WorldWideScience

Sample records for online epid verification

  1. Online 3D EPID-based dose verification: Proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel, E-mail: r.rozendaal@nki.nl; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; González, Patrick; Mans, Anton; Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van [University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Delivery errors during radiotherapy may lead to medical harm and reduced life expectancy for patients. Such serious incidents can be avoided by performing dose verification online, i.e., while the patient is being irradiated, creating the possibility of halting the linac in case of a large overdosage or underdosage. The offline EPID-based 3D in vivo dosimetry system clinically employed at our institute is in principle suited for online treatment verification, provided the system is able to complete 3D dose reconstruction and verification within 420 ms, the present acquisition time of a single EPID frame. It is the aim of this study to show that our EPID-based dosimetry system can be made fast enough to achieve online 3D in vivo dose verification. Methods: The current dose verification system was sped up in two ways. First, a new software package was developed to perform all computations that are not dependent on portal image acquisition separately, thus removing the need for doing these calculations in real time. Second, the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm was sped up via a new, multithreaded implementation. Dose verification was implemented by comparing planned with reconstructed 3D dose distributions delivered to two regions in a patient: the target volume and the nontarget volume receiving at least 10 cGy. In both volumes, the mean dose is compared, while in the nontarget volume, the near-maximum dose (D2) is compared as well. The real-time dosimetry system was tested by irradiating an anthropomorphic phantom with three VMAT plans: a 6 MV head-and-neck treatment plan, a 10 MV rectum treatment plan, and a 10 MV prostate treatment plan. In all plans, two types of serious delivery errors were introduced. The functionality of automatically halting the linac was also implemented and tested. Results: The precomputation time per treatment was ∼180 s/treatment arc, depending on gantry angle resolution. The complete processing of a single portal frame

  2. Online 3D EPID-based dose verification: Proof of concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; González, Patrick; Mans, Anton; Mijnheer, Ben; Herk, Marcel van

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Delivery errors during radiotherapy may lead to medical harm and reduced life expectancy for patients. Such serious incidents can be avoided by performing dose verification online, i.e., while the patient is being irradiated, creating the possibility of halting the linac in case of a large overdosage or underdosage. The offline EPID-based 3D in vivo dosimetry system clinically employed at our institute is in principle suited for online treatment verification, provided the system is able to complete 3D dose reconstruction and verification within 420 ms, the present acquisition time of a single EPID frame. It is the aim of this study to show that our EPID-based dosimetry system can be made fast enough to achieve online 3D in vivo dose verification. Methods: The current dose verification system was sped up in two ways. First, a new software package was developed to perform all computations that are not dependent on portal image acquisition separately, thus removing the need for doing these calculations in real time. Second, the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm was sped up via a new, multithreaded implementation. Dose verification was implemented by comparing planned with reconstructed 3D dose distributions delivered to two regions in a patient: the target volume and the nontarget volume receiving at least 10 cGy. In both volumes, the mean dose is compared, while in the nontarget volume, the near-maximum dose (D2) is compared as well. The real-time dosimetry system was tested by irradiating an anthropomorphic phantom with three VMAT plans: a 6 MV head-and-neck treatment plan, a 10 MV rectum treatment plan, and a 10 MV prostate treatment plan. In all plans, two types of serious delivery errors were introduced. The functionality of automatically halting the linac was also implemented and tested. Results: The precomputation time per treatment was ∼180 s/treatment arc, depending on gantry angle resolution. The complete processing of a single portal frame

  3. Online 3D EPID-based dose verification: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; González, Patrick; Mans, Anton; Mijnheer, Ben; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    Delivery errors during radiotherapy may lead to medical harm and reduced life expectancy for patients. Such serious incidents can be avoided by performing dose verification online, i.e., while the patient is being irradiated, creating the possibility of halting the linac in case of a large overdosage or underdosage. The offline EPID-based 3D in vivo dosimetry system clinically employed at our institute is in principle suited for online treatment verification, provided the system is able to complete 3D dose reconstruction and verification within 420 ms, the present acquisition time of a single EPID frame. It is the aim of this study to show that our EPID-based dosimetry system can be made fast enough to achieve online 3D in vivo dose verification. The current dose verification system was sped up in two ways. First, a new software package was developed to perform all computations that are not dependent on portal image acquisition separately, thus removing the need for doing these calculations in real time. Second, the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm was sped up via a new, multithreaded implementation. Dose verification was implemented by comparing planned with reconstructed 3D dose distributions delivered to two regions in a patient: the target volume and the nontarget volume receiving at least 10 cGy. In both volumes, the mean dose is compared, while in the nontarget volume, the near-maximum dose (D2) is compared as well. The real-time dosimetry system was tested by irradiating an anthropomorphic phantom with three VMAT plans: a 6 MV head-and-neck treatment plan, a 10 MV rectum treatment plan, and a 10 MV prostate treatment plan. In all plans, two types of serious delivery errors were introduced. The functionality of automatically halting the linac was also implemented and tested. The precomputation time per treatment was ∼180 s/treatment arc, depending on gantry angle resolution. The complete processing of a single portal frame, including dose verification, took

  4. WE-D-BRA-04: Online 3D EPID-Based Dose Verification for Optimum Patient Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spreeuw, H; Rozendaal, R; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Mans, A; Mijnheer, B; Herk, M van; Gonzalez, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an online 3D dose verification tool based on EPID transit dosimetry to ensure optimum patient safety in radiotherapy treatments. Methods: A new software package was developed which processes EPID portal images online using a back-projection algorithm for the 3D dose reconstruction. The package processes portal images faster than the acquisition rate of the portal imager (∼ 2.5 fps). After a portal image is acquired, the software seeks for “hot spots” in the reconstructed 3D dose distribution. A hot spot is in this study defined as a 4 cm 3 cube where the average cumulative reconstructed dose exceeds the average total planned dose by at least 20% and 50 cGy. If a hot spot is detected, an alert is generated resulting in a linac halt. The software has been tested by irradiating an Alderson phantom after introducing various types of serious delivery errors. Results: In our first experiment the Alderson phantom was irradiated with two arcs from a 6 MV VMAT H&N treatment having a large leaf position error or a large monitor unit error. For both arcs and both errors the linac was halted before dose delivery was completed. When no error was introduced, the linac was not halted. The complete processing of a single portal frame, including hot spot detection, takes about 220 ms on a dual hexacore Intel Xeon 25 X5650 CPU at 2.66 GHz. Conclusion: A prototype online 3D dose verification tool using portal imaging has been developed and successfully tested for various kinds of gross delivery errors. The detection of hot spots was proven to be effective for the timely detection of these errors. Current work is focused on hot spot detection criteria for various treatment sites and the introduction of a clinical pilot program with online verification of hypo-fractionated (lung) treatments

  5. Characterization of a novel EPID designed for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Samuel J.; McNamara, Aimee L.; Deshpande, Shrikant; Holloway, Lois; Greer, Peter B.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Vial, Philip

    2013-01-01

    100 monitor units. Over this range, the prototype and standard EPID central axis responses agreed to within 1.6%. Images taken with the prototype EPID were noisier than those taken with the standard EPID, with fractional uncertainties of 0.2% and 0.05% within the central 1 cm 2 , respectively. For all dosimetry measurements, the prototype EPID exhibited a near water-equivalent response whereas the standard EPID did not. The CNR and spatial resolution of images taken with the standard EPID were greater than those taken with the prototype EPID.Conclusions: A prototype EPID employing an array of PS fibers has been developed and the first experimental measurements are reported. The prototype EPID demonstrated a much morewater-equivalent dose response than the standard EPID. While the imaging performance of the standard EPID was superior to that of the prototype, the prototype EPID has many design characteristics that may be optimized to improve imaging performance. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of a new detector design for simultaneous imaging and dosimetry treatment verification in radiotherapy

  6. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an 192 Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an 192 Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The

  7. Suitability of markerless EPID tracking for tumor position verification in gated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpa, Marco; Baier, Kurt; Guckenberger, Matthias; Cremers, Florian; Meyer, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To maximize the benefits of respiratory gated radiotherapy (RGRT) of lung tumors real-time verification of the tumor position is required. This work investigates the feasibility of markerless tracking of lung tumors during beam-on time in electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images of the MV therapeutic beam. Methods: EPID movies were acquired at ∼2 fps for seven lung cancer patients with tumor peak-to-peak motion ranges between 7.8 and 17.9 mm (mean: 13.7 mm) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. The external breathing motion of the abdomen was synchronously measured. Both datasets were retrospectively analyzed inPortalTrack, an in-house developed tracking software. The authors define a three-step procedure to run the simulations: (1) gating window definition, (2) gated-beam delivery simulation, and (3) tumor tracking. First, an amplitude threshold level was set on the external signal, defining the onset of beam-on/-off signals. This information was then mapped onto a sequence of EPID images to generate stamps of beam-on/-hold periods throughout the EPID movies in PortalTrack, by obscuring the frames corresponding to beam-off times. Last, tumor motion in the superior-inferior direction was determined on portal images by the tracking algorithm during beam-on time. The residual motion inside the gating window as well as target coverage (TC) and the marginal target displacement (MTD) were used as measures to quantify tumor position variability. Results: Tumor position monitoring and estimation from beam's-eye-view images during RGRT was possible in 67% of the analyzed beams. For a reference gating window of 5 mm, deviations ranging from 2% to 86% (35% on average) were recorded between the reference and measured residual motion. TC (range: 62%–93%; mean: 77%) losses were correlated with false positives incidence rates resulting mostly from intra-/inter-beam baseline drifts, as well as sudden cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in exhale positions. Both

  8. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C; van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M C; Kuncic, Zdenka; O'Connor, Daryl J; Greer, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient. The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance. The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s). A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  9. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn [Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J. [Faculty of Science and IT, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C. [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Faculty of Science and IT, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Locked Bag 7, Hunter region Mail Centre, Newcastle, NSW 2310 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  10. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy

  11. First Experience With Real-Time EPID-Based Delivery Verification During IMRT and VMAT Sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, Henry C.; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Beek, Timothy van; Bhatia, Shashank; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Gantry-mounted megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have become ubiquitous on linear accelerators. WatchDog is a novel application of EPIDs, in which the image frames acquired during treatment are used to monitor treatment delivery in real time. We report on the preliminary use of WatchDog in a prospective study of cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and identify the challenges of clinical adoption. Methods and Materials: At the time of submission, 28 cancer patients (head and neck, pelvis, and prostate) undergoing fractionated external beam radiation therapy (24 IMRT, 4 VMAT) had ≥1 treatment fraction verified in real time (131 fractions or 881 fields). EPID images acquired continuously during treatment were synchronized and compared with model-generated transit EPID images within a frame time (∼0.1 s). A χ comparison was performed to cumulative frames to gauge the overall delivery quality, and the resulting pass rates were reported graphically during treatment delivery. Every frame acquired (500-1500 per fraction) was saved for postprocessing and analysis. Results: The system reported the mean ± standard deviation in real time χ 91.1% ± 11.5% (83.6% ± 13.2%) for cumulative frame χ analysis with 4%, 4 mm (3%, 3 mm) criteria, global over the integrated image. Conclusions: A real-time EPID-based radiation delivery verification system for IMRT and VMAT has been demonstrated that aims to prevent major mistreatments in radiation therapy.

  12. First Experience With Real-Time EPID-Based Delivery Verification During IMRT and VMAT Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, Henry C., E-mail: henry.woodruff@newcastle.edu.au [Faculty of Science and Information Technology, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Fuangrod, Todsaporn [Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Beek, Timothy van [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Bhatia, Shashank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Faculty of Science and Information Technology, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Gantry-mounted megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have become ubiquitous on linear accelerators. WatchDog is a novel application of EPIDs, in which the image frames acquired during treatment are used to monitor treatment delivery in real time. We report on the preliminary use of WatchDog in a prospective study of cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and identify the challenges of clinical adoption. Methods and Materials: At the time of submission, 28 cancer patients (head and neck, pelvis, and prostate) undergoing fractionated external beam radiation therapy (24 IMRT, 4 VMAT) had ≥1 treatment fraction verified in real time (131 fractions or 881 fields). EPID images acquired continuously during treatment were synchronized and compared with model-generated transit EPID images within a frame time (∼0.1 s). A χ comparison was performed to cumulative frames to gauge the overall delivery quality, and the resulting pass rates were reported graphically during treatment delivery. Every frame acquired (500-1500 per fraction) was saved for postprocessing and analysis. Results: The system reported the mean ± standard deviation in real time χ 91.1% ± 11.5% (83.6% ± 13.2%) for cumulative frame χ analysis with 4%, 4 mm (3%, 3 mm) criteria, global over the integrated image. Conclusions: A real-time EPID-based radiation delivery verification system for IMRT and VMAT has been demonstrated that aims to prevent major mistreatments in radiation therapy.

  13. Dosimetric pre-treatment verification of IMRT using an EPID; clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijtveld, Mathilda van; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In our clinic a QA program for IMRT verification, fully based on dosimetric measurements with electronic portal imaging devices (EPID), has been running for over 3 years. The program includes a pre-treatment dosimetric check of all IMRT fields. During a complete treatment simulation at the linac, a portal dose image (PDI) is acquired with the EPID for each patient field and compared with a predicted PDI. In this paper, the results of this pre-treatment procedure are analysed, and intercepted errors are reported. An automated image analysis procedure is proposed to limit the number of fields that need human intervention in PDI comparison. Materials and methods: Most of our analyses are performed using the γ index with 3% local dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement as reference values. Scalar parameters are derived from the γ values to summarize the agreement between measured and predicted 2D PDIs. Areas with all pixels having γ values larger than one are evaluated, making decisions based on clinically relevant criteria more straightforward. Results: In 270 patients, the pre-treatment checks revealed four clinically relevant errors. Calculation of statistics for a group of 75 patients showed that the patient-averaged mean γ value inside the field was 0.43 ± 0.13 (1 SD) and only 6.1 ± 6.8% of pixels had a γ value larger than one. With the proposed automated image analysis scheme, visual inspection of images can be avoided in 2/3 of the cases. Conclusion: EPIDs may be used for high accuracy and high resolution routine verification of IMRT fields to intercept clinically relevant dosimetric errors prior to the start of treatment. For the majority of fields, PDI comparison can fully rely on an automated procedure, avoiding excessive workload

  14. Online fingerprint verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upendra, K; Singh, S; Kumar, V; Verma, H K

    2007-01-01

    As organizations search for more secure authentication methods for user access, e-commerce, and other security applications, biometrics is gaining increasing attention. With an increasing emphasis on the emerging automatic personal identification applications, fingerprint based identification is becoming more popular. The most widely used fingerprint representation is the minutiae based representation. The main drawback with this representation is that it does not utilize a significant component of the rich discriminatory information available in the fingerprints. Local ridge structures cannot be completely characterized by minutiae. Also, it is difficult quickly to match two fingerprint images containing different number of unregistered minutiae points. In this study filter bank based representation, which eliminates these weakness, is implemented and the overall performance of the developed system is tested. The results have shown that this system can be used effectively for secure online verification applications.

  15. MO-AB-BRA-03: Development of Novel Real Time in Vivo EPID Treatment Verification for Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, G; Podesta, M [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Reniers, B [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, F [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments are employed worldwide to treat a wide variety of cancers. However, in vivo dose verification remains a challenge with no commercial dosimetry system available to verify the treatment dose delivered to the patient. We propose a novel dosimetry system that couples an independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform and an amorphous silicon Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to provide real time treatment verification. Methods: MC calculations predict the EPID response to the photon fluence emitted by the HDR source by simulating the patient, the source dwell positions and times, and treatment complexities such as tissue compositions/densities and different applicators. Simulated results are then compared against EPID measurements acquired with ∼0.14s time resolution which allows dose measurements for each dwell position. The EPID has been calibrated using an Ir-192 HDR source and experiments were performed using different phantoms, including tissue equivalent materials (PMMA, lung and bone). A source positioning accuracy of 0.2 mm, without including the afterloader uncertainty, was ensured using a robotic arm moving the source. Results: An EPID can acquire 3D Cartesian source positions and its response varies significantly due to differences in the material composition/density of the irradiated object, allowing detection of changes in patient geometry. The panel time resolution allows dose rate and dwell time measurements. Moreover, predicted EPID images obtained from clinical treatment plans provide anatomical information that can be related to the patient anatomy, mostly bone and air cavities, localizing the source inside of the patient using its anatomy as reference. Conclusion: Results obtained show the feasibility of the proposed dose verification system that is capable to verify all the brachytherapy treatment steps in real time providing data about treatment delivery quality and also applicator

  16. An in vivo dose verification method for SBRT–VMAT delivery using the EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: peter.mccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Van Uytven, E.; Van Beek, T.; Asuni, G. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Radiation treatments have become increasingly more complex with the development of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). SBRT involves the delivery of substantially larger doses over fewer fractions than conventional therapy. SBRT–VMAT treatments will strongly benefit from in vivo patient dose verification, as any errors in delivery can be more detrimental to the radiobiology of the patient as compared to conventional therapy. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are available on most commercial linear accelerators (Linacs) and their documented use for dosimetry makes them valuable tools for patient dose verification. In this work, the authors customize and validate a physics-based model which utilizes on-treatment EPID images to reconstruct the 3D dose delivered to the patient during SBRT–VMAT delivery. Methods: The SBRT Linac head, including jaws, multileaf collimators, and flattening filter, were modeled using Monte Carlo methods and verified with measured data. The simulation provides energy spectrum data that are used by their “forward” model to then accurately predict fluence generated by a SBRT beam at a plane above the patient. This fluence is then transported through the patient and then the dose to the phosphor layer in the EPID is calculated. Their “inverse” model back-projects the EPID measured focal fluence to a plane upstream of the patient and recombines it with the extra-focal fluence predicted by the forward model. This estimate of total delivered fluence is then forward projected onto the patient’s density matrix and a collapsed cone convolution algorithm calculates the dose delivered to the patient. The model was tested by reconstructing the dose for two prostate, three lung, and two spine SBRT–VMAT treatment fractions delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. It was further validated against actual patient data for a lung and spine SBRT–VMAT plan. The

  17. Numident Online Verification Utility (NOVU)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — NOVU is a mainframe application that accesses the NUMIDENT to perform real-time SSN verifications. This program is called by other SSA online programs that serve as...

  18. Verification of the linac isocenter for stereotactic radiosurgery using cine-EPID imaging and arc delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O' Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:Verification of the mechanical isocenter position is required as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. Several techniques have been proposed for this purpose but each of them has certain drawbacks. In this paper, a new efficient and more comprehensive method using cine-EPID images has been introduced for automatic verification of the isocenter with sufficient accuracy for stereotactic applications. Methods: Using a circular collimator fixed to the gantry head to define the field, EPID images of a Winston-Lutz phantom were acquired in cine-imaging mode during 360 deg. gantry rotations. A robust matlab code was developed to analyze the data by finding the center of the field and the center of the ball bearing shadow in each image with sub-pixel accuracy. The distance between these two centers was determined for every image. The method was evaluated by comparison to results of a mechanical pointer and also by detection of a manual shift applied to the phantom position. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were tested and it was also applied to detect couch and collimator wobble during rotation. Results:The accuracy of the algorithm was 0.03 ± 0.02 mm. The repeatability was less than 3 μm and the reproducibility was less than 86 μm. The time elapsed for the analysis of more than 100 cine images of Varian aS1000 and aS500 EPIDs were ∼65 and 20 s, respectively. Processing of images taken in integrated mode took 0.1 s. The output of the analysis software is printable and shows the isocenter shifts as a function of angle in both in-plane and cross-plane directions. It gives warning messages where the shifts exceed the criteria for SRS/SRT and provides useful data for the necessary adjustments in the system including bearing system and/or room lasers. Conclusions: The comprehensive method introduced in this study uses cine-images, is highly accurate, fast, and independent

  19. Verification of the linac isocenter for stereotactic radiosurgery using cine-EPID imaging and arc delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O' Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales 2310, Australia and School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose:Verification of the mechanical isocenter position is required as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. Several techniques have been proposed for this purpose but each of them has certain drawbacks. In this paper, a new efficient and more comprehensive method using cine-EPID images has been introduced for automatic verification of the isocenter with sufficient accuracy for stereotactic applications. Methods: Using a circular collimator fixed to the gantry head to define the field, EPID images of a Winston-Lutz phantom were acquired in cine-imaging mode during 360 deg. gantry rotations. A robust matlab code was developed to analyze the data by finding the center of the field and the center of the ball bearing shadow in each image with sub-pixel accuracy. The distance between these two centers was determined for every image. The method was evaluated by comparison to results of a mechanical pointer and also by detection of a manual shift applied to the phantom position. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were tested and it was also applied to detect couch and collimator wobble during rotation. Results:The accuracy of the algorithm was 0.03 {+-} 0.02 mm. The repeatability was less than 3 {mu}m and the reproducibility was less than 86 {mu}m. The time elapsed for the analysis of more than 100 cine images of Varian aS1000 and aS500 EPIDs were {approx}65 and 20 s, respectively. Processing of images taken in integrated mode took 0.1 s. The output of the analysis software is printable and shows the isocenter shifts as a function of angle in both in-plane and cross-plane directions. It gives warning messages where the shifts exceed the criteria for SRS/SRT and provides useful data for the necessary adjustments in the system including bearing system and/or room lasers. Conclusions: The comprehensive method introduced in this study uses cine-images, is highly accurate, fast, and

  20. A quantification of the effectiveness of EPID dosimetry and software-based plan verification systems in detecting incidents in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojechko, Casey; Phillps, Mark; Kalet, Alan; Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Complex treatments in radiation therapy require robust verification in order to prevent errors that can adversely affect the patient. For this purpose, the authors estimate the effectiveness of detecting errors with a “defense in depth” system composed of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based dosimetry and a software-based system composed of rules-based and Bayesian network verifications. Methods: The authors analyzed incidents with a high potential severity score, scored as a 3 or 4 on a 4 point scale, recorded in an in-house voluntary incident reporting system, collected from February 2012 to August 2014. The incidents were categorized into different failure modes. The detectability, defined as the number of incidents that are detectable divided total number of incidents, was calculated for each failure mode. Results: In total, 343 incidents were used in this study. Of the incidents 67% were related to photon external beam therapy (EBRT). The majority of the EBRT incidents were related to patient positioning and only a small number of these could be detected by EPID dosimetry when performed prior to treatment (6%). A large fraction could be detected by in vivo dosimetry performed during the first fraction (74%). Rules-based and Bayesian network verifications were found to be complimentary to EPID dosimetry, able to detect errors related to patient prescriptions and documentation, and errors unrelated to photon EBRT. Combining all of the verification steps together, 91% of all EBRT incidents could be detected. Conclusions: This study shows that the defense in depth system is potentially able to detect a large majority of incidents. The most effective EPID-based dosimetry verification is in vivo measurements during the first fraction and is complemented by rules-based and Bayesian network plan checking.

  1. MO-FG-202-01: A Fast Yet Sensitive EPID-Based Real-Time Treatment Verification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M; Nourzadeh, H; Neal, B; Siebers, J; Watkins, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create a real-time EPID-based treatment verification system which robustly detects treatment delivery and patient attenuation variations. Methods: Treatment plan DICOM files sent to the record-and-verify system are captured and utilized to predict EPID images for each planned control point using a modified GPU-based digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm which accounts for the patient attenuation, source energy fluence, source size effects, and MLC attenuation. The DICOM and predicted images are utilized by our C++ treatment verification software which compares EPID acquired 1024×768 resolution frames acquired at ∼8.5hz from Varian Truebeam™ system. To maximize detection sensitivity, image comparisons determine (1) if radiation exists outside of the desired treatment field; (2) if radiation is lacking inside the treatment field; (3) if translations, rotations, and magnifications of the image are within tolerance. Acquisition was tested with known test fields and prior patient fields. Error detection was tested in real-time and utilizing images acquired during treatment with another system. Results: The computational time of the prediction algorithms, for a patient plan with 350 control points and 60×60×42cm^3 CT volume, is 2–3minutes on CPU and <27 seconds on GPU for 1024×768 images. The verification software requires a maximum of ∼9ms and ∼19ms for 512×384 and 1024×768 resolution images, respectively, to perform image analysis and dosimetric validations. Typical variations in geometric parameters between reference and the measured images are 0.32°for gantry rotation, 1.006 for scaling factor, and 0.67mm for translation. For excess out-of-field/missing in-field fluence, with masks extending 1mm (at isocenter) from the detected aperture edge, the average total in-field area missing EPID fluence was 1.5mm2 the out-of-field excess EPID fluence was 8mm^2, both below error tolerances. Conclusion: A real-time verification software, with

  2. MO-FG-202-01: A Fast Yet Sensitive EPID-Based Real-Time Treatment Verification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M; Nourzadeh, H; Neal, B; Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Watkins, W

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create a real-time EPID-based treatment verification system which robustly detects treatment delivery and patient attenuation variations. Methods: Treatment plan DICOM files sent to the record-and-verify system are captured and utilized to predict EPID images for each planned control point using a modified GPU-based digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm which accounts for the patient attenuation, source energy fluence, source size effects, and MLC attenuation. The DICOM and predicted images are utilized by our C++ treatment verification software which compares EPID acquired 1024×768 resolution frames acquired at ∼8.5hz from Varian Truebeam™ system. To maximize detection sensitivity, image comparisons determine (1) if radiation exists outside of the desired treatment field; (2) if radiation is lacking inside the treatment field; (3) if translations, rotations, and magnifications of the image are within tolerance. Acquisition was tested with known test fields and prior patient fields. Error detection was tested in real-time and utilizing images acquired during treatment with another system. Results: The computational time of the prediction algorithms, for a patient plan with 350 control points and 60×60×42cm^3 CT volume, is 2–3minutes on CPU and <27 seconds on GPU for 1024×768 images. The verification software requires a maximum of ∼9ms and ∼19ms for 512×384 and 1024×768 resolution images, respectively, to perform image analysis and dosimetric validations. Typical variations in geometric parameters between reference and the measured images are 0.32°for gantry rotation, 1.006 for scaling factor, and 0.67mm for translation. For excess out-of-field/missing in-field fluence, with masks extending 1mm (at isocenter) from the detected aperture edge, the average total in-field area missing EPID fluence was 1.5mm2 the out-of-field excess EPID fluence was 8mm^2, both below error tolerances. Conclusion: A real-time verification software, with

  3. EPID-based verification of the MLC performance for dynamic IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; Barnes, Michael P.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In advanced radiotherapy treatments such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), verification of the performance of the multileaf collimator (MLC) is an essential part of the linac QA program. The purpose of this study is to use the existing measurement methods for geometric QA of the MLCs and extend them to more comprehensive evaluation techniques, and to develop dedicated robust algorithms to quantitatively investigate the MLC performance in a fast, accurate, and efficient manner. Methods: The behavior of leaves was investigated in the step-and-shoot mode by the analysis of integrated electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images acquired during picket fence tests at fixed gantry angles and arc delivery. The MLC was also studied in dynamic mode by the analysis of cine EPID images of a sliding gap pattern delivered in a variety of conditions including different leaf speeds, deliveries at fixed gantry angles or in arc mode, and changing the direction of leaf motion. The accuracy of the method was tested by detection of the intentionally inserted errors in the delivery patterns. Results: The algorithm developed for the picket fence analysis was able to find each individual leaf position, gap width, and leaf bank skewness in addition to the deviations from expected leaf positions with respect to the beam central axis with sub-pixel accuracy. For the three tested linacs over a period of 5 months, the maximum change in the gap width was 0.5 mm, the maximum deviation from the expected leaf positions was 0.1 mm and the MLC skewness was up to 0.2°. The algorithm developed for the sliding gap analysis could determine the velocity and acceleration/deceleration of each individual leaf as well as the gap width. There was a slight decrease in the accuracy of leaf performance with increasing leaf speeds. The analysis results were presented through several graphs. The accuracy of the method was assessed as 0.01 mm

  4. An EPID-based method for comprehensive verification of gantry, EPID and the MLC carriage positional accuracy in Varian linacs during arc treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; McGarry, Conor K; Barnes, Michael P; Sabet, Mahsheed; Ebert, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy, it is crucial to monitor the performance of all linac components including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method has been introduced in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems during arc treatments with the aim of ensuring the accuracy of linac mechanical performance. The Varian EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in MLC carriages as a result of linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of EPID images of a simple phantom comprised of 5 ball-bearings during arc delivery. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Twelve Varian linacs of different models were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. All machines showed less than 1 mm gantry sag. Changes in SDD values were within 1.7 mm except for three linacs of one centre which were within 9 mm. Values of EPID skewness and tilt were negligible in all tested linacs. The maximum sag in MLC leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. The EPID sag showed a considerable improvement in TrueBeam linacs. The methodology and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of linac components with gantry rotation. It is reproducible and accurate and can be easily performed as a routine test in clinics

  5. A novel method for sub-arc VMAT dose delivery verification based on portal dosimetry with an EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Ruud A M; Dirkx, Maarten L P; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2017-11-01

    The EPID-based sub-arc verification of VMAT dose delivery requires synchronization of the acquired electronic portal images (EPIs) with the VMAT delivery, that is, establishment of the start- and stop-MU of the acquired images. To realize this, published synchronization methods propose the use of logging features of the linac or dedicated hardware solutions. In this study, we developed a novel, software-based synchronization method that only uses information inherently available in the acquired images. The EPIs are continuously acquired during pretreatment VMAT delivery and converted into Portal Dose Images (PDIs). Sub-arcs of approximately 10 MU are then defined by combining groups of sequentially acquired PDIs. The start- and stop-MUs of measured sub-arcs are established in a synchronization procedure, using only dosimetric information in measured and predicted PDIs. Sub-arc verification of a VMAT dose delivery is based on comparison of measured sub-arc PDIs with synchronized, predicted sub-arc PDIs, using γ-analyses. To assess the accuracy of this new method, measured and predicted PDIs were compared for 20 clinically applied VMAT prostate cancer plans. The sensitivity of the method for detection of delivery errors was investigated using VMAT deliveries with intentionally inserted, small perturbations (25 error scenarios; leaf gap deviations ≤ 1.5 mm, leaf motion stops during ≤ 15 MU, linac output error ≤ 2%). For the 20 plans, the average failed pixel rates (FPR) for full-arc and sub-arc dose QA were 0.36% ± 0.26% (1 SD) and 0.64% ± 0.88%, based on 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm γ-analyses, respectively. Small systematic perturbations of up to 1% output error and 1 mm leaf offset were detected using full-arc QA. Sub-arc QA was able to detect positioning errors in three leaves only during approximately 20 MU and small dose delivery errors during approximately 40 MU. In an ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for the combined full-arc/sub-arc approach was

  6. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  8. Verification of PTV margins for IMRT prostate cancer using EPID; Verificacao das margens de PTV para IMRT de cancer de prostata utilizando EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidens, Matheus; Santos, Romulo R.; Estacio, Daniela R. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas. Servico de Fisica Medica; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: matheus_leidens@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this work is to present the results of a strategy to define the PTV margins for patients with prostate cancer treated with IMRT technique, due to geometrical uncertainties associated with the planned placement. 341 images of 31 patients in supine position, before applying the fractions, were obtained using an EPID attached to a linear accelerator, where only setup errors were studied. The displacements were analyzed in relation to the AP (antero-posterior), SI (superior-inferior) and LR (left-right) directions. The distribution pattern of systematic displacement deviation values were 0.12 cm, 0.06 cm, 0.02 cm and the standard deviation of the distribution of random deviations was 0.62 cm, 0.53 cm, and 0.24 cm in the AP, SI and LR directions, respectively. Data evaluation, according to Stroom and Heijmen’s method, suggests that PTV margins should be 0.66 cm in the AP direction, 0.49 cm in the SI direction and 0.20 cm in the LR direction. These data show a high reproducibility in the positioning of patients, given by a method for the correction of planned relative to the bony anatomy checked with the EPID position. (author)

  9. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient

  10. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient.

  11. SU-G-BRB-11: On the Sensitivity of An EPID-Based 3D Dose Verification System to Detect Delivery Errors in VMAT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Mijnheer, B; Mans, A; Rozendaal, R [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of an EPID-based 3D dose verification system to detect delivery errors in VMAT treatments. Methods: For this study 41 EPID-reconstructed 3D in vivo dose distributions of 15 different VMAT plans (H&N, lung, prostate and rectum) were selected. To simulate the effect of delivery errors, their TPS plans were modified by: 1) scaling of the monitor units by ±3% and ±6% and 2) systematic shifting of leaf bank positions by ±1mm, ±2mm and ±5mm. The 3D in vivo dose distributions where then compared to the unmodified and modified treatment plans. To determine the detectability of the various delivery errors, we made use of a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) methodology. True positive and false positive rates were calculated as a function of the γ-parameters γmean, γ1% (near-maximum γ) and the PTV dose parameter ΔD{sub 50} (i.e. D{sub 50}(EPID)-D{sub 50}(TPS)). The ROC curve is constructed by plotting the true positive rate vs. the false positive rate. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) then serves as a measure of the performance of the EPID dosimetry system in detecting a particular error; an ideal system has AUC=1. Results: The AUC ranges for the machine output errors and systematic leaf position errors were [0.64 – 0.93] and [0.48 – 0.92] respectively using γmean, [0.57 – 0.79] and [0.46 – 0.85] using γ1% and [0.61 – 0.77] and [ 0.48 – 0.62] using ΔD{sub 50}. Conclusion: For the verification of VMAT deliveries, the parameter γmean is the best discriminator for the detection of systematic leaf position errors and monitor unit scaling errors. Compared to γmean and γ1%, the parameter ΔD{sub 50} performs worse as a discriminator in all cases.

  12. Feasibility study on the verification of actual beam delivery in a treatment room using EPID transit dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Tae Seong; Chung, Eun Ji; Son, Jaeman; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of transit dosimetry using commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) with simple calibration method to verify the beam delivery based on detection of large errors in treatment room. Twenty four fields of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were selected from four lung cancer patients and used in the irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom. The proposed method was evaluated by comparing the calculated dose map from TPS and EPID measurement on the same plane using a gamma index method with a 3% dose and 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit. In a simulation using a homogeneous plastic water phantom, performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, the average passing rate of the transit dose based on gamma index was high enough, averaging 94.2% when there was no error during beam delivery. The passing rate of the transit dose for 24 IMRT fields was lower with the anthropomorphic phantom, averaging 86.8% ± 3.8%, a reduction partially due to the inaccuracy of TPS calculations for inhomogeneity. Compared with the TPS, the absolute value of the transit dose at the beam center differed by −0.38% ± 2.1%. The simulation study indicated that the passing rate of the gamma index was significantly reduced, to less than 40%, when a wrong field was erroneously irradiated to patient in the treatment room. This feasibility study suggested that transit dosimetry based on the calculation with commercial TPS and EPID measurement with simple calibration can provide information about large errors for treatment beam delivery

  13. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, T [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Health Insurance Co.Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, E [National Health Insurance Co.Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S [Cheil General Hospital and Women Healthcare Center, Kwandong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  14. Robustness and precision of an automatic marker detection algorithm for online prostate daily targeting using a standard V-EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, S; Beaulieu, L; Pouliot, S; Pouliot, J; Roy, R; Girouard, L M; Martel-Brisson, N; Vigneault, E; Laverdière, J

    2003-07-01

    An algorithm for the daily localization of the prostate using implanted markers and a standard video-based electronic portal imaging device (V-EPID) has been tested. Prior to planning, three gold markers were implanted in the prostate of seven patients. The clinical images were acquired with a BeamViewPlus 2.1 V-EPID for each field during the normal course radiotherapy treatment and are used off-line to determine the ability of the automatic marker detection algorithm to adequately and consistently detect the markers. Clinical images were obtained with various dose levels from ranging 2.5 to 75 MU. The algorithm is based on marker attenuation characterization in the portal image and spatial distribution. A total of 1182 clinical images were taken. The results show an average efficiency of 93% for the markers detected individually and 85% for the group of markers. This algorithm accomplishes the detection and validation in 0.20-0.40 s. When the center of mass of the group of implanted markers is used, then all displacements can be corrected to within 1.0 mm in 84% of the cases and within 1.5 mm in 97% of cases. The standard video-based EPID tested provides excellent marker detection capability even with low dose levels. The V-EPID can be used successfully with radiopaque markers and the automatic detection algorithm to track and correct the daily setup deviations due to organ motions.

  15. Data Exchanges and Verifications Online (DEVO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — DEVO is the back-end application for processing SSN verifications and data exchanges. DEVO uses modern technology for parameter driven processing of both batch and...

  16. Analyzing personalized policies for online biometric verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhwani, Apaar; Yang, Yan; Wein, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by India's nationwide biometric program for social inclusion, we analyze verification (i.e., one-to-one matching) in the case where we possess similarity scores for 10 fingerprints and two irises between a resident's biometric images at enrollment and his biometric images during his first verification. At subsequent verifications, we allow individualized strategies based on these 12 scores: we acquire a subset of the 12 images, get new scores for this subset that quantify the similarity to the corresponding enrollment images, and use the likelihood ratio (i.e., the likelihood of observing these scores if the resident is genuine divided by the corresponding likelihood if the resident is an imposter) to decide whether a resident is genuine or an imposter. We also consider two-stage policies, where additional images are acquired in a second stage if the first-stage results are inconclusive. Using performance data from India's program, we develop a new probabilistic model for the joint distribution of the 12 similarity scores and find near-optimal individualized strategies that minimize the false reject rate (FRR) subject to constraints on the false accept rate (FAR) and mean verification delay for each resident. Our individualized policies achieve the same FRR as a policy that acquires (and optimally fuses) 12 biometrics for each resident, which represents a five (four, respectively) log reduction in FRR relative to fingerprint (iris, respectively) policies previously proposed for India's biometric program. The mean delay is [Formula: see text] sec for our proposed policy, compared to 30 sec for a policy that acquires one fingerprint and 107 sec for a policy that acquires all 12 biometrics. This policy acquires iris scans from 32-41% of residents (depending on the FAR) and acquires an average of 1.3 fingerprints per resident.

  17. Time Series Based for Online Signature Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Gede Darma Putra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Signature verification system is to match the tested signature with a claimed signature. This paper proposes time series based for feature extraction method and dynamic time warping for match method. The system made by process of testing 900 signatures belong to 50 participants, 3 signatures for reference and 5 signatures from original user, simple imposters and trained imposters for signatures test. The final result system was tested with 50 participants with 3 references. This test obtained that system accuracy without imposters is 90,44897959% at threshold 44 with rejection errors (FNMR is 5,2% and acceptance errors (FMR is 4,35102%, when with imposters system accuracy is 80,1361% at threshold 27 with error rejection (FNMR is 15,6% and acceptance errors (average FMR is 4,263946%, with details as follows: acceptance errors is 0,391837%, acceptance errors simple imposters is 3,2% and acceptance errors trained imposters is 9,2%.

  18. Software verification in on-line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberger, W.

    1980-01-01

    Operator assistance is more and more provided by computers. Computers contain programs, whose quality should be above a certain level, before they are allowed to be used in reactor control rooms. Several possibilities for gaining software reliability figures are discussed in this paper. By supervising the testing procedure of a program, one can estimate the number of remaining programming errors. Such an estimation, however, is not very accurate. With mathematical proving procedures one can gain some knowledge on program properties. Such proving procedures are important for the verification of general WHILE-loops, which tend to be error prone. The program analysis decomposes a program into its parts. First the program structure is made visible, which includes the data movements and the control flow. From this analysis test cases can be derived that lead to a complete test. Program analysis can be done by hand or automatically. A statistical program test normally requires a large number of test runs. This number is diminished if details concerning both the program to be tested or its use are known in advance. (orig.)

  19. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada and Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose (<20% prescription dose) and high dose regions (>80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged

  20. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCowan, P. M.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose ( 80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged scenario for each plan. The authors defined their

  1. Online adaptation and verification of VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [KU Leuven Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000, Belgium and KU Leuven Medical Imaging Research Center, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Depuydt, Tom; Haustermans, Karin [KU Leuven Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [KU Leuven Medical Imaging Research Center, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000, Belgium and KU Leuven Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), PSI, Center for Processing Speech and Images, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [KU Leuven Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), PSI, Center for Processing Speech and Images, Leuven 3000, Belgium and KU Leuven iMinds - Medical IT Department, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method for fast volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) adaptation in response to interfraction anatomical variations. Additionally, plan parameters extracted from the adapted plans are used to verify the quality of these plans. The methods were tested as a prostate class solution and compared to replanning and to their current clinical practice. Methods: The proposed VMAT adaptation is an extension of their previous intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) adaptation. It follows a direct (forward) planning approach: the multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures are corrected in the beam’s eye view (BEV) and the monitor units (MUs) are corrected using point dose calculations. All MLC and MU corrections are driven by the positions of four fiducial points only, without need for a full contour set. Quality assurance (QA) of the adapted plans is performed using plan parameters that can be calculated online and that have a relation to the delivered dose or the plan quality. Five potential parameters are studied for this purpose: the number of MU, the equivalent field size (EqFS), the modulation complexity score (MCS), and the components of the MCS: the aperture area variability (AAV) and the leaf sequence variability (LSV). The full adaptation and its separate steps were evaluated in simulation experiments involving a prostate phantom subjected to various interfraction transformations. The efficacy of the current VMAT adaptation was scored by target mean dose (CTV{sub mean}), conformity (CI{sub 95%}), tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The impact of the adaptation on the plan parameters (QA) was assessed by comparison with prediction intervals (PI) derived from a statistical model of the typical variation of these parameters in a population of VMAT prostate plans (n = 63). These prediction intervals are the adaptation equivalent of the tolerance tables for couch shifts in the current clinical

  2. Online adaptation and verification of VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crijns, Wouter; Defraene, Gilles; Depuydt, Tom; Haustermans, Karin; Van Herck, Hans; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents a method for fast volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) adaptation in response to interfraction anatomical variations. Additionally, plan parameters extracted from the adapted plans are used to verify the quality of these plans. The methods were tested as a prostate class solution and compared to replanning and to their current clinical practice. Methods: The proposed VMAT adaptation is an extension of their previous intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) adaptation. It follows a direct (forward) planning approach: the multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures are corrected in the beam’s eye view (BEV) and the monitor units (MUs) are corrected using point dose calculations. All MLC and MU corrections are driven by the positions of four fiducial points only, without need for a full contour set. Quality assurance (QA) of the adapted plans is performed using plan parameters that can be calculated online and that have a relation to the delivered dose or the plan quality. Five potential parameters are studied for this purpose: the number of MU, the equivalent field size (EqFS), the modulation complexity score (MCS), and the components of the MCS: the aperture area variability (AAV) and the leaf sequence variability (LSV). The full adaptation and its separate steps were evaluated in simulation experiments involving a prostate phantom subjected to various interfraction transformations. The efficacy of the current VMAT adaptation was scored by target mean dose (CTV mean ), conformity (CI 95% ), tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The impact of the adaptation on the plan parameters (QA) was assessed by comparison with prediction intervals (PI) derived from a statistical model of the typical variation of these parameters in a population of VMAT prostate plans (n = 63). These prediction intervals are the adaptation equivalent of the tolerance tables for couch shifts in the current clinical practice

  3. Gated Treatment Delivery Verification With On-Line Megavoltage Fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai An; Christensen, James D.; Gore, Elizabeth; Khamene, Ali; Boettger, Thomas; Li, X. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically demonstrate the use of on-line real-time megavoltage (MV) fluoroscopy for gated treatment delivery verification. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage fluoroscopy (MVF) image sequences were acquired using a flat panel equipped for MV cone-beam CT in synchrony with the respiratory signal obtained from the Anzai gating device. The MVF images can be obtained immediately before or during gated treatment delivery. A prototype software tool (named RTReg4D) was developed to register MVF images with phase-sequenced digitally reconstructed radiograph images generated from the treatment planning system based on four-dimensional CT. The image registration can be used to reposition the patient before or during treatment delivery. To demonstrate the reliability and clinical usefulness, the system was first tested using a thoracic phantom and then prospectively in actual patient treatments under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Results: The quality of the MVF images for lung tumors is adequate for image registration with phase-sequenced digitally reconstructed radiographs. The MVF was found to be useful for monitoring inter- and intrafractional variations of tumor positions. With the planning target volume contour displayed on the MVF images, the system can verify whether the moving target stays within the planning target volume margin during gated delivery. Conclusions: The use of MVF images was found to be clinically effective in detecting discrepancies in tumor location before and during respiration-gated treatment delivery. The tools and process developed can be useful for gated treatment delivery verification.

  4. Dose-response characteristics of an amorphous silicon EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Peter; Hefner, Alfred; Georg, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for the purpose of patient setup verification. Nowadays, they are increasingly used as dosimeters (e.g., for IMRT verification and linac-specific QA). A prerequisite for any clinical dosimetric application is a detailed understanding of the detector's dose-response behavior. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon EPID (Elekta IVIEWGT) with respect to three photon beam qualities: 6, 10, and 25 MV. The EPID showed an excellent temporal stability on short term as well as on long term scales. The stability throughout the day was strongly influenced by warming up, which took several hours and affected EPID response by 2.5%. Ghosting effects increased the sensitivity of the EPID. They became more pronounced with decreasing time intervals between two exposures as well as with increasing dose. Due to ghosting, changes in pixel sensitivity amounted up to 16% (locally) for the 25 MV photon beam. It was observed that the response characteristics of our EPID depended on dose as well as on dose rate. Doubling the dose rate increased the EPID sensitivity by 1.5%. This behavior was successfully attributed to a dose per frame effect, i.e., a nonlinear relationship between the EPID signal and the dose which was delivered to the panel between two successive readouts. The sensitivity was found to vary up to 10% in the range of 1 to 1000 monitor units. This variation was governed by two independent effects. For low doses, the EPID signal was reduced due to the linac's changing dose rate during startup. Furthermore, the detector reading was influenced by intrabeam variations of EPID sensitivity, namely, an increase of detector response during uniform exposure. For the beam qualities which were used, the response characteristics of the EPID did not depend on energy. Differences in relative dose-response curves resulted from energy dependent temporal output

  5. Incorrect, fake, and false: Journalists' perceived online source credibility and verification behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, M.R.M.

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the extent journalists verify information provided by online sources, and tests to what extent this verification behavior can be explained by journalists' perceived credibility of online information and other factors, such as journalism education of journalists, work and

  6. Development of a daily dosimetric control for radiation therapy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboori, Mohammadsaeed

    2015-01-01

    Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be used to perform dose measurements during radiation therapy treatments if dedicated calibration and correction procedures are applied. The purpose of this study was to provide a new calibration and correction model for an amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPID for use in transit dose verification of step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A model was created in a commercial treatment planning system to calculate the nominal two-dimensional (2D) dose map of each radiation field at the EPID level. The EPID system was calibrated and correction factors were determined using a reference set-up, which consisted a patient phantom and an EPID phantom. The advantage of this method is that for the calibration, the actual beam spectrum is used to mimic a patient measurement. As proof-of-principle, the method was tested for the verification of two 7-field IMRT treatment plans with tumor sites in the head-and-neck and pelvic region. Predicted and measured EPID responses were successfully compared to the nominal data from treatment planning using dose difference maps and gamma analyses. Based on our result it can be concluded that this new method of 2D EPID dosimetry is a potential tool for simple patient treatment fraction dose verification.

  7. Development of a software of VMAT delivery using EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Jameson, Michael; Holloway, Lois; Goozee, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is more complex than standard IMRT, requiring new methodology to evaluate delivery accuracy. Here, we present the development of methodology and a software tool to perform control point based verification of VMAT delivery using an EPID. Individual segment dose comparison allows the verification of VMAT deli very accuracy for individual control-points. An in-house software tool was developed to predict the individual segment dose as measured by EPID for Pinnacle (Philips) generated VMAT plans. The VMAT plans were delivered using an Elekta-synergy accelerator and the segment doses were measured using EPID. A normalised dose comparison of measured and predicted doses was performed using gamma analysis with 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm DTA. The sensitivity of the proposed methodology in detecting delivery errors was studied by delivering a standard intensity pattern with a preset dose error of 4 and 5% in two of its eight control-points. Four clinical plans were also tested using this methodology. The developed software accurately predicts the EPID dose by considering all possible leaf trajectories in VMAT delivery. The mean gamma value and percentage of pixels exceeding the gamma tolerance for a segment with and without delivery errors are shown in Table. From the tabulated values it is evident that the proposed methodology is sensitive in detecting delivery errors above 3% tolerance level. The clinical plans were successfully validated showing a maximum 2.5% of pixels exceeding gamma tolerance. Methodology and a software were successfully developed to perform control-point validation of VMAT delivery using an EPID. Set error in Delivery (%) Mean gamma value% of pixels exceeding Gamma tolerance 0 0.40 1.240.5417.050.6221.8.

  8. A method for online verification of adapted fields using an independent dose monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Jina; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Jaffray, David A.; Cho, Young-Bin; Islam, Mohammad K.; Mahon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical implementation of online adaptive radiotherapy requires generation of modified fields and a method of dosimetric verification in a short time. We present a method of treatment field modification to account for patient setup error, and an online method of verification using an independent monitoring system.Methods: The fields are modified by translating each multileaf collimator (MLC) defined aperture in the direction of the patient setup error, and magnifying to account for distance variation to the marked isocentre. A modified version of a previously reported online beam monitoring system, the integral quality monitoring (IQM) system, was investigated for validation of adapted fields. The system consists of a large area ion-chamber with a spatial gradient in electrode separation to provide a spatially sensitive signal for each beam segment, mounted below the MLC, and a calculation algorithm to predict the signal. IMRT plans of ten prostate patients have been modified in response to six randomly chosen setup errors in three orthogonal directions.Results: A total of approximately 49 beams for the modified fields were verified by the IQM system, of which 97% of measured IQM signal agree with the predicted value to within 2%.Conclusions: The modified IQM system was found to be suitable for online verification of adapted treatment fields

  9. Investigation of the dosimetric properties of an a-Si flat panel epid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, A.L.; Jahangir, S.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are primarily used as an electronic replacement for film to verify the set-up of radiotherapy patients based on imaged anatomy. There has recently been much interest in the use of amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel EPIDs for dosimetric verification in radiotherapy. The work presented here has been carried out to determine their suitability for dosimetric applications by investigating some of the basic response characteristics and the implications these might have. The measurements reported in this paper were performed using 6-MV photon beams from an Elekta Precise linear accelerator fitted with Elekta iViewGT amorphous silicon flat panel EPIDs. Measurements were performed to investigate the response of the EPID as a function of exposure and field size. Similar measurements were made with an ionisation chamber for comparison. Further measurements were carried out to investigate the response of the EPID to multiple low dose exposures (e.g. 5x2 MU) such as might be encountered in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). This was compared with the response to a single high dose exposure (e.g. 10 MU) and repeated for a range of exposures. The results show the response of the EPID, to a good approximation, to be linear with dose over the range of 1 -200 MU. However, 'under-responses' in the EPID of up to 5% were seen at the lowest exposures. For multiple low dose segments the sum of the EPID responses was found to be less than the response to the same total exposure in a single large segment. This effect reduces with increase in the magnitude of the low dose segments. The variation in EPID response with field size was found to be greater than that indicated by the ionisation chamber. The results show that the a-Si detector responds to dose, to a good approximation, in a linear manner. The EPID under-response at low doses is thought to be related to the so called ghosting effect. Each image frame has a residual

  10. Online Signature Verification on MOBISIG Finger-Drawn Signature Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Antal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present MOBISIG, a pseudosignature dataset containing finger-drawn signatures from 83 users captured with a capacitive touchscreen-based mobile device. The database was captured in three sessions resulting in 45 genuine signatures and 20 skilled forgeries for each user. The database was evaluated by two state-of-the-art methods: a function-based system using local features and a feature-based system using global features. Two types of equal error rate computations are performed: one using a global threshold and the other using user-specific thresholds. The lowest equal error rate was 0.01% against random forgeries and 5.81% against skilled forgeries using user-specific thresholds that were computed a posteriori. However, these equal error rates were significantly raised to 1.68% (random forgeries case and 14.31% (skilled forgeries case using global thresholds. The same evaluation protocol was performed on the DooDB publicly available dataset. Besides verification performance evaluations conducted on the two finger-drawn datasets, we evaluated the quality of the samples and the users of the two datasets using basic quality measures. The results show that finger-drawn signatures can be used by biometric systems with reasonable accuracy.

  11. Online Signature Verification using Recurrent Neural Network and Length-normalized Path Signature

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Songxuan; Jin, Lianwen; Yang, Weixin

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the great success of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in sequential modeling, we introduce a novel RNN system to improve the performance of online signature verification. The training objective is to directly minimize intra-class variations and to push the distances between skilled forgeries and genuine samples above a given threshold. By back-propagating the training signals, our RNN network produced discriminative features with desired metrics. Additionally, we propose a novel d...

  12. Impact of the frequency of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy and set-up margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Adel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The purpose of the study was to evaluate the patient set-up error of different anatomical sites, to estimate the effect of different frequencies of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy, and to calculate margins to accommodate for the patient set-up error (ICRU set-up margin, SM. Methods and materials Alignment data of 148 patients treated with inversed planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT of the head and neck (n = 31, chest (n = 72, abdomen (n = 15, and pelvis (n = 30 were evaluated. The patient set-up accuracy was assessed using orthogonal megavoltage electronic portal images of 2328 fractions of 173 planning target volumes (PTV. In 25 patients, two PTVs were analyzed where the PTVs were located in different anatomical sites and treated in two different radiotherapy courses. The patient set-up error and the corresponding SM were retrospectively determined assuming no online verification, online verification once a week and online verification every other day. Results The SM could be effectively reduced with increasing frequency of online verifications. However, a significant frequency of relevant set-up errors remained even after online verification every other day. For example, residual set-up errors larger than 5 mm were observed on average in 18% to 27% of all fractions of patients treated in the chest, abdomen and pelvis, and in 10% of fractions of patients treated in the head and neck after online verification every other day. Conclusion In patients where high set-up accuracy is desired, daily online verification is highly recommended.

  13. Impact of the frequency of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy and set-up margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Hammoud, Mohamed; Pillay, Yogin; Alaradi, Abdul Aziz; Mohamed, Adel; Altuwaijri, Saleh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the patient set-up error of different anatomical sites, to estimate the effect of different frequencies of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy, and to calculate margins to accommodate for the patient set-up error (ICRU set-up margin, SM). Alignment data of 148 patients treated with inversed planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of the head and neck (n = 31), chest (n = 72), abdomen (n = 15), and pelvis (n = 30) were evaluated. The patient set-up accuracy was assessed using orthogonal megavoltage electronic portal images of 2328 fractions of 173 planning target volumes (PTV). In 25 patients, two PTVs were analyzed where the PTVs were located in different anatomical sites and treated in two different radiotherapy courses. The patient set-up error and the corresponding SM were retrospectively determined assuming no online verification, online verification once a week and online verification every other day. The SM could be effectively reduced with increasing frequency of online verifications. However, a significant frequency of relevant set-up errors remained even after online verification every other day. For example, residual set-up errors larger than 5 mm were observed on average in 18% to 27% of all fractions of patients treated in the chest, abdomen and pelvis, and in 10% of fractions of patients treated in the head and neck after online verification every other day. In patients where high set-up accuracy is desired, daily online verification is highly recommended

  14. Characterization of the a-Si EPID in the unity MR-linac for dosimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Xirau, I.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Baldvinsson, G.; Mijnheer, B. J.; van der Heide, U. A.; Mans, A.

    2018-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are frequently used in external beam radiation therapy for dose verification purposes. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-response characteristics of the EPID in the Unity MR-linac (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) relevant for dosimetric applications under clinical conditions. EPID images and ionization chamber (IC) measurements were used to study the effects of the magnetic field, the scatter generated in the MR housing reaching the EPID, and inhomogeneous attenuation from the MR housing. Dose linearity and dose rate dependencies were also determined. The magnetic field strength at EPID level did not exceed 10 mT, and dose linearity and dose rate dependencies proved to be comparable to that on a conventional linac. Profiles of fields, delivered with and without the magnetic field, were indistinguishable. The EPID center had an offset of 5.6 cm in the longitudinal direction, compared to the beam central axis, meaning that large fields in this direction will partially fall outside the detector area and not be suitable for verification. Beam attenuation by the MRI scanner and the table is gantry angle dependent, presenting a minimum attenuation of 67% relative to the 90° measurement. Repeatability, observed over two months, was within 0.5% (1 SD). In order to use the EPID for dosimetric applications in the MR-linac, challenges related to the EPID position, scatter from the MR housing, and the inhomogeneous, gantry angle-dependent attenuation of the beam will need to be solved.

  15. Image intelligence online consulting: A flexible and remote access to strategic information applied to verification of declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassy, A.F. de; Denizot, L.

    2001-01-01

    Commercial satellite imagery is giving International Institutions specialized Information Departments access to a great source of valuable intelligence. High resolution and multiple sensors have also led to a growing complexity of interpretation that calls for a greater need of consulting, verification and training in the field in order to make it eligible as an operational source of verification. Responding to this need, Fleximage is extending its Image intelligence (IMINT) training program to include a fully operational and flexible online consulting and training program. Image Intelligence (IMINT) Online Program, a new approach to acquiring IMINT expertise, supported by Internet technologies, and managed by a professional team of experts and technical staff. Fleximage has developed a virtual learning environment on the Internet for acquiring IMINT expertise. Called the IMINT Online Program, this dynamic learning environment provides complete flexibility and personalization of the process for acquiring expertise. The IMINT online program includes two services: Online Consulting and Online Training. The Online Consulting service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are already operational in the field of image intelligence. Online Consulting enables these staff members to acquire pertinent expertise online that can be directly applied to their professional activity, such as IAEA verification tasks. The Online Training service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are relatively new to the field of image intelligence. These staff members need to build expertise within a formal training program. Online Training is a flexible and structured program for acquiring IMINT expertise online

  16. An Efficient Authentication Method For Smart Card Verification In Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanamarlapudi Venkata Srinivasa Rao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The great cards are getting a charge out of a critical part inside the on-line managing wherever we have tendency to can’t check the cardholder up close and personal. The phishing sites may parody the data in the middle of the customer website and along these lines the common webpage. To protect the data and managing here we have tendency to are presenting the three level confirmations. In arranged approach there are two stages i.e. Enlistment and login. All through enlistment part control the word which can figure and separated into two segments i.e. parcel one can keep inside the client or customer viewpoint, segment a couple of can keep in server perspective. Next level is to exchange the client icon which can figure and split into two shares each are keep severally. In the end zero information code will be get refreshed and it’s furthermore get keep as two components. All through the login part before starting the managing the client and server ought to uncover their three-genuine data offers if each stacked data got coordinate then the client is legitimate and server isn’t a phishing site.

  17. Dosimetry in radiotherapy using a-Si EPIDs: Systems, methods, and applications focusing on 3D patient dose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2013-06-01

    An overview is provided of the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetric purposes in radiation therapy, focusing on 3D patient dose estimation. EPIDs were originally developed to provide on-treatment radiological imaging to assist with patient setup, but there has also been a natural interest in using them as dosimeters since they use the megavoltage therapy beam to form images. The current generation of clinically available EPID technology, amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers, possess many characteristics that make them much better suited to dosimetric applications than earlier EPID technologies. Features such as linearity with dose/dose rate, high spatial resolution, realtime capability, minimal optical glare, and digital operation combine with the convenience of a compact, retractable detector system directly mounted on the linear accelerator to provide a system that is well-suited to dosimetric applications. This review will discuss clinically available a-Si EPID systems, highlighting dosimetric characteristics and remaining limitations. Methods for using EPIDs in dosimetry applications will be discussed. Dosimetric applications using a-Si EPIDs to estimate three-dimensional dose in the patient during treatment will be overviewed. Clinics throughout the world are implementing increasingly complex treatments such as dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, as well as specialized treatment techniques using large doses per fraction and short treatment courses (ie. hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery). These factors drive the continued strong interest in using EPIDs as dosimeters for patient treatment verification.

  18. SU-E-T-602: Patient-Specific Online Dose Verification Based On Transmission Detector Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoelking, J; Yuvaraj, S; Jens, F; Lohr, F; Wenz, F; Wertz, H; Wertz, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy requires a comprehensive quality assurance program in general and ideally independent verification of dose delivery. Since conventional 2D detector arrays allow only pre-treatment verification, there is a debate concerning the need of online dose verification. This study presents the clinical performance, including dosimetric plan verification in 2D as well as in 3D and the error detection abilities of a new transmission detector (TD) for online dose verification of 6MV photon beam. Methods: To validate the dosimetric performance of the new device, dose reconstruction based on TD measurements were compared to a conventional pre-treatment verification method (reference) and treatment planning system (TPS) for 18 IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. Furthermore, dose reconstruction inside the patient based on TD read-out was evaluated by comparing various dose volume indices and 3D gamma evaluations against independent dose computation and TPS. To investigate the sensitivity of the new device, different types of systematic and random errors for leaf positions and linac output were introduced in IMRT treatment sequences. Results: The 2D gamma index evaluation of transmission detector based dose reconstruction showed an excellent agreement for all IMRT and VMAT plans compared to reference measurements (99.3±1.2)% and TPS (99.1±0.7)%. Good agreement was also obtained for 3D dose reconstruction based on TD read-out compared to dose computation (mean gamma value of PTV = 0.27±0.04). Only a minimal dose underestimation within the target volume was observed when analyzing DVH indices (<1%). Positional errors in leaf banks larger than 1mm and errors in linac output larger than 2% could clearly identified with the TD. Conclusion: Since 2D and 3D evaluations for all IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were in excellent agreement with reference measurements and dose computation, the new TD is suitable to qualify for routine treatment plan

  19. SU-E-T-602: Patient-Specific Online Dose Verification Based On Transmission Detector Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoelking, J; Yuvaraj, S; Jens, F; Lohr, F; Wenz, F; Wertz, H; Wertz, H [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy requires a comprehensive quality assurance program in general and ideally independent verification of dose delivery. Since conventional 2D detector arrays allow only pre-treatment verification, there is a debate concerning the need of online dose verification. This study presents the clinical performance, including dosimetric plan verification in 2D as well as in 3D and the error detection abilities of a new transmission detector (TD) for online dose verification of 6MV photon beam. Methods: To validate the dosimetric performance of the new device, dose reconstruction based on TD measurements were compared to a conventional pre-treatment verification method (reference) and treatment planning system (TPS) for 18 IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. Furthermore, dose reconstruction inside the patient based on TD read-out was evaluated by comparing various dose volume indices and 3D gamma evaluations against independent dose computation and TPS. To investigate the sensitivity of the new device, different types of systematic and random errors for leaf positions and linac output were introduced in IMRT treatment sequences. Results: The 2D gamma index evaluation of transmission detector based dose reconstruction showed an excellent agreement for all IMRT and VMAT plans compared to reference measurements (99.3±1.2)% and TPS (99.1±0.7)%. Good agreement was also obtained for 3D dose reconstruction based on TD read-out compared to dose computation (mean gamma value of PTV = 0.27±0.04). Only a minimal dose underestimation within the target volume was observed when analyzing DVH indices (<1%). Positional errors in leaf banks larger than 1mm and errors in linac output larger than 2% could clearly identified with the TD. Conclusion: Since 2D and 3D evaluations for all IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were in excellent agreement with reference measurements and dose computation, the new TD is suitable to qualify for routine treatment plan

  20. Time dependent pre-treatment EPID dosimetry for standard and FFF VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Mark; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Scheib, Stefan G; Baltes, Christof; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-08-21

    Methods to calibrate Megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetry have been previously documented for dynamic treatments such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using flattened beams and typically using integrated fields. While these methods verify the accumulated field shape and dose, the dose rate and differential fields remain unverified. The aim of this work is to provide an accurate calibration model for time dependent pre-treatment dose verification using amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for both flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. A general calibration model was created using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 EPID, for each photon spectrum 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MV-FFF, 10 MV-FFF. As planned VMAT treatments use control points (CPs) for optimization, measured images are separated into corresponding time intervals for direct comparison with predictions. The accuracy of the calibration model was determined for a range of treatment conditions. Measured and predicted CP dose images were compared using a time dependent gamma evaluation using criteria (3%, 3 mm, 0.5 sec). Time dependent pre-treatment dose verification is possible without an additional measurement device or phantom, using the on-board EPID. Sufficient data is present in trajectory log files and EPID frame headers to reliably synchronize and resample portal images. For the VMAT plans tested, significantly more deviation is observed when analysed in a time dependent manner for FFF and non-FFF plans than when analysed using only the integrated field. We show EPID-based pre-treatment dose verification can be performed on a CP basis for VMAT plans. This model can measure pre-treatment doses for both flattened and unflattened beams in a time dependent manner which highlights deviations that are missed in integrated field verifications.

  1. Dosimetric characterization of an a-based EPID for quality control if patient-specific IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo Francisco; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Silvestre Patallo, Ileana; Garcia Yip, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    The Electronic portal imaging devices, EPID for its acronym in English is a technology widely used for verification of patient positioning on linear accelerators routinely. Its use as a dosimetry device is not as widespread, although many researches in this field. It assessed the availability and versatility of the use EPID based on an amorphous silicon (a-Si) as a means of quality control specific patient for a methodology of Radiation Intensity Modulated IMRT. Dosimetric parameters were determined for the linearity of dose versus response, dispersion and sensitivity factors off-axis radiation. For absolute measurements the linearity of the dose-response relationship EPID was better than 1.1 and 1.5% for photon beams of 6 and 15mV respectively, in the range from 2 to 500 UM. The dose dependence with field size was studied and compared with the factors of dispersion in water at different depths, in agreement with those measured at 5 cm depth, Scp (z = 5cm). Off-axis sensitivity of the EPID was determined by comparing the measured profiles versus the same profiles at different depths in water. The best correspondence was observed at 5 cm depth, where the EPID response underestimates the dose to 4% for all sizes of fields in the plateau area. The EPID can be used for the evaluation of dosimetric parameters of the beam at a specific depth in water of 5 cm and a discrepancy in an acceptable maximum rate of 4%. (author)

  2. An Optimized Online Verification Imaging Procedure for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David J.; Kron, Tomas; Chua, Boon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of a kilovoltage (kV) on-board imager (OBI)-equipped linear accelerator in the setting of on-line verification imaging for external-beam partial breast irradiation. Available imaging techniques were optimized and assessed for image quality using a modified anthropomorphic phantom. Imaging dose was also assessed. Imaging techniques were assessed for physical clearance between patient and treatment machine using a volunteer. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs were identified as optimal in terms of image quality, clearance, and dose. After institutional review board approval, this approach was used for 17 patients receiving accelerated partial breast irradiation. Imaging was performed before every fraction verification with online correction of setup deviations >5 mm (total image sessions = 170). Treatment staff rated risk of collision and visibility of tumor bed surgical clips where present. Image session duration and detected setup deviations were recorded. For all cases, both image projections (n = 34) had low collision risk. Surgical clips were rated as well as visualized in all cases where they were present (n = 5). The average imaging session time was 6 min, 16 sec, and a reduction in duration was observed as staff became familiar with the technique. Setup deviations of up to 1.3 cm were detected before treatment and subsequently confirmed offline. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs allowed effective and efficient online verification for partial breast irradiation. It has yet to be tested in a multicenter study to determine whether it is dependent on skilled treatment staff.

  3. Image intelligence online consulting: A flexible and remote access to strategic information applied to verification of declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassy, A.F. de; Denizot, L.

    2001-01-01

    Commercial satellite imagery is giving International Institutions specialized Information Departments access to a great source of valuable intelligence. High resolution and multiple sensors have also led to a growing complexity of interpretation that calls for a greater need of consulting, verification and training in the field in order to make it eligible as an operational source of verification. Responding to this need, Fleximage is extending its Image Intelligence (IMINT) training program to include a fully operational and flexible online consulting and training program. Image Intelligence (IMINT) Online Program, a new approach to acquiring IMINT expertise, supported by Internet technologies, and managed by a professional team of experts and technical staff. Fleximage has developed a virtual learning environment on the Internet for acquiring IMINT expertise. Called the IMINT Online Program, this dynamic learning environment provides complete flexibility and personalization of the process for acquiring expertise. The IMINT online program includes two services: Online Consulting and Online Training. The Online Consulting service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are already operational in the field of image intelligence. Online Consulting enables these staff members to acquire pertinent expertise online that can be directly applied to their professional activity, such as IAEA verification tasks. The IMINT virtual Consulting and Training services indicated above are made possible thanks to the latest in Internet-based technologies including: multimedia CD-ROM, Internet technologies, rich media content (Audio, Video and Flash), application sharing, platform Maintenance Tools, secured connections and authentication, knowledge database technologies. IMINT Online Program operates owing to: specialized experts in fields relating to IMINT. These experts carry out the tasks of consultants, coaches, occasional speakers, and course content designers

  4. Verification test for on-line diagnosis algorithm based on noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaoki, T.; Naito, N.; Tsunoda, T.; Sato, M.; Kameda, A.

    1980-01-01

    An on-line diagnosis algorithm was developed and its verification test was performed using a minicomputer. This algorithm identifies the plant state by analyzing various system noise patterns, such as power spectral densities, coherence functions etc., in three procedure steps. Each obtained noise pattern is examined by using the distances from its reference patterns prepared for various plant states. Then, the plant state is identified by synthesizing each result with an evaluation weight. This weight is determined automatically from the reference noise patterns prior to on-line diagnosis. The test was performed with 50 MW (th) Steam Generator noise data recorded under various controller parameter values. The algorithm performance was evaluated based on a newly devised index. The results obtained with one kind of weight showed the algorithm efficiency under the proper selection of noise patterns. Results for another kind of weight showed the robustness of the algorithm to this selection. (orig.)

  5. Development of a Compton camera for online ion beam range verification via prompt γ detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldawood, S. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Liprandi, S.; Marinsek, T.; Bortfeldt, J.; Lang, C.; Lutter, R.; Dedes, G.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P.G. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); Maier, L.; Gernhaeuser, R. [TU Munich, Garching (Germany); Kolff, H. van der [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); TU Delft (Netherlands); Castelhano, I. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Schaart, D.R. [TU Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-07-01

    Precise and preferably online ion beam range verification is a mandatory prerequisite to fully exploit the advantages of hadron therapy in cancer treatment. An imaging system is being developed in Garching aiming to detect promptγ rays induced by nuclear reactions between the ion beam and biological tissue. The Compton camera prototype consists of a stack of six customized double-sided Si-strip detectors (DSSSD, 50 x 50 mm{sup 2}, 0.5 mm thick, 128 strips/side) acting as scatterer, while the absorber is formed by a monolithic LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator crystal (50 x 50 x 30 mm{sup 3}) read out by a position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier (Hamamatsu H9500). The on going characterization of the Compton camera properties and its individual components both offline in the laboratory as well as online using proton beam are presented.

  6. Online Signature Verification: To What Extent Should a Classifier be Trusted in?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Parodi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To select the best features to model the signatures is one of the major challenges in the field of online signature verification. To combine different feature sets, selected by different criteria, is a useful technique to address this problem. In this line, the analysis of different features and their discriminative power has been researchers’ main concern, paying less attention to the way in which the different kind of features are combined. Moreover, the fact that conflicting results may appear when several classifiers are being used, has rarely been taken into account. In this paper, a score level fusion scheme is proposed to combine three different and meaningful feature sets, viz., an automatically selected feature set, a feature set relevant to Forensic Handwriting Experts (FHEs, and a global feature set. The score level fusion is performed within the framework of the Belief Function Theory (BFT, in order to address the problem of the conflicting results appearing when multiple classifiers are being used. Two different models, namely, the Denoeux and the Appriou models, are used to embed the problem within this framework, where the fusion is performed resorting to two well-known combination rules, namely, the Dempster-Shafer (DS and the Proportional Conflict Redistribution (PCR5 one. In order to analyze the robustness of the proposed score level fusion approach, the combination is performed for the same verification system using two different classification techniques, namely, Ramdon Forests (RF and Support Vector Machines (SVM. Experimental results, on a publicly available database, show that the proposed score level fusion approach allows the system to have a very good trade-off between verification results and reliability.

  7. A fast online hit verification method for the single ion hit system at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, G.; Fischer, B.; Barberet, P.; Heiss, M.

    2006-01-01

    For a single ion hit facility built to irradiate specific targets inside biological cells, it is necessary to prove that the ions hit the selected targets reliably because the ion hits usually cannot be seen. That ability is traditionally tested either indirectly by aiming at pre-etched tracks in a nuclear track detector or directly by making the ion tracks inside cells visible using a stain coupled to special proteins produced in response to ion hits. However, both methods are time consuming and hits can be verified only after the experiment. This means that targeting errors in the experiment cannot be corrected during the experiment. Therefore, we have developed a fast online hit verification method that measures the targeting accuracy electronically with a spatial resolution of ±1 μm before cell irradiation takes place. (authors)

  8. Investigation of the spatial resolution of an online dose verification device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asuni, G.; Rickey, D. W.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to characterize a new online dose verification device, COMPASS transmission detector array (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). The array is composed of 1600 cylindrical ionization chambers of 3.8 mm diameter, separated by 6.5 mm center-to-center spacing, in a 40 x 40 arrangement. Methods: The line spread function (LSF) of a single ion chamber in the detector was measured with a narrow slit collimator for a 6 MV photon beam. The 0.25 x 10 mm 2 slit was formed by two machined lead blocks. The LSF was obtained by laterally translating the detector in 0.25 mm steps underneath the slit over a range of 24 mm and taking a measurement at each step. This measurement was validated with Monte Carlo simulation using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), the Fourier transform of the line spread function, was determined and compared to calculated (Monte Carlo and analytical) MTFs. Two head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields were measured using the device and were used to validate the LSF measurement. These fields were simulated with the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo model, and the Monte Carlo generated incident fluence was convolved with the 2D detector response function (derived from the measured LSF) to obtain calculated dose. The measured and calculated dose distributions were then quantitatively compared using χ-comparison criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement for in-field points (defined as those above the 10% maximum dose threshold). Results: The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the measured detector response for a single chamber is 4.3 mm, which is comparable to the chamber diameter of 3.8 mm. The pre-sampling MTF was calculated, and the resolution of one chamber was estimated as 0.25 lp/mm from the first zero crossing. For both examined IMRT fields, the χ-comparison between measured and calculated data show good agreement with 95.1% and 96.3% of in

  9. SU-E-T-05: A 2D EPID Transit Dosimetry Model Based On An Empirical Quadratic Formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y; Metwaly, M; Glegg, M; Baggarley, S; Elliott, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a 2D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) transit dosimetry model, based on an empirical quadratic formalism, that can predict either EPID or in-phantom dose distribution for comparisons with EPID captured image or treatment planning system (TPS) dose respectively. Methods: A quadratic equation can be used to relate the reduction in intensity of an exit beam to the equivalent path length of the attenuator. The calibration involved deriving coefficients from a set of dose planes measured for homogeneous phantoms with known thicknesses under reference conditions. In this study, calibration dose planes were measured with EPID and ionisation chamber (IC) in water for the same reference beam (6MV, 100mu, 20×20cm 2 ) and set of thicknesses (0–30cm). Since the same calibration conditions were used, the EPID and IC measurements can be related through the quadratic equation. Consequently, EPID transit dose can be predicted from TPS exported dose planes and in-phantom dose can be predicted using EPID distribution captured during treatment as an input. The model was tested with 4 open fields, 6 wedge fields, and 7 IMRT fields on homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons were done using 2D absolute gamma (3%/3mm) and results were validated against measurements with a commercial 2D array device. Results: The gamma pass rates for comparisons between EPID measured and predicted ranged from 93.6% to 100.0% for all fields and phantoms tested. Results from this study agreed with 2D array measurements to within 3.1%. Meanwhile, comparisons in-phantom between TPS computed and predicted ranged from 91.6% to 100.0%. Validation with 2D array device was not possible for inphantom comparisons. Conclusion: A 2D EPID transit dosimetry model for treatment verification was described and proven to be accurate. The model has the advantage of being generic and allows comparisons at the EPID plane as well as multiple planes in-phantom

  10. Comparative performance evaluation of a new a-Si EPID that exceeds quad high-definition resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kristen A; Alexandrian, Ara; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotiri

    2018-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are an integral part of the radiation oncology workflow for treatment setup verification. Several commercial EPID implementations are currently available, each with varying capabilities. To standardize performance evaluation, Task Group Report 58 (TG-58) and TG-142 outline specific image quality metrics to be measured. A LinaTech Image Viewing System (IVS), with the highest commercially available pixel matrix (2688x2688 pixels), was independently evaluated and compared to an Elekta iViewGT (1024x1024 pixels) and a Varian aSi-1000 (1024x768 pixels) using a PTW EPID QC Phantom. The IVS, iViewGT, and aSi-1000 were each used to acquire 20 images of the PTW QC Phantom. The QC phantom was placed on the couch and aligned at isocenter. The images were exported and analyzed using the epidSoft image quality assurance (QA) software. The reported metrics were signal linearity, isotropy of signal linearity, signal-tonoise ratio (SNR), low contrast resolution, and high-contrast resolution. These values were compared between the three EPID solutions. Computed metrics demonstrated comparable results between the EPID solutions with the IVS outperforming the aSi-1000 and iViewGT in the low and high-contrast resolution analysis. The performance of three commercial EPID solutions have been quantified, evaluated, and compared using results from the PTW QC Phantom. The IVS outperformed the other panels in low and high-contrast resolution, but to fully realize the benefits of the IVS, the selection of the monitor on which to view the high-resolution images is important to prevent down sampling and visual of resolution.

  11. Impact of daily anatomical changes on EPID-based in vivo dosimetry of VMAT treatments of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozendaal, Roel A.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Mans, Anton; Herk, Marcel van

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Target dose verification for VMAT treatments of head-and-neck (H&N) cancer using 3D in vivo EPID dosimetry is expected to be affected by daily anatomical changes. By including these anatomical changes through cone-beam CT (CBCT) information, the magnitude of this effect is investigated. Materials and methods: For 20 VMAT-treated H&N cancer patients, all plan-CTs (pCTs), 633 CBCTs and 1266 EPID movies were used to compare four dose distributions per fraction: treatment planning system (TPS) calculated dose and EPID reconstructed in vivo dose, both determined using the pCT and using the CBCT. D2, D50 and D98 of the planning target volume (PTV) were determined per dose distribution. Results: When including daily anatomical information, D2, D50 and D98 of the PTV change on average by 0.0 ± 0.4% according to TPS calculations; the standard deviation of the difference between EPID and TPS target dose changes from 2.5% (pCT) to 2.1% (CBCT). Small time trends are seen for both TPS and EPID dose distributions when using the pCT, which disappear when including CBCT information. Conclusions: Daily anatomical changes hardly influence the target dose distribution for H&N VMAT treatments according to TPS recalculations. Including CBCT information in EPID dose reconstructions slightly improves the agreement with TPS calculations

  12. Examining the examiners: an online eyebrow verification experiment inspired by FISWG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, Christopher Gerard; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2015-01-01

    In forensic face comparison, one of the features taken into account are the eyebrows. In this paper, we investigate human performance on an eyebrow verification task. This task is executed twice by participants: a "best-effort" approach and an approach using features based on forensic knowledge. The

  13. Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Popescu, Carmen C.

    2003-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery were investigated. The EPID was utilized with continuous frame-averaging during the beam delivery. Properties studied included effect of buildup, dose linearity, field size response, sampling of rapid multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf speeds, response to dose-rate fluctuations, memory effect, and reproducibility. The dependence of response on EPID calibration and a dead time in image frame acquisition occurring every 64 frames were measured. EPID measurements were also compared to ion chamber and film for open and wedged static fields and IMRT fields. The EPID was linear with dose and dose rate, and response to MLC leaf speeds up to 2.5 cm s-1 was found to be linear. A field size dependent response of up to 5% relative to d max ion-chamber measurement was found. Reproducibility was within 0.8% (1 standard deviation) for an IMRT delivery recorded at intervals over a period of one month. The dead time in frame acquisition resulted in errors in the EPID that increased with leaf speed and were over 20% for a 1 cm leaf gap moving at 1.0 cm s-1. The EPID measurements were also found to depend on the input beam profile utilized for EPID flood-field calibration. The EPID shows promise as a device for verification of IMRT, the major limitation currently being due to dead-time in frame acquisition

  14. Online pretreatment verification of high-dose rate brachytherapy using an imaging panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Podesta, Mark; Bellezzo, Murillo; Van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Lutgens, Ludy; Vanneste, Ben G. L.; Voncken, Robert; Van Limbergen, Evert J.; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is employed to treat a wide variety of cancers. However, an accurate treatment verification method is currently not available. This study describes a pre-treatment verification system that uses an imaging panel (IP) to verify important aspects of the treatment plan. A detailed modelling of the IP was only possible with an extensive calibration performed using a robotic arm. Irradiations were performed with a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source within a water phantom. An empirical fit was applied to measure the distance between the source and the detector so 3D Cartesian coordinates of the dwell positions can be obtained using a single panel. The IP acquires 7.14 fps to verify the dwell times, dwell positions and air kerma strength (Sk). A gynecological applicator was used to create a treatment plan that was registered with a CT image of the water phantom used during the experiments for verification purposes. Errors (shifts, exchanged connections and wrong dwell times) were simulated to verify the proposed verification system. Cartesian source positions (panel measurement plane) have a standard deviation of about 0.02 cm. The measured distance between the source and the panel (z-coordinate) have a standard deviation up to 0.16 cm and maximum absolute error of  ≈0.6 cm if the signal is close to sensitive limit of the panel. The average response of the panel is very linear with Sk. Therefore, Sk measurements can be performed with relatively small errors. The measured dwell times show a maximum error of 0.2 s which is consistent with the acquisition rate of the panel. All simulated errors were clearly identified by the proposed system. The use of IPs is not common in brachytherapy, however, it provides considerable advantages. It was demonstrated that the IP can accurately measure Sk, dwell times and dwell positions.

  15. Dosimetric characterization of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and development of a portal dosimetry simple model; Caracterizacion dosimetrica de un dispositivo electronico de imagen portal (EPID) y desarrollo de un modelo simple de dosimetria portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripol ValentIn, O.; GarcIa Romero, A.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.; Jimenez Albericio, J.; Cortes Rodicio, J.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Canellas Anoz, M.

    2010-07-01

    The use of the Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPID) for the quality control of linear accelerators of electrons is increasingly extended in practice. In this work the dosimetric characteristics of an EPID OptiVue{sup TM}1000 ST were studied and a friendly and simple method for the absorbed dose calibration was suggested. This method is based on a simple mathematical model, including: an absorbed dose transformation coefficient and image lag and field shape corrections. Software tools were developed in order to process the information and the results were validated by comparing them with the measured data with ionization chambers. The studied device showed suitable characteristics for its use for EPID dosimetry and the calculated results fitted satisfactorily with the dose planes obtained with the ionization chambers. Keeping in mind the model limitations, we concluded that it is possible to start the use of the EPID for the accelerator quality control and improvements for the current model should be studied, as well as other suitable applications: e.g. the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatment verification procedures. (Author).

  16. Evaluation of usefulness of portal image using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) in the patients who received pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Heon Jong; Park, Seong Young; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John J. K.; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device through objective compare of the images acquired using an EPID and a conventional port film. From Apr. to Oct. 1997, a total of 150 sets of images from 20 patients who received radiation therapy in the pelvis area were evaluated in the Inha University Hospital and Severance Hospital. A dual image recording technique was devised to obtain both electronic portal images and port film images simultaneously with one treatment course. We did not perform double exposure. Five to ten images were acquired from each patient. All images were acquired from posteroanterior (PA) view except images from two patients. A dose rate of 100-300 MU/min and a 10-MV X-ray beam were used and 2-10 MUs were required to produce a verification image during treatment. Kodak diagnostic film with metal/film imaging cassette which was located on the top of the EPID detector was used for the port film. The source to detector distance was 140 cm. Eight anatomical landmarks (pelvic brim, sacrum, acetabulum, iliopectineal line, symphysis, ischium, obturator foramen, sacroiliac joint) were assessed. Four radiation oncologist joined to evaluate each image. The individual landmarks in the port film or in the EPID were rated-very clear (1), clear (2), visible (3), notclear (4), not visible (5). Using an video camera based EPID system, there was no difference of image quality between no enhanced EPID images and port film images. However, when we provided some change with window level for the portal image, the visibility of the sacrum and obturator foramen was improved in the portal images than in the port film images. All anatomical landmarks were more visible in the portal images than in the port film when we applied the CLAHE mode enhancement. The images acquired using an matrix ion chamber type EPID were also improved image quality after window level adjustment. The quality of image acquired using an electronic portal imaging device was

  17. Detection and correction for EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery using cine EPID imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; McCowan, Peter M; McCurdy, Boyd M C; Greer, Peter B

    2012-02-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been studied and used for pretreatment and in-vivo dosimetry applications for many years. The application of EPIDs for dosimetry in arc treatments requires accurate characterization of the mechanical sag of the EPID and gantry during rotation. Several studies have investigated the effects of gravity on the sag of these systems but each have limitations. In this study, an easy experiment setup and accurate algorithm have been introduced to characterize and correct for the effect of EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery. Three metallic ball bearings were used as markers in the beam: two of them fixed to the gantry head and the third positioned at the isocenter. EPID images were acquired during a 360° gantry rotation in cine imaging mode. The markers were tracked in EPID images and a robust in-house developed MATLAB code was used to analyse the images and find the EPID sag in three directions as well as the EPID + gantry sag by comparison to the reference gantry zero image. The algorithm results were then tested against independent methods. The method was applied to compare the effect in clockwise and counter clockwise gantry rotations and different source-to-detector distances (SDDs). The results were monitored for one linear accelerator over a course of 15 months and six other linear-accelerators from two treatment centers were also investigated using this method. The generalized shift patterns were derived from the data and used in an image registration algorithm to correct for the effect of the mechanical sag in the system. The Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) technique was used to investigate the improvement in alignment of cine EPID images of a fixed field, by comparing both individual images and the sum of images in a series with the reference gantry zero image. The mechanical sag during gantry rotation was dependent on the gantry angle and was larger in the in-plane direction, although the patterns were not

  18. Development and implementation of EPID-based quality assurance tests for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Akbar; Poirier, Yannick; Sawant, Amit

    2018-04-28

    , with maximum differences ≤3% for ionization chamber and ≤1.7% for Gafchromic EBT3 dosimetry film, respectively. We have shown that the EPID response is linear with tube current (mA) for the entire range of tube kilovoltage peak. Notably, a close relationship was seen between the detector response vs mA slope, and the kilovoltage peak, allowing an independent verification of kilovoltage peak stability based solely on EPID response. In addition to dosimetry tests, according to the beam-targeting measurement using portal images, maximum displacement of the central axis of the x-ray beam (due to sag) was 0.76 ± 0.09 mm at gantry 135°/couch 0° and 0.89 ± 0.06 mm at gantry 0°/couch -135°. We performed the first comprehensive analysis on the dosimetric properties of an EPID operating at kilovoltage x-ray energies. We characterized the detector performance over a 11-month period. Our results indicate that the imager is a stable and convenient tool for SARRP routine QA tests. We then developed EPID-based tests to perform routine SA-IGRT systems QA tasks, such as verifying constancy of beam quality, energy, output, and profile measurements, relative output factors, and beam targeting. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Verification of results of core physics on-line simulation by NGFM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yu; Cao Xinrong; Zhao Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Nodal Green's Function Method program NGFM/TNGFM has been trans- planted to windows system. The 2-D and 3-D benchmarks have been checked by this program. And the program has been used to check the results of QINSHAN-II reactor simulation. It is proved that the NGFM/TNGFM program is applicable for reactor core physics on-line simulation system. (authors)

  20. Dose patient verification during treatment using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Today, amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (aSi EPID) are currently used to check the accuracy of patient positioning. However, they are not use for dose reconstruction yet and more investigations are required to allow the use of an aSi EPID for routine dosimetric verification. The aim of this work is first to study the dosimetric characteristics of the EPID available at the Institut Curie and then, to check patient dose during treatment using these EPID. First, performance optimization of the Varian aS500 EPID system is studied. Then, a quality assurance system is set up in order to certify the image quality on a daily basis. An additional study on the dosimetric performance of the aS500 EPID is monitored to assess operational stability for dosimetry applications. Electronic portal imaging device is also a useful tool to improve IMRT quality control. The validation and the quality assurance of a portal dose image prediction system for IMRT pre-treatment quality control are performed. All dynamic IMRT fields are verified in clinical routine with the new method based on portal dosimetry. Finally, a new formalism for in vivo dosimetry using transit dose measured with EPID is developed and validated. The absolute dose measurement issue using aSi EPID is described and the midplane dose determination using in vivo dose measurements in combination with portal imaging is used with 3D-conformal-radiation therapy. (author) [fr

  1. A comparison of the use of bony anatomy and internal markers for offline verification and an evaluation of the potential benefit of online and offline verification protocols for prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Helen A; Hansen, Vibeke N; Parker, Christopher C; Evans, Phil M; Norman, Andrew; Miles, Elizabeth; Harris, Emma J; Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard; Khoo, Vincent S; Thompson, Alan C; Dearnaley, David P

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion.

  2. SU-D-BRC-03: Development and Validation of an Online 2D Dose Verification System for Daily Patient Plan Delivery Accuracy Check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J; Hu, W; Xing, Y; Wu, X; Li, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: All plan verification systems for particle therapy are designed to do plan verification before treatment. However, the actual dose distributions during patient treatment are not known. This study develops an online 2D dose verification tool to check the daily dose delivery accuracy. Methods: A Siemens particle treatment system with a modulated scanning spot beam is used in our center. In order to do online dose verification, we made a program to reconstruct the delivered 2D dose distributions based on the daily treatment log files and depth dose distributions. In the log files we can get the focus size, position and particle number for each spot. A gamma analysis is used to compare the reconstructed dose distributions with the dose distributions from the TPS to assess the daily dose delivery accuracy. To verify the dose reconstruction algorithm, we compared the reconstructed dose distributions to dose distributions measured using PTW 729XDR ion chamber matrix for 13 real patient plans. Then we analyzed 100 treatment beams (58 carbon and 42 proton) for prostate, lung, ACC, NPC and chordoma patients. Results: For algorithm verification, the gamma passing rate was 97.95% for the 3%/3mm and 92.36% for the 2%/2mm criteria. For patient treatment analysis,the results were 97.7%±1.1% and 91.7%±2.5% for carbon and 89.9%±4.8% and 79.7%±7.7% for proton using 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm criteria, respectively. The reason for the lower passing rate for the proton beam is that the focus size deviations were larger than for the carbon beam. The average focus size deviations were −14.27% and −6.73% for proton and −5.26% and −0.93% for carbon in the x and y direction respectively. Conclusion: The verification software meets our requirements to check for daily dose delivery discrepancies. Such tools can enhance the current treatment plan and delivery verification processes and improve safety of clinical treatments.

  3. SU-D-BRC-03: Development and Validation of an Online 2D Dose Verification System for Daily Patient Plan Delivery Accuracy Check

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Xing, Y [Fudan univercity shanghai proton and heavy ion center, Shanghai (China); Wu, X [Fudan university shanghai proton and heavy ion center, Shanghai, shagnhai (China); Li, Y [Department of Medical physics at Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: All plan verification systems for particle therapy are designed to do plan verification before treatment. However, the actual dose distributions during patient treatment are not known. This study develops an online 2D dose verification tool to check the daily dose delivery accuracy. Methods: A Siemens particle treatment system with a modulated scanning spot beam is used in our center. In order to do online dose verification, we made a program to reconstruct the delivered 2D dose distributions based on the daily treatment log files and depth dose distributions. In the log files we can get the focus size, position and particle number for each spot. A gamma analysis is used to compare the reconstructed dose distributions with the dose distributions from the TPS to assess the daily dose delivery accuracy. To verify the dose reconstruction algorithm, we compared the reconstructed dose distributions to dose distributions measured using PTW 729XDR ion chamber matrix for 13 real patient plans. Then we analyzed 100 treatment beams (58 carbon and 42 proton) for prostate, lung, ACC, NPC and chordoma patients. Results: For algorithm verification, the gamma passing rate was 97.95% for the 3%/3mm and 92.36% for the 2%/2mm criteria. For patient treatment analysis,the results were 97.7%±1.1% and 91.7%±2.5% for carbon and 89.9%±4.8% and 79.7%±7.7% for proton using 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm criteria, respectively. The reason for the lower passing rate for the proton beam is that the focus size deviations were larger than for the carbon beam. The average focus size deviations were −14.27% and −6.73% for proton and −5.26% and −0.93% for carbon in the x and y direction respectively. Conclusion: The verification software meets our requirements to check for daily dose delivery discrepancies. Such tools can enhance the current treatment plan and delivery verification processes and improve safety of clinical treatments.

  4. Leaf trajectory verification during dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy using an amorphous silicon flat panel imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Brand, Bob; Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Herk, Marcel van

    2004-01-01

    An independent verification of the leaf trajectories during each treatment fraction improves the safety of IMRT delivery. In order to verify dynamic IMRT with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), the EPID response should be accurate and fast such that the effect of motion blurring on the detected moving field edge position is limited. In the past, it was shown that the errors in the detected position of a moving field edge determined by a scanning liquid-filled ionization chamber (SLIC) EPID are negligible in clinical practice. Furthermore, a method for leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT was successfully applied using such an EPID. EPIDs based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) arrays are now widely available. Such a-Si flat panel imagers (FPIs) produce portal images with superior image quality compared to other portal imaging systems, but they have not yet been used for leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of motion distortion and motion blurring on the detection accuracy of a moving field edge for an Elekta iViewGT a-Si FPI and to investigate its applicability for the leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT. We found that the detection error for a moving field edge to be smaller than 0.025 cm at a speed of 0.8 cm/s. Hence, the effect of motion blurring on the detection accuracy of a moving field edge is negligible in clinical practice. Furthermore, the a-Si FPI was successfully applied for the verification of dynamic IMRT. The verification method revealed a delay in the control system of the experimental DMLC that was also found using a SLIC EPID, resulting in leaf positional errors of 0.7 cm at a leaf speed of 0.8 cm/s

  5. A Comparison of the Use of Bony Anatomy and Internal Markers for Offline Verification and an Evaluation of the Potential Benefit of Online and Offline Verification Protocols for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Parker, Christopher; Evans, Phil M.; Norman, Andrew; Miles, Elizabeth; Harris, Emma J.; Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard; Khoo, Vincent S.; Thompson, Alan C.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. Results: The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to <1 mm. Intrafraction motion had greater impact on the effectiveness of the online protocol than the offline protocols. Conclusions: An offline protocol using gold markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion

  6. The Prevalence and Gratification of Nude Self-Presentation of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Online-Dating Environments: Attracting Attention, Empowerment, and Self-Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Richard; Merz, Simon

    2018-01-01

    This study builds on research about the importance of body presentation among men who have sex with men (MSM) by exploring the phenomenon of nude body presentation in online dating environments. In a quantitative survey of N = 9,235 MSM users of a gay online dating site (ODS) in Germany, the prevalence of nude pictures and gratifications sought while displaying them were investigated. About two-thirds of the participants declared that they use nude pictures in their dating profiles, with only small differences in prevalence between members of different ages, education levels, and sexual orientation. Furthermore, the results indicate that the use of nudity is driven by three underlying gratifications: (1) Attracting attention, meaning that nudity is used to accelerate sexual outcomes from online dating use; (2) empowerment, meaning that nudity online serves as an environment for otherwise and elsewhere inhibited forms of body presentation; and (3) self-verification, whereby nudity is used as a means of receiving affirmation from others. Regression analyses are used to investigate associations of these gratifications with sociodemographics and online dating behavior. Findings are discussed in relation to earlier research on self-presentation as well as theories of body importance among gay men. While earlier research has mainly focused on the negative implications of body presentation (e.g., self-objectification; reinforcing standards of beauty), the findings of this study hint that ODS may provide a platform for acts of nude body presentation that are not possible elsewhere and are thus accompanied by empowerment and self-verification.

  7. ON-LINE MONITORING OF I&C TRANSMITTERS AND SENSORS FOR CALIBRATION VERIFICATION AND RESPONSE TIME TESTING WAS SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTED AT ATR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Phillip A.; O' Hagan, Ryan; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, H. M.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has always had a comprehensive procedure to verify the performance of its critical transmitters and sensors, including RTDs, and pressure, level, and flow transmitters. These transmitters and sensors have been periodically tested for response time and calibration verification to ensure accuracy. With implementation of online monitoring techniques at ATR, the calibration verification and response time testing of these transmitters and sensors are verified remotely, automatically, hands off, include more portions of the system, and can be performed at almost any time during process operations. The work was done under a DOE funded SBIR project carried out by AMS. As a result, ATR is now able to save the manpower that has been spent over the years on manual calibration verification and response time testing of its temperature and pressure sensors and refocus those resources towards more equipment reliability needs. More importantly, implementation of OLM will help enhance the overall availability, safety, and efficiency. Together with equipment reliability programs of ATR, the integration of OLM will also help with I&C aging management goals of the Department of Energy and long-time operation of ATR.

  8. Feasibility of megavoltage portal CT using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and a multi-level scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Huaiqun; Zhu, Yunping

    1998-01-01

    Although electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are efficient tools for radiation therapy verification, they only provide images of overlapped anatomic structures. We investigated using a fluorescent screen/CCD-based EPID, coupled with a novel multi-level scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART), for a feasibility study of portal computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. The CT images might be useful for radiation treatment planning and verification. We used an EPID, set it to work at the linear dynamic range and collimated 6 MV photons from a linear accelerator to a slit beam of 1 cm wide and 25 cm long. We performed scans under a total of ∼200 monitor units (MUs) for several phantoms in which we varied the number of projections and MUs per projection. The reconstructed images demonstrated that using the new MLS-ART technique megavoltage portal CT with a total of 200 MUs can achieve a contrast detectibility of ∼2.5% (object size 5mmx5mm) and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm. (author)

  9. TU-G-BRD-08: In-Vivo EPID Dosimetry: Quantifying the Detectability of Four Classes of Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, E; Phillips, M; Bojechko, C [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: EPID dosimetry is an emerging method for treatment verification and QA. Given that the in-vivo EPID technique is in clinical use at some centers, we investigate the sensitivity and specificity for detecting different classes of errors. We assess the impact of these errors using dose volume histogram endpoints. Though data exist for EPID dosimetry performed pre-treatment, this is the first study quantifying its effectiveness when used during patient treatment (in-vivo). Methods: We analyzed 17 patients; EPID images of the exit dose were acquired and used to reconstruct the planar dose at isocenter. This dose was compared to the TPS dose using a 3%/3mm gamma criteria. To simulate errors, modifications were made to treatment plans using four possible classes of error: 1) patient misalignment, 2) changes in patient body habitus, 3) machine output changes and 4) MLC misalignments. Each error was applied with varying magnitudes. To assess the detectability of the error, the area under a ROC curve (AUC) was analyzed. The AUC was compared to changes in D99 of the PTV introduced by the simulated error. Results: For systematic changes in the MLC leaves, changes in the machine output and patient habitus, the AUC varied from 0.78–0.97 scaling with the magnitude of the error. The optimal gamma threshold as determined by the ROC curve varied between 84–92%. There was little diagnostic power in detecting random MLC leaf errors and patient shifts (AUC 0.52–0.74). Some errors with weak detectability had large changes in D99. Conclusion: These data demonstrate the ability of EPID-based in-vivo dosimetry in detecting variations in patient habitus and errors related to machine parameters such as systematic MLC misalignments and machine output changes. There was no correlation found between the detectability of the error using the gamma pass rate, ROC analysis and the impact on the dose volume histogram. Funded by grant R18HS022244 from AHRQ.

  10. Online Kidney Position Verification Using Non-Contrast Radiographs on a Linear Accelerator with on Board KV X-Ray Imaging Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David J.; Kron, Tomas; Hubbard, Patricia; Haworth, Annette; Wheeler, Greg; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    The kidneys are dose-limiting organs in abdominal radiotherapy. Kilovoltage (kV) radiographs can be acquired using on-board imager (OBI)-equipped linear accelerators with better soft tissue contrast and lower radiation doses than conventional portal imaging. A feasibility study was conducted to test the suitability of anterior-posterior (AP) non-contrast kV radiographs acquired at treatment time for online kidney position verification. Anthropomorphic phantoms were used to evaluate image quality and radiation dose. Institutional Review Board approval was given for a pilot study that enrolled 5 adults and 5 children. Customized digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated to provide a priori information on kidney shape and position. Radiotherapy treatment staff performed online evaluation of kidney visibility on OBI radiographs. Kidney dose measured in a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom was 0.1 cGy for kV imaging and 1.7 cGy for MV imaging. Kidneys were rated as well visualized in 60% of patients (90% confidence interval, 34-81%). The likelihood of visualization appears to be influenced by the relative AP separation of the abdomen and kidneys, the axial profile of the kidneys, and their relative contrast with surrounding structures. Online verification of kidney position using AP non-contrast kV radiographs on an OBI-equipped linear accelerator appears feasible for patients with suitable abdominal anatomy. Kidney position information provided is limited to 2-dimensional 'snapshots,' but this is adequate in some clinical situations and potentially advantageous in respiratory-correlated treatments. Successful clinical implementation requires customized partial DRRs, appropriate imaging parameters, and credentialing of treatment staff.

  11. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  12. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  13. SU-G-BRB-10: New Generation of High Frame-Rate and High Spatial-Resolution EPID QA System for Full-Body MLC-Based Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B; Xing, L; Wang, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically investigate an ultra-high spatial-resolution amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for MLC-based full-body robotic radiosurgery geometric and dosimetric quality assurance (QA). Methods: The high frame-rate and ultra-high spatial resolution EPID is an outstanding detector for measuring profiles, MLC-shaped radiosurgery field aperture verification, and small field dosimetry. A Monte Carlo based technique with a robotic linac specific response and calibration is developed to convert a raw EPID-measured image of a radiosurgery field into water-based dose distribution. The technique is applied to measure output factors and profiles for 6MV MLC-defined radiosurgery fields with various sizes ranging from 7.6mm×7.7mm to 100mm×100.1mm and the results are compared with the radiosurgery diode scan measurements in water tank. The EPID measured field sizes and the penumbra regions are analyzed to evaluate the MLC positioning accuracy. Results: For all MLC fields, the EPID measured output factors of MLC-shaped fields are in good agreement with the diode measurements. The mean output difference between the EPID and diode measurement is 0.05±0.87%. The max difference is −1.33% for 7.6mm×7.7mm field. The MLC field size derived from the EPID measurements are in good agreement comparing to the diode scan result. For crossline field sizes, the mean difference is −0.17mm±0.14mm with a maximum of −0.35mm for the 30.8mm×30.8mm field. For inline field sizes, the mean difference is +0.08mm±0.18mm with a maximum of +0.45mm for the 100mm×100.1mm field. The high resolution EPID is able to measure the whole radiation field, without the need to align the detector center perfectly at field center as diode or ion chamber measurement. The setup time is greatly reduced so that the whole process is possible for machine and patient-specific QA. Conclusion: The high spatial-resolution EPID is proved to be an accurate and efficient

  14. Optimized procedure for calibration and verification multileaf collimator from Elekta Synergy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castel Millan, A.; Perellezo Mazon, A.; Fernandez Ibiza, J.; Arnalte Olloquequi, M.; Armengol Martinez, S.; Rodriguez Rey, A.; Guedea Edo, F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design an optimized procedure for calibration and verification of a multileaf collimator used so as to allow the EPID and the image plate in a complementary way, using different processing systems. With this procedure we have two equivalent alternative as the same parameters obtained for the calibration of multileaf Elekta Synergy accelerator.

  15. Development of a Compton camera for online ion beam range verification via prompt γ detection. Session: HK 12.6 Mo 18:30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldawood, S. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Liprandi, S.; Marinsek, T.; Bortfeldt, J.; Lang, C.; Lutter, R.; Dedes, G.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P.G. [LMU Munich, Garching (Germany); Maier, L.; Gernhaeuser, R. [TU Munich, Garching (Germany); Kolff, H. van der; Schaart, D. [TU Delft (Netherlands); Castelhano, I. [University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    A real-time ion beam verification in hadron-therapy is playing a major role in cancer treatment evaluation. This will make the treatment interuption possible if the planned and actual ion range are mismatched. An imaging system is being developed in Garching aiming to detect prompt γ rays induced by nuclear reactions between the ion beam and biological tissue. The Compton camera prototype consists of a stack of six customized double-sided Si-strip detectors (DSSSD, 50 x 50 mm{sup 2}, 128 strips/side) acting as scatterer, while the absorber is formed by a monolithic LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator crystal (50 x 50 x 30 mm{sup 3}) read out by a position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier (Hamamatsu H9500). The study of the Compton camera properties and its individual component are in progress both in the laboratory as well as at the online facilities.

  16. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu Jian; Jain Jinesh; Zhu Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-01-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (σ) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 deg. and 180 deg. collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within ≤1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC

  17. Comparison of forward- and back-projection in vivo EPID dosimetry for VMAT treatment of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, James L.; Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.

    2018-01-01

    In the forward-projection method of portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the integrated signal at the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is predicted at the time of treatment planning, against which the measured integrated image is compared. In the back-projection method, the measured signal at each gantry angle is back-projected through the patient CT scan to give a measure of total dose to the patient. This study aims to investigate the practical agreement between the two types of EPID dosimetry for prostate radiotherapy. The AutoBeam treatment planning system produced VMAT plans together with corresponding predicted portal images, and a total of 46 sets of gantry-resolved portal images were acquired in 13 patients using an iViewGT portal imager. For the forward-projection method, each acquisition of gantry-resolved images was combined into a single integrated image and compared with the predicted image. For the back-projection method, iViewDose was used to calculate the dose distribution in the patient for comparison with the planned dose. A gamma index for 3% and 3 mm was used for both methods. The results were investigated by delivering the same plans to a phantom and repeating some of the deliveries with deliberately introduced errors. The strongest agreement between forward- and back-projection methods is seen in the isocentric intensity/dose difference, with moderate agreement in the mean gamma. The strongest correlation is observed within a given patient, with less correlation between patients, the latter representing the accuracy of prediction of the two methods. The error study shows that each of the two methods has its own distinct sensitivity to errors, but that overall the response is similar. The forward- and back-projection EPID dosimetry methods show moderate agreement in this series of prostate VMAT patients, indicating that both methods can contribute to the verification of dose delivered to the patient.

  18. SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bawazeer, O; Deb, P [RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Sarasanandarajah, S [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Herath, S; Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in cine mode particularly considering linearity with delivered dose, dose rate, field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed and common IMRT fields. Methods: The EPID that attached to a Varian Clinac 21iX linear accelerator, was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV using 600 MU/min. Image acquisition is controlled by the IAS3 software, Trigger delay was 6 ms, BeamOnDelay and FrameStartDelay were zero. Different frame rates were utilized. Cine mode response was calculated using MATLAB as summation of mean pixel values in a region of interest of the acquired images. The performance of cine mode was compared to integrated mode and dose measurements in water using CC13 ionization chamber. Results: Figure1 illustrates that cine mode has nonlinear response for small MU, when delivering 10 MU was about 0.5 and 0.64 for 6 and 18 MV respectively. This is because the missing acquired images that were calculated around four images missing in each delivery. With the increase MU the response became linear and comparable with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2%. Figure 2 shows that cine mode has comparable response with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2% with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered. This indicates that the dose rate change has no effect on nonlinearity of cine mode response. Except nonlinearity, cine mode is well matched to integrated mode response within 2% for field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed dependences. Conclusion: Cine mode has similar dosimetric characteristics to integrated mode with open and IMRT fields, and the main limitation with cine mode is missing images. Therefore, the calibration of EPID images with this mode should be run with large MU, and when IMRT verification field has low MU, the correction for missing images are required.

  19. SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawazeer, O; Deb, P; Sarasanandarajah, S; Herath, S; Kron, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in cine mode particularly considering linearity with delivered dose, dose rate, field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed and common IMRT fields. Methods: The EPID that attached to a Varian Clinac 21iX linear accelerator, was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV using 600 MU/min. Image acquisition is controlled by the IAS3 software, Trigger delay was 6 ms, BeamOnDelay and FrameStartDelay were zero. Different frame rates were utilized. Cine mode response was calculated using MATLAB as summation of mean pixel values in a region of interest of the acquired images. The performance of cine mode was compared to integrated mode and dose measurements in water using CC13 ionization chamber. Results: Figure1 illustrates that cine mode has nonlinear response for small MU, when delivering 10 MU was about 0.5 and 0.64 for 6 and 18 MV respectively. This is because the missing acquired images that were calculated around four images missing in each delivery. With the increase MU the response became linear and comparable with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2%. Figure 2 shows that cine mode has comparable response with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2% with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered. This indicates that the dose rate change has no effect on nonlinearity of cine mode response. Except nonlinearity, cine mode is well matched to integrated mode response within 2% for field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed dependences. Conclusion: Cine mode has similar dosimetric characteristics to integrated mode with open and IMRT fields, and the main limitation with cine mode is missing images. Therefore, the calibration of EPID images with this mode should be run with large MU, and when IMRT verification field has low MU, the correction for missing images are required.

  20. WE-EF-303-06: Feasibility of PET Image-Based On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification with Simulated Uniform Phantom and Human Brain Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, K; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Clark, J; Shao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of clinical on-line proton beam range verification with PET imaging Methods: We simulated a 179.2-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a PMMA phantom of human brain size, which was then imaged by a brain PET with 300*300*100-mm 3 FOV and different system sensitivities and spatial resolutions. We calculated the mean and standard deviation of positron activity range (AR) from reconstructed PET images, with respect to different data acquisition times (from 5 sec to 300 sec with 5-sec step). We also developed a technique, “Smoothed Maximum Value (SMV)”, to improve AR measurement under a given dose. Furthermore, we simulated a human brain irradiated by a 110-MeV proton beam of 50-mm diameter with 0.3-Gy dose at Bragg peak and imaged by the above PET system with 40% system sensitivity at the center of FOV and 1.7-mm spatial resolution. Results: MC Simulations on the PMMA phantom showed that, regardless of PET system sensitivities and spatial resolutions, the accuracy and precision of AR were proportional to the reciprocal of the square root of image count if image smoothing was not applied. With image smoothing or SMV method, the accuracy and precision could be substantially improved. For a cylindrical PMMA phantom (200 mm diameter and 290 mm long), the accuracy and precision of AR measurement could reach 1.0 and 1.7 mm, with 100-sec data acquired by the brain PET. The study with a human brain showed it was feasible to achieve sub-millimeter accuracy and precision of AR measurement with acquisition time within 60 sec. Conclusion: This study established the relationship between count statistics and the accuracy and precision of activity-range verification. It showed the feasibility of clinical on-line BR verification with high-performance PET systems and improved AR measurement techniques. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas grant RP120326, NIH grant R21CA187717, The Cancer Center Support (Core) Grant CA016672

  1. A novel approach to EPID-based 3D volumetric dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT QA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Abdulaziz; Gianoli, Chiara; Neppl, Sebastian; Martins, Juliana; Veloza, Stella; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank; Reiner, Michael; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2018-06-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are relatively complex treatment delivery techniques and require quality assurance (QA) procedures. Pre-treatment dosimetric verification represents a fundamental QA procedure in daily clinical routine in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to develop an EPID-based approach to reconstruct a 3D dose distribution as imparted to a virtual cylindrical water phantom to be used for plan-specific pre-treatment dosimetric verification for IMRT and VMAT plans. For each depth, the planar 2D dose distributions acquired in air were back-projected and convolved by depth-specific scatter and attenuation kernels. The kernels were obtained by making use of scatter and attenuation models to iteratively estimate the parameters from a set of reference measurements. The derived parameters served as a look-up table for reconstruction of arbitrary measurements. The summation of the reconstructed 3D dose distributions resulted in the integrated 3D dose distribution of the treatment delivery. The accuracy of the proposed approach was validated in clinical IMRT and VMAT plans by means of gamma evaluation, comparing the reconstructed 3D dose distributions with Octavius measurement. The comparison was carried out using (3%, 3 mm) criteria scoring 99% and 96% passing rates for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. An accuracy comparable to the one of the commercial device for 3D volumetric dosimetry was demonstrated. In addition, five IMRT and five VMAT were validated against the 3D dose calculation performed by the TPS in a water phantom using the same passing rate criteria. The median passing rates within the ten treatment plans was 97.3%, whereas the lowest was 95%. Besides, the reconstructed 3D distribution is obtained without predictions relying on forward dose calculation and without external phantom or dosimetric devices. Thus, the approach provides a fully automated, fast and easy QA

  2. Optimization and verification of image reconstruction for a Compton camera towards application as an on-line monitor for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taya, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Tagawa, L.; Mochizuki, S.; Toshito, T.; Kimura, M.; Nagao, Y.; Kurita, K.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kawachi, N.

    2017-07-01

    Particle therapy is an advanced cancer therapy that uses a feature known as the Bragg peak, in which particle beams suddenly lose their energy near the end of their range. The Bragg peak enables particle beams to damage tumors effectively. To achieve precise therapy, the demand for accurate and quantitative imaging of the beam irradiation region or dosage during therapy has increased. The most common method of particle range verification is imaging of annihilation gamma rays by positron emission tomography. Not only 511-keV gamma rays but also prompt gamma rays are generated during therapy; therefore, the Compton camera is expected to be used as an on-line monitor for particle therapy, as it can image these gamma rays in real time. Proton therapy, one of the most common particle therapies, uses a proton beam of approximately 200 MeV, which has a range of ~ 25 cm in water. As gamma rays are emitted along the path of the proton beam, quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images of diffuse sources becomes crucial, but it is far from being fully developed for Compton camera imaging at present. In this study, we first quantitatively evaluated reconstructed Compton camera images of uniformly distributed diffuse sources, and then confirmed that our Compton camera obtained 3 %(1 σ) and 5 %(1 σ) uniformity for line and plane sources, respectively. Based on this quantitative study, we demonstrated on-line gamma imaging during proton irradiation. Through these studies, we show that the Compton camera is suitable for future use as an on-line monitor for particle therapy.

  3. Feasibility study of image guided radiotherapy for lung tumor using online and offline cone-beam CT setup verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongsheng; Li Baosheng; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Yu Ningsha; Chen Yiru

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of online and offline cone-beam CT(CBCT) guided radiotherapy for lung cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients with lung tumor treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy were investigated. Online kV CBCT scan, image registration and setup correction were performed before and immediately after radiotherapy. CBCT online-guided correction data were used to calculate the population-based CTV-PTV margins under the condition of non-correction and correction in every fraction respectively. The numbers of initial images and the population-based CTV-PTV margins after the offline compensation of the system setup error were evaluated with the permission of 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm maximal residue error, respectively. Results: Under the condition of non-correction, the required margins for total error were 5.7 mm, 8.0 mm and 7.8 mm in the left-right (x axis), cranio-caudal (y axis) and anterior-posterior(z axis) directions, respectively. When the tumor was corrected in every fraction, the required margins for intra-fraction error were 2.4 mm, 2.4 mm and 2.3 mm in x,y and z axes, respectively. To correct the systematic setup error, 9 sets of CBCT images for 3.3 mm, 3.7 mm and 3.6 mm PTV margins, and 7 sets of CBCT images for 3.9 mm, 4.3 mm and 4.3 mm PTV margins in x,y and z axes were necessary when 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm maximal residue error were permitted respectively. Conclusions: Both of the online CBCT correction and the offline adaptive correction can markedly reduce the impact of setup error and reduce the required PTV margins accordingly. It is feasible to deliver the online and offline image guided radiation for patients with lung tumor. (authors)

  4. SU-F-SPS-06: Implementation of a Back-Projection Algorithm for 2D in Vivo Dosimetry with An EPID System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Reyes, B; Rodriguez Perez, E; Sosa Aquino, M [Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a back-projection algorithm for 2D dose reconstructions for in vivo dosimetry in radiation therapy using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) based on amorphous silicon. Methods: An EPID system was used to calculate dose-response function, pixel sensitivity map, exponential scatter kernels and beam hardenig correction for the back-projection algorithm. All measurements were done with a 6 MV beam. A 2D dose reconstruction for an irradiated water phantom (30×30×30 cm{sup 3}) was done to verify the algorithm implementation. Gamma index evaluation between the 2D reconstructed dose and the calculated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was done. Results: A linear fit was found for the dose-response function. The pixel sensitivity map has a radial symmetry and was calculated with a profile of the pixel sensitivity variation. The parameters for the scatter kernels were determined only for a 6 MV beam. The primary dose was estimated applying the scatter kernel within EPID and scatter kernel within the patient. The beam hardening coefficient is σBH= 3.788×10{sup −4} cm{sup 2} and the effective linear attenuation coefficient is µAC= 0.06084 cm{sup −1}. The 95% of points evaluated had γ values not longer than the unity, with gamma criteria of ΔD = 3% and Δd = 3 mm, and within the 50% isodose surface. Conclusion: The use of EPID systems proved to be a fast tool for in vivo dosimetry, but the implementation is more complex that the elaborated for pre-treatment dose verification, therefore, a simplest method must be investigated. The accuracy of this method should be improved modifying the algorithm in order to compare lower isodose curves.

  5. Using an EPID for patient-specific VMAT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiari, M.; Kumaraswamy, L.; Bailey, D. W.; Boer, S. de; Malhotra, H. K.; Podgorsak, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) method was developed to verify gantry-specific individual multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures (control points) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: VMAT treatment plans were generated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). DICOM images from a Varian EPID (aS1000) acquired in continuous acquisition mode were used for pretreatment QA. Each cine image file contains the grayscale image of the MLC aperture related to its specific control point and the corresponding gantry angle information. The TPS MLC file of this RapidArc plan contains the leaf positions for all 177 control points (gantry angles). In-house software was developed that interpolates the measured images based on the gantry angle and overlays them with the MLC pattern for all control points. The 38% isointensity line was used to define the edge of the MLC leaves on the portal images. The software generates graphs and tables that provide analysis for the number of mismatched leaf positions for a chosen distance to agreement at each control point and the frequency in which each particular leaf mismatches for the entire arc. Results: Seven patients plans were analyzed using this method. The leaves with the highest mismatched rate were found to be treatment plan dependent. Conclusions: This in-house software can be used to automatically verify the MLC leaf positions for all control points of VMAT plans using cine images acquired by an EPID.

  6. TU-C-BRE-10: A Streamlined Approach to EPID Transit Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, B; Fontenot, J [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a simple and efficient transit dosimetry method using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose delivery error detection and prevention. Methods: In the proposed method, 2D reference transit images are generated for comparison with online images acquired during treatment. Reference transit images are generated by convolving through-air EPID measurements of each field with pixel-specific kernels selected from a library of pre-calculated Monte Carlo pencil kernels of varying radiological thickness. The kernel used for each pixel is selected based on the calculated radiological thickness of the patient along a line joining the pixel and the virtual source. The accuracy of the technique was evaluated in flat homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic water phantoms, a heterogeneous cylindrical phantom, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Gamma criteria of 3%/3 mm was used to quantify the accuracy of the technique for the various cases. Results: An average of 99.9% and 99.7% of the points in the comparison between the measured and predicted images passed a 3%/3mm gamma for the homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic water phantoms, respectively. 97.1% of the points passed for the analysis of the heterogeneous cylindrical phantom. For the anthropomorphic head phantom, an average of 97.8% of points passed the 3%/3mm gamma criteria for all field sizes. Failures were observed primarily in areas of drastic thickness or material changes and at the edges of the fields. Conclusion: The data suggest that the proposed transit dosimetry method is a feasible approach to in vivo dose monitoring. Future research efforts could include implementation for more complex fields and sensitivity testing of the method to setup errors and changes in anatomy. Oncology Data Systems provided partial funding support but did not participate in the collection or analysis of data.

  7. SU-F-T-240: EPID-Based Quality Assurance for Dosimetric Credentialing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miri, N [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel dosimetric audit method for clinical trials using EPID measurements at each center and a standardized EPID to dose conversion algorithm. The aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the EPID method to different linear accelerator, EPID and treatment planning system (TPS) combinations. Methods: Combination of delivery and planning systems were three Varian linacs including one Pinnacle and two Eclipse TPS and, two ELEKTA linacs including one Pinnacle and one Monaco TPS. All Varian linacs had the same EPID structure and similarly for the ELEKTA linacs. Initially, dose response of the EPIDs was investigated by acquiring integrated pixel value (IPV) of the central area of 10 cm2 images versus MUs, 5-400 MU. Then, the EPID to dose conversion was investigated for different system combinations. Square field size images, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 15, 20, 25 cm2 acquired by all systems were converted to dose at isocenter of a virtual flat phantom then the dose was compared to the corresponding TPS dose. Results: All EPIDs showed a relatively linear behavior versus MU except at low MUs which showed irregularities probably due to initial inaccuracies of irradiation. Furthermore, for all the EPID models, the model predicted TPS dose with a mean dose difference percentage of 1.3. However the model showed a few inaccuracies for ELEKTA EPID images at field sizes larger than 20 cm2. Conclusion: The EPIDs demonstrated similar behavior versus MU and the model was relatively accurate for all the systems. Therefore, the model could be employed as a global dosimetric method to audit clinical trials. Funding has been provided from Department of Radiation Oncology, TROG Cancer Research and the University of Newcastle. Narges Miri is a recipient of a University of Newcastle postgraduate scholarship.

  8. SU-F-J-199: Predictive Models for Cone Beam CT-Based Online Verification of Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L; Lin, A; Ahn, P; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Teo, B [The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To utilize online CBCT scans to develop models for predicting DVH metrics in proton therapy of head and neck tumors. Methods: Nine patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were retrospectively selected in this study. Deformable image registration was applied to the simulation CT, target volumes, and organs at risk (OARs) contours onto each weekly CBCT scan. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans were created on the simulation CT and forward calculated onto each corrected CBCT scan. Thirty six potentially predictive metrics were extracted from each corrected CBCT. These features include minimum/maximum/mean over and under-ranges at the proximal and distal surface of PTV volumes, and geometrical and water equivalent distance between PTV and each OARs. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimension of the extracted features. Three principal components were found to account for over 90% of variances in those features. Datasets from eight patients were used to train a machine learning model to fit these principal components with DVH metrics (dose to 95% and 5% of PTV, mean dose or max dose to OARs) from the forward calculated dose on each corrected CBCT. The accuracy of this model was verified on the datasets from the 9th patient. Results: The predicted changes of DVH metrics from the model were in good agreement with actual values calculated on corrected CBCT images. Median differences were within 1 Gy for most DVH metrics except for larynx and constrictor mean dose. However, a large spread of the differences was observed, indicating additional training datasets and predictive features are needed to improve the model. Conclusion: Intensity corrected CBCT scans hold the potential to be used for online verification of proton therapy and prediction of delivered dose distributions.

  9. SU-C-207A-06: On-Line Beam Range Verification with Multiple Scanning Particle Beams: Initial Feasibility Study with Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Y; Sun, X; Lu, W; Jia, X; Wang, J; Shao, Y [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and requirement for intra-fraction on-line multiple scanning particle beam range verifications (BRVs) with in-situ PET imaging, which is beyond the current single-beam BRV with extra factors that will affect the BR measurement accuracy, such as beam diameter, separation between beams, and different image counts at different BRV positions. Methods: We simulated a 110-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a uniform PMMA phantom by GATE simulation, which generated nuclear interaction-induced positrons. In this preliminary study, we simply duplicated these positrons and placed them next to the initial protons to approximately mimic the two spatially separated positron distributions produced by two beams parallel to each other but with different beam ranges. These positrons were then imaged by a PET (∼2-mm resolution, 10% sensitivity, 320×320×128 mm^3 FOV) with different acquisition times. We calculated the positron activity ranges (ARs) from reconstructed PET images and compared them with the corresponding ARs of original positron distributions. Results: Without further image data processing and correction, the preliminary study show the errors between the measured and original ARs varied from 0.2 mm to 2.3 mm as center-to-center separations and range differences were in the range of 8–12 mm and 2–8 mm respectively, indicating the accuracy of AR measurement strongly depends on the beam separations and range differences. In addition, it is feasible to achieve ≤ 1.0-mm accuracy for both beams with 1-min PET acquisition and 12 mm beam separation. Conclusion: This study shows that the overlap between the positron distributions from multiple scanning beams can significantly impact the accuracy of BRVs of distributed particle beams and need to be further addressed beyond the established method of single-beam BRV, but it also indicates the feasibility to achieve accurate on-line multi-beam BRV with further improved

  10. Evaluation of two methods of predicting MLC leaf positions using EPID measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Dance, David R.; Fielding, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiation treatments (IMRT), the position of the field edges and the modulation within the beam are often achieved with a multileaf collimator (MLC). During the MLC calibration process, due to the finite accuracy of leaf position measurements, a systematic error may be introduced to leaf positions. Thereafter leaf positions of the MLC depend on the systematic error introduced on each leaf during MLC calibration and on the accuracy of the leaf position control system (random errors). This study presents and evaluates two methods to predict the systematic errors on the leaf positions introduced during the MLC calibration. The two presented methods are based on a series of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. A comparison with film measurements showed that the EPID could be used to measure leaf positions without introducing any bias. The first method, referred to as the 'central leaf method', is based on the method currently used at this center for MLC leaf calibration. It mimics the manner in which leaf calibration parameters are specified in the MLC control system and consequently is also used by other centers. The second method, a new method proposed by the authors and referred to as the ''individual leaf method,'' involves the measurement of two positions for each leaf (-5 and +15 cm) and the interpolation and extrapolation from these two points to any other given position. The central leaf method and the individual leaf method predicted leaf positions at prescribed positions of -11, 0, 5, and 10 cm within 2.3 and 1.0 mm, respectively, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.3 and 0.2 mm, respectively. The individual leaf method provided a better prediction of the leaf positions than the central leaf method. Reproducibility tests for leaf positions of -5 and +15 cm were performed. The reproducibility was within 0.4 mm on the same day and 0.4 mm six weeks later (1 SD). Measurements at gantry angles of 0 deg., 90 deg., and 270 deg

  11. Characterization of a new transmission detector for patient individualized online plan verification and its influence on 6MV X-ray beam characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoelking, Johannes; Sekar, Yuvaraj; Fleckenstein, Jens; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Wertz, Hansjoerg [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-11-01

    Online verification and 3D dose reconstruction on daily patient anatomy have the potential to improve treatment delivery, accuracy and safety. One possible implementation is to recalculate dose based on online fluence measurements with a transmission detector (TD) attached to the linac. This study provides a detailed analysis of the influence of a new TD on treatment beam characteristics. The influence of the new TD on surface dose was evaluated by measurements with an Advanced Markus Chamber (Adv-MC) in the build-up region. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, correction factors were determined to scale down the over-response of the Adv-MC close to the surface. To analyze the effects beyond d{sub max} percentage depth dose (PDD), lateral profiles and transmission measurements were performed. All measurements were carried out for various field sizes and different SSDs. Additionally, 5 IMRT-plans (head and neck, prostate, thorax) and 2 manually created test cases (3 x 3 cm{sup 2} fields with different dose levels, sweeping gap) were measured to investigate the influence of the TD on clinical treatment plans. To investigate the performance of the TD, dose linearity as well as dose rate dependency measurements were performed. With the TD inside the beam an increase in surface dose was observed depending on SSD and field size (maximum of +11%, SSD = 80 cm, field size = 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Beyond d{sub max} the influence of the TD on PDDs was below 1%. The measurements showed that the transmission factor depends slightly on the field size (0.893-0.921 for 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} to 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). However, the evaluation of clinical IMRT-plans measured with and without the TD showed good agreement after using a single transmission factor (γ{sub (2%/2mm)} > 97%, δ{sub ±3%} >95%). Furthermore, the response of TD was found to be linear and dose rate independent (maximum difference <0.5% compared to reference measurements). When placed in the path of the beam, the TD introduced

  12. The radiation isocenter verification using an electronic system of image portal; Verificacion del isocentro de radiacion utilizando un sistema electronico de imagen portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino Gestoso, J. A.; Portas Ferradas, B. C.; Rosa Menendez, P.; Chapel Gomez, M. L.; Fernandez Cerezo, S.; Vazquez Varela, P.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we present a procedure optimized for verification the isocenter of radiation with respect to the rotation of the gantry and the turn isocentric table of two accelerators SIEMENS, ONCOR and ARTISTE with a mannequin developed in our service and analyzing the images acquired with the EPID from each of the teams. (Author)

  13. Virtual patient 3D dose reconstruction using in air EPID measurements and a back-projection algorithm for IMRT and VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel; van Oers, René F M; Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton

    2017-05-01

    At our institute, a transit back-projection algorithm is used clinically to reconstruct in vivo patient and in phantom 3D dose distributions using EPID measurements behind a patient or a polystyrene slab phantom, respectively. In this study, an extension to this algorithm is presented whereby in air EPID measurements are used in combination with CT data to reconstruct 'virtual' 3D dose distributions. By combining virtual and in vivo patient verification data for the same treatment, patient-related errors can be separated from machine, planning and model errors. The virtual back-projection algorithm is described and verified against the transit algorithm with measurements made behind a slab phantom, against dose measurements made with an ionization chamber and with the OCTAVIUS 4D system, as well as against TPS patient data. Virtual and in vivo patient dose verification results are also compared. Virtual dose reconstructions agree within 1% with ionization chamber measurements. The average γ-pass rate values (3% global dose/3mm) in the 3D dose comparison with the OCTAVIUS 4D system and the TPS patient data are 98.5±1.9%(1SD) and 97.1±2.9%(1SD), respectively. For virtual patient dose reconstructions, the differences with the TPS in median dose to the PTV remain within 4%. Virtual patient dose reconstruction makes pre-treatment verification based on deviations of DVH parameters feasible and eliminates the need for phantom positioning and re-planning. Virtual patient dose reconstructions have additional value in the inspection of in vivo deviations, particularly in situations where CBCT data is not available (or not conclusive). Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of an amorphous silicon EPID for quality assurance of enhanced dynamic wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Routine quality assurance (QA) of enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) is usually performed weekly to monthly. Wedge factors are measured with ion-chamber, and profiles usually with diode-arrays such as the Profiler. The use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for these measurements would combine these into a single rapid set-up and measurement. Currently the Varian EPID in standard imaging mode will not acquire integrated images during EDW treatments, and therefore has not been utilised for EDW dosimetry. Modification to image acquisition was made to enable imaging for EDW, and the performance of the EPID for suitability for quality assurance of EDW was investigated. The accuracy of EDW profiles measured with the EPID were assessed by comparison to Profiler measurements. The EPID was positioned at 105 cm to the detector surface, with 4 cm of additional solid water build-up to give total build-up including EPID inherent build-up of 5 cm. Images of EDW fields were acquired with continuous frame-averaging throughout the delivery. Field sizes of 10x10 cm, and 20x20 cm were used for 30 deg and 60 deg wedge angles for both 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays. Profiler measurements of the same fields were made with 5 cm of solid water build-up with 105 cm to the detector. Profiles in the wedged direction along the central axis of the beam were then compared. The reproducibility of the EPID measured profiles was assessed by three measurements made at weekly intervals. The accuracy of EPID measured wedge factors was investigated with the same experimental set-up. Three images of a 10x10 cm open field were acquired, and the mean pixel value in a 9x9 pixel region at the central axis was found. As the pixel value is the average of all acquired frames, this was multiplied by the number of frames to yield an integrated pixel value. This was repeated for three 10x10 cm 60 deg wedge irradiations. The wedge factor measured with the EPID was then compared to routine weekly

  15. Implementation of DMLC quality control using EPID (Portal Dosimetry); Implementacao de um controle de qualidade de DMLC utilizando um EPID (Portal Dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Furnari, Laura, E-mail: mattos.fr@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Universidade de Sao Paulo (INRAD/HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Radiologia. Setor de Radioterapia

    2017-11-01

    A Quality Assurance (QA) to ensure the expected performance of a Multileaf Collimator System (MLC) is essential to deliver dose in a safety and appropriate way. The time required for equipment control and dosimetry may be reduced when the Electronic Portal Image Device (EPID) is used. The aim of this work was to check the resolution limits of the detection system for IMRT mode, and to propose a set of tests that can provide positioning analysis of a multileaf system. A Varian iX Clinac equipped with an 80 leaf Millenium MLC, and an amorphous silicon based EPID (aS1000) was used. The EPID proved itself effective for detecting errors up to 0.5 mm. The proposed tests provided relevant results of leaf position, and revealed that the MLC system is within acceptable limits found in literature. (author)

  16. Quality control of portal imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesznyak, Csilla; Kiraly, Reka; Polgar, Istvan; Zarand, Pal; Mayer, Arpad; Fekete, Gabor; Mozes, Arpad; Kiss, Balazs

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered . Material and methods: characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi registered , Siemens BeamView Plus registered , Elekta iView registered , and Varian PortalVision trademark and analyzed with the epidSoft registered 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V registered and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack registered films and evaluated with the same program. Results: the optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi registered , Elekta iView registered and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack registered films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus registered , Varian PortalVision trademark and Kodak X-OMAT V registered film 7+7 MU is recommended. Conclusion: the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used. (orig.)

  17. Role of IGRT in patient positioning and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijnheer, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy is 'Frequent imaging in the treatment room during a course of radiotherapy to guide the treatment process'. Instrumentation related to IGRT is highlighted. Focus of the lecture was on clinical experience gained by NKI-AVL, such as the use of EPID (electronic portal imaging devices) and CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) and their comparison: good results for head and neck and prostate/bladder patients: portal imaging was replaced by CBCT. After further investigation convincing results for lung patients were obtained: portal imaging was replaced by CBCT. Scan protocols were developed for these patient groups. Since February 2004 CBCT-based decision rules have been developed for: Head and Neck (Bony anatomy); Prostate (Bony anatomy; Soft tissue registration); Lung (Bony anatomy, Soft tissue registration); Brain (Bony anatomy); and Breast, bladder and liver (in progress). Final remarks are as follows: The introduction of various IGRT techniques allowed 3D verification of the position of target volumes and organs at risk just before or during treatment. Because the information is in 3D, or sometimes even in 4D, in principle these IGRT approaches provide more information compared to the use of 2D verification methods (e.g. EPIDs). Clinical data are becoming available to assess quantitatively for which treatment techniques IGRT approaches are advantageous compared to the use of conventional verification methods taking the additional resources (time, money, manpower) into account. (P.A.)

  18. An improved Monte-Carlo model of the Varian EPID separating support arm and rear-housing backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monville, M E; Greer, P B; Kuncic, Z

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigators of EPID dosimetric properties have ascribed the backscatter, that contaminates dosimetric EPID images, to its supporting arm. Accordingly, Monte-Carlo (MC) EPID models have approximated the backscatter signal from the layers under the detector and the robotic support arm using either uniform or non-uniform solid water slabs, or through convolutions with back-scatter kernels. The aim of this work is to improve the existent MC models by measuring and modelling the separate backscatter contributions of the robotic arm and the rear plastic housing of the EPID. The EPID plastic housing is non-uniform with a 11.9 cm wide indented section that runs across the cross-plane direction in the superior half of the EPID which is 1.75 cm closer to the EPID sensitive layer than the rest of the housing. The thickness of the plastic housing is 0.5 cm. Experiments were performed with and without the housing present by removing all components of the EPID from the housing. The robotic support arm was not present for these measurements. A MC model of the linear accelerator and the EPID was modified to include the rear-housing indentation and results compared to the measurement. The rear housing was found to contribute a maximum of 3% additional signal. The rear housing contribution to the image is non-uniform in the in-plane direction with 2% asymmetry across the central 20 cm of an image irradiating the entire detector. The MC model was able to reproduce this non-uniform contribution. The EPID rear housing contributes a non-uniform backscatter component to the EPID image, which has not been previously characterized. This has been incorporated into an improved MC model of the EPID.

  19. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rozario, T; Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (United States); Klash, S [Premier Cancer Centers, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  20. SU-F-T-261: Reconstruction of Initial Photon Fluence Based On EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, T; Engenhart-Cabillic, R [Philipp University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Czarnecki, D; Maeder, U; Zink, K [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen - University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany); Kussaether, R [MedCom GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Poppe, B [University Hospital for Medical Radiation Physics, Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying an algorithm to reconstruct relative initial photon fluence for clinical use. Clinical EPID and CT images were acquired to reconstruct an external photon radiation treatment field. The reconstructed initial photon fluence could be used to verify the treatment or calculate the applied dose to the patient. Methods: The acquired EPID images were corrected for scatter caused by the patient and the EPID with an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The transmitted photon fluence behind the patient was calculated subsequently. Based on the transmitted fluence the initial photon fluence was calculated using a back-projection algorithm which takes the patient geometry and its energy dependent linear attenuation into account. This attenuation was gained from the acquired cone-beam CT or the planning CT by calculating a water-equivalent radiological thickness for each irradiation direction. To verify the algorithm an inhomogeneous phantom consisting of three inhomogeneities was irradiated by a static 6 MV photon field and compared to a reference flood field image. Results: The mean deviation between the reconstructed relative photon fluence for the inhomogeneous phantom and the flood field EPID image was 3% rising up to 7% for off-axis fluence. This was probably caused by the used clinical EPID calibration, which flattens the inhomogeneous fluence profile of the beam. Conclusion: In this clinical experiment the algorithm achieved good results in the center of the field while it showed high deviation of the lateral fluence. This could be reduced by optimizing the EPID calibration, considering the off-axis differential energy response. In further progress this and other aspects of the EPID, eg. field size dependency, CT and dose calibration have to be studied to realize a clinical acceptable accuracy of 2%.

  1. Commissioning of Portal Dosimetry and characterization of an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olbi, D.S.; Sales, C.P.; Nakandakari, M.V.N.

    2016-01-01

    The development of technologies compensator blocks, MLC, high dose rate accelerators, treatment planning systems, among others, permitted that new treatment techniques in radiotherapy were created. Such techniques have the capacity to modulate radiation beam fluency (IMRT, VMAT), or to deliver high doses in few fractions or unique fractions (SRS). Following the same tendency, quality control of planning became more complex. It is necessary to evaluate the fluency delivered by the accelerator. Its levels of does and its spatial distribution should co-occur with the fluency calculated by TPS. Acquisition of new detector devices in quality control of treatments is fundamental to apply techniques. Portal Vision is a device EPID has the capacity to operate either in image mode or dosimetry mode, with the allowance of Portal Dosimetry. To evaluated planning in IMRT, the device is irradiated using planning e, therefore, the fluency measured is compared with calculated fluency, through gamma analysis. The aim of this work was to perform tests of commissioning of this device. (author)

  2. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the tracking result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 ± 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% ± 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 ± 0.08 mm and 96.7% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 ± 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% ± 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking

  3. SU-F-T-476: Performance of the AS1200 EPID for Periodic Photon Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarco, J; Fraass, B; Yang, W; McKenzie Boehnke, E [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moran, J [University Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Barnes, M [Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle, Warratah, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric performance of a new amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) suitable for high-intensity, flattening-filter-free delivery mode. Methods: An EPID-based QA suite was created with automation to periodically monitor photon central-axis output and two-dimensional beam profile constancy as a function of gantry angle and dose-rate. A Varian TrueBeamTM linear accelerator installed with Developer Mode was used to customize and deliver XML script routines for the QA suite using the dosimetry mode image acquisition for an aS1200 EPID. Automatic post-processing software was developed to analyze the resulting DICOM images. Results: The EPID was used to monitor photon beam output constancy (central-axis), flatness, and symmetry over a period of 10 months for four photon beam energies (6x, 15x, 6xFFF, and 10xFFF). EPID results were consistent to those measured with a standard daily QA check device. At the four cardinal gantry angles, the standard deviation of the EPID central-axis output was <0.5%. Likewise, EPID measurements were independent for the wide range of dose rates (including up to 2400 mu/min for 10xFFF) studied with a standard deviation of <0.8% relative to the nominal dose rate for each energy. Also, profile constancy and field size measurements showed good agreement with the reference acquisition of 0° gantry angle and nominal dose rate. XML script files were also tested for MU linearity and picket-fence delivery. Using Developer Mode, the test suite was delivered in <60 minutes for all 4 photon energies with 4 dose rates per energy and 5 picket-fence acquisitions. Conclusion: Dosimetry image acquisition using a new EPID was found to be accurate for standard and high-intensity photon beams over a broad range of dose rates over 10 months. Developer Mode provided an efficient platform to customize the EPID acquisitions by using custom script files which significantly reduced the time. This work was funded

  4. WE-E-18A-08: Towards a Next-Generation Electronic Portal Device for Simultaneous Imaging and Dose Verification in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work forms part of an ongoing study to develop a next-generation electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to characterize the imaging performance of a novel EPID that has previously been demonstrated to exhibit a water-equivalent response. The EPID ' s response was quantified in several configurations and model parameters were empirically validated against experimental measurements. Methods: A MC model of a novel a-Si EPID incorporating an array of plastic scintillating fibers was developed. Square BCF-99-06A scintillator fibers with PMMA cladding (Saint-Gobain Crystals) were modelled in a matrix with total area measuring 150×150 mm 2 . The standard electromagnetic and optical physics Geant4 classes were used to simulate radiation transport from an angled slit source (6 MV energy spectrum) through the EPID and optical photons reaching the photodiodes were scored. The prototype's modulation transfer function (MTF) was simulated and validated against experimental measurements. Several optical transport parameters, fiber lengths and thicknesses of an air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes were investigated to quantify their effects on the prototype's detection efficiency, sensitivity and MTF. Results: Simulated EPID response was more sensitive to variations in geometry than in the optical parameters studied. The MTF was particularly sensitive to the introduction of a 0.5–1.0 mm air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes, which lowered the MTF relative to that simulated without the gap. As expected, increasing the fiber length increased the detector efficiency and sensitivity while decreasing the MTF. Conclusion: A model of a novel water-equivalent EPID has been developed and benchmarked against measurements using a physical prototype. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this new device and are continuing to optimize

  5. Commissioning of Portal Dosimetry and characterization of an EPID; Comissionamento de Portal Dosimetry e caracterizacao de EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olbi, D.S.; Sales, C.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Nakandakari, M.V.N., E-mail: diego.olbi@hc.fm.usp.br [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2016-07-01

    The development of technologies compensator blocks, MLC, high dose rate accelerators, treatment planning systems, among others, permitted that new treatment techniques in radiotherapy were created. Such techniques have the capacity to modulate radiation beam fluency (IMRT, VMAT), or to deliver high doses in few fractions or unique fractions (SRS). Following the same tendency, quality control of planning became more complex. It is necessary to evaluate the fluency delivered by the accelerator. Its levels of does and its spatial distribution should co-occur with the fluency calculated by TPS. Acquisition of new detector devices in quality control of treatments is fundamental to apply techniques. Portal Vision is a device EPID has the capacity to operate either in image mode or dosimetry mode, with the allowance of Portal Dosimetry. To evaluated planning in IMRT, the device is irradiated using planning e, therefore, the fluency measured is compared with calculated fluency, through gamma analysis. The aim of this work was to perform tests of commissioning of this device. (author)

  6. Clinical validation of an in-house EPID dosimetry system for IMRT QA at the Prince of Wales Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, M.; Vial, P.; Metcalfe, P.; Downes, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this study a simple method using standard flood-field corrected Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) images for routine Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Quality Assurance (QA) was investigated. The EPID QA system was designed and tested on a Siemens Oncor Impression linear accelerator with an OptiVue 1000ST EPID panel (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, USA) and an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator with an iViewGT EPID (Elekta AB, Sweden) for 6 and 10 MV IMRT fields with Step-and-Shoot and dynamic-MLC delivery. Two different planning systems were used for patient IMRT field generation for comparison with the measured EPID fluences. All measured IMRT plans had >95% agreement to the planning fluences (using 3 cGy / 3 mm Gamma Criteria) and were comparable to the pass-rates calculated using a 2-D diode array dosimeter.

  7. Clinical validation of an in-house EPID dosimetry system for IMRT QA at the Prince of Wales Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, M; Downes, S; Vial, P; Metcalfe, P

    2013-01-01

    In this study a simple method using standard flood-field corrected Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) images for routine Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Quality Assurance (QA) was investigated. The EPID QA system was designed and tested on a Siemens Oncor Impression linear accelerator with an OptiVue 1000ST EPID panel (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, USA) and an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator with an iViewGT EPID (Elekta AB, Sweden) for 6 and 10 MV IMRT fields with Step-and-Shoot and dynamic-MLC delivery. Two different planning systems were used for patient IMRT field generation for comparison with the measured EPID fluences. All measured IMRT plans had >95% agreement to the planning fluences (using 3 cGy / 3 mm Gamma Criteria) and were comparable to the pass-rates calculated using a 2-D diode array dosimeter.

  8. Comparison of ghosting effects for three commercial a-Si EPIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, L. N.; Nijsten, S. M. J. J. G.; Sonke, J.-J.; Partridge, M.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have reported dosimetric characteristics of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Some studies ascribed a non-linear signal to gain ghosting and image lag. Other reports, however, state the effect is negligible. This study compares the signal-to-monitor unit (MU) ratio for three different brands of EPID systems. The signal was measured for a wide range of monitor units (5-1000), dose-rates, and beam energies. All EPIDs exhibited a relative under-response for beams of few MUs; giving 4 to 10% lower signal-to-MU ratios relative to that of 1000 MUs. This under-response is consistent with ghosting effects due to charge trapping

  9. Quality control of portal imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesznyak, Csilla; Kiraly, Reka; Polgar, Istvan; Zarand, Pal; Mayer, Arpad [Inst. of Oncoradiology, Uzsoki Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Fekete, Gabor [Dept. of Oncotherapy, Univ. of Szeged (Hungary); Mozes, Arpad [Oncology Center, Kalman Pandy County Hospital, Gyula (Hungary); Kiss, Balazs [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Markusovszky County Hospital, Szombathely (Hungary)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered}. Material and methods: characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi {sup registered}, Siemens BeamView Plus {sup registered}, Elekta iView {sup registered}, and Varian PortalVision trademark and analyzed with the epidSoft {sup registered} 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V {sup registered} and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack {sup registered} films and evaluated with the same program. Results: the optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi {sup registered}, Elekta iView {sup registered} and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack {sup registered} films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus {sup registered}, Varian PortalVision trademark and Kodak X-OMAT V {sup registered} film 7+7 MU is recommended. Conclusion: the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered} can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used. (orig.)

  10. Managing the backscatter component from the robotic arm of an a-Si EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.G.; Menk, F.; Greer, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Backscatter from the robotic arm mechanism of an a-Si EPID in IMRT images was examined. Images corrected with a conventional flood field (FF) containing a backscatter component (BSC) from the robotic ann were compared with a BSC-free FF. A Yarian 21 EX linac (6 MV, 18 MV) was used. All images were acquired with two aS500 EPIDs, one R-arm and one E-arm. The BSC of an EPID image is the ratio of an image acquired with the EPID attached to the arm then detaching the arm from the EPID and acquiring the same image. A range of square field sizes from 2.5 x 2.5 cm to 27.5 x 27.5 cm were acquired and the BSC analyzed. The BSC of the FFs were also measured. A series of IMRT fields were acquired. Each field was corrected with a conventional FF and compared with a BSC-free FF. Figure I shows the magnitude of the BSC from each arm in the inplane for a 6 x beam. Square fields above 16 x l6 cm (R-arm) and lO x 10 cm (E-arm) benefited from a conventional FF as it tended to cancel out the BSC in the acquired square field. The opposite was observed for smaller field sizes. A gamma analysis of the IMRT fields showed a FF correction containing a BSC reduces the effect of the arm in the final image. IMRT EPID images using conventional FFs have been shown to be less affected by backscatter from the robotic arm compared to BSC-free flood fields. (author)

  11. Ghosting effect in Siemens electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for step and shoot IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.; Vial, P.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To assess the ghosting effect of a Siemens EPID (Optivue 1000: while acquiring IMRT fluence with step and shoot delivery. Six sets of segmented fields with 1,2,3,5, J( and 20 monitor units (MU) per segment were designed. Each set consisted of ten segments of equal MU and field size (J 0 x 10 cm 2 ) Standard single fields (non-segmented) of the same total MU as the segmented fields were also created (10-200 MU). EPID images for these fields were acquired with multi-frame acquisition mode. The integrated EPID response was determined as the mean central 20 x 21 pixel readout multiplied by the number of frames. The same fields wen measured with an ionization chamber at a depth of dose maximum in, solid water phantom. The total signal measured from the segmented fields was compared to the corresponding non-segmented fields. The ratio of EPID response between segmented and non-segmented delivery indicates an under-response for segmented fields by 5, 4, 2.5 and 2% for 1,2,3, and 5 MU per segment exposures respectively compared to ionisation chamber response (se Fig. I). The ratio was within 2% for 5 MU per segment and above. Th error bar in Fig. I indicate the intra-segment response variation. The Siemens EPID exhibited significant ghosting effect and variation in response for small M U segments. EPID dosimetry ( IMRT fields with less than 5 MU per segment requires corrections t maintain dose calibration accuracy to within 2%. (author)

  12. Monte Carlo modelling of a-Si EPID response: The effect of spectral variations with field size and position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Fielding, Andrew; Dance, David R.

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on predicting the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) image of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in the absence of attenuation material in the beam with Monte Carlo methods. As IMRT treatments consist of a series of segments of various sizes that are not always delivered on the central axis, large spectral variations may be observed between the segments. The effect of these spectral variations on the EPID response was studied with fields of various sizes and off-axis positions. A detailed description of the EPID was implemented in a Monte Carlo model. The EPID model was validated by comparing the EPID output factors for field sizes between 1x1 and 26x26 cm 2 at the isocenter. The Monte Carlo simulations agreed with the measurements to within 1.5%. The Monte Carlo model succeeded in predicting the EPID response at the center of the fields of various sizes and offsets to within 1% of the measurements. Large variations (up to 29%) of the EPID response were observed between the various offsets. The EPID response increased with field size and with field offset for most cases. The Monte Carlo model was then used to predict the image of a simple test IMRT field delivered on the beam axis and with an offset. A variation of EPID response up to 28% was found between the on- and off-axis delivery. Finally, two clinical IMRT fields were simulated and compared to the measurements. For all IMRT fields, simulations and measurements agreed within 3%--0.2 cm for 98% of the pixels. The spectral variations were quantified by extracting from the spectra at the center of the fields the total photon yield (Y total ), the photon yield below 1 MeV (Y low ), and the percentage of photons below 1 MeV (P low ). For the studied cases, a correlation was shown between the EPID response variation and Y total , Y low , and P low

  13. SU-G-JeP1-08: Dual Modality Verification for Respiratory Gating Using New Real- Time Tumor Tracking Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Shibuya, K [Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawamura, S; Koike, M; Yuasa, Y; Uehara, T; Fujimoto, K [Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The respirato ry gating system combined the TrueBeam and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system (RTRT) was installed. The RTRT system consists of two x-ray tubes and color image intensifiers. Using fluoroscopic images, the fiducial marker which was implanted near the tumor was tracked and was used as the internal surrogate for respiratory gating. The purposes of this study was to develop the verification technique of the respiratory gating with the new RTRT using cine electronic portal image device images (EPIDs) of TrueBeam and log files of the RTRT. Methods: A patient who underwent respiratory gated SBRT of the lung using the RTRT were enrolled in this study. For a patient, the log files of three-dimensional coordinate of fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were acquired using the RTRT. Simultaneously, the cine EPIDs were acquired during respiratory gated radiotherapy. The data acquisition was performed for one field at five sessions during the course of SBRT. The residual motion errors were calculated using the log files (E{sub log}). The fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate into the cine EPIDs was automatically extracted by in-house software based on the template-matching algorithm. The differences between the the marker positions of cine EPIDs and digitally reconstructed radiograph were calculated (E{sub EPID}). Results: Marker detection on EPID using in-house software was influenced by low image contrast. For one field during the course of SBRT, the respiratory gating using the RTRT showed the mean ± S.D. of 95{sup th} percentile E{sub EPID} were 1.3 ± 0.3 mm,1.1 ± 0.5 mm,and those of E{sub log} were 1.5 ± 0.2 mm, 1.1 ± 0.2 mm in LR and SI directions, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed the verification method of respiratory gating combined TrueBeam and new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system using EPIDs and log files.

  14. Cine EPID evaluation of two non-commercial techniques for DIBH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Christopher; Urribarri, Jaime; Cail, Daniel; Rottmann, Joerg; Mishra, Pankaj; Lingos, Tatiana; Niedermayr, Thomas; Berbeco, Ross, E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of two noncommercial techniques for deep inspiration breathhold (DIBH) treatment of left-sided breast cancer (LSBC) usingcine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Methods: 23 875 EPID images of 65 patients treated for LSBC at two different cancer treatment centers were retrieved. At the Milford Regional Cancer Center, DIBH stability was maintained by visual alignment of inroom lasers and patient skin tattoos (TAT). At the South Shore Hospital, a distance-measuring laser device (RTSSD) was implemented. For both centers,cine EPID images were acquired at least once per week during beam-on. Chest wall position relative to image boundary was measured and tracked over the course of treatment for every patient and treatment fraction for which data were acquired. Results: Median intrabeam chest motion was 0.31 mm for the TAT method and 0.37 mm for the RTSSD method. The maximum excursions exceeded our treatment protocol threshold of 3 mm in 0.3% of cases (TAT) and 1.2% of cases (RTSSD). The authors did not observe a clinically significant difference between the two datasets. Conclusions: Both noncommercial techniques for monitoring the DIBH location provided DIBH stability within the predetermined treatment protocol parameters (<3 mm). The intreatment imaging offered by the EPID operating incine mode facilitates retrospective analysis and validation of both techniques.

  15. Cine EPID evaluation of two non-commercial techniques for DIBH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Christopher; Urribarri, Jaime; Cail, Daniel; Rottmann, Joerg; Mishra, Pankaj; Lingos, Tatiana; Niedermayr, Thomas; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of two noncommercial techniques for deep inspiration breathhold (DIBH) treatment of left-sided breast cancer (LSBC) usingcine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Methods: 23 875 EPID images of 65 patients treated for LSBC at two different cancer treatment centers were retrieved. At the Milford Regional Cancer Center, DIBH stability was maintained by visual alignment of inroom lasers and patient skin tattoos (TAT). At the South Shore Hospital, a distance-measuring laser device (RTSSD) was implemented. For both centers,cine EPID images were acquired at least once per week during beam-on. Chest wall position relative to image boundary was measured and tracked over the course of treatment for every patient and treatment fraction for which data were acquired. Results: Median intrabeam chest motion was 0.31 mm for the TAT method and 0.37 mm for the RTSSD method. The maximum excursions exceeded our treatment protocol threshold of 3 mm in 0.3% of cases (TAT) and 1.2% of cases (RTSSD). The authors did not observe a clinically significant difference between the two datasets. Conclusions: Both noncommercial techniques for monitoring the DIBH location provided DIBH stability within the predetermined treatment protocol parameters (<3 mm). The intreatment imaging offered by the EPID operating incine mode facilitates retrospective analysis and validation of both techniques

  16. SU-F-T-562: Validation of EPID-Based Dosimetry for FSRS Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y; Saleh, Z; Obcemea, C; Chan, M; Tang, X; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; Ballangrud, A; Mueller, B; Zinovoy, M; Gelblum, D; Mychalczak, B; Both, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The prevailing approach to frameless SRS (fSRS) small field dosimetry is Gafchromic film. Though providing continuous information, its intrinsic uncertainties in fabrication, response, scan, and calibration often make film dosimetry subject to different interpretations. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using EPID portal dosimetry as a viable alternative to film for small field dosimetry. Methods: Plans prescribed a dose of 21 Gy were created on a flat solid water phantom with Eclipse V11 and iPlan for small static square fields (1.0 to 3.0 cm). In addition, two clinical test plans were computed by employing iPlan on a CIRS Kesler head phantom for target dimensions of 1.2cm and 2.0cm. Corresponding portal dosimetry plans were computed using the Eclipse TPS and delivered on a Varian TrueBeam machine. EBT-XD film dosimetry was performed as a reference. The isocenter doses were measured using EPID, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber. Results: EPID doses at the center of the square field were higher than Eclipse TPS predicted portal doses, with the mean difference being 2.42±0.65%. Doses measured by EBT-XD film, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber revealed smaller differences (except OSLDs), with mean differences being 0.36±3.11%, 4.12±4.13%, 1.7±2.76%, 1.45±2.37% for Eclipse and −1.36±0.85%, 2.38±4.2%, −0.03±0.50%, −0.27±0.78% for iPlan. The profiles measured by EPID and EBT-XD film resembled TPS (Eclipse and iPlan) predicted ones within 3.0%. For the two clinical test plans, the EPID mean doses at the center of field were 2.66±0.68% and 2.33±0.32% higher than TPS predicted doses. Conclusion: We found that results obtained with EPID portal dosimetry were slightly higher (∼2%) than those obtained with EBT-XD film, diode, and CC01 ion chamber with the exception of OSLDs, but well within IROC tolerance (5.0%). Therefore, EPID has the potential to become a viable real-time alternative method to film dosimetry.

  17. Use of local noise power spectrum and wavelet analysis in quantitative image quality assurance for EPIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case and Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Yan, Guanghua; Bassett, Philip; Samant, Sanjiv, E-mail: samant@ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida 32608 (United States); Gopal, Arun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of local noise power spectrum (NPS) to characterize image noise and wavelet analysis to isolate defective pixels and inter-subpanel flat-fielding artifacts for quantitative quality assurance (QA) of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Methods: A total of 93 image sets including custom-made bar-pattern images and open exposure images were collected from four iViewGT a-Si EPID systems over three years. Global quantitative metrics such as modulation transform function (MTF), NPS, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were computed for each image set. Local NPS was also calculated for individual subpanels by sampling region of interests within each subpanel of the EPID. The 1D NPS, obtained by radially averaging the 2D NPS, was fitted to a power-law function. The r-square value of the linear regression analysis was used as a singular metric to characterize the noise properties of individual subpanels of the EPID. The sensitivity of the local NPS was first compared with the global quantitative metrics using historical image sets. It was then compared with two commonly used commercial QA systems with images collected after applying two different EPID calibration methods (single-level gain and multilevel gain). To detect isolated defective pixels and inter-subpanel flat-fielding artifacts, Haar wavelet transform was applied on the images. Results: Global quantitative metrics including MTF, NPS, and DQE showed little change over the period of data collection. On the contrary, a strong correlation between the local NPS (r-square values) and the variation of the EPID noise condition was observed. The local NPS analysis indicated image quality improvement with the r-square values increased from 0.80 ± 0.03 (before calibration) to 0.85 ± 0.03 (after single-level gain calibration) and to 0.96 ± 0.03 (after multilevel gain calibration), while the commercial QA systems failed to distinguish the image quality improvement between the two

  18. SU-F-T-562: Validation of EPID-Based Dosimetry for FSRS Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y; Saleh, Z; Obcemea, C; Chan, M; Tang, X; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; Ballangrud, A; Mueller, B; Zinovoy, M; Gelblum, D; Mychalczak, B; Both, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The prevailing approach to frameless SRS (fSRS) small field dosimetry is Gafchromic film. Though providing continuous information, its intrinsic uncertainties in fabrication, response, scan, and calibration often make film dosimetry subject to different interpretations. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using EPID portal dosimetry as a viable alternative to film for small field dosimetry. Methods: Plans prescribed a dose of 21 Gy were created on a flat solid water phantom with Eclipse V11 and iPlan for small static square fields (1.0 to 3.0 cm). In addition, two clinical test plans were computed by employing iPlan on a CIRS Kesler head phantom for target dimensions of 1.2cm and 2.0cm. Corresponding portal dosimetry plans were computed using the Eclipse TPS and delivered on a Varian TrueBeam machine. EBT-XD film dosimetry was performed as a reference. The isocenter doses were measured using EPID, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber. Results: EPID doses at the center of the square field were higher than Eclipse TPS predicted portal doses, with the mean difference being 2.42±0.65%. Doses measured by EBT-XD film, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber revealed smaller differences (except OSLDs), with mean differences being 0.36±3.11%, 4.12±4.13%, 1.7±2.76%, 1.45±2.37% for Eclipse and −1.36±0.85%, 2.38±4.2%, −0.03±0.50%, −0.27±0.78% for iPlan. The profiles measured by EPID and EBT-XD film resembled TPS (Eclipse and iPlan) predicted ones within 3.0%. For the two clinical test plans, the EPID mean doses at the center of field were 2.66±0.68% and 2.33±0.32% higher than TPS predicted doses. Conclusion: We found that results obtained with EPID portal dosimetry were slightly higher (∼2%) than those obtained with EBT-XD film, diode, and CC01 ion chamber with the exception of OSLDs, but well within IROC tolerance (5.0%). Therefore, EPID has the potential to become a viable real-time alternative method to film dosimetry.

  19. On the use of EPID-based implanted marker tracking for 4D radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P.J.; Todor, A.D.; Vedam, S.S.; Bartee, C.L.; Siebers, J.V.; Kini, V.R.; Mohan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy delivery to dynamically moving tumors requires a real-time signal of the tumor position as a function of time so that the radiation beam can continuously track the tumor during the respiration cycle. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based marker-tracking system that can be used for real-time tumor targeting, or 4D radiotherapy. Three gold cylinders, 3 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter, were implanted in a dynamic lung phantom. The phantom range of motion was 4 cm with a 3-s 'breathing' period. EPID image acquisition parameters were modified, allowing image acquisition in 0.1 s. Images of the stationary and moving phantom were acquired. Software was developed to segment automatically the marker positions from the EPID images. Images acquired in 0.1 s displayed higher noise and a lower signal-noise ratio than those obtained using regular (>1 s) acquisition settings. However, the markers were still clearly visible on the 0.1-s images. The motion of the phantom blurred the images of the markers and further reduced the signal-noise ratio, though they could still be successfully segmented from the images in 10-30 ms of computation time. The positions of gold markers placed in the lung phantom were detected successfully, even for phantom velocities substantially higher than those observed for typical lung tumors. This study shows that using EPID-based marker tracking for 4D radiotherapy is feasible, however, changes in linear accelerator technology and EPID-based image acquisition as well as patient studies are required before this method can be implemented clinically

  20. Epid cine acquisition mode for in vivo dosimetry in dynamic arc radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Mameli, Alessandra; Placidi, Elisa; Greco, Francesca; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; D'Angelillo, Rolando; Cellini, Francesco; Trodella, Lucio; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca; D'Onofrio, Guido; Azario, Luigi; Piermattei, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the cine acquisition mode of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been calibrated and tested to determine the in vivo dose for dynamic conformal arc radiation therapy (DCAT). The EPID cine acquisition mode, that allows a frame acquisition rate of one image every 1.66 s, was studied with a monitor unit rate equal to 100 UM/min. In these conditions good signal stability, ±1% (2SD) evaluated during three months, signal reproducibility within ±0.8% (2SD) and linearity with dose and dose rate within ±1% (2SD) were obtained. The transit signal, S t , (due to the transmitted beam below the phantom) measured by the EPID cine acquisition mode was used to determine, (i) a set of correlation functions, F(w,L), defined as the ratio between S t and the dose at half thickness, D m , measured in solid water phantoms of different thicknesses, w and with square fields of side L, (ii) a set of factors, f(d,L), that take into account the different X-ray scatter contribution from the phantom to the S t signal as a function of the variation, d, of the air gap between the phantom and the EPID. The reconstruction of the isocenter dose, D iso , for DCAT was obtained convolving the transit signal values, obtained at different gantry angles, with the respective reconstruction factors determined by a house-made software. The method was tested with cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms and the results show that the reconstructed D iso values can be obtained with an accuracy within ±2.5% in cylindrical phantom and within ±3.4% for anthropomorphic phantom. In conclusion, the transit dosimetry by EPID was assessed to be adequate to perform DCAT in vivo dosimetry, that is not realizable with the other traditional techniques. Moreover, the method proposed here could be implemented to supply in vivo dose values in real time

  1. Virtual EPID standard phantom audit (VESPA) for remote IMRT and VMAT credentialing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Narges; Lehmann, Joerg; Legge, Kimberley; Vial, Philip; Greer, Peter B.

    2017-06-01

    A virtual EPID standard phantom audit (VESPA) has been implemented for remote auditing in support of facility credentialing for clinical trials using IMRT and VMAT. VESPA is based on published methods and a clinically established IMRT QA procedure, here extended to multi-vendor equipment. Facilities are provided with comprehensive instructions and CT datasets to create treatment plans. They deliver the treatment directly to their EPID without any phantom or couch in the beam. In addition, they deliver a set of simple calibration fields per instructions. Collected EPID images are uploaded electronically. In the analysis, the dose is projected back into a virtual cylindrical phantom. 3D gamma analysis is performed. 2D dose planes and linear dose profiles are provided and can be considered when needed for clarification. In addition, using a virtual flat-phantom, 2D field-by-field or arc-by-arc gamma analyses are performed. Pilot facilities covering a range of planning and delivery systems have performed data acquisition and upload successfully. Advantages of VESPA are (1) fast turnaround mainly driven by the facility’s capability of providing the requested EPID images, (2) the possibility for facilities performing the audit in parallel, as there is no need to wait for a phantom, (3) simple and efficient credentialing for international facilities, (4) a large set of data points, and (5) a reduced impact on resources and environment as there is no need to transport heavy phantoms or audit staff. Limitations of the current implementation of VESPA for trials credentialing are that it does not provide absolute dosimetry, therefore a Level I audit is still required, and that it relies on correctly delivered open calibration fields, which are used for system calibration. The implemented EPID based IMRT and VMAT audit system promises to dramatically improve credentialing efficiency for clinical trials and wider applications.

  2. Normalize the response of EPID in pursuit of linear accelerator dosimetry standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Goddu, S Murty; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Caruthers, Douglas; Wen, Jie; Noel, Camille; Mutic, Sasa; Sun, Baozhou

    2018-01-01

    Normalize the response of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is the first step toward an EPID-based standardization of Linear Accelerator (linac) dosimetry quality assurance. In this study, we described an approach to generate two-dimensional (2D) pixel sensitivity maps (PSM) for EPIDs response normalization utilizing an alternative beam and dark-field (ABDF) image acquisition technique and large overlapping field irradiations. The automated image acquisition was performed by XML-controlled machine operation and the PSM was generated based on a recursive calculation algorithm for Varian linacs equipped with aS1000 and aS1200 imager panels. Cross-comparisons of normalized beam profiles and 1.5%/1.5 mm 1D Gamma analysis was adopted to quantify the improvement of beam profile matching before and after PSM corrections. PSMs were derived for both photon (6, 10, 15 MV) and electron (6, 20 MeV) beams via proposed method. The PSM-corrected images reproduced a horn-shaped profile for photon beams and a relative uniform profiles for electrons. For dosimetrically matched linacs equipped with aS1000 panels, PSM-corrected images showed increased 1D-Gamma passing rates for all energies, with an average 10.5% improvement for crossline and 37% for inline beam profiles. Similar improvements in the phantom study were observed with a maximum improvement of 32% for 15 MV and 22% for 20 MeV. The PSM value showed no significant change for all energies over a 3-month period. In conclusion, the proposed approach correct EPID response for both aS1000 and aS1200 panels. This strategy enables the possibility to standardize linac dosimetry QA and to benchmark linac performance utilizing EPID as the common detector. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. WE-DE-BRA-06: Evaluation of the Imaging Performance of a Novel Water-Equivalent EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, SJ [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); The Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Cheng, J; Atakaramians, S; Kuncic, Z [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); The Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool & Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lu, M [Perkin-Elmer Medical Imaging, Santa Clara, California (United States); Meikle, S [Faculty of Health Sciences and Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the megavoltage imaging performance of a novel, water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device (EPID) developed for simultaneous imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy. Methods: A novel EPID prototype based on active matrix flat panel imager technology has been developed by our group and previously reported to exhibit a water-equivalent dose response. It was constructed by replacing all components above the photodiode detector in a standard clinical EPID (including the copper plate and phosphor screen) with a 15 × 15 cm{sup 2} array of plastic scintillator fibers. Individual fibers measured 0.5 × 0.5 × 30 mm{sup 3}. Spatial resolution was evaluated experimentally relative to that of a standard EPID with the thin slit technique to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) for 6 MV x-ray beams. Monte Carlo (MC) EPID models were used to benchmark simulated MTFs against the measurements. The zero spatial frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE(0)) was simulated for both EPID configurations and a preliminary optimization of the prototype was performed by evaluating DQE(0) as a function of fiber length up to 50 mm. Results: The MC-simulated DQE(0) for the prototype EPID configuration was ∼7 times greater than that of the standard EPID. The prototype’s DQE(0) also increased approximately linearly with fiber length, from ∼1% at 5 mm length to ∼11% at 50 mm length. The standard EPID MTF was greater than the prototype EPID’s for all spatial frequencies, reflecting the trade off between x-ray detection efficiency and spatial resolution with thick scintillators. Conclusion: This study offers promising evidence that a water-equivalent EPID previously demonstrated for radiotherapy dosimetry may also be used for radiotherapy imaging applications. Future studies on optimising the detector design will be performed to develop a next-generation prototype that offers improved megavoltage imaging performance, with the aim to at

  4. WE-DE-BRA-06: Evaluation of the Imaging Performance of a Novel Water-Equivalent EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, SJ; Cheng, J; Atakaramians, S; Kuncic, Z; Vial, P; Lu, M; Meikle, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the megavoltage imaging performance of a novel, water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device (EPID) developed for simultaneous imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy. Methods: A novel EPID prototype based on active matrix flat panel imager technology has been developed by our group and previously reported to exhibit a water-equivalent dose response. It was constructed by replacing all components above the photodiode detector in a standard clinical EPID (including the copper plate and phosphor screen) with a 15 × 15 cm 2 array of plastic scintillator fibers. Individual fibers measured 0.5 × 0.5 × 30 mm 3 . Spatial resolution was evaluated experimentally relative to that of a standard EPID with the thin slit technique to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) for 6 MV x-ray beams. Monte Carlo (MC) EPID models were used to benchmark simulated MTFs against the measurements. The zero spatial frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE(0)) was simulated for both EPID configurations and a preliminary optimization of the prototype was performed by evaluating DQE(0) as a function of fiber length up to 50 mm. Results: The MC-simulated DQE(0) for the prototype EPID configuration was ∼7 times greater than that of the standard EPID. The prototype’s DQE(0) also increased approximately linearly with fiber length, from ∼1% at 5 mm length to ∼11% at 50 mm length. The standard EPID MTF was greater than the prototype EPID’s for all spatial frequencies, reflecting the trade off between x-ray detection efficiency and spatial resolution with thick scintillators. Conclusion: This study offers promising evidence that a water-equivalent EPID previously demonstrated for radiotherapy dosimetry may also be used for radiotherapy imaging applications. Future studies on optimising the detector design will be performed to develop a next-generation prototype that offers improved megavoltage imaging performance, with the aim to at least

  5. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, P; Riis, H L; Zimmermann, S J; Ebert, M A

    2015-07-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt and the sag in leaf bank assembly owing to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with 5 ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of the image data. Nine Elekta AB (Stockholm, Sweden) linacs of different models and number of years in service were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 2 mm for all tested linacs. Some machines showed >1-mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 1.3 cm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in multileaf collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of Elekta linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Elekta machines.

  6. On-line high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-nuclear magnetic resonance method of the markers of nerve agents for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Avik; Gupta, Hemendra K; Garg, Prabhat; Jain, Rajeev; Dubey, Devendra K

    2009-07-03

    This paper details an on-flow liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-UV-NMR) method for the retrospective detection and identification of alkyl alkylphosphonic acids (AAPAs) and alkylphosphonic acids (APAs), the markers of the toxic nerve agents for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Initially, the LC-UV-NMR parameters were optimized for benzyl derivatives of the APAs and AAPAs. The optimized parameters include stationary phase C(18), mobile phase methanol:water 78:22 (v/v), UV detection at 268nm and (1)H NMR acquisition conditions. The protocol described herein allowed the detection of analytes through acquisition of high quality NMR spectra from the aqueous solution of the APAs and AAPAs with high concentrations of interfering background chemicals which have been removed by preceding sample preparation. The reported standard deviation for the quantification is related to the UV detector which showed relative standard deviations (RSDs) for quantification within +/-1.1%, while lower limit of detection upto 16mug (in mug absolute) for the NMR detector. Finally the developed LC-UV-NMR method was applied to identify the APAs and AAPAs in real water samples, consequent to solid phase extraction and derivatization. The method is fast (total experiment time approximately 2h), sensitive, rugged and efficient.

  7. Modelos epidémicos con control por vacunación

    OpenAIRE

    Saralegui Vallejo, Unai

    2016-01-01

    Existen diferentes tipos de modelos epidémicos no lineales en los que las dinámicas de las sub-poblaciones ( susceptibles, infectados , recobrados , vacunados etc. ) están acopladas. La vacunación puede interpretatrse como un control cuyo objetivo es eliminar la infección. Se estudian estos modelos matemáticamente, para despues comprobar los resultados obtenidos mediante simulaciones.

  8. Quality control program of multi-leaf collimation based EPID for teams with Rapidarc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.; Gimeno Olmos, J.; Lliso Valverde, F.; Carmona Mesenguer, V.; Garcia Martinez, M. T.; Palomo Llinares, R.; Ballester Pallares, F.; Perez Calatayud, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to show a collection of different recommendations on the control of quality of collimation multi-leaf system and present the selection of tests based on the electronic imaging device (EPID) portal that have decided to establish in our Center, where in addition to the requirements of quality assurance generic for collimation multi-leaf system quality control methods have been included for RapidArc. (Author)

  9. SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annamalai, Gopiraj; Watanabe, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a simple method for estimating the mid-plane dose (MPD) of a patient using Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID). Methods: A Varian TrueBeam with aSi100 EPID was used in this study. The EPID images were acquired for a 30 cm × 30 cm homogeneous slab phantom and a 30 cm diameter 20 cm thick cylindrical phantom in the continuous dosimetry mode. The acquired EPID images in XIM format were imported into in-house MATLAB program for the data analysis. First, the dosimetric characteristics of EPID were studied for dose-response linearity, dose-rate dependence, and field size dependence. Next, the average pixels values of the EPID images were correlated with the MPD measured by an ionisation chamber for various thicknesses of the slab phantom (8 cm – 30 cm) and for various square field sizes (3×3 cm 2 – 25×25 cm 2 at the isocenter). Look-up tables called as GPR tables were then generated for both SSD and SAD setup by taking the ratio of MPD measured by the ionisation chamber and the corresponding EPID pixel values. The accuracy of the GPR tables was evaluated by varying the field size, phantom thickness, and wedge angles with the slab and cylindrical phantoms. Results: The dose response of EPID was linear from 20 MU to 300 MU. The EPID response for different dose rates from 40 MU/min to 600 MU/min was within ±1%. The difference in the doses from the GPR tables and the doses measured by the ionization chambers were within 2% for slab phantoms, and 3% for the cylindrical phantom for various field sizes, phantom thickness, and wedge angles. Conclusion: GPR tables are a ready reckoner for in-vivo dosimetry and it can be used to quickly estimate the MPD value from the EPID images with an accuracy of ±3% for common clinical treatment. project work funded by Union for International cancer control(UICC) under ICRETT fellowship

  10. SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, Gopiraj [Government Arignar Anna Memorial Cancer Hospital & Research Institute, Kanchipuram, TAMILNADU (India); Watanabe, Yoichi [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a simple method for estimating the mid-plane dose (MPD) of a patient using Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID). Methods: A Varian TrueBeam with aSi100 EPID was used in this study. The EPID images were acquired for a 30 cm × 30 cm homogeneous slab phantom and a 30 cm diameter 20 cm thick cylindrical phantom in the continuous dosimetry mode. The acquired EPID images in XIM format were imported into in-house MATLAB program for the data analysis. First, the dosimetric characteristics of EPID were studied for dose-response linearity, dose-rate dependence, and field size dependence. Next, the average pixels values of the EPID images were correlated with the MPD measured by an ionisation chamber for various thicknesses of the slab phantom (8 cm – 30 cm) and for various square field sizes (3×3 cm{sup 2} – 25×25 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter). Look-up tables called as GPR tables were then generated for both SSD and SAD setup by taking the ratio of MPD measured by the ionisation chamber and the corresponding EPID pixel values. The accuracy of the GPR tables was evaluated by varying the field size, phantom thickness, and wedge angles with the slab and cylindrical phantoms. Results: The dose response of EPID was linear from 20 MU to 300 MU. The EPID response for different dose rates from 40 MU/min to 600 MU/min was within ±1%. The difference in the doses from the GPR tables and the doses measured by the ionization chambers were within 2% for slab phantoms, and 3% for the cylindrical phantom for various field sizes, phantom thickness, and wedge angles. Conclusion: GPR tables are a ready reckoner for in-vivo dosimetry and it can be used to quickly estimate the MPD value from the EPID images with an accuracy of ±3% for common clinical treatment. project work funded by Union for International cancer control(UICC) under ICRETT fellowship.

  11. Swarm Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.; Joshi, Rajeev; Groce, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Reportedly, supercomputer designer Seymour Cray once said that he would sooner use two strong oxen to plow a field than a thousand chickens. Although this is undoubtedly wise when it comes to plowing a field, it is not so clear for other types of tasks. Model checking problems are of the proverbial "search the needle in a haystack" type. Such problems can often be parallelized easily. Alas, none of the usual divide and conquer methods can be used to parallelize the working of a model checker. Given that it has become easier than ever to gain access to large numbers of computers to perform even routine tasks it is becoming more and more attractive to find alternate ways to use these resources to speed up model checking tasks. This paper describes one such method, called swarm verification.

  12. A simple method to back-project isocenter dose of radiotherapy treatments using EPID transit dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, T.B.; Cerbaro, B.Q.; Rosa, L.A.R. da, E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com, E-mail: tbsilveira@inca.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work was to implement a simple algorithm to evaluate isocenter dose in a phantom using the back-projected transmitted dose acquired using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) available in a Varian Trilogy accelerator with two nominal 6 and 10 MV photon beams. This algorithm was developed in MATLAB language, to calibrate EPID measured dose in absolute dose, using a deconvolution process, and to incorporate all scattering and attenuation contributions due to photon interactions with phantom. Modeling process was simplified by using empirical curve adjustments to describe the contribution of scattering and attenuation effects. The implemented algorithm and method were validated employing 19 patient treatment plans with 104 clinical irradiation fields projected on the phantom used. Results for EPID absolute dose calibration by deconvolution have showed percent deviations lower than 1%. Final method validation presented average percent deviations between isocenter doses calculated by back-projection and isocenter doses determined with ionization chamber of 1,86% (SD of 1,00%) and -0,94% (SD of 0,61%) for 6 and 10 MV, respectively. Normalized field by field analysis showed deviations smaller than 2% for 89% of all data for 6 MV beams and 94% for 10 MV beams. It was concluded that the proposed algorithm possesses sufficient accuracy to be used for in vivo dosimetry, being sensitive to detect dose delivery errors bigger than 3-4% for conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques. (author)

  13. State Online Query System (SOLQ)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Designed specifically for State Human Service agencies, SOLQ allows States real-time online access to SSA's SSN verification service and, if permitted, retrieval of...

  14. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Sean L., E-mail: BerryS@MSKCC.org [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm γ criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm γ criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall γ pass rate was 89.1% ± 9.8% (average ± 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the γ pass rate was 95.7% ± 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  15. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-03: Development of a Human Brain PET for On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yiping [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a prototype PET for verifying proton beam-range before each fractionated therapy that will enable on-line re-planning proton therapy. Methods: Latest “edge-less” silicon photomultiplier arrays and customized ASIC readout electronics were used to develop PET detectors with depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5×1.5 and 2.0×2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables or PCB board to dedicated ASIC front-end electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition of coincidence events and data transfer. The modular detector and scalable electronics/data acquisition will enable flexible PET system configuration for different imaging geometry. Results: Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ∼18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2–3 mm DOI resolution. A small prototype PET scanner with one detector ring has been built and evaluated, validating the technology and design. A large size detector panel has been fabricated by scaling up from modular detectors. Different designs of resistor and capacitor based signal multiplexing boards were tested and selected based on optimal crystal identification and timing performance. Stackable readout electronics boards and FPGA-based data acquisition boards were developed and tested. A brain PET is under construction. Conclusion: Technology of large-size DOI detector based on SiPM array and advanced readout has been

  16. Clinical Experience and Evaluation of Patient Treatment Verification With a Transit Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricketts, Kate, E-mail: k.ricketts@ucl.ac.uk [Division of Surgery and Interventional Sciences, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, Reading (United Kingdom); Navarro, Clara; Lane, Katherine; Blowfield, Claire; Cotten, Gary; Tomala, Dee; Lord, Christine; Jones, Joanne; Adeyemi, Abiodun [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a protocol for transit dosimetry on a patient population undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to assess the issues in clinical implementation of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for treatment verification. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Amorphous silicon EPIDs were calibrated for dose and used to acquire images of delivered fields. Measured EPID dose maps were back-projected using the planning computed tomographic (CT) images to calculate dose at prespecified points within the patient and compared with treatment planning system dose offline using point dose difference and point γ analysis. The deviation of the results was used to inform future action levels. Results: Two hundred twenty-five transit images were analyzed, composed of breast, prostate, and head and neck IMRT fields. Patient measurements demonstrated the potential of the dose verification protocol to model dose well under complex conditions: 83.8% of all delivered beams achieved the initial set tolerance level of Δ{sub D} of 0 ± 5 cGy or %Δ{sub D} of 0% ± 5%. Importantly, the protocol was also sensitive to anatomic changes and spotted that 3 patients from 20 measured prostate patients had undergone anatomic change in comparison with the planning CT. Patient data suggested an EPID-reconstructed versus treatment planning system dose difference action level of 0% ± 7% for breast fields. Asymmetric action levels were more appropriate for inversed IMRT fields, using absolute dose difference (−2 ± 5 cGy) or summed field percentage dose difference (−6% ± 7%). Conclusions: The in vivo dose verification method was easy to use and simple to implement, and it could detect patient anatomic changes that impacted dose delivery. The system required no extra dose to the patient or treatment time delay and so could be used throughout the course of treatment to identify and limit

  17. Preliminary studies for implementation of a MCL quality control using EPID (Portal Dosimetry); Estudos preliminares para implementacao de um controle de qualidade de MLC com o uso do EPID (Portal Dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Furnari, Laura [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-01

    A Quality Control (CQ) to ensure the expected performance of a Multileaf Collimator System (MLC) is essential for delivering dose in a safety and appropriate way. The time required for equipment control and dosimetry may be lowered when the Electronic Portal Image Device (EPID) is used. The aim of this paper was to check the resolution limits of the detection system for IMRT mode, and to do the analysis of three tests of MLC performance: Picket Fence, Slinding GAP, MLC versus Gantry. A Varian iX Clinac equipped with an 80 leaf Millennium MLC and with amorphous silicon based EPID (aS1000) was use. The EPID proved Effective, where errors up to 0,5 mm can be detected. Information about interleaf transmissions, dose profile and gravity influence in the leaf banks also were included. (author)

  18. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson e necrólise epidérmica tóxica

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Inês Dionísio

    2013-01-01

    Trabalho final de mestrado integrado em Medicina (Dermatologia), apresentado à Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Coimbra. A Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson (SSJ) e a necrólise epidérmica tóxica (NET) são reacções mucocutâneas raras consideradas emergências médicas, podendo tornar-se fatais. Constituem dois extremos do mesmo espectro clínico das reacções cutâneas severas adversas a fármacos com necrose epidérmica, diferindo apenas na extensão do descolamento epidérmico. A gra...

  19. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  20. Software verification for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilburn, N.P.

    1985-08-01

    Why verification of software products throughout the software life cycle is necessary is considered. Concepts of verification, software verification planning, and some verification methodologies for products generated throughout the software life cycle are then discussed

  1. Use of an amorphous silicon EPID for measuring MLC calibration at varying gantry angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M F; Budgell, G J

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are used to perform routine quality control (QC) checks on the multileaf collimators (MLCs) at this centre. Presently, these checks are performed at gantry angle 0 0 and are considered to be valid for all other angles. Since therapeutic procedures regularly require the delivery of MLC-defined fields to the patient at a wide range of gantry angles, the accuracy of the QC checks at other gantry angles has been investigated. When the gantry is rotated to angles other than 0 0 it was found that the apparent pixel size measured using the EPID varies up to a maximum value of 0.0015 mm per pixel due to a sag in the EPID of up to 9.2 mm. A correction factor was determined using two independent methods at a range of gantry angles between 0 deg. and 360 deg. The EPID was used to measure field sizes (defined by both x-jaws and MLC) at a range of gantry angles and, after this correction had been applied, any residual gravitational sag was studied. It was found that, when fields are defined by the x-jaws and y-back-up jaws, no errors of greater than 0.5 mm were measured and that these errors were no worse when the MLC was used. It was therefore concluded that, provided the correction is applied, measurements of the field size are, in practical terms, unaffected by gantry angle. Experiments were also performed to study how the reproducibility of individual leaves is affected by gantry angle. Measurements of the relative position of each individual leaf (minor offsets) were performed at a range of gantry angles and repeated three times. The position reproducibility was defined by the RMS error in the position of each leaf and this was found to be 0.24 mm and 0.21 mm for the two leaf banks at a gantry angle of 0 0 . When measurements were performed at a range of gantry angles, these reproducibility values remained within 0.09 mm and 0.11 mm. It was therefore concluded that the calibration of the Elekta MLC is stable at

  2. Estudio de diez casos de encefalitis letárgica epidémica

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Morris

    2014-01-01

    La aparición en forma epidémica de una rara enfermedad que afecta profundamente el sistema nervioso central ha suscitado, durante estos últimos tres años, mucho interés en el mundo científico. Esta enfermedad ha sido estudiada con mayor ahinco en Austria y Australia, en donde apareció en 1917 y en Inglaterra, Francia y Estados Unidos en donde se presentó después. The appearance in epidemic form of a rare disease that profoundly affects the central nervous system has raised during the past ...

  3. MLC quality assurance using EPID: A fitting technique with subpixel precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Li, Harold; Low, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been shown to be a good alternative to radiographic film for routine quality assurance (QA) of multileaf collimator (MLC) positioning accuracy. In this work, we present a method of acquiring an EPID image of a traditional strip-test image using analytical fits of the interleaf and leaf abutment image signatures. After exposure, the EPID image pixel values are divided by an open field image to remove EPID response and radiation field variations. Profiles acquired in the direction orthogonal to the leaf motion exhibit small peaks caused by interleaf leakage. Gaussian profiles are fitted to the interleaf leakage peaks, the results of which are, using multiobjective optimization, used to calculate the image rotational angle with respect to the collimator axis of rotation. The relative angle is used to rotate the image to align the MLC leaf travel to the image pixel axes. The leaf abutments also present peaks that are fitted by heuristic functions, in this case modified Lorentzian functions. The parameters of the Lorentzian functions are used to parameterize the leaf gap width and positions. By imaging a set of MLC fields with varying gaps forming symmetric and asymmetric abutments, calibration curves with regard to relative peak height (RPH) versus nominal gap width are obtained. Based on this calibration data, the individual leaf positions are calculated to compare with the nominal programmed positions. The results demonstrate that the collimator rotation angle can be determined as accurate as 0.01 deg. . A change in MLC gap width of 0.2 mm leads to a change in RPH of about 10%. For asymmetrically produced gaps, a 0.2 mm MLC leaf gap width change causes 0.2 pixel peak position change. Subpixel resolution is obtained by using a parameterized fit of the relatively large abutment peaks. By contrast, for symmetrical gap changes, the peak position remains unchanged with a standard deviation of 0

  4. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polak, Wojciech [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Radiotherapy Section, Queen Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, Portsmouth PO6 3LY (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, Jim [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH, United Kingdom and Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Jones, Matt [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  5. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, Wojciech; O’Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  6. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Wojciech; O'Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-03-01

    X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be easily performed for all four cardinal

  7. SU-D-201-06: Remote Dosmetric Auditing of VMAT Deliveries for Clinical Trials Using EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legge, K; Miri, N [University of Newcastle (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital (Australia); Greer, P [University of Newcastle (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for remote dosimetric auditing the delivery of VMAT using EPID which allows for simple, inexpensive and time efficient dosimetric credentialing for clinical trials. Methods: Remote centers are provided with CT datasets and planning guidelines to produce VMAT plans for a head and neck and a post-prostatectomy treatment. Plans are transferred in the planning system to two virtual water equivalent phantoms, one flat and one cylindrical. Cine images are acquired during VMAT delivery to the EPID in air with gantry angle recorded in image headers. Centers also deliver provided calibration plans to enable EPID signal to dose conversion, determination of the central axis, and correction of EPID sag prior to analysis. EPID images and planned doses are sent to the central site. EPID cine images are converted to dose in the virtual phantoms using an established backprojection method (King et al., Med.Phys. 2012) with EPID backscatter correction. Individual arcs (with gantry angles collapsed to zero) are evaluated at 10 cm depth in the flat phantom using 2D gamma, and total doses are evaluated in the cylindrical phantom using 3D gamma. Results are reported for criteria of 3%,3mm, 3%,2mm and 2%,2mm for all points greater than 10% of global maximum. Results: The pilot study for Varian centers has commenced, and three centers have been audited for head and neck plans and two for post-prostatectomy plans to date. The mean pass rate for arc-by-arc 2D analysis at 3%,3mm is 99.5% and for 3D analysis is 95.8%. A method for Elekta linacs using an inclinometer for gantry angle information is under development. Conclusion: Preliminary results for this new method are promising. The method takes advantage of EPID equipment available at most centers and clinically established software to provide a feasible, low cost solution to credentialing centers for clinical trials. Funding has been provided from Calvary Mater Newcastle Department of Radiation Oncology, TROG

  8. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowshanfarzad, P; Lynggaard Riis, Hans; Zimmermann, S J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested...... collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour...

  9. Verification and disarmament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blix, H. [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-07-01

    The main features are described of the IAEA safeguards verification system that non-nuclear weapon states parties of the NPT are obliged to accept. Verification activities/problems in Iraq and North Korea are discussed.

  10. Verification and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1998-01-01

    The main features are described of the IAEA safeguards verification system that non-nuclear weapon states parties of the NPT are obliged to accept. Verification activities/problems in Iraq and North Korea are discussed

  11. EPID detection of radio-opaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, E.; Pouliot, J.; Laverdiere, J.; Roy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Materials and Methods: Radio-opaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of ten patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with four field box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for each field and fraction. The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movie for the complete treatment of each patient were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transrectal ultrasound examination was performed to verify the position of the marker relative to the apex. Results: Over 1000 digital portal images were acquired. Antero-posterior and lateral views of each fraction were analysed. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. Even without image histogram equalization it was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures. Moreover, the radio-opaque marker was easily visible on every on-line portal image. Qualitatively, the review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motions of the marker while bone structures remained stable. Quantitatively, the position of the marker were measured for each fraction. Marker displacements of up to 1,4 cm were measured between two consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominately in the antero-posterior and cephalo-caudal directions. Position of the markers relative to the prostatic apex were verified with ultrasound at the end of the treatments and were found to remain globaly at their original position. Intratreatment images were reviewed in two cases and no change in marker positions was observed. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions

  12. Dosimetric verification of radiation therapy including intensity modulated treatments, using an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chytyk-Praznik, Krista Joy

    Radiation therapy is continuously increasing in complexity due to technological innovation in delivery techniques, necessitating thorough dosimetric verification. Comparing accurately predicted portal dose images to measured images obtained during patient treatment can determine if a particular treatment was delivered correctly. The goal of this thesis was to create a method to predict portal dose images that was versatile and accurate enough to use in a clinical setting. All measured images in this work were obtained with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID), but the technique is applicable to any planar imager. A detailed, physics-motivated fluence model was developed to characterize fluence exiting the linear accelerator head. The model was further refined using results from Monte Carlo simulations and schematics of the linear accelerator. The fluence incident on the EPID was converted to a portal dose image through a superposition of Monte Carlo-generated, monoenergetic dose kernels specific to the a-Si EPID. Predictions of clinical IMRT fields with no patient present agreed with measured portal dose images within 3% and 3 mm. The dose kernels were applied ignoring the geometrically divergent nature of incident fluence on the EPID. A computational investigation into this parallel dose kernel assumption determined its validity under clinically relevant situations. Introducing a patient or phantom into the beam required the portal image prediction algorithm to account for patient scatter and attenuation. Primary fluence was calculated by attenuating raylines cast through the patient CT dataset, while scatter fluence was determined through the superposition of pre-calculated scatter fluence kernels. Total dose in the EPID was calculated by convolving the total predicted incident fluence with the EPID-specific dose kernels. The algorithm was tested on water slabs with square fields, agreeing with measurement within 3% and 3 mm. The

  13. Clinical Implementation of a Model-Based In Vivo Dose Verification System for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy–Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatments Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, Peter M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Asuni, Ganiyu [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Van Uytven, Eric [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); VanBeek, Timothy [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); McCurdy, Boyd M.C. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Loewen, Shaun K. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahmed, Naseer; Bashir, Bashir; Butler, James B.; Chowdhury, Amitava; Dubey, Arbind; Leylek, Ahmet; Nashed, Maged [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To report findings from an in vivo dosimetry program implemented for all stereotactic body radiation therapy patients over a 31-month period and discuss the value and challenges of utilizing in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry clinically. Methods and Materials: From December 2013 to July 2016, 117 stereotactic body radiation therapy–volumetric modulated arc therapy patients (100 lung, 15 spine, and 2 liver) underwent 602 EPID-based in vivo dose verification events. A developed model-based dose reconstruction algorithm calculates the 3-dimensional dose distribution to the patient by back-projecting the primary fluence measured by the EPID during treatment. The EPID frame-averaging was optimized in June 2015. For each treatment, a 3%/3-mm γ comparison between our EPID-derived dose and the Eclipse AcurosXB–predicted dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and the ≥20% isodose volume were performed. Alert levels were defined as γ pass rates <85% (lung and liver) and <80% (spine). Investigations were carried out for all fractions exceeding the alert level and were classified as follows: EPID-related, algorithmic, patient setup, anatomic change, or unknown/unidentified errors. Results: The percentages of fractions exceeding the alert levels were 22.6% for lung before frame-average optimization and 8.0% for lung, 20.0% for spine, and 10.0% for liver after frame-average optimization. Overall, mean (± standard deviation) planning target volume γ pass rates were 90.7% ± 9.2%, 87.0% ± 9.3%, and 91.2% ± 3.4% for the lung, spine, and liver patients, respectively. Conclusions: Results from the clinical implementation of our model-based in vivo dose verification method using on-treatment EPID images is reported. The method is demonstrated to be valuable for routine clinical use for verifying delivered dose as well as for detecting errors.

  14. Comparison Between the Spectrum reconstruction methodology and release transmitted by both based in pictures taken EPID; Comparacion entre la metodologia de recostruccion de espectros por transmision y por disperison, ambas basadas en imagenes tomadas con EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juste, B.; Miro, R.; Jambrina, A.; Campayo, J. M.; Diez, S.; Santos, A.; Verdu, V.

    2013-07-01

    A comparison of the spectral reconstruction based on data transmission and spectral reconstruction based on scattering data is presented, we have both developed using EPID images. It is shown that the reconstruction results based on transmission offer much better fit with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawoud, S. M., E-mail: samir.dawoud@leedsth.nhs.uk; Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Sykes, J. R. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  16. TH-AB-202-02: Real-Time Verification and Error Detection for MLC Tracking Deliveries Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J Zwan, B; Colvill, E; Booth, J; J O’Connor, D; Keall, P; B Greer, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The added complexity of the real-time adaptive multi-leaf collimator (MLC) tracking increases the likelihood of undetected MLC delivery errors. In this work we develop and test a system for real-time delivery verification and error detection for MLC tracking radiotherapy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: The delivery verification system relies on acquisition and real-time analysis of transit EPID image frames acquired at 8.41 fps. In-house software was developed to extract the MLC positions from each image frame. Three comparison metrics were used to verify the MLC positions in real-time: (1) field size, (2) field location and, (3) field shape. The delivery verification system was tested for 8 VMAT MLC tracking deliveries (4 prostate and 4 lung) where real patient target motion was reproduced using a Hexamotion motion stage and a Calypso system. Sensitivity and detection delay was quantified for various types of MLC and system errors. Results: For both the prostate and lung test deliveries the MLC-defined field size was measured with an accuracy of 1.25 cm 2 (1 SD). The field location was measured with an accuracy of 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm (1 SD) for lung and prostate respectively. Field location errors (i.e. tracking in wrong direction) with a magnitude of 3 mm were detected within 0.4 s of occurrence in the X direction and 0.8 s in the Y direction. Systematic MLC gap errors were detected as small as 3 mm. The method was not found to be sensitive to random MLC errors and individual MLC calibration errors up to 5 mm. Conclusion: EPID imaging may be used for independent real-time verification of MLC trajectories during MLC tracking deliveries. Thresholds have been determined for error detection and the system has been shown to be sensitive to a range of delivery errors.

  17. Verification Tools Secure Online Shopping, Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Just like rover or rocket technology sent into space, the software that controls these technologies must be extensively tested to ensure reliability and effectiveness. Ames Research Center invented the open-source Java Pathfinder (JPF) toolset for the deep testing of Java-based programs. Fujitsu Labs of America Inc., based in Sunnyvale, California, improved the capabilities of the JPF Symbolic Pathfinder tool, establishing the tool as a means of thoroughly testing the functionality and security of Web-based Java applications such as those used for Internet shopping and banking.

  18. An EPID response calculation algorithm using spatial beam characteristics of primary, head scattered and MLC transmitted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, Florin; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an independent algorithm for the prediction of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) response. The algorithm uses a set of images [open beam, closed multileaf collimator (MLC), various fence and modified sweeping gap patterns] to separately characterize the primary and head-scatter contributions to EPID response. It also characterizes the relevant dosimetric properties of the MLC: Transmission, dosimetric gap, MLC scatter [P. Zygmansky et al., J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 8(4) (2007)], inter-leaf leakage, and tongue and groove [F. Lorenz et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 5985-5999 (2007)]. The primary radiation is modeled with a single Gaussian distribution defined at the target position, while the head-scatter radiation is modeled with a triple Gaussian distribution defined downstream of the target. The distances between the target and the head-scatter source, jaws, and MLC are model parameters. The scatter associated with the EPID is implicit in the model. Open beam images are predicted to within 1% of the maximum value across the image. Other MLC test patterns and intensity-modulated radiation therapy fluences are predicted to within 1.5% of the maximum value. The presented method was applied to the Varian aS500 EPID but is designed to work with any planar detector with sufficient spatial resolution

  19. Pre-treatment verification of RapidArc® using Electronic Portal Imaging Device; Verificacao pre-tratamento de RapidArc® utilizando Dispositivo Eletronico de Imagem Porta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marilia B.; Ferreira, Anne Caroline M.; Bittencourt, Guilherme R.; Pirani, Luis F.; Silveira, Thiago B., E-mail: mbeckerlima@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    The RapidArc® is a novel but widespread technique to achieve intensity modulated beams. One of the major challenges concerning this technique is the pretreatment verification process. The aim of this paper was to analyze the viability of the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) used to perform the verification of RapidArc® using the Sun Nuclear SNC Patient software enable to EPID dose conversion (EPIDose license) and compare its results with punctual dose measurements against a low volume ion chamber. There were analyze five RapidArc® planning, evaluating, separately, planar and punctual doses for each arc. For punctual measurements was used a 0,15 cm³ volume ion chamber and the planar distributions, in Calibration Units (CU), were acquired using the EPID and then converted to absolute dose in centigray through EPIDose. The predicted doses were calculated using the AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system, version 8.6. The planar comparisons, performed in SNC Patient, employed the Gamma Index tool with a 4% dose difference, 4 mm distance to agreement and 20% threshold. The evaluation of punctual dose was defined by calculating deviations between predicted and measured doses. The mean approval percentage in planar distributions was 94.8% and the average deviation in punctual dose was -1.2%. The use of EPID for RapidArc® pre-treatment verification proved to be feasible and showed good sensibility, because of its high spatial resolution. However one must consider the uncertainty of the method. (author)

  20. MO-D-213-08: Remote Dosimetric Credentialing for Clinical Trials with the Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J; Miri, N; Vial, P; Hatton, J; Zwan, B; Sloan, K; Craig, A; Beenstock, V; Molloy, T; Greer, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Report on implementation of a Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA) for IMRT to support credentialing of facilities for clinical trials. Data is acquired by local facility staff and transferred electronically. Analysis is performed centrally. Methods: VESPA is based on published methods and a clinically established IMRT QA procedure, here extended to multi-vendor equipment. Facilities, provided with web-based comprehensive instructions and CT datasets, create IMRT treatment plans. They deliver the treatments directly to their EPID without phantom or couch in the beam. They also deliver a set of simple calibration fields. Collected EPID images are uploaded electronically. In the analysis, the dose is projected back into a virtual phantom and 3D gamma analysis is performed. 2D dose planes and linear dose profiles can be analysed when needed for clarification. Results: Pilot facilities covering a range of planning and delivery systems have performed data acquisition and upload successfully. Analysis showed agreement comparable to local experience with the method. Advantages of VESPA are (1) fast turnaround mainly driven by the facility’s capability to provide the requested EPID images, (2) the possibility for facilities performing the audit in parallel, as there is no need to wait for a phantom, (3) simple and efficient credentialing for international facilities, (4) a large set of data points, and (5) a reduced impact on resources and environment as there is no need to transport heavy phantoms or audit staff. Limitations of the current implementation of VESPA for trials credentialing are that it does not provide absolute dosimetry, therefore a Level 1 audit still required, and that it relies on correctly delivered open calibration fields, which are used for system calibration. Conclusion: The implemented EPID based IMRT audit system promises to dramatically improve credentialing efficiency for clinical trials and wider applications. VESPA for VMAT

  1. MO-D-213-08: Remote Dosimetric Credentialing for Clinical Trials with the Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Miri, N [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Hatton, J [Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG), Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Zwan, B; Sloan, K [Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW (Australia); Craig, A; Beenstock, V [Canterbury Regional Cancer and Haematology Service, Christchurch (New Zealand); Molloy, T [Orange Hospital, Orange, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Report on implementation of a Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA) for IMRT to support credentialing of facilities for clinical trials. Data is acquired by local facility staff and transferred electronically. Analysis is performed centrally. Methods: VESPA is based on published methods and a clinically established IMRT QA procedure, here extended to multi-vendor equipment. Facilities, provided with web-based comprehensive instructions and CT datasets, create IMRT treatment plans. They deliver the treatments directly to their EPID without phantom or couch in the beam. They also deliver a set of simple calibration fields. Collected EPID images are uploaded electronically. In the analysis, the dose is projected back into a virtual phantom and 3D gamma analysis is performed. 2D dose planes and linear dose profiles can be analysed when needed for clarification. Results: Pilot facilities covering a range of planning and delivery systems have performed data acquisition and upload successfully. Analysis showed agreement comparable to local experience with the method. Advantages of VESPA are (1) fast turnaround mainly driven by the facility’s capability to provide the requested EPID images, (2) the possibility for facilities performing the audit in parallel, as there is no need to wait for a phantom, (3) simple and efficient credentialing for international facilities, (4) a large set of data points, and (5) a reduced impact on resources and environment as there is no need to transport heavy phantoms or audit staff. Limitations of the current implementation of VESPA for trials credentialing are that it does not provide absolute dosimetry, therefore a Level 1 audit still required, and that it relies on correctly delivered open calibration fields, which are used for system calibration. Conclusion: The implemented EPID based IMRT audit system promises to dramatically improve credentialing efficiency for clinical trials and wider applications. VESPA for VMAT

  2. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  3. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Stephen; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  4. Physics Verification Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebling, Scott William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of the verification project is to establish, through rigorous convergence analysis, that each ASC computational physics code correctly implements a set of physics models and algorithms (code verification); Evaluate and analyze the uncertainties of code outputs associated with the choice of temporal and spatial discretization (solution or calculation verification); and Develop and maintain the capability to expand and update these analyses on demand. This presentation describes project milestones.

  5. Inspector measurement verification activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, R.S.; Crouch, R.

    e most difficult and complex activity facing a safeguards inspector involves the verification of measurements and the performance of the measurement system. Remeasurement is the key to measurement verification activities. Remeasurerements using the facility's measurement system provide the bulk of the data needed for determining the performance of the measurement system. Remeasurements by reference laboratories are also important for evaluation of the measurement system and determination of systematic errors. The use of these measurement verification activities in conjunction with accepted inventory verification practices provides a better basis for accepting or rejecting an inventory. (U.S.)

  6. Investigations on uncertainties in patient positioning for prostate treatment with EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakai, A.; Nuesslin, F.; Paulsen, F.; Plasswilm, L.; Bamberg, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Conformal radiotherapy techniques as used in prostate treatment allow to spare normal tissue by conforming the radiation fields to the shape of the planning target volume (PTV). To be able to fully utilize the advantages of these techniques correct patient positioning is an important prerequisite. This study employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) investigated the positioning uncertainties that occur in the pelvic region for different patient positioning devices. Patients and Methods: 15 patients with prostate cancer were irradiated with or without rectal balloon/pelvic mask at a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC). For each patient multiple portal images were taken from different directions and compared to the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the treatment planning system and to simulation films (Table 1, Figure 1). Results: In spite of different positioning devices, all patients showed comparable total positioning uncertainties of 4.0 mm (lateral), 4.5 mm (cranio-caudal) and 1.7 mm (dorso-ventral). The lateral positioning error was reduced for the pelvic mask patients while the cranio-caudal error increased (Table 2, Figure 2). A systematic and a random component sum up to the total positioning error, and a good estimate of the magnitudes of the two is possible from six to eight portal images (Figure 3). Conclusions: With a small number of portal images it is possible to find out the systematic and random positioning error of a patient. Knowledge of the random error can be used to resize the treatment margin which is clinically relevant since this error differs greatly for different patients (Figure 4). Image analysis with EPID is convenient, yet has some problems. For example, one only gets indirect information on the movement of the ventral rectum wall. The successful operation of positioning devices, although, needs further improvement - especially if one focuses on IMRT. (orig.) [de

  7. SU-E-T-139: Automated Daily EPID Exit Dose Analysis Uncovers Treatment Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a fully automated EPID exit dose system for its ability to detect daily treatment deviations including patient setup, delivery, and anatomy changes. Methods: PerFRACTION (Sun Nuclear Corporation) software is a system that uses integrated EPID images taken during patient treatment and automatically pulled from the Aria database and analyzed based on user-defined comparisons. This was used to monitor 20 plans consisting of a total of 859 fields for 18 patients, for a total of 251 fractions. Nine VMAT, 5 IMRT, and 6 3D plans were monitored. The Gamma analysis was performed for each field within a plan, comparing the first fraction against each of the other fractions in each treatment course. A 2% dose difference, 1 mm distance-to-agreement, and 10% dose threshold was used. These tight tolerances were chosen to achieve a high sensitivity to treatment variations. The field passed if 93% of the pixels had a Gamma of 1 or less. Results: Twenty-nine percent of the fields failed. The average plan passing rate was 92.5%.The average 3D plan passing rate was less than for VMAT or IMRT, 84%, vs. an average of 96.2%. When fields failed, an investigation revealed changes in patient anatomy or setup variations, often also leading to variations of transmission through immobilization devices. Conclusion: PerFRACTION is a fully automated system for determining daily changes in dose transmission through the patient that requires no effort other than for the imager panel to be deployed during treatment. A surprising number of fields failed the analysis and can be attributed to important treatment variations that would otherwise not be appreciated. Further study of inter-fraction treatment variations is possible and warranted. Sun Nuclear Corporation provided a license to the software described.

  8. A study on characteristics of X-ray detector for CCD-based EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun

    1999-02-01

    The combination of the metal plate/phosphor screen as a x-ray detector with a CCD camera is the most popular detector system among various electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). There is a need to optimize the thickness of the metal plate/phosphor screen with high detection efficiency and high spatial resolution for effective transferring of anatomical information. In this study, the thickness dependency on the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution of the metal plate/phosphor screen was investigated by calculation and measurement. The result can be used to determine the optimal thickness of the metal plate as well as of the phosphor screen for the x-ray detector design of therapeutic x-ray imaging and for any specific application. Bremsstrahlung spectrum was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and by Schiff formula. The detection efficiency was calculated from the total absorbed energy in the phosphor screen using the Monte Carlo simulation and the light output was measured. The spatial resolution, which was defined from the spatial distribution of the absorbed energy, was also calculated and the edge spread function was measured. It was found that the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were mainly determined by the thickness of metal plate and phosphor screen, respectively. It was also revealed that the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution have trade-off in term of the thickness of the phosphor screen. As the phosphor thickness increases, the detection efficiency increases but the spatial resolution decreases. The curve illustrating the trade-off between the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution of the metal plate/phosphor screen detector is obtained as a function of the phosphor thickness. Based on the calculations, prototype CCD-based EPID was developed and then tested by acquiring phantom images for 6 MV x-ray beam. While, among the captured images, each frame suffered from quantum noise, the frame averaging

  9. Necrolisis epidérmica tóxica: un paradigma de enfermedad crítica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Estrella-Alonso

    Full Text Available RESUMEN La necrolisis epidérmica tóxica es una reacción cutánea adversa de tipo inmunológico secundaria en la mayor parte de los casos a la administración de un fármaco. La necrolisis epidérmica tóxica, el síndrome de Steven Johnson y el eritema exudativo multiforme forman parte del mismo espectro de enfermedad. La mortalidad de la necrolisis epidérmica tóxica es alrededor del 30%. La fisiopatología de la necrolisis epidérmica tóxica es semejante en muchos aspectos a la de las quemaduras dérmicas superficiales. La afectación mucosa del epitelio ocular y genital se asocia con secuelas graves si no se trata de forma temprana. Se acepta en general que los pacientes con necrolisis epidérmica tóxica son tratados mejor en unidades de grandes quemados, donde existe experiencia en el manejo de enfermos con pérdida cutánea extensa. El tratamiento es de soporte, eliminación y cobertura con derivados biosintéticos de la piel de las zonas afectadas, tratamiento de la afectación mucosa, y tratamiento inmunosupresor específico. De los tratamientos ensayados sólo se usa actualmente en la mayor parte de los centros la inmunoglobulina G y la ciclosporina A, aun cuando no existe evidencia sólida para recomendar ningún tratamiento específico. Entre los aspectos particulares del tratamiento de esta enfermedad se encuentra la prevención de secuelas relacionadas con la formación de sinequias, los cuidados oculares para prevenir secuelas graves que pueden conducir a la ceguera, y el tratamiento específico inmunosupresor. Un mejor conocimiento de los principios del manejo de la necrolisis epidérmica tóxica llevará a un mejor manejo de la enfermedad, a una mayor supervivencia y una menor prevalencia de las secuelas.

  10. SU-G-TeP2-01: Can EPID Based Measurement Replace Traditional Daily Output QA On Megavoltage Linac?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Z; Tang, X; Song, Y; Obcemea, C; Beeban, N; Chan, M; Li, X; Tang, G; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; LoSasso, T; Mechalakos, J; Both, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long term stability and viability of using EPID-based daily output QA via in-house and vendor driven protocol, to replace conventional QA tools and improve QA efficiency. Methods: Two Varian TrueBeam machines (TB1&TB2) equipped with electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) were employed in this study. Both machines were calibrated per TG-51 and used clinically since Oct 2014. Daily output measurement for 6/15 MV beams were obtained using SunNuclear DailyQA3 device as part of morning QA. In addition, in-house protocol was implemented for EPID output measurement (10×10 cm fields, 100 MU, 100cm SID, output defined over an ROI of 2×2 cm around central axis). Moreover, the Varian Machine Performance Check (MPC) was used on both machines to measure machine output. The EPID and DailyQA3 based measurements of the relative machine output were compared and cross-correlated with monthly machine output as measured by an A12 Exradin 0.65cc Ion Chamber (IC) serving as ground truth. The results were correlated using Pearson test. Results: The correlations among DailyQA3, in-house EPID and Varian MPC output measurements, with the IC for 6/15 MV were similar for TB1 (0.83–0.95) and TB2 (0.55–0.67). The machine output for the 6/15MV beams on both machines showed a similar trend, namely an increase over time as indicated by all measurements, requiring a machine recalibration after 6 months. This drift is due to a known issue with pressurized monitor chamber which tends to leak over time. MPC failed occasionally but passed when repeated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the use of EPID for daily output measurements has the potential to become a viable and efficient tool for daily routine LINAC QA, thus eliminating weather (T,P) and human setup variability and increasing efficiency of the QA process.

  11. SU-G-TeP2-01: Can EPID Based Measurement Replace Traditional Daily Output QA On Megavoltage Linac?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Z; Tang, X; Song, Y; Obcemea, C; Beeban, N; Chan, M; Li, X; Tang, G; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; LoSasso, T; Mechalakos, J; Both, S [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the long term stability and viability of using EPID-based daily output QA via in-house and vendor driven protocol, to replace conventional QA tools and improve QA efficiency. Methods: Two Varian TrueBeam machines (TB1&TB2) equipped with electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) were employed in this study. Both machines were calibrated per TG-51 and used clinically since Oct 2014. Daily output measurement for 6/15 MV beams were obtained using SunNuclear DailyQA3 device as part of morning QA. In addition, in-house protocol was implemented for EPID output measurement (10×10 cm fields, 100 MU, 100cm SID, output defined over an ROI of 2×2 cm around central axis). Moreover, the Varian Machine Performance Check (MPC) was used on both machines to measure machine output. The EPID and DailyQA3 based measurements of the relative machine output were compared and cross-correlated with monthly machine output as measured by an A12 Exradin 0.65cc Ion Chamber (IC) serving as ground truth. The results were correlated using Pearson test. Results: The correlations among DailyQA3, in-house EPID and Varian MPC output measurements, with the IC for 6/15 MV were similar for TB1 (0.83–0.95) and TB2 (0.55–0.67). The machine output for the 6/15MV beams on both machines showed a similar trend, namely an increase over time as indicated by all measurements, requiring a machine recalibration after 6 months. This drift is due to a known issue with pressurized monitor chamber which tends to leak over time. MPC failed occasionally but passed when repeated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the use of EPID for daily output measurements has the potential to become a viable and efficient tool for daily routine LINAC QA, thus eliminating weather (T,P) and human setup variability and increasing efficiency of the QA process.

  12. Verification Account Management System (VAMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Verification Account Management System (VAMS) is the centralized location for maintaining SSA's verification and data exchange accounts. VAMS account management...

  13. The verification of the usability of the online Indares.com system in collecting data on physical activity – pilot study [Ověření využitelnosti online systému Indares.com pro sběr dat o pohybové aktivitě – pilotní studie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Mitáš

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the increase of obesity and an inactive healthy lifestyle in the population, we are seeking means which would enhance a change in physical activity behavior worldwide. Information technologies, especially the internet, are among these means. Research has shown internet intervention to be effective in enhancing health in the population. The aim of the pilot study is to verify the usability of the online Indares.com system in collecting data on physical activity (PA and at the same time to analyze a possible use of the system for intervention programs. The verification of the Indares.com system was carried out in the spring term (from January to May 2008 in a sample of 114 students at Valdosta State University who recorded their PA regularly into the system. The study analyzed the data from the first 12 weeks of the semester. The results show that the Indares.com system is an effective tool for the online collection of data on PA in its users and that the recorded data can be used for research purposes. Furthermore, the obtained information suggests that the Indares.com system can be used in internet intervention programs. [Ve snaze zmírnit trend nárůstu obezity a inaktivního způsobu života populace jsou celosvětově hledány prostředky, které by přispěly k žádoucí změně pohybového chování lidí. Mezi tyto prostředky patří moderní informační technologie, zejména internet. Dosavadní výzkumy spíše potvrzují efektivnost internetových intervencí zacílených na zdraví populace. Cílem této pilotní studie bylo ověřit praktickou využitelnost internetové aplikace Indares.com ke sběru dat o pohybové aktivitě (PA a současně analyzovat možnosti využití systému pro intervenční programy. Ověřování systému Indares.com bylo uskutečněno během jarního semestru (leden až květen 2008 na 114 studentech Valdosta State University, kteří svou PA pravidelně zapisovali do systému. V t

  14. Verification of setup errors in external beam radiation therapy using electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Murthy, K.; Al-Rahbi, Zakiya; Sivakumar, S.S.; Davis, C.A.; Ravichandran, R.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an audit on QA aspects of treatment delivery by the verification of the treatment fields position on different days to document the efficiency of immobilization methods and reproducibility of treatment. A retrospective study was carried out on 60 patients, each 20 treated for head and neck, breast, and pelvic sites; and a total of 506 images obtained by electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were analyzed. The portal images acquired using the EPID systems attached to the Varian linear accelerators were superimposed on the reference images. The anatomy matching software (Varian portal Vision. 6.0) was used, and the displacements in two dimensions and rotation were noted for each treated field to study the patient setup errors. The percentages of mean deviations more than 3 mm in lateral (X) and longitudinal (Y) directions were 17.5%, 11.25%, and 7.5% for breast, pelvis, and head and neck cases respectively. In all cases, the percentage of mean deviation with more than 5 mm error was 0.83%. The maximum average mean deviation in all the cases was 1.87. The average mean SD along X and Y directions in all the cases was less than 2.65. The results revealed that the ranges of setup errors are site specific and immobilization methods improve reproducibility. The observed variations were well within the limits. The study confirmed the accuracy and quality of treatments delivered to the patients. (author)

  15. A simple approach for EPID dosimetric calibration to overcome the effect of image-lag and ghosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshanqity, Mukhtar; Duane, Simon; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    EPID dosimetry has known drawbacks. The main issue is that a measurable residual signal is observed after the end of irradiation for prolonged periods of time, thus making measurement difficult. We present a detailed analysis of EPID response and suggest a simple, yet accurate approach for calibration that avoids the complexity of incorporating ghosting and image-lag using the maximum integrated signal instead of the total integrated signal. This approach is linear with dose and independent of dose rate. - Highlights: ► Image-lag and ghosting effects dosimetric accuracy. ► Image-lag and ghosting result in the reduction of total integrated signal for low doses. ► Residual signal is the most significant result for the image-lag and ghosting effects. ► Image-lag and ghosting can result in under-dosing of up to 2.5%.

  16. The verification of ethnographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Anthropologists are increasingly required to account for the data on which they base their interpretations and to make it available for public scrutiny and re-analysis. While this may seem straightforward (why not place our data in online repositories?), it is not. Ethnographic 'data' may consist of everything from verbatim transcripts ('hard data') to memories and impressions ('soft data'). Hard data can be archived and re-analysed; soft data cannot. The focus on hard 'objective' data contributes to the delegitimizing of the soft data that are essential for ethnographic understanding, and without which hard data cannot be properly interpreted. However, the credibility of ethnographic interpretation requires the possibility of verification. This could be achieved by obligatory, standardised forms of personal storage with the option for audit if required, and by being more explicit in publications about the nature and status of the data and the process of interpretation.

  17. EPID-based in vivo dosimetry for stereotactic body radiotherapy of non-small cell lung tumors: Initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consorti, R; Fidanzio, A; Brainovich, V; Mangiacotti, F; De Spirito, M; Mirri, M A; Petrucci, A

    2017-10-01

    EPID-based in vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been implemented for stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments of non-small cell lung cancer to check both isocenter dose and the treatment reproducibility comparing EPID portal images. 15 patients with lung tumors of small dimensions and treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy were enrolled for this initial experience. IVD tests supplied ratios R between in vivo reconstructed and planned isocenter doses. Moreover a γ-like analysis between daily EPID portal images and a reference one, in terms of percentage of points with γ-value smaller than 1, P γlevels of 5% for R ratio, P γlevel, and an average P γ90%. Paradigmatic discrepancies were observed in three patients: a set-up error and a patient morphological change were identified thanks to CBCT image analysis whereas the third discrepancy was not fully justified. This procedure can provide improved patient safety as well as a first step to integrate IVD and CBCT dose recalculation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. FMCT verification: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhang

    2001-01-01

    Full text: How to manage the trade-off between the need for transparency and the concern about the disclosure of sensitive information would be a key issue during the negotiations of FMCT verification provision. This paper will explore the general concerns on FMCT verification; and demonstrate what verification measures might be applied to those reprocessing and enrichment plants. A primary goal of an FMCT will be to have the five declared nuclear weapon states and the three that operate unsafeguarded nuclear facilities become parties. One focus in negotiating the FMCT will be verification. Appropriate verification measures should be applied in each case. Most importantly, FMCT verification would focus, in the first instance, on these states' fissile material production facilities. After the FMCT enters into force, all these facilities should be declared. Some would continue operating to produce civil nuclear power or to produce fissile material for non- explosive military uses. The verification measures necessary for these operating facilities would be essentially IAEA safeguards, as currently being applied to non-nuclear weapon states under the NPT. However, some production facilities would be declared and shut down. Thus, one important task of the FMCT verifications will be to confirm the status of these closed facilities. As case studies, this paper will focus on the verification of those shutdown facilities. The FMCT verification system for former military facilities would have to differ in some ways from traditional IAEA safeguards. For example, there could be concerns about the potential loss of sensitive information at these facilities or at collocated facilities. Eventually, some safeguards measures such as environmental sampling might be seen as too intrusive. Thus, effective but less intrusive verification measures may be needed. Some sensitive nuclear facilities would be subject for the first time to international inspections, which could raise concerns

  19. Advanced verification topics

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Bishnupriya; Hall, Gary; Heaton, Nick; Kashai, Yaron; Khan Neyaz; Kirshenbaum, Zeev; Shneydor, Efrat

    2011-01-01

    The Accellera Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) standard is architected to scale, but verification is growing and in more than just the digital design dimension. It is growing in the SoC dimension to include low-power and mixed-signal and the system integration dimension to include multi-language support and acceleration. These items and others all contribute to the quality of the SOC so the Metric-Driven Verification (MDV) methodology is needed to unify it all into a coherent verification plan. This book is for verification engineers and managers familiar with the UVM and the benefits it brings to digital verification but who also need to tackle specialized tasks. It is also written for the SoC project manager that is tasked with building an efficient worldwide team. While the task continues to become more complex, Advanced Verification Topics describes methodologies outside of the Accellera UVM standard, but that build on it, to provide a way for SoC teams to stay productive and profitable.

  20. Online Resources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Online Resources. Journal of Genetics. Online Resources. Volume 97. 2018 | Online resources. Volume 96. 2017 | Online resources. Volume 95. 2016 | Online resources. Volume 94. 2015 | Online resources. Volume 93. 2014 | Online resources. Volume 92. 2013 | Online resources ...

  1. SU-G-TeP4-07: Automatic EPID-Based 2D Measurement of MLC Leaf Offset as a Quality Control Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, T; Moran, J [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Schultz, B [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Barnes, M [Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle, Warratah, NSW (Australia); Perez, M [North Sydney Cancer Center, Sydney (Australia); Farrey, K [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Popple, R [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The MLC dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) and transmission are measured parameters which impact the dosimetric accuracy of IMRT and VMAT plans. This investigation aims to develop an efficient and accurate routine constancy check of the physical DLG in two dimensions. Methods: The manufacturer’s recommended DLG measurement method was modified by using 5 fields instead of 11 and by utilizing the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). Validations were accomplished using an ion chamber (IC) in solid water and a 2D IC array. EPID data was collected for 6 months on multiple TrueBeam linacs using both Millennium and HD MLCs at 5 different clinics in an international consortium. Matlab code was written to automatically analyze the images and calculate the 2D results. Sensitivity was investigated by introducing deliberate leaf position errors. MLC calibration and initialization history was recorded to allow quantification of their impact. Results were analyzed using statistical process control (SPC). Results: The EPID method took approximately 5 minutes. Due to detector response, the EPID measured DLG and transmission differed from the IC values but were reproducible and consistent with changes measured using the ICs. For the Millennium MLC, the EPID measured DLG and transmission were both consistently lower than IC results. The EPID method was implemented as leaf offset and transmission constancy tests (LOC and TC). Based on 6 months of measurements, the initial leaf-specific action thresholds for changes from baseline were set to 0.1 mm. Upper and lower control limits for variation were developed for each machine. Conclusion: Leaf offset and transmission constancy tests were implemented on Varian HD and Millennium MLCs using an EPID and found to be efficient and accurate. The test is effective for monitoring MLC performance using dynamic delivery and performing process control on the DLG in 2D, thus enhancing dosimetric accuracy. This work was supported by a grant

  2. Nuclear test ban verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kin-Yip

    1991-07-01

    This report describes verification and its rationale, the basic tasks of seismic verification, the physical basis for earthquake/explosion source discrimination and explosion yield determination, the technical problems pertaining to seismic monitoring of underground nuclear tests, the basic problem-solving strategy deployed by the forensic seismology resarch team at the University of Toronto, and the scientific significance of the team's research. The research carried out at the Univeristy of Toronto has two components: teleseismic verification using P wave recordings from the Yellowknife Seismic Array (YKA), and regional (close-in) verification using high-frequency L g and P n recordings from the Eastern Canada Telemetered Network. Major differences have been found in P was attenuation among the propagation paths connecting the YKA listening post with seven active nuclear explosion testing areas in the world. Significant revisions have been made to previously published P wave attenuation results, leading to more interpretable nuclear explosion source functions. (11 refs., 12 figs.)

  3. Standard Verification System (SVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — SVS is a mainframe program that accesses the NUMIDENT to perform SSN verifications. This program is called by SSA Internal applications to verify SSNs. There is also...

  4. Formal Verification -26 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by testing of the components and successful testing leads to the software being ... Formal verification is based on formal methods which are mathematically based ..... scenario under which a similar error could occur. There are various other ...

  5. SSN Verification Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The SSN Verification Service is used by Java applications to execute the GUVERF02 service using the WebSphere/CICS Interface. It accepts several input data fields...

  6. Environmental technology verification methods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) is a tool that has been developed in the United States of America, Europe and many other countries around the world to help innovative environmental technologies reach the market. Claims about...

  7. Verification of RADTRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanipe, F.L.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents details of the verification process of the RADTRAN computer code which was established for the calculation of risk estimates for radioactive materials transportation by highway, rail, air, and waterborne modes

  8. Commissioning and quality assurance for VMAT delivery systems: An efficient time-resolved system using real-time EPID imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Barnes, Michael P; Hindmarsh, Jonathan; Lim, Seng B; Lovelock, Dale M; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; O'Connor, Daryl J; Keall, Paul J; Greer, Peter B

    2017-08-01

    An ideal commissioning and quality assurance (QA) program for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery systems should assess the performance of each individual dynamic component as a function of gantry angle. Procedures within such a program should also be time-efficient, independent of the delivery system and be sensitive to all types of errors. The purpose of this work is to develop a system for automated time-resolved commissioning and QA of VMAT control systems which meets these criteria. The procedures developed within this work rely solely on images obtained, using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without the presence of a phantom. During the delivery of specially designed VMAT test plans, EPID frames were acquired at 9.5 Hz, using a frame grabber. The set of test plans was developed to individually assess the performance of the dose delivery and multileaf collimator (MLC) control systems under varying levels of delivery complexities. An in-house software tool was developed to automatically extract features from the EPID images and evaluate the following characteristics as a function of gantry angle: dose delivery accuracy, dose rate constancy, beam profile constancy, gantry speed constancy, dynamic MLC positioning accuracy, MLC speed and acceleration constancy, and synchronization between gantry angle, MLC positioning and dose rate. Machine log files were also acquired during each delivery and subsequently compared to information extracted from EPID image frames. The largest difference between measured and planned dose at any gantry angle was 0.8% which correlated with rapid changes in dose rate and gantry speed. For all other test plans, the dose delivered was within 0.25% of the planned dose for all gantry angles. Profile constancy was not found to vary with gantry angle for tests where gantry speed and dose rate were constant, however, for tests with varying dose rate and gantry speed, segments with lower dose rate and higher gantry

  9. Multilateral disarmament verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persbo, A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations, such as VERTIC (Verification Research, Training and Information Centre), can play an important role in the promotion of multilateral verification. Parties involved in negotiating nuclear arms accords are for the most part keen that such agreements include suitable and robust provisions for monitoring and verification. Generally progress in multilateral arms control verification is often painstakingly slow, but from time to time 'windows of opportunity' - that is, moments where ideas, technical feasibility and political interests are aligned at both domestic and international levels - may occur and we have to be ready, so the preparatory work is very important. In the context of nuclear disarmament, verification (whether bilateral or multilateral) entails an array of challenges, hurdles and potential pitfalls relating to national security, health, safety and even non-proliferation, so preparatory work is complex and time-greedy. A UK-Norway Initiative was established in order to investigate the role that a non-nuclear-weapon state such as Norway could potentially play in the field of nuclear arms control verification. (A.C.)

  10. aSi EPIDs for the in-vivo dosimetry of static and dynamic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, A.; Cilla, S.; Azario, L.; Greco, F.; Russo, M.; Grusio, M.; Orlandini, L.; Fidanzio, A.

    2015-10-01

    Portal imaging by amorphous silicon (aSi) photodiode is currently the most applied technology for in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) of static and dynamic radiotherapy beams. The strategy, adopted in this work to perform the IVD procedure by aSi EPID, is based on: in patient reconstruction of the isocenter dose and day to day comparison between 2D-portal images to verify the reproducibility of treatment delivery. About 20.000 tests have been carried out in this last 3 years in 8 radiotherapy centers using the SOFTDISO program. The IVD results show that: (i) the procedure can be implemented for linacs of different manufacturer, (ii) the IVD analysis can be obtained on a computer screen, in quasi real time (about 2 min after the treatment delivery) and (iii) once the causes of the discrepancies were eliminated, all the global IVD tests for single patient were within the acceptance criteria defined by: ±5% for the isocenter dose, and PγFisica Nucleare (INFN) and Università Cattolica del S.Cuore (UCSC).

  11. Implementation of an integral program of quality assurance based on EPID to the IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannez Ruiz-Labrandera; Emilio; Gonzalez Perez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We bring forward with this research the implementation of a procedure related to the assurance guaranty in the control of tue quality of IMRT treatment based on the technology of electronic portal images digital (EPID). For the sake of accomplishing quality controls, based in pylic digital images, we used like main tool the System of pylic digital images IviewGT TM with his application software. For the control of positioning of the multi-plates, we implemented a program in MATLAB, which yields the errors of positioning of the plates. For the dosimetric controls, the images obtained for the fields of treatment were climbed with the software ImageJ, and compared with the treatment planning systems (TPS) model Elekta's PrecisePlan ® for it we used the software Verisoft. We managed to implement a comprehensive program of quality control for IMRT. The positioning errors of the multiplates intervening bayouth's test younger errors of positioning under a 1m threw which the requisite is for the IMRT. The rest of the geometric proofs yielded favorable results inmail with them tolerance, same as the test Picket Fence. We verified 2 cases with the technique step and shoot, for it we verified 16 field, where gamma Index varied 85,8 - 98,9. It was checked the possibility to accomplish the quality controls for IMRT using pylic digital images, in our case checked itself himself I apply the Linac Elekta specify on the Ameijeiras. (Author)

  12. Learning a Genetic Measure for Kinship Verification Using Facial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Kou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the key observation that children generally resemble their parents more than other persons with respect to facial appearance, distance metric (similarity learning has been the dominant choice for state-of-the-art kinship verification via facial images in the wild. Most existing learning-based approaches to kinship verification, however, are focused on learning a genetic similarity measure in a batch learning manner, leading to less scalability for practical applications with ever-growing amount of data. To address this, we propose a new kinship verification approach by learning a sparse similarity measure in an online fashion. Experimental results on the kinship datasets show that our approach is highly competitive to the state-of-the-art alternatives in terms of verification accuracy, yet it is superior in terms of scalability for practical applications.

  13. Feasibility study of a dual detector configuration concept for simultaneous megavoltage imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, Shrikant; McNamara, Aimee L.; Holloway, Lois; Metcalfe, Peter; Vial, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a dual detector concept for comprehensive verification of external beam radiotherapy. Specifically, the authors test the hypothesis that a portal imaging device coupled to a 2D dosimeter provides a system capable of simultaneous imaging and dose verification, and that the presence of each device does not significantly detract from the performance of the other. Methods: The dual detector configuration comprised of a standard radiotherapy electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioned directly on top of an ionization-chamber array (ICA) with 2 cm solid water buildup material (between EPID and ICA) and 5 cm solid backscatter material. The dose response characteristics of the ICA and the imaging performance of the EPID in the dual detector configuration were compared to the performance in their respective reference clinical configurations. The reference clinical configurations were 6 cm solid water buildup material, an ICA, and 5 cm solid water backscatter material as the reference dosimetry configuration, and an EPID with no additional buildup or solid backscatter material as the reference imaging configuration. The dose response of the ICA was evaluated by measuring the detector’s response with respect to off-axis position, field size, and transit object thickness. Clinical dosimetry performance was evaluated by measuring a range of clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams in transit and nontransit geometries. The imaging performance of the EPID was evaluated quantitatively by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Images of an anthropomorphic phantom were also used for qualitative assessment. Results: The measured off-axis and field size response with the ICA in both transit and nontransit geometries for both dual detector configuration and reference dosimetry configuration agreed to within 1%. Transit dose response as a function of object thickness agreed to within 0.5%. All

  14. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F; Higashida, Y; Onizuka, Y; Terashima, H; Egashira, Y; Shioyama, Y; Nomoto, S; Honda, H; Nakamura, K; Yoshidome, S; Anai, S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 x 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s -1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  15. Embedded software verification and debugging

    CERN Document Server

    Winterholer, Markus

    2017-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of verification and debugging techniques for embedded software, which is frequently used in safety critical applications (e.g., automotive), where failures are unacceptable. Since the verification of complex systems needs to encompass the verification of both hardware and embedded software modules, this book focuses on verification and debugging approaches for embedded software with hardware dependencies. Coverage includes the entire flow of design, verification and debugging of embedded software and all key approaches to debugging, dynamic, static, and hybrid verification. This book discusses the current, industrial embedded software verification flow, as well as emerging trends with focus on formal and hybrid verification and debugging approaches. Includes in a single source the entire flow of design, verification and debugging of embedded software; Addresses the main techniques that are currently being used in the industry for assuring the quality of embedded softw...

  16. Procedure generation and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy has used Artificial Intelligence of ''AI'' concepts to develop two powerful new computer-based techniques to enhance safety in nuclear applications. The Procedure Generation System, and the Procedure Verification System, can be adapted to other commercial applications, such as a manufacturing plant. The Procedure Generation System can create a procedure to deal with the off-normal condition. The operator can then take correct actions on the system in minimal time. The Verification System evaluates the logic of the Procedure Generator's conclusions. This evaluation uses logic techniques totally independent of the Procedure Generator. The rapid, accurate generation and verification of corrective procedures can greatly reduce the human error, possible in a complex (stressful/high stress) situation

  17. Nuclear disarmament verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification

  18. Application of an EPID for fast daily dosimetric quality control of a fully computer-controlled treatment unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirkx, M.L.P.; Kroonwijk, M.; De Boer, J.C.J.; Heijmen, B.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The MM50 Racetrack Microtron, suited for sophisticated three-dimensional computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy techniques, is a complex treatment unit in various respects. Therefore, for a number of gantry angles, daily quality control of the absolute output and the profiles of the scanned photon beams in mandatory. A fast method for these daily checks, based on dosimetric measurements with the Philips SRI-100 Electronic Portal Imaging Device, has been developed and tested. Open beams are checked for four different gantry angles; for gantry angle 0, a wedged field is checked as well. The fields are set up one after another under full computer control. Performing and analyzing the measurements takes about ten minutes. The applied EPID has favourable characteristics for dosimetric quality control measurements: absolute measurements reproduce within 0.5% (1 SD) and the reproducibility of a relative (2-D) fluence profile is 0.2% (1 SD). The day-to-day sensitivity stability over a period of a month is 0.6% (1 SD). EPID-signals are within 0.2% linear with the applied dose. The 2-D fluence profile of the 25 MV photon beam of the MM50 is very stable in time: during a period of one year, a maximum fluctuation of 2.6% was observed. Once, a deviation in the cGy/MU-value of 6% was detected. Only because of the performed morning quality control checks with the EPID, erroneous dose delivery to patients could be avoided; there is no interlock in the MM50-system that would have prevented patient treatment. Based on our experiences and on clinical requirements regarding the acceptability of deviations of beam characteristics, a protocol has been developed including action levels for additional investigations. Studies on the application of the SRI-100 for in vivo dosimetry on the MM50 have been started

  19. Application of an EPID for fast daily dosimetric quality control of a fully computer-controlled treatment unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirkx, M L.P.; Kroonwijk, M; De Boer, J C.J.; Heijmen, B J.M. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The MM50 Racetrack Microtron, suited for sophisticated three-dimensional computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy techniques, is a complex treatment unit in various respects. Therefore, for a number of gantry angles, daily quality control of the absolute output and the profiles of the scanned photon beams in mandatory. A fast method for these daily checks, based on dosimetric measurements with the Philips SRI-100 Electronic Portal Imaging Device, has been developed and tested. Open beams are checked for four different gantry angles; for gantry angle 0, a wedged field is checked as well. The fields are set up one after another under full computer control. Performing and analyzing the measurements takes about ten minutes. The applied EPID has favourable characteristics for dosimetric quality control measurements: absolute measurements reproduce within 0.5% (1 SD) and the reproducibility of a relative (2-D) fluence profile is 0.2% (1 SD). The day-to-day sensitivity stability over a period of a month is 0.6% (1 SD). EPID-signals are within 0.2% linear with the applied dose. The 2-D fluence profile of the 25 MV photon beam of the MM50 is very stable in time: during a period of one year, a maximum fluctuation of 2.6% was observed. Once, a deviation in the cGy/MU-value of 6% was detected. Only because of the performed morning quality control checks with the EPID, erroneous dose delivery to patients could be avoided; there is no interlock in the MM50-system that would have prevented patient treatment. Based on our experiences and on clinical requirements regarding the acceptability of deviations of beam characteristics, a protocol has been developed including action levels for additional investigations. Studies on the application of the SRI-100 for in vivo dosimetry on the MM50 have been started.

  20. An assessment of a 3D EPID-based dosimetry system using conventional two- and three-dimensional detectors for VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, S; Dvorak, P; Spevacek, V; Pilarova, K; Bray-Parry, M; Gesner, J; Richmond, A

    2018-01-01

    To provide a 3D dosimetric evaluation of a commercial portal dosimetry system using 2D/3D detectors under ideal conditions using VMAT. A 2D ion chamber array, radiochromic film and gel dosimeter were utilised to provide a dosimetric evaluation of transit phantom and pre-treatment 'fluence' EPID back-projected dose distributions for a standard VMAT plan. In-house 2D and 3D gamma methods compared pass statistics relative to each dosimeter and TPS dose distributions. Fluence mode and transit EPID dose distributions back-projected onto phantom geometry produced 2D gamma pass rates in excess of 97% relative to other tested detectors and exported TPS dose planes when a 3%, 3 mm global gamma criterion was applied. Use of a gel dosimeter within a glass vial allowed comparison of measured 3D dose distributions versus EPID 3D dose and TPS calculated distributions. 3D gamma comparisons between modalities at 3%, 3 mm gave pass rates in excess of 92%. Use of fluence mode was indicative of transit results under ideal conditions with slightly reduced dose definition. 3D EPID back projected dose distributions were validated against detectors in both 2D and 3D. Cross validation of transit dose delivered to a patient is limited due to reasons of practicality and the tests presented are recommended as a guideline for 3D EPID dosimetry commissioning; allowing direct comparison between detector, TPS, fluence and transit modes. The results indicate achievable gamma scores for a complex VMAT plan in a homogenous phantom geometry and contributes to growing experience of 3D EPID dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  2. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  3. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  4. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  5. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bäck, A

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK ® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS ® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS ® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK ® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta 4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDose TM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry Check TM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific

  6. SU-E-T-164: Clinical Implementation of ASi EPID Panels for QA of IMRT/VMAT Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosier, K; Wu, C; Beck, K; Radevic, M; Asche, D; Bareng, J; Kroner, A; Lehmann, J; Logsdon, M; Dutton, S; Rosenthal, S

    2012-06-01

    To investigate various issues for clinical implementation of aSi EPID panels for IMRT/VMAT QA. Six linacs are used in our clinic for EPID-based plan QA; two Varian Truebeams, two Varian 2100 series, two Elekta Infiniti series. Multiple corrections must be accounted for in the calibration of each panel for dosimetric use. Varian aSi panels are calibrated with standard dark field, flood field, and 40×40 diagonal profile for beam profile correction. Additional corrections to account for off-axis and support arm backscatter are needed for larger field sizes. Since Elekta iViewGT system does not export gantry angle with images, a third-party inclinometer must be physically mounted to back of linac gantry and synchronized with data acquisition via iViewGT PC clock. A T/2 offset correctly correlates image and gantry angle for arc plans due to iView image time stamp at the end of data acquisition for each image. For both Varian and Elekta panels, a 5 MU 10×10 calibration field is used to account for the nonlinear MU to dose response at higher energies. Acquired EPID images are deconvolved via a high pass filter in Fourier space and resultant fluence maps are used to reconstruct a 3D dose 'delivered' to patient using DosimetryCheck. Results are compared to patient 3D dose computed by TPS using a 3D-gamma analysis. 120 IMRT and 100 VMAT cases are reported. Two 3D gamma quantities (Gamma(V10) and Gamma(PTV)) are proposed for evaluating QA results. The Gamma(PTV) is sensitive to MLC offsets while Gamma(V10) is sensitive to gantry rotations. When a 3mm/3% criteria and 90% or higher 3D gamma pass rate is used, all IMRT and 90% of VMAT QA pass QA. After appropriate calibration of aSi panels and setup of image acquisition systems, EPID based 3D dose reconstruction method is found clinically feasible. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. MO-FG-202-07: Real-Time EPID-Based Detection Metric For VMAT Delivery Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passarge, M; Fix, M K; Manser, P; Stampanoni, M F M; Siebers, J V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create and test an accurate EPID-frame-based VMAT QA metric to detect gross dose errors in real-time and to provide information about the source of error. Methods: A Swiss cheese model was created for an EPID-based real-time QA process. The system compares a treatmentplan- based reference set of EPID images with images acquired over each 2° gantry angle interval. The metric utilizes a sequence of independent consecutively executed error detection Methods: a masking technique that verifies infield radiation delivery and ensures no out-of-field radiation; output normalization checks at two different stages; global image alignment to quantify rotation, scaling and translation; standard gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) and pixel intensity deviation checks including and excluding high dose gradient regions. Tolerances for each test were determined. For algorithm testing, twelve different types of errors were selected to modify the original plan. Corresponding predictions for each test case were generated, which included measurement-based noise. Each test case was run multiple times (with different noise per run) to assess the ability to detect introduced errors. Results: Averaged over five test runs, 99.1% of all plan variations that resulted in patient dose errors were detected within 2° and 100% within 4° (∼1% of patient dose delivery). Including cases that led to slightly modified but clinically equivalent plans, 91.5% were detected by the system within 2°. Based on the type of method that detected the error, determination of error sources was achieved. Conclusion: An EPID-based during-treatment error detection system for VMAT deliveries was successfully designed and tested. The system utilizes a sequence of methods to identify and prevent gross treatment delivery errors. The system was inspected for robustness with realistic noise variations, demonstrating that it has the potential to detect a large majority of errors in real-time and indicate the error

  8. MO-FG-202-07: Real-Time EPID-Based Detection Metric For VMAT Delivery Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarge, M; Fix, M K; Manser, P [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M F M [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, and PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Siebers, J V [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create and test an accurate EPID-frame-based VMAT QA metric to detect gross dose errors in real-time and to provide information about the source of error. Methods: A Swiss cheese model was created for an EPID-based real-time QA process. The system compares a treatmentplan- based reference set of EPID images with images acquired over each 2° gantry angle interval. The metric utilizes a sequence of independent consecutively executed error detection Methods: a masking technique that verifies infield radiation delivery and ensures no out-of-field radiation; output normalization checks at two different stages; global image alignment to quantify rotation, scaling and translation; standard gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) and pixel intensity deviation checks including and excluding high dose gradient regions. Tolerances for each test were determined. For algorithm testing, twelve different types of errors were selected to modify the original plan. Corresponding predictions for each test case were generated, which included measurement-based noise. Each test case was run multiple times (with different noise per run) to assess the ability to detect introduced errors. Results: Averaged over five test runs, 99.1% of all plan variations that resulted in patient dose errors were detected within 2° and 100% within 4° (∼1% of patient dose delivery). Including cases that led to slightly modified but clinically equivalent plans, 91.5% were detected by the system within 2°. Based on the type of method that detected the error, determination of error sources was achieved. Conclusion: An EPID-based during-treatment error detection system for VMAT deliveries was successfully designed and tested. The system utilizes a sequence of methods to identify and prevent gross treatment delivery errors. The system was inspected for robustness with realistic noise variations, demonstrating that it has the potential to detect a large majority of errors in real-time and indicate the error

  9. SU-C-BRD-06: Sensitivity Study of An Automated System to Acquire and Analyze EPID Exit Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A; Zhuang, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric consequences of errors in patient setup or beam delivery and anatomical changes are not readily known. A new product, PerFRACTION (Sun Nuclear Corporation), is designed to detect these errors by comparing the EPID exit dose image from each field of each fraction to those from baseline fraction images. This work investigates the sensitivity of PerFRACTION to detect the deviation of induced errors in a variety of realistic scenarios. Methods: Eight plans were created mimicking potential delivery or setup errors. The plans consisted of a nominal field and the field with an induced error. These were used to irradiate the EPID simulating multiple fractions with and without the error. Integrated EPID images were acquired in clinical mode and saved in ARIA. PerFRACTION automatically pulls the images into its database and performs the user defined comparison. In some cases, images were manually pushed to PerFRACTION. We varied the distance-to-agreement or dose tolerance until PerFRACTION showed failing pixels in the affected region and recorded the values. We induced errors of 1mm and greater in jaw, MLC, and couch position, 2 degree collimation rotation (patient yaw), and 0.5% to 1.5% in machine output. Both static and arc fields with the rails in or out were also acquired and compared. Results: PerFRACTION detected position errors of the jaws, MLC, and couch with an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm, and 0.2 degrees for collimator and gantry error. PerFRACTION detected a machine output error within 0.2% and detected the change in rail position. Conclusion: A new automated system for monitoring daily treatments for machine or patient variations from the first fraction using integrated EPID images was found to be sensitive enough to detect small positional, angular, and dosimetric errors within 0.5mm, 0.2 degrees, and 0.2%, respectively. Sun Nuclear Corporation has provided a software license for the product described.

  10. Epidémiologie de l'infection urinaire chez l'enfant au CHU-Campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Titre : Epidémiologie de l'infection urinaire chez l'enfant au CHU-Campus de Lomé. Objectif : Evaluer la prévalence et étudier l'épidémiologie des infections urinaires. Méthodologie : Il s'agit d'une étude prospective qui s'est déroulée du 1er janvier au 31décembre 2009, dans le service de pédiatrie du CHU-Campus de ...

  11. Reload core safety verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlik, M.; Minarcin, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a brief look at the process of reload core safety evaluation and verification in Slovak Republic. It gives an overview of experimental verification of selected nuclear parameters in the course of physics testing during reactor start-up. The comparison of IAEA recommendations and testing procedures at Slovak and European nuclear power plants of similar design is included. An introduction of two level criteria for evaluation of tests represents an effort to formulate the relation between safety evaluation and measured values (Authors)

  12. Quiste epidérmico de inclusión de párpado. Presentación de 2 casos

    OpenAIRE

    Eréndira Güemez Sandoval; Fátima Cedillo Azuela; Rosalba García Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    El quiste epidérmico de inclusión o quiste epidermoide es una lesión intraepitelial, redonda u ovalada, de color amarillo, de crecimiento progresivo y consistencia suave; de diversa etiología, se origina por la proliferación de las células epidérmicas superficiales dentro de la dermis y su contenido es queratina. Se presenta frecuentemente en los párpados. El diagnóstico se realiza por la clínica y por el estudio histopatológico; el tratamiento es con escisión quirúrgica completa.

  13. Is flow verification necessary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetle, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Safeguards test statistics are used in an attempt to detect diversion of special nuclear material. Under assumptions concerning possible manipulation (falsification) of safeguards accounting data, the effects on the statistics due to diversion and data manipulation are described algebraically. A comprehensive set of statistics that is capable of detecting any diversion of material is defined in terms of the algebraic properties of the effects. When the assumptions exclude collusion between persons in two material balance areas, then three sets of accounting statistics are shown to be comprehensive. Two of the sets contain widely known accountancy statistics. One of them does not require physical flow verification - comparisons of operator and inspector data for receipts and shipments. The third set contains a single statistic which does not require physical flow verification. In addition to not requiring technically difficult and expensive flow verification, this single statistic has several advantages over other comprehensive sets of statistics. This algebraic approach as an alternative to flow verification for safeguards accountancy is discussed in this paper

  14. Integrated Java Bytecode Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Probst, Christian; Franz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Existing Java verifiers perform an iterative data-flow analysis to discover the unambiguous type of values stored on the stack or in registers. Our novel verification algorithm uses abstract interpretation to obtain definition/use information for each register and stack location in the program...

  15. Verification Games: Crowd-Sourced Formal Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    additional paintbrushes. Additionally, in Paradox , human players are never given small optimization problems (for example, toggling the values of 50...were developed by the Center for Game Science: Pipe Jam, Traffic Jam, Flow Jam and Paradox . Verification tools and games were integrated to verify...4 4. Paradox …………………………………………………......5 5. MyClass ………………………………………………….....7 6. Results …………………………………………………......11 7. Time to

  16. Verification in Referral-Based Crowdsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroditskiy, Victor; Rahwan, Iyad; Cebrian, Manuel; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Online social networks offer unprecedented potential for rallying a large number of people to accomplish a given task. Here we focus on information gathering tasks where rare information is sought through “referral-based crowdsourcing”: the information request is propagated recursively through invitations among members of a social network. Whereas previous work analyzed incentives for the referral process in a setting with only correct reports, misreporting is known to be both pervasive in crowdsourcing applications, and difficult/costly to filter out. A motivating example for our work is the DARPA Red Balloon Challenge where the level of misreporting was very high. In order to undertake a formal study of verification, we introduce a model where agents can exert costly effort to perform verification and false reports can be penalized. This is the first model of verification and it provides many directions for future research, which we point out. Our main theoretical result is the compensation scheme that minimizes the cost of retrieving the correct answer. Notably, this optimal compensation scheme coincides with the winning strategy of the Red Balloon Challenge. PMID:23071530

  17. The design of verification regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, N.W.

    1991-01-01

    Verification of a nuclear agreement requires more than knowledge of relevant technologies and institutional arrangements. It also demands thorough understanding of the nature of verification and the politics of verification design. Arms control efforts have been stymied in the past because key players agreed to verification in principle, only to disagree radically over verification in practice. In this chapter, it is shown that the success and stability of arms control endeavors can be undermined by verification designs which promote unilateral rather than cooperative approaches to security, and which may reduce, rather than enhance, the security of both sides. Drawing on logical analysis and practical lessons from previous superpower verification experience, this chapter summarizes the logic and politics of verification and suggests implications for South Asia. The discussion begins by determining what properties all forms of verification have in common, regardless of the participants or the substance and form of their agreement. Viewing verification as the political process of making decisions regarding the occurrence of cooperation points to four critical components: (1) determination of principles, (2) information gathering, (3) analysis and (4) projection. It is shown that verification arrangements differ primarily in regards to how effectively and by whom these four stages are carried out

  18. Estudio de un brote epidémico de tos ferina en Castellón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Morán Francisco

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: A partir de la declaración de varios casos en un centro escolar se inicia el estudio de brote con el objetivo de caracterizar éste desde el punto de vista de persona, lugar y tiempo; se calcula la efectividad de la vacuna, y se estudia la concordancia entre los casos y el resultado positivo del estudio serológico. Métodos: Se define caso a la persona que presenta tos persistente de dos semanas de duración. Se realiza estudio de la difusión de la enfermedad a través de la curva epidémica, y de la efectividad de la dosis de refuerzo de la vacuna antipertussis. La concordancia entre los casos y la serología positiva se evalúa por el índice Kappa. Resultados: Entre los alumnos de varios centros escolares y sus convivientes se encuesta a 130 personas, de los que 94 entran en la definición de caso. La media de edad de los casos es 10,5 años, un 42,6% son varones, el 84% escolares, el 71,3% muestra signos de infección reciente (IgM positiva, y el tiempo medio desde la última dosis de vacuna antipertussis es de 8,25 años. La efectividad de la dosis de refuerzo de la vacuna es del 66%. La concordancia entre los casos y el resultado positivo de la serología muestra un Kappa igual a 0,45. No se aisló B. Pertussis en las 25 muestras de frotis faríngeo. Conclusiones: Las aulas y el medio familiar son un factor de difusión de la enfermedad. La inclusión de una dosis de refuerzo a los 18 meses mejora la efectividad de la vacuna antipertussis. El aislamiento de la B. Pertussis es poco frecuente, y la serología, puede ser una alternativa ante la sospecha clínica de la enfermedad.

  19. Amorphous silicon EPID calibration for dosimetric applications: comparison of a method based on Monte Carlo prediction of response with existing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, L; Fielding, A L; Dance, D R; Seco, J; Evans, P M

    2007-01-01

    For EPID dosimetry, the calibration should ensure that all pixels have a similar response to a given irradiation. A calibration method (MC), using an analytical fit of a Monte Carlo simulated flood field EPID image to correct for the flood field image pixel intensity shape, was proposed. It was compared with the standard flood field calibration (FF), with the use of a water slab placed in the beam to flatten the flood field (WS) and with a multiple field calibration where the EPID was irradiated with a fixed 10 x 10 field for 16 different positions (MF). The EPID was used in its normal configuration (clinical setup) and with an additional 3 mm copper slab (modified setup). Beam asymmetry measured with a diode array was taken into account in MC and WS methods. For both setups, the MC method provided pixel sensitivity values within 3% of those obtained with the MF and WS methods (mean difference 2 ) and IMRT fields to within 3% of that obtained with WS and MF calibrations while differences with images calibrated with the FF method for fields larger than 10 x 10 cm 2 were up to 8%. MC, WS and MF methods all provided a major improvement on the FF method. Advantages and drawbacks of each method were reviewed

  20. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj.mishra@varian.com; Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Li, Ruijiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  1. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  2. Distorted Fingerprint Verification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya KARTHIKAESHWARAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint verification is one of the most reliable personal identification methods. Fingerprint matching is affected by non-linear distortion introduced in fingerprint impression during the image acquisition process. This non-linear deformation changes both the position and orientation of minutiae. The proposed system operates in three stages: alignment based fingerprint matching, fuzzy clustering and classifier framework. First, an enhanced input fingerprint image has been aligned with the template fingerprint image and matching score is computed. To improve the performance of the system, a fuzzy clustering based on distance and density has been used to cluster the feature set obtained from the fingerprint matcher. Finally a classifier framework has been developed and found that cost sensitive classifier produces better results. The system has been evaluated on fingerprint database and the experimental result shows that system produces a verification rate of 96%. This system plays an important role in forensic and civilian applications.

  3. RESRAD-BUILD verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Biwer, B. M.; Klett, T.

    2002-01-01

    The results generated by the RESRAD-BUILD code (version 3.0) were verified with hand or spreadsheet calculations using equations given in the RESRAD-BUILD manual for different pathways. For verification purposes, different radionuclides--H-3, C-14, Na-22, Al-26, Cl-36, Mn-54, Co-60, Au-195, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, and U-238--were chosen to test all pathways and models. Tritium, Ra-226, and Th-228 were chosen because of the special tritium and radon models in the RESRAD-BUILD code. Other radionuclides were selected to represent a spectrum of radiation types and energies. Verification of the RESRAD-BUILD code was conducted with an initial check of all the input parameters for correctness against their original source documents. Verification of the calculations was performed external to the RESRAD-BUILD code with Microsoft Excel to verify all the major portions of the code. In some cases, RESRAD-BUILD results were compared with those of external codes, such as MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle) and RESRAD. The verification was conducted on a step-by-step basis and used different test cases as templates. The following types of calculations were investigated: (1) source injection rate, (2) air concentration in the room, (3) air particulate deposition, (4) radon pathway model, (5) tritium model for volume source, (6) external exposure model, (7) different pathway doses, and (8) time dependence of dose. Some minor errors were identified in version 3.0; these errors have been corrected in later versions of the code. Some possible improvements in the code were also identified

  4. Methods of Software Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Gurin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the problem of software verification (SW. Methods of software verification designed to check the software for compliance with the stated requirements such as correctness, system security and system adaptability to small changes in the environment, portability and compatibility, etc. These are various methods both by the operation process and by the way of achieving result. The article describes the static and dynamic methods of software verification and paid attention to the method of symbolic execution. In its review of static analysis are discussed and described the deductive method, and methods for testing the model. A relevant issue of the pros and cons of a particular method is emphasized. The article considers classification of test techniques for each method. In this paper we present and analyze the characteristics and mechanisms of the static analysis of dependencies, as well as their views, which can reduce the number of false positives in situations where the current state of the program combines two or more states obtained both in different paths of execution and in working with multiple object values. Dependences connect various types of software objects: single variables, the elements of composite variables (structure fields, array elements, the size of the heap areas, the length of lines, the number of initialized array elements in the verification code using static methods. The article pays attention to the identification of dependencies within the framework of the abstract interpretation, as well as gives an overview and analysis of the inference tools.Methods of dynamic analysis such as testing, monitoring and profiling are presented and analyzed. Also some kinds of tools are considered which can be applied to the software when using the methods of dynamic analysis. Based on the work a conclusion is drawn, which describes the most relevant problems of analysis techniques, methods of their solutions and

  5. Material integrity verification radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppenjan, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the need for verification of 'as-built' spent fuel-dry storage containers and other concrete structures. The IAEA has tasked the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) to fabricate, test, and deploy a stepped-frequency Material Integrity Verification Radar (MIVR) system to nondestructively verify the internal construction of these containers. The MIVR system is based on previously deployed high-frequency, ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems that have been developed by STL for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Whereas GPR technology utilizes microwave radio frequency energy to create subsurface images, MTVR is a variation for which the medium is concrete instead of soil. The purpose is to nondestructively verify the placement of concrete-reinforcing materials, pipes, inner liners, and other attributes of the internal construction. The MIVR system underwent an initial field test on CANDU reactor spent fuel storage canisters at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario, Canada, in October 1995. A second field test at the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant in Embalse, Argentina, was completed in May 1996. The DOE GPR also was demonstrated at the site. Data collection and analysis were performed for the Argentine National Board of Nuclear Regulation (ENREN). IAEA and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Control and Accounting of Nuclear Material (ABACC) personnel were present as observers during the test. Reinforcing materials were evident in the color, two-dimensional images produced by the MIVR system. A continuous pattern of reinforcing bars was evident and accurate estimates on the spacing, depth, and size were made. The potential uses for safeguard applications were jointly discussed. The MIVR system, as successfully demonstrated in the two field tests, can be used as a design verification tool for IAEA safeguards. A deployment of MIVR for Design Information Questionnaire (DIQ

  6. Fast, daily linac verification for segmented IMRT using electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Bolt, Rene A.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Visser, Andries G.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) requires dedicated quality assurance (QA). Recently, we have published a method for fast (1-2 min) and accurate linac quality control for dynamic multileaf collimation, using a portal imaging device. This method is in routine use for daily leaf motion verification. The purpose of the present study was to develop an equivalent procedure for QA of IMRT with segmented (static) multileaf collimation (SMLC). Materials and methods: The QA procedure is based on measurements performed during 3- to 8-month periods at Elekta, Siemens and Varian accelerators. On each measurement day, images were acquired for a field consisting of five 3 x 22 cm 2 segments. These 10 monitor unit (MU) segments were delivered in SMLC mode, moving the leaves from left to right. Deviations of realized leaf gap widths from the prescribed width were analysed to study the leaf positioning accuracy. To assess hysteresis in leaf positioning, the sequential delivery of the SMLC segments was also inverted. A static 20 x 20 cm 2 field was delivered with exposures between 1 and 50 MU to study the beam output and beam profile at low exposures. Comparisons with an ionisation chamber were made to verify the EPID dose measurements at low MU. Dedicated software was developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and to correct for image distortion. Results and conclusions: The observed long-term leaf gap reproducibility (1 standard deviation) was 0.1 mm for the Varian, and 0.2 mm for the Siemens and the Elekta accelerators. In all cases the hysteresis was negligible. Down to the lowest MU, beam output measurements performed with the EPID agreed within 1 ± 1% (1SD) with ionisation chamber measurements. These findings led to a fast (3-4 min) procedure for accurate, daily linac quality control for SMLC

  7. Independent verification: operational phase liquid metal breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourne, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) recently achieved 100-percent power and now is in the initial stages of operation as a test reactor. An independent verification program has been established to assist in maintaining stable plant conditions, and to assure the safe operation of the reactor. Independent verification begins with the development of administrative procedures to control all other procedures and changes to the plant configurations. The technical content of the controlling procedures is subject to independent verification. The actual accomplishment of test procedures and operational maneuvers is witnessed by personnel not responsible for operating the plant. Off-normal events are analyzed, problem reports from other operating reactors are evaluated, and these results are used to improve on-line performance. Audits are used to confirm compliance with established practices and to identify areas where individual performance can be improved

  8. TU-FG-201-06: Remote Dosimetric Auditing for Clinical Trials Using EPID Dosimetry: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miri, N; Legge, K; Greer, P [Newcastle University, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a pilot study for remote dosimetric credentialing of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based clinical trials. The study introduces a novel, time efficient and inexpensive dosimetry audit method for multi-center credentialing. The method employs electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to reconstruct delivered dose inside a virtual flat/cylindrical water phantom. Methods: Five centers, including different accelerator types and treatment planning systems (TPS), were asked to download two CT data sets of a Head and Neck (H&N) and Postprostatectomy (P-P) patients to produce benchmark plans. These were then transferred to virtual flat and cylindrical phantom data sets that were also provided. In-air EPID images of the plans were then acquired, and the data sent to the central site for analysis. At the central site, these were converted to DICOM format, all images were used to reconstruct 2D and 3D dose distributions inside respectively the flat and cylindrical phantoms using inhouse EPID to dose conversion software. 2D dose was calculated for individual fields and 3D dose for the combined fields. The results were compared to corresponding TPS doses. Three gamma criteria were used, 3%3mm-3%/2mm–2%/2mm with a 10% dose threshold, to compare the calculated and prescribed dose. Results: All centers had a high pass rate for the criteria of 3%/3 mm. For 2D dose, the average of centers mean pass rate was 99.6% (SD: 0.3%) and 99.8% (SD: 0.3%) for respectively H&N and PP patients. For 3D dose, 3D gamma was used to compare the model dose with TPS combined dose. The mean pass rate was 97.7% (SD: 2.8%) and 98.3% (SD: 1.6%). Conclusion: Successful performance of the method for the pilot centers establishes the method for dosimetric multi-center credentialing. The results are promising and show a high level of gamma agreement and, the procedure is efficient, consistent and inexpensive. Funding has been provided from Department of Radiation Oncology

  9. A method for evaluating treatment quality using in vivo EPID dosimetry and statistical process control in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Greer, Peter B; Simpson, John; Zwan, Benjamin J; Middleton, Richard H

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Due to increasing complexity, modern radiotherapy techniques require comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes, that to date generally focus on the pre-treatment stage. The purpose of this paper is to provide a method for an individual patient treatment QA evaluation and identification of a "quality gap" for continuous quality improvement. Design/methodology/approach A statistical process control (SPC) was applied to evaluate treatment delivery using in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. A moving range control chart was constructed to monitor the individual patient treatment performance based on a control limit generated from initial data of 90 intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and ten volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient deliveries. A process capability index was used to evaluate the continuing treatment quality based on three quality classes: treatment type-specific, treatment linac-specific, and body site-specific. Findings The determined control limits were 62.5 and 70.0 per cent of the χ pass-rate for IMRT and VMAT deliveries, respectively. In total, 14 patients were selected for a pilot study the results of which showed that about 1 per cent of all treatments contained errors relating to unexpected anatomical changes between treatment fractions. Both rectum and pelvis cancer treatments demonstrated process capability indices were less than 1, indicating the potential for quality improvement and hence may benefit from further assessment. Research limitations/implications The study relied on the application of in vivo EPID dosimetry for patients treated at the specific centre. Sampling patients for generating the control limits were limited to 100 patients. Whilst the quantitative results are specific to the clinical techniques and equipment used, the described method is generally applicable to IMRT and VMAT treatment QA. Whilst more work is required to determine the level of clinical significance, the

  10. Quantum money with classical verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavinsky, Dmitry [NEC Laboratories America, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-12-04

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

  11. Quantum money with classical verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it

  12. Scalable Techniques for Formal Verification

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Sandip

    2010-01-01

    This book presents state-of-the-art approaches to formal verification techniques to seamlessly integrate different formal verification methods within a single logical foundation. It should benefit researchers and practitioners looking to get a broad overview of the spectrum of formal verification techniques, as well as approaches to combining such techniques within a single framework. Coverage includes a range of case studies showing how such combination is fruitful in developing a scalable verification methodology for industrial designs. This book outlines both theoretical and practical issue

  13. A Practitioners Perspective on Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenburgh, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    NOAAs Space Weather Prediction Center offers a wide range of products and services to meet the needs of an equally wide range of customers. A robust verification program is essential to the informed use of model guidance and other tools by both forecasters and end users alike. In this talk, we present current SWPC practices and results, and examine emerging requirements and potential approaches to satisfy them. We explore the varying verification needs of forecasters and end users, as well as the role of subjective and objective verification. Finally, we describe a vehicle used in the meteorological community to unify approaches to model verification and facilitate intercomparison.

  14. Investigations on uncertainties in patient positioning for prostate treatment with EPID; Untersuchungen zur Positionierungsgenauigkeit bei Prostatakonformationsbestrahlungen mittels Portal-Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakai, A.; Nuesslin, F. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Medizinische Physik; Paulsen, F.; Plasswilm, L.; Bamberg, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Strahlentherapie

    2002-02-01

    Background: Conformal radiotherapy techniques as used in prostate treatment allow to spare normal tissue by conforming the radiation fields to the shape of the planning target volume (PTV). To be able to fully utilize the advantages of these techniques correct patient positioning is an important prerequisite. This study employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) investigated the positioning uncertainties that occur in the pelvic region for different patient positioning devices. Patients and Methods: 15 patients with prostate cancer were irradiated with or without rectal balloon/pelvic mask at a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC). For each patient multiple portal images were taken from different directions and compared to the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the treatment planning system and to simulation films (Table 1, Figure 1). Results: In spite of different positioning devices, all patients showed comparable total positioning uncertainties of 4.0 mm (lateral), 4.5 mm (cranio-caudal) and 1.7 mm (dorso-ventral). The lateral positioning error was reduced for the pelvic mask patients while the cranio-caudal error increased (Table 2, Figure 2). A systematic and a random component sum up to the total positioning error, and a good estimate of the magnitudes of the two is possible from six to eight portal images (Figure 3). Conclusions: With a small number of portal images it is possible to find out the systematic and random positioning error of a patient. Knowledge of the random error can be used to resize the treatment margin which is clinically relevant since this error differs greatly for different patients (Figure 4). Image analysis with EPID is convenient, yet has some problems. For example, one only gets indirect information on the movement of the ventral rectum wall. The successful operation of positioning devices, although, needs further improvement - especially if one focuses on IMRT. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund

  15. A methodology to determine margins by EPID measurements of patient setup variation and motion as applied to immobilization devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Frechette, Christina M.; Herman, Michael G.; Brown, Paul D.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of clinic and site specific margins are essential for the effective use of three-dimensional and intensity modulated radiation therapy. An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based methodology is introduced which allows individual and population based CTV-to-PTV margins to be determined and compared with traditional margins prescribed during treatment. This method was applied to a patient cohort receiving external beam head and neck radiotherapy under an IRB approved protocol. Although the full study involved the use of an EPID-based method to assess the impact of (1) simulation technique (2) immobilization, and (3) surgical intervention on inter- and intrafraction variations of individual and population-based CTV-to-PTV margins, the focus of the paper is on the technique. As an illustration, the methodology is utilized to examine the influence of two immobilization devices, the UON TM thermoplastic mask and the Type-S TM head/neck shoulder immobilization system on margins. Daily through port images were acquired for selected fields for each patient with an EPID. To analyze these images, simulation films or digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR's) were imported into the EPID software. Up to five anatomical landmarks were identified and outlined by the clinician and up to three of these structures were matched for each reference image. Once the individual based errors were quantified, the patient results were grouped into populations by matched anatomical structures and immobilization device. The variation within the subgroup was quantified by calculating the systematic and random errors (Σ sub and σ sub ). Individual patient margins were approximated as 1.65 times the individual-based random error and ranged from 1.1 to 6.3 mm (A-P) and 1.1 to 12.3 mm (S-I) for fields matched on skull and cervical structures, and 1.7 to 10.2 mm (L-R) and 2.0 to 13.8 mm (S-I) for supraclavicular fields. Population-based margins ranging from 5.1 to 6.6 mm (A

  16. Image Processing Based Signature Verification Technique to Reduce Fraud in Financial Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Walid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Handwritten signature is broadly utilized as personal verification in financial institutions ensures the necessity for a robust automatic signature verification tool. This tool aims to reduce fraud in all related financial transactions’ sectors. This paper proposes an online, robust, and automatic signature verification technique using the recent advances in image processing and machine learning. Once the image of a handwritten signature for a customer is captured, several pre-processing steps are performed on it including filtration and detection of the signature edges. Afterwards, a feature extraction process is applied on the image to extract Speeded up Robust Features (SURF and Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT features. Finally, a verification process is developed and applied to compare the extracted image features with those stored in the database for the specified customer. Results indicate high accuracy, simplicity, and rapidity of the developed technique, which are the main criteria to judge a signature verification tool in banking and other financial institutions.

  17. High-level verification

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Sorin; Kundu, Sudipta

    2011-01-01

    Given the growing size and heterogeneity of Systems on Chip (SOC), the design process from initial specification to chip fabrication has become increasingly complex. This growing complexity provides incentive for designers to use high-level languages such as C, SystemC, and SystemVerilog for system-level design. While a major goal of these high-level languages is to enable verification at a higher level of abstraction, allowing early exploration of system-level designs, the focus so far for validation purposes has been on traditional testing techniques such as random testing and scenario-based

  18. Survey on Offline Finger Print Verification System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suman, R.; Kaur, R.

    2012-01-01

    The fingerprint verification, means where "verification" implies a user matching a fingerprint against a single fingerprint associated with the identity that the user claims. Biometrics can be classified into two types Behavioral (signature verification, keystroke dynamics, etc.) And Physiological

  19. HDL to verification logic translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambles, J. W.; Windley, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The increasingly higher number of transistors possible in VLSI circuits compounds the difficulty in insuring correct designs. As the number of possible test cases required to exhaustively simulate a circuit design explodes, a better method is required to confirm the absence of design faults. Formal verification methods provide a way to prove, using logic, that a circuit structure correctly implements its specification. Before verification is accepted by VLSI design engineers, the stand alone verification tools that are in use in the research community must be integrated with the CAD tools used by the designers. One problem facing the acceptance of formal verification into circuit design methodology is that the structural circuit descriptions used by the designers are not appropriate for verification work and those required for verification lack some of the features needed for design. We offer a solution to this dilemma: an automatic translation from the designers' HDL models into definitions for the higher-ordered logic (HOL) verification system. The translated definitions become the low level basis of circuit verification which in turn increases the designer's confidence in the correctness of higher level behavioral models.

  20. Verification of Simulation Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Before qualifying a simulation tool, the requirements shall first be clearly identified, i.e.: - What type of study needs to be carried out? - What phenomena need to be modeled? This phase involves writing a precise technical specification. Once the requirements are defined, the most adapted product shall be selected from the various software options available on the market. Before using a particular version of a simulation tool to support the demonstration of nuclear safety studies, the following requirements shall be met. - An auditable quality assurance process complying with development international standards shall be developed and maintained, - A process of verification and validation (V and V) shall be implemented. This approach requires: writing a report and/or executive summary of the V and V activities, defining a validated domain (domain in which the difference between the results of the tools and those of another qualified reference is considered satisfactory for its intended use). - Sufficient documentation shall be available, - A detailed and formal description of the product (software version number, user configuration, other settings and parameters) in the targeted computing environment shall be available. - Source codes corresponding to the software shall be archived appropriately. When these requirements are fulfilled, the version of the simulation tool shall be considered qualified for a defined domain of validity, in a given computing environment. The functional verification shall ensure that: - the computer architecture of the tool does not include errors, - the numerical solver correctly represents the physical mathematical model, - equations are solved correctly. The functional verification can be demonstrated through certification or report of Quality Assurance. The functional validation shall allow the user to ensure that the equations correctly represent the physical phenomena in the perimeter of intended use. The functional validation can

  1. SU-F-T-486: A Simple Approach to Performing Light Versus Radiation Field Coincidence Quality Assurance Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herchko, S; Ding, G [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate, straightforward, and user-independent method for performing light versus radiation field coincidence quality assurance utilizing EPID images, a simple phantom made of readily-accessible materials, and a free software program. Methods: A simple phantom consisting of a blocking tray, graph paper, and high-density wire was constructed. The phantom was used to accurately set the size of a desired light field and imaged on the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A macro written for use in ImageJ, a free image processing software, was then use to determine the radiation field size utilizing the high density wires on the phantom for a pixel to distance calibration. The macro also performs an analysis on the measured radiation field utilizing the tolerances recommended in the AAPM Task Group #142. To verify the accuracy of this method, radiochromic film was used to qualitatively demonstrate agreement between the film and EPID results, and an additional ImageJ macro was used to quantitatively compare the radiation field sizes measured both with the EPID and film images. Results: The results of this technique were benchmarked against film measurements, which have been the gold standard for testing light versus radiation field coincidence. The agreement between this method and film measurements were within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: Due to the operator dependency associated with tracing light fields and measuring radiation fields by hand when using film, this method allows for a more accurate comparison between the light and radiation fields with minimal operator dependency. Removing the need for radiographic or radiochromic film also eliminates a reoccurring cost and increases procedural efficiency.

  2. Amorphous silicon EPID calibration for dosimetric applications: comparison of a method based on Monte Carlo prediction of response with existing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, L [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Fielding, A L [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Dance, D R [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Seco, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Evans, P M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-21

    For EPID dosimetry, the calibration should ensure that all pixels have a similar response to a given irradiation. A calibration method (MC), using an analytical fit of a Monte Carlo simulated flood field EPID image to correct for the flood field image pixel intensity shape, was proposed. It was compared with the standard flood field calibration (FF), with the use of a water slab placed in the beam to flatten the flood field (WS) and with a multiple field calibration where the EPID was irradiated with a fixed 10 x 10 field for 16 different positions (MF). The EPID was used in its normal configuration (clinical setup) and with an additional 3 mm copper slab (modified setup). Beam asymmetry measured with a diode array was taken into account in MC and WS methods. For both setups, the MC method provided pixel sensitivity values within 3% of those obtained with the MF and WS methods (mean difference <1%, standard deviation <2%). The difference of pixel sensitivity between MC and FF methods was up to 12.2% (clinical setup) and 11.8% (modified setup). MC calibration provided images of open fields (5 x 5 to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}) and IMRT fields to within 3% of that obtained with WS and MF calibrations while differences with images calibrated with the FF method for fields larger than 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} were up to 8%. MC, WS and MF methods all provided a major improvement on the FF method. Advantages and drawbacks of each method were reviewed.

  3. SU-F-T-486: A Simple Approach to Performing Light Versus Radiation Field Coincidence Quality Assurance Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herchko, S; Ding, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate, straightforward, and user-independent method for performing light versus radiation field coincidence quality assurance utilizing EPID images, a simple phantom made of readily-accessible materials, and a free software program. Methods: A simple phantom consisting of a blocking tray, graph paper, and high-density wire was constructed. The phantom was used to accurately set the size of a desired light field and imaged on the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A macro written for use in ImageJ, a free image processing software, was then use to determine the radiation field size utilizing the high density wires on the phantom for a pixel to distance calibration. The macro also performs an analysis on the measured radiation field utilizing the tolerances recommended in the AAPM Task Group #142. To verify the accuracy of this method, radiochromic film was used to qualitatively demonstrate agreement between the film and EPID results, and an additional ImageJ macro was used to quantitatively compare the radiation field sizes measured both with the EPID and film images. Results: The results of this technique were benchmarked against film measurements, which have been the gold standard for testing light versus radiation field coincidence. The agreement between this method and film measurements were within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: Due to the operator dependency associated with tracing light fields and measuring radiation fields by hand when using film, this method allows for a more accurate comparison between the light and radiation fields with minimal operator dependency. Removing the need for radiographic or radiochromic film also eliminates a reoccurring cost and increases procedural efficiency.

  4. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  5. Improved verification methods for safeguards verifications at enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, A.; Kane, S. C.; Bourva, L.; Poirier, S.; Loghin, N. E.; Langlands, D.

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has initiated a coordinated research and development programme to improve its verification methods and equipment applicable to enrichment plants. The programme entails several individual projects to meet the objectives of the IAEA Safeguards Model Approach for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants updated in 2006. Upgrades of verification methods to confirm the absence of HEU (highly enriched uranium) production have been initiated and, in particular, the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor (CHEM) has been redesigned to reduce its weight and incorporate an electrically cooled germanium detector. Such detectors are also introduced to improve the attended verification of UF 6 cylinders for the verification of the material balance. Data sharing of authenticated operator weighing systems such as accountancy scales and process load cells is also investigated as a cost efficient and an effective safeguards measure combined with unannounced inspections, surveillance and non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement. (authors)

  6. Improved verification methods for safeguards verifications at enrichment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, A.; Kane, S. C.; Bourva, L.; Poirier, S.; Loghin, N. E.; Langlands, D. [Department of Safeguards, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, A1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has initiated a coordinated research and development programme to improve its verification methods and equipment applicable to enrichment plants. The programme entails several individual projects to meet the objectives of the IAEA Safeguards Model Approach for Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants updated in 2006. Upgrades of verification methods to confirm the absence of HEU (highly enriched uranium) production have been initiated and, in particular, the Cascade Header Enrichment Monitor (CHEM) has been redesigned to reduce its weight and incorporate an electrically cooled germanium detector. Such detectors are also introduced to improve the attended verification of UF{sub 6} cylinders for the verification of the material balance. Data sharing of authenticated operator weighing systems such as accountancy scales and process load cells is also investigated as a cost efficient and an effective safeguards measure combined with unannounced inspections, surveillance and non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement. (authors)

  7. Online Piracy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel A. Howard

    2017-01-01

    Piracy, whether made online or in any other way is an illegal act, which should be avoided and stopped. In this era of rapid globalization and booming technology, online piracy can be seen in many forms. However, the main area of concern are the consequences that the online piracy has for the many people who are directly or indirectly involved in it. These consequences provide implications for ethical considerations. In my opinion, online piracy is an unethical act and should be avoided, howe...

  8. WE-DE-BRA-04: A Cost-Effective Pixelated EPID Scintillator for Enhanced Contrast and DQE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Hu, Y; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Shedlock, D; Wang, A; Humber, D; Star-Lack, J [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Morf, D; Fueglistaller, R [Varian Medical Systems, Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Beams-eye-view imaging applications such as real-time soft-tissue motion estimation and MV-CBCT are hindered by the inherently low image contrast of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) currently in clinical use. We investigate a cost effective scintillating glass that provides substantially increased detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: A pixelated scintillator prototype was built from LKH-5 glass. The array is 12mm thick; 42.4×42.4cm2 wide and features 1.51mm pixel pitch with 20µm separation (glue+septa). The LKH-5 array was mounted on the active matrix flat panel imager (AMPFI) of an AS-1200 (Varian) with the GdO2S2:Tb removed. A second AS-1200 was utilized as reference detector. The prototype EPID was characterized in terms of CNR, modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE. Additionally, the visibility of various fiducial markers typically used in the clinic as well as a realistic 3D-printed lung tumor model was assessed. All items were placed in a 12cm thick solid water phantom. CNR is estimated using a Las Vegas contrast phantom, presampled MTF is estimated using a slanted slit technique and the DQE is calculated from measured normalized noise power spectra (NPS) and the MTF. Results: DQE(0) for the LKH-5 prototype increased by a factor of 8× to about 10%, compared to the AS-1200 equipped with its standard GdO2S2:Tb scintillator. CNR increased by a factor of 5.3×. Due to the pixel size the MTF50 decreased by about 55% to 0.23lp/mm. The visibility of all fiducial markers as well as the tumor model were however markedly improved in comparison to an acquisition with the same parameters using the GdO2S2:Tb scintillator. Conclusion: LKH-5 scintillating glasses allow the cost effective construction of thick pixelated scintillators for portal imaging which can yield a substantial increase in DQE and CNR. Soft tissue and fiducial marker visibility was found to be markedly improved. The project was supported

  9. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  10. SU-E-J-27: Shifting Multiple EPID Imager Layers to Improve Image Quality and Resolution in MV CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Rottmann, J; Yip, S; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Morf, D; Fueglistaller, R; Star-Lack, J; Zentai, G [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Vertical stacking of four conventional EPID layers can improve DQE for MV-CBCT applications. We hypothesize that shifting each layer laterally by half a pixel relative to the layer above, will improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image resolution. Methods: For CNR assessment, a 20 cm diameter digital phantom with 8 inserts is created. The attenuation coefficient of the phantom is similar to lung at the average energy of a 6 MV photon beam. The inserts have attenuations 1, 2…8 times of lung. One of the inserts is close to soft tissue, resembling the case of a tumor in lung. For resolution assessment, a digital phantom featuring a bar pattern is created. The phantom has an attenuation coefficient similar to soft tissue and the bars have an attenuation coefficient of calcium sulfate. A 2 MeV photon beam is attenuated through these phantoms and hits each of the four stacked detector layers. Each successive layer is shifted by half a pixel in the x only, y only, and x and y (combined) directions, respectively. Blurring and statistical noise are added to the projections. Projections from one, two, three and four layers are used for reconstruction. CNR and image resolution are evaluated and compared. Results: When projections from multiple layers are combined for reconstruction, CNR increases with the number of layers involved. CNR in reconstructions from two, three and four layers are 1.4, 1.7 and 1.99 times that from one layer. The resolution from the shifted four layer detector is also improved from a single layer. In a comparison between one layer versus four layers in this preliminary study, the resolution from four shifted layers is at least 20% better. Conclusion: Layer-shifting in a stacked EPID imager design enhances resolution as well as CNR for half scan MV-CBCT. The project described was supported, in part, by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc., and Award No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute. The content is solely

  11. Brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella pneumophila en niños cubanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Razón Behar

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available La Legionella pneumophila es uno de los patógenos responsable de neumonías atípicas, a través de la inhalación de aerosoles o aspiración de líquidos infectados. Se detectó un brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella, originado por la aspiración de agua contaminada de una piscina en un grupo de niños cubanos. El agente causal se identificó en 5 de 9 pacientes, por la técnica de inmunofluorescencia indirecta en muestras de sueros pareados. Los síntomas y signos más frecuentes fueron malestar general, anorexia, astenia, fiebre persistente de 39 °C a 40 °C (103 °F a 105 °F, mialgias, cefaleas, náuseas, vómitos, dolor abdominal, diarreas, tos húmeda, dolor torácico y polipnea. Durante el desarrollo de la enfermedad, el tratamiento antibiótico fue empírico (incluyendo los macrólidos, por no tener confirmado el diagnóstico. Todos los pacientes evolucionaron satisfactoriamente. Se reportó un brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella en niños por primera vez en Cuba, lo cual tiene importancia clínica y epidemiológica.The legionella pneumophila is one of the pathogens responsible for atypic pneumonias by the inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of infected liquids. An epidemic outbreak of pneumonias caused by Legionella was detected among a group of Cuban children. It was originated by the aspiration of contaminated water in a swimming pool. The causal agent was identified in 5 of 9 patients by using the indirect immunofluorescence technique in samples of matched sera. The most frequent symptoms and signs were malaise, anorexia, asthenia, persistent fever from 39°C to 40°C (103° F to 105° F, myalgias, headache, nauseas, vomits, abdominal pain, diarrheas, moist cough, thoracic pain and polypnoea. The antibiotic treatment was empiric (including the macrolides during the development of the disease, since the diagnosis was not confirmed. The patients’ evolution was satisfactory. An epidemic outbreak of pneumonias

  12. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  13. A quantitative method to the analysis of MLC leaf position and speed based on EPID and EBT3 film for dynamic IMRT treatment with different types of MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghui; Chen, Lixin; Zhu, Jinhan; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-07-01

    A quantitative method based on the electronic portal imaging system (EPID) and film was developed for MLC position and speed testing; this method was used for three MLC types (Millennium, MLCi, and Agility MLC). To determine the leaf position, a picket fence designed by the dynamic (DMLC) model was used. The full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values of each gap measured by EPID and EBT3 were converted to the gap width using the FWHM versus nominal gap width relationship. The algorithm developed for the picket fence analysis was able to quantify the gap width, the distance between gaps, and each individual leaf position. To determine the leaf speed, a 0.5 × 20 cm 2 MLC-defined sliding gap was applied across a 14 × 20 cm 2 symmetry field. The linacs ran at a fixed-dose rate. The use of different monitor units (MUs) for this test led to different leaf speeds. The effect of leaf transmission was considered in a speed accuracy analysis. The difference between the EPID and film results for the MLC position is less than 0.1 mm. For the three MLC types, twice the standard deviation (2 SD) is provided; 0.2, 0.4, and 0.4 mm for gap widths of three MLC types, and 0.1, 0.2, and 0.2 mm for distances between gaps. The individual leaf positions deviate from the preset positions within 0.1 mm. The variations in the speed profiles for the EPID and EBT3 results are consistent, but the EPID results are slightly better than the film results. Different speeds were measured for each MLC type. For all three MLC types, speed errors increase with increasing speed. The analysis speeds deviate from the preset speeds within approximately 0.01 cm s -1 . This quantitative analysis of MLC position and speed provides an intuitive evaluation for MLC quality assurance (QA). © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Societal Verification: Intellectual Game or International Game-Changer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartigan, Kelsey; Hinderstein, Corey

    2013-01-01

    Within the nuclear nonproliferation and arms control field, there is an increasing appreciation for the potential of open source information technologies to supplement existing verification and compliance regimes. While clearly not a substitute for on-site inspections or national technical means, it may be possible to better leverage information gleaned from commercial satellite imagery, international trade records and the vast amount of data being exchanged online and between publics (including social media) so as to develop a more comprehensive set of tools and practices for monitoring and verifying a state’s nuclear activities and helping judge compliance with international obligations. The next generation “toolkit” for monitoring and verifying items, facility operations and activities will likely include a more diverse set of analytical tools and technologies than are currently used internationally. To explore these and other issues, the Nuclear Threat Initiative has launched an effort that examines, in part, the role that emerging technologies and “citizen scientists” might play in future verification regimes. This paper will include an assessment of past proliferation and security “events” and whether emerging tools and technologies would have provided indicators concurrently or in advance of these actions. Such case studies will be instrumental in understanding the reliability of these technologies and practices and in thinking through the requirements of a 21st century verification regime. Keywords: Verification, social media, open-source information, arms control, disarmament.

  15. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-01-01

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm

  16. Experimental inventory verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steverson, C.A.; Angerman, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) goals and Department of Energy (DOE) inventory requirements are frequently in conflict at facilities across the DOE complex. The authors wish, on one hand, to verify the presence of correct amounts of nuclear materials that are in storage or in process; yet on the other hand, we wish to achieve ALARA goals by keeping individual and collective exposures as low as social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations permit. The Experimental Inventory Verification System (EIVSystem) is a computer-based, camera-driven system that utilizes image processing technology to detect change in vault areas. Currently in the test and evaluation phase at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this system guards personnel. The EIVSystem continually monitors the vault, providing proof of changed status for objects sorted within the vault. This paper reports that these data could provide the basis for reducing inventory requirements when no change has occurred, thus helping implement ALARA policy; the data will also help describe there target area of an inventory when change has been shown to occur

  17. Woodward Effect Experimental Verifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Paul

    2004-02-01

    The work of J. F. Woodward (1990 1996a; 1996b; 1998; 2002a; 2002b; 2004) on the existence of ``mass fluctuations'' and their use in exotic propulsion schemes was examined for possible application in improving space flight propulsion and power generation. Woodward examined Einstein's General Relativity Theory (GRT) and assumed that if the strong Machian interpretation of GRT as well as gravitational / inertia like Wheeler-Feynman radiation reaction forces hold, then when an elementary particle is accelerated through a potential gradient, its rest mass should fluctuate around its mean value during its acceleration. Woodward also used GRT to clarify the precise experimental conditions necessary for observing and exploiting these mass fluctuations or ``Woodward effect'' (W-E). Later, in collaboration with his ex-graduate student T. Mahood, they also pushed the experimental verification boundaries of these proposals. If these purported mass fluctuations occur as Woodward claims, and his assumption that gravity and inertia are both byproducts of the same GRT based phenomenon per Mach's Principle is correct, then many innovative applications such as propellantless propulsion and gravitational exotic matter generators may be feasible. This paper examines the reality of mass fluctuations and the feasibility of using the W-E to design propellantless propulsion devices in the near to mid-term future. The latest experimental results, utilizing MHD-like force rectification systems, will also be presented.

  18. Verification of hypergraph states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Yuki; Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-12-01

    Hypergraph states are generalizations of graph states where controlled-Z gates on edges are replaced with generalized controlled-Z gates on hyperedges. Hypergraph states have several advantages over graph states. For example, certain hypergraph states, such as the Union Jack states, are universal resource states for measurement-based quantum computing with only Pauli measurements, while graph state measurement-based quantum computing needs non-Clifford basis measurements. Furthermore, it is impossible to classically efficiently sample measurement results on hypergraph states unless the polynomial hierarchy collapses to the third level. Although several protocols have been proposed to verify graph states with only sequential single-qubit Pauli measurements, there was no verification method for hypergraph states. In this paper, we propose a method for verifying a certain class of hypergraph states with only sequential single-qubit Pauli measurements. Importantly, no i.i.d. property of samples is assumed in our protocol: any artificial entanglement among samples cannot fool the verifier. As applications of our protocol, we consider verified blind quantum computing with hypergraph states, and quantum computational supremacy demonstrations with hypergraph states.

  19. Necrólisis epidérmica tóxica: Descripción de 1 caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalis Peña Pérez

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de necrólisis epidérmica tóxica, enfermedad poco frecuente y con alto índice de mortalidad, en un neonato a término, de madre primigesta, con tiempo de gestación de 39,2 semanas; parto eutócico y apgar 8/9, con un peso corporal de 3 770 que a las 2 horas del nacimiento comenzó con lesiones eritematoampollosas y centro necrótico, que rápidamente evolucionó de forma desfavorable y fallece a las 33 horas de nacido. Se realiza revisión bibliográfica del tema y se emiten comentarios de su probable patogenia.A case of toxic epidermal necrolysis, a rare disease with a high mortality rate, is presented in a term infant of a primigravida with 39.2 weeks of gestation, eutocic delivery, apgar 8/9, and a body weight of 3 770 g, that presented erythematous and ampollous lesions and necrotic center 2 hours after having been delivered and had a fast unfavorable evolution and died 33 hours after birth. A bibliographic review of the topic was made and its probable pathogeny was commented.

  20. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Sobiecki, René; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with one exercise of 30 minutes duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns performance verification of the volumetric measuring capability of a small volume coordinate measuring machine...

  1. Online Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Goldfarb, Avi; Tucker, Catherine Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This chapter explores what makes online advertising different from traditional advertising channels. We argue that online advertising differs from traditional advertising channels in two important ways: measurability and targetability. Measurability is higher because the digital nature of online advertising means that responses to ads can be tracked relatively easily. Targetability is higher because data can be automatically tracked at an individual level, and it is relatively easy to show di...

  2. Online Games

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Aphra; Ivory, James D.

    2015-01-01

    When we agreed to edit the theme on online games for this Encyclopedia our first question was, “What is meant by online games?” Scholars of games distinguish between nondigital games (such as board games) and digital games, rather than between online and offline games. With networked consoles and smartphones it is becoming harder and harder to find players in the wealthy industrialized countries who play “offline” digital games. Most games developers now include ...

  3. Online Identification and Verification of the Elastic Coupling Torsional Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyou Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the torsional vibration of a diesel engine shaft, the torsional stiffness of the flexible coupling is a key kinetic parameter. Since the material properties of the elastic element of the coupling might change after a long-time operation due to the severe working environment or improper use and the variation of such properties will change dynamic feature of the coupling, it will cause a relative large calculation error of torsional vibration to the shaft system. Moreover, the torsional stiffness of the elastic coupling is difficult to be determined, and it is inappropriate to measure this parameter by disassembling the power unit while it is under normal operation. To solve these problems, this paper comes up with a method which combines the torsional vibration test with the calculation of the diesel shafting and uses the inherent characteristics of shaft torsional vibration to identify the dynamic stiffness of the elastic coupling without disassembling the unit. Analysis results show that it is reasonable and feasible to identify the elastic coupling dynamic torsional stiffness with this method and the identified stiffness is accurate. Besides, this method provides a convenient and practical approach to examine the dynamic behavior of the long running elastic coupling.

  4. Challenges for effective WMD verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andemicael, B.

    2006-01-01

    Effective verification is crucial to the fulfillment of the objectives of any disarmament treaty, not least as regards the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The effectiveness of the verification package depends on a number of factors, some inherent in the agreed structure and others related to the type of responses demanded by emerging challenges. The verification systems of three global agencies-the IAEA, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO, currently the Preparatory Commission), and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)-share similarities in their broad objectives of confidence-building and deterrence by assuring members that rigorous verification would deter or otherwise detect non-compliance. Yet they are up against various constraints and other issues, both internal and external to the treaty regime. These constraints pose major challenges to the effectiveness and reliability of the verification operations. In the nuclear field, the IAEA safeguards process was the first to evolve incrementally from modest Statute beginnings to a robust verification system under the global Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The nuclear non-proliferation regime is now being supplemented by a technology-intensive verification system of the nuclear test-ban treaty (CTBT), a product of over three decades of negotiation. However, there still remain fundamental gaps and loopholes in the regime as a whole, which tend to diminish the combined effectiveness of the IAEA and the CTBT verification capabilities. He three major problems are (a) the lack of universality of membership, essentially because of the absence of three nuclear weapon-capable States-India, Pakistan and Israel-from both the NPT and the CTBT, (b) the changes in US disarmament policy, especially in the nuclear field, and (c) the failure of the Conference on Disarmament to conclude a fissile material cut-off treaty. The world is

  5. Disarmament Verification - the OPCW Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodding, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention is the only multilateral treaty that bans completely an entire category of weapons of mass destruction under international verification arrangements. Possessor States, i.e. those that have chemical weapons stockpiles at the time of becoming party to the CWC, commit to destroying these. All States undertake never to acquire chemical weapons and not to help other States acquire such weapons. The CWC foresees time-bound chemical disarmament. The deadlines for destruction for early entrants to the CWC are provided in the treaty. For late entrants, the Conference of States Parties intervenes to set destruction deadlines. One of the unique features of the CWC is thus the regime for verifying destruction of chemical weapons. But how can you design a system for verification at military sites, while protecting military restricted information? What degree of assurance is considered sufficient in such circumstances? How do you divide the verification costs? How do you deal with production capability and initial declarations of existing stockpiles? The founders of the CWC had to address these and other challenges in designing the treaty. Further refinement of the verification system has followed since the treaty opened for signature in 1993 and since inspection work was initiated following entry-into-force of the treaty in 1997. Most of this work concerns destruction at the two large possessor States, Russia and the United States. Perhaps some of the lessons learned from the OPCW experience may be instructive in a future verification regime for nuclear weapons. (author)

  6. Verification of Chemical Weapons Destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodding, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention is the only multilateral treaty that bans completely an entire category of weapons of mass destruction under international verification arrangements. Possessor States, i.e. those that have chemical weapons stockpiles at the time of becoming party to the CWC, commit to destroying these. All States undertake never to acquire chemical weapons and not to help other States acquire such weapons. The CWC foresees time-bound chemical disarmament. The deadlines for destruction for early entrants to the CWC are provided in the treaty. For late entrants, the Conference of States Parties intervenes to set destruction deadlines. One of the unique features of the CWC is thus the regime for verifying destruction of chemical weapons. But how can you design a system for verification at military sites, while protecting military restricted information? What degree of assurance is considered sufficient in such circumstances? How do you divide the verification costs? How do you deal with production capability and initial declarations of existing stockpiles? The founders of the CWC had to address these and other challenges in designing the treaty. Further refinement of the verification system has followed since the treaty opened for signature in 1993 and since inspection work was initiated following entry-into-force of the treaty in 1997. Most of this work concerns destruction at the two large possessor States, Russia and the United States. Perhaps some of the lessons learned from the OPCW experience may be instructive in a future verification regime for nuclear weapons. (author)

  7. CASL Verification and Validation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, Vincent Andrew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dinh, Nam [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This report documents the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL) verification and validation plan. The document builds upon input from CASL subject matter experts, most notably the CASL Challenge Problem Product Integrators, CASL Focus Area leaders, and CASL code development and assessment teams. This document will be a living document that will track progress on CASL to do verification and validation for both the CASL codes (including MPACT, CTF, BISON, MAMBA) and for the CASL challenge problems (CIPS, PCI, DNB). The CASL codes and the CASL challenge problems are at differing levels of maturity with respect to validation and verification. The gap analysis will summarize additional work that needs to be done. Additional VVUQ work will be done as resources permit. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) CASL program in support of milestone CASL.P13.02.

  8. Technical challenges for dismantlement verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D.; Johnston, R.G.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Dreicer, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    In preparation for future nuclear arms reduction treaties, including any potential successor treaties to START I and II, the authors have been examining possible methods for bilateral warhead dismantlement verification. Warhead dismantlement verification raises significant challenges in the political, legal, and technical arenas. This discussion will focus on the technical issues raised by warhead arms controls. Technical complications arise from several sources. These will be discussed under the headings of warhead authentication, chain-of-custody, dismantlement verification, non-nuclear component tracking, component monitoring, and irreversibility. The authors will discuss possible technical options to address these challenges as applied to a generic dismantlement and disposition process, in the process identifying limitations and vulnerabilities. They expect that these considerations will play a large role in any future arms reduction effort and, therefore, should be addressed in a timely fashion

  9. Utterance Verification for Text-Dependent Speaker Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Tomi; Sahidullah, Md; Kukanov, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Text-dependent automatic speaker verification naturally calls for the simultaneous verification of speaker identity and spoken content. These two tasks can be achieved with automatic speaker verification (ASV) and utterance verification (UV) technologies. While both have been addressed previously...

  10. TU-FG-201-01: 18-Month Clinical Experience of a Linac Daily Quality Assurance (QA) Solution Using Only EPID and OBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Sun, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Goddu, S; Li, H; Caruthers, D; Kavanaugh, J; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the clinical use of a Linear Accelerator (Linac) DailyQA system with only EPID and OBI. To assess the reliability over an 18-month period and improve the robustness of this system based on QA failure analysis. Methods: A DailyQA solution utilizing an in-house designed phantom, combined EPID and OBI image acquisitions, and a web-based data analysis and reporting system was commissioned and used in our clinic to measure geometric, dosimetry and imaging components of a Varian Truebeam Linac. During an 18-month period (335 working days), the Daily QA results, including the output constancy, beam flatness and symmetry, uniformity, TPR20/10, MV and KV imaging quality, were collected and analyzed. For output constancy measurement, an independent monthly QA system with an ionization chamber (IC) and annual/incidental TG51 measurements with ADCL IC were performed and cross-compared to Daily QA system. Thorough analyses were performed on the recorded QA failures to evaluate the machine performance, optimize the data analysis algorithm, adjust the tolerance setting and improve the training procedure to prevent future failures. Results: A clinical workflow including beam delivery, data analysis, QA report generation and physics approval was established and optimized to suit daily clinical operation. The output tests over the 335 working day period cross-correlated with the monthly QA system within 1.3% and TG51 results within 1%. QA passed with one attempt on 236 days out of 335 days. Based on the QA failures analysis, the Gamma criteria is revised from (1%, 1mm) to (2%, 1mm) considering both QA accuracy and efficiency. Data analysis algorithm is improved to handle multiple entries for a repeating test. Conclusion: We described our 18-month clinical experience on a novel DailyQA system using only EPID and OBI. The long term data presented demonstrated the system is suitable and reliable for Linac daily QA.

  11. TH-CD-207A-02: Implementation of Live EPID-Based Inspiration Level Assessment (LEILA) for Deepinspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) Monitoring Using MV Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Sun, J; Fuangrod, T; Bhatia, S [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Doebrich, M; Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Zwan, B [The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As prior work has shown that current DIBH monitoring approaches using surrogate measures (marker block on chest) do not always correspond with the clinical quantity of interest (lung depth, LD), a software tool and workflow are introduced to use MV fluoroscopy during treatment for real-time / Live EPID-based Inspiration Level Assessment (LEILA). Methods: A prototype software tool calculates and displays the LD during the treatment of left sided breast cancer. Calculations are based on MV cine images which are acquired with the treatment beam thereby not incurring any additional imaging dose. Image capture and processing are implemented using a dedicated frame grabber computer. The calculation engine automatically detects image orientation and includes provisions for large treatment fields that exceed the size of the EPID panel. LD is measured along a line profile in the middle of the field. LEILA’s interface displays the current MV image, a reference image (DRR), the current LD, as well as a trace of LD over treatment time. The display includes patient specific LD tolerances. Tolerances are specified for each field and loaded before the treatment. A visual warning is generated when the tolerance is exceeded. LEILA is initially run in parallel with current DIBH techniques. When later run by itself DIBH setup will be done using skin marks and room laser. Results: Offline tests of LEILA confirmed accurate automatic LD measurement for a variety of patient geometries. Deployment of the EPID during all left sided breast treatments was well tolerated by patients and staff during a multi-month pilot. The frame grabber provides 11 frames-per-second; the MATLAB based LEILA prototype software can analyze five frames-per-second standalone on standard desktop hardware. Conclusion: LEILA provides an automated approach to quantitatively monitor LD on MV images during DIBH treatment. Future improvements include a database and further speed optimization.

  12. Análisis de un brote epidémico de brucelosis en trabajadores de un matadero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Sánchez Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: La notificación mediante el Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica de un número inusual de casos de Brucelosis en trabajadores de un matadero a finales de 1996 hizo sospechar la existencia de un brote epidémico entre dicho colectivo profesional. MÉTODOS: Se recopiló la información disponible respecto a: 1 animales sacrificados en el matadero diagnosticados de brucelosis; 2 bajas laborales producidas y 3 datos de la mutualidad laboral relativos a los empleados del matadero con la enfermedad. Se realizó una encuesta epidemiológica a los trabajadores sobre los antecedentes de enfermedad, actividad laboral y riesgos no laborales (ingesta de leche o derivados sin higienizar. Las dependencias y actividades del matadero fueron inspeccionadas. Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles. Se estudió cada puesto de trabajo tomando como controles a los restantes empleados del matadero. Para su verificación se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de cohortes. RESULTADOS: El brote epidémico de la enfermedad entre los trabajadores comenzó durante el mes de septiembre y duró hasta febrero del siguiente año. Las encuestas epidemiológicas descubrieron 28 trabajadores con síntomas sugestivos de la enfermedad, siendo los operarios del área de sacrificio del matadero quienes presentan la tasa de ataque más alta: 56%. En el estudio de casos y controles el riesgo más elevado se observó en dicho colectivo de trabajadores con una OR de 4,27 (IC 95%: 1,6-15 y p<0.01. Del mismo modo en el estudio de cohortes apreciamos que estos trabajadores presentan un RR de 2,5 (IC 95%: 1,5-4,3 cuando son comparados con el resto de trabajadores de la cohorte y de 8 (IC 95%: 2-30 si los comparamos con el colectivo de menor exposición. Los RR de los operarios de la limpieza y de la sala de despiece fueron de 6,56 (IC 95%: 1,6-27 para los primeros y de 4,77 (IC 95%: 1,1-21 para los segundos. Las fracciones etiológicas fueron del 87% para los de la zona de

  13. Formal Verification of Continuous Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    and the verification procedures should be algorithmically synthesizable. Autonomous control plays an important role in many safety-critical systems. This implies that a malfunction in the control system can have catastrophic consequences, e.g., in space applications where a design flaw can result in large economic...... losses. Furthermore, a malfunction in the control system of a surgical robot may cause death of patients. The previous examples involve complex systems that are required to operate according to complex specifications. The systems cannot be formally verified by modern verification techniques, due...

  14. Biometric Technologies and Verification Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vacca, John R

    2007-01-01

    Biometric Technologies and Verification Systems is organized into nine parts composed of 30 chapters, including an extensive glossary of biometric terms and acronyms. It discusses the current state-of-the-art in biometric verification/authentication, identification and system design principles. It also provides a step-by-step discussion of how biometrics works; how biometric data in human beings can be collected and analyzed in a number of ways; how biometrics are currently being used as a method of personal identification in which people are recognized by their own unique corporal or behavior

  15. IMRT plan verification in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlk, P.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the procedure for verification of IMRT (Intensity modulated radiation therapy) plan, which is used in the Oncological Institute of St. Elisabeth in Bratislava. It contains basic description of IMRT technology and developing a deployment plan for IMRT planning system CORVUS 6.0, the device Mimic (Multilammelar intensity modulated collimator) and the overall process of verifying the schedule created. The aim of verification is particularly good control of the functions of MIMIC and evaluate the overall reliability of IMRT planning. (author)

  16. K Basins Field Verification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Field Verification Program establishes a uniform and systematic process to ensure that technical information depicted on selected engineering drawings accurately reflects the actual existing physical configuration. This document defines the Field Verification Program necessary to perform the field walkdown and inspection process that identifies the physical configuration of the systems required to support the mission objectives of K Basins. This program is intended to provide an accurate accounting of the actual field configuration by documenting the as-found information on a controlled drawing

  17. Runtime Verification Through Forward Chaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Perotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a novel rule-based approach for Runtime Verification of FLTL properties over finite but expanding traces. Our system exploits Horn clauses in implication form and relies on a forward chaining-based monitoring algorithm. This approach avoids the branching structure and exponential complexity typical of tableaux-based formulations, creating monitors with a single state and a fixed number of rules. This allows for a fast and scalable tool for Runtime Verification: we present the technical details together with a working implementation.

  18. Factores de riesgo en la neuropatía epidémica periférica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Herrero Vicente

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de casos y controles con el objetivo de profundizar en el conocimiento de factores de riesgo relacionados con la neuropatía epidémica periférica. El universo de estudio estuvo conformado por la totalidad de enfermos diagnosticados por la comisión provincial durante el período de 1993 a 1998, correspondiente al área de salud del policlínico "13 de Marzo", y los controles fueron escogidos en forma aleatoria con similares variables epidemiológicas. Se comprobó que no hubo asociación con la edad, y que el sexo femenino fue el más afectado. El incremento de la actividad física y el hábito de fumar tuvieron alta significación estadística. El alcoholismo resultó importante asociado al tabaquismo. Se concluyó que la actividad física intensa, la no ingestión de suplemento vitamínico y la nutrición deficitaria son factores de riesgo importantes en la aparición de la enfermedadA case-control study was performed to expand the knowledge on risk factors related to peripheral epidemic neuropathy. The universe of study was made up of all the patients diagnosed by the provincial commission from 1993 to 1998 in the health area of "13 de Marzo" polyclinics whereas the controls with similar epidemiological variables were randomly selected. It was proved that there was no association with age, and that females were the most affected. The increased physical activity and smoking had statistical significance. Alcoholism was found to be important associated with smoking. It was concluded that the internal physical activity, no ingestion of vitamin supplements and malnutrition are important risk factors in the occurrence of the disease

  19. Reliable detection of fluence anomalies in EPID-based IMRT pretreatment quality assurance using pixel intensity deviations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J. J.; Gardner, J. K.; Wang, S.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work uses repeat images of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields to quantify fluence anomalies (i.e., delivery errors) that can be reliably detected in electronic portal images used for IMRT pretreatment quality assurance. Methods: Repeat images of 11 clinical IMRT fields are acquired on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at energies of 6 MV and 18 MV. Acquired images are corrected for output variations and registered to minimize the impact of linear accelerator and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioning deviations. Detection studies are performed in which rectangular anomalies of various sizes are inserted into the images. The performance of detection strategies based on pixel intensity deviations (PIDs) and gamma indices is evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Residual differences between registered images are due to interfraction positional deviations of jaws and multileaf collimator leaves, plus imager noise. Positional deviations produce large intensity differences that degrade anomaly detection. Gradient effects are suppressed in PIDs using gradient scaling. Background noise is suppressed using median filtering. In the majority of images, PID-based detection strategies can reliably detect fluence anomalies of ≥5% in ∼1 mm 2 areas and ≥2% in ∼20 mm 2 areas. Conclusions: The ability to detect small dose differences (≤2%) depends strongly on the level of background noise. This in turn depends on the accuracy of image registration, the quality of the reference image, and field properties. The longer term aim of this work is to develop accurate and reliable methods of detecting IMRT delivery errors and variations. The ability to resolve small anomalies will allow the accuracy of advanced treatment techniques, such as image guided, adaptive, and arc therapies, to be quantified.

  20. Narrativa epidémica. La construcción social de las crisis sanitarias en la ficción literaria

    OpenAIRE

    Nespereira García, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Las crisis sanitarias de las últimas décadas han sido al mismo tiempo crisis mediáticas, históricas y socioculturales. En este contexto, numerosos autores han señalado la importancia de las narrativas de ficción en la transformación y transmisión de los valores morales e ideológicos implicados. En el siguiente trabajo presentamos el estudio comparativo de dos obras de ficción narrativa literaria en las que el relato se estructura en torno a la gestión de una crisis epidémica...

  1. Evaluación neuroquímica de la neuropatía óptica epidémica

    OpenAIRE

    González-Quevedo Monteagudo , Alina

    2004-01-01

    La aparición súbita en Cuba de una epidemia de neuropatía óptica en 1992,desencadenó una serie de investigaciones dirigidas a esclarecer las causas subyacentes. El presente trabajo investigó la participación del balance de aminoácidos sistémicos y en el sistema nervioso, la permeabilidad de la barrera hematoencefálica (BHE) y la neurotoxicidad del metanol en la fisiopatología de la neuropatía óptica epidémica (NOE). Se llevaron a cabo estudios en pacientes con NOE y en un modelo experimental ...

  2. A Scalable Approach for Hardware Semiformal Verification

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Tomas; Lettnin, Djones; Hübner, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The current verification flow of complex systems uses different engines synergistically: virtual prototyping, formal verification, simulation, emulation and FPGA prototyping. However, none is able to verify a complete architecture. Furthermore, hybrid approaches aiming at complete verification use techniques that lower the overall complexity by increasing the abstraction level. This work focuses on the verification of complex systems at the RT level to handle the hardware peculiarities. Our r...

  3. Likelihood-ratio-based biometric verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazen, A.M.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents results on optimal similarity measures for biometric verification based on fixed-length feature vectors. First, we show that the verification of a single user is equivalent to the detection problem, which implies that for single-user verification the likelihood ratio is optimal.

  4. Likelihood Ratio-Based Biometric Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazen, A.M.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    The paper presents results on optimal similarity measures for biometric verification based on fixed-length feature vectors. First, we show that the verification of a single user is equivalent to the detection problem, which implies that, for single-user verification, the likelihood ratio is optimal.

  5. Automated Verification of Virtualized Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bleikertz, Sören; Gross, Thomas; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Virtualized infrastructures and clouds present new challenges for security analysis and formal verification: they are complex environments that continuously change their shape, and that give rise to non-trivial security goals such as isolation and failure resilience requirements. We present a pla...

  6. Future of monitoring and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagenmakers, H.

    1991-01-01

    The organized verification entrusted to IAEA for the implementation of the NPT, of the Treaty of Tlatelolco and of the Treaty of Rarotonga, reaches reasonable standards. The current dispute with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea about the conclusion of a safeguards agreement with IAEA, by its exceptional nature, underscores rather than undermines the positive judgement to be passed on IAEA's overall performance. The additional task given to the Director General of IAEA under Security Council resolution 687 (1991) regarding Iraq's nuclear-weapons-usable material is particularly challenging. For the purposes of this paper, verification is defined as the process for establishing whether the States parties are complying with an agreement. In the final stage verification may lead into consideration of how to respond to non-compliance. Monitoring is perceived as the first level in the verification system. It is one generic form of collecting information on objects, activities or events and it involves a variety of instruments ranging from communications satellites to television cameras or human inspectors. Monitoring may also be used as a confidence-building measure

  7. Hot cell verification facility update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Moffett, S.D.; Lerch, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Cell Verification Facility (HCVF) provides a prototypic hot cell mockup to check equipment for functional and remote operation, and provides actual hands-on training for operators. The facility arrangement is flexible and assists in solving potential problems in a nonradioactive environment. HCVF has been in operation for six years, and the facility is a part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory

  8. Static Verification for Code Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Manuel

    The Code Contracts project [3] at Microsoft Research enables programmers on the .NET platform to author specifications in existing languages such as C# and VisualBasic. To take advantage of these specifications, we provide tools for documentation generation, runtime contract checking, and static contract verification.

  9. Verification of safety critical software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ki Chang; Chun, Chong Son; Lee, Byeong Joo; Lee, Soon Sung; Lee, Byung Chai

    1996-01-01

    To assure quality of safety critical software, software should be developed in accordance with software development procedures and rigorous software verification and validation should be performed. Software verification is the formal act of reviewing, testing of checking, and documenting whether software components comply with the specified requirements for a particular stage of the development phase[1]. New software verification methodology was developed and was applied to the Shutdown System No. 1 and 2 (SDS1,2) for Wolsung 2,3 and 4 nuclear power plants by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited(AECL) in order to satisfy new regulation requirements of Atomic Energy Control Boars(AECB). Software verification methodology applied to SDS1 for Wolsung 2,3 and 4 project will be described in this paper. Some errors were found by this methodology during the software development for SDS1 and were corrected by software designer. Outputs from Wolsung 2,3 and 4 project have demonstrated that the use of this methodology results in a high quality, cost-effective product. 15 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  10. Verification and the safeguards legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perricos, Demetrius

    2001-01-01

    A number of inspection or monitoring systems throughout the world over the last decades have been structured drawing upon the IAEA experience of setting up and operating its safeguards system. The first global verification system was born with the creation of the IAEA safeguards system, about 35 years ago. With the conclusion of the NPT in 1968, inspections were to be performed under safeguards agreements, concluded directly between the IAEA and non-nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty. The IAEA developed the safeguards system within the limitations reflected in the Blue Book (INFCIRC 153), such as limitations of routine access by the inspectors to 'strategic points', including 'key measurement points', and the focusing of verification on declared nuclear material in declared installations. The system, based as it was on nuclear material accountancy. It was expected to detect a diversion of nuclear material with a high probability and within a given time and therefore determine also that there had been no diversion of nuclear material from peaceful purposes. The most vital element of any verification system is the inspector. Technology can assist but cannot replace the inspector in the field. Their experience, knowledge, intuition and initiative are invaluable factors contributing to the success of any inspection regime. The IAEA inspectors are however not part of an international police force that will intervene to prevent a violation taking place. To be credible they should be technically qualified with substantial experience in industry or in research and development before they are recruited. An extensive training program has to make sure that the inspectors retain their professional capabilities and that it provides them with new skills. Over the years, the inspectors and through them the safeguards verification system gained experience in: organization and management of large teams; examination of records and evaluation of material balances

  11. Eggspectation : organic egg verification tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 RIKILT conducted a study on about 2,000 eggs to evaluate three different analytical verification methods: carotenoid profiling, fatty acid profiling and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The eggs were collected from about 50 Dutch farms. The selection was based on the farms’ location and

  12. Online dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven

    2012-01-01

    This article initially provides a panoramic overview and a preliminary typologization of present and future online dictionaries based upon their application of the available technologies and suggests that the future of lexicography will be the development of highly sophisticated tools which may......, need, consultation, and data. The article then proceeds to the discussion of some advanced information science techniques that may contribute to the desired individualization. Upon this basis, it finally discusses the interaction between online dictionaries and external sources like the Internet...

  13. Online marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Zrůst, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate pay per click marketing as suitable marketing tool for promotion and distribution of a given product. The paper describes basic vocabulary related to PPC advertising, common metrics, tools used by online marketers, and logic of running PPC campaigns. The paper also tries to quantify impact of Internet on economies. The second part applies the theory to analysis of consumers' conversion path while searching online in common search engines where PPC marketi...

  14. Diagnóstico temprano en un brote epidémico del virus Dengue en Piura usando RT-PCR y nested-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Nolasco

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Un test de diagnóstico temprano (RT-PCR y Nested-PCR fue evaluado y comparado con métodos convencionales (cultivo in vitro, IFI y MAC-ELISA. Treinta y cuatro sueros de pacientes correspondientes de un brote epidémico de la costa norte peruana (Mancora, Piura en mayo de 1997 fueron incluidos en este estudio. Todos los sueros fueron obtenidos de pacientes que presentaron en los primeros cinco días manifestaciones clínicas siendo diagnosticados luego como dengue serotipo 1. Asimismo, RT-PCR permitió diagnosticar 82% de los sueros (28/34, sin embargo Mac-ELISA y cultivo in vitro reconocieron unicamente 41% de los sueros (14/34 y 38% de los sueros (13/34 respectivamente. Por lo tanto, el uso de esta herramienta molecular (RT-PCR y Nested-PCR permitiró dar un diagnóstico temprano a estos pacientes y actuar inmediatamente ante la presencia de un brote epidémico.

  15. TH-AB-202-01: Daily Lung Tumor Motion Characterization On EPIDs Using a Markerless Tiling Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozario, T [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Chiu, T; Lu, W; Chen, M; Yan, Y [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Mao, W [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tracking lung tumor motion in real time allows for target dose escalation while simultaneously reducing dose to sensitive structures, thus increasing local control without increasing toxicity. We present a novel intra-fractional markerless lung tumor tracking algorithm using MV treatment beam images acquired during treatment delivery. Strong signals superimposed on the tumor significantly reduced the soft tissue resolution; while different imaging modalities involved introduce global imaging discrepancies. This reduced the comparison accuracies. A simple yet elegant Tiling algorithm is reported to overcome the aforementioned issues. Methods: MV treatment beam images were acquired continuously in beam’s eye view (BEV) by an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during treatment and analyzed to obtain tumor positions on every frame. Every frame of the MV image was simulated by a composite of two components with separate digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs): all non-moving structures and the tumor. This Titling algorithm divides the global composite DRR and the corresponding MV projection into sub-images called tiles. Rigid registration is performed independently on tile-pairs in order to improve local soft tissue resolution. This enables the composite DRR to be transformed accurately to match the MV projection and attain a high correlation value through a pixel-based linear transformation. The highest cumulative correlation for all tile-pairs achieved over a user-defined search range indicates the 2-D coordinates of the tumor location on the MV projection. Results: This algorithm was successfully applied to cine-mode BEV images acquired during two SBRT plans delivered five times with different motion patterns to each of two phantoms. Approximately 15000 beam’s eye view images were analyzed and tumor locations were successfully identified on every projection with a maximum/average error of 1.8 mm / 1.0 mm. Conclusion: Despite the presence of

  16. Nuclear power plant C and I design verification by simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, Joachim; Yu, Kim; Lee, D.Y

    2003-01-01

    An important part of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) in the Taiwan NPP Lungmen Units no.1 and no.2 is the Full Scope Simulator (FSS). The simulator was to be built according to design data and therefore, apart from the training aspect, a major part of the development is to apply a simulation based test bed for the verification, validation and improvement of plant design in the control and instrumentation (C and I) areas of unit control room equipment, operator Man Machine Interface (MMI), process computer functions and plant procedures. Furthermore the Full Scope Simulator will be used after that to allow proper training of the plant operators two years before Unit no.1 fuel load. The article describes scope, methods and results of the advanced verification and validation process and highlights the advantages of test bed simulation for real power plant design and implementation. Subsequent application of advanced simulation software tools like instrumentation and control translators, graphical model builders, process models, graphical on-line test tools and screen based or projected soft panels, allowed a team to fulfil the task of C and I verification in time before the implementation of the Distributed Control and Information System (DCIS) started. An additional area of activity was the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) for the operator MMI. Due to the fact that the ABWR design incorporates a display-based operation with most of the plant components, a dedicated verification and validation process is required by NUREG-0711. In order to support this activity an engineering test system had been installed for all the necessary HFE investigations. All detected improvements had been properly documented and used to update the plant design documentation by a defined process. The Full Scope Simulator (FSS) with hard panels and stimulated digital control and information system are in the final acceptance test process with the end customer, Taiwan Power Company

  17. Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujay V.

    2017-01-01

    LVT is a framework developed to provide an automated, consolidated environment for systematic land surface model evaluation Includes support for a range of in-situ, remote-sensing and other model and reanalysis products. Supports the analysis of outputs from various LIS subsystems, including LIS-DA, LIS-OPT, LIS-UE. Note: The Land Information System Verification Toolkit (LVT) is a NASA software tool designed to enable the evaluation, analysis and comparison of outputs generated by the Land Information System (LIS). The LVT software is released under the terms and conditions of the NASA Open Source Agreement (NOSA) Version 1.1 or later. Land Information System Verification Toolkit (LVT) NOSA.

  18. Ontology Matching with Semantic Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Mary, Yves R; Shironoshita, E Patrick; Kabuka, Mansur R

    2009-09-01

    ASMOV (Automated Semantic Matching of Ontologies with Verification) is a novel algorithm that uses lexical and structural characteristics of two ontologies to iteratively calculate a similarity measure between them, derives an alignment, and then verifies it to ensure that it does not contain semantic inconsistencies. In this paper, we describe the ASMOV algorithm, and then present experimental results that measure its accuracy using the OAEI 2008 tests, and that evaluate its use with two different thesauri: WordNet, and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). These results show the increased accuracy obtained by combining lexical, structural and extensional matchers with semantic verification, and demonstrate the advantage of using a domain-specific thesaurus for the alignment of specialized ontologies.

  19. Use of the statistical control of processes through checking before treatment realised with the ionization chamber and by electronic portal system of imaging (E.P.I.D.) in intensity modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.); Utilisation de la maitrise statistique des processus dans le cadre des controles avant traitement realises avec la chambre d'ionisation et par systeme d'imagerie portale electronique (EPID) en radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villani, N.; Gerard, K.; Noel, A. [Nancy univ., Lab. de Recherche en Radiophysique, CRAN UMR 7039, CNRS, Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Marchesi, V.; Huger, S. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique Medicale, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    The expected results are to demonstrate that it is possible to reduce the times devoted to the pre-treatment controls, while keeping an optimal safety, on substituting the measures of the ionization chamber by this one of the electronic portal imaging device (E.P.I.D.). (N.C.)

  20. Nuclear Data Verification and Standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karam, Lisa R.; Arif, Muhammad; Thompson, Alan K.

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction verification and standardization data for the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Nuclear Physics programs which include astrophysics, radioactive beam studies, and heavy-ion reactions. The measurements made in this program are also useful to other programs that indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. These include homeland security, personnel health and safety, nuclear waste disposal, treaty verification, national defense, and nuclear based energy production. The work includes the verification of reference standard cross sections and related neutron data employing the unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; and the preservation of standard reference deposits. An essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data standards including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  1. PBL online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Problem- and Project-Based Learning (PBL) is a widely used pedagogical method in higher education. Although PBL encourages self-directed learning and works with the students’ own projects and problems, it also includes teacher presentations, discussions and group reflections, both on......-campus and online. Therefore, the teacher’s plans might be relevant to the students’ projects, but that is not always the case. This study investigates how master’s students interact with an online Problem-Based Learning design and examines how technology influences these interactions. The empirical data stem from...... lessons at an online master’s course, and they were collected and analyzed using a netnographic approach. The study finds that concepts like self-directed learning and active involvement of everyone can have very different meanings from the teachers’ and the students’ points of view. If the students do...

  2. On-power verification of the dynamic response of self-powered in-core detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdula, K.; Beaudet, M.

    1996-01-01

    Self-powered in-core detectors are used for on-line safety and regulation purposes in CANDU reactors. Such applications require use of detectors whose response is primarily prompt to changes in flux. In-service verification of the detectors' response is required to ensure significant degradation in performance has not occurred during long-term operation. Changes in the detector characteristics occur due to nuclear interactions and failures. Present verification requires significant station resources and disrupts power production. Use of the 'noise' in the detector signal is being investigated as an alternative to assess the dynamic response of the detectors during long-term operation. Measurements of reference 'signatures' were obtained from replacement shutdown system detectors. Results show 'noise' measurements are a promising alternative to the current verification method. Identification of changes in the detector response function assist in accurate diagnosis and prognosis of changes in detector signals due to process changes. (author)

  3. Online safety

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Australians are increasingly connecting online through computers, mobile phones and other electronic devices to access the internet and social media. In the process, young people in particular are becoming more at risk of being exposed to fraud, identity theft, unauthorised access to personal information, stalking, harassment and exposure to illicit or offensive materials. This book presents a range of cybersafety tips to arm readers with an informed awareness of the risks online and offer advice on how to stay protected. A chapter in the book is specifically dedicated to understanding and dea

  4. Online Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Gorm Hansen, Katrine

    Online Communities” er et medie for brugere og fagfolk, hvor de kan mødes digitalt for at dele erfaringer, og dette kan anvendes som inspiration indenfor Brugerdreven Innovation. Via ”desk research” kan virksomheder opnå adgang til varierende mængder af brugere på en forholdsvist enkelt måde. I...... denne rapport beskrives eksperimentets opbygning, resultater og mulige værdi. Vi håber hermed på at kunne give praktisk indsigt i, hvorledes virksomheder fra byggematerialeindustrien kan agere i online communities....

  5. Free and Reduced-Price Meal Application and Income Verification Practices in School Nutrition Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Junehee; Lee, Yee Ming; Park, Eunhye; Wang, Yujia; Rushing, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study assessed current practices and attitudes of school nutrition program (SNP) management staff regarding free and reduced-price (F-RP) meal application and verification in SNPs. Methods: Stratified, randomly selected 1,500 SNP management staff in 14 states received a link to an online questionnaire and/or a printed…

  6. Consent Based Verification System (CBSV)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — CBSV is a fee-based service offered by SSA's Business Services Online (BSO). It is used by private companies to verify the SSNs of their customers and clients that...

  7. Estimating output fluence with MCNP4 for shaped fields and their comparison with measurements in the EPID system aS1000 for dosimetry 2D in-vivo; Estimacion de la fluencia de salida con MCNP4 para campos conformados y su comparacion con mediciones en el sistema EPID aS1000 para dosimetria in-vivo 2D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez R, B.; Rodriguez P, X.; Sosa, M., E-mail: bhernandez@fisica.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque No. 103, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Radiotherapy dosimetry is a fundamental process in quality control of the treatments performed with this technique. Different systems exist to quantify radiation dose in radiotherapy, one of them is the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID), which is widely used in IMRT to measure the output fluence of a radiation field for comparison with a predicted fluence in a planning system. The objective of this work was to simulate a Varian linear accelerator model Clinac i X using the MCNP4 code for obtaining curves of percentage depth dose (Pdd) and open fields dosimetric profiles of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 20 x 20 and 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}. The simulations were validated by comparing them with measurements made with ionization chamber. Then a mannequin of solid water (30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3}) with an open field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} was irradiated to measure the output fluence with EPID aS1000 system of Varian. A simulation of the solid water mannequin under the same conditions of irradiation was conducted to estimate the output fluence. Tests of index gamma and percentage differences were calculated to compare that simulated with that measured. In all cases was found that more than 95% of the evaluated points passed the acceptance criteria (ΔD= 1% and ΔS= 1 mm for curves Pdd and profiles, and ΔD= 3% and ΔS= 3 mm for fluence two-dimensional). This paper will contribute to the implementation of in-vivo dosimetry three-dimensional with the EPID system. (Author)

  8. Hiperplasia de Músculo Liso no Epidídimo: Revisão de Literatura/Smooth Muscle Hyperplasia of the Epididymis: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília Vieira Lisboa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available O epidídimo pode ser acometido por hiperplasia ou neoplasia, benigna ou maligna, sempre diferenciadas pelo estudo histopatológico. Ele tem como função coletar, amadurecer e armazenar espermatozóides constantemente produzidos pelos túbulos seminíferos. Patologias do epidídimo acometem homens na puberdade, o que pode resultar em alterações na maturação dos espermatozóides e até mesmo levar a infertilidade. A conduta dessa afecção é cirúrgica e pode ser desde ressecção da tumoração preservando-se estruturas hígidas como, por exemplo, os testículos, em casos benignos, até exploração peritoneal para esvaziamento linfonodal mais orquiectomia, em casos malignos. O objetivo foi realizar uma revisão de literatura sobre hiperplasia do epidídimo que auxilie no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces que diminuam a mortalidade, morbidade e sequelas dos pacientes. Como a patologia em questão tem baixa incidência, com predomínio de casos benignos e evolução sem complicações, conclui-se que há a necessidade de mais análises sobre o tema para melhor elucidar seu tratamento e, principalmente, as consequências. The epididymis may be affected by hyperplasia or neoplastic cells, always differentiated by histopathological study. It has the function of collecting, maturing and storing sperm that are constantly produced by the seminiferous tubules. Pathologies of epididymis affect male puberty, which may result in changes in the maturation of sperm and even lead to infertility. The conduct in this condition can be from a tumor resection preserving healthy structures such as, for example, the testicles, in benign cases, while in malignant cases chooses whether the peritoneal exploration for a lymph node dissection plus orchiectomy. The purpose was to conduct a literature review of hyperplasia of the epididymis that helps in the diagnosis and early treatment, which can lead to lower risk of mortality and morbidity allowing a decrease in

  9. Craniocaudal Safety Margin Calculation Based on Interfractional Changes in Tumor Motion in Lung SBRT Assessed With an EPID in Cine Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Miyagi, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and interfractional changes in tumor motion magnitude using an electric portal imaging device in cine mode (EPID cine) during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to calculate margins to compensate for these variations. Materials and Methods: Subjects were 28 patients with Stage I NSCLC who underwent SBRT. Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) at simulation was binned into 10 respiratory phases, which provided average intensity projection CT data sets (AIP). On 4D-CT, peak-to-peak motion of the tumor (M-4DCT) in the craniocaudal direction was assessed and the tumor center (mean tumor position [MTP]) of the AIP (MTP-4DCT) was determined. At treatment, the tumor on cone beam CT was registered to that on AIP for patient setup. During three sessions of irradiation, peak-to-peak motion of the tumor (M-cine) and the mean tumor position (MTP-cine) were obtained using EPID cine and in-house software. Based on changes in tumor motion magnitude (∆M) and patient setup error (∆MTP), defined as differences between M-4DCT and M-cine and between MTP-4DCT and MTP-cine, a margin to compensate for these variations was calculated with Stroom’s formula. Results: The means (±standard deviation: SD) of M-4DCT and M-cine were 3.1 (±3.4) and 4.0 (±3.6) mm, respectively. The means (±SD) of ∆M and ∆MTP were 0.9 (±1.3) and 0.2 (±2.4) mm, respectively. Internal target volume-planning target volume (ITV-PTV) margins to compensate for ∆M, ∆MTP, and both combined were 3.7, 5.2, and 6.4 mm, respectively. Conclusion: EPID cine is a useful modality for assessing interfractional variations of tumor motion. The ITV-PTV margins to compensate for these variations can be calculated.

  10. Online 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Morris

    This paper examines the co-existence of online and CD-ROM technologies in terms of their existing pricing structures, marketing strategies, functionality, and future roles. "Fixed Price Unlimited Usage" (FPUU) pricing and flat-rate pricing are discussed as viable alternatives to current pricing practices. In addition, it is argued that the…

  11. Food online

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Lomme C.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis the research focuses on the legal rules and regulations in the Netherlands that apply in the context of food purchases by consumers that are concluded online. Sale of food via the Internet takes place in the area of Civil Code requirements on distance selling and public law

  12. Out Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Tobias

    Trans people are increasingly stepping out of the shadow of pathologization and secretiveness to tell their life stories, share information and to connect with like-minded others, using YouTube as a platform. "Out Online: Trans Self-Representation and Community Building on YouTube" explores...

  13. Game Theory Models for the Verification of the Collective Behaviour of Autonomous Cars

    OpenAIRE

    Varga, László Z.

    2017-01-01

    The collective of autonomous cars is expected to generate almost optimal traffic. In this position paper we discuss the multi-agent models and the verification results of the collective behaviour of autonomous cars. We argue that non-cooperative autonomous adaptation cannot guarantee optimal behaviour. The conjecture is that intention aware adaptation with a constraint on simultaneous decision making has the potential to avoid unwanted behaviour. The online routing game model is expected to b...

  14. Detección del receptor de factor de crecimiento epidérmico en lesiones orales premalignas por relaxometría

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Geli, Yamirka; De la Cruz, Enrique Reynaldo; Dutok Sánchez, Carlos M.; Álvarez Guerra, Eloy D

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: detectar la sobreexpresión del receptor de factor de crecimiento epidérmico en células epiteliales de lesiones premalignas de la mucosa bucal, marcadas magnéticamente por relaxometría. Métodos: las células exfoliadas de mucosa oral de individuos sanos y enfermos se marcaron con el sistema: IgG anti-EGF-R biotinilada/IgG anti-biotina conjugada con partículas superparamagnéticas y se midieron los tiempos de relajación T1 y T2. Resultados: disminuyeron los tiempos de relajación (T1 y T...

  15. Experimental verification of layout physical verification of silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shamy, Raghi S.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2018-02-01

    Silicon photonics have been approved as one of the best platforms for dense integration of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) due to the high refractive index contrast among its materials. Silicon on insulator (SOI) is a widespread photonics technology, which support a variety of devices for lots of applications. As the photonics market is growing, the number of components in the PICs increases which increase the need for an automated physical verification (PV) process. This PV process will assure reliable fabrication of the PICs as it will check both the manufacturability and the reliability of the circuit. However, PV process is challenging in the case of PICs as it requires running an exhaustive electromagnetic (EM) simulations. Our group have recently proposed an empirical closed form models for the directional coupler and the waveguide bends based on the SOI technology. The models have shown a very good agreement with both finite element method (FEM) and finite difference time domain (FDTD) solvers. These models save the huge time of the 3D EM simulations and can be easily included in any electronic design automation (EDA) flow as the equations parameters can be easily extracted from the layout. In this paper we present experimental verification for our previously proposed models. SOI directional couplers with different dimensions have been fabricated using electron beam lithography and measured. The results from the measurements of the fabricate devices have been compared to the derived models and show a very good agreement. Also the matching can reach 100% by calibrating certain parameter in the model.

  16. Tipificación molecular del virus dengue 3 durante el brote epidémico de dengue clásico en Lima, Perú, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Mamani Z

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar mediante trascripción reversa-reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (RT-PCR y sitios específicos de restricción - reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (RSS-PCR al agente causal del brote epidémico presentado en el distrito de Comas, Lima en abril del año 2005. Materiales y métodos: veinte muestras de suero colectadas durante el brote de dengue fueron procesados por RT-PCR para determinar el serotipo, esta técnica se realizó en un solo paso. Luego se aplicó la técnica RSS-PCR para la identificación del genotipo circulante y se corroboraron los resultados posteriormente con aislamiento viral y secuenciamiento. Resultados: El análisis del RTPCR del ARN extraído de las muestras presentó un producto amplificado de 290pb que corresponden al dengue serotipo 3 (DEN 3. El análisis de los productos de RSS-PCR del ARN extraído a partir de aislamientos de DEN 3 correspondió al patrón C, incluido en el genotipo III. Los aislamientos de los virus dengue 3 en líneas celulares C6/36, tipificadas por IFI y el secuenciamiento genético confirmaron los resultados obtenidos por las pruebas previamente descritas. Conclusión: Durante el brote epidémico de dengue clásico en Lima, circuló el genotipo III del virus DEN 3.

  17. SU-F-T-262: Commissioning Varian Portal Dosimetry for EPID-Based Patient Specific QA in a Non-Aria Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M; Knutson, N [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Herrington, J [University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Price, M [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Development of an in-house program facilitates a workflow that allows Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) patient specific quality assurance (QA) measurements to be acquired and analyzed in the Portal Dosimetry Application (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) using a non-Aria Record and Verify (R&V) system (MOSAIQ, Elekta, Crawley, UK) to deliver beams in standard clinical treatment mode. Methods: Initial calibration of an in-house software tool includes characterization of EPID dosimetry parameters by importing DICOM images of varying delivered MUs to determine linear mapping factors in order to convert image pixel values to Varian-defined Calibrated Units (CU). Using this information, the Portal Dose Image Prediction (PDIP) algorithm was commissioned by converting images of various field sizes to output factors using the Eclipse Scripting Application Programming Interface (ESAPI) and converting a delivered configuration fluence to absolute dose units. To verify the algorithm configuration, an integrated image was acquired, exported directly from the R&V client, automatically converted to a compatible, calibrated dosimetric image, and compared to a PDIP calculated image using Varian’s Portal Dosimetry Application. Results: For two C-Series and one TrueBeam Varian linear accelerators, gamma comparisons (global 3% / 3mm) of PDIP algorithm predicted dosimetric images and images converted via the inhouse system demonstrated agreement for ≥99% of all pixels, exceeding vendor-recommended commissioning guidelines. Conclusion: Combinations of a programmatic image conversion tool and ESAPI allow for an efficient and accurate method of patient IMRT QA incorporating a 3rd party R&V system.

  18. SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Berbeco, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. (United States); Fueglistaller, R; Morf, D [Varian Medical Systems, Dattwil, Aargau (Switzerland); Wang, A; Shedlock, D; Star-Lack, J [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a cascaded linear system model for MV cone-beam CT (CBCT) using a multi-layer (MLI) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and provide experimental insight into image formation. A validated 3D model provides insight into salient factors affecting reconstructed image quality, allowing potential for optimizing detector design for CBCT applications. Methods: A cascaded linear system model was developed to investigate the potential improvement in reconstructed image quality for MV CBCT using an MLI EPID. Inputs to the three-dimensional (3D) model include projection space MTF and NPS. Experimental validation was performed on a prototype MLI detector installed on the portal imaging arm of a Varian TrueBeam radiotherapy system. CBCT scans of up to 898 projections over 360 degrees were acquired at exposures of 16 and 64 MU. Image volumes were reconstructed using a Feldkamp-type (FDK) filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. Flat field images and scans of a Catphan model 604 phantom were acquired. The effect of 2×2 and 4×4 detector binning was also examined. Results: Using projection flat fields as an input, examination of the modeled and measured NPS in the axial plane exhibits good agreement. Binning projection images was shown to improve axial slice SDNR by a factor of approximately 1.4. This improvement is largely driven by a decrease in image noise of roughly 20%. However, this effect is accompanied by a subsequent loss in image resolution. Conclusion: The measured axial NPS shows good agreement with the theoretical calculation using a linear system model. Binning of projection images improves SNR of large objects on the Catphan phantom by decreasing noise. Specific imaging tasks will dictate the implementation image binning to two-dimensional projection images. The project was partially supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and grant No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute.

  19. Verification and nuclear material security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Director General will open the symposium by presenting a series of challenges facing the international safeguards community: the need to ensure a robust system, with strong verification tools and a sound research and development programme; the importance of securing the necessary support for the system, in terms of resources; the effort to achieve universal participation in the non-proliferation regime; and the necessity of re-energizing disarmament efforts. Special focus will be given to the challenge underscored by recent events, of strengthening international efforts to combat nuclear terrorism. (author)

  20. SHIELD verification and validation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, C.

    1992-02-01

    This document outlines the verification and validation effort for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system code. Along with its predecessors, SHIELD has been in use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for more than ten years. During this time the code has been extensively tested and a variety of validation documents have been issued. The primary function of this report is to specify the features and capabilities for which SHIELD is to be considered validated, and to reference the documents that establish the validation

  1. Trojan technical specification verification project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; Rickenback, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Trojan Technical Specification Verification (TTSV) project at the Trojan plant of Portland General Electric Company was motivated by the recognition that many numbers in the Trojan technical specifications (TTS) potentially lacked the consideration of instrument- and/or process-related errors. The plant setpoints were known to consider such errors, but many of the values associated with the limiting conditions for operation (LCO) did not. In addition, the existing plant instrument error analyses were based on industry values that do not reflect the Trojan plant-specific experience. The purpose of this project is to ensure that the Trojan plant setpoint and LCO values include plant-specific instrument error

  2. A verification environment for bigraphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Gian David; Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present the BigMC tool for bigraphical reactive systems that may be instantiated as a verification tool for any formalism or domain-specific modelling language encoded as a bigraphical reactive system. We introduce the syntax and use of BigMC, and exemplify its use with two small examples......: a textbook “philosophers” example, and an example motivated by a ubiquitous computing application. We give a tractable heuristic with which to approximate interference between reaction rules, and prove this analysis to be safe. We provide a mechanism for state reachability checking of bigraphical reactive...

  3. Hot-cell verification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschenbaum, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Hot Cell Verification Facility (HCVF) was established as the test facility for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) examination equipment. HCVF provides a prototypic hot cell environment to check the equipment for functional and remote operation. It also provides actual hands-on training for future FMEF Operators. In its two years of operation, HCVF has already provided data to make significant changes in items prior to final fabrication. It will also shorten the startup time in FMEF since the examination equipment will have been debugged and operated in HCVF

  4. Availability of prescription drugs for bipolar disorder at online pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Bauer, Michael

    2016-03-15

    There is increasing use of online pharmacies to purchase prescription drugs. While some online pharmacies are legitimate and safe, there are many unsafe and illegal so-called "rogue" online pharmacies. This study investigated the availability of psychotropic drugs online to consumers in the US, using 5 commonly prescribed drugs for bipolar disorder. Using the search term "buy [drug name]" in the Google, Yahoo and Bing search engines, the characteristics of the online pharmacies found on the first two pages of search results were investigated. The availability of the requested dosage and formulations of two brand (Seroquel XR, Abilify) and three generic drugs (lamotrigine, lithium carbonate and bupropion SR) were determined. Of 30 online pharmacies found, 17 (57%) were rated as rogue by LegitScript. Of the 30 pharmacies, 15 (50%) require a prescription, 21 (70%) claim to be from Canada, with 20 of these having a Canadian International Pharmacy association (CIPA) seal on the website. Only 13 of the 20 sites with a CIPA seal were active CIPA members. There were about the same number of trust verification seals on the rogue and legitimate pharmacy sites. Some rogue pharmacies are professional in appearance, and may be difficult for consumers to recognize as rogue. All five brand and generic drugs were offered for sale online, with or without a prescription. However, many substitutions were presented such as different strengths and formulations including products not approved by the FDA. No evaluation of product quality, packaging or purchasing. Psychotropic medications are available online with or without a prescription. The majority of online pharmacy websites were rogue. Physicians should ask about the use of online pharmacies. For those who choose to use online pharmacies, two measures to detect rogue pharmacies are recommended: (1) only purchase drugs from pharmacies that require a prescription, and (2) check all pharmacy verification seals directly on the website

  5. Protocol for the quality control systems of electronic portal imaging used in verification of radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre, Ileana; Alfonso, Rodolfo; Garcia, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Following the approach of quality control of radiotherapy equipment, conceived in the IAEA TECDOC-1151, we analyzed the different tests must be to an EPID to guarantee levels of accuracy required in the administration of radiation treatments, including the study of the impact of different parameters, geometric and dosimetric imaging, involved in the process. Established the types and frequency of checks, as well as procedures for their implementation, the allowable tolerances set of values records and forms for recording . Was carried out assessment protocol in various services based on amorphous silicon EPID for its applicability and scope. Was designed and validated in clinical practice protocol for EPID quality control, demonstrating its applicability with a minimum of material and human resources. It We concluded that with proper and systematic quality control program, tests including dosimetry, the EPID can provide valuable information about physico-beam dosimetry, and ensure adequate accuracy geometric in the patient's location. (author)

  6. Online Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vujovic, Sladjana; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2008-01-01

      Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of online networking during the innovation process, including its role(s) in communication, cooperation and coordination. The paper neither implicitly assumes that online computer-based networking is a prerequisite for the innovation...... process nor denies the possibility that innovation can emerge and successfully survive without it. It merely presupposes that, in cases of innovation where information and communication technologies play a substantial role, non-proprietarity may offer an interesting alternative to innovations based...... on proprietary knowledge. Design/methodology/approach - The paper borrows from the theory of communities-of-practice, which takes into account social relations, contacts, and the transfer and incorporation of knowledge. Open source innovation is not the exclusive preserve of computer nerds, but also has...

  7. Online kinship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The article shows how the technology of social media sites facilitates new kinds of kinship. It ana-lyzes how ‘donor families’ – i.e., families in which the children are conceived via sperm and/or egg donations – negotiate kinship, family formations and gender when connecting with each other online...... families as well as interviews with users of this Facebook group, the article shows how the affordances of social media, especially the Facebook application for smart phones, are central to the formation and maintenance of new kinship relations. Furthermore, the article illustrates how conventional....... Family formation and parenting are closely connected with gender and gender norms, and online donor families, therefore, offer an opportunity for understanding gender and gender for-mations in contemporary times and contemporary media. By analyzing commentary threads of a Facebook group connecting donor...

  8. SU-E-T-133: Assessing IMRT Treatment Delivery Accuracy and Consistency On a Varian TrueBeam Using the SunNuclear PerFraction EPID Dosimetry Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieterich, S [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Trestrail, E; Holt, R [Pacific Crest Medical Physics, Chico, CA (United States); Saini, S [Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL (Australia); Pfeiffer, I [VMTH, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Kent, M; Hansen, K [Surgical and Radiological Sciences, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess if the TrueBeam HD120 collimator is delivering small IMRT fields accurately and consistently throughout the course of treatment using the SunNuclear PerFraction software. Methods: 7-field IMRT plans for 8 canine patients who passed IMRT QA using SunNuclear Mapcheck DQA were selected for this study. The animals were setup using CBCT image guidance. The EPID fluence maps were captured for each treatment field and each treatment fraction, with the first fraction EPID data serving as the baseline for comparison. The Sun Nuclear PerFraction Software was used to compare the EPID data for subsequent fractions using a Gamma (3%/3mm) pass rate of 90%. To simulate requirements for SRS, the data was reanalyzed using a Gamma (3%/1mm) pass rate of 90%. Low-dose, low- and high gradient thresholds were used to focus the analysis on clinically relevant parts of the dose distribution. Results: Not all fractions could be analyzed, because during some of the treatment courses the DICOM tags in the EPID images intermittently change from CU to US (unspecified), which would indicate a temporary loss of EPID calibration. This technical issue is still being investigated. For the remaining fractions, the vast majority (7/8 of patients, 95% of fractions, and 96.6% of fields) are passing the less stringent Gamma criteria. The more stringent Gamma criteria caused a drop in pass rate (90 % of fractions, 84% of fields). For the patient with the lowest pass rate, wet towel bolus was used. Another patient with low pass rates experienced masseter muscle wasting. Conclusion: EPID dosimetry using the PerFraction software demonstrated that the majority of fields passed a Gamma (3%/3mm) for IMRT treatments delivered with a TrueBeam HD120 MLC. Pass rates dropped for a DTA of 1mm to model SRS tolerances. PerFraction pass rates can flag missing bolus or internal shields. Sanjeev Saini is an employee of Sun Nuclear Corporation. For this study, a pre-release version of PerFRACTION 1

  9. Particularities of Verification Processes for Distributed Informatics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents distributed informatics applications and characteristics of their development cycle. It defines the concept of verification and there are identified the differences from software testing. Particularities of the software testing and software verification processes are described. The verification steps and necessary conditions are presented and there are established influence factors of quality verification. Software optimality verification is analyzed and some metrics are defined for the verification process.

  10. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  11. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models

  12. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models.

  13. Quantitative reactive modeling and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzinger, Thomas A

    Formal verification aims to improve the quality of software by detecting errors before they do harm. At the basis of formal verification is the logical notion of correctness , which purports to capture whether or not a program behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition of software into correct and incorrect programs falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of software in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria. We therefore propose to introduce quantitative fitness measures for programs, specifically for measuring the function, performance, and robustness of reactive programs such as concurrent processes. This article describes the goals of the ERC Advanced Investigator Project QUAREM. The project aims to build and evaluate a theory of quantitative fitness measures for reactive models. Such a theory must strive to obtain quantitative generalizations of the paradigms that have been success stories in qualitative reactive modeling, such as compositionality, property-preserving abstraction and abstraction refinement, model checking, and synthesis. The theory will be evaluated not only in the context of software and hardware engineering, but also in the context of systems biology. In particular, we will use the quantitative reactive models and fitness measures developed in this project for testing hypotheses about the mechanisms behind data from biological experiments.

  14. Verification and Performance Analysis for Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2009-01-01

    This talk provides a thorough tutorial of the UPPAAL tool suite for, modeling, simulation, verification, optimal scheduling, synthesis, testing and performance analysis of embedded and real-time systems.......This talk provides a thorough tutorial of the UPPAAL tool suite for, modeling, simulation, verification, optimal scheduling, synthesis, testing and performance analysis of embedded and real-time systems....

  15. Safety Verification for Probabilistic Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lijun; She, Zhikun; Ratschan, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of random phenomena and continuous real-time control deserves increased attention for instance in wireless sensing and control applications. Safety verification for such systems thus needs to consider probabilistic variations of systems with hybrid dynamics. In safety verification o...... on a number of case studies, tackled using a prototypical implementation....

  16. On the organisation of program verification competitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Marieke; Klebanov, Vladimir; Monahan, Rosemary; Klebanov, Vladimir; Beckert, Bernhard; Biere, Armin; Sutcliffe, Geoff

    In this paper, we discuss the challenges that have to be addressed when organising program verification competitions. Our focus is on competitions for verification systems where the participants both formalise an informally stated requirement and (typically) provide some guidance for the tool to

  17. Gender Verification of Female Olympic Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Barry D.; Genel, Myron; Robinowitz, Carolyn B.; Turner, Patricia L.; Woods, Gary L.

    2002-01-01

    Gender verification of female athletes has long been criticized by geneticists, endocrinologists, and others in the medical community. Recently, the International Olympic Committee's Athletic Commission called for discontinuation of mandatory laboratory-based gender verification of female athletes. This article discusses normal sexual…

  18. HTGR analytical methods and design verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Northup, T.E.

    1982-05-01

    Analytical methods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) include development, update, verification, documentation, and maintenance of all computer codes for HTGR design and analysis. This paper presents selected nuclear, structural mechanics, seismic, and systems analytical methods related to the HTGR core. This paper also reviews design verification tests in the reactor core, reactor internals, steam generator, and thermal barrier

  19. Face Verification for Mobile Personal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Q.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we presented a detailed study of the face verification problem on the mobile device, covering every component of the system. The study includes face detection, registration, normalization, and verification. Furthermore, the information fusion problem is studied to verify face

  20. The monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper partially reviews and updates the potential for monitoring and verification of nuclear weapons, including verification of their destruction. Cooperative monitoring with templates of the gamma-ray spectrum are an important tool, dependent on the use of information barriers

  1. Fingerprint verification prediction model in hand dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chew K; Chang, Choong C; Johor, Asmah; Othman, Puwira; Baba, Roshidah

    2015-07-01

    Hand dermatitis associated fingerprint changes is a significant problem and affects fingerprint verification processes. This study was done to develop a clinically useful prediction model for fingerprint verification in patients with hand dermatitis. A case-control study involving 100 patients with hand dermatitis. All patients verified their thumbprints against their identity card. Registered fingerprints were randomized into a model derivation and model validation group. Predictive model was derived using multiple logistic regression. Validation was done using the goodness-of-fit test. The fingerprint verification prediction model consists of a major criterion (fingerprint dystrophy area of ≥ 25%) and two minor criteria (long horizontal lines and long vertical lines). The presence of the major criterion predicts it will almost always fail verification, while presence of both minor criteria and presence of one minor criterion predict high and low risk of fingerprint verification failure, respectively. When none of the criteria are met, the fingerprint almost always passes the verification. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.937, and the goodness-of-fit test showed agreement between the observed and expected number (P = 0.26). The derived fingerprint verification failure prediction model is validated and highly discriminatory in predicting risk of fingerprint verification in patients with hand dermatitis. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  2. Validation of Embedded System Verification Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marincic, J.; Mader, Angelika H.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    The result of a model-based requirements verification shows that the model of a system satisfies (or not) formalised system requirements. The verification result is correct only if the model represents the system adequately. No matter what modelling technique we use, what precedes the model

  3. A Model for Collaborative Runtime Verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testerink, Bas; Bulling, Nils; Dastani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Runtime verification concerns checking whether a system execution satisfies a given property. In this paper we propose a model for collaborative runtime verification where a network of local monitors collaborates in order to verify properties of the system. A local monitor has only a local view on

  4. On Verification Modelling of Embedded Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Hendrik; Mader, Angelika H.

    Computer-aided verification of embedded systems hinges on the availability of good verification models of the systems at hand. Such models must be much simpler than full design models or specifications to be of practical value, because of the unavoidable combinatorial complexities in the

  5. An automated portal verification system for the tangential breast portal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, F.-F.; Lai, W.; Chen, C. W.; Nelson, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In order to ensure the treatment is delivered as planned, a portal image is acquired in the accelerator and is compared to the reference image. At present, this comparison is performed by radiation oncologists based on the manually-identified features, which is both time-consuming and potentially error-prone. With the introduction of various electronic portal imaging devices, real-time patient positioning correction is becoming clinically feasible to replace time-delayed analysis using films. However, this procedure requires present of radiation oncologists during patient treatment which is not cost-effective and practically not realistic. Therefore, the efficiency and quality of radiation therapy could be substantially improved if this procedure can be automated. The purpose of this study is to develop a fully computerized verification system for the radiation therapy of breast cancer for which a similar treatment setup is generally employed. Materials/Methods: The automated verification system involves image acquisition, image feature extraction, feature correlation between reference and portal images, and quantitative evaluation of patient setup. In this study, a matrix liquid ion-chamber EPID was used to acquire digital portal images which is directly attached to Varian CL2100C accelerator. For effective use of computation memory, the 12-bit gray levels in original portal images were quantized to form a range of 8-bit gray levels. A typical breast portal image includes three important components: breast and lung tissues in the treatment field, air space within the treatment field, and non-irradiated region. A hierarchical region processing technique was developed to separate these regions sequentially. The inherent hierarchical features were formulated based on different radiation attenuation for different regions as: treatment field edge -- breast skin line -- chest wall. Initially, a combination of a Canny edge detector and a constrained

  6. Re-evaluating journalistic routines in a digital age: A review of research on the use of online sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecheler, S.; Kruikemeier, S.

    This review article provides a critical discussion of empirical studies that deal with the use of online news sources in journalism. We evaluate how online sources have changed the journalist–source relationship regarding selection of sources as well as verification strategies. We also discuss how

  7. Expressão das citoceratinas em dermatoses infecto- parasitárias associadas à hiperplasia epidérmica Expression of the cytokeratins in infectious and parasitic skin diseases associated with epidermal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Marques Nogueira-Castañon

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: As citoceratinas(C são as proteínas estruturais mais importantes das células epiteliais e exibem a maior heterogeneidade dentre todas as proteínas dos filamentos intermediários. Seu estudo através de imunomarcação possibilita a análise estrutural do citoesqueleto em vários afecções neoplásicas e inflamatórias. OBJETIVOS: Verificar o padrão imuno-histoquímico da expressão das citoceratinas na epiderme de doenças infecto-parasitárias associadas à hiperplasia escamosa. MÉTODOS: Cortes histológicos obtidos de tecidos pré-fixados e incluidos em parafina à partir de lesões de cromomicose, paracoccidioidomicose, leishmaniose e condiloma acuminado foram marcados com os anticorpos DEK10, LL025, LL002 e AE1 pela técnica de imunoperoxidase (avidina-biotina. RESULTADOS: A análise de áreas com intensidade variável de hiperplasia epidérmica presentes nos fragmentos mostrou exclusivamente e/ou predominantemente nas quatro doenças: ausência de expressão da C10 nas áreas de hiperplasia intensa e retardo da expressão nas áreas de hiperplasia moderada e/ou ausente; padrão suprabasal de marcação para a C16 independentemente do grau de hiperplasia como também, liberação de epítopos suprabasais para os marcadores LL002 (C14 e AE1 (C10,14,16,19. CONCLUSÕES: As modificações indicam que, independentemente da natureza do agente etiológico e do grau de hiperplasia presente, ocorrem alterações na diferenciação e proliferação do ceratinócito.BACKGROUND: Cytokeratins (K are the major structural proteins of epithelial cells and they display the greatest heterogeneity of all intermediate filament proteins. The study of many isolated cytokeratins by immunomarcation enables the structural verification of the cytoskeleton in many neoplastic and inflammatory diseases. OBJECTIVE: To verify the immunohistochemical pattern of cytokeratin expression in infectious and parasitic diseases associated with squamous

  8. Reliability-Based Decision Fusion in Multimodal Biometric Verification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryszczuk Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a methodology of reliability estimation in the multimodal biometric verification scenario. Reliability estimation has shown to be an efficient and accurate way of predicting and correcting erroneous classification decisions in both unimodal (speech, face, online signature and multimodal (speech and face systems. While the initial research results indicate the high potential of the proposed methodology, the performance of the reliability estimation in a multimodal setting has not been sufficiently studied or evaluated. In this paper, we demonstrate the advantages of using the unimodal reliability information in order to perform an efficient biometric fusion of two modalities. We further show the presented method to be superior to state-of-the-art multimodal decision-level fusion schemes. The experimental evaluation presented in this paper is based on the popular benchmarking bimodal BANCA database.

  9. A Scala DSL for RETE-Based Runtime Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Runtime verification (RV) consists in part of checking execution traces against formalized specifications. Several systems have emerged, most of which support specification notations based on state machines, regular expressions, temporal logic, or grammars. The field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has for an even longer period of time studied rule-based production systems, which at a closer look appear to be relevant for RV, although seemingly focused on slightly different application domains, such as for example business processes and expert systems. The core algorithm in many of these systems is the Rete algorithm. We have implemented a Rete-based runtime verification system, named LogFire (originally intended for offline log analysis but also applicable to online analysis), as an internal DSL in the Scala programming language, using Scala's support for defining DSLs. This combination appears attractive from a practical point of view. Our contribution is in part conceptual in arguing that such rule-based frameworks originating from AI may be suited for RV.

  10. FIR signature verification system characterizing dynamics of handwriting features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumwarin, Pitak; Pernwong, Jitawat; Matsuura, Takenobu

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an online signature verification method based on the finite impulse response (FIR) system characterizing time-frequency characteristics of dynamic handwriting features. First, the barycenter determined from both the center point of signature and two adjacent pen-point positions in the signing process, instead of one pen-point position, is used to reduce the fluctuation of handwriting motion. In this paper, among the available dynamic handwriting features, motion pressure and area pressure are employed to investigate handwriting behavior. Thus, the stable dynamic handwriting features can be described by the relation of the time-frequency characteristics of the dynamic handwriting features. In this study, the aforesaid relation can be represented by the FIR system with the wavelet coefficients of the dynamic handwriting features as both input and output of the system. The impulse response of the FIR system is used as the individual feature for a particular signature. In short, the signature can be verified by evaluating the difference between the impulse responses of the FIR systems for a reference signature and the signature to be verified. The signature verification experiments in this paper were conducted using the SUBCORPUS MCYT-100 signature database consisting of 5,000 signatures from 100 signers. The proposed method yielded equal error rate (EER) of 3.21% on skilled forgeries.

  11. Laminite experimental: aspectos morfológicos, morfométricos e ultra-estruturais das lâminas dérmicas e epidérmicas do casco de eqüinos tratados com a trinitroglicerina

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Rita de Cássia de Lima [UNESP

    2007-01-01

    As alterações ultra-estruturais ocorridas nas lâminas epidérmicas e dérmicas de eqüinos com laminite são responsáveis pela rotação ou afundamento da falange distal dentro do casco. Com o objetivo de prevenir esta ocorrência foram estudados os efeitos da sobrecarga de carboidratos (SCHO), assim como da utilização de trinitroglicerina na fase prodrômica da laminite, nas lâminas epidérmicas do casco de quinze eqüinos. A indução da laminite por meio da sobrecarga de carboidratos alterou siginific...

  12. MFTF sensor verification computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    The design, requirements document and implementation of the MFE Sensor Verification System were accomplished by the Measurement Engineering Section (MES), a group which provides instrumentation for the MFTF magnet diagnostics. The sensors, installed on and around the magnets and solenoids, housed in a vacuum chamber, will supply information about the temperature, strain, pressure, liquid helium level and magnet voltage to the facility operator for evaluation. As the sensors are installed, records must be maintained as to their initial resistance values. Also, as the work progresses, monthly checks will be made to insure continued sensor health. Finally, after the MFTF-B demonstration, yearly checks will be performed as well as checks of sensors as problem develops. The software to acquire and store the data was written by Harry Chow, Computations Department. The acquired data will be transferred to the MFE data base computer system

  13. Numerical Verification Of Equilibrium Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piro, Markus; Lewis, Brent; Thompson, William T.; Simunovic, Srdjan; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

  14. Seismic verification of underground explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.

    1985-06-01

    The first nuclear test agreement, the test moratorium, was made in 1958 and lasted until the Soviet Union unilaterally resumed testing in the atmosphere in 1961. It was followed by the Limited Test Ban Treaty of 1963, which prohibited nuclear tests in the atmosphere, in outer space, and underwater. In 1974 the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT) was signed, limiting underground tests after March 1976 to a maximum yield of 250 kt. The TTBT was followed by a treaty limiting peaceful nuclear explosions and both the United States and the Soviet Union claim to be abiding by the 150-kt yield limit. A comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT), prohibiting all testing of nuclear weapons, has also been discussed. However, a verifiable CTBT is a contradiction in terms. No monitoring technology can offer absolute assurance that very-low-yield illicit explosions have not occurred. The verification process, evasion opportunities, and cavity decoupling are discussed in this paper

  15. Retail applications of signature verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  16. The NRC measurement verification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, T.N.; Ong, L.D.Y.

    1995-01-01

    A perspective is presented on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approach for effectively monitoring the measurement methods and directly testing the capability and performance of licensee measurement systems. A main objective in material control and accounting (MC and A) inspection activities is to assure the accuracy and precision of the accounting system and the absence of potential process anomalies through overall accountability. The primary means of verification remains the NRC random sampling during routine safeguards inspections. This involves the independent testing of licensee measurement performance with statistical sampling plans for physical inventories, item control, and auditing. A prospective cost-effective alternative overcheck is also discussed in terms of an externally coordinated sample exchange or ''round robin'' program among participating fuel cycle facilities in order to verify the quality of measurement systems, i.e., to assure that analytical measurement results are free of bias

  17. Formal verification of algorithms for critical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, John M.; Von Henke, Friedrich

    1993-01-01

    We describe our experience with formal, machine-checked verification of algorithms for critical applications, concentrating on a Byzantine fault-tolerant algorithm for synchronizing the clocks in the replicated computers of a digital flight control system. First, we explain the problems encountered in unsynchronized systems and the necessity, and criticality, of fault-tolerant synchronization. We give an overview of one such algorithm, and of the arguments for its correctness. Next, we describe a verification of the algorithm that we performed using our EHDM system for formal specification and verification. We indicate the errors we found in the published analysis of the algorithm, and other benefits that we derived from the verification. Based on our experience, we derive some key requirements for a formal specification and verification system adequate to the task of verifying algorithms of the type considered. Finally, we summarize our conclusions regarding the benefits of formal verification in this domain, and the capabilities required of verification systems in order to realize those benefits.

  18. A Verification Logic for GOAL Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindriks, K. V.

    Although there has been a growing body of literature on verification of agents programs, it has been difficult to design a verification logic for agent programs that fully characterizes such programs and to connect agent programs to agent theory. The challenge is to define an agent programming language that defines a computational framework but also allows for a logical characterization useful for verification. The agent programming language GOAL has been originally designed to connect agent programming to agent theory and we present additional results here that GOAL agents can be fully represented by a logical theory. GOAL agents can thus be said to execute the corresponding logical theory.

  19. A framework for nuclear agreement and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter assesses the prospects for a nuclear agreement between India and Pakistan. The chapter opens with a review of past and present political environments of the two countries. The discussion proceeds to describe the linkage of global arms control agreements, prospects for verification of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, the role of nuclear power in any agreements, the intrusiveness of verification, and possible post-proliferation agreements. Various monitoring and verification technologies are described (mainly satellite oriented). The chapter concludes with an analysis of the likelihood of persuading India and Pakistan to agree to a nonproliferation arrangement

  20. Verification of DRAGON: the NXT tracking module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zkiek, A.; Marleau, G.

    2007-01-01

    The version of DRAGON-IST that has been verified for the calculation of the incremental cross sections associated with CANDU reactivity devices is version 3.04Bb that was released in 2001. Since then, various improvements were implemented in the code including the NXT: module that can track assemblies of clusters in 2-D and 3-D geometries. Here we will discuss the verification plan for the NXT: module of DRAGON, illustrate the verification procedure we selected and present our verification results. (author)

  1. Using fluence separation to account for energy spectra dependence in computing dosimetric a-Si EPID images for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weidong; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    This study develops a method to improve the dosimetric accuracy of computed images for an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager. Radially dependent kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations are convolved with the treatment-planning system's energy fluence. Multileaf collimator (MLC) beam hardening is accounted for by having separate kernels for open and blocked portions of MLC fields. Field-size-dependent output factors are used to account for the field-size dependence of scatter within the imager. Gamma analysis was used to evaluate open and sliding window test fields and intensity modulated patient fields. For each tested field, at least 99.6% of the points had γ<1 with a 3%, 3-mm criteria. With a 2%, 2-mm criteria, between 81% and 100% of points had γ<1. Patient intensity modulated test fields had 94%-100% of the points with γ<1 with a 2%, 2-mm criteria for all six fields tested. This study demonstrates that including the dependencies of kernel and fluence on radius and beam hardening in the convolution improves its accuracy compared with the use of radial and beam-hardening independent kernels; it also demonstrates that the resultant accuracy of the convolution method is sufficient for pretreatment, intensity modulated patient field verification

  2. Performing daily prostate targeting with a standard V-EPID and an automated radio-opaque marker detection algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Girouard, Louis-Martin; Aubin, Sylviane; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Brouard, Lucie; Roy-Lacroix, Lise; Dumont, Jean; Tremblay, Daniel; Laverdiere, Jacques; Vigneault, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Online prostate positioning using gold markers and a standard video-based electronic portal imaging device is reported. The average systematic (random) errors have been reduced from 2.1 mm (2.7 mm) to 0.5 mm (1.5 mm) in AP direction, 1.1 mm (1.7 mm) to 0.7 mm (1.2 mm) SI and 1.2 mm (1.7 mm) to 0.6 mm (1.3 mm) LR

  3. SU-E-J-64: Evaluation of a Commercial EPID-Based in Vivo Dosimetric System in the Presence of Lung Tissue Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno-Olmos, J; Palomo-Llinares, R; Candela-Juan, C; Carmona Meseguer, V; Lliso-Valverde, F [Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Martinez, T [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain); Richart-Sancho, J [Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the performance of Dosimetry Check (DC), an EPID-based dosimetry software, which allows performing transit dosimetry, in low density medium, by comparing calculations in-phantom, and analysing results for 15 lung patients. Methods: DC software (v.3.8, pencil beam-based algorithm) has been tested, for plans (Eclipse v.10.0 TPS) delivered in two Varian Clinac iX equipped with aS1000 EPIDs.In the CIRS lung phantom, comparisons between DC and Eclipse (Acuros) were performed for several plans: (1) four field box; (2) square field delivered in arc mode; (3) RapidArc lung patient plan medially centred; (4) RapidArc lung patient plan centred in one lung. Reference points analysed: P1 (medial point, plans 1–3) and P2 (located inside one lung, plan 4).For fifteen lung patients treated with RapidArc, the isocentre and 9 additional points inside the PTV as well as the gamma passing rate (3%/3mm) for the PTV and at the main planes were studied. Results: In-phantom:P1: Per-field differences in plan 1: good agreement for AP-PA fields; discrepancy of 7% for the lateral fields. Global differences (plans 1–3): about 4%, showing a compensating effect of the individual differences.P2: Global difference (plan 4): 15 %. This represents the worst case situation as it is a point surrounded by lung tissue, where the DC pencil beam algorithm is expected to give the greater difference against Acuros.Lung patients: Mean point difference inside the PTV:(5.4±4.2) %. Gamma passing rate inside the PTV:(45±12) %. Conclusion: The performance of DC in heterogeneous lung medium was studied with a special phantom and the results for 15 patients were analysed. The found deviations show that even though DC is a highly promising in vivo dosimetry tool, there is a need of incorporating a more accurate algorithm mainly for plans with low density regions involved.

  4. 10 CFR 300.11 - Independent verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLIMATE CHANGE VOLUNTARY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING PROGRAM: GENERAL GUIDELINES § 300.11... managing an auditing or verification process, including the recruitment and allocation of other individual.... (c) Qualifications of organizations accrediting verifiers. Organizations that accredit individual...

  5. Engineering drawing field verification program. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulk, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Safe, efficient operation of waste tank farm facilities is dependent in part upon the availability of accurate, up-to-date plant drawings. Accurate plant drawings are also required in support of facility upgrades and future engineering remediation projects. This supporting document establishes the procedure for performing a visual field verification of engineering drawings, the degree of visual observation being performed and documenting the results. A copy of the drawing attesting to the degree of visual observation will be paginated into the released Engineering Change Notice (ECN) documenting the field verification for future retrieval and reference. All waste tank farm essential and support drawings within the scope of this program will be converted from manual to computer aided drafting (CAD) drawings. A permanent reference to the field verification status will be placed along the right border of the CAD-converted drawing, referencing the revision level, at which the visual verification was performed and documented

  6. HDM/PASCAL Verification System User's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, D.

    1983-01-01

    The HDM/Pascal verification system is a tool for proving the correctness of programs written in PASCAL and specified in the Hierarchical Development Methodology (HDM). This document assumes an understanding of PASCAL, HDM, program verification, and the STP system. The steps toward verification which this tool provides are parsing programs and specifications, checking the static semantics, and generating verification conditions. Some support functions are provided such as maintaining a data base, status management, and editing. The system runs under the TOPS-20 and TENEX operating systems and is written in INTERLISP. However, no knowledge is assumed of these operating systems or of INTERLISP. The system requires three executable files, HDMVCG, PARSE, and STP. Optionally, the editor EMACS should be on the system in order for the editor to work. The file HDMVCG is invoked to run the system. The files PARSE and STP are used as lower forks to perform the functions of parsing and proving.

  7. Standard Verification System Lite (SVS Lite)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — SVS Lite is a mainframe program used exclusively by the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) to perform batch SSN verifications. This process is exactly the...

  8. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP1-01: An Efficient Method of 3D Patient Dose Reconstruction Based On EPID Measurements for Pre-Treatment Patient Specific QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, R; Lee, C [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Zwan, B; Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E; Kandasamy, K; Arthur, G [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate an efficient and clinically relevant patient specific QA method by reconstructing 3D patient dose from 2D EPID images for IMRT plans. Also to determine the usefulness of 2D QA metrics when assessing 3D patient dose deviations. Methods: Using the method developed by King et al (Med Phys 39(5),2839–2847), EPID images of IMRT fields were acquired in air and converted to dose at 10 cm depth (SAD setup) in a flat virtual water phantom. Each EPID measured dose map was then divided by the corresponding treatment planning system (TPS) dose map calculated with an identical setup, to derive a 2D “error matrix”. For each field, the error matrix was used to adjust the doses along the respective ray lines in the original patient 3D dose. All field doses were combined to derive a reconstructed 3D patient dose for quantitative analysis. A software tool was developed to efficiently implement the entire process and was tested with a variety of IMRT plans for 2D (virtual flat phantom) and 3D (in-patient) QA analysis. Results: The method was tested on 60 IMRT plans. The mean (± standard deviation) 2D gamma (2%,2mm) pass rate (2D-GPR) was 97.4±3.0% and the mean 2D gamma index (2D-GI) was 0.35±0.06. The 3D PTV mean dose deviation was 1.8±0.8%. The analysis showed very weak correlations between both the 2D-GPR and 2D-GI when compared with PTV mean dose deviations (R2=0.3561 and 0.3632 respectively). Conclusion: Our method efficiently calculates 3D patient dose from 2D EPID images, utilising all of the advantages of an EPID-based dosimetry system. In this study, the 2D QA metrics did not predict the 3D patient dose deviation. This tool allows reporting of the 3D volumetric dose parameters thus providing more clinically relevant patient specific QA.

  9. Inventory verification measurements using neutron multiplicity counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensslin, N.; Foster, L.A.; Harker, W.C.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a series of neutron multiplicity measurements of large plutonium samples at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The measurements were corrected for bias caused by neutron energy spectrum shifts and nonuniform multiplication, and are compared with calorimetry/isotopics. The results show that multiplicity counting can increase measurement throughput and yield good verification results for some inventory categories. The authors provide recommendations on the future application of the technique to inventory verification

  10. Verification of Open Interactive Markov Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Brazdil, Tomas; Hermanns, Holger; Krcal, Jan; Kretinsky, Jan; Rehak, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    Interactive Markov chains (IMC) are compositional behavioral models extending both labeled transition systems and continuous-time Markov chains. IMC pair modeling convenience - owed to compositionality properties - with effective verification algorithms and tools - owed to Markov properties. Thus far however, IMC verification did not consider compositionality properties, but considered closed systems. This paper discusses the evaluation of IMC in an open and thus compositional interpretation....

  11. Towards automatic verification of ladder logic programs

    OpenAIRE

    Zoubek , Bohumir; Roussel , Jean-Marc; Kwiatkowska , Martha

    2003-01-01

    International audience; Control system programs are usually validated by testing prior to their deployment. Unfortunately, testing is not exhaustive and therefore it is possible that a program which passed all the required tests still contains errors. In this paper we apply techniques of automatic verification to a control program written in ladder logic. A model is constructed mechanically from the ladder logic program and subjected to automatic verification against requirements that include...

  12. Transmutation Fuel Performance Code Thermal Model Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory K. Miller; Pavel G. Medvedev

    2007-09-01

    FRAPCON fuel performance code is being modified to be able to model performance of the nuclear fuels of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). The present report documents the effort for verification of the FRAPCON thermal model. It was found that, with minor modifications, FRAPCON thermal model temperature calculation agrees with that of the commercial software ABAQUS (Version 6.4-4). This report outlines the methodology of the verification, code input, and calculation results.

  13. Verification and Validation in Systems Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Debbabi, Mourad; Jarraya, Yosr; Soeanu, Andrei; Alawneh, Luay

    2010-01-01

    "Verification and validation" represents an important process used for the quality assessment of engineered systems and their compliance with the requirements established at the beginning of or during the development cycle. Debbabi and his coauthors investigate methodologies and techniques that can be employed for the automatic verification and validation of systems engineering design models expressed in standardized modeling languages. Their presentation includes a bird's eye view of the most prominent modeling languages for software and systems engineering, namely the Unified Model

  14. Verification and validation for waste disposal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    A set of evaluation criteria has been developed to assess the suitability of current verification and validation techniques for waste disposal methods. A survey of current practices and techniques was undertaken and evaluated using these criteria with the items most relevant to waste disposal models being identified. Recommendations regarding the most suitable verification and validation practices for nuclear waste disposal modelling software have been made

  15. Verification and Examination Management of Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stian Ruud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As ship systems become more complex, with an increasing number of safety-critical functions, many interconnected subsystems, tight integration to other systems, and a large amount of potential failure modes, several industry parties have identified the need for improved methods for managing the verification and examination efforts of such complex systems. Such needs are even more prominent now that the marine and offshore industries are targeting more activities and operations in the Arctic environment. In this paper, a set of requirements and a method for verification and examination management are proposed for allocating examination efforts to selected subsystems. The method is based on a definition of a verification risk function for a given system topology and given requirements. The marginal verification risks for the subsystems may then be evaluated, so that examination efforts for the subsystem can be allocated. Two cases of requirements and systems are used to demonstrate the proposed method. The method establishes a systematic relationship between the verification loss, the logic system topology, verification method performance, examination stop criterion, the required examination effort, and a proposed sequence of examinations to reach the examination stop criterion.

  16. Concepts for inventory verification in critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Sapir, J.L.; Kern, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.

    1978-12-01

    Materials measurement and inventory verification concepts for safeguarding large critical facilities are presented. Inspection strategies and methods for applying international safeguards to such facilities are proposed. The conceptual approach to routine inventory verification includes frequent visits to the facility by one inspector, and the use of seals and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements to verify the portion of the inventory maintained in vault storage. Periodic verification of the reactor inventory is accomplished by sampling and NDA measurement of in-core fuel elements combined with measurements of integral reactivity and related reactor parameters that are sensitive to the total fissile inventory. A combination of statistical sampling and NDA verification with measurements of reactor parameters is more effective than either technique used by itself. Special procedures for assessment and verification for abnormal safeguards conditions are also considered. When the inspection strategies and inventory verification methods are combined with strict containment and surveillance methods, they provide a high degree of assurance that any clandestine attempt to divert a significant quantity of fissile material from a critical facility inventory will be detected. Field testing of specific hardware systems and procedures to determine their sensitivity, reliability, and operational acceptability is recommended. 50 figures, 21 tables

  17. Tomotherapy: IMRT and tomographic verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    include MLC's and many clinics use them to replace 90% or more of the field-shaping requirements of conventional radiotherapy. Now, several academic centers are treating patients with IMRT using conventional MLC's to modulate the field. IMRT using conventional MLC's have the advantage that the patient is stationary during the treatment and the MLC's can be used in conventional practice. Nevertheless, tomotherapy using the Peacock system delivers the most conformal dose distributions of any commercial system to date. The biggest limitation with the both the NOMOS Peacock tomotherapy system and conventional MLC's for IMRT delivery is the lack of treatment verification. In conventional few-field radiotherapy one relied on portal images to determine if the patient was setup correctly and the beams were correctly positioned. With IMRT the image contrast is superimposed on the beam intensity variation. Conventional practice allowed for monitor unit calculation checks and point dosimeters placed on the patient's surface to verify that the treatment was properly delivered. With IMRT it is impossible to perform hand calculations of monitor units and dosimeters placed on the patient's surface are prone to error due to high gradients in the beam intensity. NOMOS has developed a verification phantom that allows multiple sheets of film to be placed in a light-tight box that is irradiated with the same beam pattern that is used to treat the patient. The optical density of the films are adjusted, normalized, and calibrated and then quantitatively compared with the dose calculated for the phantom delivery. However, this process is too laborious to be used for patient-specific QA. If IMRT becomes ubiquitous and it can be shown that IMRT is useful on most treatment sites then there is a need to design treatment units dedicated to IMRT delivery and verification. Helical tomotherapy is such a redesign. Helical tomotherapy is the delivery of a rotational fan beam while the patient is

  18. Verification of excess defense material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearey, B.L.; Pilat, J.F.; Eccleston, G.W.; Nicholas, N.J.; Tape, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The international community in the post-Cold War period has expressed an interest in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) using its expertise in support of the arms control and disarmament process in unprecedented ways. The pledges of the US and Russian presidents to place excess defense materials under some type of international inspections raises the prospect of using IAEA safeguards approaches for monitoring excess materials, which include both classified and unclassified materials. Although the IAEA has suggested the need to address inspections of both types of materials, the most troublesome and potentially difficult problems involve approaches to the inspection of classified materials. The key issue for placing classified nuclear components and materials under IAEA safeguards is the conflict between these traditional IAEA materials accounting procedures and the US classification laws and nonproliferation policy designed to prevent the disclosure of critical weapon-design information. Possible verification approaches to classified excess defense materials could be based on item accountancy, attributes measurements, and containment and surveillance. Such approaches are not wholly new; in fact, they are quite well established for certain unclassified materials. Such concepts may be applicable to classified items, but the precise approaches have yet to be identified, fully tested, or evaluated for technical and political feasibility, or for their possible acceptability in an international inspection regime. Substantial work remains in these areas. This paper examines many of the challenges presented by international inspections of classified materials

  19. Dosimetric verification of IMRT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulski, W.; Cheimicski, K.; Rostkowska, J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a complex procedure requiring proper dosimetric verification. IMRT dose distributions are characterized by steep dose gradients which enable to spare organs at risk and allow for an escalation of the dose to the tumor. They require large number of radiation beams (sometimes over 10). The fluence measurements for individual beams are not sufficient for evaluation of the total dose distribution and to assure patient safety. The methods used at the Centre of Oncology in Warsaw are presented. In order to measure dose distributions in various cross-sections the film dosimeters were used (radiographic Kodak EDR2 films and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT films). The film characteristics were carefully examined. Several types of tissue equivalent phantoms were developed. A methodology of comparing measured dose distributions against the distributions calculated by treatment planning systems (TPS) was developed and tested. The tolerance level for this comparison was set at 3% difference in dose and 3 mm in distance to agreement. The so called gamma formalism was used. The results of these comparisons for a group of over 600 patients are presented. Agreement was found in 87 % of cases. This film dosimetry methodology was used as a benchmark to test and validate the performance of commercially available 2D and 3D matrices of detectors (ionization chambers or diodes). The results of these validations are also presented. (authors)

  20. Didattica online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Charrier

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Obiettivi: formare un gruppo di operatori della Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia alle metodiche di progettazione e gestione di processi di didattica integrata basati sull’uso di tecnologie e risorse di rete, al fine di produrre e pubblicare materiale ODL per la Facoltà. Nel caso specifico, il progetto da realizzare era il modulo “Il rischio biologico” nell’ambito del corso “Rischio lavorativo in ambito sanitario”, allo scopo di integrare l’attività d’aula e offrire un pacchetto formativo cui i corsi di laurea interessati possano accedere per la didattica e la valutazione.

    Materiali e metodi: l’azione formativa è stata condotta con la tecnica “project based”, basata cioè sullo sviluppo di un progetto da parte dei borsisti. Le attività sono state articolate come incontri e attività di esercitazione in presenza sugli strumenti di produzione del materiale didattico (DreamWeaver, attività in “computer conferencing” sui temi trattati a lezione, attività di studio individuale assistite a distanza e attività assistita, sia in presenza che a distanza, di progettazione e realizzazione dei moduli didattici da fruirsi in rete con approccio ODL. Risultati: é stato prodotto il modulo “Il rischio biologico”, destinato agli studenti dei Corsi di Laurea della Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia e delle Scuole di Specializzazione. Il modulo è stato strutturato in quattro unità didattiche (Legislazione, Precauzioni, Misure di contenimento, Vaccinazioni, ciascuna delle quali contiene documenti di lettura e consultazione, riferimenti normativi in materia di rischio in ambito sanitario, immagini che presentano comportamenti (utilizzo dei DPI, lavaggio delle mani…, esercizi e test di autovalutazione con feedback e soluzioni consultabili online.

     Conclusioni: il modulo sarà fruibile online a partire dal I semestre dell’ anno accademico 2003-2004; si sta

  1. Exploring Marijuana Advertising on Weedmaps, a Popular Online Directory

    OpenAIRE

    Bierut, Tatiana; Krauss, Melissa J.; Sowles, Shaina J.; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    With an increase in the legalization of recreational marijuana across the U.S., advertising for marijuana products is more widespread, especially on the Internet where such practices pose a regulatory challenge. In this study, we examined the content of marijuana advertising on Weedmaps, a popular website that markets marijuana retailers online. A total of 146 recreational marijuana retailers in Colorado and Washington were examined on Weedmaps. We studied the age verification practices made ...

  2. Neosporosis epidémica y endémica: descripción de dos eventos en bovinos para cría

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio M Calandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es describir dos eventos producidos en la provincia de Buenos Aires en los cuales Neospora caninum estuvo asociado a la ocurrencia de abortos en bovinos de cría para carne. En uno de ellos se registraron 11 abortos en 57 vaquillonas durante 45 días, en este evento fue 5 veces más probable que una vaquillona que sufrió un aborto fuera seropositiva a N. caninum que una que no lo sufrió (odds ratio [OR] = 4,9 IC 1,2-19,9 (p 0,05. Se analizaron dos fetos de cada evento: estos resultaron negativos a otros patógenos de la reproducción, aunque presentaron anticuerpos específicos y lesiones histopatológicas compatibles con infecciones por N. caninum. Estos resultados sugieren dos posibles modalidades de presentación de abortos en bovinos causados por N. caninum: una epidémica, como la del primer evento aquí referido, y una endémica, como la del segundo.

  3. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson e Necrólise Epidérmica Tóxica em um hospital do Distrito Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Ferreira Barbosa Emerick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar as características demográficas e clínicas dos clientes diagnosticados com Síndrome de Stevens Johnson (SSJ e Necrólise Epidérmica Tóxica (NET, bem como identificar as ações dos profissionais de saúde para o manejo das Reações Adversas a Medicamentos (RAM em um hospital público do Distrito Federal. Pesquisa descritiva, retrospectiva, com abordagem quantitativa. Dados coletados em todos os prontuários de 22 clientes internados de janeiro de 2005 a setembro de 2012. Análise mediante estatística descritiva. Houve aumento gradativo de casos, com maior número nos anos de 2007 e 2012. Dos casos analisados, 9 foram diagnosticados com NET e 7 com SSJ; predominaram as mulheres (14 e a faixa etária de 21 aos 40 anos (10; 21 obtiveram cura. Os fármacos associados a RAM mais frequentes foram os antiepilépticos (10. Observou-se fragilidade nos registros clínicos nos prontuários e nas ações de monitoramento de RAM no serviço estudado.

  4. Opt-Out Parental Consent in Online Surveys: Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jane; Porcellato, Lorna

    2018-07-01

    This article aims to foster discussion and debate around seeking parental consent from young people recruited online. The growth of social media, particularly for young people, has led to increased interest in young people's online activities as both a research topic and recruitment setting. In a health-related study, which sought to recruit young people aged 13 to 18 years old from YouTuber fan communities to an online survey, the question arose of how parental consent could be sought from young people below 16 when no link existed between researcher and parents/guardians. A practical strategy is proposed which combines novel communication methods for participant information, opt-out online consent and age verification to address this issue. Strengths and limitations of these approaches are discussed.

  5. Euroscepticism Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutceac Segesten, Anamaria; Bossetta, Michael

    The 2014 elections for the European Parliament are likely to result in the highest number of MEPs representing right-wing parties across Europe. The prolonged eurocrisis and its direct, visible effects (e.g. unemployment and poverty) have already polarized the public opinion in many of EU:s membe...... and nationalism as the two poles on a continuum of attitudes coming out of the discourses. We discuss finally the consequences of the expected Swedish-Danish divergence of online debate content for the idea of a unified European public sphere.......The 2014 elections for the European Parliament are likely to result in the highest number of MEPs representing right-wing parties across Europe. The prolonged eurocrisis and its direct, visible effects (e.g. unemployment and poverty) have already polarized the public opinion in many of EU:s member......-criticism between Sweden and Denmark? Methodologically we combine quantitative and qualitative content analysis of the forum discussions pertaining to the EU critique taking place on the two platforms respectively. Our focus is thus not on the republished content originated in traditional media channels...

  6. On-line monitoring of water amount in fresh concrete by radioactive-wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemi, T.; Arai, M.; Enomoto, S.; Suzki, K.; Kumahara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The committee on nondestructive inspection for steel reinforced concrete structures in the Federation of Construction Materials Industries, Japan has published a proposed standard for on-line monitoring of water amount in fresh concrete by the radioactive wave method. By applying a neutron technique, water amount in fresh concrete is estimated continuously from the energy consumption of neutron due to hydrogen. A standard is discussed along with results of verification tests. Thus, on-line monitoring for water amount is proposed

  7. Validation of an online replanning technique for prostate adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Cheng; Chen Guangpei; Ahunbay, Ergun; Wang Dian; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2011-06-21

    We have previously developed an online adaptive replanning technique to rapidly adapt the original plan according to daily CT. This paper reports the quality assurance (QA) developments in its clinical implementation for prostate cancer patients. A series of pre-clinical validation tests were carried out to verify the overall accuracy and consistency of the online replanning procedure. These tests include (a) phantom measurements of 22 individual patient adaptive plans to verify their accuracy and deliverability and (b) efficiency and applicability of the online replanning process. A four-step QA procedure was established to ensure the safe and accurate delivery of an adaptive plan, including (1) offline phantom measurement of the original plan, (2) online independent monitor unit (MU) calculation for a redundancy check, (3) online verification of plan-data transfer using an in-house software and (4) offline validation of actually delivered beam parameters. The pre-clinical validations demonstrate that the newly implemented online replanning technique is dosimetrically accurate and practically efficient. The four-step QA procedure is capable of identifying possible errors in the process of online adaptive radiotherapy and to ensure the safe and accurate delivery of the adaptive plans. Based on the success of this work, the online replanning technique has been used in the clinic to correct for interfractional changes during the prostate radiation therapy.

  8. Validation of an online replanning technique for prostate adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Cheng; Chen Guangpei; Ahunbay, Ergun; Wang Dian; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X Allen

    2011-01-01

    We have previously developed an online adaptive replanning technique to rapidly adapt the original plan according to daily CT. This paper reports the quality assurance (QA) developments in its clinical implementation for prostate cancer patients. A series of pre-clinical validation tests were carried out to verify the overall accuracy and consistency of the online replanning procedure. These tests include (a) phantom measurements of 22 individual patient adaptive plans to verify their accuracy and deliverability and (b) efficiency and applicability of the online replanning process. A four-step QA procedure was established to ensure the safe and accurate delivery of an adaptive plan, including (1) offline phantom measurement of the original plan, (2) online independent monitor unit (MU) calculation for a redundancy check, (3) online verification of plan-data transfer using an in-house software and (4) offline validation of actually delivered beam parameters. The pre-clinical validations demonstrate that the newly implemented online replanning technique is dosimetrically accurate and practically efficient. The four-step QA procedure is capable of identifying possible errors in the process of online adaptive radiotherapy and to ensure the safe and accurate delivery of the adaptive plans. Based on the success of this work, the online replanning technique has been used in the clinic to correct for interfractional changes during the prostate radiation therapy.

  9. Monitoring and verification R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, Joseph F.; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory W.; Fearey, Bryan L.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report outlined the Administration's approach to promoting the agenda put forward by President Obama in Prague on April 5, 2009. The NPR calls for a national monitoring and verification R and D program to meet future challenges arising from the Administration's nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament agenda. Verification of a follow-on to New START could have to address warheads and possibly components along with delivery capabilities. Deeper cuts and disarmament would need to address all of these elements along with nuclear weapon testing, nuclear material and weapon production facilities, virtual capabilities from old weapon and existing energy programs and undeclared capabilities. We only know how to address some elements of these challenges today, and the requirements may be more rigorous in the context of deeper cuts as well as disarmament. Moreover, there is a critical need for multiple options to sensitive problems and to address other challenges. There will be other verification challenges in a world of deeper cuts and disarmament, some of which we are already facing. At some point, if the reductions process is progressing, uncertainties about past nuclear materials and weapons production will have to be addressed. IAEA safeguards will need to continue to evolve to meet current and future challenges, and to take advantage of new technologies and approaches. Transparency/verification of nuclear and dual-use exports will also have to be addressed, and there will be a need to make nonproliferation measures more watertight and transparent. In this context, and recognizing we will face all of these challenges even if disarmament is not achieved, this paper will explore possible agreements and arrangements; verification challenges; gaps in monitoring and verification technologies and approaches; and the R and D required to address these gaps and other monitoring and verification challenges.

  10. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  11. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  12. Online Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian D. Richards

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Online archives are of increasing importance in Archaeological Informatics, but like any new genre they prompt a number of questions. What is their relationship to publication? What should go in them? How should they be delivered and indexed? Can they be preserved? Whilst their delivery requires technology, we must also consider how that technology should best be employed in the service of our discipline. This article attempts to address some of these questions but it need not be read from start to finish. The links from this summary provide one fairly linear route through the text but each section is self-contained and can also be accessed directly from the Contents page. The problems posed by effective publication of archaeological fieldwork have exercised the profession for many decades. The issues raised go to the core of discussion of whether preservation by record is a valid concept, and indeed whether archaeological data exist. There are different schools of thought about the relationship between publication and archiving, but hopefully we can accept that data are recorded observations but still agree that they have a re-use value for re-examination and re-interpretation. Since the 1960s archaeology has experienced a publication crisis point. The scenario is familiar. Excavation is destruction; it is an unrepeatable experiment and the archaeologist has a professional obligation to make a full and accessible record of his/her observations. Yet full publication is increasingly expensive and difficult, and excavation monographs are read by few people, and bought by even fewer. In England the development of post-PPG16 fieldwork has exacerbated the problem by creating a mountain of unpublished grey literature and making the work of synthesis even harder; a similar situation exists in other countries. Meanwhile museum archives are also reaching breaking point; most are running out of storage space, few can provide facilities for access, and

  13. Java bytecode verification via static single assignment form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Probst, Christian W.; Franz, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) traditionally perform bytecode verification by way of an iterative data-flow analysis. Bytecode verification is necessary to ensure type safety because temporary variables in the JVM are not statically typed. We present an alternative verification mechanism that trans......Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) traditionally perform bytecode verification by way of an iterative data-flow analysis. Bytecode verification is necessary to ensure type safety because temporary variables in the JVM are not statically typed. We present an alternative verification mechanism...

  14. Online Marketing Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Horecká, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with online marketing trends. Its main goal is to define the latest online marketing trends, create a website with the free online marketing trends, and analyse their effectiveness. The theoretical part brings a thorough description of the latest online marketing trends. Moreover, it provides an insight into the latest trends in the website development. The chosen online marketing trends defined in the theoretical part are subsequently applied on a newly created website. All...

  15. Online Shopping Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Shahzad, Hashim

    2015-01-01

    Online shopping is a very much developed phenomena in Scandinavian countries. Different online factors impact online consumers’ behavior differently depending on the environment of different regions. Sweden is one of the developed and technologically advanced countries. To see the impact of different factors on consumers’ online shopping behavior, the purpose of this study is to analyse the factors that influence consumers’ online shopping behavior in Sweden’s context. One of the objectives o...

  16. Complementary technologies for verification of excess plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langner, D.G.; Nicholas, N.J.; Ensslin, N.; Fearey, B.L.; Mitchell, D.J.; Marlow, K.W.; Luke, S.J.; Gosnell, T.B.

    1998-01-01

    Three complementary measurement technologies have been identified as candidates for use in the verification of excess plutonium of weapons origin. These technologies: high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron multiplicity counting, and low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, are mature, robust technologies. The high-resolution gamma-ray system, Pu-600, uses the 630--670 keV region of the emitted gamma-ray spectrum to determine the ratio of 240 Pu to 239 Pu. It is useful in verifying the presence of plutonium and the presence of weapons-grade plutonium. Neutron multiplicity counting is well suited for verifying that the plutonium is of a safeguardable quantity and is weapons-quality material, as opposed to residue or waste. In addition, multiplicity counting can independently verify the presence of plutonium by virtue of a measured neutron self-multiplication and can detect the presence of non-plutonium neutron sources. The low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopic technique is a template method that can provide continuity of knowledge that an item that enters the a verification regime remains under the regime. In the initial verification of an item, multiple regions of the measured low-resolution spectrum form a unique, gamma-radiation-based template for the item that can be used for comparison in subsequent verifications. In this paper the authors discuss these technologies as they relate to the different attributes that could be used in a verification regime

  17. Heavy water physical verification in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, S.; Schuricht, V.; Beetle, T.; Szabo, E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is a report on the Agency experience in verifying heavy water inventories in power plants. The safeguards objectives and goals for such activities are defined in the paper. The heavy water is stratified according to the flow within the power plant, including upgraders. A safeguards scheme based on a combination of records auditing, comparing records and reports, and physical verification has been developed. This scheme has elevated the status of heavy water safeguards to a level comparable to nuclear material safeguards in bulk facilities. It leads to attribute and variable verification of the heavy water inventory in the different system components and in the store. The verification methods include volume and weight determination, sampling and analysis, non-destructive assay (NDA), and criticality check. The analysis of the different measurement methods and their limits of accuracy are discussed in the paper

  18. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  19. Comparing formal verification approaches of interlocking systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Nguyen, Hoang Nga; Roggenbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    these approaches. As a first step towards this, in this paper we suggest a way to compare different formal approaches for verifying designs of route-based interlocking systems and we demonstrate it on modelling and verification approaches developed within the research groups at DTU/Bremen and at Surrey......The verification of railway interlocking systems is a challenging task, and therefore several research groups have suggested to improve this task by using formal methods, but they use different modelling and verification approaches. To advance this research, there is a need to compare....../Swansea. The focus is on designs that are specified by so-called control tables. The paper can serve as a starting point for further comparative studies. The DTU/Bremen research has been funded by the RobustRailS project granted by Innovation Fund Denmark. The Surrey/Swansea research has been funded by the Safe...

  20. Hierarchical Representation Learning for Kinship Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Naman; Vatsa, Mayank; Singh, Richa; Noore, Afzel; Majumdar, Angshul

    2017-01-01

    Kinship verification has a number of applications such as organizing large collections of images and recognizing resemblances among humans. In this paper, first, a human study is conducted to understand the capabilities of human mind and to identify the discriminatory areas of a face that facilitate kinship-cues. The visual stimuli presented to the participants determine their ability to recognize kin relationship using the whole face as well as specific facial regions. The effect of participant gender and age and kin-relation pair of the stimulus is analyzed using quantitative measures such as accuracy, discriminability index d' , and perceptual information entropy. Utilizing the information obtained from the human study, a hierarchical kinship verification via representation learning (KVRL) framework is utilized to learn the representation of different face regions in an unsupervised manner. We propose a novel approach for feature representation termed as filtered contractive deep belief networks (fcDBN). The proposed feature representation encodes relational information present in images using filters and contractive regularization penalty. A compact representation of facial images of kin is extracted as an output from the learned model and a multi-layer neural network is utilized to verify the kin accurately. A new WVU kinship database is created, which consists of multiple images per subject to facilitate kinship verification. The results show that the proposed deep learning framework (KVRL-fcDBN) yields the state-of-the-art kinship verification accuracy on the WVU kinship database and on four existing benchmark data sets. Furthermore, kinship information is used as a soft biometric modality to boost the performance of face verification via product of likelihood ratio and support vector machine based approaches. Using the proposed KVRL-fcDBN framework, an improvement of over 20% is observed in the performance of face verification.

  1. Error diagnóstico en la neuropatía óptica epidémica Diagnostic error in epidemic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaralis Santiesteban Freixas

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La forma óptica de la epidemia de neuropatía, aparecida en el decenio pasado en Cuba, ha sido motivo de discusión por el posible hiperdiagnóstico, de los más de 22 000 casos notificados. El propósito principal de este trabajo es profundizar en la caracterización de esta enfermedad y dar a conocer la congruencia que debe de existir entre la agudeza visual y la visión de colores en las neuropatías de este tipo; además, estimar sobre la base de este elemento la posible cifra de errores diagnósticos de dos grupos de pacientes con neuropatía optica epidérmica y en un tercer grupo de pacientes que no mejoraron con tratamiento, donde se reunieron 78 casos remitidos porque no mejoraban con tratamiento vitamínico. Los resultados demostraron congruencia entre el estado de afectación de la agudeza visual y la visión de colores en más del 90 % de los 960 casos de los grupos 1 y 2, con diagnóstico de neuropatía óptica epidémica comprobados por expertos, a diferencia de los casos del tercer grupo, en los que se detectó que el 96,1 % tuvieron de inicio falsos diagnósticos de esta enfermedad p The optic form of the neuropathy epidemic that appeared in the last decade in Cuba has been discussed due to the possible hyperdiagnosis of the more than 22 000 notified cases. The main objective of this paper was to go deep into the characterization of this disease, to make known the congruency that should exist between the visual acuity and the vision of colors in the neuropathies of this type, and to estimate, on the basis of this element, the possible figure of diagnostic errors in 2 groups of patients with EON and of a third group of patients that did not improve with the treatment. In this group, there were 78 cases that were referred because they did not respond to vitamin therapy. The results showed congruency between the state of affection of visual acuity and the vision of colors in more than 90 % of the 960 cases from groups 1 and 2 with

  2. On Backward-Style Anonymity Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Yoshinobu; Mano, Ken; Sakurada, Hideki; Tsukada, Yasuyuki

    Many Internet services and protocols should guarantee anonymity; for example, an electronic voting system should guarantee to prevent the disclosure of who voted for which candidate. To prove trace anonymity, which is an extension of the formulation of anonymity by Schneider and Sidiropoulos, this paper presents an inductive method based on backward anonymous simulations. We show that the existence of an image-finite backward anonymous simulation implies trace anonymity. We also demonstrate the anonymity verification of an e-voting protocol (the FOO protocol) with our backward anonymous simulation technique. When proving the trace anonymity, this paper employs a computer-assisted verification tool based on a theorem prover.

  3. Key Nuclear Verification Priorities: Safeguards and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.

    2010-01-01

    In addressing nuclear verification priorities, we should look beyond the current safeguards system. Non-proliferation, which the safeguards system underpins, is not an end in itself, but an essential condition for achieving and maintaining nuclear disarmament. Effective safeguards are essential for advancing disarmament, and safeguards issues, approaches and techniques are directly relevant to the development of future verification missions. The extent to which safeguards challenges are successfully addressed - or otherwise - will impact not only on confidence in the safeguards system, but on the effectiveness of, and confidence in, disarmament verification. To identify the key nuclear verification priorities, we need to consider the objectives of verification, and the challenges to achieving these. The strategic objective of IAEA safeguards might be expressed as: To support the global nuclear non-proliferation regime by: - Providing credible assurance that states are honouring their safeguards commitments - thereby removing a potential motivation to proliferate; and - Early detection of misuse of nuclear material and technology - thereby deterring proliferation by the risk of early detection, enabling timely intervention by the international community. Or to summarise - confidence-building, detection capability, and deterrence. These will also be essential objectives for future verification missions. The challenges to achieving these involve a mix of political, technical and institutional dimensions. Confidence is largely a political matter, reflecting the qualitative judgment of governments. Clearly assessments of detection capability and deterrence have a major impact on confidence. Detection capability is largely thought of as 'technical', but also involves issues of legal authority, as well as institutional issues. Deterrence has both political and institutional aspects - including judgments on risk of detection and risk of enforcement action being taken. The

  4. 340 and 310 drawing field verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the drawing field verification work plan is to provide reliable drawings for the 310 Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) and 340 Waste Handling Facility (340 Facility). The initial scope of this work plan is to provide field verified and updated versions of all the 340 Facility essential drawings. This plan can also be used for field verification of any other drawings that the facility management directs to be so updated. Any drawings revised by this work plan will be issued in an AutoCAD format

  5. Key Nuclear Verification Priorities - Safeguards and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.

    2010-01-01

    In addressing nuclear verification priorities, we should look beyond the current safeguards system. Non-proliferation, which the safeguards system underpins, is not an end in itself, but an essential condition for achieving and maintaining nuclear disarmament. Effective safeguards are essential for advancing disarmament, and safeguards issues, approaches and techniques are directly relevant to the development of future verification missions. The extent to which safeguards challenges are successfully addressed - or otherwise - will impact not only on confidence in the safeguards system, but on the effectiveness of, and confidence in, disarmament verification. To identify the key nuclear verification priorities, we need to consider the objectives of verification, and the challenges to achieving these. The strategic objective of IAEA safeguards might be expressed as: To support the global nuclear non-proliferation regime by: - Providing credible assurance that states are honouring their safeguards commitments - thereby removing a potential motivation to proliferate; and - Early detection of misuse of nuclear material and technology - thereby deterring proliferation by the risk of early detection, enabling timely intervention by the international community. Or to summarise - confidence-building, detection capability, and deterrence. These will also be essential objectives for future verification missions. The challenges to achieving these involve a mix of political, technical and institutional dimensions. Confidence is largely a political matter, reflecting the qualitative judgment of governments. Clearly assessments of detection capability and deterrence have a major impact on confidence. Detection capability is largely thought of as 'technical', but also involves issues of legal authority, as well as institutional issues. Deterrence has both political and institutional aspects - including judgments on risk of detection and risk of enforcement action being taken. The

  6. Experimental preparation and verification of quantum money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Arrazola, Juan Miguel; Amiri, Ryan; Zhang, Weijun; Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-03-01

    A quantum money scheme enables a trusted bank to provide untrusted users with verifiable quantum banknotes that cannot be forged. In this work, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of the preparation and verification of unforgeable quantum banknotes. We employ a security analysis that takes experimental imperfections fully into account. We measure a total of 3.6 ×106 states in one verification round, limiting the forging probability to 10-7 based on the security analysis. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of preparing and verifying quantum banknotes using currently available experimental techniques.

  7. Core power capability verification for PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Chunyu; Liu Changwen; Zhang Hong; Liang Wei

    2002-01-01

    The Principle and methodology of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant core power capability verification for reload are introduced. The radial and axial power distributions of normal operation (category I or condition I) and abnormal operation (category II or condition II) are simulated by using neutronics calculation code. The linear power density margin and DNBR margin for both categories, which reflect core safety, are analyzed from the point view of reactor physics and T/H, and thus category I operating domain and category II protection set point are verified. Besides, the verification results of reference NPP are also given

  8. Verification and quality control of routine hematology analyzers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J Y; Huisman, A

    2016-01-01

    Verification of hematology analyzers (automated blood cell counters) is mandatory before new hematology analyzers may be used in routine clinical care. The verification process consists of several items which comprise among others: precision, accuracy, comparability, carryover, background and

  9. Specification and Automated Verification of Real-Time Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.H.; Andersen, J.H.; Skou, A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we sketch a method for specification and automatic verification of real-time software properties.......In this paper we sketch a method for specification and automatic verification of real-time software properties....

  10. Specification and Automated Verification of Real-Time Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.H.; Kristensen, C.H.; Skou, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we sketch a method for specification and automatic verification of real-time software properties.......In this paper we sketch a method for specification and automatic verification of real-time software properties....

  11. Acción del factor de crecimiento epidérmico sobre el desarrollo de las células estriatales cultivadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázara Castillo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describe la acción del factor de crecimiento epidérmico (FCE sobre las células del estriado embrionario en un sistema de cultivo disociado de neuronas y glías. El cultivo de células se preparó a partir de embriones de ratas de 16-17 días. En el sistema de cultivo empleado, la población celular fue cultivada durante 20-24 horas en un medio que contenía suero y, posteriormente, fue tratada con 20 ng/mL del FCE en un medio libre de suero. La eliminación del suero en este período inicial de desarrollo provocó una disminución apreciable de las células vivas en los cultivos tratados y en los controles. Al parecer, la población de células sobrevivientes estaba integrada, en su mayoría, por precursores celulares teniendo en cuenta su capacidad proliferativa. La acción del FCE sobre las células se manifestó en un aumento del número de células debido fundamentalmente a un estímulo de la proliferación de los precursores neuronales y astrocitos. Este efecto estuvo acompañado por una reducción de la diferenciación morfológica neuronal cuando se comparó con los cultivos controles. En los cultivos, a los 16 días, la detección de la actividad específica de la colina acetiltrasferasa evidenció la diferenciación de una subpoblación neuronal colinérgica, las cuales respondieron al tratamiento con el factor de crecimiento nervioso con un aumento de la actividad de la enzima.

  12. Genotipificación de HLA-B en pacientes colombianos afectados por el síndrome Stevens-Johnson y la Necrólisis Epidérmica Tóxica

    OpenAIRE

    León Ruiz, Maria Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Las reacciones alérgicas a medicamentos cutáneas severas (RAM) como el Síndrome Stevens Johnson (SJS) y la Necrólisis Epidérmica Tóxica (NET),caracterizadas por exantema, erosión de la piel y las membranas mucosas, flictenas, desprendimiento de la piel secundario a la muerte de queratinocitos y compromiso ocular. Son infrecuentes en la población pero con elevada morbi-mortalidad, se presentan luego de la administración de diferentes fármacos. En Asia se ha asociado el alelo HLA-B*15:02 como m...

  13. Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase Project: Verification and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Jeff; Policelli, Fritz; Fletcher, Rosea; Holecamp, Kara; Owen, Carolyn; Nicholson, Lamar; Dartez, Deanna

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase Project's verification,and validation process. The topics include: 1) What is Verification and Validation? 2) Why Verification and Validation? 3) Background; 4) ESE Data Purchas Validation Process; 5) Data Validation System and Ingest Queue; 6) Shipment Verification; 7) Tracking and Metrics; 8) Validation of Contract Specifications; 9) Earth Watch Data Validation; 10) Validation of Vertical Accuracy; and 11) Results of Vertical Accuracy Assessment.

  14. A Syntactic-Semantic Approach to Incremental Verification

    OpenAIRE

    Bianculli, Domenico; Filieri, Antonio; Ghezzi, Carlo; Mandrioli, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Software verification of evolving systems is challenging mainstream methodologies and tools. Formal verification techniques often conflict with the time constraints imposed by change management practices for evolving systems. Since changes in these systems are often local to restricted parts, an incremental verification approach could be beneficial. This paper introduces SiDECAR, a general framework for the definition of verification procedures, which are made incremental by the framework...

  15. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sangwook; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yi, Byong Yong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Suk; Cho, Sam Ju; Choi, Jinho

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  16. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sangwook, E-mail: medicalphysics@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lee, Sang Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Jung-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sam Ju [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jinho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Namdong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  17. 24 CFR 5.512 - Verification of eligible immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immigration status. 5.512 Section 5.512 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of... Noncitizens § 5.512 Verification of eligible immigration status. (a) General. Except as described in paragraph...) Primary verification—(1) Automated verification system. Primary verification of the immigration status of...

  18. Standardized Definitions for Code Verification Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebling, Scott William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This document contains standardized definitions for several commonly used code verification test problems. These definitions are intended to contain sufficient information to set up the test problem in a computational physics code. These definitions are intended to be used in conjunction with exact solutions to these problems generated using Exact- Pack, www.github.com/lanl/exactpack.

  19. 9 CFR 417.8 - Agency verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....8 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL POINT (HACCP) SYSTEMS § 417.8 Agency verification. FSIS will verify the... plan or system; (f) Direct observation or measurement at a CCP; (g) Sample collection and analysis to...

  20. Timed verification with µCRL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, S.C.C.; Ioustinova, N.; Sidorova, N.; Broy, M.; Zamulin, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    µCRL is a process algebraic language for specification and verification of distributed systems. µCRL allows to describe temporal properties of distributed systems but it has no explicit reference to time. In this work we propose a manner of introducing discrete time without extending the language.

  1. Programmable electronic system design & verification utilizing DFM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtermans, M.J.M.; Apostolakis, G.E.; Brombacher, A.C.; Karydas, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DIM) during the design and verification of programmable electronic safety-related systems. The safety system consists of hardware as well as software. This paper explains and demonstrates the use of DIM to

  2. Verification of Software Components: Addressing Unbounded Paralelism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2007), s. 300-309 ISSN 1525-9293 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400300504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : software components * formal verification * unbounded parallelism Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  3. A Comparison of Modular Verification Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Staunstrup, Jørgen; Maretti, Niels

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents and compares three techniques for mechanized verification of state oriented design descriptions. One is a traditional forwardgeneration of a fixed point characterizing the reachable states. The two others can utilize a modular structure provided by the designer. Onerequires...

  4. Formal Verification of Circuits and Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The problem of validation and verification of correctness of present day hardware and soft- ware systems has become extemely complex due to the enormous growth in the size of the designs. Today typically 50% to 70% of the design cycle time is spent in verifying correct- ness. While simulation remains a predominant form ...

  5. Model Checking - Automated Verification of Computational Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 7. Model Checking - Automated Verification of Computational Systems. Madhavan Mukund. General Article Volume 14 Issue 7 July 2009 pp 667-681. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Formal Verification of Quasi-Synchronous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    pg. 215-226, Springer-Verlag: London, UK, 2001. [4] Nicolas Halbwachs and Louis Mandel, Simulation and Verification of Asynchronous Systems by...Huang, S. A. Smolka, W. Tan , and S. Tripakis, Deep Random Search for Efficient Model Checking of Timed Automata, in Proceedings of the 13th Monterey

  7. Behaviour Protocols Verification: Fighting State Explosion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mach, M.; Plášil, František; Kofroň, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2005), s. 22-30 ISSN 1525-9293 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/0672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : formal verification * software components * stateexplos ion * behavior protocols * parse trees Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  8. Verification of Timed-Arc Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lasse; Jacobsen, Morten; Møller, Mikael Harkjær

    2011-01-01

    of interesting theoretical properties distinguishing them from other time extensions of Petri nets. We shall give an overview of the recent theory developed in the verification of TAPN extended with features like read/transport arcs, timed inhibitor arcs and age invariants. We will examine in detail...

  9. Unification & sharing in timed automata verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Behrmann, Gerd; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2003-01-01

    We present the design of the model-checking engine and internal data structures for the next generation of UPPAAL. The design is based on a pipeline architecture where each stage represents one independent operation in the verification algorithms. The architecture is based on essentially one shar...

  10. A Verification Framework for Agent Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, R.M. van; Boer, F.S. de; Hoek, W. van der; Meyer, J-J.Ch.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a verification method for the correctness of multiagent systems as described in the framework of acpl (Agent Communication Programming Language). The computational model of acpl consists of an integration of the two different paradigms of ccp (Concurrent Constraint

  11. A Typical Verification Challenge for the GRID

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, Jan Cornelis; Bal, H. E.; Brim, L.; Leucker, M.

    2008-01-01

    A typical verification challenge for the GRID community is presented. The concrete challenge is to implement a simple recursive algorithm for finding the strongly connected components in a graph. The graph is typically stored in the collective memory of a number of computers, so a distributed

  12. Zero leakage quantization scheme for biometric verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de J.A.; Linnartz, J.P.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Biometrics gain increasing interest as a solution for many security issues, but privacy risks exist in case we do not protect the stored templates well. This paper presents a new verification scheme, which protects the secrets of the enrolled users. We will show that zero leakage is achieved if

  13. Hydrostatic Paradox: Experimental Verification of Pressure Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodejška, C.; Ganci, S.; Ríha, J.; Sedlácková, H.

    2017-01-01

    This work is focused on the experimental verification of the balance between the atmospheric pressure acting on the sheet of paper, which encloses the cylinder completely or partially filled with water from below, where the hydrostatic pressure of the water column acts against the atmospheric pressure. First of all this paper solves a theoretical…

  14. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  15. Using timing information in speaker verification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, CJ

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of temporal information as a feature for use in speaker verification systems. The relevance of temporal information in a speaker’s utterances is investigated, both with regard to improving the robustness of modern...

  16. Sampling for the verification of materials balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenhaus, R.; Goeres, H.J.; Beedgen, R.

    1983-08-01

    The results of a theory for verification of nuclear materials balance data are presented. The sampling theory is based on two diversion models where also a combination of models is taken into account. The theoretical considerations are illustrated with numerical examples using the data of a highly enriched uranium fabrication plant. (orig.) [de

  17. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest online library of ... and find other information sources and more resources for researchers and journals. ... Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal/Potchefstroomse Elektroniese Regsblad.

  18. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest online library of ... and find other information sources and more resources for researchers and journals. ... Nnamdi Azikiwe University Journal of International Law and Jurisprudence.

  19. Online Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Neal W.; Pawloski, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Describes the eventful history of online data collection and presents a review of current literature following by a list of pros and cons to be considered when stepping into online surveying. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  20. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest online library of ... AJOL works to change this, so that African-origin research output is available to Africans ... South African Medical Journal ... Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences.

  1. Online driver's license renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Kentucky Department of Vehicle Regulation is exploring the possibility of developing and implementing online : drivers license renewal. The objective of this project was to: 1) evaluate online drivers license and REAL ID renewal : programs ...

  2. Implementing Online Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Online physical education, although seemingly an oxymoron, appears to be the wave of the future at least for some students. The purpose of this article is to explore research and options for online learning in physical education and to examine a curriculum, assessment, and instructional model for online learning. The article examines how physical…

  3. Library Online Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folda, Linda; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Issues related to library online systems are discussed in six articles. Topics covered include staff education through vendor demonstrations, evaluation of online public access catalogs, the impact of integrated online systems on cataloging operations, the merits of smart and dumb barcodes, and points to consider in planning for the next online…

  4. Post-silicon and runtime verification for modern processors

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to survey the state of the art and evolving directions in post-silicon and runtime verification. The authors start by giving an overview of the state of the art in verification, particularly current post-silicon methodologies in use in the industry, both for the domain of processor pipeline design and for memory subsystems. They then dive into the presentation of several new post-silicon verification solutions aimed at boosting the verification coverage of modern processors, dedicating several chapters to this topic. The presentation of runtime verification solution

  5. A multi-professional software tool for radiation therapy treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Tim; Brooks, Ken; Davis, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Verification of patient setup is important in conformal therapy because it provides a means of quality assurance for treatment delivery. Electronic portal imaging systems have led to software tools for performing digital comparison and verification of patient setup. However, these software tools are typically designed from a radiation oncologist's perspective even though treatment verification is a team effort involving oncologists, physicists, and therapists. A new software tool, Treatment Verification Tool (TVT), has been developed as an interactive, multi-professional application for reviewing and verifying treatment plan setup using conventional personal computers. This study will describe our approach to electronic treatment verification and demonstrate the features of TVT. Methods and Materials: TVT is an object-oriented software tool written in C++ using the PC-based Windows NT environment. The software utilizes the selection of a patient's images from a database. The software is also developed as a single window interface to reduce the amount of windows presented to the user. However, the user can select from four different possible views of the patient data. One of the views is side-by-side comparison of portal images (on-line portal images or digitized port film) with a prescription image (digitized simulator film or digitally reconstructed radiograph), and another view is a textual summary of the grades of each portal image. The grades of a portal image are assigned by a radiation oncologist using an evaluation method, and the physicists and therapists may only review these results. All users of TVT can perform image enhancement processes, measure distances, and perform semi-automated registration methods. An electronic dialogue can be established through a set of annotations and notes among the radiation oncologists and the technical staff. Results: Features of TVT include: 1) side-by-side comparison of portal images and a prescription image; 2

  6. Runtime verification of embedded real-time systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinbacher, Thomas; Függer, Matthias; Brauer, Jörg

    We present a runtime verification framework that allows on-line monitoring of past-time Metric Temporal Logic (ptMTL) specifications in a discrete time setting. We design observer algorithms for the time-bounded modalities of ptMTL, which take advantage of the highly parallel nature of hardware designs. The algorithms can be translated into efficient hardware blocks, which are designed for reconfigurability, thus, facilitate applications of the framework in both a prototyping and a post-deployment phase of embedded real-time systems. We provide formal correctness proofs for all presented observer algorithms and analyze their time and space complexity. For example, for the most general operator considered, the time-bounded Since operator, we obtain a time complexity that is doubly logarithmic both in the point in time the operator is executed and the operator's time bounds. This result is promising with respect to a self-contained, non-interfering monitoring approach that evaluates real-time specifications in parallel to the system-under-test. We implement our framework on a Field Programmable Gate Array platform and use extensive simulation and logic synthesis runs to assess the benefits of the approach in terms of resource usage and operating frequency.

  7. A program for verification of phylogenetic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Andreas D M; Lu, Bingxin; Zhang, Louxin

    2016-09-01

    Genetic material is transferred in a non-reproductive manner across species more frequently than commonly thought, particularly in the bacteria kingdom. On one hand, extant genomes are thus more properly considered as a fusion product of both reproductive and non-reproductive genetic transfers. This has motivated researchers to adopt phylogenetic networks to study genome evolution. On the other hand, a gene's evolution is usually tree-like and has been studied for over half a century. Accordingly, the relationships between phylogenetic trees and networks are the basis for the reconstruction and verification of phylogenetic networks. One important problem in verifying a network model is determining whether or not certain existing phylogenetic trees are displayed in a phylogenetic network. This problem is formally called the tree containment problem. It is NP-complete even for binary phylogenetic networks. We design an exponential time but efficient method for determining whether or not a phylogenetic tree is displayed in an arbitrary phylogenetic network. It is developed on the basis of the so-called reticulation-visible property of phylogenetic networks. A C-program is available for download on http://www.math.nus.edu.sg/∼matzlx/tcp_package matzlx@nus.edu.sg Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Verification and validation in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2002-04-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess accuracy and reliability in computational simulations. This paper presents an extensive review of the literature in V&V in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), discusses methods and procedures for assessing V&V, and develops a number of extensions to existing ideas. The review of the development of V&V terminology and methodology points out the contributions from members of the operations research, statistics, and CFD communities. Fundamental issues in V&V are addressed, such as code verification versus solution verification, model validation versus solution validation, the distinction between error and uncertainty, conceptual sources of error and uncertainty, and the relationship between validation and prediction. The fundamental strategy of verification is the identification and quantification of errors in the computational model and its solution. In verification activities, the accuracy of a computational solution is primarily measured relative to two types of highly accurate solutions: analytical solutions and highly accurate numerical solutions. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical solutions are presented and the importance of software testing during verification activities is emphasized. The fundamental strategy of validation is to assess how accurately the computational results compare with the experimental data, with quantified error and uncertainty estimates for both. This strategy employs a hierarchical methodology that segregates and simplifies the physical and coupling phenomena involved in the complex engineering system of interest. A hypersonic cruise missile is used as an example of how this hierarchical structure is formulated. The discussion of validation assessment also encompasses a number of other important topics. A set of guidelines is proposed for designing and conducting validation experiments, supported by an explanation of how validation experiments are different

  9. Perancangan Massively Multiplayer Online Knights Fantasy Online

    OpenAIRE

    Haris, Darius Andana; Mawardi, Viny Christanti; Pratama, Davin

    2017-01-01

    Knights Fantasy Online adalah game online multiplayer dengan genre role-playing. Game ini dibuat menggunakan ActionScript 3.0 dengan Adobe Flash sebagai sisi klien dan Java sebagai servernya. Desain dari game ini dibuat dengan Adobe illustrator. Dalam game ini, pemain memulai petualangannya di dunia bernama Edenia, sebagai ksatria dari kerajaan yang bernama Aurum. Pemain bertugas mengkontrol jumlah populasi monster. Pemain dapat mengambil quest, mengumpulkan equipment dan meningkatkan ability...

  10. Quantitative vs. subjective portal verification using digital portal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, R; Leszczynski, K; Loose, S; Boyko, S; Dunscombe, P

    1996-01-15

    as unacceptable, in terms of the field placement, exhibited significantly higher (p portals rated as unacceptable by two of the oncologists. From the parameters that were used to quantify the degree of conformity between the prescription and treatment fields, the translational error in the transverse direction correlated best with the oncologists' assessments on the field placement. Field coverage and translational error in the cranio-caudal direction correlated well with assessments of only two out of the four participating oncologists. This can be explained by the fact that for the majority of treatment sites included in the study the positioning of field borders was more critical for the transverse direction. A conclusion for the design of future quantitative and automated on-line portal verification systems is that they will have to model different perceived significances of different types of localization errors intrinsic to oncologist evaluation of portal images.

  11. Shield verification and validation action matrix summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, C.

    1992-02-01

    WSRC-RP-90-26, Certification Plan for Reactor Analysis Computer Codes, describes a series of action items to be completed for certification of reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations. Validation and verification are integral part of the certification process. This document identifies the work performed and documentation generated to satisfy these action items for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system, it is not certification of the complete SHIELD system. Complete certification will follow at a later date. Each action item is discussed with the justification for its completion. Specific details of the work performed are not included in this document but can be found in the references. The validation and verification effort for the SHIELD, SHLDED, GEDIT, GENPRT, FIPROD, FPCALC, and PROCES modules of the SHIELD system computer code is completed

  12. Focussed approach to verification under FMCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragin, V.; Carlson, J.; Bardsley, J.; Hill, J.

    1998-01-01

    FMCT will have different impacts on individual states due to the enormous variance in their nuclear fuel cycles and the associated fissile material inventories. The problem is how to negotiate a treaty that would achieve results favourable for all participants, given that interests and priorities vary so much. We believe that focussed verification, confined to safeguarding of enrichment and reprocessing facilities in NWS and TS, coupled with verification of unirradiated direct-use material produced after entry-into-force of a FMCT and supported with measures to detect possible undeclared enrichment and reprocessing activities, is technically adequate for the FMCT. Eventually this would become the appropriate model for all states party to the NPT

  13. Formal verification of industrial control systems

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Verification of critical software is a high priority but a challenging task for industrial control systems. For many kinds of problems, testing is not an efficient method. Formal methods, such as model checking appears to be an appropriate complementary method. However, it is not common to use model checking in industry yet, as this method needs typically formal methods expertise and huge computing power. In the EN-ICE-PLC section, we are working on a [methodology][1] and a tool ([PLCverif][2]) to overcome these challenges and to integrate formal verification in the development process of our PLC-based control systems. [1]: http://cern.ch/project-plc-formalmethods [2]: http://cern.ch/plcverif

  14. Development and verification of the CATHENA GUI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the development and verification of a graphical user interface for CATHENA MOD-3.5d. The thermalhydraulic computer code CATHENA has been developed to simulate the physical behaviour of the hydraulic components in nuclear reactors and experimental facilities. A representation of the facility is developed as an ASCII text file and used by CATHENA to perform the simulation. The existing method of manual generation of idealizations of a physical system for performing thermal hydraulic analysis is complex, time-consuming and prone to errors. An overview is presented of the CATHENA GUI and its depiction of a CATHENA idealization through the manipulation of a visual collection of objects. The methodologies and rigour involved in the verification of the CATHENA GUI will be discussed. (author)

  15. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, K.; Winberg, M.R.; McIsaac, C.V. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy through the National Low-Level Waste Management Program and WMG Inc. have entered into a joint development effort to design, build, and demonstrate the Packaged Low-Level Waste Verification System. Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste disposal site operators have no method to independently verify the radionuclide content of packaged low-level waste that arrives at disposal sites for disposition. At this time, the disposal site relies on the low-level waste generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to ensure that low-level waste received meets the site`s waste acceptance criteria. The subject invention provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of low-level waste shipping records to ensure that the site`s waste acceptance criteria are being met. The objective of the prototype system is to demonstrate a mobile system capable of independently verifying the content of packaged low-level waste.

  16. Time Optimal Reachability Analysis Using Swarm Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhengkui; Nielsen, Brian; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2016-01-01

    Time optimal reachability analysis employs model-checking to compute goal states that can be reached from an initial state with a minimal accumulated time duration. The model-checker may produce a corresponding diagnostic trace which can be interpreted as a feasible schedule for many scheduling...... and planning problems, response time optimization etc. We propose swarm verification to accelerate time optimal reachability using the real-time model-checker Uppaal. In swarm verification, a large number of model checker instances execute in parallel on a computer cluster using different, typically randomized...... search strategies. We develop four swarm algorithms and evaluate them with four models in terms scalability, and time- and memory consumption. Three of these cooperate by exchanging costs of intermediate solutions to prune the search using a branch-and-bound approach. Our results show that swarm...

  17. Systems Approach to Arms Control Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, K; Neimeyer, I; Listner, C; Stein, G; Chen, C; Dreicer, M

    2015-05-15

    Using the decades of experience of developing concepts and technologies for verifying bilateral and multilateral arms control agreements, a broad conceptual systems approach is being developed that takes into account varying levels of information and risk. The IAEA has already demonstrated the applicability of a systems approach by implementing safeguards at the State level, with acquisition path analysis as the key element. In order to test whether such an approach could also be implemented for arms control verification, an exercise was conducted in November 2014 at the JRC ITU Ispra. Based on the scenario of a hypothetical treaty between two model nuclear weapons states aimed at capping their nuclear arsenals at existing levels, the goal of this exercise was to explore how to use acquisition path analysis in an arms control context. Our contribution will present the scenario, objectives and results of this exercise, and attempt to define future workshops aimed at further developing verification measures that will deter or detect treaty violations.

  18. GRIMHX verification and validation action matrix summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumble, E.F.

    1991-12-01

    WSRC-RP-90-026, Certification Plan for Reactor Analysis Computer Codes, describes a series of action items to be completed for certification of reactor analysis computer codes used in Technical Specifications development and for other safety and production support calculations. Validation and verification of the code is an integral part of this process. This document identifies the work performed and documentation generated to satisfy these action items for the Reactor Physics computer code GRIMHX. Each action item is discussed with the justification for its completion. Specific details of the work performed are not included in this document but are found in the references. The publication of this document signals the validation and verification effort for the GRIMHX code is completed

  19. Sensor-fusion-based biometric identity verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.J.; Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.; Martinez, R.F.; Bartholomew, J.W.; Jordan, J.B.; Flachs, G.M.; Bao, Z.; Zhu, L.

    1998-02-01

    Future generation automated human biometric identification and verification will require multiple features/sensors together with internal and external information sources to achieve high performance, accuracy, and reliability in uncontrolled environments. The primary objective of the proposed research is to develop a theoretical and practical basis for identifying and verifying people using standoff biometric features that can be obtained with minimal inconvenience during the verification process. The basic problem involves selecting sensors and discovering features that provide sufficient information to reliably verify a person's identity under the uncertainties caused by measurement errors and tactics of uncooperative subjects. A system was developed for discovering hand, face, ear, and voice features and fusing them to verify the identity of people. The system obtains its robustness and reliability by fusing many coarse and easily measured features into a near minimal probability of error decision algorithm

  20. Automated Formal Verification for PLC Control Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Fernández Adiego, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) are widely used devices used in industrial control systems. Ensuring that the PLC software is compliant with its specification is a challenging task. Formal verification has become a recommended practice to ensure the correctness of the safety-critical software. However, these techniques are still not widely applied in industry due to the complexity of building formal models, which represent the system and the formalization of requirement specifications. We propose a general methodology to perform automated model checking of complex properties expressed in temporal logics (e.g. CTL, LTL) on PLC programs. This methodology is based on an Intermediate Model (IM), meant to transform PLC programs written in any of the languages described in the IEC 61131-3 standard (ST, IL, etc.) to different modeling languages of verification tools. This approach has been applied to CERN PLC programs validating the methodology.

  1. Face Verification using MLP and SVM

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinaux, Fabien; Marcel, Sébastien

    2002-01-01

    The performance of machine learning algorithms has steadily improved over the past few years, such as MLP or more recently SVM. In this paper, we compare two successful discriminant machine learning algorithms apply to the problem of face verification: MLP and SVM. These two algorithms are tested on a benchmark database, namely XM2VTS. Results show that a MLP is better than a SVM on this particular task.

  2. Verification tests for CANDU advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    For the development of a CANDU advanced fuel, the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundles were tested under reactor operating conditions at the CANDU-Hot test loop. This report describes test results and test methods in the performance verification tests for the CANFLEX-NU bundle design. The main items described in the report are as follows. - Fuel bundle cross-flow test - Endurance fretting/vibration test - Freon CHF test - Production of technical document. (author). 25 refs., 45 tabs., 46 figs

  3. TWRS system drawings and field verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    The Configuration Management Program combines the TWRS Labeling and O and M drawing and drawing verification programs. The combined program will produce system drawings for systems that are normally operated or have maintenance performed on the system, label individual pieces of equipment for proper identification, even if system drawings are not warranted, and perform verification of drawings that are identified as essential in Tank Farm Essential Drawing Plans. During fiscal year 1994, work was begun to label Tank Farm components and provide user friendly system based drawings for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operations and maintenance. During the first half of fiscal 1995, the field verification program continued to convert TWRS drawings into CAD format and verify the accuracy based on visual inspections. During the remainder of fiscal year 1995 these efforts will be combined into a single program providing system based drawings and field verification of TWRS equipment and facilities. This combined program for TWRS will include all active systems for tank farms. Operations will determine the extent of drawing and labeling requirements for single shell tanks, i.e. the electrical distribution, HVAC, leak detection, and the radiation monitoring system. The tasks required to meet these objectives, include the following: identify system boundaries or scope for drawing being verified; label equipment/components in the process systems with a unique Equipment Identification Number (EIN) per the TWRS Data Standard; develop system drawings that are coordinated by ''smart'' drawing numbers and/or drawing references as identified on H-14-020000; develop a Master Equipment List (MEL) multi-user data base application which will contain key information about equipment identified in the field; and field verify and release TWRS Operation and Maintenance (O and M) drawings