WorldWideScience

Sample records for online news message

  1. Posts to online news message boards and public discourse surrounding DUI enforcement.

    Connor, Susan M; Wesolowski, Kathryn

    2009-12-01

    This study analyzes posts to online news message boards covering driving under the influence (DUI) enforcement efforts to determine their usefulness for informing traffic safety program planning and public relations efforts aimed at mainstream drinking drivers. A series of Google searches were conducted using keywords designed to capture news stories regarding impaired driving enforcement efforts. For each search, the first 100 Web pages returned were reviewed and articles were included in analysis if they were from an independent news source and contained user comments. Coders captured data on 28 fields for each post, including tone in relation to enforcement, tone of interpersonal communication with other posters, and expressed feelings regarding drinking and driving. Fifty-six news articles covering DUI enforcement efforts met study criteria, with 615 posts. The majority of posts (57%) were neutral on DUI enforcement; 24 percent (148) took a negative tone and 19 percent (115) positive. Posts that discussed checkpoints were 2.6 times more likely to take a negative tone toward enforcement than those that did not. Twenty-one percent of anti-enforcement posts challenged the idea that driving after drinking was necessarily dangerous. Of the 321 posts involving direct communication between posters, 67 percent involved disagreement with another post. Profanity or belittling comments appeared in 10 percent of posts. Public responses to DUI enforcement news articles provide insight into the beliefs and thought processes of those who oppose enforcement efforts or view drinking and driving as no big deal. Primary objections to enforcement focused on civil and personal rights issues, skepticism regarding law enforcement's motives and objectivity, and the belief that drinking driving is not a "real" crime. Online news message boards could be useful in informing campaigns and helping program planners frame media events and press releases to best appeal to the most at

  2. Content analysis of UK newspaper and online news representations of women's and men's 'binge' drinking: a challenge for communicating evidence-based messages about single-episodic drinking?

    Patterson, C; Emslie, C; Mason, O; Fergie, G; Hilton, S

    2016-12-27

    In the UK, men's alcohol-related morbidity and mortality still greatly exceeds women's, despite an increase in women's alcohol consumption in recent decades. New UK alcohol guidelines introduce gender-neutral low-risk alcohol consumption guidance. This study explores how UK newspaper and online news represent women's and men's 'binge' drinking to identify opportunities to better align reporting of harmful drinking with evidence. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis of 308 articles published in 7 UK national newspapers and the BBC News website between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Articles associated women with 'binge' drinking more frequently than men, and presented women's drinking as more problematic. Men were more frequently characterised as violent or disorderly, while women were characterised as out of control, putting themselves in danger, harming their physical appearance and burdening men. Descriptions of female 'binge' drinkers' clothing and appearance were typically moralistic. The UK news media's disproportionate focus on women's 'binge' drinking is at odds with epidemiological evidence, may reproduce harmful gender stereotypes and may obstruct public understandings of the gender-neutral weekly consumption limits in newly proposed alcohol guidelines. In order to better align reporting of harmful drinking with current evidence, public health advocates may engage with the media with a view to shifting media framing of 'binge' drinking away from specific groups (young people; women) and contexts (public drinking) and towards the health risks of specific drinking behaviours, which affect all groups regardless of context. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Audiovisual Webjournalism: An analysis of news on UOL News and on TV UERJ Online

    Leila Nogueira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the development of audiovisual webjournalism on the Brazilian Internet. This paper, based on the analysis of UOL News on UOL TV – pioneer format on commercial web television - and of UERJ Online TV – first on-line university television in Brazil - investigates the changes in the gathering, production and dissemination processes of audiovisual news when it starts to be transmitted through the web. Reflections of authors such as Herreros (2003, Manovich (2001 and Gosciola (2003 are used to discuss the construction of audiovisual narrative on the web. To comprehend the current changes in today’s webjournalism, we draw on the concepts developed by Fidler (1997; Bolter and Grusin (1998; Machado (2000; Mattos (2002 and Palacios (2003. We may conclude that the organization of narrative elements in cyberspace makes for the efficiency of journalistic messages, while establishing the basis of a particular language for audiovisual news on the Internet.

  4. Investigating people’s news diets: how online news users use offline news

    Trilling, D.; Schoenbach, K.

    2015-01-01

    The question how offline media use is related to online media use has been heavily debated in the last decades. If they are functionally equivalent, then advantages like low costs, rapid publication cycles, and easy access to online news could lead to them displacing offline news. Data from a

  5. The shifting temporalities of online news

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    websites (as well as other characteristics of online archives), the construction of the empirical base stands in a complex relation to the analytical framework applied. As much as the article is a historical analysis of the temporality of online news, it, thus, also offers a range of methodological......As much as news websites news can be characterised by speed and immediacy, they are also recognisable online periodicals, which accumulate preceding news items. This is, as with the constitution of time in general, linked to relations between change and continuity. This article aims to understand...... consequently employs a framework for webpage analysis that primarily focuses on the syntactical level where temporalities emerge as relations between textual elements that change at very different intervals. This framework is applied to examples from the different stages of The Guardian’s webpage from 1996...

  6. Using Instant Messaging for Online Reference Service

    Forster, Shirley

    2006-01-01

    Many libraries are using co-browsing chat products to provide reference services to their patrons, whilst their patrons are online and using the internet. The concept of such an online service is highly desirable, but many libraries are concerned that they will never be able to afford such a system. This may have changed: Instant Messaging (IM)…

  7. Message Received: Virtual Ethnography in Online Message Boards

    Kevin F. Steinmetz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As the Internet begins to encapsulate more people within online communities, it is important that the social researcher have well-rounded ethnographic methodologies for observing these phenomena. This article seeks to contribute to methodology by detailing and providing insights into three specific facets of virtual ethnography that need attention: space and time, identity and authenticity, and ethics. Because the Internet is a globalized and instantaneous medium where space and time collapse, identity becomes more playful, and ethics become more tenuous; understanding these aspects is crucial to the study of online social groups. A second focus of this article is to apply these notions to the study of online message boards—a frequently used medium for online communication that is frequently overlooked by methodologists.

  8. Hypertext in online news stories: More control, more appreciation

    Lagerwerf, L.; Verheij, D.

    2014-01-01

    News websites struggle tailoring news stories to divergent needs of online news users. We examined a way to bridge these needs by representing sources in hypertext. News items were designed to be short and concise, with hyperlinks citing sources. Readers could either ignore hyperlinks or explore

  9. Predicting the volume of comments on online news stories

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Cheung, D.; Song, I.-Y.; Chu, W.; Hu, X.; Lin, J.; Li, J.; Peng, Z.

    2009-01-01

    On-line news agents provide commenting facilities for readers to express their views with regard to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance or impact. We report on exploratory work that predicts the comment volume of news articles

  10. Frequency of Risk-Related News Media Messages in 2016 Coverage of Zika Virus.

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Watson, Crystal; Meyer, Diane; Kronk, Marissa; Ravi, Sanjana; Pechta, Laura E; Lubell, Keri M; Rose, Dale A

    2018-01-03

    News media plays a large role in the information the public receives during an infectious disease outbreak, and may influence public knowledge and perceptions of risk. This study analyzed and described the content of U.S. news media coverage of Zika virus and Zika response during 2016. A random selection of 800 Zika-related news stories from 25 print and television news sources was analyzed. The study examined 24 different messages that appeared in news media articles and characterized them using theories of risk perception as messages with characteristics that could increase perception of risk (risk-elevating messages; n = 14), messages that could decrease perception of risk (risk-minimizing messages; n = 8), or messages about travel or testing guidance (n = 2). Overall, 96% of news stories in the study sample contained at least one or more risk-elevating message(s) and 61% contained risk-minimizing message(s). The frequency of many messages changed after local transmission was confirmed in Florida, and differed between sources in locations with or without local transmission in 2016. Forty percent of news stories included messages about negative potential outcomes of Zika virus infection without mentioning ways to reduce risk. Findings from this study may help inform current federal, state, and local Zika responses by offering a detailed analysis of how news media are covering the outbreak and response activities as well as identifying specific messages appearing more or less frequently than intended. Findings identifying the types of messages that require greater emphasis may also assist public health communicators in responding more effectively to future outbreaks. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. News from Online: More Spectroscopy

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-09-01

    rising from a cup of hot coffee. Next is an applet with atoms in a parabolic magnetic trap at http://www.colorado.edu/physics/2000/applets/bec.html. The height of the magnetic trap can be changed in order to allow for escape of the most energetic atoms, resulting in cooling so that the Bose-Einstein Condensate is formed. Physics 2000 demands robust computing power. Check the system requirements on the introductory screen before venturing too far into this site. Martin V. Goldman, from the University of Colorado at Boulder, is the Director of Physics 2000, which received support from the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the National Science Foundation. David Rea is the Technical Director, and many others help make this excellent site possible. Mark your calendars: October 31 through December 3, 1999! Bookmark this site-- http://www.ched-ccce.org/confchem/1999/d/index.html --and sign up. The Winter 1999 CONFCHEM Online Conference will focus on Developments in Spectroscopy and Innovative Strategies for Teaching Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Curriculum. Scott Van Bramer of Widener University is the conference chair. Experts will present six papers, each to be followed by online discussions. CONFCHEM Online Conferences are sponsored by the American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education's Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE). Several Online Conferences are held each year--all are well worth your time. World Wide Web Addresses EMSpectrum Explorer http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/EMSpectrum/emspectrum.html Light and Energy http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/index.html Emission Spectrum Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/emission/index.html Absorption Java Applet http://mc2.cchem.berkeley.edu/chemcnx/light_energy/applets/absorption/index.html Removing Color with a Single Filter from Colored Light http://mc2.cchem

  12. Predicting the Strength of Online News Frames

    Hrvoje Jakopović

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Framing theory is one of the most significant approaches to understanding media and their potential impact on publics. Leaving aside that fact, the author finds that publicity effects seem to be dispersed and difficult to catch for public relations. This article employs a specific research design, which could be applied to public relations practice, namely with a view to observing correlations between specific media frames and individual frames. The approach is based on the typology of news frames. The author attributes negative, positive and neutral determinants to the types of frames in his empirical research. Online news regarding three transport organizations and the accompanying user comments (identified as negative, positive and neutral are analysed by means of the method of content and sentiment analysis. The author recognizes user comments and reviews as individual frames that take part in the creation of online image. Furthermore, he identifies the types of media frames as well as individual frames manifested as image, and undertakes correlation research in order to establish their prediction potential. The results expose the most frequently used types of media frames concerning the transport domain. The media are keen to report through the attribution of responsibility frame, and after that, through the economic frame and the conflict frame, but, on the other hand, they tend to neglect the human interest frame and the morality frame. The results show that specific types of news frames enable better prediction of user reactions. The economic frame and the human interest frame therefore represent the most predictable types of frame.

  13. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The 2013 general elections in Malaysia: An analysis of online news portals

    Kasim, Azahar; Mohd Sani, Mohd Azizuddin

    2016-01-01

    This research analyzed the coverage of online news portals during the election campaign in Malaysia's 13th General Election on 5th May 2013. There were two types of news portals chosen for this research: 1) the mainstream online news portals, namely The Star Online, Berita Harian Online, Bernama Online and Utusan Online; and 2) the alternative news portals consisting of political parties' publications: the Harakah Daily, Roketkini and Keadilan Daily; and the independent news portals of The Ma...

  15. Emotional Mining: Tagging Emoticons to Online News

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Zhi Yong, Lee; Aida Zamnah, Z. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an emotion mining system, which assigns emoticons to newspaper articles into a pre-defined emotion category based on the underlying emotion in the news. Next, the system makes recommendation to the reader by tagging the news headline with the respective emoticons. Users are then able to decide whether to read the news based on the emoticons provided. The system also provides a filter for the users to choose the category of news to read following the emoticons.

  16. Linking online news and social media

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what is discussed in social media is inspired by events in the news and, vice versa, social media provide us with a handle on the impact of news events. We address the following linking task: given a news article, find social media utterances that implicitly reference it. We follow a

  17. Online public response to Dutch news about money laundering

    Veul, Romy; van Charldorp, T.C.; Soudijn, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how Dutch Public Prosecution’s press releases about money laundering and underground banking are received by producers and consumers of online news reports. First we take a closer look at how journalists (re)framed six official press releases in 75 news reports. It turns out

  18. Online Marketing for Media : The Case of Greek News Websites

    Antonopoulos, N.; Veglis, A.; Emmanouloudis, A.

    Nowadays it is quite easy to create a news website and start promoting it online. However, the structure of a significant amount of news websites seems to have been changing, often deviating from trends of past years or even setting their own marketing direction. Based on seven hypotheses related

  19. Predicting User Views in Online News

    Hardt, Daniel; Rambow, Owen

    2017-01-01

    We analyze user viewing behavior on anonline news site. We collect data from64,000 news articles, and use text featuresto predict frequency of user views.We compare predictiveness of the headlineand “teaser” (viewed before clicking) andthe body (viewed after clicking). Both arepredictive of click...

  20. Is the internet about to take over? How using online news is related to offline news consumption patterns

    Trilling, D.; Schönbach, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the ongoing debate on the role of the Internet in public discourse, it is often assumed that online news fundamentally changes mass communication. But is there a relationship between online news use and a differentiation in overall news consumption patterns? The results of a large-scale survey

  1. Britishness and Community Cohesion in Muslim News Online

    Hassen ZRIBA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The issues of British national identity and social cohesion have become pressing concerns within the multicultural fabric of contemporary British society. The increasing number of immigrants and their offspring, along with the maintenance of their cultural roots, seem to represent a serious defiance to social cohesion and the alleged “purity” of Britishness. A number of race related reports were produced by the official authorities to churn out the necessary steps to be followed by the British (immigrants and host community in order to keep social stability and community cohesion. Thus, the politics of community cohesion came to the fore as the neologism of contemporary British political discourse. Such new discourse of governance has been digested and processed differently by different mass media. It has been decoded, for instance, preferably by mainstream news agencies like BBC News Online. However, arguably, it is read appositionally or at best negotiatedly by ethnicity-related news agencies such as Muslim News Online. In this article, attempt has been made to adopt media discourse analysis tools to decipher the ways Muslim News Online decoded and then encoded the hegemonic official discourses of Britishness and community cohesion. A critical and interpretative approach is used to accomplish such study. The corpus of this study is primarily extracted from the website of the Muslim News Online.

  2. Sending the right message : forty years of BBC Radio News

    Luscombe-Serlie, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Radio is, compared to television and newspapers, an under-researched area in media studies. This research has looked at BBC Radio News in the period 1966-2008; it is a case study into the views of 43 (former) writers of the BBC Radio Newsroom and BBC Radio One. Interviews were conducted with

  3. Masculinity discourse on media text: A critical review about news about violence on online news portals

    Daniel Susilo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Media as a medium plays a significant role in strengthening gender concept in society. Female’s sexualities are viewed as an object of judgement for the media. For the sake of men readers’ satisfaction, media justifies itself in its attempts to exploit women sexuality. Masculine’s way of thinking has been perpetuated in reports about women. Masculine men are considered empowering female’s bodies. Violence acts are considered as the form of masculine domination over feminine beings. This research aims to dismantle how media construct their texts on masculine discourses on online news portals. Online news portals are required to be swift in uploading news and using their acquired resources; thus, they perpetuate this masculine discourse. Critical discourse analysis of Van Dick was employed to unravel masculine discourse structures on media texts at the largest news portals in Indonesia, Alexa.com; and Tribunnews.com; which belong to a corporate media, Kompas Gramedia. The findings of this research state that online news portals and their acquired resources strengthen violence labelling as a part of masculine domination over feminine beings.

  4. The Effect of the Online News on Tourism

    Eda DİŞLİ BAYRAKTAR

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the technological developments, people are able to quickly reach the information and the news about destinations where they have planned to go on their holidays. Online news websites are important and reliable tools which deliver up-to-date information about a destination to broad masses. It is indisputable that the media is a significant influence on public awareness, tourist purchase decision, destination image and tourist behavior. A tourist who chooses a holiday destination decides among countless destinations according to the information he receives from various sources. Therefore, in this study, the news in the two foreign online news sites are interpreted according to the touristic arrival statistics from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism. The two countries to be included in the study, Germany and England, were selected among the countries that sent the most tourists to Turkey. In these countries, news web sites with the highest number of daily visitors were determined and the news related to Turkey in the 7 years period between 2010 and 2016 were analyzed by content analysis.

  5. How Fear-Arousing News Messages Affect Risk Perceptions and Intention to Talk About Risk.

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Oh, Sang-Hwa; Hove, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Building on the theoretical arguments of the impersonal-impact and differential-impact hypotheses, this study has a twofold purpose: first, to demonstrate how fear-arousing media messages about risk are associated with personal-level risk perception, as well as, and perhaps more so than, societal-level risk perception; and second, to examine how the resulting risk perceptions can mediate intention to talk about the risk with family and friends. A news message evaluation study was conducted among the general public in South Korea concerning two major risks, carcinogens and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two sets of structural equation models reveal three main findings: (a) Fear-arousing news messages are positively related to personal-level risk perception, as well as to societal-level risk perception; (b) fear-arousing news messages result in intention to talk about the risk directly and indirectly through risk perception; and (c) personal-level risk perception appears more strongly related to intention to talk than does societal-level risk perception, although such relationships may vary across risk topics.

  6. News from Online: Industrial Chemicals and Polymers

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-02-01

    of the American Chemical Society Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering and General Electric Corporation. The POLYED site, http:/ /chemdept.uwsp.edu/polyed/index.htm, is hosted by the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. This National Center for Polymer Education is another good place to go for information. More education is available at the Ziegler Research Group Home Page at http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/index.html . Go to Metallocene as Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: An Introduction ( http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/met_intro.html ) for historical accounts of metallocene and Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Movies are available here too. This Canadian site is well-documented and educational. Back at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, The Why Files site at http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu helps bring important chemical and technology news to the public. Go to the archived files of October 1997 ( http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu/shorties/catalyst.html ) to find information about the importance of low-temperature metallocene catalysts. The Why Files received funding from the National Science Foundation. Go here for science information in an easy-to-read format. One of the driving forces toward better catalysis is the attempt to reach 100% product, combining efficiency with lowered pollution. Companies can look to the Environmental Protection Agency for information: Environsense at http://es.epa.gov/ is pledged to offer "Common Sense Solutions to Environmental Problems". So where can we get these polymers? The American Chemical Society can help. Go to Chemcylopedia at http://pubs.acs.org/chemcy99/ for great information. Both purchasers and users of chemicals can benefit from this site. Searches can be made on the chemical or on the supplier. Information provided includes CAS Registry Numbers and special shipping requirements as well as potential applications. Do you remember that we started with paper? Let

  7. News in online and print newspapers: Differences in reader consumption and recall

    d'Haenens, Leen; Jankowski, Nicholas; Heuvelman, A.

    2004-01-01

    How readers consume and recall news presented in online and print versions of two newspapersin the Netherlands are investigated in this experimental study. Few differences are found between the online and print versions in terms of news supply. Reader attention to the news stories varies, depending

  8. 'The secret shame': a content analysis of online news reporting of a celebrity admitting smoking while pregnant.

    Carroll, Beverley; Freeman, Becky

    2015-04-01

    Around one in 10 Australian women report that they smoke while pregnant, and this may be a significant underestimation. In 2013, Australian celebrity Chrissie Swan announced publicly that she had been smoking during her pregnancy, generating substantial media coverage. This study sought to identify the main themes in the reporting of the 'Swan pregnant and admitting smoking' story by online news media. Between 6 February 2013 and 18 February 2013 inclusively, a content analysis was conducted of Australian online news items using the keywords: 'Chrissie Swan smoking', and 'Chrissie Swan pregnant and smoking'. News items were coded for nine themes. A total of 124 items were identified. The most frequent themes were: 'celebrity story' (90.32%) and 'societal judgement of pregnant smokers' (69.35%). Less than one-half (45.97%) of the news items included 'quitting is hard' content and only 29.03% of the news items included 'smoking and health' content. Specific quit-referral content was found in only 13.71% of the news items. There was a missed opportunity to promote positive, non-judgemental smoking and pregnancy messages and health information that support pregnant women to quit smoking. SO WHAT?: Health promotion strategies are needed to build capacity in advocacy to promote positive health messages and counter societal judgement of pregnant smokers. Formative research into the use of celebrities and other influential women to promote positive empowering messages should be carried out and incorporated in future health promotion campaigns to improve pregnant women's ability to quit smoking.

  9. Online Scheduling in Distributed Message Converter Systems

    Risse, Thomas; Wombacher, Andreas; Surridge, Mike; Taylor, Steve; Aberer, Karl

    The optimal distribution of jobs among hosts in distributed environments is an important factor to achieve high performance. The optimal strategy depends on the application. In this paper we present a new online scheduling strategy for distributed EDI converter system. The strategy is based on the

  10. Psychological distance cues in online messages: Interrelatedness of probability and spatial distance

    Sungur, H.; van Koningsbruggen, G.M.; Hartmann, T.

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence reveals that people rely on heuristic cues when processing online information. The current research, by adopting a construal level theory approach, examined whether psychological distance cues within online messages influence message processing. According to construal level theory,

  11. Women receiving news of a family BRCA1/2 mutation: messages of fear and empowerment.

    Crotser, Cheryl B; Dickerson, Suzanne S

    2010-12-01

    Communication of genetic test results to healthy at-risk family members is complicated considering family dynamics and the complexity of cancer genetics. The purpose of this study was to understand the experience of family communication of BRCA1/2 results from the perspective of young and middle-aged women receiving the news. THEORETICAL RATIONALE: Individuals are self-interpretive beings influenced by family culture, history, and communication patterns. Humans express meaning through language and stories. Heideggerian hermeneutics guided in-depth interviews and team interpretation of data. Using purposive and network sampling, 19 women 18 to 50 years of age who received news of a family BRCA1/2 mutation from a biologic relative were recruited from support groups and two health facilities in upstate New York. Five themes emerged: (a) situating the story, (b) receiving the message from family, (c) responding to receipt of the message, (d) impacting family communication, and (e) advice for communicating risk. Two constitutive patterns were identified: (a) communicating risk as a message of fear and empowerment and (b) integrating the message by taking one step at a time. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) have an important role in provision of anticipatory guidance for communication of genetic test results, including the potential behavioral and emotional responses to family risk communication. Future research is indicated to understand the role of HCPs in family risk communication. Presentation of comprehensive and balanced information and the use of patient-centered communication is essential. HCPs need to view women as whole rather than as a person at risk. Continued support is needed for women who subsequently test positive or negative for the family BRCA1/2 mutation from HCPs and others, often outside the family network. © 2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Qualitative content analysis of online news media coverage of weight loss surgery and related reader comments.

    Glenn, N M; Champion, C C; Spence, J C

    2012-10-01

    The media has the ability to affect public opinion and policy direction. Prevalence of morbid obesity in Canada is increasing; as is the only effective long-term treatment, weight loss surgery (WLS). Limited research has explored media re/presentations of WLS. The purpose of this study was to examine national online news coverage (and reader comments) of WLS using content analysis. We sought to understand the dominant messages being conveyed within the news texts and reader comments, specifically whose voice was represented, who was the intended audience and what was the overall tone. Articles and comments were retrieved from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation news web site and analysed using line-by-line techniques. Articles were predominantly 'positive/supportive' (63%) in tone and frequently presented the voices and opinions of 'experts' conveying a biomedical perspective. Comments were overwhelmingly 'negative' (56%) and often derogatory including such language as 'piggy' and 'fatty'. Comments were almost exclusively anonymous (99%) and were frequently directed at other commenters (33%) and 'fat' people (6%). The potentially problematic nature of media framing and reader comments, particularly as they could relate to weight-based stigmatization and discrimination is discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  13. Is the future of meat palatable? Perceptions of in vitro meat as evidenced by online news comments.

    Laestadius, Linnea I; Caldwell, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    To understand current public perceptions of in vitro meat (IVM) in light of its potential to be a more environmentally sustainable alternative to conventional meat. A qualitative content analysis of the comments made on online news articles highlighting the development of IVM and the world's first IVM hamburger in August 2013. News article comment sections across seven US-based online news sources (The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Cable News Network and National Public Radio). Four hundred and sixty-two commenters who made eight hundred and fourteen publicly available online comments addressing IVM. Key themes in commenter perceptions of IVM included environmental and public health benefits, but also negative themes such as IVM's status as an unnatural and unappealing food. Overall, the tone of comments was more negative than positive. Findings suggest that while the environmental and public health motivations for developing and in turn consuming IVM resonate with some segments of the population, others find that reasoning both uncompelling and problematic. Concerns about IVM as an unnatural and risky product also appear to be a significant barrier to public acceptance of IVM. Supporters of IVM may wish to begin to develop a regulatory strategy for IVM to build public trust and explore messaging strategies that cast IVM as a new technology with benefits to individuals rather than primarily a solution to global challenges. Those in the public health nutrition field can make an important contribution to the emerging public discussion about IVM.

  14. Quantifying the role of online news in linking conservation research to Facebook and Twitter.

    Papworth, S K; Nghiem, T P L; Chimalakonda, D; Posa, M R C; Wijedasa, L S; Bickford, D; Carrasco, L R

    2015-06-01

    Conservation science needs to engage the general public to ensure successful conservation interventions. Although online technologies such as Twitter and Facebook offer new opportunities to accelerate communication between conservation scientists and the online public, factors influencing the spread of conservation news in online media are not well understood. We explored transmission of conservation research through online news articles with generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information theoretic approach. In particular, we assessed differences in the frequency conservation research is featured on online news sites and the impact of online conservation news content and delivery on Facebook likes and shares and Twitter tweets. Five percent of articles in conservation journals are reported in online news, and the probability of reporting depended on the journal. There was weak evidence that articles on climate change and mammals were more likely to be featured. Online news articles about charismatic mammals with illustrations were more likely to be shared or liked on Facebook and Twitter, but the effect of news sites was much larger. These results suggest journals have the greatest impact on which conservation research is featured and that news site has the greatest impact on how popular an online article will be on Facebook and Twitter. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  15. The 2013 general elections in Malaysia: An analysis of online news portals

    Azahar Kasim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed the coverage of online news portals during the election campaign in Malaysia's 13th General Election on 5th May 2013. There were two types of news portals chosen for this research: 1 the mainstream online news portals, namely The Star Online, Berita Harian Online, Bernama Online and Utusan Online; and 2 the alternative news portals consisting of political parties' publications: the Harakah Daily, Roketkini and Keadilan Daily; and the independent news portals of The Malaysian Insider and Malaysiakini. This study was conducted starting from the nomination day on the 20th April 2013 until the polling day on the 5th May 2013. Results obtained were based on the frequencies of articles covering the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN party and the opposition Pakatan Rakyat (PR party. Each article was coded and labeled as positive, negative, or neutral coverage for each political party. The Content Analysis method was applied where the researchers chose and analyzed each election article and placed it in one of five categories; +BN (positive report, −BN (negative report, +PR (positive report, −PR (negative report and N (Neutral. The results showed that the four mainstream online news portals favored the BN with their coverage. However, the parties' online news portals clearly owned by PR alliance parties had completely opposite, bias toward their owners. The two independent news portals seemed to give more balanced coverage to both sides.

  16. Online dissemination of news in Nicolae Titulescu University

    Stefan Ciucu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional” websites are a very good method of disseminating information for students in online environment. We might thing that with this new trend, people pref er to get information on a social network website, but actually for complex information the “traditional” websites are better. Facebook social network is very used in Romania, mostly by young people. It is a common saying around here: if you do not have a Facebook account, then you do not exist. The Facebook account of the University was created in may, 2012. Since then it has been a powerful tool for disseminating information, but mostly for photos, short messages, links and videos. YouTube and Twitter are not that used by students for finding information about their University, but during one year, I’ve recorded growth in number of followers. In this paper I compare these four online methods of disseminating information for students (may 2012 - may 2013 period of time.

  17. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  18. Understanding Public Perceptions of the HPV Vaccination Based on Online Comments to Canadian News Articles.

    Yael Feinberg

    Full Text Available Given the variation in human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine coverage across Canada, and debate regarding delivery of HPV vaccines in Catholic schools, we studied online comments on Canadian news websites to understand public perceptions of HPV and HPV vaccine.We searched English- and French-language Canadian news websites for 2012 articles that contained the terms "HPV" or "human papillomavirus." Articles about HPV vaccinations that contained at least one comment were included. Two researchers independently coded comments, analyzing them for emerging themes.We identified 3073 comments from 1198 individuals in response to 71 news articles; 630 (52.6% individuals expressed positive sentiments about HPV vaccination (2.5 comments/individual, 404 (33.7% were negative (3.0 comments/individual, 34 (2.8% were mixed (1.5 comments/individual and 130 (10.8% were neutral (1.6 comments/individual. Vaccine-supportive commenters believed the vaccine is safe and effective. Common themes in negative comments included concerns regarding HPV vaccine safety and efficacy, distrust of pharmaceutical companies and government, and belief that school-age children are too young for HPV vaccine. Many comments focused on whether the Catholic Church has the right to inform health policy for students, and discussion often evolved into debates regarding HPV and sexual behaviour. We noted that many individuals doubted the credibility of vaccine safety information.The majority of commenters do not appear to be against HPV vaccination, but public health messaging that focuses on both the vaccine's safety profile, and its use as a means to prevent cancer rather than sexually transmitted HPV infection may facilitate its acceptance.

  19. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts.

    Kätsyri, Jari; Kinnunen, Teemu; Kusumoto, Kenta; Oittinen, Pirkko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

  20. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts.

    Jari Kätsyri

    Full Text Available Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

  1. Still "Live at the Scene": An Exploration of Timely Television News Broadcasts Repurposed as Online Content

    Ware, Jennifer Marie

    2012-01-01

    Technology has afforded journalists a myriad of new opportunities to promote and publish content online. This project provides an overview of many of the new practices that have become standard operating procedures for digital media news creation and examines how the heavy imprint of traditional media news values are not contextualized within the…

  2. Online Marketing for Media : The Case of Greek News Websites

    Antonopoulos, N.; Veglis, A.; Emmanouloudis, A.

    Nowadays it is quite easy to create a news website and start promoting it online. However, the structure of a significant amount of news websites seems to have been changing, often deviating from trends of past years or even setting their own marketing direction. Based on seven hypotheses related

  3. Erratum to "News from the online traveling repairman" [TCS 295(1-3) 279-294

    Krumke, S.O.; Paepe, de W.E.; Poensgen, D.; Stougie, L.

    2006-01-01

    This note identifies and corrects an error in our paper "News from the Traveling Repairman", which appeared in S.O. Krumke et al. [News from the online traveling repairman, Theoret. Comput. Sci. 295 (1–3) (2003) 279–294].

  4. The spread of true and false news online.

    Vosoughi, Soroush; Roy, Deb; Aral, Sinan

    2018-03-09

    We investigated the differential diffusion of all of the verified true and false news stories distributed on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. The data comprise ~126,000 stories tweeted by ~3 million people more than 4.5 million times. We classified news as true or false using information from six independent fact-checking organizations that exhibited 95 to 98% agreement on the classifications. Falsehood diffused significantly farther, faster, deeper, and more broadly than the truth in all categories of information, and the effects were more pronounced for false political news than for false news about terrorism, natural disasters, science, urban legends, or financial information. We found that false news was more novel than true news, which suggests that people were more likely to share novel information. Whereas false stories inspired fear, disgust, and surprise in replies, true stories inspired anticipation, sadness, joy, and trust. Contrary to conventional wisdom, robots accelerated the spread of true and false news at the same rate, implying that false news spreads more than the truth because humans, not robots, are more likely to spread it. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. Changing in Convergence: The Impact of TV News Routines on the Usage of Online UGC Sources

    Huei-Ling Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Online videos, or so called user-generated content, have been used in TV news frequently because of recent media convergence. This study examined whether this phenomenon influences news routines, and whether new characteristics of news routines have emerged because of the dependency on UGC sources. A qualitative research method was adopted, and 15 Taiwanese TV journalists were interviewed. The results show that the high dependence on the Internet for obtaining news has encouraged journalists producing news without having to leave newsroom. New routines have been formed in new production. At organizational levels, the search for online materials has been routinized, Journalist’ newsgathering and reporting are no longer original and initial but follow the hit topics on the Internet, Moreover, and news coverage currently focuses on format instead of meaning. At interorganizational level, TV news organizations monitor and imitate each other to adjust their routines. This paper shows that some unprofessional behaviors of journalists have become reasonable because of news routines changed. Consequently, the ethical and professional controversies have been ignored in newsroom.

  6. Words analysis of online Chinese news headlines about trending events: a complex network perspective.

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Huang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines' keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words' networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly.

  7. Words analysis of online Chinese news headlines about trending events: a complex network perspective.

    Huajiao Li

    Full Text Available Because the volume of information available online is growing at breakneck speed, keeping up with meaning and information communicated by the media and netizens is a new challenge both for scholars and for companies who must address public relations crises. Most current theories and tools are directed at identifying one website or one piece of online news and do not attempt to develop a rapid understanding of all websites and all news covering one topic. This paper represents an effort to integrate statistics, word segmentation, complex networks and visualization to analyze headlines' keywords and words relationships in online Chinese news using two samples: the 2011 Bohai Bay oil spill and the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. We gathered all the news headlines concerning the two trending events in the search results from Baidu, the most popular Chinese search engine. We used Simple Chinese Word Segmentation to segment all the headlines into words and then took words as nodes and considered adjacent relations as edges to construct word networks both using the whole sample and at the monthly level. Finally, we develop an integrated mechanism to analyze the features of words' networks based on news headlines that can account for all the keywords in the news about a particular event and therefore track the evolution of news deeply and rapidly.

  8. Headless, hungry, and unhealthy: a video content analysis of obese persons portrayed in online news.

    Puhl, Rebecca M; Peterson, Jamie Lee; DePierre, Jenny A; Luedicke, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The news media has substantial influence on public perceptions of social and health issues. This study conducted a video content analysis to examine portrayals of obese persons in online news reports about obesity. The authors downloaded online news videos about obesity (N = 371) from 5 major news websites and systematically coded visual portrayals of obese and nonobese adults and youth in these videos. The authors found that 65% of overweight/obese adults and 77% of overweight/obese youth were portrayed in a negative, stigmatizing manner across multiple obesity-related topics covered in online news videos. In particular, overweight/obese individuals were significantly more likely than were nonoverweight individuals to be portrayed as headless, with an unflattering emphasis on isolated body parts, from an unflattering rear view of their excess weight, eating unhealthy foods, engaging in sedentary behavior, and dressed in inappropriately fitting clothing. Nonoverweight individuals were significantly more likely to be portrayed positively. In conclusion, obese children and adults are frequently stigmatized in online news videos about obesity. These findings have important implications for public perceptions of obesity and obese persons and may reinforce negative societal weight bias.

  9. Heterogeneous characters modeling of instant message services users' online behavior.

    Cui, Hongyan; Li, Ruibing; Fang, Yajun; Horn, Berthold; Welsch, Roy E

    2018-01-01

    Research on temporal characteristics of human dynamics has attracted much attentions for its contribution to various areas such as communication, medical treatment, finance, etc. Existing studies show that the time intervals between two consecutive events present different non-Poisson characteristics, such as power-law, Pareto, bimodal distribution of power-law, exponential distribution, piecewise power-law, et al. With the occurrences of new services, new types of distributions may arise. In this paper, we study the distributions of the time intervals between two consecutive visits to QQ and WeChat service, the top two popular instant messaging services in China, and present a new finding that when the value of statistical unit T is set to 0.001s, the inter-event time distribution follows a piecewise distribution of exponential and power-law, indicating the heterogeneous character of IM services users' online behavior in different time scales. We infer that the heterogeneous character is related to the communication mechanism of IM and the habits of users. Then we develop a combination model of exponential model and interest model to characterize the heterogeneity. Furthermore, we find that the exponent of the inter-event time distribution of the same service is different in two cities, which is correlated with the popularity of the services. Our research is useful for the application of information diffusion, prediction of economic development of cities, and so on.

  10. Heterogeneous characters modeling of instant message services users' online behavior.

    Hongyan Cui

    Full Text Available Research on temporal characteristics of human dynamics has attracted much attentions for its contribution to various areas such as communication, medical treatment, finance, etc. Existing studies show that the time intervals between two consecutive events present different non-Poisson characteristics, such as power-law, Pareto, bimodal distribution of power-law, exponential distribution, piecewise power-law, et al. With the occurrences of new services, new types of distributions may arise. In this paper, we study the distributions of the time intervals between two consecutive visits to QQ and WeChat service, the top two popular instant messaging services in China, and present a new finding that when the value of statistical unit T is set to 0.001s, the inter-event time distribution follows a piecewise distribution of exponential and power-law, indicating the heterogeneous character of IM services users' online behavior in different time scales. We infer that the heterogeneous character is related to the communication mechanism of IM and the habits of users. Then we develop a combination model of exponential model and interest model to characterize the heterogeneity. Furthermore, we find that the exponent of the inter-event time distribution of the same service is different in two cities, which is correlated with the popularity of the services. Our research is useful for the application of information diffusion, prediction of economic development of cities, and so on.

  11. Heterogeneous characters modeling of instant message services users’ online behavior

    Fang, Yajun; Horn, Berthold

    2018-01-01

    Research on temporal characteristics of human dynamics has attracted much attentions for its contribution to various areas such as communication, medical treatment, finance, etc. Existing studies show that the time intervals between two consecutive events present different non-Poisson characteristics, such as power-law, Pareto, bimodal distribution of power-law, exponential distribution, piecewise power-law, et al. With the occurrences of new services, new types of distributions may arise. In this paper, we study the distributions of the time intervals between two consecutive visits to QQ and WeChat service, the top two popular instant messaging services in China, and present a new finding that when the value of statistical unit T is set to 0.001s, the inter-event time distribution follows a piecewise distribution of exponential and power-law, indicating the heterogeneous character of IM services users’ online behavior in different time scales. We infer that the heterogeneous character is related to the communication mechanism of IM and the habits of users. Then we develop a combination model of exponential model and interest model to characterize the heterogeneity. Furthermore, we find that the exponent of the inter-event time distribution of the same service is different in two cities, which is correlated with the popularity of the services. Our research is useful for the application of information diffusion, prediction of economic development of cities, and so on. PMID:29734327

  12. ‘Let’s Get Them Involved’ . . . to Some Extent: Analyzing Online News Participation

    Susanne M. Almgren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of social media applications, such as blogs, Facebook, and Twitter, has offered new participatory opportunities for everyday media users. This article contributes to research by looking into one specific aspect of the increasingly more participatory media ecology—the news comment feature. Drawing on a quantitative content analysis of 1,100 news pieces, as well as spaces for user comments, the article reveals both how this emerging public space is shaped by the media company and, later, appropriated by their participating users. Our analysis reveals, for instance, that the online newspaper prefers to allow users to comment on lightweight news such as sports and entertainment. The users, however, prefer to post comments on news covering changes in proximity space, politics, and health care, while also clearly ignoring the most available news pieces (sport and entertainment. In the concluding section, the discrepancy in preferences is discussed.

  13. Decoding the codes: A content analysis of the news coverage of genetic cloning by three online news sites and three national daily newspapers, 1996 through 1998

    Hyde, Jon E.

    This study compared news coverage of genetic cloning research in three online news sites (CNN.com, ABC.com, and MSNBC.com) and three national daily newspapers (The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today). The study involved the analysis of 230 online and print news articles concerning genetic cloning published from 1996 through 1998. Articles were examined with respect to formats, sources, focus, tone, and assessments about the impact of cloning research. Findings indicated that while print news formats remained relatively constant for the duration of this study, online news formats changed significantly with respect to the kinds of media used to represent the news, the layouts used to represent cloning news, and the emphasis placed on audio-visual content. Online stories were as much as 20 to 70% shorter than print stories. More than 50% of the articles appearing online were composed by outside sources (wire services, guest columnists, etc.). By comparison, nearly 90% of the articles published by print newspapers were written "in-house" by science reporters. Online news sites cited fewer sources and cited a smaller variety of sources than the newspapers examined here. In both news outlets, however, the sources most frequently cited were those with vested interests in furthering cloning research. Both online and print news coverage of cloning tends to focus principally on the technical procedures and on the future benefits of cloning. More than 60% of the articles focused on the techniques and technologies of cloning. Less than 25% of the articles focused on social, ethical, or legal issues associated with cloning. Similarly, articles from all six sources (75%) tended to be both positive and future-oriented. Less than 5% of the total articles examined here had a strongly negative or critical tone. Moreover, both online and print news sources increasingly conveyed a strong sense of acceptance about the possibility of human cloning. Data from this study

  14. The Case for Cinematic Aesthetics in Online Video Journalism: The BBC News Authored Story

    Damian Fasolo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Online journalism is fast becoming a central source of news worldwide. Yet all too often the perception of online is that it’s rough and ready, and what’s worse, that audiences don’t care. This paper argues that the predominantly authored form that we know as video journalism owes more to the cinematic aesthetics of documentary and cinema than traditional news, and that the growth of online digital literacy has had a profound impact on audiences’ expectations of production quality.  The author’s recent work for BBC News are used as case studies to reveal how VJs are able to implement cinematic approaches at both a narrative and aesthetic level

  15. An Evaluation of Online Machine Translation of Arabic into English News Headlines: Implications on Students' Learning Purposes

    Kadhim, Kais A.; Habeeb, Luwaytha S.; Sapar, Ahmad Arifin; Hussin, Zaharah; Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, online Machine Translation (MT) is used widely with translation software, such as Google and Babylon, being easily available and downloadable. This study aims to test the translation quality of these two machine systems in translating Arabic news headlines into English. 40 Arabic news headlines were selected from three online sources,…

  16. KONSEP PENULISAN JURNALISTIK MASA DEPAN DAN DESAIN STORYBOARD UNTUK ONLINE NEWS

    Ido Priyana Hadi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entering this 21st century%2C press (on newspapers and magazines no longer count on physical printed edition to meet the readers demand on actual news. Press are required to provide online information in term of minutes or even seconds as soon as an event is occuring. Thus%2C speed has become an essential factor in journalism. News is associated to new-ness. Newspapers and magazines are competing one another to serve news fresh from the oven. Journalism has proceeds to an outstanding speed and dynamics which transforms its operation pattern%2C affiliated with the boost of information technology and communication especially the internet. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Memasuki trend abad ke 21 pers cetak (koran dan majalah sekarang tidak saja mengandalkan edisi fisik cetak untuk menjumpai para pembaca setianya dengan sajian berita-berita aktualnya. Tetapi dituntut mampu memberikan sajian informasi online yang seketika%2C dalam hitungan menit atau bahkan detik atas peristiwa atau kejadian disuatu tempat. Karenanya unsur kecepatan (speed menjadi sesuatu yang esensial dalam jurnalistik. News yang berarti berita terkandung didalamnya makna kebaruan. Surat kabar dan majalah dengan sendirinya berkompetisi dalam menyampaikan kebaruan tersebut. Karenanya kehidupan jurnalistik mengalami percepatan serta dinamika yang luar biasa%2C yang pada akhirnya mengubah pola pengerjaan jurnalistik seiring dengan kemajuan di bidang teknologi informasi dan komunikasi khususnya internet. Writing%2C Journalism%2C Online News%2C Storyboard Design.

  17. "Pervy Role-Play and Such": Girls' Experiences of Sexual Messaging Online

    Nielsen, Silja; Paasonen, Susanna; Spisak, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Sexting is one of the recurring causes of concern in public discussion of young people and network media. This paper builds on findings from a survey with 1269 Finnish female respondents aged 11-18 conducted using a popular online community for girls on their experiences of and views on online messages concerning sex and sexuality. Sixty-five per…

  18. Misleading or Falsification? Inferring Deceptive Strategies and Types in Online News and Social Media

    Volkova, Svitlana; Jang, Jin Yea

    2018-04-27

    Deceptive information in online news and social media has had dramatic effect on our society in recent years. This study is the first to gain deeper insights into writers' intent behind digital misinformation by analyzing psycholinguistic signals: moral foundations and connotations extracted from different types of deceptive news ranging from strategic disinformation to propaganda and hoaxes. To ensure consistency of our findings and generalizability across domains, we experiment with data from: (1) confirmed cases of disinformation in news summaries, (2) {propaganda}, hoax, and disinformation news pages, and (3) social media news. We first contrast lexical markers of biased language, syntactic and stylistic signals, and connotations across deceptive news types including disinformation, propaganda, and hoaxes, and {deceptive} strategies including misleading or falsification. We then incorporate these insights to build machine learning and deep learning predictive models to infer deception strategies and deceptive news types. Our experimental results demonstrate that unlike earlier work on deception detection, content combined with biased language markers, moral foundations, and connotations leads to better predictive performance of deception strategies compared to syntactic and stylistic signals (as reported in earlier work on deceptive reviews). Falsification strategy is easier to identify than misleading strategy. Disinformation is more difficult to predict than to propaganda or hoaxes. Deceptive news types (disinformation, propaganda, and hoaxes), unlike deceptive strategies (falsification and misleading), are more salient, and thus easier to identify in tweets than in news reports. Finally, our novel connotation analysis across deception types provides deeper understanding of writers' perspectives and therefore reveals the intentions behind digital misinformation.

  19. Readability Comparison of Pro- and Anti-Cancer Screening Online Messages in Japan

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masahumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cancer screening rates are lower in Japan than those in western countries. Health professionals publish pro-cancer screening messages on the internet to encourage audiences to undergo cancer screening. However, the information provided is often difficult to read for lay persons. Further, anti-cancer screening activists warn against cancer screening with messages on the Internet. We aimed to assess and compare the readability of pro- and anti-cancer screening online messages in Japan using a measure of readability. Methods: We conducted web searches at the beginning of September 2016 using two major Japanese search engines (Google.jp and Yahoo!.jp). The included websites were classified as “anti”, “pro”, or “neutral” depending on the claims, and “health professional” or “non-health professional” depending on the writers. Readability was determined using a validated measure of Japanese readability. Statistical analysis was conducted using two-way ANOVA. Results: In the total 159 websites analyzed, anti-cancer screening online messages were generally easier to read than pro-cancer screening online messages, Messages written by health professionals were more difficult to read than those written by non-health professionals. Claim × writer interaction was not significant. Conclusion: When health professionals prepare pro-cancer screening materials for publication online, we recommend they check for readability using readability assessment tools and improve text for easy comprehension when necessary. PMID:28125867

  20. Tobacco-prevention messages online: social marketing via the Web.

    Lin, Carolyn A; Hullman, Gwen A

    2005-01-01

    Antitobacco groups have joined millions of other commercial or noncommercial entities in developing a presence on the Web. These groups primarily represent the following different sponsorship categories: grassroots, medical, government, and corporate. To obtain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses in the message design of antitobacco Web sites, this project analyzed 100 antitobacco Web sites ranging across these four sponsorship categories. The results show that the tobacco industry sites posted just enough antismoking information to appease the antismoking publics. Medical organizations designed their Web sites as specialty sites and offered mostly scientific information. While the government sites resembled a clearinghouse for antitobacco related information, the grassroots sites represented the true advocacy outlets. In general, the industry sites provided the weakest persuasive messages and medical sites fared only slightly better. Government and grassroots sites rated most highly in presenting their antitobacco campaign messages on the Web.

  1. Online news: between private enterprise and public subsidy

    Hjarvard, Stig; Kammer, Aske

    2015-01-01

    The Nordic countries’ media systems are exemplary of the democratic corporatist model, and newspapers have occupied a very prominent position in the political public sphere supported by wide circulation and a political will to subsidize the press and still keep an arm’s length distance. During past...... decades, these features have come under pressure due to – among other things – the spread of digital media. In this article, we explore two current structural economic challenges to legacy newspaper organizations in Denmark. The first challenge regards the implementation of subscription on news websites...

  2. News from the Library: Scientific American and Nature increasingly accessible online!

    CERN Library

    2011-01-01

    Since a few weeks, the CERN Library has been offering online access to "Scientific American" and "Nature" within a longer timespan. This is part of a long-term plan to extend our e-collections in order to include prestigious scientific journals from the beginning of publication.   CERN users can browse and read the complete archives of "Scientific American" since 1845. Among the many interesting articles now readable online, you can find Einstein's account of research on a generalized theory of gravitation. A small, though important addition to the Library's online collections: "Nature" online is now reaching back to 1987. You can now read online the "Nature" news column reporting about the first anti-atom discovered at CERN. We plan to further expand online access to "Nature", but in the meantime you can rely on the Library's paper collection...

  3. News from the Library: Scientific American and Nature increasingly accessible online!

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Since a few weeks, the CERN Library has been offering online access to "Scientific American" and "Nature" within a longer timespan. This is part of a long-term plan to extend our e-collections in order to include prestigious scientific journals from the beginning of publication.   CERN users can browse and read the complete archives of "Scientific American" since 1845. Among the many interesting articles now readable online, you can find Einstein's account of research on a generalized theory of gravitation. A small, though important addition to the Library's online collections: "Nature" online is now reaching back to 1987. You can now read online the "Nature" news column reporting about the first anti-atom discovered at CERN. We plan to further expand online access to "Nature", but in the meantime you can rely on the Library's paper collection...

  4. How Online Peer-to-Peer Conversation Shapes the Effects of a Message About Healthy Sleep.

    Robbins, Rebecca; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Conversation about health messages and campaigns is common, and message-related conversations are increasingly recognized as a consequential factor in shaping message effects. The evidence base is limited, however, about the conditions under which conversation may help or hinder health communication efforts. In this study, college students (N = 301) first watched a short sleep video and were randomly assigned to either talk with a partner in an online chat conversation or proceed directly to a short survey. Unknown to participants, the chat partner was a confederate coached to say positive things about sleep and the message ('positive' chat condition), negative things ('negative' chat condition), or unrelated things ('natural' chat condition). All respondents completed a short survey on beliefs about sleep, reactions to the message, and intentions to get adequate sleep. Respondents had greater intentions to engage in healthy sleep when they engaged in positive conversation following message exposure than when they engaged in negative conversation after the message (p chat perceptions were significant predictors (p < 0.05) of intentions to achieve healthy sleep. Health message designers may benefit from understanding how messages are exchanged in peer-to-peer conversation to better predict and explain their effects.

  5. Schizophrenia in the News: The Role of News Frames in Shaping Online Reader Dialogue about Mental Illness.

    Gwarjanski, Anna Rae; Parrott, Scott

    2018-08-01

    A quantitative content analysis examined the portrayal of schizophrenia in eight of the most read online news publications in the United States. The analysis documented the prevalence of stigma frames, which communicate stereotypes concerning schizophrenia, and stigma-challenge frames, which contradict stereotypes, in 558 articles related to schizophrenia. The study also examined the relationship between media framing and reader commentary, including the likelihood of readers posting stigmatizing comments, stigma-challenging comments, and comments in which they disclosed personal experience with mental illness. Stigma frames were prevalent in the sample, suggesting the news media continue associating schizophrenia with violent and criminal behavior. Stigma frames stood greater chance of being accompanied by stigmatizing comments from readers when compared to stigma-challenging frames. Conversely, stigma-challenging frames stood greater chance of being accompanied by stigma-challenging comments from readers. Readers were more likely to disclose personal experience with mental illness when they encountered a stigma-challenging frame. Recommendations are made for journalists and health communicators.

  6. A Goal Programming Model for Selection and Scheduling of Advertisements on Online News Media

    Manik, Prerna; Gupta, Anshu; Jha, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Digital revolution has resulted in a paradigm shift in the field of marketing with online advertising becoming increasingly popular as it offers the reach, range, scale and interactivity to organizations to influence their target customers. Moreover, web advertisement is the primary revenue stream...... for several websites that provide free services to internet users. The website management team needs to do a lot of planning and optimally schedule various advertisements (ads) to maximize revenue, taking care of advertisers' needs under system constraints. In this paper, we have considered the case of news...... websites that provide news to its viewers for free with ads as the primary source of their revenue. The considered news website consists of many webpages with different banners for advertisement. Each banner consists of different number of partitions and cost per partition varies for different rectangular...

  7. News

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  8. News

    News, Transfer

    2017-01-01

      NOTICIAS / NEWS (“transfer”, 2018)  1) LIBROS – CAPÍTULOS DE LIBRO  / BOOKS – BOOK CHAPTERS 1. Bandia, Paul F. (ed.). (2017). Orality and Translation.  London: Routledge.   2. Trends in Translation and Interpretin,  Institute of Translation & Interpreting 3. Schippel, Larisa & Cornelia Zwischenberger. (eds). (2017). Going East: Discovering New and Alternative Traditions in Translation Studies. Berlin: Frank & Timme. 4.  Godayol, Pilar. (2017). Tres escritoras censuradas: Simone de Beauvoir,...

  9. Comparing the Hierarchy of Keywords in On-Line News Portals.

    Tibély, Gergely; Sousa-Rodrigues, David; Pollner, Péter; Palla, Gergely

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical organization is prevalent in networks representing a wide range of systems in nature and society. An important example is given by the tag hierarchies extracted from large on-line data repositories such as scientific publication archives, file sharing portals, blogs, on-line news portals, etc. The tagging of the stored objects with informative keywords in such repositories has become very common, and in most cases the tags on a given item are free words chosen by the authors independently. Therefore, the relations among keywords appearing in an on-line data repository are unknown in general. However, in most cases the topics and concepts described by these keywords are forming a latent hierarchy, with the more general topics and categories at the top, and more specialized ones at the bottom. There are several algorithms available for deducing this hierarchy from the statistical features of the keywords. In the present work we apply a recent, co-occurrence-based tag hierarchy extraction method to sets of keywords obtained from four different on-line news portals. The resulting hierarchies show substantial differences not just in the topics rendered as important (being at the top of the hierarchy) or of less interest (categorized low in the hierarchy), but also in the underlying network structure. This reveals discrepancies between the plausible keyword association frameworks in the studied news portals.

  10. Comparing the Hierarchy of Keywords in On-Line News Portals.

    Gergely Tibély

    Full Text Available Hierarchical organization is prevalent in networks representing a wide range of systems in nature and society. An important example is given by the tag hierarchies extracted from large on-line data repositories such as scientific publication archives, file sharing portals, blogs, on-line news portals, etc. The tagging of the stored objects with informative keywords in such repositories has become very common, and in most cases the tags on a given item are free words chosen by the authors independently. Therefore, the relations among keywords appearing in an on-line data repository are unknown in general. However, in most cases the topics and concepts described by these keywords are forming a latent hierarchy, with the more general topics and categories at the top, and more specialized ones at the bottom. There are several algorithms available for deducing this hierarchy from the statistical features of the keywords. In the present work we apply a recent, co-occurrence-based tag hierarchy extraction method to sets of keywords obtained from four different on-line news portals. The resulting hierarchies show substantial differences not just in the topics rendered as important (being at the top of the hierarchy or of less interest (categorized low in the hierarchy, but also in the underlying network structure. This reveals discrepancies between the plausible keyword association frameworks in the studied news portals.

  11. Online News Sites and Journalism 2.0: Reader Comments on Al Jazeera Arabic

    Muhammad M. Abdul-Mageed

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The current paper investigates reader commenting on news sites as one facet of journalism 2.0. Specifically, the themes, frequency, and regional coverage of readers’ comments—and in general, their activity levels and distribution—are considered, with a goal to increase knowledge of convergent media and computer-mediated communication (CMC, as well as shed light on the interactivity strategies adopted by influential news producers. The corpus is collected from the Arabic news site of the controversial Middle East-based, bilingual network Al Jazeera. Reader commenting was found to be a regular occurrence on the site but distributed unevenly across stories. The stories focused mostly on themes related to military and political violence, politics, and foreign relations, and covered events related to the Arab world more than other regions. Also, patterns of commenting varied according to day of the week and position of the story on the web page. Overall, these findings suggest that citizen journalism—journalism is performed by lay persons—on Al Jazeera tends to be shaped by the coverage and layout of the news site. Moreover, citizen participation in online news sites such as Al Jazeera is still far from ideal, in that commenters are given neither the access nor the facilitation to use modalities other than written text. These limitations are critiqued in light of contemporary discourses about media convergence and journalism 2.0.

  12. Visual Representations of Sexual Violence in Online News Outlets

    Sandra Schwark

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To study visual representations of sexual violence, photographs accompanying German Internet news articles that appeared between January 2013 and March 2015 (N = 42 were subjected to thematic analysis. Two main themes, consisting of several sub-themes, emerged from the data. The first theme was “rape myths,” illustrating a stereotypical view of sexual violence. It consisted of three sub-themes: “beauty standards,” referring to the fact that all women in our sample fit western beauty standards, “physical violence,” as most images implied some form of physical violence, and finally “location,” suggesting that rape only happens in secluded outdoor areas. These findings suggest that the images from our sample perpetuate certain rape myths. The second theme was “portrayal of victimhood,” referring to the way victims of sexual violence were portrayed in photographs. The analysis of the sub-theme “passivity” showed that these portrayals fit a certain stereotype: the women were shown to be weak and helpless rather than individuals with agency and able to leave their status as a victim. Further sub-themes were “background,” “organization of space,” “camera perspective,” and “lighting.” We discuss these findings in relation to possibly reinforcing rape myths in society and as an issue in creating a biased perception of women who have experienced sexual violence.

  13. An Analysis of Euphemisms Found in the Political Issues News of the Jakarta Post Online Newspaper

    AVRIANTI, NUKE ELOK

    2014-01-01

    Keyword : Euphemisms, Type of Euphemisms, Motives of using Euphemisms The political issues which become the highlighted issues in media Indonesia in recent days is the reason of the writer in conducting this study. The writer wants to examine how the euphemistic expression is used in the newspaper when they publish their article. The writer analyzed the political issues news written in The Jakarta Post online newspaper since the development of technology is running very fast so the ...

  14. Journalism and news cultures: journalistic practices and online media in the Chilean newsroom

    Jofré Larenas, Claudio Omar

    2017-01-01

    An extensive body of scholarship has examined technological change and the impact of online media on journalism and newsrooms in the US and Europe (Quandt et al., 2006; Domingo, 2008; Domingo et al., 2008; Steensen, 2009; Paulussen & Ugille, 2008; Hermida, 2010; Singer, 2013; Singer et al., 2011). However, comparatively little research has been undertaken in the Latin American context. This deficit is especially apparent in the case of Chile. Important developments in journalism, news media, ...

  15. news

    Marina Tkacheva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available XXIV World Congress of Architecture – UIA Tokyo 2011UIA NewsTuva Architects' SuccessRecollection of "Zodchestvo 2011""Children Are not People of Tomorrow, but Are People of Today with a Different Scale of Feelings and Experience"The 30th Anniversary of the Union of Architects of RussiaXX International Review Competition for the Best Graduation Architecturaland Design Projects (YerevanParticipation of the Design Department of National Research Irkutsk State Technical UniversityParticipation of Institute of Architecture and Construction of National Research Irkutsk State Technical UniversitySeven Years and Further on!Breathe Together!VI Special Meeting of the National Association of DesignersWhat is Good for a German… or a Russian-Style SRO2012. "Katastrofa" Festival. AdvertisementSummer Workshop of Les Ateliers of Urban Planning and Development (Cergy-Pontoise, France

  16. Toward an Understanding of Online Word-of-Mouth Message Content and the Booking Intentions of Lodging Consumers

    Van Loon, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the message structure of an online word-of-mouth referral influences the booking intentions of lodging consumers. The objectives were (1) determine what elements of the message structure of an online word-of-mouth referral influenced the booking intention of lodging consumers and (2)…

  17. Analyzing Behaviour of the Utilization of the Online News Clipping Database: Experience in Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University

    Siriporn Poolsuwan; Kanyarat Bussaban

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to investigate and analyze user’s behaviour towards the utilization of the online news clipping database at Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Thailand. Data is gathered from 214 lecturers and 380 undergraduate students by using questionnaires. Findings show that most users knew the online news clipping service from their friends, library’s website and their teachers. The users learned how to use it by themselves and others learned by training of SSRU library. Most users us...

  18. Australian print news media coverage of sweet, non-alcoholic drinks sends mixed health messages.

    Bonfiglioli, Catriona; Hattersley, Libby; King, Lesley

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to analyse the contribution of Australian print news coverage to the public profile of sweet, non-alcoholic beverages. News media portrayal of health contributes to individuals' decision-making. The focus on sugar-sweetened beverages reflects their contribution to excessive energy intake. One year's coverage of sweet, non-alcoholic beverages by major Australian newspapers was analysed using content and frame analysis. Research questions addressed which sweet drinks are most prominently covered, what makes sweet drinks newsworthy and how are the health aspects of sweet drinks framed? Fruit juice was the most widely covered sweet drink, closely followed by carbonated, sugar-sweetened soft drinks. Overall coverage was positively oriented towards sweet drinks, with fruit juice primarily portrayed as having health benefits. Some coverage mentioned risks of sweet drinks, such as obesity, tooth decay, metabolic syndrome and heart attack. Sweet drinks often enjoy positive coverage, with their health benefits and harms central to their ability to attract journalists' attention. However, the mix of coverage may be contributing to consumer confusion about whether it is safe and/or healthy to consume sweet non-alcoholic drinks. Framing of sweet drinks as healthy may undermine efforts to encourage individuals to avoid excess consumption of energy-dense drinks which offer few or minimal health benefits. © 2011 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2011 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. A message-queuing framework for STAR's online monitoring and metadata collection

    Arkhipkin, D; Lauret, J; Betts, W

    2011-01-01

    We report our experience on migrating STARs Online Services (Run Control System, Data Acquisition System, Slow Control System and Subsystem Monitoring) from direct read/write database accesses to a modern non-blocking message-oriented infrastructure. Based on the Advanced Messaging Queuing Protocol (AMQP) and standards, this novel approach does not specify the message data structure, allowing great flexibility in its use. After careful consideration, we chose Google Protocol Buffers as our primary (de)serialization format for structured data exchange. This migration allows us to reduce the overall system complexity and greatly improve the reliability of the metadata collection and the performance of our online services in general. We will present this new framework through its software architecture overview, providing details about our staged and non-disruptive migration process as well as details of the implementation of pluggable components to provide future improvements without compromising stability and availability of services.

  20. Student and Instructor Responses to Emotional Motivational Feedback Messages in an Online Instructional Environment

    Sarsar, Firat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Emotional Motivational Feedback Message (EMFEM) in an online learning environment. This exploratory research was conducted using mixed method single case study design. Participants were 15 undergraduate students enrolled in an instructional technology course in a large state…

  1. Automatic topic identification of health-related messages in online health community using text classification.

    Lu, Yingjie

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate patient involvement in online health community and obtain informative support and emotional support they need, a topic identification approach was proposed in this paper for identifying automatically topics of the health-related messages in online health community, thus assisting patients in reaching the most relevant messages for their queries efficiently. Feature-based classification framework was presented for automatic topic identification in our study. We first collected the messages related to some predefined topics in a online health community. Then we combined three different types of features, n-gram-based features, domain-specific features and sentiment features to build four feature sets for health-related text representation. Finally, three different text classification techniques, C4.5, Naïve Bayes and SVM were adopted to evaluate our topic classification model. By comparing different feature sets and different classification techniques, we found that n-gram-based features, domain-specific features and sentiment features were all considered to be effective in distinguishing different types of health-related topics. In addition, feature reduction technique based on information gain was also effective to improve the topic classification performance. In terms of classification techniques, SVM outperformed C4.5 and Naïve Bayes significantly. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed approach could identify the topics of online health-related messages efficiently.

  2. The effects of online review message appeal and online review source across two product types on review credibility, product attitude, and purchase intention

    Beldad, Ardion; Avicenna, Fitria; De Vries, Sjoerd; Fui-Hoon, Fiona; Tan, Chuan-Hoo

    2017-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the effects of online review message appeal and online review source type on review credibility perception, product attitude, and purchase intention across two types of products, namely technical and non-technical. A between-respondent 2 (message appeal:

  3. Personality traits and dysfunctional construal of online health promotion messages.

    Lee, Yaeeun; Kurtz, John E

    2017-10-20

    With the Internet becoming increasingly popular as a source of information, blogs offering healthy lifestyle techniques and knowledge have become popular and accessible. Despite their focus on health, these blogs portray content that may be negatively construed by viewers, especially those with or at risk for eating disorders. The present study investigated changes in affect and self-esteem after viewing a prototypic health blog. Personality traits, specifically neuroticism and conscientiousness, were also investigated. A prototypic health blog was constructed after extensive review of existing blogs. A parallel format was then followed to create a home décor website for a control condition. Female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to one of two blog sites, and participants completed an earlier personality assessment and post-viewing study questionnaires. Contrary to the hypothesis that readers of the health blog will report more negative outcomes, no main effect of blog condition was found. However, individuals high in trait neuroticism experienced greater differences in negative affect, but not self-esteem, when viewing the health blog versus the control blog. This study found that viewing health blogs did not have immediate effects on affect and self-esteem, but more neurotic individuals were more inclined to experience negative affect when viewing health promotion messages. Personality traits assessed prior to the experiment were more predictive of negative affect and self-esteem during the experiment than blog viewing conditions. No level of evidence, experimental study.

  4. News

    2004-09-01

    Meeting: Brecon hosts 'alternative-style' Education Group Conference Meeting: Schools' Physics Group meeting delivers valuable teaching update Saturn Mission: PPARC’s Saturn school resource goes online Funding: Grant scheme supports Einstein Year activities Meeting: Liverpool Teachers’ Conference revives enthusiasm for physics Loan Scheme: Moon samples loaned to schools Awards: Schoolnet rewards good use of ICT in learning Funding: PPARC provides cash for science projects Workshop: Experts in physics education research share knowledge at international event Bulgaria: Transit of Venus comes to town Conference: CERN weekend provides lessons in particle physics Summer School: Teachers receive the summer-school treatment

  5. An extension of the extended parallel process model (EPPM) in television health news: the influence of health consciousness on individual message processing and acceptance.

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the role of health consciousness in processing TV news that contains potential health threats and preventive recommendations. Based on the extended parallel process model (Witte, 1992), relationships among health consciousness, perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, perceived response efficacy, perceived self-efficacy, and message acceptance/rejection were hypothesized. Responses collected from 175 participants after viewing four TV health news stories were analyzed using the bootstrapping analysis (Preacher & Hayes, 2008). Results confirmed three mediators (i.e., perceived severity, response efficacy, self-efficacy) in the influence of health consciousness on message acceptance. A negative association found between health consciousness and perceived susceptibility is discussed in relation to characteristics of health conscious individuals and optimistic bias of health risks.

  6. [Semantic Network Analysis of Online News and Social Media Text Related to Comprehensive Nursing Care Service].

    Kim, Minji; Choi, Mona; Youm, Yoosik

    2017-12-01

    As comprehensive nursing care service has gradually expanded, it has become necessary to explore the various opinions about it. The purpose of this study is to explore the large amount of text data regarding comprehensive nursing care service extracted from online news and social media by applying a semantic network analysis. The web pages of the Korean Nurses Association (KNA) News, major daily newspapers, and Twitter were crawled by searching the keyword 'comprehensive nursing care service' using Python. A morphological analysis was performed using KoNLPy. Nodes on a 'comprehensive nursing care service' cluster were selected, and frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality were calculated and visualized with Gephi for the semantic network. A total of 536 news pages and 464 tweets were analyzed. In the KNA News and major daily newspapers, 'nursing workforce' and 'nursing service' were highly rated in frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality. On Twitter, the most frequent nodes were 'National Health Insurance Service' and 'comprehensive nursing care service hospital.' The nodes with the highest edge weight were 'national health insurance,' 'wards without caregiver presence,' and 'caregiving costs.' 'National Health Insurance Service' was highest in degree centrality. This study provides an example of how to use atypical big data for a nursing issue through semantic network analysis to explore diverse perspectives surrounding the nursing community through various media sources. Applying semantic network analysis to online big data to gather information regarding various nursing issues would help to explore opinions for formulating and implementing nursing policies. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  7. Schizophrenia in Chinese and U.S. Online News Media: Exploring Cultural Influence on the Mediated Portrayal of Schizophrenia.

    Yang, Yiyi; Parrott, Scott

    2018-05-01

    Drawing on the constructionist framing approach, this quantitative content analysis compares online news coverage of schizophrenia in China and the United States in 2015. Incorporating the concept of individualism-collectivism, this study seeks to unveil the effects of culture on the framing of causes, solutions, responsibility attribution, and discourse types. The findings reveal that the link between cultural orientation and the media's framing of schizophrenia is not simple, as both cross-cultural consistency and differences were observed. In addition, compared to U.S. online media, Chinese online news outlets were more likely to cover schizophrenia episodically, while placing more problem-solving responsibility on society. Moreover, examining stigma and challenge cues, this study also found that schizophrenia was more severely stigmatized in Chinese than in U.S. online news platforms. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  8. Sentiment analysis to determine the impact of online messages on smokers' choices to use varenicline.

    Cobb, Nathan K; Mays, Darren; Graham, Amanda L

    2013-12-01

    Social networks are a prominent component of online smoking cessation interventions. This study applied sentiment analysis-a data processing technique that codes textual data for emotional polarity-to examine how exposure to messages about the cessation drug varenicline affects smokers' decision making around its use. Data were from QuitNet, an online social network dedicated to smoking cessation and relapse prevention. Self-reported medication choice at registration and at 30 days was coded among new QuitNet registrants who participated in at least one forum discussion mentioning varenicline between January 31, 2005 and March 9, 2008. Commercially available software was used to code the sentiment of forum messages mentioning varenicline that occurred during this time frame. Logistic regression analyses examined whether forum message exposure predicted medication choice. The sample of 2132 registrants comprised mostly women (78.3%), white participants (83.4%), averaged 41.2 years of age (SD = 10.9), and smoked on average 21.5 (SD = 9.7) cigarettes/day. After adjusting for potential confounders, as exposure to positive varenicline messages outweighed negative messages, the odds of switching to varenicline (odds ratio = 2.05, 95% confidence interval = 1.66 to 2.54) and continuing to use varenicline (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.96 to 3.10) statistically significantly increased. Sentiment analysis is a useful tool for analyzing text-based data to examine their impact on behavior change. Greater exposure to positive sentiment in online conversations about varenicline is associated with a greater likelihood that smokers will choose to use varenicline in a quit attempt.

  9. News from the Library: Two new online services available at CERN: thank you for your feedback!

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    The Library has activated two different new online services, as a result of very successful trial periods and thanks to your positive feedback and strong support: PressDisplay and Nucleonica.   PressDisplay is an online portal where one can browse and read online articles from more than 1,900 newspapers from 95 countries, as soon as they are published. Le Monde, International Herald Tribune and many more titles are available in their original layout including text and images. Thanks to RSS feeds, users can directly receive news from their favorite newspapers, but articles can also be printed and sent via email. Based on the very positive feedback we got from the community, the CERN Library has activated a one-year subscription to PressDisplay, and a wealth of information is now available at everyone's fingertips at CERN. In addition to that, the latest Library news about Nucleonica, the nuclide and isotope database derived from the Karlsruhe Nuclide Chart, generated so much interest ...

  10. Political campaigning 2.0: The influence of online news and social networking sites on attitudes and behavior

    Montathar Faraon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine differences in influence between online news (e.g., New York Times and social networking sites (e.g., Facebook and Twitter on attitudes in political campaigns. In a web-based experiment, campaign, polls and election between two fictitious candidates were simulated. Participants’ explicit and implicit attitudes as well as voting behavior were assessed using self-report items and the Implicit Association Test (IAT. The results reveal that information emanating from online news had a significant influence on explicit and implicit attitudes while that of social networking sites did not. Overall, negative items had a stronger impact than positive ones, more so in online news compared to social networking sites. Negative information from either type of media was more likely to change participants’ explicit attitudes in a negative direction and as a consequence also change their vote. Practical implications of the findings and limitations of the study are discussed.

  11. Examining Perceptions about Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers through Online Comments on News Stories.

    Yang Lei

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to understand online public perceptions of the debate surrounding the choice of annual influenza vaccinations or wearing masks as a condition of employment for healthcare workers, such as the one enacted in British Columbia in August 2012.Four national and 82 local (British Columbia Canadian online news sites were searched for articles posted between August 2012 and May 2013 containing the words "healthcare workers" and "mandatory influenza vaccinations/immunizations" or "mandatory flu shots and healthcare workers." We included articles from sources that predominantly concerned our topic of interest and that generated reader comments. Two researchers coded the unedited comments using thematic analysis, categorizing codes to allow themes to emerge. In addition to themes, the comments were categorized by: 1 sentiment towards influenza vaccines; 2 support for mandatory vaccination policies; 3 citing of reference materials or statistics; 4 self-identified health-care worker status; and 5 sharing of a personal story.1163 comments made by 648 commenters responding to 36 articles were analyzed. Popular themes included concerns about freedom of choice, vaccine effectiveness, patient safety, and distrust in government, public health, and the pharmaceutical industry. Almost half (48% of commenters expressed a negative sentiment toward the influenza vaccine, 28% were positive, 20% were neutral, and 4% expressed mixed sentiment. Of those who commented on the policy, 75% did not support the condition to work policy, while 25% were in favour. Of the commenters, 11% self-identified as healthcare workers, 13% shared personal stories, and 18% cited a reference or statistic.The perception of the influenza vaccine in the comment sections of online news sites is fairly poor. Public health agencies should consider including online forums, comment sections, and social media sites as part of their communication channels to correct

  12. The use of an online support group for neuromuscular disorders: a thematic analysis of message postings.

    Meade, Oonagh; Buchanan, Heather; Coulson, Neil

    2017-06-08

    People affected by neuromuscular disorders can experience adverse psychosocial consequences and difficulties accessing information and support. Online support groups provide new opportunities for peer support. The aim of this study was to understand how contributors used the message board function of a newly available neuromuscular disorders online support group. Message postings (n = 1951) from the first five months of the message board of a newly formed online support group for neuromuscular disorders hosted by a charitable organization were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Members created a sense of community through disclosing personal information, connecting with people with similar illness experiences or interests, welcoming others and sharing aspirations for the development of a resourceful community. Experiences, emotional reactions and support were shared in relation to: delayed diagnosis; symptom interpretation; illness management and progression; the isolating impact of rare disorders; and the influence of social and political factors on illness experiences. This study provided a novel insight into individuals' experiences of accessing a newly available online support group for rare conditions hosted by a charitable organization. The findings highlight how the online support group provided an important peer support environment for members to connect with others, exchange information and support and engender discussion on political and social issues unique to living with often-rare neuromuscular disorders. Online support groups may therefore provide an important and easily accessible support outlet for people with neuromuscular disorders as well as a platform for empowering members to raise awareness about the impact of living with these conditions. Further research is needed to examine member motivations for using such groups and any effects of participation in greater detail. Implications for rehabilitation Online support groups may

  13. Nudging Online Security Behaviour with Warning Messages: Results from an online experiment

    VAN BAVEL RENE; RODRIGUEZ PRIEGO NURIA

    2016-01-01

    This study is part of a larger effort to better understand online behaviour. We tested the effect on people’s security behaviour of different ways of warning them about cybersecurity threats with an online experiment (n=5,065) in Germany, Sweden, Poland, the UK and Spain. Participants had to make a purchase in a mock online store, and their behaviour was observed through four behavioural measures. Results show that making users aware of the steps they can take to minimise their exposure to ri...

  14. A thematic analysis of messages posted by moderators within health-related asynchronous online support forums.

    Smedley, Richard M; Coulson, Neil S

    2017-09-01

    To identify and describe the activities performed by online support community moderators. A total of 790 messages were downloaded for analysis. Messages were written by 59 moderators from 6 forums that represent a diverse range of conditions (arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, Crohn's disease, depression, diabetes and Huntington's disease). Thematic analysis revealed four themes: supportive tasks supportive tasks involve providing help to members, moderators sharing experiences shows how they use forums to fulfil their own personal support needs, making announcements about new discoveries and upcoming events, and administrative tasks such as enforcing rules and deleting spam. These results are consistent with the helper-therapy principle and provide a new insight into the diverse and varied range of activities carried out by moderators. Moderators perform many roles, including using forums for their own support needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Internet message boards for pregnancy loss: who's on-line and why?

    Gold, Katherine J; Boggs, Martha E; Mugisha, Emeline; Palladino, Christie Lancaster

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy loss is common, but its significance is often minimized by family, friends, and the community, leaving bereaved parents with unmet need for support. This study sought to describe demographics, usage patterns, and perceived benefits for women participating in Internet pregnancy loss support groups. We requested permission to post an anonymous Internet survey on large and active United States Internet message boards for women with miscarriages and stillbirths. The study purposefully oversampled stillbirth sites and included both closed- and open-ended questions. The University of Michigan Institutional Review Board approved the study. Closed-ended questions were summarized and evaluated with bivariate analysis. We performed a qualitative analysis of open-ended data using an iterative coding process to identify key themes. Of 62 sites queried, 15 granted permission to post the survey on 18 different message boards. We collected 1,039 surveys, of which 1,006 were complete and eligible for analysis. Women were typically white, well educated, and frequent users. They noted message boards helped them to feel less isolated in their loss and grief and they appreciated unique aspects of Internet communication such as convenience, access, anonymity, and privacy. Pregnancy loss message boards are an important aspect of support for many bereaved mothers. African-American women seem to be substantially underrepresented on-line despite being at higher risk for stillbirth. Internet message boards serve a unique function in providing support for women with miscarriage and stillbirth. The benefits are often significantly different from those encountered in traditional face-to-face bereavement support. Copyright © 2012 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Behavioral consequences of conflict-oriented health news coverage: the 2009 mammography guideline controversy and online information seeking.

    Weeks, Brian E; Friedenberg, Laura M; Southwell, Brian G; Slater, Jonathan S

    2012-01-01

    Building on channel complementarity theory and media-system dependency theory, this study explores the impact of conflict-oriented news coverage of health issues on information seeking online. Using Google search data as a measure of behavior, we demonstrate that controversial news coverage of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's November 2009 recommendations for changes in breast cancer screening guidelines strongly predicted the volume of same-day online searches for information about mammograms. We also found that this relationship did not exist 1 year prior to the coverage, during which mammography news coverage did not focus on the guideline controversy, suggesting that the controversy frame may have driven search behavior. We discuss the implications of these results for health communication scholars and practitioners.

  17. When News Goes Online. A Cross-Media Analysis of Editorial Logics and Consumers’ Feedbacks in the Printed, Online and Facebook Versions of the Italian Newspaper la Repubblica

    Francesca Arcostanzo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the advent and diffusion of new media, one of the most accredited hypotheses in the realm of mediatization theory has been that the essential prerequisites of mediatization would have slowly started to disappear. On the contrary, we hypothesize that the unprecedented knowledge about users’ preferences given to media companies would be reflected in the logics of news production, which would shift from being guided by internal logics and standards of newsworthiness to be driven by an audience-oriented commercial logic. Therefore, we expect storytelling techniques to prevail in online news production, with soft news becoming progressively prevalent moving from traditional to new media. We address our hypothesis performing a cross-media analysis of the Italian newspaper la Repubblica, investigating both the different editorial logics underlying the selection and framing of contents as well as the relationship between the general news frame and the level of readers’ engagement. In our findings, soft news prevails regardless of the platform, also following a positive trend as we move towards Facebook. Moreover, soft news seems to be able to foster a higher level of users’ engagement as expressed in terms of likes and shares, while hard news prevails in commenting activities.

  18. CAN NEWS SITES STIMULATE ONLINE DELIBERATION? A STUDY OF READERS COMMENTS POSTED ON FOLHA.COM

    Samuel Anderson Rocha Barros

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses online deliberation on readers’ comments on the website of the Brazilian newspaper Folha de S. Paulo. To this end, 260 posts on four different stories were analyzed. In addition to the comments, the newspaper’s website, its discursive tools and the political stance of the participants, were examined. It was concluded that there was relevant deliberativeness in discussions but also excessive aggressiveness among participants. The comments posted revealed that most of the participants sought to win debates rather than promoting mutual understanding. Lastly, the paper discusses how to deal normatively with this aggressiveness and attempts to identify ways to increase democratic values through the provision of discursive tools by news sites.

  19. Unintended messages in online advertising to youth: illicit drug imagery in a Canadian sports marketing campaign.

    Auger, Nathalie; Daniel, Mark; Knäuper, Bärbel; Dourian, Tara; Raynault, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the potential for harmful messages in online advertisements targeted to youth, using the example of the Canadian "Light It Up" marketing campaign from a large sports corporation. We undertook a cluster randomized controlled trial of 20 secondary school classes in Montreal, Canada. Classes were randomly allocated to view a "Light It Up" advertisement (n = 205) or a neutral comparison advertisement (n = 192). The main outcome measures were self-reports of illicit drug messages in the advertisements. Of the students, 22.9% reported that the "Light It Up" advertisement contained illicit drug messages compared with 1.0% for the comparison advertisement (relative risk, 22.0; 95% confidence interval, 6.5-74.9). Although meant to promote sports, youth in this study believed that the "Light It Up" advertisement was related to illicit drugs. The campaign illustrates how advertisements may inadvertently market unwanted behaviors to children. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The complementary relationship between the Internet and traditional mass media: the case of online news and information

    An Nguyen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The question whether old media are driven out of existence by new media has been a long concern in academic and industrial research but has received no definitive answer. Aim.This paper goes beyond most previous studies of Internet impact on traditional media, which have placed their relationship within a competition-based framework, to specifically investigate the complementary effect of online news and information usage on traditional sources. Method. Secondary data analysis of a national survey of 4270 Australians conducted in late 2003, employing hypothesis testing for the mean, partial correlations, and a linear regression analysis. Results. Online news and information usage at different usage levels is positively associated with the use of traditional news and information sources, especially those that are more information-intensive. Those who relied on the Internet the most for news and information still used traditional sources substantially. Conclusion. The findings suggest that even if a displacement effect takes place, there will be no replacement (absolute displacement: traditional media will still exist to complement the Internet in serving human beings' news and information needs.

  1. news-please

    Hamborg, Felix; Meuschke, Norman; Breitinger, Corinna; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    The amount of news published and read online has increased tremendously in recent years, making news data an interesting resource for many research disciplines, such as the social sciences and linguistics. However, large scale collection of news data is cumbersome due to a lack of generic tools for crawling and extracting such data. We present news-please, a generic, multilanguage, open-source crawler and extractor for news that works out-of-thebox for a large variety of news websites. ...

  2. "And now for the good news..." the impact of negative and positive messages in self-management education for people with Type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study in an ethnically diverse population.

    Eborall, Helen C; Virdee, Satnam K; Patel, Naina; Redwood, Sabi; Greenfield, Sheila M; Stone, Margaret A

    2016-03-01

    To explore the impact of Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed (DESMOND) Foundation education, particularly from interviewees' narratives regarding recall of good and bad news messages and behaviour changes. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample (n=19) of people who had attended education sessions as part of a randomised controlled trial in two UK sites with ethnically diverse populations. Data collection and analysis were informed by the constant comparative approach and facilitated through charting. Findings were similar in people from different ethnic backgrounds. Exploration of levels of recall of the sessions suggested that this was variable and sometimes very limited, but that interviewees had all assimilated some relevant learning. Key themes emerged relating to the way in which interviewees recalled and had been influenced by positive (good news) and negative (bad news) messages within the education sessions, including biomedical explanations. Both types of message appeared to have an important role in terms of motivation to change behaviour, but a notable observation was that none of the interviewees recalled receiving bad news messages when diagnosed. Our findings have highlighted the importance of providing and combining both negative and positive messages within education designed to promote self-management behaviour change. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Effects of news media messages about mass shootings on attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness and public support for gun control policies.

    McGinty, Emma E; Webster, Daniel W; Barry, Colleen L

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, mass shootings by persons with serious mental illness have received extensive news media coverage. The authors test the effects of news stories about mass shootings on public attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness and support for gun control policies. They also examine whether news coverage of proposals to prevent persons with serious mental illness from having guns exacerbates the public's negative attitudes toward this group. The authors conducted a survey-embedded randomized experiment using a national sample (N=1,797) from an online panel. Respondents were randomly assigned to groups instructed to read one of three news stories or to a no-exposure control group. The news stories described, respectively, a mass shooting by a person with serious mental illness, the same mass shooting and a proposal for gun restrictions for persons with serious mental illness, and the same mass shooting and a proposal to ban large-capacity magazines. Outcome measures included attitudes toward working with or living near a person with serious mental illness, perceived dangerousness of persons with serious mental illness, and support for gun restrictions for persons with serious mental illness and for a ban on large-capacity magazines. Compared with the control group, the story about a mass shooting heightened respondents' negative attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness and raised support for gun restrictions for this group and for a ban on large-capacity magazines. Including information about the gun restriction policy in a story about a mass shooting did not heighten negative attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness or raise support for the restrictions. The aftermath of mass shootings is often viewed as a window of opportunity to garner support for gun control policies, but it also exacerbates negative attitudes toward persons with serious mental illness.

  4. Pathway to political participation: the influence of online and offline news media on internal efficacy and turnout of first-time voters

    Moeller, J.; de Vreese, C.; Esser, F; Kunz, R.

    2014-01-01

    News media play a key role in informing young citizens about politics and cultivating a sense of political efficacy. Online news media, in particular, are expected to have a positive impact due to their interactivity and new opportunities to share and discuss information. This study analyzes the

  5. The messages presented in online electronic cigarette promotions and discussions: a scoping review protocol.

    McCausland, Kahlia; Maycock, Bruce; Jancey, Jonine

    2017-11-08

    Electronic cigarettes have become increasingly popular over the last 10 years. These devices represent a new paradigm for tobacco control offering smokers an opportunity to inhale nicotine without inhaling tobacco smoke. To date there are no definite conclusions regarding the safety and long-term health effects of electronic cigarettes; however, there is evidence that they are being marketed online as a healthier alternative to traditional cigarettes. This scoping review aims to identify and describe the breadth of messages (eg, health, smoking-cessation and price related claims) presented in online electronic cigarette promotions and discussions. A scoping review will be undertaken adhering to the methodology outlined in The Joanna Briggs Institute Manual for Scoping Reviews. Six key electronic databases will be searched to identify eligible studies. Studies must be published in English between 2007 and 2017, examine and/or analyse content captured from online electronic cigarette promotions or discussions and report results for electronic cigarettes separately to other forms of tobacco delivery. Studies will be screened initially by title and abstract, followed by full-text review. Results of the search strategy will be reported in a PRISMA flow diagram and presented in tabular form with accompanying narrative summary. The methodology consists of reviewing and collecting data from publicly available studies, and therefore does not require ethics approval. Results will be published in a peer reviewed journal and be presented at national/international conferences. Additionally, findings will be disseminated via social media and online platforms. Advocacy will be key to informing policy makers of regulatory and health issues that need to be addressed. The review was registered prospectively with The Joanna Briggs Institute Systematic Reviews database. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  6. The use of tags and tag clouds to discern credible content in online health message forums.

    O'Grady, Laura; Wathen, C Nadine; Charnaw-Burger, Jill; Betel, Lisa; Shachak, Aviv; Luke, Robert; Hockema, Stephen; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2012-01-01

    Web sites with health-oriented content are potentially harmful if inaccurate or inappropriate medical information is used to make health-related decisions. Checklists, rating systems and guidelines have been developed to help people determine what is credible, but recent Internet technologies emphasize applications that are collaborative in nature, including tags and tag clouds, where site users 'tag' or label online content, each using their own labelling system. Concepts such as the date, reference, author, testimonial and quotations are considered predictors of credible content. An understanding of these descriptive tools, how they relate to the depiction of credibility and how this relates to overall efforts to label data in relation to the semantic web has yet to emerge. This study investigates how structured (pre-determined) and unstructured (user-generated) tags and tag clouds with a multiple word search feature are used by participants to assess credibility of messages posted in online message forums. The targeted respondents were those using web sites message forums for disease self-management. We also explored the relevancy of our findings to the labelling or indexing of data in the context of the semantic web. Diabetes was chosen as the content area in this study, since (a) this is a condition with increasing prevalence and (b) diabetics have been shown to actively use the Internet to manage their condition. From January to March 2010 participants were recruited using purposive sampling techniques. A screening instrument was used to determine eligibility. The study consisted of a demographic and computer usage survey, a series of usability tests and an interview. We tested participants (N=22) on two scenarios, each involving tasks that assessed their ability to tag content and search using a tag cloud that included six structured credibility terms (statistics, date, reference, author, testimonial and quotations). MORAE Usability software (version 3

  7. Online De-Radicalization? Countering Violent Extremist Narratives: Message, Messenger and Media Strategy

    Omar Ashour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Is “online de-radicalization” possible? Given the two growing phenomena of “online radicalization” and “behavioral/ideological/organizational de-radicalization,” this article outlines a broad strategy for countering the narratives of violent extremists. It argues that an effective counter-narrative should be built on three pillars. The first is an effective comprehensive message that dismantles and counter-argues against every dimension of the extremist narrative, namely the theological, political, historical, instrumental and socio-psychological dimensions. The second pillar is the messengers. The article argues that for the first time in the history of Jihadism a “critical mass” of former militants, who rebelled not only against the current behaviour of their former colleagues but also against the ideology supporting it, has come into existence. This “critical mass” can constitute the core of credible messengers, especially the few de-radicalized individuals and groups that still maintain influence and respect among vulnerable communities. The third pillar is the dissemination and attraction strategy of the counter-narratives(s which focuses on the role of the media. The author of the article outlines a broad framework, which is a part of a UN-sponsored, comprehensive research project on countering the extremists narrative.

  8. NewsPaperBox - Online News Space: a visual model for representing the social space of a website

    Selçuk Artut

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available NewsPaperBox * propounds an alternative visual model utilizing the treemap algorithm to represent the collective use of a website that evolves in response to user interaction. While the technology currently exists to track various user behaviors such as number of clicks, duration of stay on a given web site, these statistics are not yet employed to influence the visual representation of that site's design in real time. In that sense, this project propounds an alternative modeling of a representational outlook of a website that is developed by collaborations and competitions of its global users. This paper proposes the experience of cyberspace as a generative process driven by its effective user participation.

  9. How message framing affects consumer attitudes in food crises

    Mitchell, V-W.; Bakewell, C.; Jackson, P. R.; Heslin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between consumer risk perceptions and behaviour when information about food risks is framed in a positive or negative way.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach - Using food consumption scenarios in an on-line experiment consumers perceived risk and risk tolerance is examined when messages are framed in three different news-type stories.\\ud \\ud Findings - As anticipated, message framing emerged as a significant predictor of perce...

  10. Online Social Support for Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Thematic Analysis of Messages Posted to a Virtual Support Community

    Masoumeh Abbasi Shavazi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently with the emergence of the Internet, patients have an opportunity to exchange social support online. However, little attention has been devoted to different dimensions of online social support exchanged in virtual support communities for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods: To provide a rich insight, the aim of this qualitative study was to explore and categorize different dimensions of online social support in messages exchanged in a virtual support community for patients with MS. A total of 548 posted messages created during one year period were selected using purposive sampling to consider the maximum variation sampling. Prior-research-driven thematic analysis was then conducted. In this regard, we used the Cutruna and Suhr’s coding system. The messages that could not be categorized with the used coding system were thematically analyzed to explore new additional social support themes. Results: The results showed that various forms of social support including informational, emotional, network, esteem and tangible support were exchanged. Moreover, new additional social support themes including sharing personal experiences, sharing coping strategies and spiritual support emerged in this virtual support community. Conclusion: The wide range of online social support exchanged in the virtual support community can be regarded as a supplementary source of social support for patients with MS. Future researches can examine online social support more comprehensively considering additional social support themes emerging in the present study.

  11. Earned media and public engagement with CDC's "Tips from Former Smokers" campaign: an analysis of online news and blog coverage.

    Kornfield, Rachel; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Szczypka, Glen; Vera, Lisa; Emery, Sherry

    2015-01-20

    In March 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the first-ever paid national tobacco education campaign. At a cost of US $54 million, "Tips from Former Smokers" (Tips) ran for 3 months across multiple media, depicting the suffering experienced by smokers and their families in graphic detail. The potential impact and reach of the Tips campaign was not limited to that achieved through paid media placements. It was also potentially extended through "earned media", including news and blog coverage of the campaign. Such coverage can shape public understanding of and facilitate public engagement with key health issues. To better understand the contribution of earned media to the public's engagement with health issues in the current news media environment, we examined the online "earned media" and public engagement generated by one national public health campaign. We constructed a purposive sample of online media coverage of the CDC's 2012 Tips from Former Smokers television campaign, focusing on 14 influential and politically diverse US news outlets and policy-focused blogs. We identified relevant content by combining campaign and website-specific keywords for 4 months around the campaign release. Each story was coded for content, inclusion of multimedia, and measures of audience engagement. The search yielded 36 stories mentioning Tips, of which 27 were focused on the campaign. Story content between pieces was strikingly similar, with most stories highlighting the same points about the campaign's content, cost, and potential impact. We saw notable evidence of audience engagement; stories focused on Tips generated 9547 comments, 8891 Facebook "likes", 1027 tweets, and 505 story URL shares on Facebook. Audience engagement varied by story and site, as did the valence and relevance of associated audience comments. Comments were most oppositional on CNN and most supportive on Yahoo. Comment coding revealed approximately equal levels of

  12. Universidades y Google News: visibilidad internacional a través de los medios de comunicación online

    Herrero-Solana, Víctor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of scientific information and its presence in the main media converge on the Internet. Both processes contribute to create the online reputation of an academic institution. This study discusses whether the research competence of a university has an impact on its digital media presence. To answer this question, we measured and compared the research output from nine universities together with news about them retrieved from Google News. The results show that the greater the scientific capacity, the greater the media visibility, therefore resulting in greater impact and standing.La difusión de la actividad científica y la mediatización de la ciencia en la actualidad convergen en Internet. Ambos procesos contribuyen a la creación de la reputación online de las instituciones académicas. Este estudio discute si la capacidad investigadora de una universidad repercute en su presencia en los medios digitales. Para responder a esta cuestión se mide y compara la producción científica y las noticias recuperadas por Google News de nueve universidades. Los resultados muestran que las instituciones académicas con mayor capacidad científica tienen a su vez más visibilidad mediática y, por tanto, más impacto y prestigio.

  13. Gender Equity On-line: Messages Portrayed with and about the New Technologies.

    Knupfer, Nancy Nelson; And Others

    This paper examines gender messages within advertisements and informational, technology-focused materials that are targeted toward a general population of consumers. The pattern of gender bias in visual messages and stereotyping which prevails in advertising appears to be carrying the same messages from print to television and into the newest…

  14. News coverage of controversial emerging technologies. Evidence for the issue attention cycle in print and online media.

    Anderson, Ashley A; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the issue attention cycle for print and online media coverage of a scientific publication examining the deaths of Chinese factory workers due to lung damage from chronic exposure to nanoparticles. The results of the nanoparticle study, published in 2009, embody news values that would make the study a prime candidate for press coverage, namely, novelty, negativity, controversy, and potential widespread impact. Nevertheless, mentions of the event in traditional English-language print media were nearly nonexistent. Online media, on the other hand, gave the story greater coverage. This case study exemplifies why online media may not be bound to the same issue attention cycle that print media are for controversial scientific events.

  15. Trends in news coverage about skin cancer prevention, 1993-2006: increasingly mixed messages for the public.

    Scully, Maree; Wakefield, Melanie; Dixon, Helen

    2008-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of trends in news coverage about sun protection issues in an Australian setting over a 14-year period. A content analysis was performed on all relevant articles (N=547) published in two major daily newspapers, The Age and the Herald Sun, from 1993 to 2006. Articles were coded for article type, prominence, theme, spokesperson, topic slant and opinion slant. The most frequent themes were the health effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure (24% of articles), education/prevention (14%) and product issues (12%). Themes that became more dominant over time were vitamin D issues, solaria issues and fake tans. Sixty per cent of articles included a pro-sun protection spokesperson and 12% an anti-sun protection spokesperson, with the profile of anti-sun protection spokespeople increasing over time. Half the articles reported on topics positive for sun protection, whereas 18% reported on negative topics; however, this difference narrowed considerably from 2001 onwards. In opinionated articles, the opinions expressed by authors were mainly positive (57%) rather than negative (7%) for sun protection. The findings suggest that the mix of sun protection issues covered and views of sun protection have changed over time, resulting in greater coverage of controversies and issues not necessarily positive for sun protection objectives. These findings imply that evaluation of paid skin cancer prevention public education campaigns may need to take account of the changing news media environment in which they take place.

  16. Conflict over natural resource management a social indicator based on analysis of online news media text

    David N. Bengston; David P. Fan

    1999-01-01

    An indicator of the level of conflict over natural resource management was developed and applied to the case of U.S. national forest policy and management. Computer-coded content analysis was used to identify expressions of conflict in a national database of almost 10,000 news media stories about the U.S. Forest Service. Changes in the amount of news media discussion...

  17. Online news media reporting of football-related fatalities in Australia: A matter of life and death.

    Fortington, Lauren V; Bekker, Sheree; Finch, Caroline F

    2018-03-01

    While deaths in sports settings are rare, they do occur. To develop an understanding of the sports and people most at risk, and to identify opportunities for prevention, routine and systematic data detailing the occurrence of these fatalities is required. There is currently no routine reporting of data of this nature in Australia. As there is often strong community interest in these incidents, the media offers an opportunity for surveillance. However before this can occur, understanding of the terminology used by the media is required. The aim of this study was to identify the terminology most frequently used in online Australian news media coverage of football-related deaths. Retrospective review of online news media. Three databases were searched for online news media reports of people who died while participating in football (all football codes) in Australia. A descriptive analysis of terminology was undertaken to identify the common language applied. Thirty-four football-related fatalities in Australia were identified between 2010-2016, via 149 separate articles. The most frequent terms identified in the media items were: Family; Club; Rugby; Football; Player; League; Died; Game; Death; Life; Loved; Hospital; Match; Young; Community; Playing; Friends; Sport; Heart; AFL [Australian Football League]. This study identified terminology used in reporting football-related fatalities in Australia, identifying common reference to terms relating to 'death' as metaphors and the frequent celebration of 'life.' The findings suggest that a reliance on researcher-generated terminology will be insufficient to reflect media discourse in prospective monitoring of sports deaths for surveillance. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. “Sex, Scandals, and Celebrities”? Exploring the Determinants of Popularity in Online News.

    Angèle Christin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available What kinds of articles are read most often on news websites? In web newsrooms, journalists now have access to software programs that allow them to track the preferences of their readers in real time. Based on this data, web journalists often claim that “sex, scandals, and celebrities” are the best recipe for attracting readers and “clicks.” Conversely, journalists assert that articles on world news, politics, and culture fare poorly online. Journalists also strongly distinguish between groups of readers, depending on whether they “click,” “like,” “tweet,” or write comments. This paper compares qualitative material and quantitative data to explore whether journalists’ representations of their “quantified audience” diverge from the actual behavior of their readers. Drawing on an original data set composed of 13,159 articles published between 2007 and 2012 on a French news site, I find that articles about sex, scandals, and celebrities indeed attract more readers than articles about world news or culture. Yet articles about politics, long articles, and user-generated contributions are also highly popular. In addition, the preferences of readers vary depending on whether one measures this by the number of “clicks,” “likes,” “tweets,” or comments on the articles. Though regression models do not reveal significant differences, a more qualitative approach indicates that the most popular articles on Facebook and Twitter are humorous pieces and user-generated contributions, whereas controversial political topics attract more comments. I propose several explanations in order to make sense of this gap between the journalists’ representations and the behavior of online readers. These involve the editorial line and audience of the French website under consideration, the changing political context and media coverage of politics in France, and the specific temporal structure of internet traffic for longer articles. Quels

  19. Multimediality and interactivity in the news coverage for the 2008 United States Presidential Election by Spanish media online

    Dr. Víctor Manuel Pérez-Martínez; vmperezm@ull.es

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from online communicative models, we analyze some of the multimedia and interarctive elements used during the news coverage of 2008 United States Presidential Election by Spanish media online, due to their importance as contents which offer an additional value to informative texts. The contents of three Spanish general information media published online on 4th and 5th December 2008 were revised: El País.com, El Mundo.es and Abc.es. The results proved that in general the media online used multimedia and interactive resoursces linked to the Elections news coverage; informative processing which was a priority in the media online here studied. Finally, some connections were established with the contents relevance, their place in the media online, the contents of multimedia resources and the updating of media online.Partiendo de los modelos de comunicación en línea analizamos algunos de los elementos multimedia e interactivos utilizados durante la cobertura informativa de las elecciones presidenciales de los Estados Unidos del 2008 en los cibermedios españoles, por su importancia como contenidos que ofrecen un valor agregado a los textos informativos. Se revisaron los contenidos de las páginas electrónicas principales de los días 4 y 5 de diciembre de 2008 de tres cibermedios españoles de información general: El País.com, El Mundo.es y Abc.es. Los resultados indicaron que los cibermedios en general utilizaron recursos multimedia e interactivos vinculados con la cobertura informativa de las elecciones; tratamiento informativo que tuvo preferencia en los cibermedios estudiados. Finalmente se establecieron algunas relaciones con la relevancia de los contenidos, su ubicación en los cibermedios, el contenido de los recursos multimedia y la actualización de los cibermedios.Palabras clave: Elecciones Estados Unidos 2008; análisis de contenido; cibermedios españoles; multimedia; modelos de comunicación en línea.

  20. Ideology as Resource in Entrepreneurial Journalism : The French online news startup Mediapart

    Wagemans, Andrea; Witschge, Tamara; Deuze, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of a startup culture in the field of journalism is global: since the early years of the twenty-first century, new independent journalism companies have formed around the world. Although setting up one's own journalistic practice is not particularly novel in the news industry, the last

  1. Ideology as resource in entrepreneurial journalism: The French online news startup Mediapart

    Wagemans, A.; Witschge, T.; Deuze, M.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of a startup culture in the field of journalism is global: since the early years of the twenty-first century, new independent journalism companies have formed around the world. Although setting up one’s own journalistic practice is not particularly novel in the news industry, the last

  2. A Case Study Combining Online Social Media and Video to Teach News Literacy

    Spikes, Michael A.; Haque, Yousuf S.

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of information availability and the speed at which it can be disseminated, it is now the consumer's job to exercise more discernment and to become more skeptical about the information coming across their screens. This is a major point in the argument to adopt a relatively new academic discipline known as News Literacy. A subset of…

  3. Automatic Detection of Fake News

    Pérez-Rosas, Verónica; Kleinberg, Bennett; Lefevre, Alexandra; Mihalcea, Rada

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of misleading information in everyday access media outlets such as social media feeds, news blogs, and online newspapers have made it challenging to identify trustworthy news sources, thus increasing the need for computational tools able to provide insights into the reliability of online content. In this paper, we focus on the automatic identification of fake content in online news. Our contribution is twofold. First, we introduce two novel datasets for the task of fake news...

  4. Qualitative analysis of Camel Snus' website message board--users' product perceptions, insights and online interactions.

    Wackowski, Olivia Ann; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2011-03-01

    In 2006, RJ Reynolds began test-marketing Camel Snus, a new smokeless tobacco (SLT) product. Promotion included use of a brand website, a relatively new marketing channel used by tobacco companies, which allowed visitors to learn about the product and discuss it with others on the website's message board. Our study aimed to examine early experiences with and perceptions of Camel Snus as described by board contributors and also to consider the use and benefits of the message board for both consumers and the company. We conducted a qualitative analysis, coding each message in Atlas.Ti and analysing it for emerging themes and patterns. Messages were also coded for demographic information where evident, such as tobacco use status and geographical location. Descriptive data and illustrative quotes are presented. Board participants described being introduced to Camel Snus through free samples. Favourable evaluations were posted by current smokers who had never tried SLT before as well as current users of other SLT brands. Messages indicated both initiation of dual product use among smokers and product substitution. Participants used the board to advise each other on how to use the product, where to get more, suggest ways RJ Reynolds could improve the product and to encourage RJ Reynolds to release it nationally. Camel Snus has appeal for at least some smokers and SLT users. Camel Snus' website message board may have been a doubly beneficial marketing feature in both connecting product users and providing product feedback to the company during test-marketing.

  5. Change your ways : Fostering health attitudes toward change through selective exposure to online health messages

    Westerwick, Axel; Johnson, Benjamin K.; Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Health information is often sought online, despite varying credibility of online sources, and may shape health behaviors. This investigation builds on the Selective Exposure Self- and Affect-Management model to examine selective exposure to online health information from low- and high-credibility

  6. No news is good news?

    Peter Schmid

    I'm retired and living back home in Austria. But I am still excited about ATLAS and I try to follow the progress of the project as closely as I can. The ATLAS e-news are an excellent source of information. Appearing now every month they provide a broad, solid view of what is going on. But I'm greedy; I'd love to be "on-line". When the first End-Cap Toroid moved from hall 180 to the pit I was frustrated. I knew that it was happening but I could only get first pictures and reports a few days later. In the meantime the ECT was lowered into the cavern; no information on this available nowhere up to the this issue of the e-news. Here is my dream: an "ATLAS news ticker", i.e. a web page with the news appearing on the day they happen; just one line of information, possibly with a reference to a picture, a person or a report. My idea isn't new. On the ATLAS web-site for the public we have a window "latest news". But I was disappointed when, until a week ago, the latest news dated from December 2006 !!! Can't we do...

  7. The platform shapes the message : How website design affects abstraction and valence of online consumer reviews

    Aerts, Goele; Smits, Tim; Verlegh, Peeter W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Online consumer reviews provide relevant information about products and services for consumers. In today's networked age, the online consumer review platform market is hyper-competitive. These platforms can easily change different design characteristics to get more reviewers and to nudge reviewers

  8. Routinizing Breaking News

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re-theorizat......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”......This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re...

  9. Do you want the good news or the bad news? Gain- versus loss-framed messages following health risk information: The effects on leisure time physical activity beliefs and cognitions.

    Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca L; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E

    2013-12-01

    The primary purpose was to examine the relative effectiveness of chronic disease and psychological health risk information combined with gain- versus loss-framed leisure time physical activity (LTPA) messages for changing perceived personal risk, LTPA response efficacy (i.e., the belief that LTPA can effectively reduce risk), and LTPA intentions. A secondary purpose was to explore the relationship between message framing and cognitive processing. Baseline assessments of perceived risk for inactivity-related disease and psychological health problems, LTPA response efficacy, and intentions were measured among 96 individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Participants read population-specific information about the risk for inactivity-related disease and psychological health problems following SCI, and perceived risk was reassessed. Participants were then randomized to read LTPA response efficacy messages emphasizing the benefits of LTPA (gain framed) or the risks of inactivity (loss framed). Immediately following message exposure, cognitive processing (i.e., thought listing and message recall), LTPA response efficacy, and LTPA intentions were assessed. Changes in perceived risk were observed following exposure to health risk information. Changes in LTPA response efficacy and intentions were greater following loss-framed messages targeting psychological health compared with gain-framed messages. Greater cognitive processing was observed following loss-framed messages compared with gain-framed messages. Following exposure to psychological health risk information, loss-framed messages may be more effective than gain-framed messages for eliciting cognitive processing and changing LTPA beliefs and intentions.

  10. Online advertising by three commercial breast imaging services: message takeout and effectiveness.

    Johnson, Rebecca; Jalleh, Geoffrey; Pratt, Iain S; Donovan, Robert J; Lin, Chad; Saunders, Christobel; Slevin, Terry

    2013-10-01

    Mammography is widely acknowledged to be the most cost-effective technique for population screening for breast cancer. Recently in Australia, imaging modalities other than mammography, including thermography, electrical impedance, and computerised breast imaging, have been increasingly promoted as alternative methods of breast cancer screening. This study assessed the impact of three commercial breast imaging companies' promotional material upon consumers' beliefs about the effectiveness of the companies' technology in detecting breast cancer, and consumers' intentions to seek more information or consider having their breasts imaged by these modalities. Results showed 90% of respondents agreed that the companies' promotional material promoted the message that the advertised breast imaging method was effective in detecting breast cancer, and 80% agreed that the material promoted the message that the imaging method was equally or more effective than a mammogram. These findings have implications for women's preference for and uptake of alternative breast imaging services over mammography. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experiences of recovery in binge-eating disorder: a qualitative approach using online message boards.

    Lord, Vanessa M; Reiboldt, Wendy; Gonitzke, Dariella; Parker, Emily; Peterson, Caitlin

    2018-02-01

    In this study, qualitative methods were employed to analyze secondary data from the anonymous postings of a pro-recovery website in an effort to investigate the changes in thinking of binge-eating disorder (BED) sufferers who were able to recover from the disorder, understand more fully how guilt and self-blame affect recovery, and explore the perceived motivators and challenges to recovery. 681 messages from 65 participants pertaining to BED were analyzed from January 1, 2014-January 1, 2015 through thematic analysis. Coding strategies were employed to reveal patterns within the experiences of the participants. The researchers identified three themes surrounding "changes in thinking" from analysis of the message board postings: admitting the disorder, recognizing unhealthy coping behaviors, and seeing recovery. Further analysis of postings suggested that guilt and self-blame hinder recovery by promoting a feedback cycle of binging, which leads to further guilt and self-blame. The data ultimately identified experiences that resulted in or hindered recovery. The experience of validation appeared to result in recovery; those who experienced validation were less inclined to engage in disordered eating behaviors. Conversely, weight loss or attempts at weight loss hindered recovery by ultimately promoting more disordered eating behaviors. This qualitative analysis of message board postings offers authentic, credible data with a unique perspective. Practitioners working in the field of eating disorders such as registered dietitian nutritionists or therapists might use evidence from the data to guide their practice.

  12. The mixed health messages of Millsberry: a critical study of online child-targeted food advergaming.

    Thomson, Deborah M

    2011-06-01

    This paper offers a critical study of the contradictions of Millsberry.com, a General Mills (GM) advergaming website used to market GM's breakfast cereal brands to children. The paper takes a critical semiotic approach to argue that Millsberry.com sends players contradictory messages about health by simultaneously promoting nutritional wellness and consumption of high-sugar cereals, essentially conflating the two. Players on Millsberry.com create a virtual self (a Buddy) who lives in the fictional town of Millsberry, and a Buddy's health is tracked over time as players make nutritional choices for the Buddy. Health on Millsberry equates to eating from multiple food groups (nutritional balance) and eating only until full (caloric moderation). Yet both of these health messages are essentially undermined by play on the site. Nutritional balance is undermined by both the excessive promotion of high-sugar cereals and the differences between depictions of branded and unbranded foods. Caloric moderation is contradicted by digital advergames that operate on a logic of maximal consumption, by narratives of branded spokescharacters' endless appetites for cereal, and by giveaways of "free" boxes of virtual cereal that can be eaten by the Buddy in a single bite. The study concludes that such mixed messages about nutritional health are highly problematic, particularly given the alarming increase in diet and weight-related diseases among children.

  13. A readability comparison of anti- versus pro-influenza vaccination online messages in Japan

    Tsuyoshi Okuhara

    2017-06-01

    When health professionals prepare pro-influenza vaccination materials for publication online, we recommend they check for readability using readability assessment tools and improve the text for easy reading if necessary.

  14. Inexpensive News Sources.

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  15. Googling the news

    Ørmen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Search engines provide a window into the changing association between websites and keywords across cultures and countries and over time. As such, they offer journalism and news researchers an opportunity to study how search engines, in this case Google, mediate news events and stories online...

  16. The visual framing of graphics when used in preventative health digital news packages: exploring the use of a narrative structure as the message infrastructure.

    Sontag, Jennah M; Barnes, Spencer R

    2017-09-26

    Visual framing can improve health-message effectiveness. Narrative structure provides a template needed for determining how to frame visuals to maximise message effectiveness. Participants (N = 190) were assigned to a message condition determined by segments (establisher, initial, peak), graphic (static, animated) and cancer (lung, melanoma). ANOVAs revealed that melanoma was more believable than lung cancer with static graphics at the establisher and peak; narratives were more believable with animated graphics at the peak segment; melanoma elicited greater positive attitudes; graphics in the peak influenced greatest intentions. Animated graphics visually framed to emphasise information at the establisher and peak segments suggest maximum effectiveness.

  17. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  18. When Information from Public Health Officials is Untrustworthy: The Use of Online News, Interpersonal Networks, and Social Media during the MERS Outbreak in South Korea.

    Jang, Kyungeun; Baek, Young Min

    2018-03-20

    Public health officials (PHOs) are responsible for providing trustworthy information during a public health crisis; however, there is little research on how the public behaves when their expectations for such information are violated. Drawing on media dependency theory and source credibility research as our primary theoretical framework, we tested how credibility of information from PHOs is associated with people's reliance on a particular communication channel in the context of the 2015 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak in South Korea. Using nationally representative data (N = 1036) collected during the MERS outbreak, we found that less credible information from PHOs led to more frequent use of online news, interpersonal networks, and social media for acquiring MERS-related information. However, credibility of information from PHOs was not associated with the use of television news or print newspapers. The theoretical and practical implications of our results on communication channels usage are discussed.

  19. Global news production

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    Events around the world are broadcast by giant media players such as CNN, BBC and NHK amongst others. Consumers of news media receive the final message without knowing the processes that the images, the text and the sound have gone through. The media players can be considered as professional gene......), and it shows how events are "domesticated" for the target audience....

  20. The impact of flavour, device type and warning messages on youth preferences for electronic nicotine delivery systems: evidence from an online discrete choice experiment.

    Shang, Ce; Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J; Emery, Sherry L

    2017-11-02

    To examine the impact of flavour, device type and health warning messages on youth preference for electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), and to provide evidence and data to inform the Food and Drug Administration's potential regulatory actions on ENDS. An online discrete choice experiment was conducted in September 2015. Each participant was given nine choice sets and asked to choose one out of two alternative ENDS products, with varying characteristics in three attributes (flavour, device type and warning message). The impact of the attributes on the probability of choosing ENDS was analysed using conditional and nested logit regressions, controlling for individual sociodemographic characteristics and current smoking status. A general population sample of 515 participants (50 ever-users and 465 never-users of ENDS) aged 14-17 years were recruited to complete the experiment using an online panel. Fruit/sweets/beverage flavours significantly increase the probability of choosing ENDS among youth (pe-cigarettes, increase (p<0.05) the probability of choosing ENDS among adolescent never-users. Warning messages reduce (p<0.01) the probability of choosing ENDS among never-users. Restricting fruit/sweets/beverage flavours in ENDS, regulating modifiable vaping devices and adopting strong health warning messages may reduce the uptake of ENDS among youth. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  2. The emotional process from diagnosis to birth following a prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomaly: A qualitative study of messages in online discussion boards.

    Carlsson, Tommy; Starke, Veronica; Mattsson, Elisabet

    2017-05-01

    to explore written statements found in online discussion boards where parents currently expecting, or with previous experience of expecting, a child with a prenatally diagnosed congenital anomaly communicate about their emotional process from diagnosis to birth. cross-sectional qualitative study of messages in public online discussion boards. Swedish public discussion boards about reproductive subjects. ten pregnant women and eight parents (of children with prenatal diagnoses) who had written 852 messages in five threads in Swedish online discussion boards identified via systematic searches. three phases were identified in the process of moving from the diagnosis to the birth: shock, existential crisis, and life remodeling. The people posting message ('posters') moved from initial shock to existential crisis and, lastly, a phase of remodeling life later in the pregnancy. During the pregnancy, considerable worries about both antenatal and postnatal aspects were expressed. To cope with their situation, the posters distanced themselves from the diagnoses, vented their feelings, sought control, and obtained practical support from friends and relatives. expectant parents faced with a prenatal diagnosis move from initial shock to a phase of life remodeling and acceptance. Burdened with considerable worries, expectant parents cope with their situation through informational, emotional, and instrumental support from health professionals, family, friends, and peers. health professionals should make sure that expectant parents feel involved in planning their children's postnatal care, that they are offered sufficient information, and that they have access to emotional and instrumental support structures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Research News

    ... Research News Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Research News Research News Quarterly Updates Research Call Archive ... Clinical Trials in MS Learn More Become a Research Champion An MS Research Revolution Support MS Research ...

  4. Can Seeding in the Clinic Reach a Wide Audience? A Proof of Concept Study on Spreading a Health Message About Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using a Shareable Online Video

    Fay, Michaela; Rapley, Tim; Foster, Helen; Pain, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Shareable online video offers the potential for spreading a health message across online and real world social networks. Seeding a message in a clinical setting may be advantageous. Objective To investigate the potential of an online video to spread a health message about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when delivered or seeded in a clinical setting and investigate factors that influence sharing behavior. Methods Multimethod proof of concept study. Concepts for two different styles of video were developed using focus groups and interviews and reviewed by an online market research panel. We compared dissemination of the two videos from two specialist pediatric rheumatology clinics in NHS Hospitals. Participants were 15 patients, family members, and clinical staff with knowledge of JIA at concept stage; 300 market research panel members in development stage; and 38 patients and their parents or guardians in the seeding stage. Newly diagnosed patients with JIA and/or parents or guardians were invited to view and share an online video with a health message about JIA across real-life and electronic social networks. Main outcome measures were viewing statistics, sharing behavior and patterns, and participant feedback. Results Of 38 patients and/or their parents or guardians given links, 26 visited the video webpage and shared the link, 2 visited and did not share, and 10 did not visit. Most links were viewed and shared within a few days. A total of 3314 pageviews were recorded with a mean of 89.6 pageviews per link (range 0-1245). Links were accessed from 26 countries, with most viewers in the United Kingdom (82.5%). Mothers were the most active group of sharers. Conclusions Distribution of a video link in a clinical setting may be an effective way to spread a health message. Parents or guardians of children with JIA are more likely to share a link than young people. Dissemination depends on a small number of active sharers, the content of the video, and

  5. Can Seeding in the Clinic Reach a Wide Audience? A Proof of Concept Study on Spreading a Health Message About Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using a Shareable Online Video.

    Fay, Michaela; Rapley, Tim; Foster, Helen; Pain, Clare; Gerrand, Craig

    2016-02-22

    Shareable online video offers the potential for spreading a health message across online and real world social networks. Seeding a message in a clinical setting may be advantageous. To investigate the potential of an online video to spread a health message about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when delivered or seeded in a clinical setting and investigate factors that influence sharing behavior. Multimethod proof of concept study. Concepts for two different styles of video were developed using focus groups and interviews and reviewed by an online market research panel. We compared dissemination of the two videos from two specialist pediatric rheumatology clinics in NHS Hospitals. Participants were 15 patients, family members, and clinical staff with knowledge of JIA at concept stage; 300 market research panel members in development stage; and 38 patients and their parents or guardians in the seeding stage. Newly diagnosed patients with JIA and/or parents or guardians were invited to view and share an online video with a health message about JIA across real-life and electronic social networks. Main outcome measures were viewing statistics, sharing behavior and patterns, and participant feedback. Of 38 patients and/or their parents or guardians given links, 26 visited the video webpage and shared the link, 2 visited and did not share, and 10 did not visit. Most links were viewed and shared within a few days. A total of 3314 pageviews were recorded with a mean of 89.6 pageviews per link (range 0-1245). Links were accessed from 26 countries, with most viewers in the United Kingdom (82.5%). Mothers were the most active group of sharers. Distribution of a video link in a clinical setting may be an effective way to spread a health message. Parents or guardians of children with JIA are more likely to share a link than young people. Dissemination depends on a small number of active sharers, the content of the video, and the willingness of participants to share health

  6. Earned Media and Public Engagement With CDC’s "Tips From Former Smokers" Campaign: An Analysis of Online News and Blog Coverage

    Kornfield, Rachel; Szczypka, Glen; Vera, Lisa; Emery, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Background In March 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the first-ever paid national tobacco education campaign. At a cost of US $54 million, “Tips from Former Smokers” (Tips) ran for 3 months across multiple media, depicting the suffering experienced by smokers and their families in graphic detail. The potential impact and reach of the Tips campaign was not limited to that achieved through paid media placements. It was also potentially extended through “earned media”, including news and blog coverage of the campaign. Such coverage can shape public understanding of and facilitate public engagement with key health issues. Objective To better understand the contribution of earned media to the public’s engagement with health issues in the current news media environment, we examined the online “earned media” and public engagement generated by one national public health campaign. Methods We constructed a purposive sample of online media coverage of the CDC’s 2012 Tips from Former Smokers television campaign, focusing on 14 influential and politically diverse US news outlets and policy-focused blogs. We identified relevant content by combining campaign and website-specific keywords for 4 months around the campaign release. Each story was coded for content, inclusion of multimedia, and measures of audience engagement. Results The search yielded 36 stories mentioning Tips, of which 27 were focused on the campaign. Story content between pieces was strikingly similar, with most stories highlighting the same points about the campaign’s content, cost, and potential impact. We saw notable evidence of audience engagement; stories focused on Tips generated 9547 comments, 8891 Facebook “likes”, 1027 tweets, and 505 story URL shares on Facebook. Audience engagement varied by story and site, as did the valence and relevance of associated audience comments. Comments were most oppositional on CNN and most supportive on Yahoo

  7. When pictures waste a thousand words: analysis of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on television news.

    Luth, Westerly; Jardine, Cindy; Bubela, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Effective communication by public health agencies during a pandemic promotes the adoption of recommended health behaviours. However, more information is not always the solution. Rather, attention must be paid to how information is communicated. Our study examines the television news, which combines video and audio content. We analyse (1) the content of television news about the H1N1 pandemic and vaccination campaign in Alberta, Canada; (2) the extent to which television news content conveyed key public health agency messages; (3) the extent of discrepancies in audio versus visual content. We searched for "swine flu" and "H1N1" in local English news broadcasts from the CTV online video archive. We coded the audio and visual content of 47 news clips during the peak period of coverage from April to November 2009 and identified discrepancies between audio and visual content. The dominant themes on CTV news were the vaccination rollout, vaccine shortages, long line-ups (queues) at vaccination clinics and defensive responses by public health officials. There were discrepancies in the priority groups identified by the provincial health agency (Alberta Health and Wellness) and television news coverage as well as discrepancies between audio and visual content of news clips. Public health officials were presented in official settings rather than as public health practitioners. The news footage did not match the main public health messages about risk levels and priority groups. Public health agencies lost control of their message as the media focused on failures in the rollout of the vaccination campaign. Spokespeople can enhance their local credibility by emphasizing their role as public health practitioners. Public health agencies need to learn from the H1N1 pandemic so that future television communications do not add to public confusion, demonstrate bureaucratic ineffectiveness and contribute to low vaccination rates.

  8. School Violence and the News

    ... and teens have many sources of information about school shootings or other tragic events. They might see or hear news stories or graphic images on TV, radio, or online, over and over. ... of a news story about school violence can make some kids feel that might ...

  9. Analysis of the Capacity of Google Trends to Measure Interest in Conservation Topics and the Role of Online News.

    Nghiem, Le T P; Papworth, Sarah K; Lim, Felix K S; Carrasco, Luis R

    2016-01-01

    With the continuous growth of internet usage, Google Trends has emerged as a source of information to investigate how social trends evolve over time. Knowing how the level of interest in conservation topics--approximated using Google search volume--varies over time can help support targeted conservation science communication. However, the evolution of search volume over time and the mechanisms that drive peaks in searches are poorly understood. We conducted time series analyses on Google search data from 2004 to 2013 to investigate: (i) whether interests in selected conservation topics have declined and (ii) the effect of news reporting and academic publishing on search volume. Although trends were sensitive to the term used as benchmark, we did not find that public interest towards conservation topics such as climate change, ecosystem services, deforestation, orangutan, invasive species and habitat loss was declining. We found, however, a robust downward trend for endangered species and an upward trend for ecosystem services. The quantity of news articles was related to patterns in Google search volume, whereas the number of research articles was not a good predictor but lagged behind Google search volume, indicating the role of news in the transfer of conservation science to the public.

  10. Analysis of the Capacity of Google Trends to Measure Interest in Conservation Topics and the Role of Online News.

    Le T P Nghiem

    Full Text Available With the continuous growth of internet usage, Google Trends has emerged as a source of information to investigate how social trends evolve over time. Knowing how the level of interest in conservation topics--approximated using Google search volume--varies over time can help support targeted conservation science communication. However, the evolution of search volume over time and the mechanisms that drive peaks in searches are poorly understood. We conducted time series analyses on Google search data from 2004 to 2013 to investigate: (i whether interests in selected conservation topics have declined and (ii the effect of news reporting and academic publishing on search volume. Although trends were sensitive to the term used as benchmark, we did not find that public interest towards conservation topics such as climate change, ecosystem services, deforestation, orangutan, invasive species and habitat loss was declining. We found, however, a robust downward trend for endangered species and an upward trend for ecosystem services. The quantity of news articles was related to patterns in Google search volume, whereas the number of research articles was not a good predictor but lagged behind Google search volume, indicating the role of news in the transfer of conservation science to the public.

  11. Public responses to proposals for a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages: A thematic analysis of online reader comments posted on major UK news websites.

    Molly Thomas-Meyer

    Full Text Available Regular consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs is associated with weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and dental caries. The UK will introduce a levy on the manufacturers of SSBs in 2018. Details will be negotiated over the next two years. How the UK public views SSB taxes is likely to be an important determinant of the content and success of the final policy. We aimed to capture the views, ideas and concerns of commenters on major UK news websites on SSB taxes.We conducted a qualitative analysis of reader comments to online news coverage of one proposal for an SSB tax in the UK. 1645 comments on four articles were included. Three underpinning themes influenced support or opposition to the tax: the balance between individual responsibility and autonomy, and population need; mistrust of the intention of the proposed tax and those promoting it; and variations in the perceived complexity of unhealthy diets and obesity associated with variations in what are considered appropriate interventions. Arguments under each theme were used to justify both support and opposition in different cases.As the final form of the UK SSB tax is negotiated, effort should be made to address the concerns we identified. Our results suggest these efforts could usefully focus on emphasising the social and environmental determinants of diet and obesity, reinforcing the benefits of the tax to the NHS, and pitching the tax as playing into a variety of different conceptualisations of obesity.

  12. THE CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF THE SUICIDE IN ROMANIA COVERED BY THE MEDIA AND ONLINE NEWS SITES. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATIONS AND QUALITATIVE CLASSIFICATIONS

    Professor SORIN M. RADULESCU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present the main findings of a quantitative and qualitative analysis on the suicides in Romania, as they are submitted in media and online news sites. The quantitative analysis provides information on the main factors associated with the increase of the suicides in Romania (gender, age, county, suicide methods, suicide causes and key motivations for suicide. The qualitative analysis, too, offers a classification and evaluation scheme for the essential characteristics of the suicide in Romania. There are set on this occcasion some categories and subcategories such as: the victims numbers, the rational or irrational character of the suicide, its form of the expression (solitary or public suicide, the model followed (e.g. the ,,mimetic” suicide, the suicide methods, the suicide locations etc. The most important part of the paper is devoted to the classification of the causes, motivations and the main triggers of the suicide

  13. Daily Market News Sentiment and Stock Prices

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the influx of news related to traded assets in international financial markets. This financial news is now available via print media but also through real-time online sources such as internet news and social media sources. The

  14. SMS Messaging Applications

    Pero, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Cell phones are the most common communication device on the planet, and Short Message Service (SMS) is the chief channel for companies to offer services, accept requests, report news, and download binary files over cell phones. This guide describes the protocols and best practices (things that ensure you won't get sued or lose your right to offer a service) you need to know to make SMS messaging part of an organizational service. Issues such as character sets, differences among vendors, common practices in Europe and North America, and API choices are covered.

  15. Online Communication Patterns of Teachers

    Kale, Ugur; Brush, Thomas; Bryant, Alison; Saye, John

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary efforts to examine teachers' online participation and depth of messages have tended to focus solely on message metrics (e.g., counting the number of messages). However, such efforts do not address online messages in relation to one another. Taking relations of messages into account is important as the messages are not individual online…

  16. The persuasion context and results in online opinion seeking: effects of message and source-the moderating role of network managers.

    Cabezudo, Rebeca San José; Izquierdo, Carmen Camarero; Pinto, Javier Rodríguez

    2013-11-01

    Online opinion networks are areas for social exchange, or conversational networks, made up of individuals actively involved in sharing experiences and opinions concerning matters of mutual interest between consumers or concerning their experience with a given product or service. We pinpoint a gap in the literature regarding how the persuasion process occurs when individuals seek opinions online, including the results process. In an attempt to find an answer, we draw on traditional theories related to information processing. These are mostly taken from the field of psychology and enable us to identify which signals or aspects of communication or opinions the individuals focus their attention on (message and source) and the value attached to such communications as well as how much they impact individuals' purchase decisions, bearing in mind the medium (or online opinion network) in which the opinions are located. Findings from those interviewed support the idea that the quality of information on the Internet, as well as trust in the source of said information, or in the opinion of network users, have an impact on the informational value obtained from involvement in this online opinion seeking and on purchasing decisions. Moreover, depending on the kind of network (firm or brand controlled, review Web sites, and user-controlled nonofficial opinion networks), the quality of the information or trust in the users will have a different bearing in the persuasion process.

  17. News analytics for financial decision support

    Milea, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual messages, by

  18. Positive Organizational Behavior: A Buffer for Bad News

    French, Sandra L.; Holden, Tracey Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Most communication research on bad news messages focuses on crisis communication, where attention is often limited to image repair strategies. The authors argue that a key indicator of an organization's effectiveness in communicating "bad news" messages is its organizational culture. Developing an organizational culture that values positive…

  19. News media old and new

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and discusses three different approaches to the exploration of the cross-media challenges facing news audiences, as they seek access to, navigate in and make sense of the multitude of news sources across print, broadcasting, online and mobile media platforms. From a modernized...... uses and gratifications perspective, based on the notion of “worthwhileness” as the determinant of people's everyday selections from the “supermarket of news”, the article first reports from a longitudinal survey study in Denmark in which the author's foundational mapping of cross-media news...... consumption in pre-mobile 2008 is compared with replicating mappings carried out in 2011 and 2012, in a collaborative project between academics and news publishers. The analytical interest here focuses on the fluctuations between traditional news media and the surging digital news outlets of the internet...

  20. A sneak into the Devil's Colony - Fake Profiles in Online Social Networks

    Wani, Mudasir Ahmad; Jabin, Suraiya

    2017-01-01

    Online Social Networks (OSNs) play an important role for internet users to carry out their daily activities like content sharing, news reading, posting messages, product reviews and discussing events etc. At the same time, various kinds of spammers are also equally attracted towards these OSNs. These cyber criminals including sexual predators, online fraudsters, advertising campaigners, catfishes, and social bots etc. exploit the network of trust by various means especially by creating fake p...

  1. The Exposure Effects of Online Model Pictures and Weight-Related Persuasive Messages on Women's Weight-Loss Planned Behaviors.

    Pan, Wenjing; Peña, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    This study examined how exposure to pictures of women with different body sizes (thin, obese), physical attractiveness levels (attractive, unattractive), along with exposure to weight-related messages (pro-anorexia, anti-anorexia) embedded in a fashion website affected female participants' planned behavior toward weight loss. Participants exposed to attractive model pictures showed higher intentions, attitudes, and subjective norms to lose weight compared with unattractive models. Additionally, participants exposed to thin and attractive model pictures indicated the highest attitudes and self-efficacy to lose weight, whereas those exposed to thin and unattractive model pictures indicated the lowest. Furthermore, weight-related messages moderated the effect of model appearance (body size and attractiveness) on controllability of weight-loss activities. However, website pictures' body size differences had no main effects on planned behavior toward weight loss. These effects are discussed in the light of social comparison mechanisms.

  2. Public's Cognitive and Emotional Responses to Nuclear Messages: Implications for Effective Nuclear Communication Programs

    Kim, Hyo Jung

    2017-01-01

    The public debate over the use of nuclear energy is not limited to the area of technology, and has become subject to the public's subjective perceptions and emotions regarding the issue. This study empirically demonstrated the advantage of loss framing in improving public's favorable responses toward nuclear energy messages. Such framing effect was found to be moderated by individuals' daily use of online news. The findings of this study suggest that public's cognitive and emotional responses toward nuclear messages should be carefully considered when planning effective nuclear communication program.

  3. Marketing messages accompanying online selling of low/er and regular strength wine and beer products in the UK: a content analysis.

    Vasiljevic, Milica; Coulter, Lucia; Petticrew, Mark; Marteau, Theresa M

    2018-02-08

    Increased availability of low/er strength alcohol products has the potential to reduce alcohol consumption if they are marketed as substitutes for higher strength products rather than as additional products. The current study compares the main marketing messages conveyed by retailers and producers for low/er and regular strength wine and beer products. A content analysis of the marketing messages stated (in text) or depicted (in image) for low/er and regular strength wines and beers sold online on the websites of the four main UK retailers (Tesco, ASDA, Sainsbury's, and Morrisons), and the producers of these products between February-March 2016. Four themes were identified: (a) suggested occasions for consumption, (b) health-related associations, (c) alcohol content, and (d) taste. Compared with regular strength products, low/er strength equivalents were more often marketed in association with occasions deemed to be suitable for their consumption including lunchtimes [wine: X 2 (1, n = 172) = 11.75, p = .001], outdoor events/barbeques [beer: X 2 (1, n = 96) = 11.16, p = .001] and on sport/fitness occasions [beer: X 2 (1, n = 96) = 7.55, p = .006]. Compared with regular strength wines and beers, low/er strength equivalents were more frequently marketed with images or text associated with health. These included images of fruit [wine: X 2 (1, n = 172) = 7.78, p = .005; beer: X 2 (1, n = 96) = 22.00, p marketed with information about their alcohol content. There were few differences in the marketing messages regarding taste. Low/er strength wines and beers appear to be marketed not as substitutes for higher strength products but as ones that can be consumed on additional occasions with an added implication of healthiness.

  4. Do Health Promotion Messages Integrate Unintended Pregnancy and STI Prevention? A Content Analysis of Online Information for Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Steiner, Riley J; Rasberry, Catherine N; Sales, Jessica M; Gaydos, Laura M; Pazol, Karen; Kramer, Michael; Swartzendruber, Andrea

    2018-04-20

    Recently there have been calls to strengthen integration of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention messages, spurred by increasing use of long-acting reversible contraception. To assess the extent to which public health/clinical messages about unintended pregnancy prevention also address STI prevention, we conducted a content analysis of web-based health promotion information for young people. Websites identified through a systematic Google search were eligible for inclusion if they were operated by a United States-based organization with a mission related to public health/clinical services and the URL included: 1) original content; 2) about sexual and reproductive health; 3) explicitly for adolescents and/or young adults. Using defined protocols, URLs were screened and content was selected and analyzed thematically. Many of the 32 eligible websites presented information about pregnancy and STI prevention separately. Concurrent discussion of the two topics was often limited to statements about (1) strategies that can prevent both outcomes (abstinence, condoms only, condoms plus moderate or highly effective contraceptive methods) and (2) contraceptive methods that confer no STI protection. We also identified framing of condom use with moderate or highly effective contraceptive method for back-up pregnancy prevention but not STI prevention. STI prevention methods in addition to condoms, such as STI/HIV testing, vaccination, or pre-exposure or post-exposure prophylaxis, were typically not addressed with pregnancy prevention information. There may be missed opportunities for promoting STI prevention online in the context of increasing awareness of and access to a full range of contraceptive methods. Strengthening messages that integrate pregnancy and STI prevention may include: describing STI prevention strategies when noting that birth control methods do not prevent STIs; promoting a full complement of STI prevention strategies; and

  5. News from the Library: You need never be lost for words again - Oxford Reference Online and Oxford Dictionaries Pro

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Whether you are looking for an English word definition or want to check the correct usage of a word, we can offer you a solution: Oxford Reference Online.   It includes a wide range of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, but also subject-specific reference books on physics, astronomy or mathematics. All these works are fully indexed and cross-searchable. Two highlights from this vast collection of reference works are the Concise Oxford English Dictionary and the Oxford Dictionary of English, which is the online counterpart of the compact, single-volume dictionary of current English language. As the name says, Oxford Dictionaries Pro focuses on language dictionaries. Particularly noteworthy are the dictionaries for writers and editors. On a dedicated web page you will find access to: - The "New Hart's Rules", providing information on all aspects of writing and preparing copy for publication, whether in print or electronically - The New Oxford Dictionary for Wri...

  6. News from the Library: Online particle physics information: a unique compilation of information resources in particle physics

    CERN Library

    2012-01-01

    Are you looking for some specific information in particle physics? For example, the main literature databases, data repositories or laboratories...   Just go to the Libary's Online Particle Physics Information page. There you'll find a wide selection of relevant information, as well as resources in particle physics and related areas. The collection covers all aspects of the discipline - in addition to traditional scientific information resources you can find, for example, a selection of relevant blogs and art websites. This webpage is an extended and regularly updated version of the chapter on Online Particle Physics Information in the Review of Particle Properties. It is maintained by the CERN Library team which welcomes suggestions for additions and updates: library.desk@cern.ch.  

  7. Misinformation with fake news

    M. BOTEI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The last presidential elections in the United States of America (2016 have brought to the international public opinion’ s attention the phenomenon of “fake news”. Though it isn’t a new phenomenon, the spread of fake information for manipulating and misinforming the masses has existed in all historical periods. This time the phenomenon was noticed because of the number of fake news and, especially because of their impact, starting the discussion whether the victory of Donald Trump happened because of fake news and raising the question whether this phenomenon is a danger to democracy. An important reaction came also from the part of technology companies, of tech giants, Google and Facebook especially, which want the implementation of the phenomenon. Misinformation with public speech under the form of fake news brings to discussion the responsibility in the online space, but also the protection of people against this phenomenon.

  8. One-to-One Support for Crisis Intervention Using Online Synchronous Instant Messaging: Evaluating Working Alliance and Client Satisfaction

    Blake Buffini, Katrina; Gordon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Young people are increasingly turning to online support, especially when traditional mental health services are not immediately available. Using a cross-sectional design, sociodemographic information and self-reported perceptions of the strength of the working alliance and client satisfaction were collected from a sample of participants (n = 78)…

  9. Health-Seeking Influence Reflected by Online Health-Related Messages Received on Social Media: Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Iftikhar, Rahila; Abaalkhail, Bahaa

    2017-11-16

    Major social networking platforms, such as Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter, have become popular means through which people share health-related information, irrespective of whether messages disseminated through these channels are authentic. This study aims to describe the demographic characteristics of patients that may demonstrate their attitudes toward medical information shared on social media networks. Second, we address how information found through social media affects the way people deal with their health. Third, we examine whether patients initiate or alter/discontinue their medications based on information derived from social media. We conducted a cross-sectional survey between April and June 2015 on patients attending outpatient clinics at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Patients who used social media (Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter) were included. We designed a questionnaire with closed-ended and multiple-choice questions to assess the type of social media platforms patients used and whether information received on these platforms influenced their health care decisions. We used chi-square test to establish the relationship between categorical variables. Of the 442 patients who filled in the questionnaires, 401 used Facebook, WhatsApp, or Twitter. The majority of respondents (89.8%, 397/442) used WhatsApp, followed by Facebook (58.6%, 259/442) and Twitter (42.3%, 187/442). In most cases, respondents received health-related messages from WhatsApp and approximately 42.6% (171/401) reported ever stopping treatment as advised on a social media platform. A significantly higher proportion of patients without heart disease (P=.001) and obese persons (P=.01) checked the authenticity of information received on social media. Social media messages influenced decision making among patients without heart disease (P=.04). Respondents without heart disease (P=.001) and obese persons (P=.01) were more likely to discuss health-related information

  10. Health-Seeking Influence Reflected by Online Health-Related Messages Received on Social Media: Cross-Sectional Survey

    2017-01-01

    Background Major social networking platforms, such as Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter, have become popular means through which people share health-related information, irrespective of whether messages disseminated through these channels are authentic. Objective This study aims to describe the demographic characteristics of patients that may demonstrate their attitudes toward medical information shared on social media networks. Second, we address how information found through social media affects the way people deal with their health. Third, we examine whether patients initiate or alter/discontinue their medications based on information derived from social media. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey between April and June 2015 on patients attending outpatient clinics at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Patients who used social media (Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter) were included. We designed a questionnaire with closed-ended and multiple-choice questions to assess the type of social media platforms patients used and whether information received on these platforms influenced their health care decisions. We used chi-square test to establish the relationship between categorical variables. Results Of the 442 patients who filled in the questionnaires, 401 used Facebook, WhatsApp, or Twitter. The majority of respondents (89.8%, 397/442) used WhatsApp, followed by Facebook (58.6%, 259/442) and Twitter (42.3%, 187/442). In most cases, respondents received health-related messages from WhatsApp and approximately 42.6% (171/401) reported ever stopping treatment as advised on a social media platform. A significantly higher proportion of patients without heart disease (P=.001) and obese persons (P=.01) checked the authenticity of information received on social media. Social media messages influenced decision making among patients without heart disease (P=.04). Respondents without heart disease (P=.001) and obese persons (P=.01) were more likely to

  11. NERSC News

    NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Scheduled Outages Login Node Status My NERSC Now Computing Highlights Timeline News & Publications News Coming to NERSC Login Page May 21, 2018 NERSC rolls out a redesigned login page on June 11. Read More Â

  12. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ONLINE AND OFF LINE WORD OF MOUTH MESSAGES ON TRADITIONAL COURSE CHOICE AT TERTIARY LEVEL

    N. Serdar SEVER

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explain how bachelor of communications students who are enrolled to various courses at Anadolu University value word-of-mouth messages in making a course decision. Use of WOM as a marketing tool in tertiary teaching is not a common practice. As elective course numbers increase, students look for alternative avenues and types of information to be sure of making the best possible course selection. The findings of this study indicate that instructors’ previous experiences are not as important as their in-class performances. Another interesting finding of the study is although participants are prone to use internet resources as sources of information; they value the use of computer-mediated and enhanced technologies in teaching. Perhaps the most peculiar finding of the study is senior students are perceived as the most common source of information, and their experiences often seen as a point of reference in choosing a course.

  13. The quest for young eyes. Attention to news among young people in the Low Countries

    Van Cauwenberge, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation started off with the observation that attention for news among young people decreases. More precisely, previous survey studies outlined a triple shift in the current young generation’s use of news: from more to less news, from offline to online news, and from professional to non-professional news sources. Underlying these three trends, was the finding that news does not constitute a substantial part of the daily routines of young people. This finding is disturbing given news...

  14. Large-scale Comparative Sentiment Analysis of News Articles

    Wanner, Franz; Rohrdantz, Christian; Mansmann, Florian; Stoffel, Andreas; Oelke, Daniela; Krstajic, Milos; Keim, Daniel; Luo, Dongning; Yang, Jing; Atkinson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Online media offers great possibilities to retrieve more news items than ever. In contrast to these technical developments, human capabilities to read all these news items have not increased likewise. To bridge this gap, this poster presents a visual analytics tool for conducting semi-automatic sentiment analysis of large news feeds. The tool retrieves and analyzes the news of two categories (Terrorist Attack and Natural Disasters) and news which belong to both categories of the Europe Media ...

  15. THE REPRESENTATION OF EGYPTIAN PEOPLE’S VOICE IN THE JAKARTA GLOBE NEWS PHOTOGRAPHS

    Fini Fitriani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: As a product of mass media, news photograph is an image which provides the viewers with a valuable source of information and news story. All events captured in photographs turn into a news photo. Besides covering the news with fact, news photographs do not only have surface meanings, but also deeper meanings to be interpreted by each viewer. The phenomenon of demonstration, particularly the massive demonstration in Egypt in 2011, offers a good chance to discover how visual messages have been presented to guide interpretation of foreign news events. Principally, demonstration is an expression of the people’s voices, and thus, their voices are related closely with their demands, grievances and wishes related to the new government. Here, the photographs are able to portray and reflect the people’s voices through the compositions and contents (meanings involved in the photos. This study is aimed at discovering the portrayal of the voice of the people (the protesters in the news photographs of the Indonesian online newspaper, The Jakarta Globe. The data consist of 15 news photographs taken from The Jakarta Globe online newspaper published in January – October 2011. The study employs qualitative method framed with semiotic analysis using Roland Barthes’ theory of orders of signification and photographic message. The results of the study show that The Jakarta Globe visually constructs this event (demonstration by focusing on the human action (the protesters. Thus, the voice of the people is portrayed in the photo subjects (the protesters and the included objects of the photo. Meanwhile, the technical aspects of the photos play a meaningful role in emerging the portrayal of the people’s voice. There are four voices revealed by the people in the 15 photographs, namely the voice of freedom, the voice of peace, the voice of justice and the voice of human rights. The photo text including headlines and captions also interact with

  16. News & Announcements

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include: Total Pages Served 361,115 Total Visits 138,377 Total Unique Visitors 51,744 Total Repeat Visitors 11,536 Average Visit Length 03:05 Average Requests/Visit 10.8 Average Pages/Visit 2.6 Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include: ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds. ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers

  17. News & Announcements

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House National Chemistry Week (NCW) Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles). Awards Announced Passer Award Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are: George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses. Welch Award Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome

  18. Fake News

    Grunewald, Andreas; Kräkel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, social media and the Internet have amplified the possibility to spread false information, a.k.a. fake news, which has become a serious threat to the credibility of politicians, organizations, and other decision makers. This paper proposes a framework for investigating the incentives to strategically spread fake news under different institutional configurations and payoff structures. In particular, we show under what conditions institutions that foster transparency in the m...

  19. Varieties of online gatekeeping

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    News media organizations like newspapers and broadcasters have long functioned as gatekeepers between news and audiences, but with the rise of digital media, the search engines and social networking sites that are central to how most people find news online increasingly complement news media...... in different ways and for different purposes. The three varieties are (1) editorially-based gatekeeping processes (typically defining what information is displayed as news on news media websites), (2) link-based gatekeeping processes (the core of how search engines like Google select what information......). I show that news media websites remain amongst the most important gateways to news online, but also demonstrate how they are supplemented by other “second-order gatekeepers” (Singer, 2013) like search engines and social networking sites. While these rarely produce original content defined as “news...

  20. Incorporating popularity in a personalized news recommender system

    Nirmal Jonnalagedda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online news reading has become a widely popular way to read news articles from news sources around the globe. With the enormous amount of news articles available, users are easily overwhelmed by information of little interest to them. News recommender systems help users manage this flood by recommending articles based on user interests rather than presenting articles in order of their occurrence. We present our research on developing personalized news recommendation system with the help of a popular micro-blogging service, “Twitter.” News articles are ranked based on the popularity of the article identified from Twitter’s public timeline. In addition, users construct profiles based on their interests and news articles are also ranked based on their match to the user profile. By integrating these two approaches, we present a hybrid news recommendation model that recommends interesting news articles to the user based on their popularity as well as their relevance to the user profile.

  1. NEWS: Institute news

    2000-03-01

    -March onwards include Guildford, Brighton, Gosport, Leeds, Loughborough, Oakham, Wolverhampton, Framlingham (Suffolk), Hatfield and London. Further details from Catherine Wilson (catherine.wilson@iop.org ). Courses and conferences Physics Update courses will be held in four locations this year. Details of the Malvern course (1 - 3 April) have already been circulated to schools and colleges. Details of the York course (8 - 10 July) will be circulated early next term. An Update course for teachers in Scotland will be held at Stirling University on 9 - 10 June and the final Update of the year will be held at Oxford University on 8 - 10 December. Further details are available from Leila Solomon (leila.solomon@iop.org ). Entitled `Hands on, minds on: raising standards by sharing good practice', the Education Group's Annual Conference 2000 will be held at the University of Durham on 7 - 8 July. Further details can be obtained from Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani (jasmina.bolfek-radovani@iop.org ) in the Institute's Conference Department. Other dates: * Schools Physics Group annual one-day meeting, 8 June 2000, Rugby School. * Scottish Branch one-day meeting for physics teachers, 8 June 2000, Stirling University. Posters A set of four full-colour A2 posters has recently been produced, with another set of four in preparation. The aim is to get across the message `Physics at the heart of everything' by means of eye-catching images - and to brighten up school and college labs and corridors in the process. Further explanations of the physics depicted are printed on the back of the posters. Sets of the first four posters are being circulated to all schools but additional copies will be available on request from schools.education@iop.org . And finally ... The Institute's Schools and Colleges Affiliation Scheme is to be relaunched later this year, as a free scheme for all schools and colleges which will provide low-cost items on a regular basis. There will also be a second, subscription tier giving

  2. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    News Agencies and Global Communication: Development Implications for Third World Nations. ... It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. ... village”, cultural imperialism, ethnocentrism, media imperialism, media dependency, global ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  3. NEWS: Institute news

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  4. Authors’ Rights and Audiences: Does Intellectual Property Protection Apply to User-Generated Content? A Comparative Legal Study of Online News.

    Javier Díaz Noci

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Audience participation in the production process is an increasing reality in all elds of cultural production, from fan ction to news commentary, from transmedia extensions to news items themselves. Author participation takes many shapes, and user-generated content is the most authorial of them. Whether by way of well-formulated strategies of personal authorship or collaborative strategies with other users, or through derivative or collaborative work, audiences are casting a wider shadow on collective work – newspapers or websites, for instance. They complete previous work or create new product. Regardless, audiences have now joined journalists, photographers and the media themselves as actors in news creation and circulation, and constitute a very real part of media business. In this paper, we propose a comparative analysis of the changes introduced by this reality on legal activity, which has implied the reform of the copyright laws in all countries of the two main juridical traditions – Common law and Civil law – and also in the concrete practices of the media, as re ected speci cally in their legal terms and conditions, copyright notices and more generally, in the licenses and contracts signed by the users when they enter a website. We aim to determine the characteristics of legal protection as it applies to news content, regardless of its authorship, so as to explain the contemporary tendencies in copyright on news reporting as a social activity. To this end we use comparative legal research techniques, and more precisely, deal with one of the big issues concerning copyright law with respect to news production: the balance between the protection granted individual authors, journalists or users, and the protection granted corporate entities responsible for the content of collective work. L’intervention des audiences dans les processus de production est une réalité de plus en plus présente dans tous les domaines de la production

  5. Reach and messages of the world's largest ivory burn.

    Braczkowski, Alexander; Holden, Matthew H; O'Bryan, Christopher; Choi, Chi-Yeung; Gan, Xiaojing; Beesley, Nicholas; Gao, Yufang; Allan, James; Tyrrell, Peter; Stiles, Daniel; Brehony, Peadar; Meney, Revocatus; Brink, Henry; Takashina, Nao; Lin, Ming-Ching; Lin, Hsien-Yung; Rust, Niki; Salmo, Severino G; Watson, James Em; Kahumbu, Paula; Maron, Martine; Possingham, Hugh P; Biggs, Duan

    2018-03-01

    Recent increases in ivory poaching have depressed African elephant populations. Successful enforcement has led to ivory being stockpiled. Stockpile destruction is becoming increasingly popular, and most destruction has occurred in the last five years. Ivory destruction is intended to send a strong message against ivory consumption, both in promoting a taboo on ivory use and catalyzing policy change. However, there has been no effort to establish the distribution and extent of media reporting on ivory destruction events globally. We analyze media coverage across eleven important nation states of the largest ivory destruction event in history (Kenya, 30 April 2016). We used a well-accepted online media crawling tool and key language translations to search online and print newspapers. We found most online news on the ivory burn came from the US (81% of articles), while print news was dominated by Kenya (61% of articles). We subjected online articles from five key countries and territories to content analysis and found 86-97% of all online articles reported the burn as a positive conservation action, while between 4-50% discussed ivory burning as having a negative impact on elephant conservation. Most articles discussed law enforcement and trade bans as effective for elephant conservation. There was more relative search interest globally on the 2016 Kenyan ivory burn than any other in five years. Our study is the first attempt to track the spread of media around an ivory burn and is a case study in tracking the effects of a conservation-marketing event. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The news machine hacking, the untold story

    Hanning, James

    2014-01-01

    There is one mystery figure at the heart of ?Hackergate' ? Glenn Mulcaire, the News of the World's top private investigator. The former AFC Wimbledon footballer has never spoken publicly or in court about his work investigating and backing up front-page news stories (such as the News of the World's award-winning David Beckham scoop). Mulcaire's arrest in 2006 for intercepting royal-household phone messages barely registered at the time. Yet his work has continued to generate headlines and embarrassment for the establishment ? with a Prime Minister on the back foot after his former aide Andy

  7. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  8. Popular Mobilization Messaging

    James Garrison

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This Research Paper examines the Iraqi Popular Mobilization Unit’s (PMU messaging on the organisation’s website and social media platforms through early January 2017 to develop a more nuanced understanding of the PMU’s outlook, both present and future. After providing an overview of the PMU’s media presence online, the paper discusses how the organisation promotes its core narrative: that it is a cross-confessional and patriotic force for the defence of all Iraqis against a brutal and evil IS. The paper then addresses the PMU’s use of messaging to refute the sectarian portrayal of the organisation in some quarters before turning to the way the PMU approaches regional and international states in its media. Finally, the paper summarises the PMU’s messaging strategy and discusses how this strategy implies a less threatening future for the organisation than is often anticipated.

  9. people | News

    of Communication Fermilab news Search Useful links Symmetry magazine Interactions Interact people , people, building, Wilson Hall, farm, planter A John Deere planter is ready for work. Josh Frieman takes the experiment for the next two years. Controlled burn at Pine Street entrance May 9, 2018 Ryan

  10. Fake News

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In a politically and digitally polarized environment, identifying and evaluating fake news is more difficult than ever before. Librarians who have been teaching information and media literacy skills for decades understand the role we can and must play in this environment.

  11. Automated Detection of Financial Events in News Text

    F.P. Hogenboom (Frederik)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractToday’s financial markets are inextricably linked with financial events like acquisitions, profit announcements, or product launches. Information extracted from news messages that report on such events could hence be beneficial for financial decision making. The ubiquity of news,

  12. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  13. News & Announcements

    1999-09-01

    provided as a part of the telephone order; when the new account is active, the account information will be emailed. Remember to Provide Your Email Address Knowing your email address has become important for Journal communication. In addition to account information, we will send an order confirmation to each subscriber who provides an email address. For those who want it, we intend, in the near future, to send an email message announcing when each month's issue goes online. We do not sell or give email addresses to anyone else. Keeping Up to Date with JCE Online JCE Online will continue to change and expand, as the technology around us changes and as new features and columns are added. The best way to keep abreast of new developments is to look for the JCE Online column in both print and online. Jon Holmes, editor of JCE Online, uses this column to keep readers in touch with the latest happenings: JCE Online FAQs (March 1999, p 446) JCE Online 99 (April 1999, p 584) JCE Feature Columns (May 1999, p 718) Molecular Modeling (June 1999, p 871) JCE: A Good Deal That Keeps Getting Better If you carry copies of JCE around in hopes of finding time to read them, you may think they are getting heavierand they are. Your Journal was more than a third bigger in 1998 than it was in 1995! We have printed more pages every year since 1996 (see graph for the past 25 years). We estimate that you will receive more than 2000 pages this year and even more next year. This is more pages than at any time in the Journal 's history, excepting the four years 1929-1932, when the pages were smaller. We are printing more pages because we need to. We have many good manuscripts that have been peer reviewed and accepted and now are awaiting publication in print. The time between acceptance of a manuscript and its publication is already too long. Unless we print more pages, it will grow longer. For the past three years we have been slowly but steadily reducing this publication lag, and we don't want to stop

  14. Polarized Discourse in the Egyptian News: Critical Discourse Analysis Perspective

    Eissa, Mohammed Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate ideological structures of polarized discourse coded in the reports of two online news websites: egyptindependent and ikwanweb. The study focuses on online news reports relating to three interrelated events: the issuing of a constitutional declaration by Egyptian president, the aftermath clashes outside…

  15. An Exploratory Study of Gambling Operators' Use of Social Media and the Latent Messages Conveyed.

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Delfabbro, Paul; King, Daniel L; Hing, Nerilee

    2016-03-01

    Advertisements for gambling products have historically been restricted due to their potential to normalize gambling and contribute to excessive gambling behaviours among vulnerable populations. However, social media enables gambling operators to promote products and brands with fewer constraints than in traditional forms of media. This study investigated how social media is used by gambling operators to promote gambling activities including an analysis of the latent messages that are conveyed. A representative sample of major land-based and online gambling venues and operators, including casinos, clubs, hotels, lottery and wagering operators (n = 101), was obtained. Websites and social media profiles of gambling operators were audited to investigate the types of social media used, content of promotions, and prevalence of responsible gambling messaging. The results showed that Facebook and Twitter were the dominant platforms used, most commonly by casinos and online wagering operators. A key finding was that online gambling operators included gambling content in conjunction with related news and events, as well as unrelated content, as way of normalizing gambling within a broader social context. Unlike land-based gambling promotions, responsible gambling information tended not to feature in operators' posts and profiles. The key messages propagated in social media gambling promotions were positively framed, and tended to encourage gambling using a range of cross-promotional tactics to emphasize the winning aspect of gambling. The implications of freely accessible and pervasive gambling promotions via social media are discussed with respect to the general community as well as vulnerable populations.

  16. How to work through the news media

    Chapman, M.

    1986-01-01

    There are essentially four steps that anyone must follow if the objective is to communicate a message through the news media: 1) Understand media (adversarial relationship, code of ethics, importance of First Amendment); 2) Redefine the relationship (become acquainted with reporter, save steps for the reporter); 3) Communicate clearly; and 4) Use alternatives when appropriate. These four steps are discussed

  17. News & Announcements

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  18. Stealth Advertising: The Commercialization of Television News Broadcasts in Canada

    Gennadiy Chernov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-phase study deals with the phenomenon of “stealth advertising” in Canada. This concept refers to the encroachment of commercially tinted messages into broadcast news segments. Different theories of commercial speech were used as a theoretical framework. The study combined mixed methods, content analysis and in-depth interviews. The first phase concentrated on the frequency and actual time spent airing commercially influenced messages in television newscast segments. The sample consisted of eight randomly selected English-language markets across Canada including news stations affiliated with CBC, CTV and Global. Seventy-five newscasts were recorded and content-analyzed. The analysis demonstrated that private television stations used more explicit and aggressive stealth advertising than publicly owned ones. In subsequent interviews, the news directors and sales managers of some of these stations denied that they yield to outside commercial pressures but admitted they may include messages with commercial content if these have public interest value. In the second phase thirty-nine newscasts of a news station affiliated with Global were recorded and content-analyzed, showing high numbers of commercially influenced messages and corroborating previous research findings. Subsequent interviews showed some news decision-makers accept the inclusion of commercially tinted news segments, thus eroding the divide between editorial and commercial contents. This study is intended to contribute to the empirical basis for pursuing the question of corruption of news by surreptitious commercial content.

  19. News coverage of climate change in Nature News and ScienceNOW during 2007

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    of appreciating climate change, its severe consequences, and its anthropogenic causes. During that year the two journals’ online news services Nature News and ScienceNOW framed climate change to fit particular agendas resulting in markedly different narratives. This article demonstrates that Nature News reported...... more critically on political decisions, scientific results, and social matters of climate change compared to ScienceNOW. Operating under different institutional constraints ScienceNOW generally took a more cautious line. The evidence drawn from both textual and visual analyses shows that news sections...

  20. Analysis of Online Social Networks to Understand Information Sharing Behaviors Through Social Cognitive Theory.

    Yoon, Hong-Jun; Tourassi, Georgia

    2014-05-01

    Analyzing the contents of online social networks is an effective process for monitoring and understanding peoples' behaviors. Since the nature of conversation and information propagation is similar to traditional conversation and learning, one of the popular socio-cognitive methods, social cognitive theory was applied to online social networks to. Two major news topics about colon cancer were chosen to monitor traffic of Twitter messages. The activity of "leaders" on the issue (i.e., news companies or people will prior Twitter activity on topics related to colon cancer) was monitored. In addition, the activity of "followers", people who never discussed the topics before, but replied to the discussions was also monitored. Topics that produce tangible benefits such as positive outcomes from appropriate preventive actions received dramatically more attention and online social media traffic. Such characteristics can be explained with social cognitive theory and thus present opportunities for effective health campaigns.

  1. News of the Year.

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Margolis, Rick; Glick, Andrea; Milliot, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following reports: "'LJ' (Library Journal) News Report: Libraries Success at Funding Books and Bytes"; "'SLJ' (School Library Journal) News Report: We're in the Money!"; and "'PW' (Publishers Weekly) News Reports". (AEF)

  2. FAKE NEWS

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Vestergaard, Mads

    Politik og medier oversvømmes af fordrejninger, fortielser, forglemmelser og forvanskninger af sandheden. Vi invaderes af populistiske fortællinger, “alternative kendsgerninger” og “fake news”. Det er nu et faktum, at misinformation er noget man aktivt må forholde sig til som politiker, som...... for virkelige udfordringer, vi står over for. FAKE NEWS giver et første sammenhængende billede af hvordan opmærksomhedsøkonomien kan ende i det postfaktuelle demokrati: Eventyrlige fortællinger erstatter kendsgerninger som grundlag for politisk meningsdannelse, debat og lovgivning. Et monster, som de færreste...

  3. The Effectiveness of Campaign Messages on Turnout and Vote Choice

    Friedel, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I study campaign effects on turnout and vote choice. I analyze different campaign messages and the way they affect voters across various situations. First, through an online survey experiment, I study the impact of campaign messages and ideological cues on voters as they make inferences on candidates. Next, through a field experiment, I test whether microtargeted messages or general messages on the economy have any effect on turnout. Lastly, using online survey data, I e...

  4. Subtle Messages.

    Tamplin de Poinsot, Nan

    1999-01-01

    Describes a self-portrait assignment inspired by the work of Frida Kahlo. Discusses Frida Kahlo's artwork and use of surrealist and symbolist views. States that each student had to incorporate personal symbolism in the portrait to convey a message about him or herself in a subtle manner. (CMK)

  5. Personalized News Recommendation: A Review and an Experimental Investigation

    Lei Li; Ding-Ding Wang; Shun-Zhi Zhu; Tao Li

    2011-01-01

    Online news articles,as a new format of press releases,have sprung up on the Internet.With its convenience and recency,more and more people prefer to read news online instead of reading the paper-format press releases.However,a gigantic amount of news events might be released at a rate of hundreds,even thousands per hour.A challenging problem is how to efficiently select specific news articles from a large corpus of newly-published press releases to recommend to individual readers,where the selected news items should match the reader's reading preference as much as possible.This issue refers to personalized news recommendation.Recently,personalized news recommendation has become a promising research direction as the Internet provides fast access to real-time information from multiple sources around the world.Existing personalized news recommendation systems strive to adapt their services to individual users by virtue of both user and news content information.A variety of techniques have been proposed to tackle personalized news recommendation,including content-based,collaborative filtering systems and hybrid versions of these two.In this paper,we provide a comprehensive investigation of existing personalized news recommenders.We discuss several essential issues underlying the problem of personalized news recommendation,and explore possible solutions for performance improvement.Further,we provide an empirical study on a collection of news articles obtained from various news websites,and evaluate the effect of different factors for personalized news recommendation.We hope our discussion and exploration would provide insights for researchers who are interested in personalized news recommendation.

  6. News & Announcements

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999. Guy Anderson Jim Becvar Jerry Bell Jim Birk Diane Bunce Ann Cartwright Thomas Clark Jane Crosby Maria Dean Art Ellis Donald Elswick Tommy Franklin Babu George Paul Heath Angela Hoffman Lynn Hogue J. J. Lagowski Frank Lambert Dorothy Lehmkuhl George Lelevre Scott Luaders Jane McMullen Marci Merritt Carl Minnier Richard Narske Ron Perkins Gabriel Pinto Dick Potts Herb Retcofsky Jerry Sarquis Elke Schoffers Sara Selfe Uni Susskind J. Mark Tolman John Varine Dawn Wakeley Marla White Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift Subscription Awards As spring, the season of awards, approaches, we remind you of our handy Gift Certificates (a replica is shown on page 142). A gift of the Journal is not only affordable

  7. News and Announcements

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  8. News & Announcements

    2001-09-01

    Helge H. Wehmeier, President and Chief Executive Office of Bayer Corporation, is the recipient of the 2001 Leadership in Education Award from the Keystone Center. Wehmeier was cited for his support in spearheading ongoing education and volunteer efforts such as Bayer's Making Science Make Sense program, which, in partnership with NSF, advances science literacy through hands-on, inquiry-based science learning. You are invited to send contributions to the News & Announcements column. They should be sent to Elizabeth A. Moore, Associate Editor, by email or by mail at Journal of Chemical Education, 209 N. Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715-1116. Contributions should be concise, to the point, and appropriate for the Journal's audience. They may be edited for clarity, timeliness, appropriateness, or length.

  9. Exploring Message Meaning: A Qualitative Media Literacy Study of College Freshmen

    Ashley, Seth; Lyden, Grace; Fasbinder, Devon

    2012-01-01

    Critical media literacy demands understanding of the deeper meanings of media messages. Using a grounded theory approach, this study analyzed responses by first-year college students with no formal media literacy education to three types of video messages: an advertisement, a public relations message and a news report. Students did not exhibit…

  10. Advanced Messaging Concept Development Basic Safety Message

    Department of Transportation — Contains all Basic Safety Messages (BSMs) collected during the Advanced Messaging Concept Development (AMCD) field testing program. For this project, all of the Part...

  11. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  12. DMS message design workshops.

    2009-03-01

    This report summarizes the training conducted statewide regarding the design and display of messages on : dynamic message signs. The training is based on the Dynamic Message Sign Message Design and Display : Manual (0-4023-P3). Researchers developed ...

  13. Vahid Online: Post-2009 Iran and the Politics of Citizen Media Convergence

    Babak Rahimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to study the social network site, Vahid Online, pseudonym of a leading Iranian activist who has the largest social media followership online. Vahid Online is Iran’s leading distributor of information about social and political news about Iran, a source of information used by citizens and journalists. Similar to Twitter, Vahid Online posts, shares, and communicates news in short messages with hyperlinks, hashtags, or internet slang for multimedia purposes. In this networking media space, citizen journalism is assumed the civic responsibility of news and information dissemination with a perceived conception of internet as an agency of change. Vahid Online, I argue, is representative of an individuated networking activism in the new technology for information production. Technology, likewise, is imagined as a political agency and, in turn, citizenship is redefined through technology that carries the promise of change. It is also argued that Vahid Online’s conception of citizen journalism is directly born out of the Green Movement in 2009, a protest movement against the 2009 presidential elections with a self-image of networked citizenship with a relative reliance on a weak tie model of civic association. The notion of citizen journalism examined here is one of civic participatory activism in archiving the collection, reporting, and dissemination of news through the merging of diverse media technologies in an attempt to create and distribute the most impact spreading news. The paper finally offers a critical analysis and argues that Vahid Online is more about individuated network framing of a privileged politics through practice of new technology.

  14. Physics News

    Gianotti, F.

    In spite of the fact that real data will only come in the year 2006, this is a very busy and interesting time for Physics-related activities. A very short overview of these activities is given in this issue of the ATLAS News Letter, while the various topics will be described in more detail in the next issues. The Physics and Combined Performance groups are working in four main areas: 1) Assess the ATLAS potential for physics, with emphasis on new channels and ideas. Recent examples are Extra-dimensions, invisible Higgs decays, heavy ion physics, the expected potential of a "Super-LHC" running at a luminosity of 10^35, etc.. 2) Improve the understanding of the detector performance and optimise the reconstruction algorithms. Examples of issues in the pipeline are: can we tag charm-jet ? What can we gain in the jet energy resolution by combining the calorimeter and tracker information to reconstruct the jet energy ? 3) Follow detector changes and detector-related issues and monitor the impact on the perform...

  15. Novae news

    2012-01-01

    As announced in the previous Bulletin, Novae has opened a new snack bar on the Flagstaff car park, just a few metres from CERN's reception area (Building 33).   Just a few metres from the CERN Reception, the new Novae snack point welcomes visitors and CERNois. Opening hours Currently: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. From September: Monday to Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The snack bar selection includes breakfast, starting at 2.70 CHF, cold dishes from 5 CHF, and hot dishes from 6 CHF.   Novae has also installed a 24-hour-a-day food vending machine in the CERN hostel (Building 39) and in Building 13. You can buy pasta and cooked dishes for 6.50 CHF to 8 CHF. In addition, a groceries vending machine has been installed in the main building, just across from the news kiosk. Nearly 60 different items are available around the clock. Finally, Novae has introduced a new payment system in several buildings on the Meyrin site. It accepts credit ca...

  16. Sugar-sweetened beverages coverage in the British media: an analysis of public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging.

    Elliott-Green, Alex; Hyseni, Lirije; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Bromley, Helen; Capewell, Simon

    2016-07-19

    To assess the extent of media-based public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging regarding sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). We conducted a systematic analysis to identify and examine all articles regarding SSBs published in all mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014. We initially conducted a brief literature search to develop appropriate search terms and categorisations for grouping and analysing the articles. Articles were then coded according to the publishing newspaper, article type, topic, prominence and slant (pro-SSB or anti-SSB). A contextual analysis was undertaken to examine key messages in the articles. We identified 374 articles published during 2014. The majority of articles (81%) suggested that SSBs are unhealthy. Messaging from experts, campaign groups and health organisations was fairly consistent about the detrimental effects of SSB on health. However, relatively few articles assessed any approaches or solutions to potentially combat the problems associated with SSBs. Only one-quarter (24%) suggested any policy change. Meanwhile, articles concerning the food industry produced consistent messages emphasising consumer choice and individual responsibility for making choices regarding SSB consumption, and promoting and advertising their products. The food industry thus often managed to avoid association with the negative press that their products were receiving. SSBs were frequently published in mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites during 2014. Public health media advocacy was prominent throughout, with a growing consensus that sugary drinks are bad for people's health. However, the challenge for public health will be to mobilise supportive public opinion to help implement effective regulatory policies. Only then will our population's excess consumption of SSBs come under control. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  17. The quality of political news in a changing media environment

    Jacobi, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    What do ongoing changes in the media environment, notably the perceived popularization of news and the shift towards individualized online media, mean for political news quality, both in terms of what it is, as well as how we measure it? This dissertation firstly argues, based on a literature review

  18. News from Council

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  19. Energy Systems Integration Facility News | Energy Systems Integration

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems Integration Facility News Energy Systems Integration Facility Energy Dataset A massive amount of wind data was recently made accessible online, greatly expanding the Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has completed technology validation testing for Go

  20. How News Type Matters : Indirect Effects of Media Use on Political Participation Through Knowledge and Efficacy

    Andersen, K.; Bjarnøe, C.; Albæk, E.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Today, citizens have the possibility to use many different types of news media and participate politically in various ways. This study examines how use of different news types (hard and soft TV news as well as printed and online versions of broadsheet and tabloid newspapers) indirectly affects

  1. Emerging consumption patterns among young people of traditional and internet news platforms in the Low Countries

    Cauwenberge, A.M.R. van; d'Haenens, L.S.J.; Beentjes, J.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    In search of a better understanding of young people’s news media consumption in a European high-media environment, this study analysed the role of uses and gratifications motivations in driving time spent with television news, newspapers, and online news sites, while controlling for the effects of

  2. News/Press Releases

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  3. Market News Price Dataset

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Real-time price data collected by the Boston Market News Reporter. The NOAA Fisheries' "Fishery Market News" began operations in New York City on February 14, 1938....

  4. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    Zhengyou Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs. In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  5. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  6. News Media Industry

    2007-01-01

    radio news departments will operate on many technological platforms at the same time ( Papper , 2006, p.3). News radio stations will likely broadcast...Retrieved March 25, 2007, from http://firstlook.nytimes.com/index.php?cat=4 Papper , Bob. RTNDF’s 2006 Future of the News Survey, 25 Mar. 2006. 10 Mar

  7. Analyzing the Social Knowledge Construction Behavioral Patterns of an Online Synchronous Collaborative Discussion Instructional Activity Using an Instant Messaging Tool: A Case Study

    Hou, Huei-Tse; Wu, Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Online discussions have been widely utilized as an educational activity, and much research has been conducted on the process and behaviors involved in asynchronous discussions. However, research on behavioral patterns in learners' synchronous discussions, including the process of social knowledge construction and project coordination is limited.…

  8. Mixed messages

    Chen, Christopher B.; Hall, Kevin; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 5 years ago, the Blueprint for Pharmacy developed a plan for transitioning pharmacy practice toward more patient-centred care. Much of the strategy for change involves communicating the new vision. Objective: To evaluate the communication of the Vision for Pharmacy by the organizations and corporations that signed the Blueprint for Pharmacy’s Commitment to Act. Methods: The list of 88 signatories of the Commitment to Act was obtained from the Blueprint for Pharmacy document. The website of each of these signatories was searched for all references to the Blueprint for Pharmacy or Vision for Pharmacy. Each of the identified references was then analyzed using summative content analysis. Results: A total of 934 references were identified from the webpages of the 88 signatories. Of these references, 549 were merely links to the Blueprint for Pharmacy’s website, 350 of the references provided some detailed information about the Blueprint for Pharmacy and only 35 references provided any specific plans to transition pharmacy practice. Conclusion: Widespread proliferation of the Vision for Pharmacy has not been achieved. One possible explanation for this is that communication of the vision by the signatories has been incomplete. To ensure the success of future communications, change leaders must develop strategies that consider how individual pharmacists and pharmacies understand the message. PMID:24660012

  9. A randomized controlled trial of a brief online intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in new university students: Combining self-affirmation, theory of planned behaviour messages, and implementation intentions.

    Norman, Paul; Cameron, David; Epton, Tracy; Webb, Thomas L; Harris, Peter R; Millings, Abigail; Sheeran, Paschal

    2018-02-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption increases when students enter university. This study tests whether combining (1) messages that target key beliefs from the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) that underlie binge drinking, (2) a self-affirmation manipulation to reduce defensive processing, and (3) implementation intentions (if-then plans to avoid binge drinking) reduces alcohol consumption in the first 6 months at university. A 2 (self-affirmation) × 2 (TPB messages) × 2 (implementation intention) between-participants randomized controlled trial with 6-month follow-up. Before starting university, students (N = 2,951) completed measures of alcohol consumption and were randomly assigned to condition in a full-factorial design. TPB cognitions about binge drinking were assessed immediately post-intervention (n = 2,682). Alcohol consumption was assessed after 1 week (n = 1,885), 1 month (n = 1,389), and 6 months (n = 892) at university. TPB cognitions were assessed again at 1 and 6 months. Participants who received the TPB messages had significantly less favourable cognitions about binge drinking (except perceived control), consumed fewer units of alcohol, engaged in binge drinking less frequently, and had less harmful patterns of alcohol consumption during their first 6 months at university. The other main effects were non-significant. The findings support the use of TPB-based interventions to reduce students' alcohol consumption, but question the use of self-affirmation and implementation intentions before starting university when the messages may not represent a threat to self-identity and when students may have limited knowledge and experience of the pressures to drink alcohol at university. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Alcohol consumption increases when young people enter university. Significant life transitions represent potential teachable moments to change behaviour. Interventions with a strong theoretical

  10. Something fishy? News media presentation of complex health issues related to fish consumption guidelines.

    Greiner, Amelia; Clegg Smith, Katherine; Guallar, Eliseo

    2010-11-01

    The news media are an important source of dietary information. Understanding news content, particularly the portrayal of risks and benefits of certain foods, is relevant for effective public health communication. Fish consumption may reduce risk for CVD and aid neonatal development, but recent work shows public confusion about the benefits of fish, challenged by the evidence of mercury and other contaminants in fish. We present an analysis of the messages about fish in US news media over 15 years, identifying trends in coverage and highlighting implications of current messaging. We conducted a descriptive text analysis and coded for manifest content: locality of focus, story frame, reference to studies, inclusion of government guidelines and portrayal of uncertainty. We identified chronological patterns and analysed the data for statistically significant relationships between media source and content. News stories were selected from five daily newspapers and five television networks (1993-2007). We analysed 310 health-related news stories on fish. Risk messages outweighed benefit messages four to one, and health benefits only became prominent after 2002. No difference existed in coverage topic by news source. Fish consumption has increasingly become a national issue. With the bulk of messages about fish consumption focused on risk, the benefits may be lost to consumers. This gap creates a need for public health to work with news media to more effectively communicate benefits and risks around fish consumption and health and to consider options for communicating tailored information where it can be more readily utilised.

  11. Conceptualizing Media Generations: the Print-, Online- and Individualized Generations

    Westlund, Oscar; A Färdigh, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    During the 1990s news publishers established an online presence and in the 2000s they developed cross-media news work. This has resulted in changing news accessing habits, with varied magnitude among generations. This article aims to construct theoretically sound news media generations, through...... statistical analysis of data from a nationally representative scientific omnibus survey conducted in 2010. Firstly the article presents a descriptive and explanatory analysis of how eight generational cohorts utilize news in print and/or online and/or mobile. Secondly these findings are used for merging...... highest of online only news accessing (Pearson’s r = .135). The heterogeneous news usage patterns exhibited by the individualized generation (1980s-1990s) were accommodated for by two cohorts. The online cohort shows high probability for online-only news usage (49%) and a positive correlation (Pearson’s r...

  12. The Effects of Newspaper-Television Cross-Ownership on News Homogeneity.

    Gormley, William T., Jr.

    After discussing the need for message pluralism in a democracy, this report focuses on a three-stage research strategy conducted to study the effects of newspaper/television cross-ownership on news homogeneity. The three stages consist of: an analysis of questionnaire data obtained from 214 newspaper managing editors and television news directors;…

  13. Effectiveness of a Non-Classroom News Media Literacy Intervention among Different Undergraduate Populations

    Vraga, Emily K.; Tully, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we test the effectiveness of a short news media literacy message with audiences who differ in their media literacy education. We manipulate whether individuals are exposed to a news media literacy public service announcement (PSA) immediately before viewing a political program among two groups: students enrolled in media education…

  14. Media Messages and Perception of Risk for Ebola Virus Infection, United States.

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Boddie, Crystal; McGinty, Emma E; Pollack, Keshia; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Burke, Thomas A; Rutkow, Lainie

    2017-01-01

    News media have been blamed for sensationalizing Ebola in the United States, causing unnecessary alarm. To investigate this issue, we analyzed US-focused news stories about Ebola virus disease during July 1-November 30, 2014. We found frequent use of risk-elevating messages, which may have contributed to increased public concern.

  15. Prediction and Characterization of High-Activity Events in Social Media Triggered by Real-World News.

    Kalyanam, Janani; Quezada, Mauricio; Poblete, Barbara; Lanckriet, Gert

    2016-01-01

    On-line social networks publish information on a high volume of real-world events almost instantly, becoming a primary source for breaking news. Some of these real-world events can end up having a very strong impact on on-line social networks. The effect of such events can be analyzed from several perspectives, one of them being the intensity and characteristics of the collective activity that it produces in the social platform. We research 5,234 real-world news events encompassing 43 million messages discussed on the Twitter microblogging service for approximately 1 year. We show empirically that exogenous news events naturally create collective patterns of bursty behavior in combination with long periods of inactivity in the network. This type of behavior agrees with other patterns previously observed in other types of natural collective phenomena, as well as in individual human communications. In addition, we propose a methodology to classify news events according to the different levels of intensity in activity that they produce. In particular, we analyze the most highly active events and observe a consistent and strikingly different collective reaction from users when they are exposed to such events. This reaction is independent of an event's reach and scope. We further observe that extremely high-activity events have characteristics that are quite distinguishable at the beginning stages of their outbreak. This allows us to predict with high precision, the top 8% of events that will have the most impact in the social network by just using the first 5% of the information of an event's lifetime evolution. This strongly implies that high-activity events are naturally prioritized collectively by the social network, engaging users early on, way before they are brought to the mainstream audience.

  16. Message framing in social networking sites.

    Kao, Danny Tengti; Chuang, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Sui-Min; Zhang, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Online social networking sites represent significant new opportunities for Internet advertisers. However, results based on the real world cannot be generalized to all virtual worlds. In this research, the moderating effects of need for cognition (NFC) and knowledge were applied to examine the impact of message framing on attitudes toward social networking sites. A total of 216 undergraduates participated in the study. Results reveal that for social networking sites, while high-NFC individuals form more favorable attitudes toward negatively framed messages than positively framed messages, low-NFC individuals form more favorable attitudes toward positively framed messages than negatively framed messages. In addition, low-knowledge individuals demonstrate more favorable attitudes toward negatively framed messages than positively framed messages; however, the framing effect does not differentially affect the attitudes of high-knowledge individuals. Furthermore, the framing effect does not differentially affect the attitudes of high-NFC individuals with high knowledge. In contrast, low-NFC individuals with low knowledge hold more favorable attitudes toward positively framed messages than negatively framed messages.

  17. Framing Service, Benefit, and Credibility Through Images and Texts: A Content Analysis of Online Promotional Messages of Korean Medical Tourism Industry.

    Jun, Jungmi

    2016-07-01

    This study examines how the Korean medical tourism industry frames its service, benefit, and credibility issues through texts and images of online brochures. The results of content analysis suggest that the Korean medical tourism industry attempts to frame their medical/health services as "excellence in surgeries and cancer care" and "advanced health technology and facilities." However, the use of cost-saving appeals was limited, which can be seen as a strategy to avoid consumers' association of lower cost with lower quality services, and to stress safety and credibility.

  18. Factors influencing message dissemination through social media

    Zheng, Zeyu; Yang, Huancheng; Fu, Yang; Fu, Dianzheng; Podobnik, Boris; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-06-01

    Online social networks strongly impact our daily lives. An internet user (a "Netizen") wants messages to be efficiently disseminated. The susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) dissemination model is the traditional tool for exploring the spreading mechanism of information diffusion. We here test our SIR-based dissemination model on open and real-world data collected from Twitter. We locate and identify phase transitions in the message dissemination process. We find that message content is a stronger factor than the popularity of the sender. We also find that the probability that a message will be forwarded has a threshold that affects its ability to spread, and when the probability is above the threshold the message quickly achieves mass dissemination.

  19. Who Makes The News?

    Jørndrup, Hanne; Bentsen, Martine

    As newsroom staff around the world went about their day on 25 March 2015, hundreds of volunteers located in over 100 countries gathered to monitor their news media as part of the Fifth Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP). The Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) is the world’s longest......-running and most extensive research on gender in the news media. It began in 1995 when volunteers in 71 countries around the world monitored women’s presence in their national radio, television and print news. The research revealed that only 17% of news subjects – the people who are interviewed or whom the news...... is about – were women. It found that gender parity was ‘a distant prospect in any region of the world. News [was] more often being presented by women but it [was] still rarely about women. Denmark participates in GMMP for the second time and both times we can recognize the global inequality in the Danish...

  20. News media coverage of U.S. Ebola policies: Implications for communication during future infectious disease threats.

    Sell, Tara Kirk; Boddie, Crystal; McGinty, Emma E; Pollack, Keshia; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Burke, Thomas A; Rutkow, Lainie

    2016-12-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2014-2015 raised concerns about the disease's potential spread in the U.S. and received significant news media coverage. Prior research has shown that news media coverage of policy options can influence public opinion regarding those policies, as well as public attitudes toward the broader social issues and target populations addressed by such policies. To assess news media coverage of Ebola policies, the content of U.S.-focused news stories (n=1262) published between July 1 and November 30, 2014 from 12 news sources was analyzed for 13 policy-related messages. Eight-two percent of news stories mentioned one or more policy-related messages. The most frequently appearing policy-related messages overall were those about isolation (47%) and quarantine (40%). The least frequently mentioned policy-related message described dividing potentially exposed persons into distinct groups based on their level of Ebola risk in order to set different levels of restrictions (5%). Message frequency differed depending on whether news sources were located in an area that experienced an Ebola case or controversy, by news sources' political ideological perspective, and by type of news source (print and television). All policy-related messages showed significant increases in frequency after the first case of Ebola was diagnosed in the U.S. on September 30, 2014, with the exception of messages related to isolation, which showed a significant decrease. Results offer insight into how the news media covers policies to manage emerging disease threats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding health food messages on Twitter for health literacy promotion.

    Zhou, J; Liu, F; Zhou, H

    2018-05-01

    With the popularity of social media, Twitter has become an important tool to promote health literacy. However, many health-related messages on Twitter are dead-ended and cannot reach many people. This is unhelpful for health literacy promotion. This article aims to examine the features of online health food messages that people like to retweet. We adopted rumour theory as our theoretical foundation and extracted seven characteristics (i.e. emotional valence, attractiveness, sender's authoritativeness, external evidence, argument length, hashtags, and direct messages). A total of 10,025 health-related messages on Twitter were collected, and 1496 messages were randomly selected for further analysis. Each message was treated as one unit and then coded. All the hypotheses were tested with logistic regression. Emotional valence, attractiveness, sender's authoritativeness, argument length, and direct messages in a Twitter message had positive effects on people's retweet behaviour. The effect of external evidence was negative. Hashtags had no significant effect after consideration of other variables. Online health food messages containing positive emotions, including pictures, containing direct messages, having an authoritative sender, having longer arguments, or not containing external URLs are more likely to be retweeted. However, a message only containing positive or negative emotions or including direct messages without any support information will not be retweeted.

  2. Consumer Attention Online: How to be Visible?

    Viktorija Grigaliūnaitė

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The axiom “unseen – unsold” implies that marketing communication cannot be effective if it does not bypass the filter of attention, which is difficult in today’s information clutter. As internet has emerged as powerful channel for marketing communication, the same axiom applies to the online marketing communication. In this research the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature as well as two eye tracking experiments are applied for the analysis of internet context-related elements influencing consumer visual attention and as a consequence having influence on consumer behavior. As a result, the guidelines for the selection of advertising message-related factors and advertisement’s position in the internet news portals are provided. Moreover, recommendations for the attraction of consumer visual attention in the search engines are presented.

  3. Inaugural Message

    Ruifu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This 21st century will witness great advances in science and technology, many of which are certain to improve quality of life. Though numerous advances provide benefits, we still face the challenge of infectious diseases, which emerge or remerge, naturally or otherwise. The outbreak of the Ebola virus disease in West Africa at the end of 2013 is a case in point. It has continued for over a year and spread from the known origin of Guinea to neighboring countries, and reached the United States, Europe, and Asia through international travel. This outbreak accelerated translational research on vaccines and practical therapeutics. Thus, basic research paved the way for translational medicine. The driver for translational medicine is human health needs. In the era of the Internet, it is inevitable that people take full advantage of all this powerful tool can offer. The most obvious feature of the Internet age is the free sharing of knowledge and other information. In this regard, there is a need for a platform to share knowledge about infectious diseases and translational medicine. This journal, Infectious Diseases and Translational Medicine (IDTM, was designed to meet this requirement. We editors hope that this new journal will help our colleagues in exchanging ideas and bridging the gaps between basic research and translational medicine. We also hope that our readers will help in sharing their efforts with their colleagues by means of this platform. IDTM is a peer-reviewed, double-blinded, open-access, high-quality platform for online publication in both PDF and HTML formats. The journal is devoted to basic, applied, and translational research of infectious diseases. It includes diagnostics, therapeutics, and preventive countermeasures as well as related basic research, focusing on genomics, proteomics, and other omics-driven research to examine such areas as evolution, pathogenesis, and epidemiology. Here, we are formally announcing the launch of

  4. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    to give second life to EV batteries Yemen News National Lab Licensing Hydrogen Refueling Method Could Computing Center Centers, Institutes, and Programs RISCRisk and Infrastructure Science Center Other

  5. Good Friends, Bad News

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    . In this paper we explore the apparent paradox in a quantitative analysis of information diffusion on Twitter. Twitter is interesting in this context as it has been shown to present both the characteristics social and news media. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the probability of retweet. Twitter...... is different from email in that retweeting does not depend on pre-existing social relations, but often occur among strangers, thus in this respect Twitter may be more similar to traditional news media. We therefore hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets...

  6. Experimental Evidence of the Knowledge Gap: Message Arousal, Motivation, and Time Delay

    Grabe, Maria Elizabeth; Yegiyan, Narine; Kamhawi, Rasha

    2008-01-01

    This study experimentally tested the knowledge gap from an information processing perspective. Specifically, knowledge acquisition was investigated under conditions of medium and low news message arousal, with time delay. Results show the persistence of a knowledge gap, particularly for low arousing messages. In fact, at low levels of message…

  7. Visibility of news items on Twitter and Facebook: comparative analysis of the most replicated news in Europe and the Americas

    Gabriela da Silva Zago

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies and compares the top replicated news items on Twitter and Facebook, on news websites from Brazil, Germany, Spain, the United States and United Kingdom. The data includes 8 of the newspapers with the largest circulation in the 5 countries, totaling 40 outlets. The volume of “retweets” and “likes” was used as a metric for representing the visibility of news items. Links posted on Twitter and messages posted by newspapers on Facebook were collected for a period of two weeks during October 2012. Content analysis was carried out for the top 25 replicated messages in each social network, which uncovered significant cultural traits and editorial differences across countries, based upon the content that circulated on social networks during the period. The results confirm users’ perceptions of social networking sites, with Facebook being used largely for entertainment and recreation, and Twitter for covering political, economic, and social events.

  8. The News Delivery Sequence: Bad News and Good News in Conversational Interaction.

    Maynard, Douglas W.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the conditional nature of good and bad news while focusing on three topics: (1) the status of information as news according the participants in a conversation; (2) the valence of this information with regard to its perception as good or bad; and (3) the effect of news on individuals. Notes that good news is privileged over bad news in…

  9. Civic engagement through mainstream online newspapers: Possibilities and shortcomings

    Cecilie Givskov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a pilot study of online news making and commenting in Denmark, the article discusses the relationship between online political news making and democracy. Empirical insights on the dynamics of user engagement and debates on mainstream Danish online news platforms are used to delineate the contours of the online public sphere. It is argued that the new digital media should be discussed not only as a new forum for political participation but also in relation to traditional forms of representative democracy. The analysis comprises the technical features and apps that are designed by online news providers in Denmark to facilitate the constitution of new “voice publics”. How these voice publics are designed as an element of news making and news distribution and, as such, linked to the old “representative” and “attentive publics” of news consumption is investigated.

  10. Global Imagery in Online Advertisements

    Hynes, Geraldine E.; Janson, Marius

    2007-01-01

    A well-designed online advertisement is essential for effective communication with potential customers and contributes to successful e-commerce. However, creating online sales messages that appeal to a broad range of cultures can pose unique challenges. Internet ads must offer both a globally appealing and a culture-specific message that in turn…

  11. What does the media say about palliative care? A descriptive study of news coverage in written media in Spain

    García, Miriam; Navas, Alejandro; Olza, Inés; Gómez-Baceiredo, Beatriz; Pujol, Francesc; Garralda, Eduardo; Centeno, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The goal of palliative care (PC) is to improve the quality of life of terminal stage patients and their families. The subject frequently appears in the mass-media and this helps create a socially accepted identity. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse PC related news items appeared in the Spanish written media. Methodology A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed. Considering diffusion, scope and the range in editorial policy criteria, four printed newspapers (PN) were selected, together with four exclusively digital media sources (DM). Through Mynews, a newspaper content depository, and the search tool for each DM website, articles published between 2009 and 2014 which included the terms "palliative care" and "palliative medicine" were sought. A questionnaire was created to characterise each article identified and a descriptive analysis was undertaken. Results A total of 627 articles were identified, of which 359 (57%) were published in PN (42% in the printed editions -PE- 16% in their online editions -OE-) and 268 (43%) in DM. In general, they appeared mainly in sections concerning Health (23%), Culture and Society (18%) and General/Home News (15%). In PE, just 2% were found in the Health section and nearly 70% in Culture and Society and General/Home News. Most of the articles were informative in nature and contained socio-political messages (90%). Statements by PC professionals were found in 35% of the articles and by politicians in 32%. The most frequent content was related to facing end of life (74%) and patient quality of life (70%). Conclusions The Spanish written media reflects the socio-political interest aroused by PC. Nevertheless, messages circulating about PC do not describe professional practice, or the contribution of the same for patients. Content more in line with the clinical practice might help contribute to the development of this new area of medicine. PMID:28968433

  12. What does the media say about palliative care? A descriptive study of news coverage in written media in Spain.

    José Miguel Carrasco

    Full Text Available The goal of palliative care (PC is to improve the quality of life of terminal stage patients and their families. The subject frequently appears in the mass-media and this helps create a socially accepted identity. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse PC related news items appeared in the Spanish written media.A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed. Considering diffusion, scope and the range in editorial policy criteria, four printed newspapers (PN were selected, together with four exclusively digital media sources (DM. Through Mynews, a newspaper content depository, and the search tool for each DM website, articles published between 2009 and 2014 which included the terms "palliative care" and "palliative medicine" were sought. A questionnaire was created to characterise each article identified and a descriptive analysis was undertaken.A total of 627 articles were identified, of which 359 (57% were published in PN (42% in the printed editions -PE- 16% in their online editions -OE- and 268 (43% in DM. In general, they appeared mainly in sections concerning Health (23%, Culture and Society (18% and General/Home News (15%. In PE, just 2% were found in the Health section and nearly 70% in Culture and Society and General/Home News. Most of the articles were informative in nature and contained socio-political messages (90%. Statements by PC professionals were found in 35% of the articles and by politicians in 32%. The most frequent content was related to facing end of life (74% and patient quality of life (70%.The Spanish written media reflects the socio-political interest aroused by PC. Nevertheless, messages circulating about PC do not describe professional practice, or the contribution of the same for patients. Content more in line with the clinical practice might help contribute to the development of this new area of medicine.

  13. What does the media say about palliative care? A descriptive study of news coverage in written media in Spain.

    Carrasco, José Miguel; García, Miriam; Navas, Alejandro; Olza, Inés; Gómez-Baceiredo, Beatriz; Pujol, Francesc; Garralda, Eduardo; Centeno, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The goal of palliative care (PC) is to improve the quality of life of terminal stage patients and their families. The subject frequently appears in the mass-media and this helps create a socially accepted identity. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse PC related news items appeared in the Spanish written media. A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed. Considering diffusion, scope and the range in editorial policy criteria, four printed newspapers (PN) were selected, together with four exclusively digital media sources (DM). Through Mynews, a newspaper content depository, and the search tool for each DM website, articles published between 2009 and 2014 which included the terms "palliative care" and "palliative medicine" were sought. A questionnaire was created to characterise each article identified and a descriptive analysis was undertaken. A total of 627 articles were identified, of which 359 (57%) were published in PN (42% in the printed editions -PE- 16% in their online editions -OE-) and 268 (43%) in DM. In general, they appeared mainly in sections concerning Health (23%), Culture and Society (18%) and General/Home News (15%). In PE, just 2% were found in the Health section and nearly 70% in Culture and Society and General/Home News. Most of the articles were informative in nature and contained socio-political messages (90%). Statements by PC professionals were found in 35% of the articles and by politicians in 32%. The most frequent content was related to facing end of life (74%) and patient quality of life (70%). The Spanish written media reflects the socio-political interest aroused by PC. Nevertheless, messages circulating about PC do not describe professional practice, or the contribution of the same for patients. Content more in line with the clinical practice might help contribute to the development of this new area of medicine.

  14. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  15. EMI Messaging Guidelines

    Cons, L.

    2011-01-01

    Guidelines for potential users of messaging within EMI. The goal is to provide enough practical information so that EMI product teams can start investigating whether using messaging in their products can be beneficial or not.

  16. Disease Detection or Public Opinion Reflection? Content Analysis of Tweets, Other Social Media, and Online Newspapers During the Measles Outbreak in the Netherlands in 2013

    Harmsen, Irene Anhai; Broekhuizen, Emma; Clijnk, Rutger; De Melker, Hester; Paulussen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; Ruiter, Robert; Das, Enny

    2015-01-01

    Background In May 2013, a measles outbreak began in the Netherlands among Orthodox Protestants who often refuse vaccination for religious reasons. Objective Our aim was to compare the number of messages expressed on Twitter and other social media during the measles outbreak with the number of online news articles and the number of reported measles cases to answer the question if and when social media reflect public opinion patterns versus disease patterns. Methods We analyzed measles-related tweets, other social media messages, and online newspaper articles over a 7-month period (April 15 to November 11, 2013) with regard to topic and sentiment. Thematic analysis was used to structure and analyze the topics. Results There was a stronger correlation between the weekly number of social media messages and the weekly number of online news articles (Psocial media messages) than between the weekly number of social media messages and the weekly number of reported measles cases (P=.003 and P=.048 for tweets and other social media messages, respectively), especially after the summer break. All data sources showed 3 large peaks, possibly triggered by announcements about the measles outbreak by the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment and statements made by well-known politicians. Most messages informed the public about the measles outbreak (ie, about the number of measles cases) (93/165, 56.4%) followed by messages about preventive measures taken to control the measles spread (47/132, 35.6%). The leading opinion expressed was frustration regarding people who do not vaccinate because of religious reasons (42/88, 48%). Conclusions The monitoring of online (social) media might be useful for improving communication policies aiming to preserve vaccination acceptability among the general public. Data extracted from online (social) media provide insight into the opinions that are at a certain moment salient among the public, which enables public health

  17. Disease detection or public opinion reflection? Content analysis of tweets, other social media, and online newspapers during the measles outbreak in The Netherlands in 2013.

    Mollema, Liesbeth; Harmsen, Irene Anhai; Broekhuizen, Emma; Clijnk, Rutger; De Melker, Hester; Paulussen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; Ruiter, Robert; Das, Enny

    2015-05-26

    In May 2013, a measles outbreak began in the Netherlands among Orthodox Protestants who often refuse vaccination for religious reasons. Our aim was to compare the number of messages expressed on Twitter and other social media during the measles outbreak with the number of online news articles and the number of reported measles cases to answer the question if and when social media reflect public opinion patterns versus disease patterns. We analyzed measles-related tweets, other social media messages, and online newspaper articles over a 7-month period (April 15 to November 11, 2013) with regard to topic and sentiment. Thematic analysis was used to structure and analyze the topics. There was a stronger correlation between the weekly number of social media messages and the weekly number of online news articles (Psocial media messages) than between the weekly number of social media messages and the weekly number of reported measles cases (P=.003 and P=.048 for tweets and other social media messages, respectively), especially after the summer break. All data sources showed 3 large peaks, possibly triggered by announcements about the measles outbreak by the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment and statements made by well-known politicians. Most messages informed the public about the measles outbreak (ie, about the number of measles cases) (93/165, 56.4%) followed by messages about preventive measures taken to control the measles spread (47/132, 35.6%). The leading opinion expressed was frustration regarding people who do not vaccinate because of religious reasons (42/88, 48%). The monitoring of online (social) media might be useful for improving communication policies aiming to preserve vaccination acceptability among the general public. Data extracted from online (social) media provide insight into the opinions that are at a certain moment salient among the public, which enables public health institutes to respond immediately and appropriately

  18. Threat and efficacy in Malaysia’s cancer news coverage

    Collin Jerome

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The news media plays important roles not only in creating and disseminating health messages, but also in influencing people’s perceptions of health and their health behaviours. However, much more needs to be known about the creation process, particularly how health messages are created with the goal of raising awareness and knowledge, and changing people’s attitudes and behaviours. This paper presents a study aimed at examining cancer risk messages in Malaysia’s leading newspapers. Methods: Our search identified count the total 73 articles related to cancer which were published in three leading Malaysian English dailies in 2012 – September 2017. Of these, 10 were selected for a content analysis using the Extended Parallel Process (EPPM Model. The analysis focused on the presence and the levels of two important components required for designing effective health risk message: threat (severity and susceptibility and efficacy (responses efficacy and self-efficacy. The language used in the news articles was also analysed to see whether it helped enhance the threat-efficacy levels which are crucial for increasing message acceptance and yielding behaviour change. Results: Present study shows that the varying presence of threat and efficacy in the articles as evidenced by messages that focused on threat alone with no efficacy and messages that highlighted both threat and efficacy. Results also show contrasting levels of threat and efficacy as evidenced by messages that possessed high levels of threat and efficacy and messages that revealed a high level of threat and a low level of efficacy. Furthermore, the contents were composed differently in terms of language use: some articles used neutral language while others used vivid and descriptive language in addressing the topic and target audience. These have implication on message acceptance and behaviour change where high levels of threat and efficacy, and the ways in which vivid

  19. Related Fact Checks: a tool for combating fake news

    Guha, Sreya

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of "Fake News" and misinformation via online news and social media has spurred an interest in computational tools to combat this phenomenon. In this paper we present a new "Related Fact Checks" service, which can help a reader critically evaluate an article and make a judgment on its veracity by bringing up fact checks that are relevant to the article. We describe the core technical problems that need to be solved in building a "Related Fact Checks" service, and present results ...

  20. Demographic variation in how the social brain processes news messages

    Driel, I.I. van; Grabe, M.E.; Bas, O.; Kleemans, M.

    2016-01-01

    A high capacity for visual perception distinguishes Homo sapiens from other primates. This human ability to detect social cues and retain visual records of social networks has been tested mostly with static facial images in laboratory settings. However, media consumption has become closely entangled

  1. Do They Believe It When They See It?: Video News Release Effects on Viewer Recall and Attitudes.

    Owen, Anne; Karrh, James A.

    A study tested responses of viewers (as opposed to news organizations and sponsoring firms) to video news releases (VNRs). Subjects, 81 undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory advertising course, viewed a 30-second message about McDonald's and the Big Mac in a VNR format or an advertisement about the Big Mac special "Meal…

  2. Media Systems Online and Off

    Ørsten, Mark; Willig, Ida; Benson, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how media system differences in the form of news change or stay the same as newspapers in the United States (liberal), Denmark (democratic corporatist), and France (polarized pluralist) move from print to online. Internet technological affordances are posited to move online news...... voices increase slightly. A lesser degree of change in France may be due to greater state insulation from market pressures; some contradictory tendencies in Denmark indicate that technological influences are shaped by contextual national factors....

  3. Tweeting News Articles

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the impact of social media readership to the editorial profile of newspapers. We analyze tweets containing links to news articles from eight of the largest national newspapers in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, and Germany. The data collection follows the first two weeks of October 2012 and includes 2,842,699 tweets with links to news articles. Twitter-shortened links were resolved using a three-pass routine and assigned to 1 of the 21 newspaper sections. We found the concentration of links to news articles posted by top users to be lower than reported in the literature and the strategy of relaying headlines on Twitter via automatic news aggregators (feeds to be inefficient. The results of this investigation show which sections of a newspaper are the most and least read by readers in different parts of the world, with German readers placing greater emphasis on Politics and Economy; Brazilians on Sports and Arts; Spaniards on Local and National news; Britons and Americans on Opinion and World news. We also found that German and Spanish readers are more likely to read multiple national newspapers, while British readers more often resort to foreign sources of news. The results confirm that feedback to news items from a large user base is pivotal for the replication of content and that newspapers and news items can be clustered according to the editorial profile and principles of newsworthiness inherited from legacy media. The results of this investigation shed light onto the networked architecture of journalism that increasingly depends on readership agency.

  4. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that individual exposure to negative economic news enhances internal economic efficacy, a sense of competence in and understanding of the economy. This is good news as internal economic efficacy may facilitat...

  5. Cascading Corruption News

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  6. Cascading Corruption News

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...... by the media, with harmful effects on democracy....

  7. Improved Message Authentication and Confidentiality Checking

    Ismail Jabiullah, M.; Abdullah Al-Shamim, M.; Lutfar Rahman, M.

    2005-01-01

    The most confusing areas of the secured network communications are the message authentication and confidentiality checking. The attacks and the counter measures have become so convoluted that the users in this area begin to account for all contingencies. Two session-key generation techniques are used here to generate two separate session keys K 1 and K 2 ; and both the sender and the reveiver share these keys for higher degree of authentication and confidentiality. For this, the message is first encrypted by the key K 1 , and then the intermediary message authenticatin code (MAC) is generated by encrypting the encrypted message using the key K 2 . Then, the encrypted message and the intermediary MAC is again encrypted by using the K 2 and concatenated with the encrypted message and sent to the destination. At the receiving end, first, the received ciphertext is encrypted by using key K 2 and compared to the received MAC. The received ciphertext again is decrypted by the key K 2 and compared with the first decrypted MAC twice by the key K 2 . The plaintext is obtained by decrypting the received ciphertext first by K 2 and then by K 1 , using the corresponding decryption techniques respectively. The encryption techniques with key K 2 provides the authentication and with key K 1 provides the confidentiality checking of the transmitted message. The developed technique can be applied to both academic and commercial applications in online or offline electronic transactions for security.(authors)

  8. A qualitative study of the coverage of influenza vaccination on Dutch news sites and social media websites.

    Lehmann, Birthe A; Ruiter, Robert A C; Kok, Gerjo

    2013-06-05

    Information about influenza and the effectiveness of vaccination against influenza is largely available on the Internet, and may influence individual decision making about participation in future influenza vaccination rounds. E-health information has often been found to be inaccurate, or even to contradict Health Authority recommendations, especially when it concerns controversial topics. By means of an online media monitoring programme, Dutch news sites and social media websites were scanned for the Dutch counterparts of the terms influenza, vaccination, vaccine and epidemic during February, March and April 2012. Data were processed with QSR NVivo 8.0 and analysed using a general inductive approach. Three overarching themes were found in both media sources: (1) the (upcoming) influenza epidemic, (2) general information regarding the virus, its prevention and treatment, and (3) uncertainty and mistrust regarding influenza vaccination. Social media tended to report earlier on developments such as the occurrence of an influenza epidemic. The greatest difference was that in social media, influenza was not considered to be a serious disease, and more opposition to the flu shot was expressed in social media, as compared to news media. News media and social media discussed the same topics regarding influenza, but differed in message tone. Whereas news media reports tended to be more objective and non-judgmental, social media more critically evaluated the harmfulness of influenza and the necessity of the flu shot. Media may influence decision making and behaviours of Internet users and may thereby influence the success of vaccination campaigns and recommendations made by health authorities. Social media may be more of a problem in this sense, since it is neither controlled nor censored. Future research should investigate the actual impact of Internet media on the influenza decision making process of its users.

  9. The Message Reporting System of the ATLAS DAQ System

    Caprini, M; Kolos, S; 10th ICATPP Conference on Astroparticle, Particle, Space Physics, Detectors and Medical Physics Applications

    2008-01-01

    The Message Reporting System (MRS) in the ATLAS data acquisition system (DAQ) is one package of the Online Software which acts as a glue of various elements of DAQ, High Level Trigger (HLT) and Detector Control System (DCS). The aim of the MRS is to provide a facility which allows all software components in ATLAS to report messages to other components of the distributed DAQ system. The processes requiring a MRS are on one hand applications that report error conditions or information and on the other hand message processors that receive reported messages. A message reporting application can inject one or more messages into the MRS at any time. An application wishing to receive messages can subscribe to a message group according to defined criteria. The application receives messages that fulfill the subscription criteria when they are reported to MRS. The receiver message processing can consist of anything from simply logging the messages in a file/terminal to performing message analysis. The inter-process comm...

  10. Principles of Multimedia News Systems for Business Applications

    Ioan I. ANDONE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years considerable demand for business oriented multimedia information systems has developed. A multimedia information system is one that can create, import, integrate, store, retrieve, edit, and delete two or more types of media materials in digital form, such as audio, image, full-motion video, and text information. Multimedia information systems play a central role in many business activities. They represent a very special class complex computing systems. This paper surveys a special type of multimedia information systems: multimedia news systems. Multimedia news systems deal with architectures to manage complex multimedia news databases, online presentation and distribution services or the integration of several existing services to meta-services using intelligent news retrieval engines. The leading presentation platform in multimedia news presentation is news networks providing television services and Internet content distribution. The primary focus is on advanced multimedia news systems infrastructure, document standards, application architecture and principles for multimedia news on the Web that suggest long-term trends in this increasingly important area.

  11. CDC MessageWorks: Designing and Validating a Social Marketing Tool to Craft and Defend Effective Messages

    Cole, Galen E.; Keller, Punam A.; Reynolds, Jennifer; Schaur, Michelle; Krause, Diane

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, in partnership with Oak Ridge Associated Universities, designed an online social marketing strategy tool, MessageWorks, to help health communicators effectively formulate messages aimed at changing health behaviors and evaluate message tactics and audience characteristics. MessageWorks is based on the advisor for risk communication model that identifies 10 variables that can be used to predict target audience intentions to comply with health recommendations. This article discusses the value of the MessageWorks tool to health communicators and to the field of social marketing by (1) describing the scientific evidence supporting use of MessageWorks to improve health communication practice and (2) summarizing how to use MessageWorks and interpret the results it produces. PMID:26877714

  12. CDC MessageWorks: Designing and Validating a Social Marketing Tool to Craft and Defend Effective Messages.

    Cole, Galen E; Keller, Punam A; Reynolds, Jennifer; Schaur, Michelle; Krause, Diane

    2016-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, in partnership with Oak Ridge Associated Universities, designed an online social marketing strategy tool, MessageWorks, to help health communicators effectively formulate messages aimed at changing health behaviors and evaluate message tactics and audience characteristics. MessageWorks is based on the advisor for risk communication model that identifies 10 variables that can be used to predict target audience intentions to comply with health recommendations. This article discusses the value of the MessageWorks tool to health communicators and to the field of social marketing by (1) describing the scientific evidence supporting use of MessageWorks to improve health communication practice and (2) summarizing how to use MessageWorks and interpret the results it produces.

  13. Types of Journalistic News Selection or Media Tracks

    SILVIA BRANEA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following question: How do the TV news and the online media platforms reflect reality from Romania and from outside of Romania? The subjective response to this question will be given based on an audiovisual and online monitoring conducted in the week 2-8 May 2011. The main core of our analysis consists of data obtained through monitoring of programs at four local Romanian TV stations (TVR 2, B1TV, Realitatea TV and Antena 3 for one week at the beginning of May, 2011. We also used information provided by two news websites: hotnews.ro and realitatea.ro.The research starts from two assumptions: 1. The news presented by all four TV networks will focus on events in the proximity, on the one hand and on human interest, on the other hand. 2. Online news websites will be more interested in political and social news, both in the region and in more distant areas. From the methodological point of view, the analysis of documents (the audiovisual tracks and the online ones is based on the communicational approach and on hermeneutic analysis.

  14. TYPES OF JOURNALISTIC NEWS SELECTION OR MEDIA TRACKS

    SILVIA BRANEA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following question: How do the TV news and the online media platforms reflect reality from Romania and from outside of Romania? The subjective response to this question will be given based on an audiovisual and online monitoring conducted in the week 2−8 May 2011. The main core of our analysis consists of data obtained through monitoring of programs at four local Romanian TV stations (TVR 2, B1TV, Realitatea TV and Antena 3 for one week at the beginning of May, 2011. We also used information provided by two news websites: hotnews.ro and realitatea.ro. The research starts from two assumptions: 1. The news presented by all four TV networks will focus on events in the proximity, on the one hand and on human interest, on the other hand. 2. Online news websites will be more interested in political and social news, both in the region and in more distant areas. From the methodological point of view, the analysis of documents (the audiovisual tracks and the online ones is based on the communicational approach and on hermeneutic analysis

  15. The news Engine

    Andersson, Ralf

    for ideas etc. Reporters have limitedpossibilities for making own stories and less time for research - each live reportercovers 5-7 stories during a day. People : In a survey, most reporters replied that the new workflow was afundamental change of their work and had major impact on their identity......The News Engine How a new experiment in newsrooms can change process, product and people.   By Ralf Andersson   In fall 2012, the news department of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation,decided to implement a new workflow called ”The News Engine” - in order to workfaster, more freely, flexible...... and with fewer resources. This was done to raisethe productivity. The fundamental principle was that all stories should fit all platforms(content sharing) - and that no one did their own story anymore. DR News introduced 8-10 mobile live teams who are responsible for doinginterviews, record pictures and sound...

  16. Zimbabwe Science News

    -disciplinary and semi-popular. The Zimbabwe Science News has ceased publication. ... An overview of solar and solar-related technologies in Zimbabwe · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  17. The News Media Industry

    Bartlett, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    American news media has two fundamental roles in our democracy: that of eyewitness, giving citizens critical information, and also as the watchdog, providing another arm of "checks and balances" within our governmental system...

  18. The News Media Industry

    2003-06-05

    into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and news of the lives of celebrities. As a result, the American public is, as media critic Mark...presented by multiple outlets is often recycled . For example, a reader of Newsweek may see a similar, if not identical, story in its sibling...teleprompter. News and entertainment have morphed into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and the lives of celebrities. Unfortunately

  19. News from Online: A Spectrum of Color

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-06-01

    Thomas Chasteen's site ( http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/sounds/sound.html) shows how to separate colors using a tuneable monochromator. This graphic comes from his monochromator animation ( http://www.shsu.edu/~chemistry/monochromator/mono.gif). Science Media's site ( http://www.scimedia.com/index.html#scimedia) includes spectroscopy tutorials by Brian Tissue. This graphic can be found at http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-rad.gif (©1998 B. M. Tissue, www.scimedia.com). All the colors in the rainbow! Now that is a good place to start. Go to About Rainbows ( http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/rnbw.html), a tutorial from astronomer Beverly Lynds, working with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The tutorial begins with a historical perspective, complete with a sketch by René Descartes in 1637. The bibliography makes this tutorial a good starting point for color exploration. About Rainbows brings you questions to explorefor example, "What happens when you look at a rainbow through dark glasses?" Try the links to these other sites. Project SkyMath: Making Mathematical Connections ( http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/Skymath.html) is especially for the middle school student. Reproducible masters of these teaching modules can be printed in English and Spanish. From Project SkyMath, you can go to Blue-Skies, a user-friendly graphical interface from The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan ( http://groundhog.sprl.umich.edu/BS.html). And speaking of blue skies, look at a great site, Why is the Sky Blue at http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/sky/sky.shtml. This is a super site from the Arizona Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers, by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Arizona State University. If you go to Patterns in Nature: Light and Optics at http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/activities.shtml, plan to spend some time, for it is wonderful. Another link from the About Rainbows tutorial goes to an experiment that is suitable for older students, Circles of Light--The Mathematics of Rainbows at http://www.geom.umn.edu/education/calc-init/rainbow/. Frederick J. Wicklin and Paul Edelman of the University of Minnesota note that this comprehensive lab is based on a module developed by Steven Janke. Go back to About Rainbows to link to a Java applet, allowing you to change the incident angle and color of light striking a water droplet. This great teaching device is from Fu-Kwun Hwang of the National Taiwan Normal University at http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava /Rainbow/rainbow.html. And while you are here in this site (choose English or Chinese), look at the more than 30 Java applets created by F.-K. Hwang at http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava/index.html. The interactive applet on Shadow/Image and Color is great fun, (http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava/shadow /shadow.html). From mixing colors, we can go to Thomas Chasteen's fine work at http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/sounds/sound.html for an animation (and movie also) of how to separate colors using a tuneable monochromator ( http://www.shsu.edu/~chemistry/monochromator/mono.gif). This colorful graphic, showing incoming parallel white light, is clipped from that monochromator animation. While you are here at this site at Sam Houston State University, look at the other great animations and movies, including a movie showing solution-phase chemiluminescence at http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/chemilumdir/movie.html. So now that we have explored the breaking down of light into its component colors, we need to also look at another process--polarizing light. Let's go to Science Media's comprehensive site ( http://www.scimedia.com/index.html#scimedia) to examine polarized light ( http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/spec/molec/polarim.htm). Of course, most sunglasses polarize light--bringing us back to the question of the rainbow again. Explore here for a while--appreciate the beautiful visible electromagnetic spectrum at http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-visib.jpg. Great spectroscopy tutorials from Brian Tissue of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University are found at Science Media's site. One of my favorite graphics ( http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-rad.gif) reminds us of why light is electromagnetic radiation. But how to we actually see color? Go to the Access Excellence Classic Collection sponsored by Genentech, Inc. (http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/). From here, go to How We See: The First Steps of Human Vision at http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/vision_background.html. Here are good graphics and explanations of the roles of rod and cone cells, and lots more! And marvel a little the next time you see a rainbow. World Wide Web Addresses About Rainbows http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/rnbw.html Project SkyMath: Making Mathematical Connections http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/Skymath.html The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan--Blue- Skies http://groundhog.sprl.umich.edu/BS.html Why is the Sky Blue http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/sky/sky.shtml Patterns in NatureLight and Optics Activities http://acept.la.asu.edu/PiN/act/activities.shtml Circles of Lightthe Mathematics of Rainbows http://www.geom.umn.edu/education/calc-init/rainbow/ The Physics of a Rainbow http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava /Rainbow/rainbow.html The NTNU Virtual Physics Laboratory http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava /index.html Shadow/Image and Color http://science.kongju.ac.kr/phys/shin/experiment/ntnujava/shadow/shadow.html Thomas Chasteen's Chemistry-Based QuickTime Movies, Animations, and Streaming Audio http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/sounds/sound.html Tuneable Monochromator http://www.shsu.edu/~chemistry/monochromator/mono.gif The Chemiluminescence Home Page http://www.shsu.edu/~chm_tgc/chemilumdir/movie.html Science Hypermedia Home Page http://www.scimedia.com/index.html#scimedia Polarimetry http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/spec/molec/polarim.htm The Visible Spectrum http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-visib.jpg Propagation Direction of Electromagnetic Radiation http://www.scimedia.com/chem-ed/light/graphics/em-rad.gif Access Excellence Classic Collection http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/ How We SeeThe First Steps of Human Vision http://www.gene.com/ae/AE/AEC/CC/vision_background.html access date for all sites: April 1999

  20. Can Self-Censorship in News Media be Detected Algorithmically? A Case Study in Latin America

    Tao, Rongrong; Zhou, Baojian; Chen, Feng; Liu, Naifeng; Mares, David; Butler, Patrick; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2016-01-01

    Censorship in social media has been well studied and provides insight into how governments stifle freedom of expression online. Comparatively less (or no) attention has been paid to detecting (self) censorship in traditional media (e.g., news) using social media as a bellweather. We present a novel unsupervised approach that views social media as a sensor to detect censorship in news media wherein statistically significant differences between information published in the news media and the co...

  1. How the doc should (not) talk: When breaking bad news with negations influences patients' immediate responses and medical adherence intentions

    Burgers, C.F.; Beukeboom, C.J.; Sparks, L

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We investigate the role of specific formulations in a doctor's bad news delivery. We focus on the effects of negations and message framing on patients' immediate responses to the message and the doctor, and long-term consequences including quality of life and medical adherence intentions.

  2. News values on social media: News organizations’ Facebook use

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations’ ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process. PMID:29278253

  3. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  4. Anger, Sadness and Fear in Response to Breaking Crime and Accident News Stories: How Emotions Influence Support for Alcohol-Control Public Policies via Concern about Risks

    Solloway, Tyler; Slater, Michael D.; Chung, Adrienne; Goodall, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that discrete emotions, notably anger and fear, can explain effects of news articles on health and alcohol-control policy support. This study advances prior work by coding expressed emotional responses to messages (as opposed to directly manipulated emotions or forced responses), incorporating and controlling for central thoughts, including sadness (a particularly relevant response to tragic stories), and examining concern’s mediating role between emotion and policy support. An experiment with a national online adult panel had participants read one of 60 violent crime or accident news stories, each manipulated to mention or withhold alcohol’s causal contribution. Multi-group structural equation models suggest that stories not mentioning alcohol had a direct effect on policy support via fear and central thoughts, unmediated by concern. When alcohol was mentioned, sadness and anger affects alcohol-control support through concern. Findings help confirm that emotional responses are key in determining news story effects on public support of health policies. PMID:26491487

  5. Unified Internet Messaging

    Healy, Paul; Barber, Declan

    2015-01-01

    As telephony services, mobile services and internet services continue to converge, the prospect of providing Unified Messaging and even Unified Communications becomes increasingly achievable. This paper discusses the growing importance of IP-based networks to Unified Messaging developments and examines some of the key services and protocols that are likely to make Unified Messaging more widely available. In this initial paper, we limit ourselves initially to the unification of text-based mess...

  6. Instant Messaging in Dental Education.

    Khatoon, Binish; Hill, Kirsty B; Walmsley, A Damien

    2015-12-01

    Instant messaging (IM) is when users communicate instantly via their mobile devices, and it has become one of the most preferred choices of tools to communicate amongst health professions students. The aim of this study was to understand how dental students communicate via IM, faculty members' perspectives on using IM to communicate with students, and whether such tools are useful in the learning environment. After free-associating themes on online communication, two draft topic guides for structured interviews were designed that focussed on mobile device-related communication activities. A total of 20 students and six faculty members at the University of Birmingham School of Dentistry agreed to take part in the interviews. Students were selected from years 1-5 representing each year group. The most preferred communication tools were emails, social networking, and IM. Emails were used for more formal messages, and IM and social networking sites were used for shorter messages. WhatsApp was the most used IM app because of its popular features such as being able to check if recipients have read and received messages and group work. The students reported that changes were necessary to improve their communication with faculty members. The faculty members reported having mixed feelings toward the use of IM to communicate with students. The students wished to make such tools a permanent part of their learning environment, but only with the approval of faculty members. The faculty members were willing to accept IM as a communication tool only if it is monitored and maintained by the university and has a positive effect on learning.

  7. NEWS: Eclipse matters (still)!

    1999-05-01

    This collection of snippets has as its theme the 1999 Solar Eclipse, and covers items that might be of interest to eclipse watchers and their associates. Much information can be obtained from the national web site at http://www.eclipse.org.uk. Set up by the CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, on behalf of the UK Eclipse Group, the site is intended to keep viewers abreast of developments during the countdown to the eclipse. The list of contents includes: about eclipses; eclipse pictures; eclipse science; safety advice; latest news; and local information. There is also a wealth of images and video footage, so the site has been organized with the visitor having a small PC and modem in mind, so that the key information can be accessed as quickly as possible. Free colour leaflets containing useful details for eclipse watchers can be obtained from the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. `The Sun - our local star' and `Neutrinos' are additions to PPARC's series introducing key areas of its science. They answer such questions as what the Sun is, what eclipses are, why the Sun is important and where neutrinos come from. They support the National Curriculum Key Stages 3 and 4 plus A-level physics. The A5 leaflets open out into an A2 sized double-sided wall chart and bulk quantitites are available for class sets, visitor centres, exhibitions, open days etc. A full list of PPARC materials can be found at the website http://www.pparc.ac.uk or by order from Mark Wells, PPARC, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1SZ (fax: 01793 442002). A message has been received from George Care, Head of Physics in the Science Department at Mounts Bay School, Penzance, which we now pass on to our readers. During his application for electronic access to Physics Education via the Institute of Physics Affiliated Schools and Colleges scheme, George notes that his school is on the track of the eclipse this summer and he has invited us to pass on the details to anyone who

  8. Networks in the news media

    Bro, Peter

    more formal types of social networks, but also complement or even substitute social networking elsewhere, and as such this particular type of social network offers people both inside and outside the news room new potentials - and problems. This article describe the basic vision of networks in the news......When news reporters connect people in a single news story or in a series of coherent news stories they essentially construct networks in the news media. Networks through which social actors are aligned symbolically in written, visible or audible form. These socio-symbolic networks not only copy...

  9. Auctioning Bulk Mobile Messages

    S. Meij (Simon); L-F. Pau (Louis-François); H.W.G.M. van Heck (Eric)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe search for enablers of continued growth of SMS traffic, as well as the take-off of the more diversified MMS message contents, open up for enterprises the potential of bulk use of mobile messaging , instead of essentially one-by-one use. In parallel, such enterprises or value added

  10. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that

  11. Science News of the Year.

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  12. Kompresi Teks Menggunakan Algoritma Huffman Dan Md5 Pada Instant Messaging Smartphone Android

    Chulkamdi, M. Taofik; Pramono, Sholeh Hadi; Yudaningtyas, Erni

    2015-01-01

    Instant messaging is one of Android social media application that make user possible to send short messages directly in the same time (real time) using text to another user that online in the some network, more ever a lot of user using this application as an alternative communication via short message service (SMS). Remembering how important this application, so writer make an instant message application with small text transmission that will provide in the current needs with Huffman algorith...

  13. Real Time Assessment of Young Adults' Attitudes toward Tobacco Messages.

    Hébert, Emily T; Vandewater, Elizabeth A; Businelle, Michael S; Harrell, Melissa B; Kelder, Steven H; Perry, Cheryl L

    2018-01-01

    We used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to examine young adults' attitudes towards pro-tobacco messages encountered in real time and their association with intentions to use tobacco. Young adults (N = 92, ages 18-29) recorded sightings of marketing or social media related to tobacco in real time via mobile app for 28 days. Participants reported message characteristics, their attitudes towards the message, and intentions to use the depicted product for each submission. We used generalized linear mixed models to examine factors related to attitude towards message and intentions to use tobacco. Messages depicting e-cigarettes (p < .001) or hookah (p < .05) were associated with significantly more favorable attitudes compared with traditional cigarettes. Positive attitude towards the message was significantly associated with intention to use the depicted product (p < .001). Messages depicting e-cigarettes and hookah were significantly associated with higher intention to use. Message source was not significantly related to attitudes towards the message or product use intentions. Marketing featuring e-cigarettes and hookah is an important target for future regulation. Given that pro-tobacco and e-cigarette messages are prevalent online, future research should consider the Internet and social media as important venues for counter-marketing and intervention efforts.

  14. Political News and Political Consciousness

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  15. Mighty vulture back from near extinction | Nickerson | Vulture News

    No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 56 () 2007: pp.104-105. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms ...

  16. Vulture worries stalk activists on Uttarayan | Anon | Vulture News

    No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 56 () 2007: pp.103-103. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms ...

  17. In South Asia, it's cattle vs vultures | Ganguli | Vulture News

    In South Asia, it's cattle vs vultures. Ishani Ganguli. Abstract. No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 55, 2006: 50-51. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  18. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Fusion is based on high quality full length articles. However, in the words of the journal home page, `Nuclear Fusion welcomes Letters as a means to quickly communicate new, maybe preliminary, results which make a significant advancement of the knowledge in the field. Letters should be comprehensive and short, aiming for four printed pages including figures.' I would like to take the opportunity to reiterate this message and to say that, as Editor, I would welcome the submission of high quality Letters. Publishing procedures In-house, Nuclear Fusion's publishing procedures are subject to continuous scrutiny for potential improvements. Of particular note from 2008 are faster than ever peer review and publishing times that have been achieved despite the very rigorous processing to which submissions are subject. Readers may have noticed the implementation of the new article numbering system, announced by the Publisher, Yasmin McGlashan in 2008 Nucl. Fusion 48 010101. This new scheme gives us more flexibilty and has led to faster online publication. The Nuclear Fusion Office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also due to the tireless and largely unsung efforts of the Nuclear Fusion Office in Vienna and IOP Publishing in Bristol. I would like to express my personal thanks to Maria, Katja, Sophy, Sarah, Rachael and Yasmin for the support that they have given to me, the authors and the referees. Season's Greetings I would like to wish our readers, authors, referees and Board of Editors a successful and happy 2009 and thank them for their contributions to Nuclear Fusion in 2008.

  19. CERN television news

    2002-01-01

    CERN events brought right to your desktop by the new video bulletin.   CERN now has its very own news broadcast , or rather 'webcast', with a host of special reports and even a star presenter. From today onwards, just go to the Bulletin's web page, click on the 'video news' link and sit back and enjoy the latest news about CERN, presented in images by Wendy Korda. The ten-minute newscast in both French and English, the Organization's two official languages, presents interviews, pictures of experiments and computer-generated graphics, bringing you right up to date with some of the Laboratory's latest stories. The show concludes with a selection of the best snapshots taken by the CERN Photo Lab. So every one or two months CERN's Audio-Video Service (ETT/DH) will be putting together a video news report that you can watch on your own desktop computer. Daniel Boileau, Patrick Gilbert de Vautibault and Jacques Fichet, the Service's three technicians, came up with the idea of producing this regular feat...

  20. Multimodal news framing effects

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  1. VULTURE NEWS 55.indd

    2006-06-18

    Jun 18, 2006 ... near San Lucas, but the marksmen didn't use non-lead ammunition. Condors eat only carrion – dead carcasses – and are highly susceptible to lead poisoning if they ingest lead bullet ... came in and started eating everything,”. Petersen said. News of the ... And yet the state refuses to act.” Earlier this.

  2. COBE video news

    1989-10-01

    This videotape was produced for hand-out to both local and national broadcast media as a prelude to the launch of the Cosmic Background Explorer. The tape consists of short clips with multi-channel sound to facilitate news media editing.

  3. Antarctic news clips, 1991

    1991-08-01

    Published stories are presented that sample a year's news coverage of Antarctica. The intent is to provide the U.S. Antarctic Program participants with a digest of current issues as presented by a variety of writers and popular publications. The subject areas covered include the following: earth science; ice studies; stratospheric ozone; astrophysics; life science; operations; education; antarctic treaty issues; and tourism

  4. BBC VERSUS EURO NEWS: DISCOURSE AND IDEOLOGY IN NEWS TRANSLATION

    Hosseini, F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare discursive strategies employed by two international news agencies including Euro News and BBC. Van Dijk’s (2004 model of CDA was adopted. Thirty pieces of news about internal affairs of Iran together with their Persian translations were downloaded from the corresponding website, i.e. 30 pieces of English news and their corresponding Persian translations from the Euro News website and 30 pieces of English news with their corresponding translations from the BBC website. The frequency of lexical items was observed to not differ significantly. Two sets of translations were compared to their source texts based on four discursive strategies of hyperbole, polarization, vagueness and euphemism. An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the frequency of strategies applied by the two news agencies. Results revealed no significant difference between the two agencies except for the discursive strategy of vagueness.

  5. Twitter as a news source : How Dutch and British newspapers used tweets in their news coverage, 2007–2011

    Broersma, M.J.; Graham, T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Twitter has become a convenient, cheap and effective beat for journalists in search of news and information. Reporters today increasingly aggregate information online and embed it in journalism discourse. In this paper, we analyse how tweets have increasingly been included as quotes in newspaper

  6. Effects of Electronic Word - of - Mouth Messages

    Choong Hoon Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increased usage of online technologies, there has been an escalation of Electronic Word - of –Mouth (eWOM messages related to sport products and services offered and consumed. Therefore, in this original investigation by applying eWOM to the sport industry, this study examined how the combination of the quality of the eWOM message and the provider of the eWOM message affects purchaseintentions depending on the expertise level of the consumer. This study – which involved the collection of data from 134 students at a large university situated in the Midwest of the United States – utilized repeated measures of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA with tripartite groups of expertise and experimental conditions as independent variables. Purchase intention was the dependent variables. The results indicated that the quality of the eWOM message moderated the effect of the provider of the eWOM message. The subject’s level of expertise also had a moderating role on purchase intention.

  7. How 'Social' are Social News Sites? Exploring the Motivations for Using Reddit.com

    Bogers, Toine; Nordenhoff Wernersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    present a tiered framework of motivational factors for participating on social news sites, based on a comprehensive literature review, drawn from fields like social media research, sociology, (social) psychology, and behavioral economics. We then validate this framework through a survey deployed on Reddit...... surprisingly, the social aspect of social news sites is not a motivating factor for the majority of Reddit users. Influencing the placement and reception of news stories in their niche communities of interest is what draws people to sites such as Reddit.......Social news sites allow their users to submit and vote on online news stories, thereby bypassing the authority and power of traditional newspaper editors. In this paper we explore what motivates users of social news sites, such as Reddit, to participate in this collaborative editorial process. We...

  8. From Social Media to Mainstream News: The Information Flow of the Vaccine-Autism Controversy in the US, Canada, and the UK.

    Jang, S Mo; Mckeever, Brooke W; Mckeever, Robert; Kim, Joon Kyoung

    2017-10-13

    Despite increasing warnings about inaccurate information online, little is known about how social media contribute to the widespread diffusion of unverified health information. This study addresses this issue by examining the vaccine-autism controversy. By looking into a large dataset of Twitter, Reddit posts, and online news over 20 months in the US, Canada, and the UK, our time-series analysis shows that Twitter drives news agendas, and Reddit follows news agendas regarding the vaccine-autism debate. Additionally, the results show that both Twitter and Reddit are more likely to discuss the vaccine-autism link compared to online news content.

  9. Health content analysis of organ donation and transplantation news on Turkish television channels and in Turkish print media.

    Colak, M Yavuz; Hekimoglu, D; Ersoy, K; Sozen, F; Haberal, M

    2010-01-01

    The media affects individuals' behaviors, especially by means of news and advertisements. In this study, we evaluated health content of organ donation and transplantation news in the printed media and on television programs for a 1-year period in Turkey. We examined 2449 news items in 230 newspapers and magazines; 1179 news programs on 45 television channels, all concerning organ donation and transplantation. The news obtained from the Media Pursuit Center were transferred to an electronic file to evaluate the format and content of the news. Nine variables were examined about the scope and the formal characteristics of the news: the publication name, its type, the province, the date, the headline, the title length, the presence of a photograph, or its kind, the news size, and the page number. In the content analysis of the news, we also examined 9 variables: the topic, the message of the headline, the property of the words in the title, the identification of photographs in the news, the age, gender of actors in the news, as well as donor or recipient. In a summary, print media and television channels, failed to show sufficient information about organ donation and transplantation. The percentage of news about organ donation and transplantation was small and mostly negative items in the media. On television channels, sufficient place was not given to organ donation and transplantation. The news in printed media and on television channels was not about motivated or altruistic behavior. The pattern of organ donation and transplantation news is important in terms of perception and comment by the public. Furthermore it directly affects the perception of the news by the reader.

  10. Instant Messaging by SIP

    Muhi, Daniel; Dulai, Tibor; Jaskó, Szilárd

    2008-11-01

    SIP is a general-purpose application layer protocol which is able to establish sessions between two or more parties. These sessions are mainly telephone calls and multimedia conferences. However it can be used for other purposes like instant messaging and presence service. SIP has a very important role in mobile communication as more and more communicating applications are going mobile. In this paper we would like to show how SIP can be used for instant messaging purposes.

  11. Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News

    Kjetil Vaage Øie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service.

  12. From Reader to Writer: Citizen Journalism as News Produsage

    Bruns, Axel

    Today, participatory or citizen journalism - journalism which enables readers to become writers - exists online and offline in a variety of forms and formats, operates under a number of editorial schemes, and focuses on a wide range of topics from the specialist to the generic and the micro-local to the global. Key models in this phenomenon include veteran sites Slashdot and Indymedia, as well as news-related weblogs; more recent additions into the mix have been the South Korean OhmyNews, which in 2003 was “the most influential online news site in that country, attracting an estimated 2 million readers a day” (Gillmor, 2003a, p. 7), with its new Japanese and international offshoots, as well as the Wikipedia with its highly up-to-date news and current events section and its more recent offshoot Wikinews, and even citizen-produced video news as it is found in sites such as YouTube and Current.tv.

  13. [Influence of the news media].

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  14. Counter-ideological forces of “Mr Gate” in online Journalism in Malaysia: A study of MalaysiaKini and The Malaysian Insider

    Kasmani Mohd Faizal; Sabran Rosidayu; Othman Siti Suriani; Adzrah Ramle Noor

    2017-01-01

    The online news media are said to have changed the understanding of the gatekeeping theory. Due to the virtually unlimited news space together with the interactivity in the online presentation of news, the Internet defies the whole conception of gatekeeping in journalism. This article seeks to examine the influence of gatekeeping forces in two influential Malaysian online news portals, MalaysiaKini and The Malaysian Insider (TMI), during the 2013 Malaysian general election. Based on the hiera...

  15. Managing the Risks and Rewards of Instant Messaging

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    You probably think instant messaging (IM) as something teenagers do to chat up friends online, whether across the street or across the world. But IM has some buttoned-down business benefits, as well as some risks you may not be aware of. Unlike e-mail, in which you fire off messages to recipients who read them when they next check their in-box,…

  16. Songs as a Medium for Embedded Reproductive Messages

    Dawn R. Hobbs

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that sensational news stories as well as popular romance novels often feature themes related to important topics in evolutionary psychology. In the first of four studies described in this paper we examined the song lyrics from three Billboard charts: Country, Pop, and R&B. A content analysis of the lyrics revealed 18 reproductive themes that read like an outline for a course in evolutionary psychology. Approximately 92% of the 174 songs that made it into the Top Ten in 2009 contained one or more reproductive messages, with an average of 10.49 reproductive phrases per song. Although differences in the frequency of different themes between charts were found, further analyses showed that the most popular/bestselling songs contained significantly more reproductive messages. An analysis of the lyrics of opera arias and art songs also revealed evidence for many of the same embedded reproductive messages extending back more than 400 years.

  17. Contact: Releasing the news

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  18. The Effects of Bad News and Good News on a Newspaper's Image.

    Haskins, Jack B.; Miller, M. Mark

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that whether a newspaper carries mostly good news or mostly bad news affects the image of the paper, with bad news having negative effects and good news having positive effects on readers' perceptions of the newspaper. (FL)

  19. Arctic Warming as News - Perils and Possibilities

    Revkin, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    A science journalist in his 30th year covering human-driven climate change, including on three Arctic reporting trips, reflects on successes and setbacks as news media, environmentalists and Arctic communities have tried to convey the significance of polar change to a public for which the ends of the Earth will always largely be a place of the imagination.Novel challenges are arising in the 24/7 online media environment, as when a paper by a veteran climate scientist proposing a mechanism for abrupt sea-level rise became a big news story before it was accepted by the open-review journal to which it had been submitted. New science is digging in on possible connections between changing Arctic sea ice and snow conditions and disruptive winter weather in more temperate northern latitudes, offering a potential link between this distant region and the lives of ordinary citizens. As cutting-edge research, such work gets substantial media attention. But, as with all new areas of inquiry, uncertainty dominates - creating the potential for distracting the public and policymakers from the many aspects of anthropogenic climate change that are firmly established - but, in a way, boring because of that.With the challenges, there are unprecedented opportunities for conveying Arctic science. In some cases, researchers on expeditions are partnering with media, offering both scientists and news outlets fresh ways to convey the story of Arctic change in an era of resource constraints.Innovative uses of crittercams, webcams, and satellite observations offer educators and interested citizens a way to track and appreciate Arctic change. But more can be done to engage the public directly without the news media as an intermediary, particularly if polar scientists or their institutions test some of the established practices honed by more experienced communicators at NASA.

  20. The message is the message-maker.

    Chalkley, A B

    1977-03-01

    For those engaged in family planning or other demographic work of an active kind, serious errors can be made and much money and skill wasted unless there is a clear idea of available means of communication. Literacy and media-diffusion figures offer vague parameters, especially in Asia, and the role of spoken communication -- considered key in "illiterate" societies -- is even more difficult to assess. For mass media, the starting point is "diffusion rates" representing numbers of TV sets owned or newspapers sold per 1000 population and so on -- measures of quantity. This article surveys the population growth rates, urban-rural distribution, educational levels, literacy rates, numbers of newspapers bought, radios and TVs owned (per 1000 population) for 12 Asian countries, and discusses their meaning in terms of media use. Chief among the points made are that print media still have an enormous role to play in the developing countries -- newspaper diffusion rates are quite high, even in countries with low urban population (especially India). The quality of electronic media (too often considered the natural "wave of the future" everywhere) varies but is generally not high. Where they are fully developed their role is vital -- but it might be noted that it is the message makers themselves who are most vital. Choosing the right medium and the proper message for it is essential.

  1. Contagious comments: what was the online buzz about the 2011 Quebec measles outbreak?

    Jennifer A Pereira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although interruption of endemic measles was achieved in the Americas in 2002, Quebec experienced an outbreak in 2011 of 776 reported cases; 80% of these individuals had not been fully vaccinated. We analyzed readers' online responses to Canadian news articles regarding the outbreak to better understand public perceptions of measles and vaccination. METHODS: We searched Canadian online English and French news sites for articles posted between April 2011 and March 2012 containing the words "measles" and "Quebec". We included articles that i concerned the outbreak or related vaccination strategies; and ii generated at least ten comments. Two English and two bilingual researchers coded the unedited comments, categorizing codes to allow themes to emerge. RESULTS: We analyzed 448 comments from 188 individuals, in response to three French articles and six English articles; 112 individuals expressed positive perceptions of measles vaccination (2.2 comments/person, 38 were negative (4.2 comments/person, 11 had mixed feelings (1.5 comments/person, and 27 expressed no opinion (1.1 comments/person. Vaccine-supportive themes involved the success of vaccination in preventing disease spread, societal responsibility to vaccinate for herd immunity, and refutation of the autism link. Those against measles vaccination felt it was a personal rather than societal choice, and conveyed a distrust of vaccine manufacturers, believing that measles infection is not only safe but safer than vaccination. Commenters with mixed feelings expressed uncertainty of the infection's severity, and varied in support of all vaccines based on perceived risk/benefit ratios. CONCLUSION: The anti-vaccine minority's volume of comments translates to a disproportionately high representation on online boards. Public health messages should address concerns by emphasizing that immunization is always a personal choice in Canada, and that the pharmaceutical industry is strictly

  2. An Examination of Adolescent Recall of Anti-Smoking Messages: Attitudes, Message Type, and Message Perceptions.

    Bigsby, Elisabeth; Monahan, Jennifer L; Ewoldsen, David R

    2017-04-01

    Delayed message recall may be influenced by currently held accessible attitudes, the nature of the message, and message perceptions (perception of bias and message elaboration). This study examined the potential of message perceptions to mediate the influence of valenced attitude accessibility and message type on unaided recall of anti-smoking Public Service Announcements (PSAs). In a field experiment, ninth grade students (N = 244) watched three PSAs and responded to items on laptop computers. Twelve weeks later, follow-up telephone surveys were conducted to assess unaided recall. Both valenced attitude accessibility and message type were associated with message perceptions. However, only perception of message bias partially mediated the relationship between message type and unaided recall.

  3. The BlackBerry Project: Capturing the Content of Adolescents’ Text Messaging

    Underwood, Marion K.; Rosen, Lisa H.; More, David; Ehrenreich, Sam; Gentsch, Joanna K.

    2011-01-01

    This brief report presents an innovative method for capturing the content of adolescents’ electronic communication on handheld devices: text messaging, email, and Instant Messaging. In an ongoing longitudinal study, adolescents were provided with BlackBerry devices with service plans paid by the investigators, and use of text messaging was examined when participants were 15 years old and in the 10th grade (N=175, 81 girls). BlackBerries are configured so that the content of all text messages, email messages, and Instant Messages is saved to a secure server and organized in a highly secure, searchable, online archive. This paper describes the technology used to devise this method and ethical considerations. Evidence for validity is presented, including information on use of text messaging to show that participants used these devices heavily and frequencies of profane and sexual language in a two-day sample of text messaging to demonstrate that they were communicating openly. PMID:22004337

  4. An Evaluation of Online Help for the NOTIS OPAC.

    White, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of online help systems in online public access catalogs (OPACs) focuses on a study that evaluated the online help system for the NOTIS (Northwestern Online Total Integrated System) OPAC. Features of the system reviewed include online functions; training features; general interface features; access points; and message content and display…

  5. How Television News Programs Use Video News Releases.

    Harmon, Mark D.; White, Candace

    2001-01-01

    Examines actual use in television news broadcasts of video news releases (VNRs). Finds that all sizes of markets were likely to use VNRs. Finds that the most common use was as a voice-over story in an early evening newscast, and that VNRs associated with children and their safety or health got the greatest number of uses. (SR)

  6. The good news about giving bad news to patients.

    Farber, Neil J; Urban, Susan Y; Collier, Virginia U; Weiner, Joan; Polite, Ronald G; Davis, Elizabeth B; Boyer, E Gil

    2002-12-01

    There are few data available on how physicians inform patients about bad news. We surveyed internists about how they convey this information. We surveyed internists about their activities in giving bad news to patients. One set of questions was about activities for the emotional support of the patient (11 items), and the other was about activities for creating a supportive environment for delivering bad news (9 items). The impact of demographic factors on the performance of emotionally supportive items, environmentally supportive items, and on the number of minutes reportedly spent delivering news was analyzed by analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis. More than half of the internists reported that they always or frequently performed 10 of the 11 emotionally supportive items and 6 of the 9 environmentally supportive items while giving bad news to patients. The average time reportedly spent in giving bad news was 27 minutes. Although training in giving bad news had a significant impact on the number of emotionally supportive items reported (P woman, unmarried, and having a history of major illness were also associated with reporting a greater number of emotionally supportive activities. Internists report that they inform patients of bad news appropriately. Some deficiencies exist, specifically in discussing prognosis and referral of patients to support groups. Physician educational efforts should include discussion of prognosis with patients as well as the availability of support groups.

  7. News from the world

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    News from the world in relation with nuclear power and fuel cycle are given: Dismantling of the research reactor of the Pasteur Institute, Areva gets the contract to replace the vessel caps for the nuclear power plant of Diablo Canyon, the United Kingdom chooses the renewal of the nuclear park and an increase in the use of renewable energy sources, The united states launches a call to projects for the building of new generation nuclear power plants, in Argentina the government develops its nuclear industry, the Russian federation proposes the creation of an international center for the fuel cycle are the principal points that are developed in this issue. (N.C.)

  8. News from the future

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a corpus linguistic analysis of the development in future-oriented political journalism in four Danish newspapers in the period 1997–2013 (N = 2954 full articles = 1,553,038 word tokens). Keyword analysis and concordance analysis are applied within a framework of grammatical......-semantic theory of tense and modal verbs and semantic-pragmatic theory of time meaning, modality and speech acts. The results suggest, unexpectedly, that the newspapers – and news reports in particular – seem to have become less future-oriented in the period. At the same time, however, the articles...

  9. CERN Video News

    2003-01-01

    From Monday you can see on the web the new edition of CERN's Video News. Thanks to a collaboration between the audiovisual teams at CERN and Fermilab, you can see a report made by the American laboratory. The clip concerns the LHC magnets that are being constructed at Fermilab. Also in the programme: the spectacular rotation of one of the ATLAS coils, the arrival at CERN of the first American magnet made at Brookhaven, the story of the discovery 20 years ago of the W and Z bosons at CERN. http://www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page.

  10. Nuclear waste: good news

    Gay, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The author states that the problem of nuclear wastes is solved. He states that 90 per cent of radioactive wastes are now permanently managed and that technical solutions for deep geological storage and for transmutation will soon solve the problem for the remaining 10 pc. He states that geological storage will be funded (it is included in electricity price). He denounces why these facts which he consider as good news, do not prevail. He proposes several documents in appendix: a text explaining the nuclear fuel cycle in France, and an extract of a report made by the national inventory of radioactive materials and wastes

  11. Relating group size and posting activity of an online community of financial investors: Regularities and seasonal patterns

    Racca, P.; Casarin, R.; Dondio, P.; Squazzoni, F.

    2018-03-01

    Group size can potentially affect collective activity and individual propensity to contribute to collective goods. Mancur Olson, in his Logic of Collective Action, argued that individual contribution to a collective good tends to be lower in groups of large size. Today, online communication platforms represent an interesting ground to study such collaborative dynamics under possibly different conditions (e.g., lower costs related to gather and share information). This paper examines the relationship between group size and activity in an online financial forum, where users invest time in sharing news, analysis and comments with other investors. We looked at about 24 million messages shared in more than ten years in the finanzaonline.com online forum. We found that the relationship between the number of active users and the number of posts shared by those users is of the power type (with exponent α > 1) and is subject to periodic fluctuations, mostly driven by hour-of-the-day and day-of-the-week effects. The daily patterns of the exponent showed a divergence between working week and weekend days. In general, the exponent was lower before noon, where investors are typically interested in market news, higher in the late afternoon, where markets are closing and investors need better understanding of the situation. Further research is needed, especially at the micro level, to dissect the mechanisms behind these regularities.

  12. Delivering Bad News: Attitudes, Feelings, and Practice Characteristics Among Speech-Language Pathologists.

    Gold, Rinat; Gold, Azgad

    2018-02-06

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, feelings, and practice characteristics of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Israel regarding the subject of delivering bad news. One hundred and seventy-three Israeli SLPs answered an online survey. Respondents represented SLPs in Israel in all stages of vocational experience, with varying academic degrees, from a variety of employment settings. The survey addressed emotions involved in the process of delivering bad news, training on this subject, and background information of the respondents. Frequency distributions of the responses of the participants were determined, and Pearson correlations were computed to determine the relation between years of occupational experience and the following variables: frequency of delivering bad news, opinions regarding training, and emotions experienced during the process of bad news delivery. Our survey showed that bad news delivery is a task that most participants are confronted with from the very beginning of their careers. Participants regarded training in the subject of delivering bad news as important but, at the same time, reported receiving relatively little training on this subject. In addition, our survey showed that negative emotions are involved in the process of delivering bad news. Training SLPs on specific techniques is required for successfully delivering bad news. The emotional burden associated with breaking bad news in the field of speech-language pathology should be noticed and addressed.

  13. Pushed news: when the news comes to the cellphone

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet which state that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  14. PUSHED NEWS: When the news comes to the cellphone

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet whichstate that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  15. Are Instant Messages Speech?

    Baron, Naomi S.

    Instant messaging (IM) is commonly viewed as a “spoken” medium, in light of its reputation for informality, non-standard spelling and punctuation, and use of lexical shortenings and emoticons. However, the actual nature of IM is an empirical issue that bears linguistic analysis.

  16. Microprocessorized message multiplexer

    Ejzman, S.; Guglielmi, L.; Jaeger, J.J.

    1980-07-01

    The 'Microprocessorized Message Multiplexer' is an elementary development tool used to create and debug the software of a target microprocessor (User Module: UM). It connects together four devices: a terminal, a cassette recorder, the target microprocessor and a host computer where macro and editor for the M 6800 microprocessor are resident [fr

  17. Grounding in Instant Messaging

    Fox Tree, Jean E.; Mayer, Sarah A.; Betts, Teresa E.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated predictions of the "collaborative theory of language use" (Clark, 1996) as applied to instant messaging (IM). This theory describes how the presence and absence of different grounding constraints causes people to interact differently across different communicative media (Clark & Brennan, 1991). In Study 1, we…

  18. The Prodiguer Messaging Platform

    Denvil, S.; Greenslade, M. A.; Carenton, N.; Levavasseur, G.; Raciazek, J.

    2015-12-01

    CONVERGENCE is a French multi-partner national project designed to gather HPC and informatics expertise to innovate in the context of running French global climate models with differing grids and at differing resolutions. Efficient and reliable execution of these models and the management and dissemination of model output are some of the complexities that CONVERGENCE aims to resolve.At any one moment in time, researchers affiliated with the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) climate modeling group, are running hundreds of global climate simulations. These simulations execute upon a heterogeneous set of French High Performance Computing (HPC) environments. The IPSL's simulation execution runtime libIGCM (library for IPSL Global Climate Modeling group) has recently been enhanced so as to support hitherto impossible realtime use cases such as simulation monitoring, data publication, metrics collection, simulation control, visualizations … etc. At the core of this enhancement is Prodiguer: an AMQP (Advanced Message Queue Protocol) based event driven asynchronous distributed messaging platform. libIGCM now dispatches copious amounts of information, in the form of messages, to the platform for remote processing by Prodiguer software agents at IPSL servers in Paris. Such processing takes several forms: Persisting message content to database(s); Launching rollback jobs upon simulation failure; Notifying downstream applications; Automation of visualization pipelines; We will describe and/or demonstrate the platform's: Technical implementation; Inherent ease of scalability; Inherent adaptiveness in respect to supervising simulations; Web portal receiving simulation notifications in realtime.

  19. 3. Secure Messaging

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 1. Electronic Commerce - Secure Messaging. V Rajaraman. Series Article Volume 6 Issue 1 January 2001 pp 8-17. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/01/0008-0017 ...

  20. Characterizing popularity dynamics of online videos

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Shi, , Yu-Qiang; Liao, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Online popularity has a major impact on videos, music, news and other contexts in online systems. Characterizing online popularity dynamics is nature to explain the observed properties in terms of the already acquired popularity of each individual. In this paper, we provide a quantitative, large scale, temporal analysis of the popularity dynamics in two online video-provided websites, namely MovieLens and Netflix. The two collected data sets contain over 100 million records and even span...

  1. Source Similarity and Social Media Health Messages: Extending Construal Level Theory to Message Sources.

    Young, Rachel

    2015-09-01

    Social media users post messages about health goals and behaviors to online social networks. Compared with more traditional sources of health communication such as physicians or health journalists, peer sources are likely to be perceived as more socially close or similar, which influences how messages are processed. This experimental study uses construal level theory of psychological distance to predict how mediated health messages from peers influence health-related cognition and behavioral intention. Participants were exposed to source cues that identified peer sources as being either highly attitudinally and demographically similar to or different from participants. As predicted by construal level theory, participants who perceived sources of social media health messages as highly similar listed a greater proportion of beliefs about the feasibility of health behaviors and a greater proportion of negative beliefs, while participants who perceived sources as more dissimilar listed a greater proportion of positive beliefs about the health behaviors. Results of the study could be useful in determining how health messages from peers could encourage individuals to set realistic health goals.

  2. Designing Skin Cancer Prevention Messages: Should We Emphasize Gains or Losses? Message Framing, Risk Type, and Prior Experience.

    Lee, Moon J; Kang, Hannah

    2018-05-01

    To test whether message framing (ie, gain vs. loss) and risk type (ie, health vs appearance risk) in skin cancer prevention messages interact with one's prior experience. Two experiments with a 2 (message framing: gain vs loss) × 2 (risk type: health vs appearance risk) factorial design were conducted. The participants were given a URL to the experiment website via e-mail. On the first page of the website, the participants were told that they would be asked to evaluate a skin cancer print public service announcement (PSA): Online experiments. A total of 397 individuals participated (236 for experiment 1 and 161 for experiment 2). Apparatus: Four versions of the skin cancer print PSAs were developed. Four PSAs were identical except for the 2 manipulated components: message framing and risk type. Measures were adopted from Cho and Boster (message framing), Jones and Leary and Kiene et al. (risk type), De Vries, Mesters, van't Riet, Willems, and Reubsaet and Knight, Kirincich, Farmer, and Hood (prior experience), and Hammond, Fong, Zanna, Thrasher, and Borland and Hoffner and Ye (behavioral intent). General linear models were used to test hypotheses. Three-way interactions among message framing, risk type, and prior experience were found: When the intent of the message was to encourage sunscreen use, the effects of message framing and risk type were shown to be the exact opposite directions from when the intent was to discourage indoor/outdoor tanning. To discourage tanning among those with prior experience, messages emphasizing losses in terms of one's health will work better. For those with no prior experience, messages emphasizing potential appearance losses will work better for discouraging tanning while messages emphasizing gains like improving appearance will do a better job in encouraging sunscreen use.

  3. Getting Out the Good News.

    Paciancia, David

    1995-01-01

    A majority of American schools are meeting the challenge of educating children. A New York State district gets out the good news by producing school newsletters and videos, by constant and close contact with the local news media, and by forming ties with local real estate agents. (MLF)

  4. Is macroeconomic announcement news priced?

    de Goeij, Peter; Hu, Jiehui; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We test whether news contained in macroeconomic announcements (MEAs) is priced in the cross-section of stock returns. When including news on a set of widely followed individual macroeconomic fundamentals in the cross-section of stock returns, estimates of their prices of risk are consistent with the

  5. What Turns Events into News?

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  6. CERN Video News on line

    2003-01-01

    The latest CERN video news is on line. In this issue : an interview with the Director General and reports on the new home for the DELPHI barrel and the CERN firemen's spectacular training programme. There's also a vintage video news clip from 1954. See: www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page

  7. Does the Screening Status of Message Characters Affect Message Effects?

    Alber, Julia M.; Glanz, Karen

    2018-01-01

    Public health messages can be used to increase awareness about colorectal cancer screenings. Free or inexpensive images for creating health messages are readily available, yet little is known about how a pictured individual's engagement in the behavior of interest affects message outcomes. Participants (N = 360), aged 50 to 75 years, completed an…

  8. Climate News Across Media Platforms

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2015-01-01

    In a changing media landscape marked by technological, institutional and cultural convergence, comparative and cross-media content analysis represents a valuable analytical tool in mapping the diverse channels of climate change communication. This paper presents a comparative study of climate...... quantitative and qualitative content analysis the paper documents and explores the extent and character of climate change news across different media platforms. The study aims at contributing to the on-going assessment of how news media are addressing climate change at a time when old and new media...... change news on five different media platforms: newspapers, television, radio, web-news and mobile news. It investigates the themes and actors represented in public climate change communication as well as the diverse possibilities of participating in public debates and information sharing. By combining...

  9. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    Paola Cerchiello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM, that takes into account covariates as well. Our aim is to study the possible evolution of topics extracted from two well known news archive—Reuters and Bloomberg—and to investigate a causal effect in the diffusion of the news by means of a Granger causality test. Our results show that both the temporal dynamics and the spatial differentiation matter in the news contagion.

  10. The effects of colour and valence on news evaluation.

    Kaspar, Kai; Grümmer, Melanie; Kießler, Antje; Neuß, Celina; Schröter, Franziska

    2017-12-01

    Research across different fields of psychology has reported effects of colour cues on a variety of cognitive processes. Especially, the colour red has been shown to have striking influences. In the context of media reception, however, colour effects have been widely neglected so far. This study made a first step in this direction by investigating the effects of the colour red (compared with blue and grey) on the way news articles are evaluated. Two types of news were framed by a coloured border while the valence of the news content additionally varied. Based on 369 participants who read and evaluated the news articles online, we observed effects for colour cues and news valence in the absence of an interaction effect, indicating that the colour red induced approach motivation. However, only the contrast between red and grey reached statistical significance, indicating that chromatic and achromatic colours may differ in their perceived visual saliency. Overall, these results provide an important complement to previous studies and have practical implications for media researchers and producers. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  11. Written Evidence Submitted to the House of Commons-Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee’s Inquiry on Fake News

    Fuchs, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Executive Summary This submission provides evidence on four aspects: 1. What do we know about fake news, fake profiles/accounts, and fake attention on social media? 2. What are the causes of fake news, political bots and fake social media accounts? 3. What are the problems and impacts of fake news, political bots and fake accounts? 4. What can be done against fake news culture? This submission gives special attention to the role of online advertising in fake news culture. (§§1.1-1.16) Reports...

  12. News and Announcements

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.) A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970 The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator Discovery of Lawrencium How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms The Discovery of Element 106-Finally The Naming of Element 106 The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements What Good Is a Heavy Element? To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall

  13. Estimation of Cross-Lingual News Similarities Using Text-Mining Methods

    Zhouhao Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs based on machine learning from financial news articles have been proposed. Every second, innumerable text data, including all kinds news, reports, messages, reviews, comments, and tweets are generated on the Internet, and these are written not only in English but also in other languages such as Chinese, Japanese, French, etc. By taking advantage of multi-lingual text resources provided by Thomson Reuters News, we developed two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs from multilingual text resources. In our first method, we propose a novel structure that uses the word information and the machine learning method effectively in this task. Simultaneously, we developed a bidirectional Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM based method to calculate cross-lingual semantic text similarity for long text and short text, respectively. Thus, when an important news article is published, users can read similar news articles that are written in their native language using our method.

  14. Degree sequence in message transfer

    Yamuna, M.

    2017-11-01

    Message encryption is always an issue in current communication scenario. Methods are being devised using various domains. Graphs satisfy numerous unique properties which can be used for message transfer. In this paper, I propose a message encryption method based on degree sequence of graphs.

  15. News trends and web search query of HIV/AIDS in Hong Kong

    Chiu, Alice P. Y.; Lin, Qianying

    2017-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Hong Kong has worsened in recent years, with major contributions from high-risk subgroup of men who have sex with men (MSM). Internet use is prevalent among the majority of the local population, where they sought health information online. This study examines the impacts of HIV/AIDS and MSM news coverage on web search query in Hong Kong. Methods Relevant news coverage about HIV/AIDS and MSM from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2014 was obtained from the WiseNews databse. News trends were created by computing the number of relevant articles by type, topic, place of origin and sub-populations. We then obtained relevant search volumes from Google and analysed causality between news trends and Google Trends using Granger Causality test and orthogonal impulse function. Results We found that editorial news has an impact on “HIV” Google searches on HIV, with the search term popularity peaking at an average of two weeks after the news are published. Similarly, editorial news has an impact on the frequency of “AIDS” searches two weeks after. MSM-related news trends have a more fluctuating impact on “MSM” Google searches, although the time lag varies anywhere from one week later to ten weeks later. Conclusions This infodemiological study shows that there is a positive impact of news trends on the online search behavior of HIV/AIDS or MSM-related issues for up to ten weeks after. Health promotional professionals could make use of this brief time window to tailor the timing of HIV awareness campaigns and public health interventions to maximise its reach and effectiveness. PMID:28922376

  16. Message from Fermilab Director

    2009-01-01

    With this issue’s message, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone opens a new series of occasional exchanges between CERN and other laboratories world-wide. As part of this exchange, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, wrote a message in Tuesday’s edition of Fermilab TodayPerspectivesNothing is more important for our worldwide particle physics community than successfully turning on the LHC later this year. The promise for great discoveries is huge, and many of the plans for our future depend on LHC results. Those of us planning national programmes in anticipation of data from the LHC face formidable challenges to develop future facilities that are complementary to the LHC, whatever the physics discoveries may be. At Fermilab, this has led us to move forcefully with a programme at the intensity frontier, where experiments with neutrinos and rare decays open a complementary window into nature. Our ultimate goal for a unified picture of nat...

  17. ONLINE PORNOGRAPHY AND SEXUALITY: SOME RESULTS OF EU KIDS ONLINE SURVEY II IN THE ROMANIAN CASE

    VALENTINA MARINESCU

    2014-01-01

    The present article intends to analyze the exposure of Romanian children and teens to sexually explicit message and the so-called „sexting” activities they perform in the online environment. The main research topic to which we try to find some answers is: are young people more exposed to risks because they view sexually explicit content online and send sexual messages to others? Our results validate the risk migration hypothesis, the blurring boundaries between the online and offline world...

  18. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  19. WhatsApp Messaging: Achievements and Success in Academia

    Nitza, Davidivitch; Roman, Yavich

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant rise in the use of technological means in general and in academic teaching in particular. Many programs have been developed that include computer-assisted teaching, as well as online courses at educational institutions. The current study focuses on WhatsApp messaging and its use in academia. Studies…

  20. Privacy implications of presence sharing in mobile messaging applications

    Buchenscheit, Andreas; Könings, Bastian; Neubert, Andreas; Schaub, Florian; Schneider, Matthias; Kargl, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Mobile messaging applications, such as WhatsApp, provide a free alternative for mobile texting on smartphones. Mobile messengers typically also share presence information about users to indicate when a user is online. We investigated the privacy implications of such presence updates, using WhatsApp

  1. A Qualitative Study of Smokers' Responses to Messages Discouraging Dual Tobacco Product Use

    Popova, Lucy; Kostygina, Ganna; Sheon, Nicolas M.; Ling, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette companies increasingly promote novel smokeless tobacco products to smokers, encouraging them to use smokeless tobacco in smoke-free environments. New messages may counteract this promotion. We developed 12 initial anti-smokeless message ideas and tested them in eight online focus groups with 75 US smokers. Those smokers who never tried…

  2. News from Afar

    Harmsen, Peter

    in Denmark immediately following the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943, and a second wave erupted in the summer of 1944 after the Normandy landings. In other words, knowledge of the war at large was an important aspect of life in German-controlled Europe in the 1940s, but remains somewhat understudied......News filtering through about the changing fortunes of the Axis had a direct impact on public opinion in occupied Europe during the war years, not only affecting morale but also at times triggering mass popular action. For example, a wave of protests against the German occupation broke out...... theater of war by writers of diaries in Denmark. It can be tentatively concluded that while reporting on the Pacific was relatively neutral in tone and did not, to a systematic extent, exaggerate Japanese victories, the Danish public especially paid attention to that theater of war in 1941 and 1942...

  3. NetWorking News

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    For many years cooperative design was primarily concerned with the development of IT supported systems for professional users. However, the cooperative design approach can embrace other social practices such as children’s everyday life. At a methodological level there is no difference in designing...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....... with adults or children. However there is a need for new methods to support communication and collaboration between designers and children. This article proposes a new method for understandings children’s appropriation of new technology in an interactive workshop setting. The method, which we call...

  4. News from the world

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers a series of brief news concerning nuclear industry throughout the world. Russia and Venezuela have signed an agreement for the construction of the first nuclear power plant in Venezuela. Russia and Ukraine have signed an agreement for the construction of a nuclear fuel plant in Ukraine, this plant will produce fuel assemblies for VVER reactors. The Italian authorities have stated that the come back of nuclear energy will allow Italy to comply with the Kyoto protocol. The French consortium Novarka is constructing the new sarcophagus for the Chernobyl reactor whose cost will reach 870.10 6 euros. The Socatri company has been discharged on the count of environment pollution in the accident that occurred in July 2008 on the Tricastin plant but the company was fined for not reporting in due delay the accident. (A.C.)

  5. Message Correlation Analysis Tool for NOvA

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A complex running system, such as the NOvA online data acquisition, consists of a large number of distributed but closely interacting components. This paper describes a generic realtime correlation analysis and event identification engine, named Message Analyzer. Its purpose is to capture run time abnormalities and recognize system failures based on log messages from participating components. The initial design of analysis engine is driven by the DAQ of the NOvA experiment. The Message Analyzer performs filtering and pattern recognition on the log messages and reacts to system failures identified by associated triggering rules. The tool helps the system maintain a healthy running state and to minimize data corruption. This paper also describes a domain specific language that allows the recognition patterns and correlation rules to be specified in a clear and flexible way. In addition, the engine provides a plugin mechanism for users to implement specialized patterns or rules in generic languages such as C++.

  6. Message Correlation Analysis Tool for NOvA

    Lu Qiming; Biery, Kurt A; Kowalkowski, James B

    2012-01-01

    A complex running system, such as the NOvA online data acquisition, consists of a large number of distributed but closely interacting components. This paper describes a generic real-time correlation analysis and event identification engine, named Message Analyzer. Its purpose is to capture run time abnormalities and recognize system failures based on log messages from participating components. The initial design of analysis engine is driven by the data acquisition (DAQ) of the NOvA experiment. The Message Analyzer performs filtering and pattern recognition on the log messages and reacts to system failures identified by associated triggering rules. The tool helps the system maintain a healthy running state and to minimize data corruption. This paper also describes a domain specific language that allows the recognition patterns and correlation rules to be specified in a clear and flexible way. In addition, the engine provides a plugin mechanism for users to implement specialized patterns or rules in generic languages such as C++.

  7. Message correlation analysis tool for NOvA

    Lu, Qiming [Fermilab; Biery, Kurt A. [Fermilab; Kowalkowski, James B. [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    A complex running system, such as the NOvA online data acquisition, consists of a large number of distributed but closely interacting components. This paper describes a generic real-time correlation analysis and event identification engine, named Message Analyzer. Its purpose is to capture run time abnormalities and recognize system failures based on log messages from participating components. The initial design of analysis engine is driven by the data acquisition (DAQ) of the NOvA experiment. The Message Analyzer performs filtering and pattern recognition on the log messages and reacts to system failures identified by associated triggering rules. The tool helps the system maintain a healthy running state and to minimize data corruption. This paper also describes a domain specific language that allows the recognition patterns and correlation rules to be specified in a clear and flexible way. In addition, the engine provides a plugin mechanism for users to implement specialized patterns or rules in generic languages such as C++.

  8. Multi-level scaling properties of instant-message communications

    Chen, Guanxiong; Han, Xiaopu; Wang, Binghong

    2010-08-01

    To research the statistical properties of human's communication behaviors is one of the highlight areas of Human Dynamics. In this paper, we analyze the instant message data of QICQ from volunteers, and discover that there are many forms of non-Poisson characters, such as inter-event distributions of sending and receiving messages, communications between two friends, log-in activities, the distribution of online time, quantities of messages, and so on. These distributions not only denote the pattern of human communication activities, but also relate to the statistical property of human behaviors in using software. We find out that most of these exponents distribute between -1 and -2, which indicates that the Instant Message (IM) communication behavior of human is different from Non-IM communication behaviors; there are many fat-tail characters related to IM communication behavior.

  9. Reaching adolescent girls through social networking: a new avenue for smoking prevention messages.

    Struik, Laura Louise; Bottorff, Joan L; Jung, Mary; Budgen, Claire

    2012-09-01

    Because adolescent girls are being targeted on social networking sites by the tobacco industry, new online tobacco control (TC) initiatives are needed. The purpose of this interpretive descriptive study was to explore adolescent girls' perspectives on the use of social networking sites to deliver TC messages targeting young women. Focus groups were conducted with 17 girls aged 16 to 19. Seven TC messages were provided for evaluation and as context for discussion about the delivery of TC messages on social networking sites. Data were analyzed for themes, which included concerns about the effectiveness of current TC messages and the stereotypical representations of gender, factors perceived to influence the effectiveness of TC messages on social networking sites, and suggestions for enhancing the effectiveness of TC messages placed on social networking sites. Endorsement of TC messaging on social networking sites suggests that this medium is an untapped resource for smoking prevention.

  10. Cultural Knowledge in News Comprehension

    Mathieu, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main lines of the design and the findings of a reception study on news comprehension. This empirical study is a comparison of the comprehension processes of Danes and French Canadians over a set of news texts from both countries. Comprehension is explored from a cultural...... perspective, through the lens of cognition and pragmatics, revealing the role played by cultural knowledge in comprehension and the underlying relationship between a text and its intended audience. It is argued that recipients ‘problematise’ the news texts, a process by which the texts answer questions...

  11. Pilot study of psychotherapeutic text messaging for depression.

    Pfeiffer, Paul N; Henry, Jennifer; Ganoczy, Dara; Piette, John D

    2017-08-01

    Background Text messaging services could increase access to psychotherapeutic content for individuals with depression by avoiding barriers to in-person psychotherapy such as cost, transportation, and therapist availability. Determining whether text messages reflecting different psychotherapeutic techniques exhibit differences in acceptability or effectiveness may help guide service development. Objectives We aimed to determine: (1) the feasibility of delivering a psychotherapy-based text messaging service to people with depression identified via the internet, (2) whether there is variation in satisfaction with messages according to the type of psychotherapeutic technique they represent, and (3) whether symptoms of depression vary according to receipt of each message type and participants' satisfaction with the messages they received. Methods For this study 190 US adults who screened positive for a major depressive episode (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) score ≥10) were recruited from online advertisements. Participants received a daily psychotherapy-based text message 6 days per week for 12 weeks. Text messages were developed by a team of psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers to reflect three psychotherapeutic approaches: acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), behavioural activation, and cognitive restructuring. Each week the message type for the week was randomly assigned from one of the three types, allowing for repeats. Participants were asked daily to rate each message. On the 7th day of each week, participants completed a two-item depression screener (PHQ-2). Web-based surveys at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks were used as the primary measure of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9). Results Of the 190 participants enrolled, 85 (45%) completed the 6-week web survey and 67 (35%) completed the 12-week survey. The mean baseline PHQ-9 score was 19.4 (SD 4.2) and there was a statistically significant mean improvement in PHQ-9 scores of -2.9 (SD 6.0; p

  12. Fighting obesity or obese persons? Public perceptions of obesity-related health messages.

    Puhl, R; Peterson, J L; Luedicke, J

    2013-06-01

    This study examined public perceptions of obesity-related public health media campaigns with specific emphasis on the extent to which campaign messages are perceived to be motivating or stigmatizing. In summer 2011, data were collected online from a nationally representative sample of 1014 adults. Participants viewed a random selection of 10 (from a total of 30) messages from major obesity public health campaigns from the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia, and rated each campaign message according to positive and negative descriptors, including whether it was stigmatizing or motivating. Participants also reported their familiarity with each message and their intentions to comply with the message content. Participants responded most favorably to messages involving themes of increased fruit and vegetable consumption, and general messages involving multiple health behaviors. Messages that have been publicly criticized for their stigmatizing content received the most negative ratings and the lowest intentions to comply with message content. Furthermore, messages that were perceived to be most positive and motivating made no mention of the word 'obesity' at all, and instead focused on making healthy behavioral changes without reference to body weight. These findings have important implications for framing messages in public health campaigns to address obesity, and suggest that certain types of messages may lead to increased motivation for behavior change among the public, whereas others may be perceived as stigmatizing and instill less motivation to improve health.

  13. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers of...

  14. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  15. Breaking news dissemination in the media via propagation behavior based on complex network theory

    Liu, Nairong; An, Haizhong; Gao, Xiangyun; Li, Huajiao; Hao, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    The diffusion of breaking news largely relies on propagation behaviors in the media. The tremendous and intricate propagation relationships in the media form a complex network. An improved understanding of breaking news diffusion characteristics can be obtained through the complex network research. Drawing on the news data of Bohai Gulf oil spill event from June 2011 to May 2014, we constructed a weighted and directed complex network in which media are set as nodes, the propagation relationships as edges and the propagation times as the weight of the edges. The primary results show (1) the propagation network presents small world feature, which means relations among media are close and breaking news originating from any node can spread rapidly; (2) traditional media and official websites are the typical sources for news propagation, while business portals are news collectors and spreaders; (3) the propagation network is assortative and the group of core media facilities the spread of breaking news faster; (4) for online media, news originality factor become less important to propagation behaviors. This study offers a new insight to explore information dissemination from the perspective of statistical physics and is beneficial for utilizing the public opinion in a positive way.

  16. "I Have Good News and Bad News:" The Effects of Power Imbalances and Physical Distance on News-givers' Use of Blended News Delivery

    Legg, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    People dislike giving bad news, and one strategy they use to ease the process is to pair bad news with some good news, a phenomenon called blended news delivery. Often, blended news arrives from people in power positions such as physicians, managers, or teachers. But followers also find themselves needing to give bad news to those in higher power positions. Similarly, people can choose how they deliver bad news, such as in person or over email. The current study brings much needed empirical a...

  17. Computer operating systems: HEPiX news

    Silverman, Alan

    1995-01-15

    In October the North American and European Chapters of HEPiX (the HEP UNIX group established to share worldwide high energy physics experience in using the UNIX operating system - March 1994, page 18), held meetings at Fermilab and Saclay. The two-day Fermilab meeting attracted over 30 attendees from some 12 sites in the US, as well as representation from CERN. The three-day European meeting two weeks later was attended by some 70 people from 30 sites in Europe, the US and Japan. Both meetings featured some common themes such as the growth in the use of AFS (the Andrew File System) for distributed access to central filebases, and the continuing trend away from mainframes towards farms of UNIX workstations and/or servers. Other topics of interest included an update of the POSIX standards efforts, an online presentation of an experimental graphics interface, first impressions of new utility for batch job control in UNIX, the latest news on the spread of the HEPiX login scripts and a review of trends in magnetic tape technology. Detailed minutes are in preparation and will be published in the HEPNET.HEPiX news group in due course. In the meantime, the transparencies presented in many of the sessions at both conferences can be consulted via the World-Wide Web at URL http://wwwcn.cern.ch/hepix/ meetings.html.

  18. Computer operating systems: HEPiX news

    Silverman, Alan

    1995-01-01

    In October the North American and European Chapters of HEPiX (the HEP UNIX group established to share worldwide high energy physics experience in using the UNIX operating system - March 1994, page 18), held meetings at Fermilab and Saclay. The two-day Fermilab meeting attracted over 30 attendees from some 12 sites in the US, as well as representation from CERN. The three-day European meeting two weeks later was attended by some 70 people from 30 sites in Europe, the US and Japan. Both meetings featured some common themes such as the growth in the use of AFS (the Andrew File System) for distributed access to central filebases, and the continuing trend away from mainframes towards farms of UNIX workstations and/or servers. Other topics of interest included an update of the POSIX standards efforts, an online presentation of an experimental graphics interface, first impressions of new utility for batch job control in UNIX, the latest news on the spread of the HEPiX login scripts and a review of trends in magnetic tape technology. Detailed minutes are in preparation and will be published in the HEPNET.HEPiX news group in due course. In the meantime, the transparencies presented in many of the sessions at both conferences can be consulted via the World-Wide Web at URL http://wwwcn.cern.ch/hepix/ meetings.html

  19. ‘It’s Something Posh People Do’: Digital Distinction in Young People’s Cross-Media News Engagement

    Jannie Møller Hartley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I analyse digital distinction mechanisms in young people’s cross media engagement with news. Using a combination of open online diaries and qualitative interviews with young Danes aged 15 to 18 who differ in social background and education, and with Bourdieu’s field theory as an analytical framework, the article investigates how cultural capital (CC operates in specific tastes and distastes for news genres, platforms and providers. The article argues that distinction mechanism not only works on the level of news providers and news genres but also on the level of engagement practices—the ways in which people enact and describe their own news engagement practices. Among those rich in CC, physical, analogue objects in the form of newspapers and physical conversations about news are seen as ‘better’ that digital ones, resulting in a feeling of guilt when they mostly engage with news on social media. Secondly, young people with lower CC discard legacy news, which they see as elitist and irrelevant. Thirdly, those rich in CC are media and news genre savvy in the sense that it makes them able to critically evaluate the news they engage with across platforms and sites.

  20. Between hope and fear: Distinctiveness of media accountability online in The Netherlands

    drs Harmen Groenhart

    2011-01-01

    News media in The Netherlands show great variety in the extent and ways, in which they realize media accountability online in terms of actor transparency, product transparency and feedback opportunities online. It is suggested that even those news rooms that seem to adhere to transparency and public

  1. Creative Cycling of News Professionals

    Astrid Gynnild, PhD.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of creative cycling emerged from my PhD study of news professionals in Norway. The study was carried out according to classic grounded theory principles (Glaser and Strauss 1967, Glaser 1978, 1998, 2001, 2005, and the area of interest was the performance of news journalism in the multimedia age. The theory runs counter to widespread tendencies of industrial age thinking in news media. It emphasizes news professionals’ search for meaning in their daily work, and suggests that their main concern is self-fulfillment through original contribution. The dilemma and resolution, creative cycling, is a basic social process continuously going within inner and outer framings. It consists of three interrelated dimensions: productive processing, breaks and shifts and inspirational looping.

  2. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  3. Subprime Loans and Fake News

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2017-01-01

    Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?......Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?...

  4. News, Documentary and Advocacy Journalism

    Charles, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines how alternative models of journalism are emerging to counter the news values associated with the so-called mainstream media - news values, which are increasingly criticised for serving only the interests of the political and economic elite. In particular, this chapter looks at advocacy journalism, which focuses on a shift away from objectivity towards the arguably more ethical practice of attachment. The neutral and detached reporter, who remains outside of events and re...

  5. Move! Eat better: news

    2013-01-01

    Are you curious to know whether you’re doing enough daily exercise…? Test yourself with a pedometer!   Through the Move! Eat better campaign, launched in May 2012, the CERN medical service is aiming to improve the health of members of the personnel by encouraging them to prioritise physical activity in conjunction with a balanced diet. Various successful activities have already taken place: relay race/Nordic walk, Bike2work, Zumba and fitness workshops, two conferences (“Physical activity for health” and “Good nutrition every day”), events in the restaurants, as well as posters and a website. Although everyone has got the message from our various communications that physical activity is good for your health, there is still a relevant question being asked: “What is the minimum amount of exercise recommended?” 10,000 steps per day is the ideal figure, which has been demonstrated as beneficial by scientific studies ...

  6. NSO News - February 2014

    Beck, James B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-04

    Welcome to the February newsletter. Recent highlights include progress on the nuclear deal with Iran, the continued challenges with North Korea, the developing situation in Ukraine and Georgia, and issues related to the Unites States Nuclear Deterrent. In this newsletter, some key messages from the recent Nuclear Deterrent summit, which is annually held in Washington, DC, asre also included. The NSO recently hosted a workshop organized with the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) at Stanford University on how other States view nuclear weapons and deterrence. Participants included Dr. Bradley Roberts, Gen. (Ret.) Robert Kehler, Bridge Colby, Dr. Robert Gromoll, and other experts. If you would like to have a more in-depth discussion on this or any related topics, please contact Sylvia Martinez at 667-6120 to set up some time.

  7. Special features of informative photography in Spanish online media

    Lic. María Isabel Villa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the most relevant conclusions of the research: “The informative image in online media: newspaper, radio and television”. Firstly, the author presents the theory and methodology which has been employed. Secondly, she describes how they were put into practice on a sample collected in 2004. This sample consisted of 311 images from the following newspapers online editions: La Vanguardia, El País and El Mundo; as from the radio stations Cadena Ser, Onda Cero, COPE, as well as from the TV channels Antena 3 and Telecinco. Finally, the paper explores how the object of study has changed and developed until 2008 and its possible lines of research. One of the main conclusions is that the modular design of the pages damages the visual message. Moreover, The presentation is homogeneous and the edition of the images is sharp to adjust them to fixed sizes. In addition to this, photographers have become anonymous, whereas news agencies have become the main suppliers of images.

  8. In the Know and in the News: How Science and the Media Communicate About Stem Cells, Autism and Cerebral Palsy.

    Sharpe, Kimberly; Di Pietro, Nina; Illes, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell research has generated considerable attention for its potential to remediate many disorders of the central nervous system including neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebral palsy (CP) that place a high burden on individual children, families and society. Here we characterized messaging about the use of stem cells for ASD and CP in news media articles and concurrent dissemination of discoveries through conventional science discourse. We searched LexisNexis and Canadian Newsstand for news articles from the US, UK, Canada and Australia in the period between 2000 and 2014, and PubMed for peer reviewed articles for the same 10 years. Using in-depth content analysis methods, we found less cautionary messaging about stem cells for ASD and CP in the resulting sample of 73 media articles than in the sample of 87 science papers, and a privileging of benefits over risk. News media also present stem cells as ready for clinical application to treat these neurodevelopmental disorders, even while the science literature calls for further research. Investigative news reports that explicitly quote researchers, however, provide the most accurate information to actual science news. The hope, hype, and promise of stem cell interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders, combined with the extreme vulnerability of these children and their families, creates a perfect storm in which journalists and stem cell scientists must commit to a continued, if not even more robust, partnership to promote balanced and accurate messaging.

  9. News of the world

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers short pieces of news from nuclear industry throughout the world. The most relevant are the following. A micro-crack has been detected in the bottom head instrumentation penetration during the ten-yearly inspection of the unit 1 of the Gravelines nuclear power station. Poland is expected before the end of 2012 to launch a bid of tender for the construction of 2 nuclear power plants of 3000 MW each. The cost of this program is estimated to near 23 billions euros. The Spanish government has allowed the 2 reactors of the Asco plant to operate 10 years more. The Russian company 'Atomstroyexport' will supply the 2 nuclear islands of the 2 new reactors at the Tianwan nuclear power plant (China). Russia is going to build the first nuclear power plant in Bangladesh. Areva has recently discovered 12300 tonnes of uranium in central Jordan. The IAEA experts recommend the Japanese Authorities to decontaminate first the inhabited areas contaminated by the Fukushima accident. It is more important to focus on the real radiation dose received by the population than on the contamination levels of the environment. (A.C.)

  10. News from the world

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of information from around the world concerning the nuclear sector. Among which were the following. Saudi-Arabia projects to build 16 nuclear reactors till 2020. In Pakistan the third reactor has entered into service, this reactor (Chashma-2, 330 MW) is a PWR-type reactor designed by CNNC (China National Nuclear Corporation). Areva Newport News LLC has postponed to a later date the construction of a plant dedicated to manufacturing big components like reactor vessels or vessel heads. Areva and Rhodia have signed an agreement for a better valorization of deposits involving uranium and rare earth elements. Bulgaria has inaugurated a new storage center for nuclear wastes. Areva has launched the construction of a plant dedicated to the production of Pb-212, an isotope used in the treatment of some cancers. A worker died of a fall on the building site of Flamanville-3. According to COMARE (Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment) there is no relationship between the child leukemia and the presence of nuclear power plants in U.K. Siemens has been condemned to pay 0.648 billion euros to Areva as a compensation for the breach of the shareholder pact. Rosatom has created Rosatom Overseas that will be in charge of financing, building, operating and even owning nuclear power plants on foreign soil. 'Electricite de France' has presented its trends for the next decade. (A.C.)

  11. News from EUPHA

    EUPHA 17th European Conference on Public Health

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very good news for Italian participation at this year’s EUPHA meeting, which will be held in Lodz (Poland. From 25 to 28 November the joint annual conference EUPHA-ASPHER will see a peaceful “invasion” from Italy. Out of the 63 Italian abstracts submitted to the conference organisers, only 5 (7.9% were rejected. Overall, 11.6% of all of the accepted abstracts are Italian, 9.8% of the oral presentations and 13% of the poster presentations. These results pay testimony to the high quality of European public health research and practice reached in several fields and settings (academic, public health regional agencies, and local health units. Highlights from Italy include the ongoing work in the field of infectious disease control, Stefania Bruno (Catholic University will present the Roman experience of Tubercolosis surveillance in the homeless. Maria De Giusti (Sapienza University presents “Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections and S. aureus nasal colonisation”; while Chiara de Waure (Catholic University will present “Rapid screening tests for MRSA carriage at hospital admission: a systematic review”.

  12. Antarctic news clips - 1992

    1992-07-01

    The newspaper and magazine stories selected for this book present only a sampling of one year's (July 1991 to July 1992) news coverage of Antarctica. The only requirement for inclusion in this publication is that the article's subject matter pertains or refers to Antarctica in some way - whether it is focused on the science done there, or on the people who play such a large part in the work accomplished, or on the issues related to it. No attempt has been made to correlate the number of articles, or their length, with the importance of the subjects treated. Clippings are provided to the Foundation by a service that searches for items containing the phrase 'National Science Foundation'. Identical versions of many stories, especially those written and distributed by wire services such as the Associated Press and United Press International, and by syndicated columnists, are published in numerous papers across the United States. Other articles are submitted from a variety of sources, including interested readers across the United States and in New Zealand.

  13. New Bulletin: Latest News

    2005-01-01

    The paper version of the CERN Bulletin will be published twice a month with effect from 18 April 2005. The electronic version will be updated weekly. This year will see many changes in the Bulletin, designed to make it more economical, more compact and more attractive. From 18 April the paper version of the Bulletin will be published twice monthly, so we shall have to stop calling it the "Weekly". The purpose of this change in publication frequency is to redistribute the resources of the Publications Section of the Communications Group so that it can produce new brochures for the general public. However, so as not to compromise on topicality and communication of information, the Official News and General Information sections, the Pension Fund and training announcements and the seminar schedule will continue to be updated weekly. If you have signed up to be informed of the updates, you will continue to receive a weekly e-mail reminding you that the electronic version of the Bulletin has been updated. Offici...

  14. Social Network Facebook in News: Comparisiion of Space Dedicated to Social Network Facebook ads its Content in Czech Media in the Years 2009 and 2011

    Bezdíčková, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Diploma thesis "Social Network Facebook in News: Comparison of Space Dedicated to Social Network Facebook and its Content in Czech Media in the Years 2009 and 2011", is dedicated to the way of use and citation of social network Facebook in the selected news media. The paper summarizes the establishment and strengthening of online media, particularly the phenomenon of social networks on the example of social network Facebook, and their influence on the transformation of the media sector, news ...

  15. News from the Library

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    A third of the world’s current literature in electrical engineering is available on your CERN desktop Looking for a technical standard on software reviews and audits? Is it referred to as "IEEE color books"? Want to download and read NOW the latest version of IEEE 802? Whenever a need for a technical standard or specification arises in your activity, the Library is here to serve you. For IEEE standards it is particularly easy; the whole collection is available for immediate download. Indeed, since 2007, the CERN Library offers readers online access to the complete IEEE Electronic Library (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). This licence gives unlimited online access to all IEEE and IET journals and proceedings, starting from the first issue. But not everyone knows that this resource gives also access to all current IEEE standards as well as a selection of archival ones. The Library is now working on the integration of a selection of these standards in our onlin...

  16. Message valence, familiarity, sex, and personality effects on the perceptual distortion of height.

    Hensley, W E; Angoli, M

    1980-03-01

    The perceptual distortion of height was examined in a group of American male and female college student volunteers (n = 139). A message which announced either good or bad news was delivered by a familiar or unfamiliar person who was either male or female. After hearing the message, the students were asked to estimate the height of the communicator. Additionally, the variables of self-esteem and independence of judgment were measured. Results indicated that familiarity with the message source (p less than .0025) as well as sex of the communicator (p less than .024) were predictors of the perceptual distortion of height, but message valence was not. Neither self-esteem nor independence of judgment was functionally related to the proclivity to distort the heights of the communicators.

  17. A Messaging Infrastructure for WLCG

    Casey, James; Cons, Lionel; Lapka, Wojciech; Paladin, Massimo; Skaburskas, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    During the EGEE-III project operational tools such as SAM, Nagios, Gridview, the regional Dashboard and GGUS moved to a communication architecture based on ActiveMQ, an open-source enterprise messaging solution. LHC experiments, in particular ATLAS, developed prototypes of systems using the same messaging infrastructure, validating the system for their use-cases. In this paper we describe the WLCG messaging use cases and outline an improved messaging architecture based on the experience gained during the EGEE-III period. We show how this provides a solid basis for many applications, including the grid middleware, to improve their resilience and reliability.

  18. Survey of Instant Messaging Applications Encryption Methods

    Kabakuş, Abdullah; Kara, Resul

    2015-01-01

    Instant messaging applications has already taken the place of traditional Short Messaging Service (SMS) and Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) due to their popularity and usage easement they provide. Users of instant messaging applications are able to send both text and audio messages, different types of attachments such as photos, videos, contact information to their contacts in real time. Because of instant messaging applications use internet instead of Short Message Service Technical Reali...

  19. Getting Your Message Across: Mobile Phone Text Messaging

    Beecher, Constance C.; Hayungs, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Want to send a message that 99% of your audience will read? Many Extension professionals are familiar with using social media tools to enhance Extension programming. Extension professionals may be less familiar with the use of mobile phone text-based marketing tools. The purpose of this article is to introduce SMS (short message system) marketing…

  20. Mapping online journalism in transition

    Hartley, Jannie Møller; Houman Ellersgaard, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    By operationalising Pierre Bourdieu’s concepts of field, capital and positions of autonomy and heteronomy, and applying a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to data gathered from a large content analysis, the article explores the relations between online newspapers and their corresponding print...... or broadcast versions within a constructed Danish “field of news” by graphically presenting the data as maps of the changes in these relations. First, mapping transformations graphically shows that the online newspapers have gained autonomy from their “parent platforms”, but we see that in the same period...... they have increased their dependence on news agency stories. Furthermore, the mapping demonstrates how the online newspapers differ in terms of news productions strategies and in their relation to their parent platforms, meaning they take up different...

  1. Covert Channel Pada Aliran Data Websocket untuk Komunikasi Messaging XMPP

    Yoga Dwitya Pramudita

    2015-07-01

    Abstract Instant Messaging communication services provide a variety of communication features that can be used by the user, such as text messaging (text messages both online and offline. One of the standard protocol that supports this service is XMPP (Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol. XMPP communication using XML documents, making it vulnerable to passive attacks monitoring content of  communications. To overcome this drawback the solution is encrypted communications. The other solutions that try to offer in this research is the use of a covert channel to send hidden messages. In this research will create a browser based XMPP client application that is capable to deliver XMPP communication and also provide covert channel communication. XMPP communication can be built on a web-based application using WebSocket protocol. This protocol will exploit field masking-key to load the covert channel messages that is sent during the session XMPP communication takes place. From the test results, the client application is able to produce a covert channel communication with a data width of 3 bytes in each packet. The client application is also able to perform covert communication channel in a communication link with the condition of the probability of packet loss rate below 10%.   Keywords— WebSocket, XMPP, masking-key, Covert Channel, browser based application.

  2. Effects of media messages on parent-child sexual communication.

    Evans, W Douglas; Davis, Kevin C; Silber Ashley, Olivia; Khan, Munziba

    2012-01-01

    Parent-child communication about sex is an important reproductive health outcome. Consistent, positive perceptions of communication by parents and children can promote behavioral outcomes such as delaying sexual debut and increasing contraceptive use. The authors investigated whether exposure to messages from the Parents Speak Up National Campaign (PSUNC), a social marketing campaign to promote increased parent-child sexual communication, led to increased children's self-reports of communication. Also, the authors examined whether PSUNC message exposure increased agreement about communication between parents and their children. In a randomized experimental design, the authors surveyed children of parents exposed and not exposed to PSUNC messages. Parents and children completed online instruments asking matched questions about sexual attitudes, beliefs, and communication. The authors matched 394 parents and children for analysis. They used ordinal logistic regression modeling and kappa statistics. Children of parents exposed to PSUNC messages were more likely to (a) report sexual communication than were those not exposed and (b) agree with their parents about extent and content. Parent-child pairs of the same gender, younger pairs, and non-White pairs were more likely to agree. Overall, PSUNC message exposure appears to have promoted more extensive sexual communication. Future research should examine behavioral mechanisms and message receptivity among subgroups of parents and children.

  3. News of the world

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of news from the nuclear industry around the world. The most relevant are the following. EDF has inaugurated a logistic hub for the supply of spare parts for its 58 operating reactors. Russia has opened a new site to store spent fuels from RBMK reactors. This site is located at Zheleznogorsk near Krasnoiarsk in Siberia. The capacity of the La Hague fuel reprocessing plant is 1700 tonnes a year but the plant processes only between 800 and 1000 tones because most of its foreign contracts have come to an end and have not been renewed. In 2012 the plant is expected to process 1003 tonnes for EDF and 12 tonnes for The Netherlands. AREVA has delivered to the CNNC Chinese company 700 fuel assemblies and 800 control rod clusters. The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) said that there was neither health nor environmental hazards on French soil due to the Fukushima accident. The French Academy of Sciences has highlighted the least sanitary impact of nuclear power compared to other energies. The American Nuclear Safety Association has stated that the American nuclear power plants are safe and that the probability of a severe accident is very low. A new study shows an excess of cases of leukemia near nuclear power stations in France. This study rests on very few statistical cases. An opinion survey in the United Kingdom shows that the construction of nuclear power stations is considered as the best investment in infrastructures. EDF has planned to recruit in 2012 about 6000 people essentially in the nuclear sector. The Netherlands government has given its consent for the construction of the high flux reactor Pallas on the Petten site, this reactor will replace the HFR whose lifetime is over 50 years. (A.C.)

  4. A Visualized Message Interface (VMI) for intelligent messaging services

    Endo, T.; Kasahara, H.; Nakagawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    In CCITT, Message Handling Systems (MHS) have been studied from the viewpoint of communications protocol standardization. In addition to MHS services, Message Processing (MP) services, such as image processing, filing and retrieving services, will come into increasing demand in office automation field. These messaging services, including MHS services, can be thought of as Intelligent Messaging (IM) services. IM services include many basic services, optional user facilities and service parameters. Accordingly, it is necessary to deal with these parameters and MP procedures in as systematic and user-friendly a manner as possible. As one step towards realizing a user-friendly IM services interface, the characteristics of IM service parameters are studied and a Visualized Message Interface (VMI) which resembles a conventional letter exchange format is presented. The concept of VMI formation is discussed using the generic document structure concept as well as a Screen Interface and Protocol Interface conversion package

  5. Indonesian News Harvester and Recommender System

    Adi Wibowo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To provide convenience for the user that frequently read the news, a system to gather, classify, and provide news from several news websites in one place was needed. This system utilized a recommender system to provide only relevant news to the user. This research proposed a system architecture that used vector space model, and Rocchio relevance feedback to provide specific news recommendation to user’s feedback. The results are that the proposed system architecture can achieve the goal by using five levels of feedback from the user. However, the time needed to gather news is increasing exponentially in line with the number of terms gathered from articles.

  6. Women Are Seen More than Heard in Online Newspapers

    Jia, Sen; Lansdall-Welfare, Thomas; Sudhahar, Saatviga; Carter, Cynthia; Cristianini, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Feminist news media researchers have long contended that masculine news values shape journalists’ quotidian decisions about what is newsworthy. As a result, it is argued, topics and issues traditionally regarded as primarily of interest and relevance to women are routinely marginalised in the news, while men’s views and voices are given privileged space. When women do show up in the news, it is often as “eye candy,” thus reinforcing women’s value as sources of visual pleasure rather than residing in the content of their views. To date, evidence to support such claims has tended to be based on small-scale, manual analyses of news content. In this article, we report on findings from our large-scale, data-driven study of gender representation in online English language news media. We analysed both words and images so as to give a broader picture of how gender is represented in online news. The corpus of news content examined consists of 2,353,652 articles collected over a period of six months from more than 950 different news outlets. From this initial dataset, we extracted 2,171,239 references to named persons and 1,376,824 images resolving the gender of names and faces using automated computational methods. We found that males were represented more often than females in both images and text, but in proportions that changed across topics, news outlets and mode. Moreover, the proportion of females was consistently higher in images than in text, for virtually all topics and news outlets; women were more likely to be represented visually than they were mentioned as a news actor or source. Our large-scale, data-driven analysis offers important empirical evidence of macroscopic patterns in news content concerning the way men and women are represented. PMID:26840432

  7. Using Text Message Surveys to Evaluate a Mobile Sexual Health Question-and-Answer Service.

    Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; L'Engle, Kelly Ladin; Jackson, Kennon; Brickman, Jared

    2018-01-01

    Text message programs for sexual health are becoming increasingly popular as practitioners aim to meet youth on media they use frequently. Two-way mobile health (mHealth) interventions allow for feedback solicitation from participants. This study explores the use of a text message survey to assess demographics and program feedback from users of an adolescent sexual health text message question-and-answer service. Development and feasibility of the short-message service survey are discussed. The text message survey achieved a 43.9% response rate, which is comparable to response rates of surveys conducted via other methods. When compared to respondents who used the service and completed an online in-school questionnaire, text survey respondents were more likely to be female and older. They also reported higher service satisfaction. Results have implications for text message service providers and researchers. This article examines a community application of a new intervention strategy and research methodology.

  8. Girls, Guys and Games: How News Media Perpetuate Stereotypes of Male and Female Gamers

    Erin Maclean

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the sheer popularity of gaming, stereotypes of gamers are persistent and often ill-informed. The average age of an Australian gamer, for example, is 33 and nearly half of gamers are female. Yet, few mainstream and gaming news articles seem to acknowledge this diversity. Because news media and public perception are intertwined, such misrepresentation may affect the way gamers are perceived by the public and, in turn, how gamers negotiate their identities. This paper, through a primarily qualitative analysis of 75 online news articles, explores many examples of simplistic and distorted portrayals of gamers that characterise news coverage. In particular, it examines three gendered tropes—‘not real’ female gamers, women as the victims and oppressors of gamers, and toxic male gamers—that news media use to frame the narratives that misrepresent gaming in social life. Ultimately, this article argues that two prevailing themes underlie many news stories about gaming: the perpetuation of male technocratic privilege and moral panic. Both of these phenomena have relevance to the #GamerGate controversy of 2014, which news media portrayed as a ‘culture war’ between these inaccurate notions of male and female gamers. Thus, this indicates that the media blame game and alienation of gaming culture, as a multibillion-dollar international industry of increasing social importance, must be acknowledged and addressed.

  9. Picturing obesity: analyzing the social epidemiology of obesity conveyed through US news media images.

    Gollust, Sarah E; Eboh, Ijeoma; Barry, Colleen L

    2012-05-01

    News media coverage can affect how Americans view health policy issues. While previous research has investigated the text content of news media coverage of obesity, these studies have tended to ignore the photographs and other images that accompany obesity-related news coverage. Images can convey important messages about which groups in society are more or less affected by a health problem, and, in turn, shape public understanding about the social epidemiology of that condition. In this study, we analyzed the images of overweight and obese individuals in Time and Newsweek coverage over a 25-year period (1984-2009), and compared these depictions, which we characterize as representing the "news media epidemiology" of obesity, to data describing the true national prevalence of obesity within key populations of interest over this period. Data collected included descriptive features of news stories and accompanying images, and demographic characteristics of individuals portrayed in images. Over the 25-year period, we found that news magazines increasingly depicted non-whites as overweight and obese, and showed overweight and obese individuals less often performing stereotypical behaviors. Even with increasing representation of non-whites over time, news magazines still underrepresented African Americans and Latinos. In addition, the elderly were starkly underrepresented in images of the overweight and obese compared to actual prevalence rates. Research in other policy arenas has linked media depictions of the populations affected by social problems with public support for policies to combat them. Further research is needed to understand how news media depictions can affect public stigma toward overweight and obese individuals and public support for obesity prevention efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. News on pediatric urology

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  11. Online Resources

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Online Resources. Journal of Genetics. Online Resources. Volume 97. 2018 | Online resources. Volume 96. 2017 | Online resources. Volume 95. 2016 | Online resources. Volume 94. 2015 | Online resources. Volume 93. 2014 | Online resources. Volume 92. 2013 | Online resources ...

  12. Washington State Retail Marijuana Legalization: Parent and Adolescent Preferences for Marijuana Messages in a Sample of Low-Income Families.

    Hanson, Koren; Haggerty, Kevin P; Fleming, Charles B; Skinner, Martie L; Casey-Goldstein, Mary; Mason, W Alex; Thompson, Ronald W; Redmond, Cleve

    2018-03-01

    As legalization of nonmedical retail marijuana increases, states are implementing public health campaigns designed to prevent increases in youth marijuana use. This study investigated which types of marijuana-related messages were rated most highly by parents and their teens and whether these preferences differed by age and marijuana use. Nine marijuana-focused messages were developed as potential radio, newspaper, or television announcements. The messages fell into four categories: information about the law, general advice/conversation starters, consequences of marijuana use/positive alternatives, and information on potential harmful effects of teen marijuana use. The messages were presented through an online survey to 282 parent (84% female) and 283 teen (54% female) participants in an ongoing study in Washington State. Both parents and youth rated messages containing information about the law higher than other types of messages. Messages about potential harms of marijuana use were rated lower than other messages by both generations. Parents who had used marijuana within the past year (n = 80) rated consequence/positive alternative messages lower than parent nonusers (n = 199). Youth marijuana users (n = 77) and nonusers (n = 202) both rated messages containing information about the law higher than other types of messages. Youth users and nonusers were less likely than parents to believe messages on the harmful effects of marijuana. The high ratings for messages based on information about the marijuana law highlight the need for informational health campaigns to be established as a first step in the marijuana legalization process.

  13. News from the Library: PressDisplay on mobile devices!

    CERN Library

    2013-01-01

    You are probably already using PressDisplay to read newspapers online, but for those of you who are not yet aware of this service, PressDisplay is an online portal where you can browse and read online articles from more than 1,900 newspapers from 95 countries, as soon as they are published.   Whether you are an experienced user or a beginner, we have good news concerning PressDisplay: our license now permits you to download complete newspaper issues to your mobile devices and read them offline wherever you like. To do that, you have to use the mobile app PressReader. Instructions on how to install the PressReader app are available here: For Ipad For Android smartphone For Android tablet For Windows 8 devices For BlackBerry Playbook For Android eReader Your feedback is welcome! Please contact us by e-mail.

  14. Exploiting Tri-Relationship for Fake News Detection

    Shu, Kai; Wang, Suhang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming popular nowadays. The low cost, easy access and rapid information dissemination of social media bring benefits for people to seek out news timely. However, it also causes the widespread of fake news, i.e., low-quality news pieces that are intentionally fabricated. The fake news brings about several negative effects on individual consumers, news ecosystem, and even society trust. Previous fake news detection methods mainly focus on news contents fo...

  15. News Consumption and Media Bias

    Yi Xiang; Miklos Sarvary

    2007-01-01

    Bias in the market for news is well-documented. Recent research in economics explains the phenomenon by assuming that consumers want to read (watch) news that is consistent with their tastes or prior beliefs rather than the truth. The present paper builds on this idea but recognizes that (i) besides “biased” consumers, there are also “conscientious” consumers whose sole interest is in discovering the truth, and (ii) consistent with reality, media bias is constrained by the truth. These two fa...

  16. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    Paola Cerchiello; Giancarlo Nicola

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM), that takes into account covariat...

  17. How to Spot Fake News?

    Çev.: Fatih Canata

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is a key skill in media and information literacy, and the mission of libraries is to educate and advocate its importance. Discussions about fake news has led to a new focus on media literacy more broadly, and the role of libraries and other education institutions in providing this. When Oxford Dictionaries announce post-truth is Word of the Year 2016, as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking – a crucial skill when navigating the information society, an infographic with eight simple steps have been prepared by IFLA to discover the verifiability of a given news-piece in front of you.

  18. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: an exploration of competitive strategies

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.; Beentjes, J.; Nuijten, K.; Peeters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  19. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: An exploration of competitive strategies

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Beentjes, J.W.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Peeters, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  20. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Fu Xin; Liang Yu; Cao Sanxing; Gu Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  1. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Fu Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  2. Effects of "Good News" and "Bad News" on Newscast Image and Community Image.

    Galician, Mary-Lou; Vestre, Norris D.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates whether the relative amount of bad, neutral, and good news on television has corresponding effects on viewers' image of the community depicted and of the carrying newscast. Concludes that bad news creates a bad image for the community but that good news does not produce a more favorable image than neutral news. (MM)

  3. Controversial Ebola vaccine trials in Ghana: a thematic analysis of critiques and rebuttals in digital news

    Per Egil Kummervold

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication is of paramount importance in responding to health crises. We studied the media messages put forth by different stakeholders in two Ebola vaccine trials that became controversial in Ghana. These interactions between health authorities, political actors, and public citizens can offer key lessons for future research. Through an analysis of online media, we analyse stakeholder concerns and incentives, and the phases of the dispute, to understand how the dispute evolved to the point of the trials being suspended, and analyse what steps might have been taken to avert this outcome. Methods A web-based system was developed to download and analyse news reports relevant to Ebola vaccine trials. This included monitoring major online newspapers in each country with planned clinical trials, including Ghana. All news articles were downloaded, selecting out those containing variants of the words “Ebola,” and “vaccine,” which were analysed thematically by a team of three coders. Two types of themes were defined: critiques of the trials and rebuttals in favour of the trials. After reconciling differences between coders’ results, the data were visualised and reviewed to describe and interpret the debate. Results A total of 27,460 articles, published between 1 May and 30 July 2015, were collected from nine different newspapers in Ghana, of which 139 articles contained the keywords and met the inclusion criteria. The final codebook included 27 themes, comprising 16 critiques and 11 rebuttals. After coding and reconciliation, the main critiques (and their associated rebuttals were selected for in-depth analysis, including statements about the trials being secret (mentioned in 21% of articles, claims that the vaccine trials would cause an Ebola outbreak in Ghana (33%, and the alleged impropriety of the incentives offered to participants (35%. Discussion Perceptions that the trials were “secret” arose from a combination

  4. Controversial Ebola vaccine trials in Ghana: a thematic analysis of critiques and rebuttals in digital news.

    Kummervold, Per Egil; Schulz, William S; Smout, Elizabeth; Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Larson, Heidi J

    2017-08-07

    Communication is of paramount importance in responding to health crises. We studied the media messages put forth by different stakeholders in two Ebola vaccine trials that became controversial in Ghana. These interactions between health authorities, political actors, and public citizens can offer key lessons for future research. Through an analysis of online media, we analyse stakeholder concerns and incentives, and the phases of the dispute, to understand how the dispute evolved to the point of the trials being suspended, and analyse what steps might have been taken to avert this outcome. A web-based system was developed to download and analyse news reports relevant to Ebola vaccine trials. This included monitoring major online newspapers in each country with planned clinical trials, including Ghana. All news articles were downloaded, selecting out those containing variants of the words "Ebola," and "vaccine," which were analysed thematically by a team of three coders. Two types of themes were defined: critiques of the trials and rebuttals in favour of the trials. After reconciling differences between coders' results, the data were visualised and reviewed to describe and interpret the debate. A total of 27,460 articles, published between 1 May and 30 July 2015, were collected from nine different newspapers in Ghana, of which 139 articles contained the keywords and met the inclusion criteria. The final codebook included 27 themes, comprising 16 critiques and 11 rebuttals. After coding and reconciliation, the main critiques (and their associated rebuttals) were selected for in-depth analysis, including statements about the trials being secret (mentioned in 21% of articles), claims that the vaccine trials would cause an Ebola outbreak in Ghana (33%), and the alleged impropriety of the incentives offered to participants (35%). Perceptions that the trials were "secret" arose from a combination of premature news reporting and the fact that the trials were prohibited

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF ONLINE ADVERTISING

    G. Anusha

    2017-01-01

    Advertising has come a long way today. More and more new medium is being explored each day to make a successful advertising campaign. Internet that has in recent times picked up as advertising medium has become the favorite of the advertiser in no time. Online advertisement, also called internet advertising uses the internet to deliver promotional marketing messages to consumers. It includes email marketing, search engine marketing, social media marketing, many types of display advertising (i...

  6. Konstruksi Realitas Impor Beras Oleh Kompas Online: Sebuah Analisis Wacana Kritis

    Abdul Gaffar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the news about the import of rice released by Compass online media (WWW.KOMPAS.COM during the year 2012. By using the news released by Reuters online, this study seeks to look at the construction of social reality created by Compass online on imported rice. In addition, this study seeks to look at the relationship of knowledge in producing a news reporter with the social context of the imported rice and rice problem in society, farmers and rice traders. The results of the analysis of the news of the rice import, that the online Compass has been able to establish social construction of reality on imported rice. Journalists, through titles, headlines, news emphasized by certain words that are bias against those who reject the rice import policy, in this case farmers, rice traders and some other party and is able to describe the social reality behind the rice import policy.

  7. An exploration of social identity: The geography and politics of news-sharing communities in twitter

    HerdaĞdelen, AmaÇ; Zuo, Wenyun; Gard-Murray, Alexander; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2013-11-01

    The importance of collective social action in current events is manifest in the Arab Spring and Occupy movements. Electronic social media have become a pervasive channel for social interactions, and a basis of collective social response to information. The study of social media can reveal how individual actions combine to become the collective dynamics of society. Characterizing the groups that form spontaneously may reveal both how individuals self-identify and how they will act together. Here we map the social, political, and geographical properties of news-sharing communities on Twitter, a popular micro-blogging platform. We track user-generated messages that contain links to New York Times online articles and we label users according to the topic of the links they share, their geographic location, and their self-descriptive keywords. When users are clustered based on who follows whom in Twitter, we find social groups separate by whether they are interested in local (NY), national (US) or global (cosmopolitan) issues. The national group subdivides into liberal, conservative and other, the latter being a diverse but mostly business oriented group with sports, arts and other splinters. The national political groups are based across the US but are distinct from the national group that is broadly interested in a variety of topics. A person who is cosmopolitan associates with others who are cosmopolitan, and a US liberal / conservative associates with others who are US liberal / conservative, creating separated social groups with those identities. The existence of "citizens" of local, national and cosmopolitan communities is a basis for dialog and action at each of these levels of societal organization.

  8. Visualizing news: obstacles, challenges, and solutions

    Dr. Piet Bakker; Gerard Smit; Yael de Haan; Laura Buijs

    2013-01-01

    Depicting news graphically is considered an apt way to deal with challenges of modern journalism: to disclose big data, and present news attractively, visually, and fast to grasp. This study delves into reported obstacles and challenges for the production of news visualizations. It focuses on the

  9. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  10. The News Media as a Political Institution

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    : what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled...... with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems....

  11. Product Differentiation in Local Television News.

    Atwater, Tony

    A study was conducted to investigate the extent to which local television stations exhibited diversity in newscast content within three midwest broadcast markets. A second objective was to describe the nature of the news content characteristic of local news stories that were broadcast by only one station within a market (or unique news stories). A…

  12. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  13. News Resources on the World Wide Web.

    Notess, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes up-to-date news sources that are presently available on the Internet and World Wide Web. Highlights include electronic newspapers; AP (Associated Press) sources and Reuters; sports news; stock market information; New York Times; multimedia capabilities, including CNN Interactive; and local and regional news. (LRW)

  14. Semantic Analysis of FBI News Reports

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work on semantic analysis of FBI News reports. In the paper we have considered the News which are of the immense significance for the analyst who want to analyze the News of specific area. With this definite analysis we are able to extract critical events or concepts...

  15. Detecting Terrorism Incidence Type from News Summary

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the experiments to detect terrorism incidence type from news summary data. We have applied classification techniques on news summary data to analyze the incidence and detect the type of incidence. A number of experiments are conducted using various classification algorithms...... and results show that a simple decision tree classifier can learn incidence type with satisfactory results from news data....

  16. Possible Courses for News and Public Affairs

    Wald, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    Live programming, regular daily news programs, and documentary series, which are suggested as solutions to the limited scope of news and public affairs air time, would enable PBS to increase its coverage of news and public affairs. Some suggestions are also made for restructuring the functions of stations within the system to facilitate this…

  17. Kekerasan Simbolik Media Online (Analisis Framig Berita Fenomena Lgbt dalam Portal Berita Republika Online)

    Cahya Utaminingtyas, Eunike

    2017-01-01

    Online media is the latest form of mass media which have the ability to dominate a value and form public perception. Media's ability to form this public perception is also done by highlighting Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community in Indonesia. Media did not only construct reality on LGBT phenomenon, but also create symbolic violence with order of words in its news texts. Normatively, media has responbility to report LGBT news that cover both sides and does not discriminativ...

  18. Tree-nesting Rüppells Griffon vultures | Rondeau | Vulture News

    Guy Rondeau, Phlippe Pilard, Bernard Ahon, Moussa Coundé. Abstract. No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 55, 2006: 14-22. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  19. Instant Messaging for Creating Interactive and Collaborative m-Learning Environments

    James Kadirire

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available 'Instant Messaging' (IM and 'Presence,' which is essentially the ability of being able to detect if other users are logged in on the network and send them messages in real time, has become one of the most popular applications of the Internet, causing people to want to stay connected to the Internet for inordinate amounts of time, a phenomena that also fosters a sense of "online community," that perhaps no other application has done previously (Alvestrand, 2002. This research looks at the use of mobile devices to send instant messages that can carry much more information than the short message service (SMS messages, but would be free to use, notwithstanding the price of getting online. We present a prototype IM system that can be used as a viable means of communicating and learning in higher education establishments. There is some evidence to show that learning using mobile devices reduces the formality of the learning experience, and helps engage reluctant learners and raise their self-confidence. In order for the learning process to be successful in online distance learning, unlike in the traditional face-to-face learning, attention must be paid to developing the participants' sense of community within their particular group. Instant messaging – or IM – is a natural medium for online community building and asynchronous/ synchronous peer discussions.

  20. Fake news propagate differently from real news even at early stages of spreading

    Zhao, Zilong; Zhao, Jichang; Sano, Yukie; Levy, Orr; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2018-01-01

    Social media can be a double-edged sword for modern communications, either a convenient channel exchanging ideas or an unexpected conduit circulating fake news through a large population. Existing studies of fake news focus on efforts on theoretical modelling of propagation or identification methods based on black-box machine learning, neglecting the possibility of identifying fake news using only structural features of propagation of fake news compared to those of real news and in particular...

  1. The Dutch and the news

    Annemarie Wennekers; Jos de Haan

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Nederlanders en nieuws For a long time, the television and newspapers were the most prominent news sources in the Netherlands, but digitalisation and the rise of new media have caused major shifts in the media landscape. Based on a time use survey focusing on media (Media:Tijd

  2. Journalism and Explaining News Content

    Albæk, E.; Skovsgaard, M.; de Vreese, C.H.; Nussbaum, J.F.

    Three models are presented to explain variation in news content. In the first model the explanation is based on the individual journalist, in the second model on the professional journalist, and in the third model on the organized journalist. The individual journalist model focuses on how the

  3. Myth, Method and International News.

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth…

  4. How to Tell Bad News

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  5. News from the Library

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    The LHC Library to be merged with the Central Library. Not everyone knows that CERN Scientific Information Service currently counts three physical libraries on site. The Central Library is located in Building 52 and there are two satellite libraries located respectively in building 30 (the LHC Library) and in building 864 on Prévessin site (the SPS Library). Moreover, the Legal Service Library is located in Building 60. In the past, there have been at CERN up to 6 satellite libraries; they were essential at a time when information was only in paper form and having multiple copies of documents located in several places at CERN was useful to facilitate scientific research. Today, this need is less critical as most of our resources are online. That is why, following a SIPB (Scientific Information Policy Board) decision, the collections of the LHC Library will be merged this summer with the Central collection. This reorganization and centralization of resources will improve loan services. The SP...

  6. An Investigation of the Impact of an Intervention to Reduce Academic Procrastination Using Short Message Service (SMS) Technology

    Davis, Darrel R.; Abbitt, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-method pilot study investigated the impact of a custom Short Message Service (SMS) reminder system developed to help students reduce procrastination and increase performance on weekly content-related quizzes in a high-enrollment hybrid online course. Text message reminders were sent to three students with high procrastination and low…

  7. News and Announcements

    1999-07-01

    New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to

  8. "Playing Hooky" Health Messages: Apprehension, Impression Management, and Deception.

    Barrett, Ashley; Murphy, Melissa; Blackburn, Kate

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates playing hooky in higher education classrooms and associates this behavior with students' communicative dispositions, instructor perceptions, and language use. We define "playing hooky" as students skipping class and explaining their absence to their instructor with deceptive health messages. The purpose of Study 1, an online survey (N = 177), is to further understand the characteristics of students who engage in this type of deceptive health communication. Study 1 measures communication apprehension and perceived instructor credibility in students who had played hooky from class and those who had not. Findings reveal that students who communicate playing hooky health messages (a) reported more instructor communication apprehension and (b) perceived the instructors with whom they had played hooky to be less credible. Study 2 uses facework theory and MEH analysis to reveal the different linguistic strategies students use to communicate (a) truthful health messages (N = 165) and (b) deceptive heath messages (N = 82) to their instructor following an absence. Results demonstrate that students' facework strategies are more geared toward saving instructors' negative face in the deceptive health message condition. Implications of both studies are offered.

  9. GPS Ephemeris Message Broadcast Simulation

    Browne, Nathan J; Light, James J

    2005-01-01

    The warfighter constantly needs increased accuracy from GPS and a means to increasing this accuracy to the decimeter level is a broadcast ephemeris message containing GPS satellite orbit and clock corrections...

  10. Technical Evaluation Report 6: Chat and Instant Messaging Systems

    Jennifer Stein

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Text-based conferencing can be both asynchronous (i.e., participants log into the conference at separate times, and synchronous (i.e., interaction takes place in real time. It is thus subject to the same wide variation as the online audio- and video-conferencing methods (see the earlier Reports in this series. Synchronous text-based approaches (e.g., online chat groups and instant messaging systems are highly popular among online users generally owing to their ability to bring together special-interest groups from around the world without cost. In distance education (DE, however, synchronous chat methods are less widely used, owing in part to the problems of arranging for working adults in different time zones to join a discussion group simultaneously. Instant text messaging is more popular among DE users in view of the choice it provides between responding to a message immediately (synchronous communication or after a delay (asynchronous. The different synchronous and asynchronous approaches are likely to become more widely used in parallel with one another, as they are integrated in individual product packages.

  11. [The late media emergency of smallpox vaccine, news coverage of Spanish press (1999-2004)].

    Martínez-Martínez, Pedro Javier; Tuells, José; Colmenar-Jarillo, Gema

    2015-06-01

    Discussions on the need for smallpox virus preservation in 1999 focused attention on an eradicated disease 20 years ago. Smallpox was replaced as a potential candidate to be used as a bioterrorist weapon because of the international alarm scenario produced after the 11/9 events in USA. The reactivation of a vaccine which remained forgotten was the direct consequence. The initial target groups were the security forces of America. Spain was also among the countries that were interested in acquiring the smallpox vaccine. The aim of this study is to analyze the considerable media coverage of smallpox obtained in our country. Systematic review of published news in the four largest national daily newspapers (ABC, El Mundo, El País and La Vanguardia) for the period 1999-2004 of the Dow Jones Factiva document database. "Smallpox" were used as a key word. From the obtained data, a qualitative and quantitative analysis was done. 416 reviews were analyzed; the newspaper El Mundo was the most interested in these news (158 citations, 37.98%). Most of the news were published in 2003 (152, 36.5%) The year with more news about smallpox (2003) coincides with the purchase of vaccines in Spain. The type of messages in the news was highly changeable over this six-year period. Those related to "politics and diplomacy", "epidemiological risk", "bioterrorism" and "vaccine" were predominant. The alarm raised around the smallpox vaccination was a media phenomenon due to political strategy issues rather than a real public health problem.

  12. Military Message Experiment. Volume II.

    1982-04-01

    elements of the Department of Defense. This resulted in a memorandum from the Director, Telecomunications and Comand and Control, OSD, in June 1975...1978 to April 1979 and provides a discussion of the telecomunications inter- face aspects of the experiment. This Final Report covers the period of...arise in the telecomunication system which require A retransmission of an outgoing message. A "service" message may be created within the

  13. The shifting cross-media news landscape

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Steeg Larsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    and lifestyles. Theoretically the study is anchored in Habermas’s notion of the public sphere, and its recent reconceptualizations in theories of ‘cultural citizenship’, 'civic agency' and 'public connection'. The project operationalizes these theories through the concept of users' perceived “worthwhileness......The article offers new insights for democracy and for news producers by mapping the use and users of today’s cross-media news landscape, as the everyday consumption of news across the range of available news media and formats is shifting as a result of transformations of technology, culture......” of news media, a user-anchored concept which incorporates the different functionalities of the situational cross-media use of news by citizen/consumers in everyday life. Empirically the article presents the findings of a large-scale survey that traces the imminent challenges facing players in the news...

  14. Navigating cross-media news use

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    distinctive cross-media repertoires, and what makes these compositions meaningful. This article analyzes the value of different platforms, genres and practices in everyday life by mapping patterns of cross-media news use. Combining Q methodology with think-aloud protocols and day-in-the-life-interviews, five...... distinct news media repertoires are identified: 1) regionally-oriented 2) background-oriented 3) digital 4) laid-back and 5) nationally-oriented news use. Our findings indicate that users do not always use what they prefer, nor do they prefer what they use. Moreover, the boundaries they draw between news......The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble...

  15. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    Lindskow, Kasper

    News publishers in the industrialized world are experiencing a fundamental challenge to their business models because of the changing modes of consumption, competition, and production of their offerings that are associated with the emergence of the networked information society. The erosion...... of the traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web...

  16. Discussions of Adolescent Sexuality in News Media Coverage of the HPV Vaccine

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Tsui, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Given the sexually transmitted nature of human papillomavirus (HPV), some worry the HPV vaccine will create a false sense of security and promote adolescent sexual activity. Media coverage of vaccines can influence social norms, parental attitudes, and vaccine acceptance; in this paper we examine U.S. news media messages related to sexuality and HPV vaccination. Drawing on a structured analysis of 447 articles published during 2005-2009, we qualitatively analyzed a purposive sample of 49 articles discussing adolescent health behaviors related to HPV vaccination. Commonly, articles discussed vaccination in the context of abstinence-only versus comprehensive sexual health education; cited research findings to support vaccination or sex education; argued against connecting vaccination to promiscuous behavior; but included fear-inducing messages. Media messages concerning health behaviors related to HPV vaccination tended to support government and parental involvement in sex education, and dismiss concerns linking vaccination to sexual activity, while also presenting the vaccine as lifesaving. PMID:24439619

  17. Agency and civic involvement in news production via Facebook commentary

    Eberholst, Mads Kæmsgaard; Hartley, Jannie Møller

    Social media services such as Facebook, Twitter and Youtube, where users create and share content, has become a large part of most peoples everyday digital life and equally media companies has realised that these services plays a great role in peoples news con-sumption pattern. On these services...... users can contribute to the publication process, in theory broadening the diversity of public debate. This paper explores user involvement on the Facebook pages of Danish mainstream online newspapers in November 2012 and investigate the hypothesises that user interactivity gives audiences greater power...

  18. Public health news frames in North Carolina newspaper coverage of the 100% Tobacco-Free Schools campaign? Sometimes.

    Morrison, Suzanne DePalma; Sutton, Sonya F; Mebane, Felicia E

    2006-01-01

    News organizations are an important and influential part of the social environment. They identify certain issues by the extent and nature of their coverage. To help explain what public health policy messages may have influenced school policy decisions, this content analysis provides an examination of newspaper coverage of North Carolinas 100% tobacco-free schools campaign. Researchers searched LexisNexis for articles published in North Carolina newspapers between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004 that included variations of "North Carolina tobacco-free schools." Researchers then conducted a descriptive analysis of 138 stories from nine North Carolina newspapers (approximately 4% of all the states newspapers) and used page placement and story type to examine the level of importance placed on the issue. Finally, frames for and against tobacco-free school policies were tracked, along with the presence of key messages presented by 100% TFS advocates. The volume of news coverage changed throughout the study period, with peaks and valleys closely associated with external "trigger" events. In addition, a majority of the newspaper articles did not include key public health messages. The results suggest an opportunity for public health experts and officials to work more effectively with local journalists to increase the use (and impact) of public health messages in news coverage of tobacco policies affecting youth.

  19. Online Identities and Social Networking

    Maheswaran, Muthucumaru; Ali, Bader; Ozguven, Hatice; Lord, Julien

    Online identities play a critical role in the social web that is taking shape on the Internet. Despite many technical proposals for creating and managing online identities, none has received widespread acceptance. Design and implementation of online identities that are socially acceptable on the Internet remains an open problem. This chapter discusses the interplay between online identities and social networking. Online social networks (OSNs) are growing at a rapid pace and has millions of members in them. While the recent trend is to create explicit OSNs such as Facebook and MySpace, we also have implicit OSNs such as interaction graphs created by email and instant messaging services. Explicit OSNs allow users to create profiles and use them to project their identities on the web. There are many interesting identity related issues in the context of social networking including how OSNs help and hinder the definition of online identities.

  20. Research and Practice of the News Map Compilation Service

    Zhao, T.; Liu, W.; Ma, W.

    2018-04-01

    Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  1. The Dynamic Cross-Correlations between Mass Media News, New Media News, and Stock Returns

    Zuochao Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic cross-correlations between mass media news, new media news, and stock returns for the SSE 50 Index in Chinese stock market by employing the MF-DCCA method. The empirical results show that (1 there exist power-law cross-correlations between two types of news as well as between news and its corresponding SSE 50 Index return; (2 the cross-correlations between mass media news and SSE 50 Index returns show larger multifractality and more complicated structures; (3 mass media news and new media news have both complementary and competitive relationships; (4 with the rolling window analysis, we further find that there is a general increasing trend for the cross-correlations between the two types of news as well as the cross-correlations between news and returns and this trend becomes more persistent over time.

  2. Good news is bad news: Leverage cycles and sudden stops

    Akinci, Ozge; Chahrour, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We show that a model with imperfectly forecastable changes in future productivity and an occasionally binding collateral constraint can match a set of stylized facts about “sudden stop” events. “Good” news about future productivity raises leverage during times of expansion, increasing the probability that the constraint binds, and a sudden stop occurs, in future periods. The economy exhibits a boom period in the run-up to the sudden stop, with output, consumption, and investment all above tre...

  3. Science exemplars in the eye of the beholder: How exposure to online science information affects attitudes

    Knobloch-Westerwick, S.; Johnson, B.K.; Silver, N.A.; Westerwick, A.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on exemplification theory and confirmation bias, this study examined exposure to online science information and subsequent attitude impacts. Participants freely browsed online messages manipulated to feature (a) either exemplar or numeric information and (b) opposing viewpoints, resulting in

  4. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Campbell, Peter

    2000-07-01

    sometimes hard-to-come-by information, insightful and occasionally witty comment and illustration. The fifth booklet, published in April this year, rounds off the series so far. For those who have not yet seen them, here are the questions that the booklets have explored: Making Physics Connect (editor: Peter Campbell). How can physics courses connect better with the learner and with other human activities and areas of knowledge? Physics in Mathematical Mood (editor: Simon Carson). How can we teach physics in an appropriately mathematical way, conveying the beauty and power of mathematical reasoning to students? Physics in Vocational Courses (editor: Ken Gadd). In the new National Qualifications Framework, what role should physics play in the `general vocational' and `vocational' pathways? The Study of Matter (editor: Claire Davis). What aspects of a wide and interdisciplinary subject should be included in courses at advanced level, and how can these best be taught? Revitalising Physics Education (editor: Andrew Morris). What can we learn from histories of physics and of education, or from curriculum development projects of the last thirty years? What can be said about teaching and learning physics beyond qualifications, or learned from international developments in physics education? These booklets should find their way into every physics department in the UK. They will be of immediate practical use in schools or colleges, informing teaching while also providing stimulus material for discussion among physics teachers. (The latter would rightly be called in-service training.) Student teachers will find them a good guide covering new terrain. Lecturers at higher education level will gain valuable insight into changes affecting their undergraduate intake. And the physics advisory committee of every Awarding Body will surely want to discuss issues raised in the booklets. The main message overall is that, to meet tomorrow's challenges, the many parties involved in physics

  5. A Study of a Sample of Facebook Users Finds They Do Not Seek Political News through Facebook But Are Exposed to Political News through This Medium

    Elizabeth Margaret Stovold

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Schaferm, S., Sulflow, M., & Muller, P. (2017. The special taste of snack news: an application of niche theory to understand the appeal of Facebook as a source for political news. First Monday, 22(4-3. http://dx.doi.org/10.5210/fm.v22i4.7431 Abstract Objective – To investigate Facebook as a source of exposure to political news stories and to compare the reasons for using Facebook as a news source and the gratifications obtained, compared with other news sources. Design – Survey questionnaire. Setting – Facebook. Subjects – 422 German Facebook users. Methods – An online survey was developed to investigate the use of Facebook as a news source compared with other sources. Specific research questions were informed by the ‘theory of niche’ (Dimmick, 2003 which examines the coexistence and competition between different media outlets by examining the breadth, overlap and superiority of one platform over another. The survey was distributed using a ‘snowball’ technique between July and August 2015. The survey was shared by 52 student research assistants on their Facebook profiles. They asked their friends to complete the survey and share it with their own networks. Main results – The mean (M age of the 422 respondents was 23.5 years (SD=8.25. The majority were female (61% with a high school degree (89%. TV news and news websites were the most frequently used sources of political news. Facebook ranked third, ahead of newspapers, search engines, magazines, email provider websites, and Twitter. The mean score for the importance of Facebook as a news sources was 2.46 (SD=1.13 on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 is low and 5 is high. This fell in the middle of the range when compared with the top ranked source assessed by importance (TV news, M 4.40, SD=0.88 and the lowest (email providers, M 1.92, SD=0.97. Users rarely visited Facebook with the purpose of finding news (M 1.59, SD=0.73. However, they estimated around 24% of the

  6. Bibliographic Instruction and the Development of Online Catalogs.

    McDonald, David R.; Searing, Susan E.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the definition of an online library catalog; five factors to be considered by the online catalog designer; user-computer communication (error messages, help screens, prompts, unnatural language); online tutorials and offline instruction offered by bibliographic instruction librarians; and the current situation. Nine references are…

  7. A Constructivist Model of Mentoring, Coaching, and Facilitating Online Discussions

    Murphy, Karen L.; Mahoney, Sue E.; Chen, Chun-Ying; Mendoza-Diaz, Noemi V.; Yang, Xiaobing

    2005-01-01

    This case study of an online graduate course determines the message characteristics of the instructor, volunteer teaching assistants, and students in online discussions, and proposes a mentoring, coaching, and facilitating model for online discussions. The researchers developed a coding system based on the literature of mentoring, coaching, and…

  8. Instant Messaging for Creating Interactive and Collaborative m-Learning Environments

    James Kadirire

    2007-01-01

    'Instant Messaging' (IM) and 'Presence,' which is essentially the ability of being able to detect if other users are logged in on the network and send them messages in real time, has become one of the most popular applications of the Internet, causing people to want to stay connected to the Internet for inordinate amounts of time, a phenomena that also fosters a sense of "online community," that perhaps no other application has done previously (Alvestrand, 2002). This research looks at the us...

  9. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    Anderson, Ashley A.; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites-blogs, government, and general sites-are conducted.

  10. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    Anderson, Ashley A., E-mail: aaanderson3@wisc.edu; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Life Sciences Communication (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites-blogs, government, and general sites-are conducted.

  11. Asymmetric News Effects on Volatility: Good vs. Bad News in Good vs. Bad Times

    Laakkonen, Helinä; Lanne, Markku

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of positive and negative macroeconomic US and European news announcements in different phases of the business cycle on the highfrequency volatility of the EUR/USD exchange rate. The results suggest that in general bad news increases volatility more than good news. The news effects also depend on the state of the economy: bad news increases volatility more in good times than in bad times, while there is no difference between the volatility effects of good news in bad and go...

  12. Engaging Young People: Deliberative Preferences in Discussions About News and Politics

    Cynthia Peacock

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Internet affords users a unique and low-cost way to engage with news, politics, and one another. Although young people are the most likely age cohort to go online, it is questionable whether young people take advantage of the Internet as a deliberative space. We examine the way college students perceive the online world as a venue for political discussion by analyzing responses from six focus groups conducted with college students across the United States. Using deliberative theory as a guide, we examine focus group participants’ thoughts about political discussion both online and offline. Our findings indicate that young people’s preferences for online discussions about politics and the news consistently link to the ideals of deliberation. Young people prefer engaging with others who are knowledgeable and remain flexible and calm during discussions. Goals for engaging in conversations about politics primarily revolved around sharing information and opinions. Participants preferred civil discourse that focuses on commonalities rather than differences between people. This study provides greater insight into how the rising generation currently engages with politics and the news and reasons why many people hesitate to participate in online discussions about public affairs.

  13. FACEBOOK ADVERTISING: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TYPES OF MESSAGE, BRAND ATTITUDE AND PERCEIVED BUYING RISK

    BOGDAN ANASTASIEI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a spectacular growth in electronic commerce in recent years, although we cannot say that it has been without obstacles. Among the barriers mentioned by the literature are the lack of trust in online brands, the perceived purchase risk, the perception of the type of promotional message. More often than not, commercial Facebook posts influence brand image and brand trust, which can lead to an increased buying intention. Our research attempted to determine whether the type of commercial Facebook posts (paid or unpaid and the type of post content (rational or emotional influence message credibility, attitude towards the advertised brand and perceived purchase risk. The type of post appeared not to influence any of these variables, while the type of message significantly influenced the credibility and the perceived risk. The rational message generated more credibility, while the perceived purchase risk is higher for the emotional messages.

  14. Delivering bad news in emergency care medicine.

    Maynard, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting is a strategy for delivering bad news and is compared to two other strategies, stalling and being blunt. Forecasting provides some warning that bad news is forthcoming without keeping the recipient in a state of indefinite suspense (stalling) or conveying the news abruptly (being blunt). Forecasting appears to be more effective than stalling or being blunt in helping a recipient to "realize" the bad news because it involves the deliverer and recipient in a particular social relation. The deliverer of bad news initiates the telling by giving an advance indication of the bad news to come; this allows the recipient to calculate the news in advance of its final presentation, when the deliverer confirms what the recipient has been led to anticipate. Thus, realization of bad news emerges from intimate collaboration, whereas stalling and being blunt require recipients to apprehend the news in a social vacuum. Exacerbating disruption to recipients' everyday world, stalling and being blunt increase the probability of misapprehension (denying, blaming, taking the situation as a joke, etc.) and thereby inhibit rather than facilitate realization. Particular attention is paid to the "perspective display sequence", a particular forecasting strategy that enables both confirming the recipient's perspective and using that perspective to affirm the clinical news. An example from acute or emergency medicine is examined at the close of the paper.

  15. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  16. Online Public Deliberation in China

    Medaglia, Rony; Yang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Internet discussion platforms in China provide a hugely interesting and relevant source for understanding dynamics of online discussions in a unique context. Adopting the theoretical lens of public deliberation, this paper investigates the evolution of patterns of similar-minded and different......-minded interactions over time on a Chinese online discussion forum. We analyse the content and reply networks of 18,000+ messages on four highly debated topics on the Bulletin Board System (BBS) platform Tianya. Findings provide nuanced evidence to the phenomenon of increased network homophily over time, mitigated...... investigation on independent variables for understanding dynamics of online discussions, and for studies comparing cases across different contexts....

  17. MessageSpace: a messaging system for health research

    Escobar, Rodrigo D.; Akopian, David; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Esparza, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Mobile Health (mHealth) has emerged as a promising direction for delivery of healthcare services via mobile communication devices such as cell phones. Examples include texting-based interventions for chronic disease monitoring, diabetes management, control of hypertension, smoking cessation, monitoring medication adherence, appointment keeping and medical test result delivery; as well as improving patient-provider communication, health information communication, data collection and access to health records. While existing messaging systems very well support bulk messaging and some polling applications, they are not designed for data collection and processing of health research oriented studies. For that reason known studies based on text-messaging campaigns have been constrained in participant numbers. In order to empower healthcare promotion and education research, this paper presents a system dedicated for healthcare research. It is designed for convenient communication with various study groups, feedback collection and automated processing.

  18. Analysing News for Stock Market Prediction

    Ramalingam, V. V.; Pandian, A.; Dwivedi, shivam; Bhatt, Jigar P.

    2018-04-01

    Stock market means the aggregation of all sellers and buyers of stocks representing their ownership claims on the business. To be completely absolute about the investment on these stocks, proper knowledge about them as well as their pricing, for both present and future is very essential. Large amount of data is collected and parsed to obtain this essential information regarding the fluctuations in the stock market. This data can be any news or public opinions in general. Recently, many methods have been used, especially big unstructured data methods to predict the stock market values. We introduce another method of focusing on deriving the best statistical learning model for predicting the future values. The data set used is very large unstructured data collected from an online social platform, commonly known as Quindl. The data from this platform is then linked to a csv fie and cleaned to obtain the essential information for stock market prediction. The method consists of carrying out the NLP (Natural Language Processing) of the data and then making it easier for the system to understand, finds and identifies the correlation in between this data and the stock market fluctuations. The model is implemented using Python Programming Language throughout the entire project to obtain flexibility and convenience of the system.

  19. Online Social Networking: A Primer for Radiology

    Prasanna, Prasanth M.; Seagull, F. Jacob; Nagy, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Online social networking is an immature, but rapidly evolving industry of web-based technologies that allow individuals to develop online relationships. News stories populate the headlines about various websites which can facilitate patient and doctor interaction. There remain questions about protecting patient confidentiality and defining etiquette in order to preserve the doctor/patient relationship and protect physicians. How much social networking-based communication or other forms of E-c...

  20. Content Analysis of US News Stories About E-Cigarettes in 2015.

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Giovenco, Daniel P; Singh, Binu; Lewis, M Jane; Steinberg, Michael B; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2017-08-03

    Coverage of e-cigarettes in the news media may shape public perceptions about them but little is known about such news content. This content analysis characterized discussion of e-cigarettes in leading print and online US news sources in 2015. We searched Access World News and Factiva databases for e-cigarette-related news articles appearing in the top 30 circulating newspapers, 4 newswires, and 4 online news sources in the United States in 2015 (n = 295). Coders identified the presence of various e-cigarette topics (e.g. regulation), and benefit and risk statements. Nearly half of articles (45.1%) focused primarily on e-cigarette policy/regulatory issues, although e-cigarette prevalence (21.0%) and health effects (21.7%) were common main topics. Concerns about youth were frequently mentioned, including the rise in youth e-cigarette use (45.4%), gateway to smoking potential (33.9%) and appeal of flavors (22.4%). Youth e-cigarette prevalence was more frequently mentioned than adult prevalence in articles discussing FDA regulation (61% vs. 13.5%, respectively). News articles more frequently discussed potential e-cigarette risks or concerns (80%) than benefits (45.4%), such as smoking harm-reduction. Quoted physicians, researchers, and government representatives were more likely to refer to e-cigarette risks than benefits. In 2015, rising rates of e-cigarette use among youth and policy strategies to address e-cigarettes dominated US e-cigarette news stories, leading up to their FDA regulation in 2016. Statements about e-cigarettes' potential risks were frequently attributed to trusted sources such as physicians, and outnumbered claims about their harm-reduction benefits. Such coverage may impact e-cigarette risk perceptions, use intentions and policy support. In the year leading up to the FDA's Deeming Rule, concerns about youth use or potential use were frequently discussed in e-cigarette news. News articles more frequently discussed potential e-cigarette risks

  1. A news media analysis of economic sanction effects on access to medicine in Iran.

    Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Rashidian, Arash; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades economic sanctions have been used by different countries or international organizations in order to deprive target countries of some transactions. While the sanctions do not target health care systems or public health structures, they may, in fact, affect the availability of health care in target countries. In this study, we used media analysis to assess the impacts of recent sanctions imposed by the Central Bank of Iran in 2012 on access to medicines in Iran. We searched different sources of written news media including a database of nonspecialized weeklies and magazines, online news sources, web pages of daily newspapers and healthcare oriented weeklies from 2011 to 2013. We searched the sources using the general term "medicine" to reduce the chances of missing relevant items. The identified news media were read, and categorized under three groups of items announcing "shortage of medicines," "medicines related issues" and "no shortage." We conducted trend analyzes to see whether the news media related to access to medicines were affected by the economic sanctions. A total number of 371 relevant news media were collected. The number of news media related to medicines substantially increased in the study period: 30 (8%), 161 (43%) and 180 (49%) were published in 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. While 145 (39%) of media items referred to the shortage of medicines, 97 (26%) reported no shortage or alleviating of concerns. Media analysis suggests a clear increase in the number of news media reporting a shortage in Iran after the sanctions. In 2013, there were accompanying increases in the number of news media reporting alleviation of the shortages of medicines. Our analysis provides evidence of negative effects of the sanctions on access to medicines in Iran.

  2. A news media analysis of economic sanction effects on access to medicine in Iran

    Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Rashidian, Arash; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the past decades economic sanctions have been used by different countries or international organizations in order to deprive target countries of some transactions. While the sanctions do not target health care systems or public health structures, they may, in fact, affect the availability of health care in target countries. In this study, we used media analysis to assess the impacts of recent sanctions imposed by the Central Bank of Iran in 2012 on access to medicines in Iran. Methods: We searched different sources of written news media including a database of nonspecialized weeklies and magazines, online news sources, web pages of daily newspapers and healthcare oriented weeklies from 2011 to 2013. We searched the sources using the general term “medicine” to reduce the chances of missing relevant items. The identified news media were read, and categorized under three groups of items announcing “shortage of medicines,” “medicines related issues” and “no shortage.” We conducted trend analyzes to see whether the news media related to access to medicines were affected by the economic sanctions. Findings: A total number of 371 relevant news media were collected. The number of news media related to medicines substantially increased in the study period: 30 (8%), 161 (43%) and 180 (49%) were published in 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. While 145 (39%) of media items referred to the shortage of medicines, 97 (26%) reported no shortage or alleviating of concerns. Conclusion: Media analysis suggests a clear increase in the number of news media reporting a shortage in Iran after the sanctions. In 2013, there were accompanying increases in the number of news media reporting alleviation of the shortages of medicines. Our analysis provides evidence of negative effects of the sanctions on access to medicines in Iran. PMID:26645026

  3. Reactions to threatening health messages.

    Ten Hoor, Gill A; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kalagi, Janice; de Groot, Lianne; Grootjans, Karlijne; Huschens, Alexander; Köhninger, Constanze; Kölgen, Lizan; Pelssers, Isabelle; Schütt, Toby; Thomas, Sophia; Ruiter, Robert A C; Kok, Gerjo

    2012-11-21

    Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  4. News from the Library: newspapers anyone? Try PressDisplay!

    CERN Library

    2011-01-01

    PressDisplay is an online portal where you can browse and read online articles from more than 1,900 newspapers from 95 countries, as soon as they are published. With Pressdisplay, the time when newspapers were nicely displayed on wooden rods in libraries has passed...   Le Monde, International Herald Tribune and many more titles are displayed in their original layout including text and images, and you can print and e-mail the articles you are interested in. You even have the possibility to create rss feeds, so that the news reaches you directly.   The CERN Library has now activated a trial version of PressDisplay valid till 31 December; it is open to everyone at CERN. This trial doesn't offer the possibility to create personalised alerts based on specific search criteria. In case you need such features - or if you have any comments or questions - please contact us.

  5. Online stock trading platform

    Ion LUNGU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is the perfect tool that can assure the market’s transparency for any user who wants to trade on the stock market. The investor can have access to the market news, financial calendar or the press releases of the issuers. A good online trading platform also provides real-time intraday quotes, trading history and technical analysis giving the investor a clearer view of the supply and demand in the market. All this information provides the investor a good image of the market and encourages him to trade. This paper wishes to draft the pieces of an online trading platform and to analyze the impact of developing and implementing one in a brokerage firm.

  6. NPS and Online WOM

    Raassens, Néomie

    2017-01-01

    The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is, according to Reichheld, the single most reliable indicator of company growth, and many companies use this recommendation-based technique for measuring customer loyalty. Despite its widespread adoption by many companies across multiple industries, the debate about NPS goes on. A major concern is that managers treat NPS as being equivalent across customers, which is often very misleading. By using a unique data set that combines customers’ promoter scores and online word-of-mouth (eWOM) behavior, this research studies how individual customers’ promoter scores are related to eWOM, including its relationship with the three categories of customers that are identified by the NPS paradigm (i.e., promoters, passives, and detractors). Based on a sample of 189 customers, their promoter scores and corresponding eWOM, the results show that there is a positive relationship between customers’ promoter scores and the valence of online messages. Further, while detractors and promoters are homogeneous with respect to the valence of the eWOM messages they spread, passives show message valence heterogeneity. Thus, although passives, the largest group of customers, have no weight in calculating the NPS, our results reveal that companies should flag passives for further attention and action. PMID:29046609

  7. For Video Games, Bad News Is Good News: News Reporting of Violent Video Game Studies.

    Copenhaver, Allen; Mitrofan, Oana; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of video game violence studies has been critiqued for focusing mainly on studies supporting negative effects and failing to report studies that did not find evidence for such effects. These concerns were tested in a sample of 68 published studies using child and adolescent samples. Contrary to our hypotheses, study effect size was not a predictor of either newspaper coverage or publication in journals with a high-impact factor. However, a relationship between poorer study quality and newspaper coverage approached significance. High-impact journals were not found to publish studies with higher quality. Poorer quality studies, which tended to highlight negative findings, also received more citations in scholarly sources. Our findings suggest that negative effects of violent video games exposure in children and adolescents, rather than large effect size or high methodological quality, increase the likelihood of a study being cited in other academic publications and subsequently receiving news media coverage.

  8. How Do We Know What Is Happening Online?: A Mixed Methods Approach to Analysing Online Activity

    Charalampidi, Marina; Hammond, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of analysing online discussion and argue for the merits of mixed methods. Much research of online participation and e-learning has been either message-focused or person-focused. The former covers methodologies such as content and discourse analysis, the latter interviewing and surveys.…

  9. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    .andrew.cmu.edu/projects/visual. David Sokoloff (University of Oregon) and Priscilla Laws (Dickinson College) led a discussion session on the Interactive Lecture Demonstrations that they have been developing to promote active learning in the classroom. Loren Winters of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics showed some very fine work done with digital video cameras, both in producing motion videos for frame-by-frame analysis and in producing still images of high-speed phenomena. Finally, Patrick Tam of Humboldt State University in California talked about the Multimedia Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT), a project to organize and review the proliferation of internet-based teaching materials that are rapidly becoming available. Their purpose is to make it easier for teachers like us to sift through the plethora of new innovations, to locate those that are potentially useful in our teaching, and finally to implement them effectively. You can check out the project on the web at www.merlot.org. As is evident from the number of sessions of contributed papers and the tandem conference, the quality and quantity of physics education research into new curricula and teaching methods continue to increase. A number of interesting areas were discussed including interactive lecture techniques, studio-classroom approaches combining lectures and labs, assessment techniques, and identifying and correcting student misconceptions. In addition to the plenary talks on current research topics in physics mentioned above, there were sessions on Space Physics and Hot Topics in Physics. There were sessions on professional and career concerns including Preparing Future Physics Faculty, New Faculty Experiences and Concerns, Balancing Career and Family, How Physics Topics Support the Job Market and Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics. Whether one was a high school teacher or a university professor, this was an enjoyable and educational meeting. We all look forward to the Winter 2001 meeting from

  10. News and Announcements

    1999-06-01

    1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award David Clemmer, Indiana University EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus) EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999 NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999 DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999 New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999 Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999 Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999 Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences

  11. Giving bad news: a qualitative research exploration.

    Aein, Fereshteh; Delaram, Masoumeh

    2014-06-01

    The manner in which healthcare professionals deliver bad news affects the way it is received, interpreted, understood, and dealt with. Despite the fact that clinicians are responsible for breaking bad news, it has been shown that they lack skills necessary to perform this task. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian mothers' experiences to receive bad news about their children cancer and to summarize suggestions for improving delivering bad news by healthcare providers. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mothers from two pediatric hospitals in Iran. Five major categories emerged from the data analysis, including dumping information, shock and upset, emotional work, burden of delivering bad news to the family members, and a room for multidisciplinary approach. Effective communication of healthcare team with mothers is required during breaking bad news. Using multidisciplinary approaches to prevent harmful reactions and providing appropriate support are recommended.

  12. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  13. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms

  14. Extracting messages masked by chaos

    Perez, G.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    We show how to extract messages that are masked by a chaotic signal in a system of two Lorenz oscillators. This mask removal is done for two different modes of transmission, a digital one where a parameter of the sender is switched between two values, and an analog mode, where a small amplitude message is added to the carrier signal. We achieve this without using a second Lorenz oscillator as receiver, and without doing a full reconstruction of the dynamics. This method is robust with respect to transformations that impede the unmasking using a Lorenz receiver, and is not affected by the broad-band noise that is inherent to the synchronization process. We also discuss the limitations of this way of extraction for messages in high frequency bands. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs

  15. From press release to news: mapping the framing of the 2009 H1N1 A influenza pandemic.

    Lee, Seow Ting; Basnyat, Iccha

    2013-01-01

    Pandemics challenge conventional assumptions about health promotion, message development, community engagement, and the role of news media. To understand the use of press releases in news coverage of pandemics, this study traces the development of framing devices from a government public health agency's press releases to news stories about the 2009 H1N1 A influenza pandemic. The communication management of the H1N1 pandemic, an international news event with local implications, by the Singapore government is a rich locus for understanding the dynamics of public relations, health communication, and journalism. A content analysis shows that the evolution of information from press release to news is marked by significant changes in media frames, including the expansion and diversification in dominant frames and emotion appeals, stronger thematic framing, more sources of information, conversion of loss frames into gain frames, and amplification of positive tone favoring the public health agency's position. Contrary to previous research that suggests that government information subsidies passed almost unchanged through media gatekeepers, the news coverage of the pandemic reflects journalists' selectivity in disseminating the government press releases and in mediating the information flow and frames from the press releases.

  16. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News.

    Lăzăroiu, George; Pera, Aurel; Ştefănescu-Mihăilă, Ramona O; Bratu, Sofia; Mircică, Nela

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010), Zelizer (2010), and Gunter (2015), we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals' news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not) be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals' skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  17. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News

    George Lăzăroiu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010, Zelizer (2010, and Gunter (2015, we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals’ news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals’ skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  18. Message from the Editor

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    The journal Nuclear Fusion has played a key role in the development of the physics basis for fusion energy. That physics basis has been sufficiently advanced to enable construction of such major facilities as ITER along the tokamak line in magnetic fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in laser-driven fusion. In the coming decade, while ITER is being constructed and brought into deuterium-tritium (DT) operation, this physics basis will be significantly deepened and extended, with particular key remaining issues addressed. Indeed such a focus was already evident with about 19% of the papers submitted to the 24th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego, USA appearing in the directly labelled ITER and IFE categories. Of course many of the papers in the other research categories were aimed at issues relevant to these major fusion directions. About 17% of the papers submitted in the 'Experiment and Theory' categories dealt with the highly ITER relevant and inter-related issues of edge-localized modes, non-axisymmetric fields and plasma rotation. It is gratifying indeed to see how the international community is able to make such a concerted effort, facilitated by the ITPA and the ITER-IO, around such a major issue for ITER. In addition to deepening and extending the physics bases for the mainline approaches to fusion energy, the coming decade should see significant progress in the physics basis for additional fusion concepts. The stellarator concept should reach a high level of maturity with such facilities as LHD operating in Japan and already producing significant results and the W7-X in the EU coming online soon. Physics issues that require pulses of hundreds of seconds to investigate can be confronted in the new superconducting tokamaks coming online in Asia and in the major stellarators. The basis for steady-state operation of a tokamak may be further developed in the upper half of the tokamak operating space—the wall stabilized regime. New divertor

  19. Gain versus loss-framed messaging and colorectal cancer screening among African Americans: A preliminary examination of perceived racism and culturally targeted dual messaging.

    Lucas, Todd; Hayman, Lenwood W; Blessman, James E; Asabigi, Kanzoni; Novak, Julie M

    2016-05-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of gain versus loss-framed messaging as well as culturally targeted personal prevention messaging on African Americans' receptivity to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. This research also examined mechanistic functions of perceived racism in response to message framing. Community samples of African Americans (N = 132) and White Americans (N = 50) who were non-compliant with recommended CRC screening completed an online education module about CRC, and were either exposed to a gain-framed or loss-framed message about CRC screening. Half of African Americans were exposed to an additional and culturally targeted self-control message about personal prevention of CRC. Theory of planned behavior measures of attitudes, normative beliefs, perceived behavioural control, and intentions to obtain a CRC screen served as primary outcomes. The effect of messaging on perceived racism was also measured as an outcome. Consistent with prior research, White Americans were more receptive to CRC screening when exposed to a loss-framed message. However, African Americans were more receptive when exposed to a gain-framed message. The contrary effect of loss-framed messaging on receptivity to screening among African Americans was mediated by an increase in perceived racism. However, including an additional and culturally targeted prevention message mitigated the adverse effect of a loss-framed message. This study identifies an important potential cultural difference in the effect of message framing on illness screening among African Americans, while also suggesting a culturally relevant linking mechanism. This study also suggests the potential for simultaneously presented and culturally targeted messaging to alter the effects of gain and loss-framed messaging on African Americans. What is already known on this subject? African Americans are at an increased risk of both developing and dying from colorectal cancer (CRC). These disparities can be

  20. The Stock Market's Reaction to Unemployment News: Why Bad News is Usually Good for Stocks

    John H. Boyd; Ravi Jagannathan; Jian Hu

    2001-01-01

    We find that on average an announcement of rising unemployment is 'good news' for stocks during economic expansions and 'bad news' during economic contractions. Thus stock prices usually increase on news of rising unemployment, since the economy is usually in an expansion phase. We provide an explanation for this phenomenon. Unemployment news bundles two primitive types of information relevant for valuing stocks: information about future interest rates and future corporate earnings and divide...