyarticular JIA as well as RA is confirmed in Japanese. Thus, HLA-SE and PADI4 status both influence JIA clinical manifestations. PMID:28182665

  14. The diagnostic accuracy of unenhanced MRI in the assessment of joint abnormalities in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (G1-235), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Veenendaal, Mira van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J.M. van den; Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology (G1-235), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and reliability of MRI without contrast enhancement in the evaluation of JIA knee joint abnormalities. JIA patients with clinically active knee involvement were prospectively studied using an 1-T open-bore magnet. MRI features were independently evaluated by two readers using the JAMRIS system. The first reading included unenhanced images, whereas complete image sets were available for the second reading. Imaging findings from 73 patients were analysed. Agreement between Gd-enhanced (+Gd) and Gd-unenhanced (-Gd) MRI scores of bone marrow changes, cartilage lesions and bone erosions was good concerning sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value. Inter-observer agreement was good for both -Gd and +Gd scores (ICC = 0.91-1.00, 0.93-1.00, respectively). Regarding the assessment of synovial hypertrophy, specificity of -Gd was high (0.97), but the sensitivity of unenhanced MRI was only 0.62. Inter-reader agreement for +Gd MRI was ICC = 0.94; however, omitting post-Gd acquisitions increased inter-reader variation (ICC = 0.86). If Gd-enhanced MRI is the reference standard, omitting Gd contrast medium is irrelevant for the assessment of bone marrow changes, cartilage lesions and bone erosions as joint abnormalities in JIA. Omitting intravenous Gd in the MRI assessment of joints in JIA is inadvisable, because it decreases the reliability of detecting synovial disease. circle Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to assess juvenile idiopathic arthritis. circle Synovial hypertrophy, a marker of JIA activity, is well shown by MRI. (orig.)

  15. High rates of unsuccessful transfer to adult care among young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Duffy Ciarán M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to describe the proportion of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA who had experienced an unsuccessful transfer from a pediatric rheumatology team to an adult rheumatologist and to compare the characteristics of those who achieved successful transfer to those who did not. Methods We conducted a systematic chart review of all patients with JIA who attended their final Montreal Children's Hospital JIA clinic appointment between 1992 and 2005. We tracked these patients for the two years after transfer to an adult rheumatologist. We then compared characteristics of patients with successful and unsuccessful transfers of care. Variables pertaining to disease characteristics, disease severity and psychosocial factors were examined. Univariate analyses were performed to determine if any single factor was associated with the outcome of unsuccessful transfer of care. Results 52% of patients fulfilled our criteria for unsuccessful transfer. Of the variables tested, an active joint count (AJC of zero at last visit was associated with the outcome of unsuccessful transfer (OR = 2.67 (CI 1.16-6.16; p = 0.0199. Conclusions Despite the presence of a coordinated process of transfer from pediatric to adult health care for the majority of the patients in this study, there was a high rate of unsuccessful transfer and/or sustained follow up which is disheartening. We found that patients with less active disease at the time of transfer, as indicated by a lower AJC, were more likely to be lost to follow up. Recent literature suggests that even in the least severe categories of JIA, 50% of patients persist with active disease into adulthood. Thus educating all JIA patients about the possibility of disease flare in adulthood may improve their adherence to recommendations for sustained follow-up in the adult milieu. This may lead to improvement of longitudinal outcomes for all JIA patients.

  16. Exercise Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntze, Gregor; Nesbitt, Colleen; Whittaker, Jackie L; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Toomey, Clodagh; Esau, Shane; Doyle-Baker, Patricia K; Shank, Jena; Brooks, Julia; Benseler, Susanne; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-07-18

    To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy of exercise interventions in improving outcomes across domains of functioning and disability in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seven electronic databases were systematically searched up to November 16, 2016. Original data, analytic prospective design, physical therapy-led exercise intervention evaluation, children and adolescents with JIA, and assessment of functional, structural, activity, participation, or quality of life outcomes. Two authors screened search results, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Of 5037 potentially relevant studies, 9 randomized controlled trials and 1 cohort study were included and scored. Study quality (Downs and Black quality assessment tool) and level of evidence (Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine model) were assessed and meta-analysis conducted where appropriate. Alternatively, a descriptive summary approach was chosen. All randomized controlled trials were moderate-quality intervention studies (level 2b evidence; median Downs and Black score, 20 out of 32; range, 15-27). Interventions included aquatic, strengthening, proprioceptive, aerobic, and Pilates exercises. Pediatric activity capacity (Child Health Assessment Questionnaire) improved with exercise (mean difference, .45; 95% confidence interval, .05-.76). Furthermore, descriptive summaries indicated improved activity capacity, body function and structure (pain and muscle strength), and quality of life outcomes. Exercise therapy appears to be well tolerated and beneficial across clinically relevant outcomes in patients with JIA. The paucity of high-quality evidence and study heterogeneity limited the ability to provide conclusive, generalizing evidence for the efficacy of exercise therapy and to provide specific recommendations for clinical practice at this time. Future research evaluating exercise program implementation using validated outcomes and detailed adherence and

  17. Long-term treatment with rituximab in severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Modorati, Giulio; Berchicci, Luigi; Pontikaki, Irene; Meroni, Pierluigi; Gerloni, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the long-term efficacy of rituximab in patients with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. Eight patients (15 eyes) with severe and longstanding JIA uveitis, who had an inadequate response in controlling uveitis to one or more biologic agents including tumour necrosis factor blockers and abatacept, received rituximab therapy. Rituximab was given at a dose of 1000 mg per infusion on days 1 and 15 and then every 6 months. Clinical responses to treatment, including decrease in uveitis activity, visual acuity changes, reduction of concomitant local and systemic corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressants, and occurrence of adverse events, were assessed. Eight patients with a mean±SD age of 22.8±5.5 years were treated. The mean ocular disease duration was 17.7 years; the mean±SD follow-up time on rituximab was 44.75±4.9 months; and the mean number of rituximab infusions received was 8.75 (range 6-12). All patients achieved complete control of uveitis, but in two patients rituximab was discontinued due to inefficacy in treating arthritis. The decrease in uveitis activity was evident 4-5 months after the first infusion. Systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressants used in association with rituximab were discontinued in five patients at the end of follow-up. None of the patients experienced visual worsening during the follow-up. No drug-related complications were encountered. Rituximab may be a promising effective treatment option for refractory uveitis associated with JIA leading to long-term quiescence of uveitis, particularly for patients who have not previously responded to other biologic therapies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Abatacept in the treatment of severe, longstanding, and refractory uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappeiner, Christoph; Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Bodaghi, Bahram; Kotaniemi, Kaisu; Mackensen, Friederike; Gerloni, Valeria; Quartier, Pierre; Lutz, Thomas; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2015-04-01

    Abatacept (ABA), a selective T cell costimulation modulator that binds to CD80 and CD86 on antigen-presenting cells, was investigated for its antiinflammatory effect in treating severe chronic uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Our retrospective study was conducted by members of the Multinational Interdisciplinary Working Group for Uveitis in Childhood (MIWGUC). Patients with JIA who are receiving ABA treatment for active uveitis were included. In all patients, uveitis had been refractory to previous topical and systemic corticosteroids, immunosuppressives, and at least 1 tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor. A standardized protocol was used to document uveitis (MIWGUC) and arthritis. Baseline visit and visits at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months before and after ABA start were evaluated. Primary outcome measure was defined as achievement of uveitis inactivity; secondary outcome measures were tapering of corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressive treatment, and occurrence of complications. In all, 21 patients (16 female) with active uveitis (n = 21) and arthritis (n = 18) were included (mean age 11.8 ± 3.6 yrs). In 7 of 18 patients with active arthritis at baseline, inactivity was achieved following ABA treatment. Uveitis inactivity was achieved in 11 patients, but recurred later in 8 of them, and remained active in another 10 cases. Systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppression were tapered in 3 patients, but uveitis recurred in all of them during further followup. Ocular complications secondary to uveitis were present in 17 patients at baseline, while 3 patients developed new ocular complications during followup. A sustained response to ABA was uncommon in patients with severe and refractory uveitis.

  19. [Cytokine profile changes in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, E A; Yadykina, E V; Mezentseva, E A; Nikushkina, K V

    to identify the differences between serum cytokine profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) with or without uveal tract inflammation. Serum cytokine profiles were studied in two groups of patients: 20 children with JIA and JIA-associated uveitis and 33 children, who had no signs of uveitis under basic therapy for their JIA. All the patients showed drug remission of articular syndrome. Inflammation of the choroid took the form of chronic anterior uveitis. The process was active in 95% of cases. The control group consisted of 35 children without rheumatic disease or other acute condition at the time of examination. Groups were comparable in terms of age and sex. Serum levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-10 were measured by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique. A statistically significant increase in TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17, and IL-10 levels was found in all patients as compared to the control group. A comparison drawn between serum cytokine levels of JIA patients and those, who also suffered from JIA-associated uveitis, revealed a decrease in IFN-γ and an increase in IL-10 in the latter group. There was also a statistically significant positive correlation between TNF-α and IFN-γ serum levels in patients with JIA-associated uveitis. Development of uveitis in patients with drug remission of JIA occurs on the background of cytokine imbalance in the serum, in particular, increased concentrations of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-17 cytokines along with reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-10 levels. This may be regarded as risk factors for ocular inflammation and should be taken into account when making treatment decisions.

  20. Exposure to animals and risk of oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a multicenter case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michels Hartmut

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An inverse association between early contact with microbial compounds and respiratory allergies is well established. The protective effect of infant contact with animals was also shown for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. We aimed to test the association between animal contact in infancy and oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (OA JIA. Methods Parents of children with OA JIA registered at the Hospital for Pediatric Rheumatology in Garmisch-Partenkirchen were asked to complete a questionnaire. Children who underwent strabismus surgery at six referral centers for ophthalmology served as controls. Children age 6 to 18 years born in Germany without malformations were included (238 cases; response 89% and 832 controls; response 86%. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models after adjusting for potential confounders. Results Neither place of living (urban vs. rural area, living on a farm, nor regular farm animal (adjusted odds ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.42-1.47 or pet contact (0.79; 0.55-1.14 during infancy were clearly related to case status. Allergic rhinitis was inversely related to OA JIA (0.57; 0.34-0.95. Neither place of living (urban vs. rural area, living on a farm, nor regular farm animal (adjusted odds ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.42-1.47 or pet contact (0.79; 0.55-1.14 during infancy were related to case status. Allergic rhinitis was inversely related to OA JIA (0.57; 0.34-0.95. Conclusions Contact with farm environments in infancy might not be associated with OA JIA. This finding is consistent with previous findings for diabetes mellitus type 1 but contradicts results for IBD and SLE.

  1. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  2. How do parents of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA perceive their therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageswaran Savithri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapies are commonly used by pediatric patients with chronic medical conditions. Little is known about parents' perceptions of these therapies. This study describes the views of parents of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA regarding conventional and CAM therapies. Methods Parents of children with JIA seen at a pediatric rheumatology clinic were surveyed between June 1 and July 31, 2007. Questionnaires asked about patients' use of over 75 therapies in the past 30 days, their perceived helpfulness (0 = not helpful; 3 = very helpful, perceived side effects (0 = none; 3 = severe, and whether each therapy would be recommended to other patients with JIA (Yes, No, Not sure. Results Questionnaires were returned by 52/76 (68% parents; patients' average age was 10.9 years and 87% were Caucasian. Medications were used by 45 (88% patients; heat (67% and extra rest (54% were also commonly used. CAM therapies were used by 48 (92%, e.g., massage (54%, vitamins and other supplements (54%, avoiding foods that worsened pain (35% and stress management techniques (33%. Among the therapies rated by 3 or more parents, those that scored 2.5 or higher on helpfulness were: biologic medications, methotrexate, naproxen, wheelchairs, orthotics, heat, vitamins C and D, music, support groups and prayer. CAM therapies had 0 median side effects and parents would recommend many of them to other families. Conclusion JIA patients use diverse therapies. Parents report that many CAM therapies are helpful and would recommend them to other parents. These data can be used in counseling patients and guiding future research.

  3. Patterns of compensation of functional deficits of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Beata Żuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a group of pathological syndromes of unknown aetiology, observed at the developmental age. Their common feature is sustained chronic arthritis with flares and remissions. Clinical signs and symptoms include joint pain, periarticular tissue oedema or articular exudate, frequently associated with hypertrophy of the synovial membrane. The intra- and extra-articular structural damage impairs the motion range and smoothness. The disease process may involve any joint. The knee joint is the most frequently affected in oligo- and polyarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine a direct correlation between disorders of knee joint function and the change in the range of motion of the ankle and hip joints of both lower extremities, and the so--called indirect impact of these changes on patients’ posture. Material and methods : The study included 36 JIA patients and 56 healthy controls aged 8–16 years. The evaluation was based on physical examination. Results : The results showed differences in the values of quality and range of motion between patients and controls. In the patient group pes planovalgus was more frequently associated with knee joint dysfunction along with the inherent restriction of dorsal flexion of the foot. Shortening of the iliotibial band, increased outward rotation of the right lower extremity with enlarged joint contour and augmented inward rotation of the contralateral healthy extremity all proved significant. Changes in motion range in the joints below and over the knee were associated with alterations of antero-posterior spine curvatures and vertebral rotation along the long spinal axis. Based on the results, the mechanism of the compensation is outlined. Conclusions : The observed differences in the range and quality of motion in the ankle, hip and spinal joints between patients and healthy children provide evidence that dysfunction of the knee joint affects the function

  4. Disease activity, severity, and damage in the UK Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Louise; Leone, Valentina; Pilkington, Clarissa; Tullus, Kjell; Rangaraj, Satyapal; McDonagh, Janet E; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Wilkinson, Nick; Riley, Phil; Tizard, Jane; Armon, Kate; Sinha, Manish D; Ioannou, Yiannis; Archer, Neil; Bailey, Kathryn; Davidson, Joyce; Baildam, Eileen M; Cleary, Gavin; McCann, Liza J; Beresford, Michael W

    2012-07-01

    The UK Juvenile-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (JSLE) Cohort Study is a multicenter collaborative network established with the aim of improving the understanding of juvenile SLE. The present study was undertaken to describe the clinical manifestations and disease course in patients with juvenile SLE from this large, national inception cohort. Detailed data on clinical phenotype were collected at baseline and at regular clinic reviews and annual followup assessments in 232 patients from 14 centers across the UK over 4.5 years. Patients with SLE were identified according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) SLE classification criteria. The present cohort comprised children with juvenile SLE (n=198) whose diagnosis fulfilled ≥4 of the ACR criteria for SLE. Among patients with juvenile SLE, the female:male sex distribution was 5.6:1 and the median age at diagnosis was 12.6 years (interquartile range 10.4-14.5 years). Male patients were younger than female patients (PLupus Assessment Group disease activity index demonstrated significantly increased frequencies of musculoskeletal (82%), renal (80%), hematologic (91%), immunologic (54%), and neurologic (26%) involvement among the patients over time. A large proportion of the patients (93%) were taking steroids and 24% of the patients required treatment with cyclophosphamide. Disease damage was common, with 28% of the patients having a Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/ACR damage score of ≥1. The data on these patients from the UK JSLE Cohort Study, comprising one of the largest national inception cohorts of patients with juvenile SLE to date, indicate that severe organ involvement and significant disease activity are primary characteristics in children with juvenile SLE. In addition, accumulation of disease-associated damage could be seen. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Do adolescent drug users fare the worst? Onset type, juvenile delinquency, and criminal careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Matt; Angton, Alexia; Behnken, Monic P; Kusow, Abdi M

    2015-02-01

    Although substance abuse often accompanies delinquency and other forms of antisocial behavior, there is less scholarly agreement about the timing of substance use vis-à-vis an individual's antisocial trajectory. Similarly, although there is extraordinary evidence that onset is inversely related to the severity of the criminal career, there is surprisingly little research on the offense type of onset or the type of antisocial behavior that was displayed when an individual initiated his or her offending career. Drawing on data from a sample of serious adult criminal offenders (N = 500), the current study examined 12 forms of juvenile delinquency (murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, auto theft, arson, weapons, sexual offense, drug sales, and drug use) in addition to age at arrest onset, age, sex, race to explore their association with chronicity (total arrests), extreme chronicity (1 SD above the mean which was equivalent to 90 career arrests), and lambda (offending per year). The only onset offense type that was significantly associated with all criminal career outcomes was juvenile drug use. Additional research on the offense type of delinquent onset is needed to understand launching points of serious antisocial careers.

  6. Three-dimensional morphological condylar and mandibular changes in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: interdisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Farronato

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ involvement is common but usually delayed in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. We describe the case of a JIA patient with bilateral TMJ involvement, mandibular retrognathia, bone erosion, and severely restricted mouth opening. The use of cone beam computed tomography and a 3D diagnostic protocol in young patients with JIA provides reliable, accurate and precise quantitative data and images of the condylar structures and their dimensional relationships. Analgesics and conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs were ineffective, but interdisciplinary treatment with etanercept and a Herbst functional appliance improved functional TMJ movement and bone resorption.

  7. TNF and LT binding capacities in the plasma of arthritis patients: effect of etanercept treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, S; Larsen, R; Sørensen, L K;

    2004-01-01

    Etanercept (Enbrel) induces a rapid and sustained decline in disease activity in the majority of patients with refractory juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). For unknown reasons, however, a number of JIA patients fail to respond to this therapy. During this treatment neutralisation of tumour...... necrosis factor (TNF, previously termed TNF alpha) and lymphotoxin (LT, previously termed TNF beta) may be mediated by etanercept itself as well as by naturally occurring soluble TNF receptors. In light of this, it was of interest to study the total TNF neutralizing capacity in plasma before and during...... treatment with etanercept....

  8. Sequential treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis%幼年特发性关节炎的序贯治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾萍; 曾华松

    2014-01-01

    随着对幼年特发性关节炎治疗药物的不断认识和治疗方案的不断完善,幼年特发性关节炎患儿的治疗目标有了新的提升,科学的、个体化的序贯治疗方案的选择有利丁疾病的恢复.%With the improvement of the therapy and the drugs we known more results in a therapeutic ambitious goals of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Selection of individualized sequential therapy is beneficial to the recovery of the disease.

  9. EXPERIENCE OF THE ADALIMUMAB APPLICATION FOR THE PATIENT WITH EARLY DEBUT OF JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS AND UVEITIS

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    K. B. Isaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of early debut and heavy course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the patient at the age of 1 year and 8 months, associated with uveitis refractory to the therapy by methotrexate and nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations is presented. The given clinical example shows high therapeutic efficiency of the adalimumab. To the 8th week of treatment inflammatory changes in conjunctiva were stopped, to the 12th week the stage of inactive illness was registered, i.e. the patient had no inflammatory changes in joints, uveitis activity signs, increase of laboratory indicators of illness activity. Duration of remission of articulate syndrome and uveitis made 9 months.

  10. Therapeutic effect on idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss with duration of onset more than 3 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Han, Yuechen; Fan, Zhaomin; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and stability upon idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) patients with duration of onset more than 3 months. Twenty-eight patients diagnosed as ISSNHL were treated by intravenous injection and another 26 by oral medication. Pure tone tests were undertaken at pre-therapy, the 3rd, 7th, 10th, 14th day of post-treatment, and 1 and 2 months of follow-up respectively. A total of 54 ISSNHL patients with duration of onset ranged from 3 months to 19 years were concerned. In the group administrated by intravenous injection, the total effective rate was 64.29 % including 2 cases total recovery, 3 excellent and 13 partial recovery. In the oral administration group, there was no recovery or excellence case, and 8 (30.77 %) showed partial recovery. There was significant difference between the two groups in total effective rates (P hearing loss. The administration by intravenous injection should be the optimization.

  11. Reabilitação em artrite idiopática juvenil Rehabilitation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Vanessa Cristina Bueno

    2007-06-01

    adequadamente os diversos tipos de exercícios.INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA may cause permanent physical disabilities in children and adolescents. This study aimed to describe the several kinds of rehabilitation procedures, ranging from evaluation to prescription of exercises, as well as the elaboration of a practical rehabilitation guide for JIA patients. SOURCES OF DATA: the research was based on data from Medline and Lilacs. The opinion of experts working on the Pediatric Rheumatology service from Lar Escola São Francisco and Universidade Federal de São Paulo was considered on the debate of several topics. SUMMARY: JIA patients may present pain and limitation of joint movement thereby leading to decrease in physical capacity, affecting both aerobic and anaerobic activities. In addition to the joint compromise, cardiac and autonomic dysfunctions collaborate on this process, impairing sport and everyday activities. The American College of Rheumatology recommends 30-minute activity with moderate intensity, two to three times weekly. Hydrotherapy is associated to treatment adherence, besides helping in decreasing pain perception and adding to cope with daily activities. Other rehabilitation modalities, such as massage, education, joint protection, energy conservation, and splints are also considered in the present review. CONCLUSION: there are few studies in the literature focusing on rehabilitation in children with JIA. Particularly, there is a lack of studies concerning aspects of adequate prescription of exercises, weight-bearing, number of series and repetitions, as well as the best choice regarding ground or water activity. We believe that additional information is needed in order to improve the physical care to these patients.

  12. The relationship between CAG repeat length and age of onset differs for Huntington's disease patients with juvenile onset or adult onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, J Michael; Gayán, Javier; Djoussé, Luc; Roberts, Simone; Brocklebank, Denise; Cherny, Stacey S; Cardon, Lon R; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Myers, Richard H; Housman, David E; Wexler, Nancy S

    2007-05-01

    Age of onset for Huntington's disease (HD) varies inversely with the length of the disease-causing CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene. A simple exponential regression model yielded adjusted R-squared values of 0.728 in a large set of Venezuelan kindreds and 0.642 in a North American, European, and Australian sample (the HD MAPS cohort). We present evidence that a two-segment exponential regression curve provides a significantly better fit than the simple exponential regression. A plot of natural log-transformed age of onset against CAG repeat length reveals this segmental relationship. This two-segment exponential regression on age of onset data increases the adjusted R-squared values by 0.012 in the Venezuelan kindreds and by 0.035 in the HD MAPS cohort. Although the amount of additional variance explained by the segmental regression approach is modest, the two slopes of the two-segment regression are significantly different from each other in both the Venezuelan kindreds [F(2, 439) = 11.13, P= 2 x 10(-5)] and in the HD MAPS cohort [F(2, 688) = 38.27, P= 2 x 10(-16)]. In both populations, the influence of each CAG repeat on age of onset appears to be stronger in the adult-onset range of CAG repeats than in the juvenile-onset range.

  13. [Biologics for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Consensus statement of the 7th Wörlitzer Expertengespräche 2004 for the German Arbeitsgemeinschaft Kinder- und Jugendrheumatologie].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneff, G

    2006-03-01

    The group of biologics for the treatment of rheumatic diseases is continuously growing. They have become an important option not only for treatment of so far untreatable chronic inflammatory or rheumatic disease, but also for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. In addition, the velocity and the degree of improvement is better than with to conventional therapies. Furthermore, toxicity and risks seem to be lower with higher safety and compatibility. Although the data are scarce, they are widely used. Therefore, the German Arbeitsgemeinschaft Kinder- und Jugendrheumatologie is updating the current recommendation for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis using biologics.

  14. Síndrome de ativação macrofágica em pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil Macrophage activation syndrome in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério do Prado

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de ativação macrofágica (SAM é uma complicação rara das doenças reumáticas crônicas, particularmente a artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ de início sistêmico. Este processo pode ser desencadeado por agentes infecciosos virais e bacterianos, neoplásicos, drogas antiinflamatórias não esteroidais ou drogas modificadoras da doença, mudanças abruptas das medicações e doenças reumáticas. O quadro clínico inicia-se com irritação do sistema nervoso central, acompanhado de falências hepática e renal, além de pancitopenia. Relatamos três casos de pacientes com AIJ do nosso serviço que desenvolveram SAM com descrição das características clínicas, evolutivas e de tratamento.The macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is an uncommon complication of chronic rheumatic diseases, specially systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. It can be triggered by infectious (viral or bacterial or malignant diseases, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory or disease modified anti-rheumatic drugs, changes in the therapy and rheumatic diseases. The clinical features present at the onset are related mainly with central nervous system involvement, hepatic and renal failure and pancytopenia. We describe the clinical, evolutive features and treatment of three patients with JIA that developed MAS.

  15. Association of the IL2RA/CD25 Gene With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Worthington, Jane; Thompson, Susan D; Langefeld, Carl D; Glass, David N; Thomson, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Objective IL2RA/CD25, the gene for interleukin-2 receptor α, is emerging as a general susceptibility gene for autoimmune diseases because of its role in the development and function of regulatory T cells and the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within this gene with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM), Graves' disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to determine whether SNPs within the IL2RA/CD25 gene are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Three SNPs within the IL2RA/CD25 gene, that previously showed evidence of an association with either RA, MS, or type 1 DM, were selected for genotyping in UK JIA cases (n = 654) and controls (n = 3,849). Data for 1 SNP (rs2104286) were also available from North American JIA cases (n = 747) and controls (n = 1,161). Association analyses were performed using Plink software. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Results SNP rs2104286 within the IL2RA/CD25 gene was significantly associated with UK JIA cases (OR for the allele 0.76 [95% CI 0.66–0.88], P for trend = 0.0002). A second SNP (rs41295061) also showed modest evidence for association with JIA (OR 0.80 [95% CI 0.63–1.0], P = 0.05). Association with rs2104286 was convincingly replicated in the North American JIA cohort (OR 0.84 [95% CI 0.65–0.99], P for trend = 0.05). Meta-analysis of the 2 cohorts yielded highly significant evidence of association with JIA (OR 0.76 [95% CI 0.62–0.88], P = 4.9 × 10−5). Conclusion These results provide strong evidence that the IL2RA/CD25 gene represents a JIA susceptibility locus. Further investigation of the gene using both genetic and functional approaches is now required. PMID:19116909

  16. Are panoramic radiographs predictive of temporomandibular joint synovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Shelly; Simon, Lisa E; Susarla, Harlyn K; Lee, Edward Y; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Susan; Kaban, Leonard B

    2014-06-01

    To identify specific panoramic radiographic findings associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) synovitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). This was a retrospective study of children with JIA evaluated at Boston Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they had a confirmed diagnosis of JIA, a panoramic radiograph, and a contemporaneous TMJ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study with contrast. Medical records and imaging studies were reviewed to document demographic, panoramic (accentuated antegonial notch, short ramus and condyle unit [RCU] length, and abnormal condyle morphology: decreased condyle anteroposterior or superoinferior dimension) and MRI findings. The outcome variable was the presence or absence of TMJ synovitis on MRI. Descriptive and bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to identify associations (significant at P ≤ .05). Thirty patients (21 girls) with a mean age of 11.1 years (range, 5 to 16 yr) met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 15 patients had MRI scans positive for synovitis (bilateral in 18 joints in 9 patients and unilateral in 6 joints in 6 patients). The remaining 15 patients did not have evidence of synovitis on MRI. In the synovitis group, 18 of 24 joints (75%) showed abnormal panoramic findings (abnormal condyle morphology in 18 joints, accentuated antegonial notch in 9 joints, or short RCU length in 5 joints). In the nonsynovitis group, 15 of 36 joints (42%) showed abnormal panoramic findings (abnormal condyle morphology in 12 joints, accentuated antegonial notch in 6 joints, or short RCU length in 4 joints). Abnormal condyle morphology and accentuated antegonial notching on panoramic radiographs were found to be significantly correlated with synovitis (P = .0005 and .044, respectively). In a logistic regression model, abnormal condyle morphology was significantly associated with an increase in likelihood of TMJ synovitis versus those joints with normal condyle morphology (P = .007

  17. Unstimulated salivary flow, pH, proteins and oral health in patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Zalewska, Anna; Kuźmiuk, Anna; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Ławicki, Sławomir; Bagińska, Joanna

    2017-06-02

    There have been inconsistent conclusions regarding salivary abnormalities and their effect on oral health of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the flow rate and selected biochemical parameters of unstimulated whole saliva in correlation to oral health in JIA children. Thirty-four JIA patients and 34 age- and sex-matched controls not affected by JIA (C) were divided into two groups: with mixed and permanent dentition. DMFT/dmft, gingival and simplified oral hygiene indices were evaluated. Salivary flow rate, pH, lysozyme, lactoferrin, salivary protein concentrations and peroxidase activity were assessed. The salivary flow rate was significantly lower in the total JIA group (0.41 ml/min) as compared with the C (0.51 ml/min) and in the permanent dentition of JIA children (0.43 ml/min) as compared with the C (0.61 ml/min). A significantly lower pH was observed in total (6.74), mixed (6.7) and permanent (6.76) dentition of JIA groups in comparison to the C (7.25, 7.21, 7.28 respectively). The specific activity of peroxidase was significantly higher in JIA patients (total 112.72 IU/l, mixed dentition 112.98 IU/l, permanent dentition 112.5 IU/l) than in the C group (total 70.03 IU/l, mixed dentition 71.83 IU/l, permanent dentition 68.61 IU/l). The lysozyme concentration in JIA patients (total and permanent dentition groups) was significantly higher than in the C group. There were no significant differences in lactoferrin and salivary protein concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences in oral status between JIA patients and C, respectively: DMFT = 5.71, dmft = 3.73, OHI-S = 0.95, GI = 0.25 and DMFT 5.71, dmft = 3.73, OHI-S = 0.85, GI = 0.24. The specific activity of peroxidase in the unstimulated whole saliva was inversely correlated with the GI index, whereas the salivary lysozyme concentration was inversely correlated with the dmft index in JIA patients. In

  18. EULAR-PReS points to consider for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch-Bourn, A N; Edwards, C J; Collado, P

    2015-01-01

    To develop evidence based points to consider the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in clinical practice. The task force comprised a group of paediatric rheumatologists, rheumatologists experienced in imaging, radiologists, methodologists and pat...

  19. Effects of the live attenuated measles-mumps-rubella booster vaccination on disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, Marloes W; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Armbrust, Wineke; Swart, Joost; Gorter, Simone; de Vries, Lara D; Smits, Gaby P; van Gageldonk, Pieter G; Berbers, Guy A M; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The immunogenicity and the effects of live attenuated measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination on disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are matters of concern, especially in patients treated with immunocompromising therapies. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether M

  20. Feasibility of a Website and a Hospital-Based Online Portal for Young Adults With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Views and Experiences of Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, Judy J.W.; Scholtus, Lieske W.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Os-Medendorp, van Harmieke; Prakken, Berent; Kruize, Aike A.; Bijlsma, Johannes J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To improve knowledge and to encourage active involvement of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), an informative website with written and video information and an online portal with access to the personal medical record, self-monitoring, and e-consult functionalities wer

  1. Feasibility of a Website and a Hospital-Based Online Portal for Young Adults With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis : Views and Experiences of Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, Judy Jw; Scholtus, Lieske W; Drossaert, Constance Hc; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Prakken, Berent; Kruize, Aike A; Bijlsma, Johannes JW

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve knowledge and to encourage active involvement of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), an informative website with written and video information and an online portal with access to the personal medical record, self-monitoring, and e-consult functionalities wer

  2. Novel self-epitopes derived from aggrecan, fibrillin, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 drive distinct autoreactive T-cell responses in juvenile idiopathic arthritis and in health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S.M. Kamphuis (Sylvia); K. Hrafnkelsdóttir (Kolbrún); M. Klein (Mark); W. de Jager (Wilco); M.H. Haverkamp (Margje); J.H.M. van Bilsen (Jolanda); S. Albani (Salvatore); W. Kuis (Wietse); M.H.M. Wauben (Marca); B.J. Prakken (Berent)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractJuvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease characterized by chronic joint inflammation. Knowing which antigens drive the autoreactive T-cell response in JIA is crucial for the understanding of disease pathogenesis and additionally may provide targets for an

  3. Development of a standardized method of assessment of radiographs and radiographic change in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: introduction of the Dijkstra composite score.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, M.A. van; Boers, M.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Soesbergen, R.M. van; Wieringa, H.; Fiselier, T.J.W.; Franssen, M.J.A.M.; Cate, R. ten; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W. van; Wulffraat, N.M.; Luijk, W.H. van; Oostveen, J.C.; Kuis, W.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sensitivity to change of a newly developed radiologic assessment tool, the Dijkstra score, and to develop a numeric composite score and progressor classification scheme to apply in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) trials. METHODS: A placebo-controlled trial of sulfasala

  4. Development of a standardized method of assessment of radiographs and radiographic change in juvenile idiopathic arthritis - Introduction of the Dijkstra composite score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, MAJ; Zwinderman, AH; van Soesbergen, RM; Wieringa, H; Fiselier, TJW; Franssen, MJAM; ten Cate, R; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Wulffraat, NM; van Luijk, WHJ; Oostveen, JCM; Kuis, W; Dijkmans, BAC

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the sensitivity to change of a newly developed radiologic assessment tool, the Dijkstra score, and to develop a numeric composite score and progressor classification scheme to apply in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) trials. Methods. A placebo-controlled trial of sulfasala

  5. Promoting physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis through an internet-based program: Results of a pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, O.; Armbrust, W.; Geertzen, J.; De Graaf, I.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Sauer, P.; Van Weert, E.; Bouma, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are less physically active than healthy peers. Therefore we developed an internet-based intervention to improve physical activity (PA). The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of the program in improving PA. Relevance: Evidence

  6. Promoting physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis through an internet-based program: Results of a pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, O.; Armbrust, W.; Geertzen, J.; De Graaf, I.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Sauer, P.; Van Weert, E.; Bouma, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are less physically active than healthy peers. Therefore we developed an internet-based intervention to improve physical activity (PA). The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of the program in improving PA. Relevance: Evidence

  7. Severe idiopathic hypocalcemia in a juvenile western lowland gorilla, Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Jenifer; Stones, Greeley; Jalil, Tania

    2012-03-01

    A 6-mo-old, male western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was evaluated because of tetany of both hands. The gorilla had alternating periods of constipation, diarrhea, and bloating since birth. A diagnosis of idiopathic hypocalcemia was based on severe hypocalcemia, a normal vitamin D level, response to oral calcium and vitamin D therapy, and eventual resolution. Idiopathic hypocalcemia, an uncommon disease in neonatal humans, should be considered in young gorillas with persistent gastrointestinal problems or acute tetany.

  8. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Smith, Hans-Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Arvidsson, Linda Z.; Larheim, Tore A. [University of Oslo, Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Oslo (Norway); Flatoe, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O. [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    2016-03-15

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  9. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Arvidsson, Linda Z; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Flatø, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O; Larheim, Tore A

    2016-03-01

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  10. Ovulatory patterns in women with juvenile and late-onset/persistent acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, G; Pravatà, G; Aricò, M; Maneschi, F; Palisi, F

    1990-01-01

    The ovulatory patterns in women with acne vulgaris were evaluated in order to understand their relationship with androgenic levels. Ovulation disturbances were found in 58.3% of patients with prevalence of anovulation in the juvenile acne and of luteal insufficiency in the late-onset/persistent acne. Significant negative correlation was found between T free and P in the late-onset/persistent group (r: -0.629; p = 0.016): This may be interpreted as a rather steady endocrine status in which the raised androgenic levels, probably due to peripheral conversion, are concomitant to absent or insufficient ovulations. In the younger patients both the androgen excess and the ovulation disturbances could be due to an abnormal or delayed maturation of the hypothalamus-pituitary ovarian axis. The evaluation of the ovarian function in women with acne vulgaris may be useful to detect ovulatory disturbances in view of a possible resolution of both the problems by specific endocrine management.

  11. Intra-articular corticosteroids in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Safety, efficacy, and features affecting outcome. A comprehensive review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Carman Gotte

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Alisa Carman GotteUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: Intra-articular corticosteroid injection (IACI has been used in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis in adults for over fifty years. Over the last two decades, IACI has become an important tool in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, particularly in the oligoarthritis subset of JIA. Many factors may affect the efficacy of this treatment modality, although the majority of evidence on this topic is anecdotal, nonconvincing, or conflicting. The review examines the rationale, efficacy, safety, and application of the use of IACI in the treatment of JIA, focusing on factors that affect the outcome following IACI. Keywords: juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoids, treatment, children

  12. CD3(+)CD56(+) natural killer T cell activity in children with different forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the influence of etanercept treatment on polyarticular subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Ye; Tang, Xuemei; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2017-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has three major onset types with widely varying clinical features. We assessed the natural killer T (NKT) cell function in patients with different JIA subtypes, and found systemic patients exhibited lower NKT cell counts, perforin and granzyme B expression, while the pauciarticular and polyarticular patients displayed higher perforin and granzyme B expression as compared with the controls. The synovial fluid had more NKT cells with higher levels of perforin, granzyme B, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α than peripheral cells. The polyarticular patients that responded to etanercept had lower NKT cell counts, intracellular perforin, granzyme B and the mean fluorescence intensity of TNF-α than the patients that did not respond. Treatment with etanercept reduced the granzyme B and perforin, interferon (IFN)-γ and TNF-α expression in NKT cells in the responsive group. Therefore, a higher NKT cell function may indicate a decreased response to etanercept in polyarticular patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Studies on physical performance and functional ability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.

    2003-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the physical training possibilities of children with juvenile arthritis. In the first Chapter a brief introduction on physical fitness and physical training is given including an overview of the existing studies in juvenile arthritis patients. In Chapter 2, we describe

  14. Studies on physical performance and functional ability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.

    2003-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the physical training possibilities of children with juvenile arthritis. In the first Chapter a brief introduction on physical fitness and physical training is given including an overview of the existing studies in juvenile arthritis patients. In Chapter 2, we describe

  15. The family journey-to-diagnosis with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a cross-sectional study of the changing social media presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modica RF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Renee F Modica,1 Kathleen Graham Lomax,2 Pamela Batzel,3 Leah Shapardanis,3 Kimberly Compton Katzer,3 Melissa E Elder1 1Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2Immunology and Dermatology Medical Affairs, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, USA; 3Treato, Princeton, NJ, USA Background: Children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA often encounter a delay between symptom onset and disease diagnosis, partly due to the broad differential of fever and lack of symptom recognition by providers. Families often seek multiple medical opinions and post on social media about their frustrations. This linguistic analysis observed the changing language patterns and social media posting behaviors of parents in the time leading to, during, and after SJIA diagnosis. Methods: Public social media sites were manually reviewed by a linguistic team to evaluate posts about SJIA from US-based parents. Results: A total of 3,979 posts between July 2001 and January 2015 were reviewed from 108 sites. Pre-SJIA diagnosis parents sought answers and shared status updates on social media, focusing primarily on the following three site types: alternative/natural lifestyle forums (39%, Facebook (27%, and disease-specific forums (17%. Posts during early prediagnosis phases were characterized by expressive language showing confidence in health care providers and trust in parental instincts. At later prediagnosis stages, parents continued to use social media, but the posts demonstrated increased frustration with delays in diagnosis and gaps in communication with providers. More objective symptom descriptions and a greatly reduced child-centered emotional focus were observed as parents shifted into caregiving roles. Once the diagnosis of SJIA was confirmed, parents used straightforward, less expressive language, and Facebook (47% to make "announcement" posts and increased their

  16. Juvenile versus adult-onset ankylosing spondylitis -- clinical, radiographic, and social outcomes. a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadon, Deepak R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Sengupta, Raj

    2013-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has 2 main modes of onset: juvenile-onset AS (JoAS) and adult-onset AS (AoAS). It is not known whether JoAS is a subtype of AS, or AS modulated by early age of onset and longer disease duration. We performed a systematic review of the literature, identifying 12 articles and 1 abstract directly comparing JoAS and AoAS cohorts, with observational study design. Patients with JoAS appear to have more peripheral joint involvement both clinically and radiographically (especially knees and ankles) and more root joint involvement (hips and shoulders); they are more likely to proceed to hip arthroplasty and often initially present with peripheral rather than axial symptoms. Patients with AoAS appear to have more axial symptoms and radiographic disease, particularly in the lumbar spine, and worse axial metrology. In terms of other characteristics, more evidence is needed to confidently state whether JoAS and AoAS are different.

  17. Clinical Features in Juvenile-Onset Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Carrying Different B27 Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yikun Mou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a common rheumatic disease and is characterized by inflammation of the axial skeleton. HLA-B27 is strongly associated with AS. Juvenile-onset AS (JAS with disease onset before 16 years of age differs from adult-onset AS (AAS in many respects. Objective. To compare the clinical features in JAS with different B27 subtypes and analyze the differences between JAS and AAS. Methods. 145 JAS and 360 AAS patients were included. The demographic data, clinical manifestations, laboratory markers, Bath AS indices, and B27 subtypes were recorded. Results. Peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, BASDAI, ESR, and CRP were significantly higher in JAS patients with HLA-B*2704 than those with B27-negative. Enthesitis and ESR were significantly higher in patients with HLA-B*2705 than those with B27-negative. The onset age of HLA-B*2715 group was much earlier than the other groups. The peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, and hip joint involvement in JAS with HLA-B*2704 were significantly higher than those in AAS with HLA-B*2704. Conclusion. JAS with different B27 subtypes had similar features in most of manifestations; JAS and AAS patients with the same subtype could have distinctive courses. Early diagnosis, hip detection, and control of systemic active inflammation in JAS patients will be helpful for improving the prognosis.

  18. Lipoprotein cholesterol fractions are related to markers of inflammation in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Pedersen, Freddy Karup; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study is to determine levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density, and high-density lipoprotein fractions of cholesterol (LDLc and HDLc), in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and relate those to disease activity, overweight, and physical activity...... in the patients were within the normal range for Danish Children. HDLc was negatively correlated with MRP8/14 (r = -0.343, CI -0.474 to -0.201, p overweight or PA. Neither TC nor LDLc showed any association with inflammation, overweight, or PA. MRP8/14 correlated positively...... (PA), testing the hypothesis that the levels of cholesterol fractions are associated with inflammation as well as with overweight and low PA. METHODS: Two hundred ten patients with JIA were included in this descriptive cross-sectional study. TC, LDLc, HDLc were measured, and associations with clinical...

  19. Relationship of pain coping strategies and pain specific beliefs to pain experience in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thastum, Mikael; Herlin, Troels; Zachariae, R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether pain-specific beliefs and coping strategies of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) independently predict their reported pain, while controlling for relevant demographic variables, disease activity, and parent-rated disability. To compare use of pain...... contribution to the prediction of pain after controlling for other variables. Significant differences were found between the scores of high pain patients and the rest of the group for the health belief subscale of disability (mean +/- SD 2.0 +/- 0.6 and 1.2 +/- 0.7, respectively), and for the health belief...... subscale of harm (mean +/- SD 2.7 +/- 0.6 and 1.8 +/- 0.7, respectively). Significant correlations were obtained between the pain measure and the pain-coping subscale of catastrophizing, the pain belief subscales of disability, harm, solicitude (inverse), control, and medical cure. CONCLUSION...

  20. VibroCV: a computer vision-based vibroarthrography platform with possible application to Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Andrew D; Prahalad, Sampath; Inan, Omer T

    2016-08-01

    Vibroarthrography, a method for interpreting the sounds emitted by a knee during movement, has been studied for several joint disorders since 1902. However, to our knowledge, the usefulness of this method for management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) has not been investigated. To study joint sounds as a possible new biomarker for pediatric cases of JIA we designed and built VibroCV, a platform to capture vibroarthrograms from four accelerometers; electromyograms (EMG) and inertial measurements from four wireless EMG modules; and joint angles from two Sony Eye cameras and six light-emitting diodes with commercially-available off-the-shelf parts and computer vision via OpenCV. This article explains the design of this turn-key platform in detail, and provides a sample recording captured from a pediatric subject.

  1. EXPERIENCE OF THE EFFICIENT USING OF METHOTREXATE FOR SUBCUTANEOUS ADMINISTRATION IN PATIENT WITH POLYARTICULAR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ushakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes successful case of the methotrexate monotherapy through subcutaneous administration (15 mg/m2 of body surface per week for treatment of the polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the girl in the age of 4. After 6 and 12 months of the methotrexate therapy the significant reduction of the clinical and laboratory disease activity indices and increase in functional activity of the child according to the pediatric ACR criteria for 50 and 90% respectively were observed. No adverse experience during the monotherapy was recorded. Development of inactive disease phase after 15 months of treatment allows predicting the development of pharmacological remission in patient in the prospective. Timely (immediately after the disease was diagnosed administration of methotrexate allowed preventing the disablement of the child and improving the life quality of both the patient and her family.

  2. Evaluation of macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: single center experience over a one-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Yücel, Gözde; Sinoplu, Ada Bulut; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the demographic, clinical, laboratory properties of patients with macrophage activation syndrome and treatment outcomes. Material and Methods: The data of the patients who were diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome secondary to systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis between June 2013–May 2014 were evaluated by screening patient records. Results: Ten patients with macrophage activation syndrome were followed up in one year. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was found to be 7.6±4.5 years. The most common clinical finding at presentation (80%) was increased body temperature. Hepatosplenomegaly was found in half of the patients. The most common hematological finding (90%) was anemia. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was found to be 71.8±36.2 mm/h, whereas it was measured to be lower (31.2±25.2 mm/h) at the time of the diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome. Increased ferritin level was found in all of our patients (the mean ferritin level was found to be 23 957±15 525 ng/mL). Hypertriglyceridemia was found in nine patients (90%). The mean triglyceride level was found to be 397±332 mg/dL. Systemic steroid treatment was administered to all patients. Cyclosporine A was given to eight patients (80%), canakinumab was given to four patients (40%) and anakinra was given to five patients (50%). Plasmapheresis was performed in two patients. Improvement was found in all patients except for one patient. The patient in whom no improvement was observed showed a chronic course. Conclusions: The diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome should be considered in presence of sudden disturbance in general condition, resistant high fever and systemic inflammation findings in children with active rheumatic disease. Complete recovery can be provided with early and efficient treatment in macrophage activation syndrome which develops secondary to systemic juvenil idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26884689

  3. Abnormal kappa:lambda light chain ratio in circulating immune complexes as a marker for B cell activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, J M; Chauhan, A K; Moore, T L

    2007-01-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have been shown to have elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) which correlated with disease activity. Our aim was to assess B cell activity by measuring the amount of and the kappa:lambda chain immunoglobulin light (L) chain ratio in CICs from JIA patients and to determine potential evidence for either an antigen-driven response or B-cell receptor editing. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure kappa and lambda chains present in the CICs from the sera of patients with JIA. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation, one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc analysis. Sera from 44 JIA patients were examined for the concentration of L chains in CICs. Healthy controls had a kappa:lambda chain ratio of 1.2:1, whereas this ratio was reversed among JIA subgroups with RF-positive polyarthritis (1:1.2), RF-negative polyarthritis (1:1.3), oligoarthritis (1:2.3) and systemic-onset arthritis (1:2.5). In addition, overall lambda chain selection was not significantly associated with a particular immunoglobulin heavy (H) chain and occurred with all immunoglobulin isotypes. We showed preferential selection of lambda chains contributing to the formation of potentially pathogenic CICs from JIA patients, of all onset types compared to healthy controls, in an H chain-independent manner. The reversal of kappa:lambda chain ratio within the JIA CICs and association with all immunoglobulin isotypes demonstrated the potential for L chain editing. Furthermore, we conclude that a reversal of the normal kappa:lambda chain ratio in JIA CICs may be used as a marker for increased B-cell activity.

  4. Dental and facial characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis Características dentárias e faciais de pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil

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    Cynthia Savioli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It has been shown that the temporomandibular joint is frequently affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and this degenerative disease, which may occur during facial growth, results in severe mandibular dysfunction. However, there are no studies that correlate oral health (tooth decay and gingival diseases and temporomandibular joint dysfunction in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the oral and facial characteristics of the patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated in a large teaching hospital. METHOD: Thirty-six patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (26 female and 10 male underwent a systematic clinical evaluation of their dental, oral, and facial structures (DMFT index, plaque and gingival bleeding index, dental relationship, facial profile, and Helkimo's index. The control group was composed of 13 healthy children. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis was 10.8 years; convex facial profile was present in 12 juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients, and class II molar relation was present in 12 (P = .032. The indexes of plaque and gingival bleeding were significant in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with a higher number of superior limbs joints involved (P = .055. Anterior open bite (5 and temporomandibular joint noise (8 were present in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis group. Of the group in this sample, 94% (P = .017 had temporomandibular joint dysfunction, 80% had decreased mandibular opening (P = 0.0002, and mandibular mobility was severely impaired in 33% (P = .015. CONCLUSION: This study confirms that patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis a have a high incidence of mandibular dysfunction that can be attributed to the direct effect of the disease in the temporomandibular joint and b have a higher incidence of gingival disease that can be considered a secondary effect of juvenile idiopathic arthritis on oral health

  5. The Cutaneous Assessment Tool : development and reliability in juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, A. M.; Dugan, E. M.; Lachenbruch, P. A.; Feldman, B. M.; Perez, M. D.; Zemel, L. S.; Lindsley, C. B.; Rennebohm, R. M.; Wallace, C. A.; Passo, M. H.; Reed, A. M.; Bowyer, S. L.; Ballinger, S. H.; Miller, F. W.; Rider, L. G.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. Clinical care and therapeutic trials in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) require accurate and consistent assessment of cutaneous involvement. The Cutaneous Assessment Tool (CAT) was designed to measure skin activity and damage in IIM. We describe the development and inter-rater r

  6. Protocol for the Foot in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis trial (FiJIA: a randomised controlled trial of an integrated foot care programme for foot problems in JIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendry Gordon J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot and ankle problems are a common but relatively neglected manifestation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Studies of medical and non-medical interventions have shown that clinical outcome measures can be improved. However existing data has been drawn from small non-randomised clinical studies of single interventions that appear to under-represent the adult population suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To date, no evidence of combined therapies or integrated care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients with foot and ankle problems exists. Methods/design An exploratory phase II non-pharmacological randomised controlled trial where patients including young children, adolescents and adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and associated foot/ankle problems will be randomised to receive integrated podiatric care via a new foot care programme, or to receive standard podiatry care. Sixty patients (30 in each arm including children, adolescents and adults diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited from 2 outpatient centres of paediatric and adult rheumatology respectively. Participants will be randomised by process of minimisation using the Minim software package. The primary outcome measure is the foot related impairment measured by the Juvenile Arthritis Disability Index questionnaire's impairment domain at 6 and 12 months, with secondary outcomes including disease activity score, foot deformity score, active/limited foot joint counts, spatio-temporal and plantar-pressure gait parameters, health related quality of life and semi-quantitative ultrasonography score for inflammatory foot lesions. The new foot care programme will comprise rapid assessment and investigation, targeted treatment, with detailed outcome assessment and follow-up at minimum intervals of 3 months. Data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months from baseline

  7. In favour of the definition "adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis": juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis braced after ten years of age, do not show different end results. SOSORT award winner 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Donzelli, Sabrina; Zaina, Fabio; Lusini, Monia; Minnella, Salvatore; Negrini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background The most important factor discriminating juvenile (JIS) from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the risk of deformity progression. Brace treatment can change natural history, even when risk of progression is high. The aim of this study was to compare the end of growth results of JIS subjects, treated after 10 years of age, with final results of AIS. Methods Design: prospective observational controlled cohort study nested in a prospective database. Setting: outpatient tertiary...

  8. Coblation plus photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of juvenile onset laryngeal papillomatosis: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengyong; Sun, Baochun; Wang, Feng; Dai, Zhiyao; Han, Zeli; Han, Jiahong; Chen, Maomao; Shen, Yao

    2014-08-29

    In treating juvenile-onset laryngeal papillomatosis, the most difficult aspect is preventing recurrence. After a single treatment, recurrence can begin after as soon as 20 days and the recurrent rate can be higher than 90%. The causes of recurrence include the presence of mucosal cells infected with papilloma virus, which are undetectable with the naked eyes, and surgery-induced infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) could effectively solve this problem. Virus-infected cells have a very high metabolic energy for capturing and internalizing the photosensitizer, which, after light stimulation, subsequently induces active oxygen species inside the nucleus, which kill infected cells. The second generation of photosensitizer agents (PA) are locally applied to avoid the intravenous systemic damage caused by first-generation PAs, and this method is widely used for the treatment of genital warts to very good effect. We used the photodynamic method to treat laryngeal papillomatosis in children and obtained significant efficacy. We followed three juvenile subjects with recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis through a course of treatment (each course includes three PDT sessions), with a follow-up after 6 months. The characteristic procedures involve exposing the larynx with a laryngoscope and using low-temperature plasma technology to visualize the tumor resection, as the effects of plasma technology can reduce postoperative laryngeal edema and reduce intraoperative metastasis. PDT was performed during the first surgery, 20 days after and 30 days after surgery. At the 6-month follow-ups, there was no recurrence. This was the world's first successful reported case of the use of PDT treatment for juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis.

  9. Coexistence of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis and Late-Onset Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Sixty-year-old Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Ünlü

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH and ankylosing spondylitis (AS are two diseases characterized by ossification of the ligaments and tendons in both the axial skeleton and peripheral sites with very different pathologies. Coexistence of DISH and AS is a rare condition and there are relatively few cases in the English-language literature. In this paper, we report a human leukocyte antigen-B27-negative patient who presented with the typical appearance of DISH on the dorsal radiograph and also had sacroileitis, suggesting AS. We discussed prognosis of the late-onset case and the interaction of two diseases in this coexistence.

  10. Condyloma in pregnancy is strongly predictive of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silverberg, Michael J.; Thorsen, Poul; Lindeberg, Henning

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis conferred by a maternal history of genital warts in pregnancy, and to identify additional cofactors such as the method of delivery (cesarean versus vaginal) and procedures or complications during pregnancy. METHODS......: A retrospective cohort design was used to evaluate maternal and infant characteristics associated with respiratory papillomatosis among Danish births between 1974 and 1993. Using data from Danish registries, we identified 3033 births with a maternal history of genital warts during pregnancy. Fifty......-seven respiratory papillomatosis cases were identified by review of medical records from ear, nose, and throat departments. RESULTS: Seven of every 1000 births with a maternal history of genital warts resulted in disease in the offspring, corresponding to a 231.4 (95% confidence interval 135.3, 395.9) times higher...

  11. Accommodative lag and juvenile-onset myopia progression in children wearing refractive correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, David A; Sinnott, Loraine T; Mutti, Donald O; Zadnik, Karla

    2011-05-11

    The relationship between accommodative lag and annual myopia progression was investigated using linear models in 592 myopic children wearing a full refractive correction in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. The mean (± SD) age and spherical equivalent refractive error at baseline were 10.4 ± 1.8 years and -2.13 ± 1.24 D, respectively. The mean annual progression of myopia was -0.45 ± 0.32 D, and the mean accommodative lag (for a 4-D Badal stimulus) was 1.59 ± 0.63 D. Neither lag at the beginning nor at the end of a yearly progression interval was associated with annual myopia progression (all p ≥ 0.12). These data suggest that foveal hyperopic retinal blur during near viewing may not drive juvenile-onset myopia progression.

  12. A Case Report on Juvenile Neuromyelitis Optica: Early Onset, Long Remission Period, and Atypical Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpers, Christiane; Gross, Catharina C; Fiedler, Barbara; Meuth, Sven G; Kurlemann, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and preferentially targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. NMO is rare in children and clinical course of the disease is highly variable as described in studies. Here, we present a case report of a young girl presenting with a rare course of pediatric NMO with an early disease onset at the age of 12 years, a relapse free interval of 4 years, evidence of NMO immunoglobulin G (IgG) and an unusual response against immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this report is to highlight the potentially long remission period between relapses complicating proper diagnosis despite well defined diagnostic criteria. In addition, we want to encourage the use of rituximab in pediatric NMO, although larger cohorts are warranted to establish B cell depleting therapies in juvenile NMO.

  13. HLA-DRB1 alleles in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: renal histologic class correlations

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    B.L. Liphaus

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigens (HLA DRB1*03 and DRB1*02 have been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in Caucasians and black populations. It has been observed that certain HLA alleles show stronger associations with SLE autoantibodies and clinical subsets, although they have rarely been associated with lupus renal histologic class. In the present study, HLA-DRB1 allele correlations with clinical features, autoantibodies and renal histologic class were analyzed in a cohort of racially mixed Brazilian patients with juvenile-onset SLE. HLA-DRB1 typing was carried out by polymerase chain reaction amplification with sequence-specific primers using genomic DNA from 55 children and adolescents fulfilling at least four of the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE. Significance was determined by the chi-square test applied to 2 x 2 tables. The HLA-DRB1*15 allele was most frequent in patients with renal, musculoskeletal, cutaneous, hematologic, cardiac, and neuropsychiatric involvement, as well as in patients positive for anti-dsDNA, anti-Sm, anti-U1-RNP, and anti-SSA/Ro antibodies, although an association between HLA alleles and SLE clinical features and autoantibodies could not be observed. The HLA-DRB1*17, HLA-DRB1*10, HLA-DRB1*15, and HLA-DRB1*07 alleles were significantly higher in patients with renal histologic class I, class IIA, class IIB, and class V, respectively. The present results suggest that the contribution of HLA- DRB1 alleles to juvenile-onset SLE could not be related to clinical or serological subsets of the disease, but it may be related to renal histologic classes, especially class I, class II A, class II B, and class V. The latter correlations have not been observed in literature.

  14. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in neonates, children and adults, and in patients with pauci- and polyarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, K; Zak, M; Nielsen, S;

    2011-01-01

    patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) of the pauci- or polyarticular onset type. RESULTS: IL-1ra serum levels were found to differ significantly between the three age groups, being higher in neonates (569 pg/ml) than in children (70 pg/ml) and adults (177 pg/ml). IL-1ra production in E. coli...

  15. Effet of tocilizumab, tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs treating systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis%托珠单抗和肿瘤坏死因子α抑制剂及改善病情抗风湿药物治疗全身型幼年特发性关节炎的临床效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁芳芳; 彭程; 罗书立; 李永柏; 杨军

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze clinical effect of tocilizumab,tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)inhibitors and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) on systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA).Methods Totally 30 children with SoJIA from December 2013 to December 2015 in Shenzhen Children's Hospital were randomly divided into tocilizumab group(10 cases),TNF-o inhibitors group(10 cases)and DMARDs group(10 cases).The tocilizumab group was treated with tocilizumab and methotrexate;the TNF-α inhibitors group was treated with TNF-α inhibitors and methotrexate;the DMARDs group was treated with DMARDs and glucocorticoid or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.After 3 and 6 months of treatment,joint pain index,joint swelling index,recurrent fever time and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR),C-reactive protein (CRP),serum ferritin(SF),American College of Rheumatology(ACR) 30 improvement rate and ACR 50 improvement rate were analyzed.Adverse reactions were observed.Results After 3 and 6 months of treatment,joint pain indexes,joint swelling indexes,recurrent fever times and levels of ESR,CRP,SF were all significantly lower than those before treatment in 3 groups [DMARD group:(2.19 ± 0.22),(1.39 ± 0.42) scores vs (2.45 ± 0.21)scores;(2.5±0.5),(2.0±0.3)scores vs (3.5±0.3)scores;(2.67±0.21),(2.06±0.33)months vs (3.78 ± 1.65)months;(61 ± 15),(45 ± 12) mm/1 h vs (84 ± 17) mm/1 h;(69 ± 10),(44 ± 14)mg/L vs (85 ±17)mg/L;(866 ±265),(639 ±96)mg/L vs (2 522 ± 1 686) mg/L;TNF-α inhibitor group:(1.83 ±0.35),(1.02 ± 0.17) scores vs (2.34 ± 0.26) scores;(2.0 ± 0.5),(1.5 ± 0.3) scores vs (3.3 ± 0.3) scores;(1.53±0.36),(1.62±0.24)months vs (3.66 ±1.52)months;(44±12),(34±9)mm/1 h vs (82±19)mm/1 h;(54±15),(30 ± 11) mg/L vs (87 ± 19) mg/L;(574 ± 164),(464 ± 81)mg/L vs (2 496 ±1 826) mg/L;Tocilizumab group:(1.65 ± 0.34),(0.74 ± 0.20) scores vs (2.23 ± 0.25) scores;(1.6 ± 0.4),(0.8 ± 0.5) scores vs (3.4 ± 0.4) scores;(1.63 ± 0.27),(0.80

  16. [A case of idiopathic torsion dystonia showing blepharospasm at the onset].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Mayu; Hayashi, Kitami; Tanaka, Teruyuki; Imai, Kaoru; Osawa, Makiko; Fukuyama, Yukio

    2002-05-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with idiopathic torsion dystonia. Blepharospasm appeared at the age of 10, followed by truncal hypertonia and progressive scoliosis after 1 year. He had bizarre involuntary movement of his limbs upon waking, which was initially misinterpreted as a psychogenic reaction. Routine neurological examinations revealed no abnormality. Treatment with diazepam, bacrophen, 1-dopa, and clonazepam, led to only short time improvement of symptoms. At the age of 14, his symptoms gradually improved in natural course. At present he is 15 years old, and capable of normal daily activities. His clinical course was not typical of idiopathic torsion dystonia and very rare in children.

  17. Muscle strength, physical fitness and well-being in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the effect of an exercise programme: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sandstedt, Eva; Fasth, Anders; Eek, Meta Nyström; BECKUNG, EVA

    2013-01-01

    Background Decreased muscle strength, fitness and well-being are common in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared to healthy peers. Biological drugs have improved health in children with JIA, but despite this pain is still a major symptom and bone health is reported as decreased in the group. The improvement made by the biological drugs makes it possible to more demanding exercises. To jump is an exercise that can improve bone heath, fitness and muscle stre...

  18. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: diagnosis and follow-up of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the ankle region. A descriptive interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Susan;

    2011-01-01

    The ankle region is frequently involved in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) but difficult to examine clinically due to its anatomical complexity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of ultrasonography (US) of the ankle and midfoot (ankle region) in JIA. Doppler-US detected synovial...... hypertrophy, effusion and hyperemia and US was used for guidance of steroid injection and to assess treatment efficacy....

  19. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...

  20. Recognition systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis%再认识全身型幼年特发性关节炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴凤岐

    2014-01-01

    全身型幼年特发性关节(sJIA)是幼年特发性关节炎(JIA)的一个亚型,不同于JIA的其他亚型,sJIA的临床表现除关节炎外,全身表现特别突出,如弛张热、皮疹、肝脾大、浆膜炎等,与巨噬细胞活化综合征强相关.sJIA发病机制上主要与固有免疫异常有关,细胞因子白细胞介素(IL)-1、IL-6、IL-18及中性粒细胞、单核细胞、巨噬细胞等起重要作用.目前认为sJIA不是自身免疫性疾病,而是一个自身炎症性疾病.对sJIA发病机制的新认识带来治疗方法的进步,近年来,IL-1和IL-6拮抗剂靶向治疗取得了良好效果,为sJIA患儿远期预后带来了新希望.%Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is systemic inflammatory disease classified as a subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).Besides arthritis,it is characterised by systemic features such as spiking fever,skin rash,hepatosplenomegaly or serositis.It is becoming clear now that abnormalities in the innate immunity [cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1,IL-6 and IL-18,and neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages rather than lymphocytes] play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA,distinguishing it from other JIA subtypes.Another distinctive feature of sJIA is its strong association with macrophage activation syndrome (MAS).Based on this,consensus is emerging that sJIA should be viewed as an autoinflammatory syndrome rather than a classic auto-immune disease.As a consequence of the progression in understanding the underlying mechanisms of sJIA,major changes in the management are evolving.Recently,remarkable improvement has been observed with IL-1 and IL-6 targeted therapies.These therapies might also change the long-term outcome of this disease.

  1. Púrpura trombocitopênica imunológica como manifestação inicial de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura as initial manifestation of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini Braga

    2003-12-01

    salientar a importância da determinação de auto-anticorpos para lúpus eritematoso sistêmico nas crianças com a forma crônica desta patologia.Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP present a high trend to develop Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, especially those with chronic presentation. Some authors observed that female gender, older patients and familial history of autoimmune disease in patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura are factors that lead to increased susceptibility for the development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Based on these facts, we decided to study 5 children with chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and late Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In this paper, we describe the clinical and laboratorial features of 5 female children with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura that later developed Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. All patients were girls, 3 Caucasian, with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura onset age ranged between 6 years and 3 months and 12 years and 1 month (mean - 9 years and 2 months. The age at Systemic Lupus Erythematosus diagnosis ranged between 8 years and 13 years and 8 months (mean - 10 years and 10 months. Though, the gap between Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus diagnosis ranged between 11 months and 2 years and 9 months (mean - 1 year and 10 months. All patients presented chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (thrombocytopenia lasts longer than 6 months. The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus classification criteria were (in decreasing frequency: malar erythema and positivity of ANA in 5 patients; arthritis, hematological (thrombocytopenia and immunological alterations (positivity of anti-DNA in 4 patients; photosensitivity and positivity of anti-cardiolipin in 3 patients. Other manifestations included oral ulcers, renal involvement, leukopenia and auto-immune hemolytic anemia, serositis (pericarditis, neurological involvement and positivity of anti-Sm antibody

  2. Prediction of melatonin efficacy by pretreatment dim light melatonin onset in children with idiopathic chronic sleep onset insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Smits, Marcel G; van Someren, Eus J W; Boudewijn Gunning, W

    2005-06-01

    Research has shown efficacy of melatonin treatment to advance sleep-wake rhythms in insomnia. In healthy adults, direction and magnitude of the phase shift depends on the timing of administration relative to the phase position of the circadian system. Therefore, in the present study we investigated whether in children with chronic sleep onset insomnia (SOI) efficacy of melatonin treatment in the early evening could be predicted from dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), a phase marker of the circadian system. We combined data of two previously published double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in 110 participants, aged 6-12 years. Sleep was actigraphically estimated, and saliva collected, at baseline and in the third week of a 4-week treatment period with 5 mg melatonin or placebo at 18:00 or 19:00 hours. Primary outcome measures were pre- to post-treatment changes in dim light melatonin onset (DeltaDLMO), sleep onset (DeltaSO), sleep latency (DeltaSL), and total sleep duration (DeltaTSD). Melatonin advanced DLMO with +1:12 h (P melatonin-treated group, but not in the placebo-treated group, pretreatment DLMO was significantly related to DeltaDLMO [F(1, 29) = 7.28, P = 0.012] and DeltaSO [F(1, 25) = 7.72, P = 0.010]. The time interval between treatment administration and pretreatment DLMO (INT) was only significantly related to DeltaSO [F(1,26) = 5.40, P = 0.028]. The results suggest that in children with SOI, the efficacy of early evening melatonin to advance sleep onset and endogenous melatonin onset increases the later the pretreatment DLMO is.

  3. Influence of Matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 genetic variations on susceptibility and severity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Allah, Somia H; El-Shal, Amal S; Shalaby, Sally M; Pasha, Heba F; Abou El-Saoud, Amany M; Abdel Galil, Sahar M; Mahmoud, Tysser A

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease affecting children aged less than 16 years, characterized by chronic synovitis, cartilage damage, and bony erosions mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), mainly MMP-1 and MMP-3. The purpose of this study was to investigate MMP-1 and MMP-3 gene polymorphisms in patients with JIA, the role of genes in susceptibility to JIA, and their associations with JIA activity and prognosis. Case-control study included 100 patients diagnosed with JIA, according to the criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR), and 100 healthy children, age and sex matched, as controls. The MMP-1 (-1607 1G/2G) and MMP-3 (-1171 5A/6A) polymorphisms were screened by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The serum levels of MMP-1 and MMP 3 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There were significant differences between patients with JIA and control groups regarding the genotype and allele frequencies distributions of both MMP-1 1G/2G and MMP-3 5A/6A polymorphisms. The haplotype 2G-6A, which carries the abnormal alleles, showed higher frequencies in patients with JIA than in controls (OD = 2.8, P = 0.002). The prevalence of MMP-1 2G and 6A allele for MMP-3 polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with persistent oligoarticular, rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive polyarthritis, and systemic JIA groups. There were significantly increased serum levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 associated with 2G/6A haplotype in the patient group, especially with the polyarticular RF (+ve) group than in other groups and the control group. MMP-1 and MMP-3 haplotypes could be useful genetic markers for JIA susceptibility and severity in the juvenile Egyptian population. Moreover, our data further support the use of serum MMP-3 and MMP-1 as specific markers of disease activity in JIA.

  4. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Heijden, K.B. van der; Egberts, A.C.G.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. Objectives This study aims to establish a dose–response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and 1

  5. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.; van der Heijden, K.B.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Korzilius, H.P.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to establish a dose-response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and

  6. Phospholipase A2 Receptor-Positive Idiopathic Membranous Glomerulonephritis with Onset at 95 Years: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Keiichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Mise, Koki; Hazue, Ryo; Sekine, Akinari; Yabuuchi, Junko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Kikuchi, Koichi; Sumida, Keiichi; Hayami, Noriko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Akiyama, Shinichi; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    A 95-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of bilateral lower-limb edema persisting for 3 months. Serum creatinine was 1.55 mg/dl, and urinary protein excretion was 9.1 g/day. Renal biopsy revealed stage 1 membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with immunoglobulin G4-dominant staining. This patient did not have any underlying disease such as infection with hepatitis B or C virus or malignancy, and anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) antibody was detected in the serum. Accordingly, idiopathic MGN was diagnosed. Corticosteroid therapy was avoided, but hemodialysis was required to treat generalized edema. The patient is currently doing well. This is the oldest reported case of idiopathic MGN with positivity for anti-PLA2R antibody. PMID:27390744

  7. Role of vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Theoretical and practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kostik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with impaired immune system performance. The specific features of JIA may be genetically determined.Objective: to assess JIA activity in children with vitamin D receptor (VDR gene ApaI and BsmI polymorphism genotypes.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 71 patients with JIA. When included in the investigation, all the patients were in an active state of disease. JIA activity was assessed using the most commonly used clinical and laboratory indicators, including the Ritchie articular index (RAI, JADAS10, JADAS27, JADAS71, CDAI, DAS, and DAS28. Molecular genetic studies determined VDR gene ApaI and BsmI polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction, followed by restriction analysis.Results. The boys who were carriers of a bb BsmI polymorphic marker in the VDR gene had a significantly higher activity of JIA measured by RAI (p=0.03, DAS (p<0.05, JADAS10 (p=0.04, JADAS27 (p=0.04, and JADAS71 (p=0.04 than those who were carriers of B allele (BB + Bb genotypes.Conclusion. The carriage of the VDR gene bb BsmI genotype of the polymorphic marker is associated with high JIA activity, which may be regarded as a marker of poor prognosis in boys with JIA.

  8. Blood gene expression profiling in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mileka; Punaro, Marilynn

    2014-01-01

    Blood gene expression profiling has led to major advances in the field of rheumatology over the last few decades. Specifically, DNA microarray technology has been integral in increasing our knowledge of key players in the pathogenesis of some rare pediatric rheumatic diseases. Our group, using microarray analysis, identified the interferon (IFN) gene signature in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has published data that suggest high doses of intravenous corticosteroid treatment may have benefit over strictly oral regimens. Additionally, DNA microarray technology led to our discovery that the interleukin (IL)-1 gene signature is associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and to the use of IL-1 blockade with anakinra in this disease. We also reported the biologic rationale for use of anakinra early in the disease course. Anakinra is now being used as first-line treatment in sJIA in multiple centers. Herein, we review how information obtained from blood gene expression profiling has changed our clinical practice.

  9. Carpal erosions in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: repeatability of a newly devised MR-scoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hospital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice; Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rheumatology, Genoa (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2015-12-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterized by synovial inflammation, with potential risk of developing progressive joint destruction. Personalized state-of-the-art treatment depends on valid markers for disease activity to monitor response; however, no such markers exist. To evaluate the reliability of scoring of carpal bone erosions on MR in children with JIA using two semi-quantitative scoring systems. A total of 1,236 carpal bones (91 MR wrist examinations) were scored twice by two independent pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists. Bony erosions were scored according to estimated bone volume loss using a 0-4 scale and a 0-10 scale. An aggregate erosion score comprising the sum total carpal bone volume loss was calculated for each examination. The 0-4 scoring system resulted in good intra-reader agreement and moderate to good inter-observer agreement in the assessment of individual bones. Fair and moderate agreement were achieved for inter-reader and intra-reader agreement, respectively, using the 0-10 scale. Intra- and particularly inter-reader aggregate score variability were much less favorable, with wide limits of agreement. Further analysis of erosive disease patterns compared with normal subjects is required, and to facilitate the development of an alternative means of quantifying disease. (orig.)

  10. Premature subclinical atherosclerosis in children and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A review considering preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C; Pedersen, Freddy Karup; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Müller, Klaus

    2016-01-06

    Many studies show that Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is associated with early subclinical signs of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation per se may be an important driver but other known risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin insensitivity, a physically inactive lifestyle, obesity, and tobacco smoking may also contribute substantially. We performed a systematic review of studies through the last 20 years on early signs of subclinical atherosclerosis in children and adolescents with JIA with the purpose of investigating whether possible risk factors, other than inflammation, were considered.We found 13 descriptive cross sectional studies with healthy controls, one intervention study and two studies on adults diagnosed with JIA. Only one study addressed obesity, and physical activity (PA) has only been assessed in one study on adults with JIA and only by self-reporting. This is important as studies on PA in children with JIA have shown that most patients are less physically active than their healthy peers, and as physical inactivity in several large studies of normal schoolchildren is found to be associated with increased clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. It is thus possible that an inactive lifestyle in patients with JIA is an important contributor to development of the subclinical signs of atherosclerosis seen in children with JIA, and that promotion of an active lifestyle in childhood and adolescence may diminish the risk for premature atherosclerotic events in adulthood.

  11. Contrast-enhanced MRI compared with the physical examination in the evaluation of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in discriminating between active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and to compare physical examination outcomes with MRI outcomes in the assessment of disease status in JIA patients. Consecutive JIA patients with knee involvement were prospectively studied using an open-bore MRI. Imaging findings from 146 JIA patients were analysed (59.6 % female; mean age, 12.9 years). Patients were classified as clinically active or inactive. MRI features were evaluated using the JAMRIS system, comprising validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. Inter-reader reliability was good for all MRI features (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87-0.94). No differences were found between the two groups regarding MRI scores of bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions or bone erosions. Synovial hypertrophy scores differed significantly between groups (P = 0.016). Nonetheless, synovial hypertrophy was also present in 14 JIA patients (35.9 %) with clinically inactive disease. Of JIA patients considered clinically active, 48.6 % showed no signs of MRI-based synovitis. MRI can discriminate between clinically active and inactive JIA patients. However, physical examination is neither very sensitive nor specific in evaluating JIA disease activity compared with MRI. Subclinical synovitis was present in >35 % of presumed clinically inactive patients. (orig.)

  12. MRI assessment of bone marrow in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: intra- and inter-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Damasio, Maria Beatrice [Ospedale G. Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Paediatrics, Rome (Italy); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Boavida, Peter [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale G. Gaslini, Department of Pediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rava, Lucilla [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Epidemiology, Rome (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Bone marrow oedema (BMO) is included in MRI-based scoring systems of disease activity in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Similar systems in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. To assess the reproducibility in a multi-centre setting of an MRI BMO scoring system in children with JIA. Seventy-six wrist MRIs were read twice, independently, by two experienced paediatric radiologists. BMO was defined as ill-defined lesions within the trabecular bone, returning high and low signal on T2- and T1-weighted images respectively, with or without contrast enhancement. BMO extension was scored for each of 14 bones at the wrist from 0 (none) to 3 (extensive). The intra-observer agreement was moderate to excellent, with weighted kappa ranging from 0.85 to 1.0 and 0.49 to 1.0 (readers 1 and 2 respectively), while the inter-observer agreement ranged from 0.41 to 0.79. The intra- and inter-observer intraclass correlation coefficients were excellent and satisfactory, respectively. The scoring system was reliable and may be used for grading bone marrow abnormality in JIA. The relatively large variability in aggregate scores, particularly between readers, underscores the need for thorough standardisation. (orig.)

  13. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: erosions or normal variants? A prospective case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ording Muller, Lil-Sofie [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Boavida, Peter [Homerton University Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Avenarius, Derk; Eldevik, Odd Petter [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Damasio, Beatrice [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Rhematology, Genoa (Italy); Lambot-Juhan, Karen [Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Tanturri, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Owens, Catherine M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Rosendahl, Karen [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    Bony depressions at the wrist resembling erosions are frequently seen on MRI in healthy children. The accuracy of MRI in detecting early bony destruction is therefore questionable. We compared findings on MRI of the wrist in healthy children and those with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to investigate markers for true disease. We compared the number and localisation of bony depressions at the wrist in 85 healthy children and 68 children with JIA, ages 5-15 years. The size of the wrist was assessed from a radiograph of the wrist performed on the same day as the MRI. No significant difference in the number of bony depressions in the carpal bones was seen between healthy children and children with JIA at any age. Depressions are found in similar locations in the two groups, except for a few sites, where bony depressions were seen exclusively in the JIA group, particularly at the CMC joints. The wrist was significantly smaller in children with JIA (P < 0.001). Using adult scoring systems and standard MR sequences in the assessment of bone destruction in children may lead to overstaging or understaging of disease. At present, standard MRI sequences cannot easily be used for assessment of early signs of erosions in children. (orig.)

  14. Anti-type II collagen antibodies detection and avidity in patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Galber R; Fonseca, João E; Fujimura, Patricia T; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Silva, Carlos H M; Mourão, Ana F; Canhão, Helena; Goulart, Luiz R; Gonçalves, João; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refers to a heterogeneous group of illnesses that have in common the occurrence of chronic joint inflammation in children younger than 16 years of age. The diagnosis is made only on clinical assessment. The identification of antibody markers could improve the early diagnosis, optimizing the clinical management of patients. Type II collagen is one potential autoantigen that has been implicated in the process of arthritis development. The aims of our study were to investigate the occurrence of anti-type II collagen antibodies and also to determine the avidity of the antibody-antigen binding. Ninety-six patients with oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA, 13 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 61 healthy controls (HC) were tested for anti-type II collagen antibodies by ELISA and avidity ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Forty-two JIA patients (44%) were positive for antibodies against type II collagen. Its detection was significantly higher in JIA patients than in AS patients (p=0.006) and HCs (ppolyarticular JIA, being its presence more prevalent in patients with early disease. It also demonstrates that JIA patients with active disease present antibodies with high avidity against type II collagen.

  15. Oral health and orthodontic considerations in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: review of the literature and report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synodinos, Philippos N; Polyzois, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a severe disease of childhood, which comprises a diverse group of distinct clinical entities of unclear aetiology. Some abnormality of the immune system is present in all JIA cases. In its most severe clinical form, JIA may show localised and/or systemic complications, including functional impairment of the affected sites. This may result in variable growth and developmental anomalies. In many JIA cases, where the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected, mandibular growth may be restricted, thus leading to the development of mandibular hypoplasia and/or retrognathism. As a result, it is not uncommon for JIA patients to present with skeletal Class II and open bite malocclusions. Furthermore, in JIA cases with unilateral TMJ involvement, craniofacial asymmetry may occur. In such cases, early orthodontic intervention facilitates both the skeletal and the occlusal rehabilitation. Increased prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease in JIA cases may be attributed to a combination of aetiological factors, including difficulties in executing good oral hygiene, unfavourable dietary practices and side effects from the long-term administration of medication. In addition, an association between periodontal disease and JIA has been reported based on their similar pattern of clinical disregulation of the inflammatory process. This paper presents a brief description of JIA, with special reference to dental health and orthodontic treatment considerations. In addition, a case is presented where the appropriate orthodontic intervention led to the establishment of a normally functioning, as well as an aesthetically pleasing, occlusion.

  16. Distinct Effects of Methotrexate and Etanercept on the B Cell Compartment in Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesener, Stephanie; Quách, Tâm D; Onken, Nils; Weller-Heinemann, Frank; Dressler, Frank; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Thon, Angelika; Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2014-01-01

    Objective B cells have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Current treatments include the disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs methotrexate (MTX) and tumor necrosis factor α inhibition with etanercept. This study was undertaken to determine how these drugs influence the B cell compartment in patients with JIA. Methods B cell subpopulations and follicular helper T (Tfh) cells in the peripheral blood of JIA patients were investigated by multicolor flow cytometry. Serum immunoglobulin and BAFF levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results There was a significant decrease in transitional B cells and significantly lower serum immunoglobulin levels in patients receiving MTX than in untreated patients and those receiving etanercept. In contrast, etanercept treatment had no effect on most of the B cell subpopulations, but resulted in significantly lower BAFF levels and increased numbers of Tfh cells. Thus, our findings indicate an unexpected and previously unknown direct effect of low-dose MTX on B cells, whereas etanercept had a more indirect influence. Conclusion Our results contribute to a better understanding of the potency of MTX in autoantibody-mediated autoimmune disease and present a possible mechanism of prevention of the development of drug-induced antibodies to biologic agents. The finding that MTX and etanercept affect the B cell compartment differently supports the notion that combination therapy with etanercept and MTX is more effective than monotherapy. PMID:24909567

  17. Multidisciplinary approach in the management of absolute trismus with bilateral temporomandibular joint replacements for a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaras, Nikolaos; Parry, Nicholas S; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an exclusion diagnosis that gathers together all forms of arthritis that begin before the age of 16 years, persist for more than 6 weeks and are of unknown origin. We present the case of a 42 year old woman with a 20 year history of absolute trismus, secondary to bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis caused by JIA. The trismus resulted in grossly compromised oral hygiene and limited the patient to a semi-solid diet. JIA also affected her neck leading to a severe cervico-thoracic kyphosis. The patient who had been wheelchair bound developed severe lymphoedema of both lower limbs, complicating the pre-operative work up further. This particularly challenging case required input from specialists in anaesthetics, neurosurgery, special care dentistry, intensive care and maxillofacial surgery. Treatment consisted of ankylosis release, dental clearance and bilateral alloplastic replacement of her TMJs with custom implants. A full range of hinge movement and good functional outcome was achieved. This case presents the multidisciplinary approach to a severely compromised patient and illustrates the pre-, intra- and postoperative management of bilateral TMJ ankylosis with bespoke implants. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis on Kinematics and Kinetics of the Lower Extremities Call for Consequences in Physical Activities Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hartmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA patients (n=36 with symmetrical polyarticular joint involvement of the lower extremities and healthy controls (n=20 were compared concerning differences in kinematic, kinetic, and spatio-temporal parameters with 3D gait analysis. The aims of this study were to quantify the differences in gait between JIA patients and healthy controls and to provide data for more detailed sport activities recommendations. JIA-patients showed reduced walking speed and step length, strongly anterior tilted pelvis, reduced maximum hip extension, reduced knee extension during single support phase and reduced plantar flexion in push off. Additionally the roll-off procedure of the foot was slightly decelerated. The reduced push off motion in the ankle was confirmed by lower peaks in ankle moment and power. The gait of JIA-patients can be explained as a crouch-like gait with hyperflexion in hip and knee joints and less plantar flexion in the ankle. A preventive mobility workout would be recommendable to reduce these restrictions in the future. Advisable are sports with emphasis on extension in hip, knee, and ankle plantar flexion.

  19. Synovial and inflammatory diseases in childhood: role of new imaging modalities in the assessment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice [G. Gaslini Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Genoa (Italy); Malattia, Clara [G. Gaslini Institute, Department of Pediatrics 2, Genoa (Italy); Martini, Alberto [University of Genova, Department of Pediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Toma, Paolo [Bambin Gesu Pediatric Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) represents a group of heterogeneous diseases characterized by a chronic inflammatory process primarily targeting the synovial membrane. A persistent synovitis is associated with an increased risk of osteocartilaginous damage. With the advent of effective structure-modifying treatment for JIA, it may be possible to significantly reduce or even completely prevent structural damage and associated functional disability. The trend towards early suppression of inflammation, in order to prevent erosive disease, shifts the emphasis away from conventional radiographic detectable structural damage to the slightest traces of early joint damage, and drives the need for alternative imaging techniques more sensitive in detecting early signs of disease activity and damage. In this regard MRI and US are playing an increasing role in the evaluation of arthritic joints. This article will review the key aspects of the current status and recent important advances of imaging techniques available to investigate the child with rheumatic disease, briefly discussing conventional radiography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. In this era of advancing imaging technology, knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with JIA. (orig.)

  20. Serum ferritin levels as a useful diagnostic marker for the distinction of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Mao; Shimizu, Masaki; Inoue, Natsumi; Kasai, Kazuko; Nakagishi, Yasuo; Takahara, Tadamori; Hamahira, Kiyoshi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-11-01

    The clinical features and laboratory parameters of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) and systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) tend to overlap. Furthermore, there have been no definitive biomarkers for these diseases, making clinical diagnosis difficult. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of serum ferritin levels for differentiating KD from s-JIA and predicting the disease severity of KD. We analyzed 228 patients with KD and 81 patients with s-JIA. Serum ferritin levels were compared between patients with s-JIA and KD. Furthermore, serum ferritin levels in patients with KD were compared with respect to clinical features such as responsiveness to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Serum ferritin levels in KD patients with no response to IVIG therapy were significantly higher than those in KD patients with a good response to IVIG therapy. Serum ferritin levels in patients with KD needing plasma exchange (PE) were significantly higher than those in patients not needing PE. However, serum ferritin levels overlapped between severe KD patients with nonresponsiveness to IVIG therapy or needing PE and other patients with mild KD. Furthermore, patients with s-JIA showed a distinct elevation of serum ferritin levels compared with KD patients. The cutoff value of serum ferritin levels for differentiating KD from s-JIA was 369.6 ng/ml. Serum ferritin levels were significantly elevated in s-JIA patients compared with KD patients. Measurement of serum ferritin levels can be useful for differentiating s-JIA from KD.

  1. Genetic Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Portuguese Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Data from Reuma.pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Maria José; Mendonça, Sílvia; Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Melo-Gomes, José; Martins, Fernando; Lopes, Ana; Bettencourt, Bruno Filipe; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Costa, José; Furtado, Carolina; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Branco, Jaime; Fonseca, João Eurico; Canhão, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to assess the genetic determinants of poor outcome in Portuguese patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods. Our study was conducted in Reuma.pt, the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register, which includes patients with JIA. We collected prospectively patient and disease characteristics and a blood sample for DNA analysis. Poor prognosis was defined as CHAQ/HAQ >0.75 at the last visit and/or the treatment with biological therapy. A selected panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with susceptibility was studied to verify if there was association with poor prognosis. Results. Of the 812 patients with JIA registered in Reuma.pt, 267 had a blood sample and registered information used to define “poor prognosis.” In univariate analysis, we found significant associations with poor prognosis for allele A of TNFA1P3/20 rs6920220, allele G of TRAF1/C5 rs3761847, and allele G of PTPN2 rs7234029. In multivariate models, the associations with TRAF1/C5 (1.96 [1.17–3.3]) remained significant at the 5% level, while TNFA1P3/20 and PTPN2 were no longer significant. Nevertheless, none of associations found was significant after the Bonferroni correction was applied. Conclusion. Our study does not confirm the association between a panel of selected SNP and poor prognosis in Portuguese patients with JIA. PMID:26504858

  2. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  3. Quantitative MR characterization of disease activity in the knee in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a longitudinal pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workie, Dagnachew W. [University of Cincinnati, Department of Physics, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Graham, T.B. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Laor, Tal; Racadio, Judy M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rajagopal, Akila; O' Brien, Kendall J.; Bommer, Wendy A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shire, Norah J. [University of Cincinnati, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cincinnati, OH (United States); University of Cincinnati, Division of Digestive Diseases, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Dardzinski, Bernard J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The development of a quantifiable and noninvasive method of monitoring disease activity and response to therapy is vital for arthritis management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) based on pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling to evaluate disease activity in the knee and correlate the results with the clinical assessment in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A group of 17 children with JIA underwent longitudinal clinical and laboratory assessment and DCE-MRI of the knee at enrollment, 3 months, and 12 months. A PK model was employed using MRI signal enhancement data to give three parameters, K{sup trans} ' (min{sup -1}), k{sub ep} (min{sup -1}), and V{sub p} ' and to calculate synovial volume. The PK parameters, synovial volumes, and clinical and laboratory assessments in most children were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) at 12 months when compared to the enrollment values. There was excellent correlation between the PK and synovial volume and the clinical and laboratory assessments. Differences in MR and clinical parameter values in individual subjects illustrate persistent synovitis when in clinical remission. A decrease in PK parameter values obtained from DCE-MRI in children with JIA likely reflects diminution of disease activity. This technique may be used as an objective follow-up measure of therapeutic efficacy in patients with JIA. MR imaging can detect persistent synovitis in patients considered to be in clinical remission. (orig.)

  4. Behavioral Problems in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Controlled Study to Examine the Risk of Psychopathology in a Chronic Pediatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanara, Elham; Raeeskarami, Seyed-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are prone to the problems that can delay their psychosocial development; however, the existing literature has not reached a consensus on the psychological problems related to JIA. A total of 51 children and adolescents with JIA and 75 healthy controls aged 6 to 18 years were examined using the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). Our results represented that 70 percent of JIA group reached “borderline clinical” range or “clinical” range in internalizing problems, while this percentage in the control group was 18 percent. In addition, our results indicated that JIA group has gotten significantly higher scores (more than twofold) in externalizing behaviors compared to control group. Furthermore, children with JIA showed higher rate of anxiety/depression, withdrawal/depression, somatic complaints, rule breaking behaviors, and aggressive behaviors as well as thought and social problems compared to control group (p < 0.001). As a conclusion, children and adolescents with JIA compared to healthy controls may show higher rate of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, our novel findings on externalizing, social, and thought problems in JIA warrant further investigation on affected children who may be at greater risk of future psychopathologies. PMID:27656678

  5. Infectious factors and Juvenile idiopathic arthritis%感染因子与幼年特发性关节炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡国宏; 鹿玲

    2012-01-01

    幼年特发性关节炎(JIA)是儿童时期常见的慢性风湿性疾病.本病病因及发病机理尚未完全阐明.目前认为本病与感染及自身免疫反应有关,可能是内源性和外源性抗原作用于具有遗传背景的易感个体产生或者触发自身免疫反应而导致自身组织损伤的结果,感染因子被认为是其潜在的致病因素.%Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood.The pathogenesis of JIA is still not fully clarified.It is widely believed that JIA is correlated to infection and autoimmune reaction.It is possible that endogenous and exogenous antigen affect susceptible individuals who have genetic backgrounds and induce autoimmune reactions.Therefore,infectious factors are considered as potential pathogenic factors.

  6. Orofacial symptoms related to temporomandibular joint arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: smallest detectable difference in self-reported pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Kristensen, Kasper D; Verna, Carlalberta; Küseler, Annelise; Herlin, Troels; Pedersen, Thomas K

    2012-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may lead to mandibular growth disturbances and interfere with optimal joint and muscle function. Orofacial symptoms are common clinical findings in relation to TMJ arthritis in adolescence. Knowledge about their clinical manifestation is important for TMJ arthritis diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome evaluation. The aim of our prospective observational study was to evaluate and describe the frequency, the main complaints, and the localization of TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms. The smallest detectable differences (SDD) for minimal, average, and maximal pain were estimated. Thirty-three patients with JIA and arthritis-related orofacial symptoms in relation to 55 affected TMJ were included in our questionnaire study (mean age 14.11 yrs). Calculation of the SDD was based on a duplicate assessment 45 min after the first questionnaire was completed. The majority of the patients had common orofacial symptoms during mastication and maximal mouth opening procedures. Persistent orofacial symptoms were rare. The TMJ area in combination with the masseter muscle region was the orofacial region where symptoms were most common. The SDD for minimal, average, and maximal pain were between 10 and 14 mm on a visual analog scale. Our study offers new knowledge about TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms that may aid diagnosis and clinical decision-making. We suggest that TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms could be understood as products of the primary TMJ inflammation in combination with secondary myogenic and functional issues.

  7. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation Increases Efficacy of Etanercept in Selected Subtypes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: An Innovative Clinical Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Andrei Chiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, placebo-controlled study assesses the efficacy of synergic administration of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI and etanercept in selected subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Etanercept is a tumor necrosis factor alpha blocking agent with recognized importance in JIA. Laser radiation has immunomodulatory effects in animal and human studies. Fourteen patients (Group I received ILBI and 9 patients (Group II received placebo laser. ILBI was performed in addition to ongoing JIA medication, including etanercept. ILBI was administrated in 3 sets of 5 consecutive daily sessions, with a 7-week interval between every set of sessions. Evaluation was performed using ACR (American College of Rheumatology Pediatric Criteria (ACR Pedi at study enrollment and at 10 and 20 weeks, respectively. After 10 weeks, 85.7% of the patients in Group I fulfilled Pedi 30 criteria, compared to only 55.6% of the patients in Group II. After 20 weeks, all patients in both groups had a Pedi 30 response. In Group I, 92.8% of the subjects met the Pedi 50 response, compared to only 55.6% in the placebo group. One patient in Group I responded best, fulfilling Pedi 70 criteria. If applied synergistically, ILBI and etanercept would have an increased efficacy in promoting JIA remission.

  8. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...... at disease onset (median age 4.9 (IQR 2.1-8.8) vs. 6.6 (IQR 2.8-10.1) years, pdisease onset, if the ankle joint...

  9. Tocilizumab: The evidence for its place in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2010-01-01

    clinical trial of tocilizumab demonstrating the clinical efficacy and safety in systemic onset JIA have been published. Within those studies, sustained and high response rates of clinical improvement have been achieved with American College of Rheumatology Pediatric criteria (ACRPed) 30, 50, and 70...... antibody, could therefore be an effective treatment of systemic JIA. AIMS: The purpose of this article was to review the clinical trials of tocilizumab and to discuss its place in the treatment of JIA with the focus on the systemic onset of disease. EVIDENCE REVIEW: Two phase II studies and one phase III...

  10. Melatonin improves health status and sleep in children with idiopathic chronic sleep-onset insomnia: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; van Stel, H.F.; van der Heijden, K.; Meijer, A.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on health status and sleep in children with idiopathic sleep-onset insomnia. Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a Dutch sleep center, involving 62 children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more

  11. Is parental coping associated with quality of life in juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Ciarán M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parents of children with a chronic condition such as juvenile arthritis must cope with greater demands than those living with a healthy child. They must adopt different behaviours in order to lessen the impact on the family structure. Parental coping refers to the parent's specific cognitive and behavioural efforts to reduce or manage a demand on the family system. The aims of this study were: to describe coping in a cohort of parents of children with JIA; to determine whether quality of life is associated with parental coping; to explore whether socio-demographic factors such as child's age, family socioeconomic status and family structure are associated with parental coping. One hundred eighty-two parents caring for a child with JIA completed a postal survey at three times over a one-year period, which included the Juvenile Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JAQQ, the Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP and questionnaires describing socio-demographic characteristics. Linear mixed models were employed to analyse the association between the child's quality of life and parental coping. Mean total QoL scores (JAQQ showed that children experienced difficulty in completing specified activities at most just below 25% of the time and results fall off slightly following the 6 month time point. Mean parental coping scores for the CHIP subscales at baseline were 38.4 ± 9.0, 33.4 ± 11.6, 16.5 ± 6.1, for Maintaining Family Integration (maximum score 57, Maintaining Social Support (maximum score 54 and Understanding the Medical Situation (maximum score 24, respectively. Understanding the Medical Situation was deemed most useful. The child's QoL was associated with parental coping. Parents of children with greater psychosocial dysfunction used more coping behaviours related to Understanding the Medical Situation (β coefficient, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.01, 1.45. These findings underscore the importance of helping parents of children with JIA

  12. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  13. [The spa and health resort- based treatment of back pain syndrome in the adolescents presenting with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsova, E Yu; Murav'ev, S V; Kravtsov, Yu I

    The relevance of the problem arises from the lack of substantiation for the inclusion of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tSDCS) in the comprehensive spa and health resort-based treatment of back pain syndrome in the adolescents presenting with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation for the comprehensive spa and health resort-based treatment of back pain syndrome in the adolescents presenting with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. A total of 18 patients with scoliosis forming the study group 1 received the traditional comprehensive spa and health resort-based treatment. The course of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation was prescribed to 38 other patients (comprising group 2) in addition to the standard procedures. Another control group was comprised of 15 practically healthy adolescents having no signs of spinal deformations. The visual analog scale for pain, the McGill questionnaire, the scale for the assessment of the situational and personal uneasiness levels (Spilberger Ch.D., Khanin Yu.L.), and the Beck and Tsung depression scales were used, beside the routine clinical methods. Statistical data processing was carried out with the use of the Statistica 6.0 software package. In the group of patients treated with the use of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation, regression of pain syndrome was well apparent. In the boys with the severity of pain estimated at 2 points based on the visual analog scale who received the standard course of the spa and health resort-based treatment, the pain rank index and the index of the number of the selected descriptors decreased significantly but nonetheless remained higher than in the patients treated by means of tSDCS as a component of the combined therapy (p=0.039). Simultaneously, the significantly lower level of situational (Q1=25.00; Me=36.50; Q3=45.00; p=0.036) and

  14. Transfer from paediatric rheumatology to the adult rheumatology setting: experiences and expectations of young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilderson, Deborah; Eyckmans, Leen; Van der Elst, Kristien; Westhovens, Rene; Wouters, Carine; Moons, Philip

    2013-05-01

    Adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are transferred from paediatrics to adult-oriented healthcare when they reach early adulthood. Research on the extent to which patients' expectations about the adult healthcare setting match their actual experience after transfer, may promote successful transfer from paediatrics to adult care. As part of the 'Don't Retard' project ( http://www.kuleuven.be/switch2/rheuma.html ), experiences and expectations of young adults regarding their transfer from paediatric rheumatology to adult rheumatology were explored. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured, in-depth interviews of 11 patients with JIA, aged 18 to 30. Data were analysed using procedures inherent to the content analysis approach. For both concepts, experiences and expectations, three main themes emerged: 'preparation', 'parental involvement' and an 'adapted setting for the late-adolescent or early adult'. The need for a gradual process covered the themes 'preparation' and 'parental involvement'. Young people with JIA prefer to have a say in the moment of transfer and in the reduction of parental involvement. The majority of the participants like their parents' presence at the first consultation at the adult rheumatology department. They expect a healthcare setting adapted to their needs and the possibility to meet peers in this setting. Sudden confrontation with older patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis at adult rheumatology was an unsettling experience for some of the young patients and they declared that better preparation is needed. This study enabled us to define three main themes important in transfer. These themes can facilitate healthcare professionals in developing specific interventions to prepare the young people to transfer, to regulate parental involvement and to arrange an adapted setting for them. Since we included patients who were in follow-up at one tertiary care centre, in which both paediatric and adult

  15. Etanercept reduces matrix metalloproteinase-9 level in children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis and TNF-alpha-308GG genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, Jelena; Pavlovic, Dusica; Jevtovic-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Vojinovic, Jelena; Susic, Gordana; Stojanovic, Ivana; Kocic, Gordana; Milosevic, Vuk; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Marinkovic, Milena; Veljkovic, Andrej

    2010-06-01

    Genetic contribution of tumor necrosis factor polymorphism (TNF-alpha-308G/A) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) on response to TNF blocking agents, as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) production, is not yet well established. We have investigated whether the TNF-alpha-308G/A polymorphism can influence MMP-9 level and clinical response to etanercept (TNF receptor II-Fc fusion protein) in JIA patients, after 1 year of treatment. A total of 66 patients with polyarticular JIA and 65 healthy children were screened for the polymorphism using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. JIA patients donated paired blood samples prior to and 12 months after etanercept therapy. Plasma MMP-9 level was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Clinical assessment was performed according to ACR Pedi 50 improvement criteria. The frequency of the A allele was significantly higher in JIA patients compared to controls (39% vs. 26%, P = 0.026). Patients with the -308GG genotype achieved an ACR Pedi 50 response significantly more frequently than those with the -308AA genotype (P = 0.035). MMP-9 level in patients with the genotype -308GG was significantly decreased after 1 year of treatment with etanercept compared to the value from before (P = 0.036). On the other hand, there was a decrease of MMP-9 levels after treatment, but not statistically significant in patients with the genotypes -308GA/AA. We conclude that etanercept reduces MMP-9 level in children with polyarticular JIA and TNF-alpha-308GG genotype. Our results correlate with findings that the -308A allele is associated with a lower response to etanercept treatment.

  16. Safety, effectiveness, and pharmacokinetics of adalimumab in children with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis aged 2 to 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Daniel J; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Patel, Gina; Arora, Vipin; Kalabic, Jasmina; Kupper, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety of adalimumab in patients aged 2 to polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Clinical effectiveness and pharmacokinetics (PK) of adalimumab were also evaluated. This was an international, multicenter, open-label, phase 3b study in 32 patients with active JIA that were treated with adalimumab 24 mg/m(2) (maximum = 20 mg/dose) every other week up to 120 weeks, with or without concomitant methotrexate. Adverse events (AEs) were summarized for completed visits. Efficacy endpoints included American College of Rheumatology pediatric (PedACR) 30/50/70/90 responses and JIA core components. Adalimumab serum trough concentrations were measured in a subset of patients. Among the patients, 88 % were female. Baseline mean age, weight, and JIA duration were 3 years, 13 kg, and 12 months, respectively; 39 % had elevated C-reactive protein. AE incidence rates included any AEs (29/32, 91 %), serious AEs (5/32, 16 %), infectious AEs (25/32, 78 %), and serious infections (3/32, 9 %). No deaths, malignancies, or opportunistic infections were reported. Growth was not adversely impacted. At week 96, 92 % of patients achieved PedACR30, and 77 % achieved PedACR70. Improvements in JIA core components were observed. Mean steady-state serum adalimumab trough concentrations were 7-8 μg/mL at weeks 12 and 24. Adalimumab was well tolerated in JIA patients aged 2 to <4 years old or ≥4 years old weighing <15 kg. The efficacy and PK of adalimumab were comparable to those seen in older JIA patients.

  17. Alteration of Fecal Microbiota Profiles in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 Allele and Disease Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Monica; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; Sordo, Maddalena; Pindo, Massimo; Donati, Claudio; Pagnini, Ilaria; Giani, Teresa; Simonini, Gabriele; Paladini, Alessia; Lionetti, Paolo; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial “pro-arthritogenic” profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS), evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA), in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA). Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively, compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter, and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly to

  18. Alteration of fecal microbiota profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Associations with HLA-B27 allele and disease status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Di Paola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of gut microbiota is involved in several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, and gut microbial pro-arthritogenic profiles have been hypothesized. Intestinal inflammation may be involved in spondyloarthropathies and in a subset of patients affected by Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, the most common chronic rheumatic disease of childhood. We compared the fecal microbiota composition of JIA patients with healthy subjects (HS, evaluating differences in microbial profiles between sub-categories of JIA, such as enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA, in which inflammation of entheses occurs, and polyarticular JIA, non-enthesitis related arthritis (JIA-nERA. Through taxon-level analysis, we discovered alteration of fecal microbiota components that could be involved in subclinical gut inflammation, and promotion of joint inflammation. We observed abundance in Ruminococcaceae in both JIA categories, reduction in Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae in JIA-ERA, and increase in Veillonellaceae in JIA-nERA, respectively compared with HS. Among the more relevant genera, we found an increase in Clostridium cluster XIVb, involved in colitis and arthritis, in JIA-ERA patients compared with HS, and a trend of decrease in Faecalibacterium, known for anti-inflammatory properties, in JIA-nERA compared with JIA-ERA and HS. Differential abundant taxa identified JIA patients for the HLA-B27 allele, including Bilophila, Clostridium cluster XIVb, Oscillibacter and Parvimonas. Prediction analysis of metabolic functions showed that JIA-ERA metagenome was differentially enriched in bacterial functions related to cell motility and chemotaxis, suggesting selection of potential virulence traits. We also discovered differential microbial profiles and intra-group variability among active disease and remission, suggesting instability of microbial ecosystem in autoimmune diseases with respect to healthy status. Similarly

  19. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatović, Maja; Heijstek, Marloes W; Verkaaik, Marleen; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Kuis, Wietse; Egberts, Toine C G; Sinnema, Gerben; Rademaker, Carin M A; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2011-07-01

    To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS) questionnaire was constructed, consisting of 5 domains: stomach ache, nausea, vomiting, sore mouth, and behavioral symptoms. The domains each consisted of 3 questions pertaining to the presence of a symptom upon, prior to (anticipatory), and when thinking of (associative) MTX intake. The MISS questionnaire was validated in 86 patients by determining its discriminative power between patients with and those without MTX intolerance, identified as such by a gold standard (physician's opinion). Using the MISS questionnaire, the prevalence of MTX intolerance was determined in 297 JIA patients. The MISS questionnaire discriminated well between MTX-intolerant and MTX-tolerant patients. A cutoff score of 6 yielded the best sensitivity (88%) and specificity (80%). MTX intolerance was found in 150 (50.5%) of 297 patients. Of 220 patients receiving oral MTX, 98 (44.5%) experienced MTX intolerance, whereas 67.5% of 77 patients receiving parenteral MTX experienced intolerance to the drug (P = 0.001). Our findings indicate that the MISS questionnaire is a highly sensitive and specific tool for the diagnosis of MTX intolerance, and that there is a high prevalence of MTX intolerance among JIA patients. The prevalence of intolerance in patients receiving parenteral MTX exceeds that in patients receiving oral MTX. The frequent occurrence of anticipatory and associative symptoms suggests that classic conditioning plays an important role in MTX intolerance. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. The comparisons between thermography and ultrasonography with physical examination for wrist joint assessment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Sungkarat, Witaya; Chitrapazt, Niyata; Fuangfa, Praman; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to assess infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonography (US) for detecting wrist arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Although IRT could help us detecting joint inflammation, IRT studies in JIA patients with wrist arthritis are still limited. Currently, no validated US criteria exist for detecting arthritis, and the most useful parameters between Gray-scale ultrasound (GSUS) or Power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) remain unclear. Therefore, this study focused on detecting wrist arthritis in varying degrees using IRT and US compared with physical examination. Of 46 JIA patients, 16 had previous wrist arthritis but currently inactive, 30 still had wrist arthritis, and the median ages (IQR) were 7.7 (4.3) and 10.2 (4.8) years respectively. Fifteen healthy participants were included, with a median age (IQR) of 9.2 (2.0) years. Using IRT, mean temperature (Tmean) and maximum temperature (Tmax) at skin surface in the region of interest (ROI) in the arthritis group were higher than in the inactive group and the healthy controls with p examination, the moderate to severe arthritis had Tmean and Tmax higher than the mild arthritis group with statistical significance. The Heat Distribution Index (HDI), two standard deviations of all pixel temperature values in the ROI, in the moderate to severe arthritis group was higher than in the healthy controls (p = 0.027). The receiver operating characteristic analysis in arthritis detection revealed diagnostic sensitivity of 85.7% and 71.4% and specificity of 80.0% and 93.3% at a cut-off points of Tmean ≥ 31.0 C and Tmax ≥ 32.3 C respectively. For US, GSUS and PDUS are useful in detecting arthritis, providing high sensitivity (83.3%) and specificity (81.3%). Our study demonstrated that both IRT and US were applicable tools for detecting wrist arthritis.

  1. Whole-exome sequencing reveals overlap between macrophage activation syndrome in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth M; Linghu, Bolan; Szustakowski, Joseph D; Husami, Ammar; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Kejian; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fall, Ndate; Harley, John B; Nirmala, N R; Grom, Alexei A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), a life-threatening complication of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), resembles familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a constellation of autosomal-recessive immune disorders resulting from deficiency in cytolytic pathway proteins. We undertook this study to test our hypothesis that MAS predisposition in systemic JIA could be attributed to rare gene sequence variants affecting the cytotolytic pathway. Whole-exome sequencing was used in 14 patients with systemic JIA and MAS and in their parents to identify protein-altering single-nucleotide polymorphisms/indels in known HLH-associated genes. To discover new candidate genes, the entire whole-exome sequencing data were filtered to identify protein-altering, rare recessive homozygous, compound heterozygous, and de novo variants with the potential to affect the cytolytic pathway. Heterozygous protein-altering rare variants in the known genes (LYST,MUNC13-4, and STXBP2) were found in 5 of 14 patients with systemic JIA and MAS (35.7%). This was in contrast to only 4 variants in 4 of 29 patients with systemic JIA without MAS (13.8%). Homozygosity and compound heterozygosity analysis applied to the entire whole-exome sequencing data in systemic JIA/MAS revealed 3 recessive pairs in 3 genes and compound heterozygotes in 73 genes. We also identified 20 heterozygous rare protein-altering variants that occurred in at least 2 patients. Many of the identified genes encoded proteins with a role in actin and microtubule reorganization and vesicle-mediated transport. "Cellular assembly and organization" was the top cellular function category based on Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (P < 3.10 × 10(-5) ). Whole-exome sequencing performed in patients with systemic JIA and MAS identified rare protein-altering variants in known HLH-associated genes as well as in new candidate genes. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Overlap Between Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Linghu, Bolan; Szustakowski, Joseph D.; Husami, Ammar; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Kejian; Filipovich, Alexandra; Fall, Ndate; Harley, John B.; Nirmala, N.R.; Grom, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), a life-threatening complication of systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (SJIA), resembles Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH), a constellation of autosomal recessive immune disorders resulting from deficiency in cytolytic pathway proteins. We hypothesized that MAS predisposition in SJIA could be attributed to rare gene sequence variants affecting the cytotolytic pathway. Methods Whole exome sequencing (WES) was used in 14 SJIA/MAS patients and their parents to identify protein altering SNPs/indels in the known HLH-associated genes. To discover new candidate genes, the entire WES data were filtered to identify protein altering, rare recessive homozygous, compound heterozygous, and de novo variants with the potential to affect the cytolytic pathway. Results Heterozygous protein-altering rare variants in the known genes (LYST, MUNC13-4, and STXBP2) were found in 5 of 14 SJIA/MAS patients (35.7%). This was in contrast to only 4 variants in 4 of 29 (13,7%) SJIA patients without MAS. Homozygosity and compound heterozygosity analysis applied to the entire WES data in SJIAMAS, revealed 3 recessive pairs in 3 genes, and 76 compound heterozygotes in 75 genes. We also identified 22 heterozygous rare protein altering variants that occurred in at least two patients. Many of the identified genes encode proteins with a role in actin and microtubule reorganization and vesicle-mediated transport. “Cellular assembly and organization” was the top cellular function category based on Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (p<3.10E-05). Conclusion WES performed in SJIA/MAS patients identified rare protein altering variants in the known HLH associated genes as well as new candidate genes. PMID:25047945

  3. Efficacy of custom foot orthotics in improving pain and functional status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mary; Seid, Michael; Szer, Ilona S

    2005-05-01

    . To compare the clinical efficacy of custom foot orthotics, prefabricated "off-the-shelf" shoe inserts, and supportive athletic shoes worn alone, on reducing pain and improving function for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Children with JIA and foot pain (n = 40) were randomized to one of 3 groups receiving: (1) custom-made semirigid foot orthotics with shock absorbing posts (n = 15), (2) off-the-shelf flat neoprene shoe inserts (n = 12), or (3) supportive athletic shoes with a medial longitudinal arch support and shock absorbing soles worn alone (n = 13). Foot pain and functional limitations were measured using the Pediatric Pain Questionnaire-visual analog scale (VAS), Timed Walking, Foot Function Index (FFI), and the Physical Functioning Subscale of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). Measures were administered by personnel blinded to group status at baseline (before wearing the assigned intervention) and at 3 months' followup. Children in the orthotics group showed significantly greater improvements in overall pain (p = 0.009), speed of ambulation (p = 0.013), activity limitations (p = 0.002), foot pain (p = 0.019), and level of disability (p = 0.024) when compared with the other 2 groups. Both children and parents in the orthotics group reported clinically meaningful improvement in child health-related quality of life, although the group by time interaction did not show statistical significance. Except for a reduction in pain for supportive athletic shoes (paired t test, p = 0.011), neither the off-the-shelf shoe inserts nor the supportive athletic shoes worn alone showed significant effect on any of the evaluation measures. In children with JIA, custom-made semirigid foot orthotics with shock-absorbing posts significantly improve pain, speed of ambulation, and self-rated activity and functional ability levels compared with prefabricated off-the-shelf shoe inserts or supportive athletic shoes worn alone.

  4. Diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis%幼年特发性关节炎的诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋红梅

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the most common rheumatologic disease in childhood, is characterized by arthritis beginning before the age of 16 years with symptoms persisting for more than 6 weeks with unknown causes.It was divided into seven subtypes by the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR): systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis, polyarthritis rheumatoid factor (RF) negative, polyarthritis RF positive,psoriatic arthritis, enthestis related arthritis (ERA), and undifferentiated arthritis.The appropriate auxiliary examinations should be chosen to differentiate it carefully from other causes that presented similar manifestations to JIA.Attention should be paid to assess the disease activity, prognosis and treatment outcomes.Meanwhile, complications needs to be watched.%幼年特发性关节炎(JIA)是指16岁以下儿童持续6周以上原因不明的关节炎.是儿童时期最常见的风湿性疾病.JIA按照国际风湿病学联盟的分类标准分为7个亚型,包括全身型、少关节炎型、多关节炎型类风湿因子(RF)阴性、多关节炎型RF阳性、银屑病件关节炎、附着点炎症相关的关节炎和分类不明的关节炎.应该选择适当的辅助检查与可能引起相似表现的其他原因相鉴别,并且应用适当的工具评价其活动程度,同时要注意并发症的诊断.

  5. Benefit of fluoroscopically guided intraarticular, long-acting corticosteroid injection for subtalar arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, Anne M.; Cho, Sandy S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Baskin, Kevin M. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Beukelman, Timothy; Cron, Randy Q. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kaye, Robin D. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Towbin, Richard B.

    2007-06-15

    Children with arthritis may endure a lifetime of disfigurement, dysfunction, and pain if acute inflammation progresses to chronic changes in the joint cartilage and underlying bone. Intraarticular steroids have become an integral component of treatment, but at times are difficult to deliver to joints, such as the subtalar joint, that have complex anatomies. We describe our technique and outcomes using fluoroscopically guided intraarticular subtalar steroid injection in patients with active symptoms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Fluoroscopically guided subtalar joint injections were performed in 38 children (mean age 6.7 years). Medical records were reviewed retrospectively and improvement was evaluated clinically by the degree of foot movement in eversion and inversion. Subtalar joint injection was technically successful in 100% of the JIA patients with improvement in physical symptoms in 34/38 (89%). Of the 38 children, 32 were followed up within 13 weeks of the initial injection and, therefore, satisfied the eligibility criteria for resolution of arthritis. Of these 32 children, 14 showed clinical resolution (44%). The mean duration of improvement was 1.2 {+-} 0.9 years. Children with a longer interval (>1 year) from diagnosis to treatment had significantly less resolution (P = 0.04). Local subcutaneous atrophy or hypopigmentation were observed in 53% of the children after steroid injection (20/38). These minor complications were associated with a greater volume of steroid injected into the site per child (P = 0.02). Fluoroscopically guided subtalar joint injection is an effective treatment for subtalar arthropathy. Prompt referral for intraarticular steroid treatment in the acute phase improves response. Skin changes often occur at the injection site, and specific precautions should be employed to reduce this risk. Prospective study is indicated to determine the most effective treatment strategy to prevent long-term pain and disability. (orig.)

  6. Are temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Sousa, Soraia Ale; Fernandes, Artur Rocha Corrêa; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to perform a comprehensive clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to investigate the association between the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the TMJs of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventy-five patients with JIA participated in this study. All patients underwent a rheumatological examination performed by a paediatric rheumatologist, a TMJ examination performed by a single dentist and an MRI with contrast of the TMJs. These examinations were scheduled on the same date. The patients were examined again 1 year later. Twenty-eight (37.3 %) patients reported symptoms at the first evaluation and 11 (14.7 %) patients at the second evaluation. In relation to signs, 35 (46.7 %) of the patients presented at least one sign at the first evaluation and 29 (38.7 %) at the second. Intense contrast enhancement of TMJ was significantly associated with disease activity (p < 0.001) at the first evaluation and a trend to significance was observed at the second (p = 0.056), with poly/systemic subtypes (p = 0.028 and p = 0.049, respectively), with restricted mouth opening capacity (p = 0.013 and p = 0.001, respectively), with the presence of erosions at both evaluations (p = 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and with altered condylar shape at the second evaluation (p = 0.0005). TMJ involvement is highly prevalent in JIA patients, with asymptomatic children presenting severe structural alterations of the TMJ. The TMJ should always be evaluated in JIA patients, even in the absence of signs and symptoms.

  7. An exploration of parents’ preferences for foot care in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a possible role for the discrete choice experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background An increased awareness of patients’ and parents’ care preferences regarding foot care is desirable from a clinical perspective as such information may be utilised to optimise care delivery. The aim of this study was to examine parents’ preferences for, and valuations of foot care and foot-related outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods A discrete choice experiment (DCE) incorporating willingness-to-pay (WTP) questions was conducted by surveying 42 parents of children with JIA who were enrolled in a randomised-controlled trial of multidisciplinary foot care at a single UK paediatric rheumatology outpatients department. Attributes explored were: levels of pain; mobility; ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL); waiting time; referral route; and footwear. The DCE was administered at trial baseline. DCE data were analysed using a multinomial-logit-regression model to estimate preferences and relative importance of attributes of foot care. A stated-preference WTP question was presented to estimate parents’ monetary valuation of health and service improvements. Results Every attribute in the DCE was statistically significant (p preferences for foot care for their child. The magnitudes of the coefficients indicate that the strength of preference for each attribute was (in descending order): improved ability to perform ADL, reductions in foot pain, improved mobility, improved ability to wear desired footwear, multidisciplinary foot care route, and reduced waiting time. Parents’ estimated mean annual WTP for a multidisciplinary foot care service was £1,119.05. Conclusions In terms of foot care service provision for children with JIA, parents appear to prefer improvements in health outcomes over non-health outcomes and service process attributes. Cost was relatively less important than other attributes suggesting that it does not appear to impact on parents’ preferences. PMID:24502508

  8. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Foot Care in the Management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Toupin-April, Karine; Wells, George; Smith, Christine A; Pugh, Arlanna G; Stinson, Jennifer N; Duffy, Ciarán M; Gifford, Wendy; Moher, David; Sherrington, Catherine; Cavallo, Sabrina; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; Rahman, Prinon; Marcotte, Rachel; Taki, Jade; Bisaillon, Jacinthe; King, Judy; Coda, Andrea; Hendry, Gordon J; Gauvreau, Julie; Hayles, Martin; Hayles, Kay; Feldman, Brian; Kenny, Glen P; Li, Jing Xian; Briggs, Andrew M; Martini, Rose; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Maltais, Désirée B; Tupper, Susan; Bigford, Sarah; Bisch, Marg

    2016-07-01

    To create evidence-based guidelines evaluating foot care interventions for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). An electronic literature search of the following databases from database inception to May 2015 was conducted: MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), Cochrane CENTRAL, and clinicaltrials.gov. The Ottawa Panel selection criteria targeted studies that assessed foot care or foot orthotic interventions for the management of JIA in those aged 0 to ≤18 years. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used to evaluate study quality, of which only high-quality studies were included (score, ≥5). A total of 362 records were screened, resulting in 3 full-text articles and 1 additional citation containing supplementary information included for the analysis. Two reviewers independently extracted study data (intervention, comparator, outcome, time period, study design) from the included studies by using standardized data extraction forms. Directed by Cochrane Collaboration methodology, the statistical analysis produced figures and graphs representing the strength of intervention outcomes and their corresponding grades (A, B, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-). Clinical significance was achieved when an improvement of ≥30% between the intervention and control groups was present, whereas P>.05 indicated statistical significance. An expert panel Delphi consensus (≥80%) was required for the endorsement of recommendations. All included studies were of high quality and analyzed the effects of multidisciplinary foot care, customized foot orthotics, and shoe inserts for the management of JIA. Custom-made foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts displayed the greatest improvement in pain intensity, activity limitation, foot pain, and disability reduction (grades A, C+). The use of customized foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts seems to be a good choice for managing foot pain and function in JIA. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  9. Early detection of temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - the role of contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Stuber, Tina; Winkler, Peter [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Radiology, Radiologisches Institut, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, Jan; Hospach, Toni [Olgahospital Klinikum Stuttgart, Pediatric Rheumatology, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Early treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis is crucial in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to prevent permanent functional impairment. As involvement of TMJs is often asymptomatic, contrast-enhanced MRI is regarded as the most sensitive noninvasive diagnostic tool. To evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement in TMJs of children and adolescents with JIA in comparison to normal controls from a previous study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of 50 children and adolescents with JIA (6.3 to 18 years of age; mean: 12 years) were retrospectively analysed. We assessed morphological abnormalities and postcontrast time-intensity curves of the soft joint tissue and the mandibular condyle. Ratios were calculated to quantify postcontrast signal intensities (SI) in relation to precontrast SI at initial (1 min postcontrast) and maximum (6 min postcontrast) increase. Time-intensity curves followed similar biphasic patterns in normal and pathological joints. In joints with morphological signs of arthritis, mean SI ratios were on average higher than in normal joints of the reference group, but ranges of values widely overlapped. Arthritis: mean initial increase of SI 62% (±2 S.D. 18-105%), mean maximum SI 106% higher than precontrast (±2 S.D. 46-166%). Normal: mean initial increase of SI 49% (±2 S.D. 14- 85%), mean maximum of SI 73% (±2 S.D. 23-123%). Given this considerable overlap of results in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the degree of contrast enhancement alone did not allow differentiation between TMJs with and without signs of inflammation. Thickening of the soft joint tissue seems to remain the earliest sign to reliably indicate TMJ arthritis. (orig.)

  10. Vitamin D status in Egyptian patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garf, Kamal El; Marzouk, Huda; Farag, Yomna; Rasheed, Laila; Garf, Ayman El

    2015-09-01

    There are scanty data on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relation to disease activity among patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JoSLE) in the Middle East and North Africa, an area known to be endemic for vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. The aim of this study was, therefore, to study vitamin D status and its relation to disease activity and parameters in Egyptian patients with JoSLE. Serum levels of 25(OH) D3 in 70 JoSLE patients were compared to 40 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. The 25(OH) D3 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Information regarding the medical history, clinical symptoms, and signs was registered at the time of serum sampling. Disease activity of SLE was evaluated according to the SLEDAI score. The mean level of serum 25(OH) D3 was 12 ± 3.7 in JoSLE patients compared to 21 ± 3.5 ng/mL in normal controls (p 30 ng/mL. There was no significant correlation between serum levels of 25(OH) D3 and the demographic data, medication used, and some laboratory data of patients with JoSLE. Disease activity score in our patients was insignificantly correlated with serum levels of 25(OH) D3. In spite of vitamin D supplementation in Egyptian JoSLE patients and the presence of vitamin D insufficiency in the control group, there are still significantly lower levels of vitamin D in JoSLE compared to normal controls.

  11. The many shades of enhancement: timing of post-gadolinium images strongly influences the scoring of juvenile idiopathic arthritis wrist involvement on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieter, Jasper F.M.M.; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Avenarius, Derk F.M. [Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe (Norway); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Malattia, Clara [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Paediatrics, Genoa (Italy); Rosendahl, Karen [Haukeland University Hospital, Radiology Department, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Department of Clinical Medicine, K1, Bergen (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    Potential long-term side effects of treatment for juvenile idiopathic arthritis are concerning. This has necessitated accurate tools, such as MRI, to monitor treatment response and allow for personalized therapy. To examine the extent to which timing of post-contrast MR images influences the scoring of inflammatory change in the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We studied two sets of post-contrast 3-D gradient echo MRI series of the wrist in 34 children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These images were obtained immediately after administration of intravenous contrast material and again after approximately 10 min. The dataset was drawn from a prospective multicenter project conducted 2006-2010. We assessed five wrist locations for synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation. Examinations were scored by one radiologist in two sessions - the first was based on the early post-contrast images, and the later session, for which the previous findings were masked, was based on the later post-contrast images. Fifty-two of the 170 locations (30.6%) received a higher synovial enhancement score based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early images. Sixty of the 170 (35%) locations received a higher total inflammation score. The mean scores of synovial enhancement and total inflammation were significantly higher when based on the late post-contrast images as compared to the early post-contrast images. An MRI-based scoring system for the presence and degree of synovitis should be based on a standardized MR-protocol with a fixed interval between intravenous contrast injection and post-contrast images. (orig.)

  12. Natural evolution from idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in an untreated young patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Francesca; Egeo, Gabriella; Fattouch, Jinan; Fanella, Martina; Morano, Alessandra; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy (IPOE) is an idiopathic localization-related epilepsy characterized by age-related onset, specific mode of precipitation, occipital photic-induced seizures--frequently consisting of visual symptoms--and good prognosis. This uncommon epilepsy, which usually starts in childhood or adolescence, has rarely been observed in families in which idiopathic generalized epilepsy also affects other members. We describe a nuclear family in which the proband showed electro-clinical features of idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy in childhood, which subsequently evolved into absences and a single generalized tonico-clonic seizure in early adolescence. His mother had features suggestive of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. This case illustrates a continuum between focal and generalized entities in the spectrum of the so-called idiopathic (genetically determined) epileptic syndromes. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy leading to dramatic improvement in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and severe pericarditis resistant to steroid pulse therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Oki, Eishin; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Nakahata, Tohru; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    A 7-year-old Japanese boy with a 4-month history of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) experienced disease flare with spiking fever, exanthema and arthralgia. He then developed progressive dyspnea due to severe pericarditis, and proinflammatory hypercytokinemia was suspected. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was ineffective and echocardiography showed massive pericardial effusion had persisted. Alternatively, subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy resulted in dramatic resolution of the pericardial effusion, and his general condition significantly improved within a few days. This case report may lend further support the use of IVIG for selected patients with s-JIA and severe pericarditis.

  14. Aspectos da sexualidade e gravidez em adolescentes com artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ Sexuality aspects and pregnancy of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Artur Almeida Silva

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho tem como objetivo descrever aspectos da sexualidade, gravidez e pós-parto de três adolescentes com artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ. No período entre 1983 e 2004, 4.638 pacientes foram acompanhados na Unidade de Reumatologia Pediátrica do Departamento de Pediatria da FMUSP, entre os quais 537 (11,5% apresentaram o diagnóstico de AIJ (critérios do ILAR. Entre os pacientes com AIJ, três engravidaram durante o seguimento ambulatorial. A idade da primeira atividade sexual variou de 16 a 18 anos. A paciente 1 apresentou uma gestação gemelar a termo, permanecendo em atividade da doença durante toda a gravidez, em uso de 15mg/dia de prednisona. As pacientes 2 e 3 encontravam-se em remissão da doença, sem uso de medicamentos, apresentando gestação a termo sem intercorrências. A paciente 2, porém, evoluiu com recidiva da doença um ano após o parto. Todos os recém-nascidos foram adequados para idade gestacional e evoluíram adequadamente no período neonatal. Apenas a paciente 1 necessitou de prednisona, naproxeno e cloroquina na amamentação. O aumento da gravidez na adolescência é uma realidade nos serviços de reumatologia pediátrica, o que impõe novos debates sobre os aspectos da sexualidade e contracepção nessa população.The objective of the present study is to describe the sexuality aspects, pregnancy and postpartum in three adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. From 1983 to 2004, 4,638 patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Pediatric Department of FMUSP, of which 537 (11.5% were diagnosed with JIA (ILAR criteria and three of these patients became pregnant during the follow-up period. The age at their first sexual intercourse ranged from 16 to 18 years old. Patient 1 presented a twin pregnancy, with active disease throughout pregnancy, and was on 15 mg of prednisone per day. Patients 2 and 3 were at disease remission, with no drug treatment, and had full

  15. Síndrome CINCA: um diagnóstico diferencial da artrite idiopática juvenil CINCA syndrome: a differential diagnosis of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Naomi Naka

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome CINCA (crônico-infantil-neurológica-cutâneaarticular é uma enfermidade inflamatória multissistêmica rara, de início no período neonatal e caracterizada por febre, exantema cutâneo, envolvimento articular e do sistema nervoso central. É também conhecida pela literatura médica norte-americana como NOMID (doença multissistêmica inflamatória de início neonatal. Relatamos o caso de uma criança de 3 anos de idade admitida em nosso serviço com história de febre e exantema cutâneo desde o período neonatal. Apresentou crises convulsivas no sexto mês de vida e artrite simétrica de joelhos desde o nono mês. Na admissão, mostrava-se toxemiada, pálida, com um exantema maculopapular generalizado e artrite de joelhos e tornozelos. Apresentava ainda retardo de crescimento e desenvolvimento. Achados laboratoriais incluíram anemia, leucocitose, trombocitose, níveis elevados de proteína C reativa e meningite asséptica no exame do liquor. Os outros exames foram negativos. Os achados radiográficos dos joelhos, quadris e tornozelos foram anormais. A criança recebeu tratamento com antiinflamatório não hormonal, corticosteróide e metotrexato, com melhora apenas da dor e da febre. A etiologia da síndrome CINCA permanece desconhecida e nenhum tratamento tem se mostrado eficaz. Essa doença deve ser distinguida da forma sistêmica da artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ, o principal diagnóstico diferencial.CINCA syndrome (chronic-infantile-neurological-cutaneousarticular is a rare multisystemic inflammatory disease with neonatal onset characterized by fever, skin rash, articular, and central nervous system involvement. This syndrome is known in the North American medical literature as infantile onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID. We describe the case of a 3-yearold child admitted in our service with fever and skin rash since the neonatal period. She presented seizures at 6 months-old and bilateral arthritis of the

  16. Síndrome da ativação do macrófago em paciente com artrite idiopática juvenil poliarticular Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acir Rachid

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A linfohistiocitose hemofagocítica caracteriza-se por ativação e proliferação excessiva de linfócitos e macrófagos. Quando associada à artrite idiopática juvenil é também conhecida por "síndrome de ativação do macrófago", sendo uma complicação potencialmente fatal desta doença. Apresentamos o caso de uma mulher de 26 anos portadora de artrite idiopática juvenil (poliartrite, fator reumatóide negativo, com diagnóstico aos 13 anos, em uso de antiinflamatórios não esteroidais (diclofenaco, nimesulide. Admitida com quadro de resposta inflamatória sistêmica, febre, linfonodomegalia, esplenomegalia, anemia, trombocitopenia, hipofibrinogenemia, hiperferritinemia, hipertrigliceridemia e achados de hematofagocitose na medula óssea. Os autores discutem aspectos relacionados com a patogênese, diagnóstico e tratamento desta doença pouco conhecida.Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is characterized by massive lymphocyte and macrophage activation and proliferation. When observed in association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis it is also called "macrophage activation syndrome" being a potentially lethal complication of this disease. We report the case of a 26 years old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyarthritis, rheumatoid factor negative since 13 years old, receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, nimesulide. She was admitted with systemic inflammatory response, fever, lymph node enlargement, splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. Aspects related to pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this little known disease are discussed.

  17. Different familial association patterns of autoimmune diseases between juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Mei; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the prevalence of autoimmune disorders in the relatives of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is greater than that of relatives of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Interviews were used to obtain histories of the following autoimmune disorders among living or deceased first-, second-, and third-degree relatives of 91 SLE and 110 JRA families: ankylosing spondylitis, SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), JRA, multiple sclerosis, juvenile dermatomyositis, Sjögren's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, psoriasis, and thyroid diseases. There were statistically significant differences between the SLE and JRA probands in mean age and gender ratio (19.1 +/- 4.8 vs 14.0 +/- 5.5 years; M (male)/F (female): 17/74 vs 62/48, pJRA families (11.8%), but not statistically significantly so. The mean age (18.0 +/- 5.3 vs 14.0 +/- 4.3 years), mean age at diagnosis (13.4 +/- 4.3 vs 7.9 +/- 3.9 years) and gender ratio (F/M, 16/3 vs 5/8) of the patients with affected relatives between these 2 groups all had statistically significant differences. A higher prevalence of SLE in relatives was found in SLE families than in JRA cases. Furthermore, this study revealed a higher incidence of autoimmune disorders among second- and third-degree relatives of SLE or JRA probands versus first-degree ones, especially sisters (including 1 pair of twins) and the maternal aunt in SLE families. These data demonstrate that the prevalence of autoimmune disorders in the relatives of patients with SLE is greater than those of relatives of patients with JRA. This suggests that clinically different autoimmune phenotypes may share common susceptibility genes, which may act as risk factors for autoimmunity.

  18. Evaluation of anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and significance of anti-citrullinated vimentin and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies and elucidate their role in the disease process of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Sera were obtained from 95 patients with various subtypes of JIA, 19 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 10 healthy children. Antibodies were measured in the sera against citrullinated and native type II collagen and vimentin (vim1-16 and vim 59-74) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were compared to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes, and our previously measured anti-citrullinated fibrinogen and α-enolase antibodies on the same patient population, in addition to erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. The relationship between the anti-citrullinated antibody profile and disease activity and joint damage were also investigated. Results Twenty-three JIA patients (24%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated type II collagen. Ten JIA patients (10.5%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 antibodies and 7 (7.4%) to anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies. One IgM RF-positive polyarticular patient was positive for all 5 of the citrullinated autoantibodies tested. Thirty-seven different subsets of patients were identified based on their anti-citrullinated autoantibody and RF isotype profile. No significant associations were noted with anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies with joint damage or disease activity. Anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies demonstrated the highest overall specificity at 89.7%, with anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies at 86.2%. Conclusion This study demonstrates that antibodies to multiple citrullinated epitopes are present in the sera of patients with various subtypes of JIA. It also

  19. Prevalência de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados na artrite idiopática juvenil The prevalence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Sandra H. Machado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a presença de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados em uma coorte de pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. MÉTODOS: A presença de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados foi avaliada por ensaio imunoenzimático (ELISA no soro de pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil com idade inferior a 18 anos, acompanhados no ambulatório de reumatologia pediátrica do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, com tempo de diagnóstico de doença de, no mínimo, 6 meses. Também foi estudada a presença do fator reumatóide IgM e do fator antinuclear em células Hep-2 RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas amostras séricas de 45 pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil. A presença de títulos elevados de anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados foi encontrada somente no soro de uma criança (2%, a qual apresentava quadro de poliartrite com fator reumatóide reagente. CONCLUSÕES: O anticorpo contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados pode ser detectado em crianças com artrite idiopática juvenil, mas em freqüência muito inferior aos adultos com artrite reumatóide. Torna-se importante avaliar se anticorpos contra peptídeos cíclicos citrulinados podem identificar os pacientes com artrite idiopática juvenil com potencial de evolução para artrite reumatóide do adulto.OBJECTIVES: To assess the presence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in a cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. METHODS: Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies was tested for with an enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA in serum samples of patients from the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, all less than 18 years old and with previous diagnosis for at least 6 months. IgMRF (rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies in Hep-2 cells were also assayed. RESULTS: Serum samples were analyzed from 45 patients. The presence of high levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies was found

  20. Circadian phase typing in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: Dim light melatonin onset and patterns of melatonin secretion-Semicurve findings in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, Raffaele; De Icco, Roberto; Cremascoli, Riccardo; Ferrera, Giulia; Furia, Francesca; Zambrelli, Elena; Canevini, Maria Paola; Terzaghi, Michele

    2016-08-01

    It has been debated in the literature whether patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) have a distinctive, evening-oriented chronotype. The few questionnaire-based studies that are available in the literature have conflicting results. The aim of our study was to define chronotype in patients with IGE by determining dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Twenty adults diagnosed with IGE (grand mal on awakening [GM] in 7 cases and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in 13 cases) were investigated by means of a face-to-face semistructured sleep interview, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire, and a melatonin salivary test with DLMO determination. Eighteen healthy subjects (HC) and 28 patients affected with cryptogenic focal epilepsy (FE) served as controls. The mean MEQ score was significantly lower in patients with IGE than that in patients with FE (49.1±5.9 versus 56.1±8.7 P<0.01) but not significantly lower than that in HC (49.1±5.9 versus 49.3±8.6). Midsleep on free days corrected for sleep duration did not differ significantly between the three subject groups (04:59±01:21h, 04:37±01:17h, 04:29±00:52h). The mean DLMO time in patients with IGE (22:13±01:34h) occurred 49min later than that in HC (21.24±1h), and the melatonin surge within the 30-minute time interval after DLMO in patients with IGE was significantly lower than that in HC (1.51±2.7 versus 3.8±3.6pg/mL P=0.045). Subjective measures of chronotype do not indicate a definite evening-oriented chronotype in patients with IGE. However, the data concerning endogenous melatonin secretion indicate that patients with IGE tend to have a late circadian phase. Further studies are warranted in order to better define the late pattern of endogenous melatonin secretion in patients with IGE and to ascertain the role of this pattern in influencing behavioral chronotype in these subjects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A variant of idiopathic epilepsy: Clinical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of idiopathic generalized epilepsy with a variable phenotype, a similar type of epileptiform activity in the second stage of sleep, and a similar genotype in siblings. The onset of seizures was observed after closed brain injury in both cases. The sister had myoclonic seizures and her brother had generalized convulsive seizures late in the evening. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized convulsive seizures appears as generalized tonic-clonic seizures on awakening. But in a number of cases, these seizures may occur when going to sleep. The brother has supposedly idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonicclonic seizures and his sister has juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, as indicated by her age, hereditary predisposition, phenobarbital-provoked seizures (the latter are also observed in his brother, an electrographic pattern, and the efficacy of Keppra and Topamax. 

  2. 2016 Classification criteria for macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis : A European league against Rheumatism/American college of Rheumatology/Paediatric rheumatology international trials organisation collaborative initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, Anna Carin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M.; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A.; Henter, Jan Inge; Ilowite, Norman T.; Jordan, Michael B.; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J.; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E.; Ozen, Seza; Schmid, Jana Pachlopnik; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V.; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073121185; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I.; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q.

    2016-01-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to

  3. Design and acceptance of Rheumates@Work, a combined internet-based and in person instruction model, an interactive, educational, and cognitive behavioral program for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, Joyce J. F. J.; Cappon, Jeannette; van Rossum, Marion A. J. J.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Wulffraat, Nico; van Wijnen, Veera K.; Lelieveld, Otto T. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Patients suffer daily discomforts such as pain, fatigue, stiffness, and mood disturbances. Their exercise capacity is decreased to a variable degree and physical activity levels may be impaired. To prevent long-term card

  4. Design and acceptance of Rheumates@Work, a combined internet-based and in person instruction model, an interactive, educational, and cognitive behavioral program for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, Joyce J. F. J.; Cappon, Jeannette; van Rossum, Marion A. J. J.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Wulffraat, Nico; van Wijnen, Veera K.; Lelieveld, Otto T. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic rheumatic disease. Patients suffer daily discomforts such as pain, fatigue, stiffness, and mood disturbances. Their exercise capacity is decreased to a variable degree and physical activity levels may be impaired. To prevent long-term card

  5. Expression of the inflammatory chemokines CCL5, CCL3 and CXCL10 in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and demonstration of CCL5 production by an atypical subset of CD8+T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pharoah, Daniel S.; Varsani, Hemlata; Tatham, Richard W.; Newton, Katy R.; de Jager, Wilco; Prakken, Berent J.; Klein, Nigel; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses upon three chemokines, namely CCL5, CXCL10 and CCL3, which are potential novel therapeutic targets in arthritis. The aim of the study was to analyse the expression and production of these three chemokines within the joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of th

  6. PReS-FINAL-2148: Rheumates@work a cognitive behavioural internet based intervention promoting physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Preliminary results of a randomized clinical trail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J; Armbrust, W.; Geertzen, J.; Sauer, P.; Dijkstra, P.; Van Brussel, M.; Cappon, J.; Lelieveld, O.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a chronic disease in which periods of active inflammation alternate with periods of inactive disease in an unpredictable way. Although impairments are most pronounced in children with disease activity, deficits like fatigue, decreased physical act

  7. Mild angle early onset idiopathic scoliosis children avoid progression under FITS method (Functional Individual Therapy of Scoliosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Marianna

    2015-05-01

    Physiotherapy for stabilization of idiopathic scoliosis angle in growing children remains controversial. Notably, little data on effectiveness of physiotherapy in children with Early Onset Idiopathic Scoliosis (EOIS) has been published.The aim of this study was to check results of FITS physiotherapy in a group of children with EOIS.The charts of the patients archived in a prospectively collected database were retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criteria were:diagnosis of EOIS based on spine radiography, age below 10 years, both girls and boys, Cobb angle between 118 and 308, Risser zero, FITS therapy, no other treatment (bracing), and a follow-up at least 2 years from the initiation of the treatment. The criterion for curve progression were as follows: the Cobb angle increase of 68 or more, for curve stabilization; the Cobb angle was 58 comparing to the initial radiograph,for curve correction; and the Cobb angle decrease of 68 or more at the final follow-up radiograph.There were 41 children with EOIS, 36 girls and 5 boys, mean age 7.71.3 years (range 4 to 9 years) who started FITS therapy. The curve pattern was single thoracic (5 children), single thoracolumbar (22 children) or double thoracic/thoracolumbar (14 children), totally 55 structural curvatures. The minimum follow-up was 2 years after initiation of the FITS treatment, maximum was 16 years, mean 4.8 years). At follow-up the mean age was 12.53.4 years. Out of 41 children, 10 passed pubertal growth spurt at the final follow-up and 31 were still immature and continued FITS therapy. Out of 41 children, 27 improved, 13 were stable, and one progressed. Out of 55 structural curves, 32 improved, 22 were stable and one progressed. For the 55 structural curves, the Cobb angle significantly decreased from 18.085.48 at first assessment to 12.586.38 at last evaluation,p<0.0001, paired t-test. The angle of trunk rotation decreased significantly from 4.782.98 to 3.282.58 at last evaluation, p<0.0001,paired t

  8. 幼年特发性关节炎伴发葡萄膜炎%Uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑曰忠

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) that persists for at least 6 weeks is a group of the most common chronic arthritis conditions occurring in children under 16 years of age.Uveitis accompanies JIA in about 10% of patients.The characteristics of uveitis are usually asymptomatic with silent onset,light inflammation,more complications and severe visual damage.Traditional risk factors for uveitis development include children less than 7 years old at the time of arthritis onset,a positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) test result,female sex and oligoarthritis.The classic clinical pictures are bilateral chronic asymptomatic anterior uveitis and the major complications include band keratopathy,complicated cataract,posterior iris synechiae and secondary glaucoma.Treatment consists of topical corticosteroids,nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and mydriatics.In severe cases,treatment may include oral corticosteroids,immunosuppressive agents or biological therapies.Patients with complicated cataract need surgical management and aggressive perioperative control of intraocular inflammation for successful cataract surgery with lens implantation.In view of the asymptomatic nature of uveitis,careful screening of eyes in JIA patients and early diagnosis and treatment of uveitis are crucial to prevent complications and blindness.%幼年特发性关节炎(JIA)是指发生在16岁以下儿童以慢性关节炎为主要临床表现的全身多系统自身免疫性疾病,临床表现为不明原因的持续6周以上的关节肿胀或炎症.大约有10%的患者伴有葡萄膜炎症,具有发病隐匿、炎症反应轻、并发症多和视力损害重等特点.好发人群为关节炎发病年龄小、抗核抗体阳性的女性少关节型关节炎患者.典型临床表现为双眼不对称的慢性轻度前葡萄膜炎,常见致盲性并发症有角膜带状变性、虹膜后粘连、并发性白内障和继发性青光眼等.局部应用糖皮质激素、非甾体抗炎剂和散

  9. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J;

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in contro...

  10. Effect and significance of total glucosides of paeony treatment on serum Leptin,IP-10 and hs-CRP expression in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Xiang Quan; Dong-Xu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore and analyze the effect and significance of total glucosides of paeony treatment on serum Leptin, IP-10 and hs-CRP expression of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.Methods:80 cases of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treated in Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital and our hospital from March 2004 to March 2013 were selected and randomly divided into observation group and control group, 40 cases in each group. Control group received routine treatment and observation group, based on the treatment of control group, were given a sufficient amount of total glucosides of paeony for treatment. Then expression levels of serum Leptin, IP-10 (interferon-induced protein of rats-10) and hs-CRP (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) of both groups before treatment and at various time points after treatment were detected, and test results were observed and counted.Results:Data between two groups, at different time points as well as at different time points between two groups had significant differences, with statistical significance. And after t test, Leptin levels of both groups after 6m of treatment were significantly higher than those before treatment; Leptin level of observation group after 6 m of treatment was significantly higher than that of control group, with statistical significance. Data between two groups, at different time points as well as at different time points between two groups had significant difference, with statistical significance. And after t test, hs-CRP levels of both groups after 6m of treatment were significantly higher than those before treatment; Hs-CRP level of observation group after 6m of treatment was significantly higher than that of control group, with statistical significance. IP-10 levels of both groups after 6 months of treatment significantly decreased than those before treatment, but IP-10 level of observation group was significantly lower than that of control group, with statistical significance

  11. Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis treated with posterior arthrodesis and segmental pedicle screw instrumentation before the age of 9 years: a 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaoğlu Resul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Retrospective study. Objective To evaluate the radiological results of fusion with segmental pedicle screw fixation in juvenile idiopathic scoliosis with a minimum 5-year follow-up. Summary of background data Progression of spinal deformity after posterior instrumentation and fusion in immature patients has been reported by several authors. Segmental pedicle screw fixation has been shown to be effective in controlling both coronal and sagittal plane deformities. However, there is no long term study of fusion with segmental pedicle screw fixation in these group of patients. Methods Seven patients with juvenile idiopathic scoliosis treated by segmental pedicle screw fixation and fusion were analyzed. The average age of the patients was 7.4 years (range 5–9 years at the time of the operation. All the patients were followed up 5 years or more (range 5–8 years and were all Risser V at the most recent follow up. Three dimensional reconstruction of the radiographs was obtained and 3DStudio Max software was used for combining, evaluating and modifying the technical data derived from both 2d and 3d scan data. Results The preoperative thoracic curve of 56 ± 15° was corrected to 24 ± 17° (57% correction at the latest follow-up. The lumbar curve of 43 ± 14° was corrected to 23 ± 6° (46% correction at the latest follow-up. The preoperative thoracic kyphosis of 37 ± 13° and the lumbar lordosis of 33 ± 13° were changed to 27 ± 13° and 42 ± 21°, respectively at the latest follow-up. None of the patients showed coronal decompensation at the latest follow-up. Four patients had no evidence of crankshaft phenomenon. In two patients slight increase in Cobb angle at the instrumented segments with a significant increase in AVR suggesting crankshaft phenomenon was seen. One patient had a curve increase in both instrumented and non instrumented segments due to incorrect strategy. Conclusion In juvenile idiopathic curves of

  12. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the inside of the eye/s is called iritis or anterior uveitis. While uveitis usually causes symptoms ... treating diseases of the eye) to check for iritis in any patient with JIA What are the ...

  13. An ARHGEF10 deletion is highly associated with a juvenile-onset inherited polyneuropathy in Leonberger and Saint Bernard dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari J Ekenstedt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An inherited polyneuropathy (PN observed in Leonberger dogs has clinical similarities to a genetically heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies termed Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease in humans. The Leonberger disorder is a severe, juvenile-onset, chronic, progressive, and mixed PN, characterized by exercise intolerance, gait abnormalities and muscle atrophy of the pelvic limbs, as well as inspiratory stridor and dyspnea. We mapped a PN locus in Leonbergers to a 250 kb region on canine chromosome 16 (Praw = 1.16×10-10, Pgenome, corrected = 0.006 utilizing a high-density SNP array. Within this interval is the ARHGEF10 gene, a member of the rho family of GTPases known to be involved in neuronal growth and axonal migration, and implicated in human hypomyelination. ARHGEF10 sequencing identified a 10 bp deletion in affected dogs that removes four nucleotides from the 3'-end of exon 17 and six nucleotides from the 5'-end of intron 17 (c.1955_1958+6delCACGGTGAGC. This eliminates the 3'-splice junction of exon 17, creates an alternate splice site immediately downstream in which the processed mRNA contains a frame shift, and generates a premature stop codon predicted to truncate approximately 50% of the protein. Homozygosity for the deletion was highly associated with the severe juvenile-onset PN phenotype in both Leonberger and Saint Bernard dogs. The overall clinical picture of PN in these breeds, and the effects of sex and heterozygosity of the ARHGEF10 del