WorldWideScience

Sample records for online courses

  1. Transforming the Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Ben-Naim, D.; Semken, S. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional large lecture classes are fundamentally passive and teacher-centered. Most existing online courses are as well, including massive open online courses (MOOCs). Research tells us that this mode of instruction is not ideal for student learning. However, the unique attributes of the online environment have thus far been mostly underutilized. We hypothesize that new tools and the innovative curricula they enable can foster greater student engagement and enhance learning at large scale. To test this hypothesis, over the past three years, Arizona State University developed and offered "Habitable Worlds", an online-only astrobiology lab course. The course curriculum is based on the Drake Equation, which integrates across disciplines. The course pedagogy is organized around a term-long, individualized, game-inspired project in which each student must find and characterize rare habitable planets in a randomized field of hundreds of stars using concepts learned in the course. The curriculum allows us to meaningfully integrate concepts from Earth, physical, life, and social sciences in order to address questions related to the possibility of extraterrestrial life. The pedagogy motivates students to master concepts, which are taught through interactive and adaptive inquiry-driven tutorials, featuring focused feedback and alternative pathways that adjust to student abilities, built using an intelligent tutoring system (Smart Sparrow's Adaptive eLearning Platform - AeLP). Through the combination of the project and tutorials, students construct knowledge from experience, modeling the authentic practice of science. Because the tutorials are self-grading, the teaching staff is free to dedicate time to more intense learner-teacher interactions (such as tutoring weaker students or guiding advanced students towards broader applications of the concepts), using platforms like Piazza and Adobe Connect. The AeLP and Piazza provide robust data and analysis tools that allow us to

  2. Benefits of Synchronous Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Scott; Smith, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Most online courses are offered as "asynchronous" courses and have no real-time contact with students. The Synchronous online alternative provides normal scheduled class time and allows students to login to a virtual online classroom with the instructor. We provide an overview of two different platforms for hosting synchronous classes…

  3. Student Perceptions of Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Irma S.; Blankenship, Dianna

    2017-01-01

    Presently, at the post-secondary level, digital or online education is offered in addition to traditional face-to-face courses and the number of online course offerings is rapidly growing. The "Occupational Outlook Handbook" reveals that employment in" computer and information technology" occupations is projected to grow 12…

  4. Deep Learning Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    course offered at Stanford University in Winter 2015 and again in Winter 2016 on the topic of “Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition...com- puter science professor at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Prof. Mathias Kolsch, used the materials to teach his own version of the course at...helping the student learn to code the algo- rithms taught in the course. As there was no “expert” in this subject available to teach the course, the

  5. Online Education and Its Course Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Dan

    2015-01-01

    There is a very important and urgent task about online education—to develop high-quality online course which can be applied to online education with the vigorous development of online information technology. This essay discusses the present situation of online education; the concept of online course; its characteristic and advantage; the basic function and structure and probe into the design principle of online course.

  6. Understanding massively open online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2014-02-01

    Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are an innovative delivery system for educational offerings. MOOCs have been hailed with optimism for making education accessible to many, but at the same time, they have been criticized for poor participant completion rates. Nurse educators are considering whether and how to use MOOCs; this column explains MOOCs and their advantages and disadvantages for nurse educators.

  7. BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSES ONLINE SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUČÍRKOVÁ, Lenka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the project called Online Study Support for the Subject of Business English within the Fund of Higher Education Development of the Czech Republic. It will be created in the form of a twelve-module course in the Moodle Learning Management System (LMS on the B1 level of the Common European Framework of References for Languages. Moodle is an open source Virtual Learning Environment which is free, developed by a worldwide community and is used for study purposes. It allows the teachers to create online courses and the students to enrol in them. The course is focused on the development of business and economic terminology, on reading comprehension, listening comprehension and the work with up-to-date authentic audio-visual materials. The course comprises the topics such as business and its basic terms, business letters, business organizations, macroeconomics and microeconomics, personnel management, marketing, email, accounting and finance etc. Single units have the following structure: lead in, key words and definitions, specialist material, various activities such as filling in the gaps, multiple choice, matching, word formation, word order etc. These electronic activities are created in the most famous authoring tool in our field called Hot Potatoes, they can be stored on a central server and accessed from anywhere through the Internet. Online support will be intended for students of all faculties and fields of study at the Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS in Prague, including incoming Erasmus students and academic staff as well as the students of other universities.

  8. The Bottom Line: Funding Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Rob

    2010-01-01

    A few school administrators in Clovis, California, began a quest to introduce online high school courses in their school district, believing it might cost less to teach classes online than it would to teach students face to face in a classroom. They figured instead of having one teacher fielding a load of 150 students per course, an online course…

  9. Examining Student Satisfaction of Online Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asfour, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    This survey research of 55 participants was completed at a private university to determine students' satisfaction of statistic online courses. The study explored the students' satisfaction of course components: online statistics, online instruction, communication, assessment, and overall student satisfaction. The findings showed a positive…

  10. Using Collaborative Course Development to Achieve Online Course Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ining Tracy; Saj, Tami; Hamilton, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The issue of quality is becoming front and centre as online distance education moves into the mainstream of higher education. Many believe collaborative course development is the best way to design quality online courses. This research uses a case study approach to probe into the collaborative course development process and the implementation of…

  11. Teaching Dance with Online Course Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Erika; Knosp, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    As a result of easier access to and functionality of the Internet, online course management systems (CMSs) began to be developed in the mid-1990s. These technological tools were created to fill a need in the growing field of teaching through online courses.Most notable of these course tools are Blackboard (2015) and Desire2Learn (1999). Both of…

  12. Video and Course Context Discussion on Massive Open Online Courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubosson, Magali; Emad, Sabine; Broillet, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Video and Course Content Discussion on Massive Open Online Courses: An Exploratory Research—Magali Dubosson (HEG Fribourg), Sabine Emad (HEG Genève), Alexandra Broillet (University of Geneva and Webster University Geneva), Constance Kampf (Aarhus University, Denmark)...

  13. Evaluating and Improving Online Intelligence Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Alexandra Luce

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Civilian, military and government institutions offer a wide range of courses on intelligence and are increasingly doing so online. While evaluation and improvement are critical to ensuring quality training and education, there is little research about how to evaluate and improve online intelligence courses. Based on the author’s experience developing and teaching such courses, this article offers four suggestions to those involved in online intelligence training and education: (1 conduct a key assumptions check; (2 ensure the course presentation embodies the principles of intelligence communication; (3 encourage creative freedom; and (4 build in mechanisms for feedback throughout the course.

  14. An interactive online robotics course.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedeward, Kevin (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM); Bruder, Steven B. H.

    2003-07-01

    Attempting to convey concepts and ideas in the subject area of robotic manipulators from within the confines of a static two-dimensional printed page can prove quite challenging to even the most gifted of authors. The inherently dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of the subject matter seems better suited to a medium of conveyance wherein a student is allowed to interactively explore topics in this multi-disciplinary field. This article describes the initial development of an online robotics course 'textbook' which seeks to leverage recent advances in Web-based technologies to enhance the learning experience in ways not possible with printed materials. The pedagogical approach employed herein is that of multi-modal reinforcement wherein key concepts are first described in words, conveyed visually, and finally reinforced by soliciting student interaction.

  15. Teaching Accounting Courses Online: One Instructor's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusing, Gregory M.; Hosler, Jonathan C.; Ragan, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Accounting programs at colleges and universities across the country are offering more online courses, and in some cases entire degree programs. Given increasing enrollments in online accounting education, it is important that accounting educators become aware of the things that work and the things that don't work when delivering courses over the…

  16. Designing Online Courses to Promote Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Fisher, Amy; Han, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although the issue of student retention is a campus-wide one, it is of special interest in online distance learning courses, where retention rates are reported to be lower than in face-to-face classes. Among the explanations and theories of retention rates in online courses, one that struck us as most useful is a structural one, namely, course…

  17. Supporting Academic Honesty in Online Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McGee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring academic honesty is a challenge for traditional classrooms, but more so for online course where technology use is axiomatic to learning and instruction. With the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA requirement that online course providers reduce opportunities to cheat and verify student identity, all involved with course delivery must be informed about and involved in issues related to academic dishonesty. This article examines why students cheat and plagiarize, types of dishonesty in online courses, strategies to minimize violations and institutional strategies that have proven to be successful.

  18. Supporting Academic Honesty in Online Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McGee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring academic honesty is a challenge for traditional classrooms, but more so for online course where technology use is axiomatic to learning and instruction. With the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA requirement that online course providers reduce opportunities to cheat and verify student identity, all involved with course delivery must be informed about and involved in issues related to academic dishonesty. This article examines why students cheat and plagiarize, types of dishonesty in online courses, strategies to minimize violations and institutional strategies that have proven to be successful.

  19. What Makes a MOOC? Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCSs) Compared to Mainstream Online University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    A Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is a model for delivering learning content online to any person who wants to take a course, with no limit on attendance. The MOOC industry is growing rapidly, fueled by students interested in free higher-education learning, and the universities and venture capitalists willing to fund the courses. This paper…

  20. Massive open online courses in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Karen; Greene-Ryan, Jane

    2014-01-01

    MOOCs are changing the face of higher education. Online programs provide nurses with access to technologies, networking with other professionals, and opportunities reflect on their practice. The changing climate of online, higher education provides access and flexibility to students balancing work, family, and financial responsibilities. Offering free courses may provide nursing students ambivalent about online learning the chance to experience otherwise unavailable educational opportunities including the chance to earn a BSN degree.

  1. Grade Validity of Online Quantitative Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurer, Judson C.

    2013-01-01

    Are prospective employers getting "quality" educated, degreed applicants and are academic institutions that offer online degree programs ensuring the quality control of the courses/programs offered? The issue specifically addressed in this paper is not with all institutions offering degrees through online programs or even with all online…

  2. BEST PRACTICES IN ONLINE EDUCATION: Online Instructors, Courses, and administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad D. BAGHDADI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning and teaching online imposes certain challenges on both students and teachers. Teachers should be prepared to meet special requirements of teaching online. Teachers play an important role in teaching. Roles of teachers increase with introducing the online learning, contrary to an early assumption perceived with the invention of the Internet. Designing and developing online courses need collaboration of several people with a variety of interests and expertise, including administrators, teachers, designers, and technical specialists. Each course within the curriculum should be well-designed and fit well within the curriculum. The curriculum in turn should reflect the current state of the discipline, enabling the learners to develop appropriate proficiency and mastery within the specific discipline. This paper describes the roles of teachers and administrators in online learning, and discusses the rules of best practices for both.

  3. Scaffolding Learner Autonomy in Online University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribbe, Elisa; Bezanilla, María José

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the question in what ways teachers and course designers can support the development and exertion of learner autonomy among online university students. It advocates that a greater attention to learner autonomy could help more students to complete their course successfully and thus contribute the decrease of the high dropout…

  4. Online Courses the Real Challenge Is "Motivation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Cynthia F.; Monds, Kathaleena E.

    2008-01-01

    Among the academic disciplines, business has led the way in offering Internet courses to its students. While online classes give students more opportunity and flexibility to integrate courses into their daily schedules, many concerns have developed from this form of distance education. Research on distance education indicates that the keys to…

  5. Online course design for teaching critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Patricia; Shanedling, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Teaching critical thinking (CT) skills, a goal in higher education, is seldom considered in the primary design of either classroom or online courses, and is even less frequently measured in student learning. In health professional education, CT along with clinical reasoning skills is essential for the development of clinical practitioners. This study, measuring CT skill development in an online theory course, supports using a cyclical course design to build higher level processes in student thinking. Eighty-six Masters of Occupational Therapy students in four sections of an occupation-based theory course were evaluated on elements in the Paul and Elder CT Model throughout the course and surveyed for their perceptions in their ability to think critically at course completion. Results of this study demonstrated that the online theory course design contributed to improving critical thinking skills and student's perceived CT skill development as applicable to their future professional practice. In a focus group, eight students identified four effective course design features that contributed to their CT skill development: highly structured learning, timely feedback from instructor, repetition of assignments, and active engagement with the material.

  6. An online agricultural genetics course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Vivian

    2014-07-03

    In this age of rapidly developing online learning, the advent of a series of talks and supplementary material devoted to genetics in agriculture from Henry Stewart Talks ( http://hstalks.com/main/browse_talks.php?r=776&c=252 ) is welcome indeed. The series is designed for researchers and graduate students in the fields of genetics, plant science, animal science, agricultural science, food science, human nutrition and environmental science, advanced undergraduate students, policy makers and managers in public and private sectors, and continuing professional education/development.

  7. Discouraging academic dishonesty in online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway-Klaassen, Janice M; Keil, Deborah E

    2010-01-01

    With the development of distance education and blended course delivery formats, our faculty faced new issues related to academic integrity in online testing. Current students often differ in their understanding of what is appropriate academic behavior and what is considered cheating. Enhancing quiz formats and educating faculty and students about academic integrity policies has minimized the situation in our program.

  8. Who Owns Online Course Intellectual Property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranch, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Faculty develop intellectual property needed for online courses while employed by an academic institution. That institution has a claim on the copyright because the instructional materials developed by the faculty members could be seen as "works for hire." On the other hand, both tradition and case law have seen faculty as the copyright…

  9. A Taxonomy of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Olga; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a new approach to distance education, which originated from the open education resources (OER) movement, are becoming widespread throughout the world. Over time, early versions of cMOOCs have undergone changes in terms of use, name and structure. In their short life, MOOCs have been categorized into different…

  10. TEACHING IN ONLINE COURSES: Experiences of Instructional Technology Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omur AKDEMIR

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and computer technology have altered the education landscape. Online courses are offered throughout the world. Learning about the experiences of faculty members is important to guide practitioners and administrators. Using qualitative research methodology, this study investigated the experiences of faculty members teaching online courses. A convenience sampling was used to select the instructional technology faculty members to investigate their experiences in online courses. Semi-structured interviews with faculty members teaching online courses were used as the primary source to collect data about the experiences of faculty members in online courses. Results of the study showed that faculty members' interest in using technology and the amount of time available to them for online course design affected the quality of online courses. The findings of this study also indicated that design quality of online courses is affected by the interest of faculty members to use the technology and the time that they can devote to planning, designing, and developing online courses. The poor design of existing online courses, high learning expectations of ndividuals from these courses, and the future of online courses are the concerns of faculty members. Higher education institutions should support workshops and trainings to increase the skills and interests of non-instructional design faculty members to design and develop online courses.

  11. Developing a Collaborative Multidisciplinary Online Design Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Bender

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology is transforming the practice of architecture and design from the conceptual stages right down to the actual construction. One would assume technology is being readily integrated into current design education. Unfortunately, this is not the case. The purpose of this study is to explore the integration of online education into the curriculum of architecture and design. The three primary obstacles to integrating technology with education in these disciplines are identified as: 1 the limited evidence of online education in the fields of architecture and design (Sagun, Demirkan, & Goktepe, 2001; 2 the reluctance of design educators to teach in an online environment (Bender & Good, 2003; and 3 the lack of multidisciplinary coursework currently available between architecture, design, and other related fields (IIDA Report, 1998. This paper will discuss online education in the context of traditional architecture and design studio instruction. A case study of the development of a collaborative, multidisciplinary online course offered between five major universities will be presented as a catalyst for change. The paper concludes with reflections on the pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of this new educational model and its implications for instructors involved in online education.

  12. Toward Deep Learning for Adult Students in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Xie, Kui

    2009-01-01

    Adult students have become the new majority in online distance education. Research in online distance education, however, is still predominantly based on the historical perspective of the traditional student profile. This study examines adult students' learning engagement in online courses and explores the impact of online course design models and…

  13. Developing and Applying Smartphone Apps in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gongjun; Rawat, Danda B.; Shi, Hui; Alnusair, Awny

    2014-01-01

    Online courses provide students flexible access to class at anytime and anywhere. Most online courses currently rely on computer-based delivery. However, computers still burden instructors and students with limited mobility and flexibility. To provide more convenient access to online courses, smartphones have been increasingly adopted as a mobile…

  14. Online by design the essentials of creating information literacy courses

    CERN Document Server

    Mery, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    As online instruction becomes more popular, librarians will want to develop the knowledge and skills needed to create an effective online information literacy course. Online by Design: The Essentials of Creating Information Literacy Courses will guide librarians as they go through the process of designing, developing, and delivering online information literacy courses. Yvonne Mery & Jill Newby offer proven techniques and tips for creating quality online courses that are engaging and effective. This handbook is perfect for instruction librarians who are interesting in developing new courses or

  15. Increasing Student Interaction in Technical Writing Courses in Online Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Drew

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how the levels of student interaction change through the use of small groups and moderators in online writing courses. The study examines three technical and professional online writing courses: one course that employs small groups and group moderators and two courses that have no small groups or moderators. The results of…

  16. Online Planetary Science Courses at Athabasca University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Martin; Munyikwa, Ken; Bredeson, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Athabasca University offers distance education courses in science, at freshman and higher levels. It has a number of geology and astronomy courses, and recently opened a planetary science course as the first upper division astronomy course after many years of offering freshman astronomy. Astronomy 310, Planetary Science, focuses on process in the Solar System on bodies other than Earth. This process-oriented course uses W. F. Hartmann's "Moons and Planets" as its textbook. It primarily approaches the subject from an astronomy and physics perspective. Geology 415, Earth's Origin and Early Evolution, is based on the same textbook, but explores the evidence for the various processes, events, and materials involved in the formation and evolution of Earth. The course provides an overview of objects in the Solar System, including the Sun, the planets, asteroids, comets, and meteoroids. Earth's place in the solar system is examined and physical laws that govern the motion of objects in the universe are looked at. Various geochemical tools and techniques used by geologists to reveal and interpret the evidence for the formation and evolution of bodies in the solar system as well as the age of earth are also explored. After looking at lines of evidence used to reconstruct the evolution of the solar system, processes involved in the formation of planets and stars are examined. The course concludes with a look at the origin and nature of Earth's internal structure. GEOL415 is a senior undergraduate course and enrols about 15-30 students annually. The courses are delivered online via Moodle and student evaluation is conducted through assignments and invigilated examinations.

  17. Massive open online courses in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Ira; Klaas, Brian; Yager, James D; Kanchanaraksa, Sukon

    2013-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) represent a new and potentially transformative model for providing educational opportunities to learners not enrolled in a formal educational program. The authors describe the experience of developing and offering eight MOOCs on a variety of public health topics. Existing institutional infrastructure and experience with both for-credit online education and open educational resources mitigated the institutional risk and resource requirements. Although learners are able to enroll easily and freely and do so in large numbers, there is considerable variety in the level of participation and engagement among enrollees. As a result, comprehensive and accurate assessment of meaningful learning progress remains a major challenge for evaluating the effectiveness of MOOCs for providing public health education.

  18. A Cognitive Framework for the Analysis of Online Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Karen L.; Leinhardt, Gaea

    2008-01-01

    Many students now are receiving instruction in online environments created by universities, museums, corporations, and even students. What features of a given online course contribute to its effectiveness? This paper addresses that query by proposing and applying an analytic framework to five online introductory chemistry courses. Introductory…

  19. Assessment in Online Courses: How Are Counseling Skills Evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicco, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Online courses are a necessary addition to most graduate education programs. Offering students the option of completing program requirements online makes the program more competitive, convenient, and attractive. Responsible online instructors and program administrators must consider whether or not specific courses that are offered in the…

  20. Perpetual Enrollment Online Courses: Advantages, Administration, and Caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekula, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Although the advent of online learning has revolutionized the delivery of education, from the average student's perspective there have been few radical innovations in the general administration of pure online courses since their inception. With some exceptions the scheduling of online courses generally aligns with the university calendar, while…

  1. ESSEA K-4 Online Course: Polar Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, L.; Myers, R. J.; Schwerin, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) is a National Science Foundation-supported program implemented by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) to improve the quality of geoscience instruction for pre-service, middle, and high school teachers. ESSEA increases teachers' access to quality materials, standards-based instructional methods and content knowledge. Started in 2000 and based on a trio of online courses (for elementary, middle, and high school teachers), the courses have been used by 40 faculty at 20 institutions educating over 1,700 teachers in Earth system science. Program evaluation of original course participants indicated that the courses had significant impact on teachers Earth system content knowledge and beliefs about teaching and learning. Seventeen of the original participating institutions have continued to use the courses and many have developed new programs that incorporate the courses in Earth science education opportunities for teachers. Today the ESSEA program lists nearly 40 colleges and universities as participants. The original K-4 course and modules have been revised to include topics and resources focusing on the International Polar Year. The new K-4 Land, Living Things, Water and Air modules contain inquiry-based investigations exploring our polar regions. Each module lists a set of essential questions that guide teachers and their students as they build content knowledge. The course structure requires teachers to work individually and in teams to build content knowledge and pedagogical understanding of how their students learn. This group investigation approach and a "Teacher as Researcher" theme promote reflection and collaboration to develop criteria for effective concept building. By exploring the characteristics of polar landscapes, atmosphere, and polar life, teachers and their students will develop new understandings about the interactions and dependencies of the Earth spheres and our polar regions

  2. Access Patterns of Online Materials in a Blended Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarta, Carlos J.; Schmidt, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Patterns in student accesses of online materials and their effects upon student performance in a blended course are examined. Our blended course is an introductory business and economic statistics course where lectures are only available online while the traditional class period is used for complementary learning activities. Timing, volumes,…

  3. Student Perceptions of Cheating in Online Business Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Michael P.; Robertson, Paul J.; Clark, Renae K.

    2011-01-01

    Accounting majors enrolled in business courses at two different universities were asked to complete a survey questionnaire pertaining to cheating in online business courses. Specifically, students majoring in Accounting were asked about their awareness of cheating in online business courses as well as their opinions regarding the credibility of…

  4. National Standards for Quality Online Courses: Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Association for K-12 Online Learning, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL) is to ensure all students have access to world-class education and quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success. "National Standards for Quality Online Courses" is designed to provide states, districts, online programs, and…

  5. Comparison of Course Completion and Student Performance through Online and Traditional Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Atchley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Enrollment in online courses has outpaced overall university enrollment for the past several years. The growth of online courses does not appear to be slowing. The purpose of this study was to compare course completion and student academic performance between online and traditional courses. Archival data from the host university student records system was collected using the Structured Query Language. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze student characteristics. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if statistically significant differences existed between students enrolled in online and traditional courses when comparing course completion and academic performance. Analysis found statistically significant differences existed in both course completion and academic performance for students enrolled in online versus traditional courses. Additional analysis indicated statistically significant differences existed in course completion by course discipline.

  6. Students' Views About Potentially Offering Physics Courses Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlo, Susan E.

    2016-06-01

    Nationally, many public universities have started to move into the online course and program market that is most often associated with for-profit institutions of higher education. Administrators in public universities make statements regarding benefits to students' desire for flexibility and profit margins related to online courses. But do students attending a large public university want to take courses online especially science courses perceived to be difficult such as freshmen-level physics courses? This study took place at a large, public, Midwestern university and involved students enrolled in the first semester of a face-to-face, flipped physics course for engineering technology majors. Statements were collected from comments about online courses made by the university's administration and students in the course. Twenty students sorted 45 statements. Two student views emerged with one rejecting online courses in general and the other primarily rejecting online math, science, and technology courses, including physics. Students' descriptions of their previous online course experiences were used to inform the analyses and to assist in describing the two views that emerged in conjunction with the distinguishing statements. Consensus among the two views is also discussed. Overall, the results indicate a potential divergence between student views and what university administrators believe students want.

  7. Exploring the Potential of the Massive, Open, Online Astronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carmen; Impey, C. D.; Wenger, M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronomy: State of the Art is a massive, open, online course (MOOC) in astronomy. Course content was released weekly, over 7 weeks, in the spring of 2013. More than 10 hours of video lectures were produced and deployed along with supplementary readings, podcasts, and realtime Q&A sessions with professor Chris Impey. All content is still available online as a self-paced course. Over 5,000 students have enrolled in the course through the online course platform Udemy. This poster presents student engagement data, and a discussion of lessons learned and opportunities for future improvement.

  8. Online and Hybrid Water Industry Courses for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    The Water Quality Management Technology department at Red Rocks Community College in Denver, CO received a National Science Foundation grant and converted 24 courses from a face-to-face format to online and hybrid formats. The courses were converted to meet a growing employment need within the water industry. The online and hybrid options gave…

  9. Utilizing a Simulation within an Online School Technology Leadership Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Online courses and programs have grown to become and continue to be a popular option for students. As part of an online Master's of Education in Instructional Technology program, students must complete a school technology leadership course. Leadership decision making, policy making, and how to have innovations take hold in a school settings are…

  10. Teaching Strategies to Promote Immediacy in Online Graduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahara, Manuel Flores; Castro, Armida Lozano

    2015-01-01

    The present study is the result of the research question: How do teachers promote immediacy through interaction with their students in online graduate courses? Research was carried out at Tecnológico de Monterrey, a Mexican private university that offers online courses. The research methodology employed a qualitative approach of virtual…

  11. Student Motives for Taking Online Courses in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Dolph, David; Young, I. Phillip

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with students enrolled in a master's degree program in educational administration at a private research university that offered all required courses in both online and in-class formats. The purposes were to determine (a) the extent to which online courses were selected, (b) the level of importance students placed on four…

  12. Online Course Quality Assurance: Development of a Quality Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Steven J.; Jackson, Christina M.; Premer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The University of Nebraska at Kearney's Online Course Checklist is the main instrument for assessing the quality of online courses at UNK. A number of issues were faced when developing and deploying this quality assurance checklist at a small four-year university. The process including development, implementation, and revision is discussed along…

  13. Business Student Attitudes, Experience, and Satisfaction with Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Ann; Kuzma, John; Thiewes, Harold

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to examine business students' perceptions of their online class experience relative to the traditional in-class experience; specifically, whether a descriptive, theoretical or analytical course would be preferred as an online or traditional course. Two hundred and ninety students enrolled in upper-level business courses…

  14. Factors that Influence Students' Decision to Dropout of Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Pedro A.; Johnson, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many reasons why students dropout of college courses, those reasons may be unique for students who are enrolled in an online program. Issues of isolation, disconnectedness, and technological problems may be factors that influence a student to leave a course. To understand these factors, an online survey was developed to collect…

  15. MOOCs and the AI-Stanford Like Courses: Two Successful and Distinct Course Formats for Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Open online courses (OOC) with a massive number of students have represented an important development for online education in the past years. A course on artificial intelligence, CS221, at the University of Stanford was offered in the fall of 2011 free and online which attracted 160,000 registered students. It was one of three offered as an…

  16. Applying Distributed Learning Theory in Online Business Communication Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristin

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the critical use of technology in online formats that entail relatively new teaching media. Argues that distributed learning theory is valuable for teachers of online business communication courses for several reasons. Discusses the application of distributed learning theory to the teaching of business communication online. (SG)

  17. Incorporating pedagogical principles in developing an online nursing research course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Sue Ellen; Barnes, Katrina; Wicker, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Since 1998, developing online courses to accommodate nontraditional students has been a major focus at a public commuter university in the southeast. Concern about the quality of online instruction prompted a number of faculty members in different disciplines to explore pedagogically sound methods for improving and evaluating their teaching using instructional technology. In response to the impetus to have a framework for the development of online courses, a seminar series based on the Seven Principles of Undergraduate Education was developed. On the basis of the pedagogical principles presented during the seminar series, the online nursing research course was redesigned to be more learner-centered by increasing student-to-student and student-to-faculty interaction. Seven interactive modules were developed to address students' diverse learning styles. Using this approach for teaching an online nursing research course, students were able to learn the important concepts typically taught in a traditional, face-to-face course, while managing family and work responsibilities.

  18. Preparing for Distance Learning: Designing An Online Student Orientation Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane D. Chapman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the analysis undertaken to design a 1-credit-hour online orientation course for students new to online learning. An instructional design team, as a part of an advanced instructional design course, worked with a university-based client. The client identified specific problem areas encountered by novice students of online courses and the team designed a comprehensive program to meet those needs. Analysis of the data revealed surprising differences in expectations between instructors of online courses and their students of what an orientation to online learning should include. The team also conducted a task analysis to aid in further identifying the skills, knowledge and attitudes required by students for success in online courses. Findings indicated that there is a need for online learners to understand the time commitment required of an online course and possess or develop strong time management skills. Because of small sample size, results cannot be generalized beyond the respondents. The authors found a mismatch in the perception of instructor technical skills versus student technical skill. Based on their findings, the paper provides recommendations on the appropriate design, development and implementation of an orientation to online learning.

  19. Climate Discovery Online Courses for Educators from NCAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D. L.; Meymaris, K. K.; Johnson, R. M.; Gardiner, L.; Russell, R.

    2008-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has responded to the pressing need for professional development in climate and global change sciences by creating the Climate Discovery online course series. This series was designed with the secondary geoscience educator in mind. The online courses are based on current and credible climate change science. Interactive learning techniques are built into the online course designs with assignments that encourage active participation. A key element of the online courses is the creation of a virtual community of geoscience educators who exchange ideas related to classroom implementation, student assessment, and lessons plans. Geoscience educators from around the country have participated in the online courses. The ongoing interest from geoscience educators strongly suggests that the NCAR Climate Discovery online courses are a timely and needed professional development opportunity. The intent of NCAR Climate Discovery is to positively impact teachers' professional development scientifically authentic information, (2) experiencing guided practice in conducting activities and using ancillary resources in workshop venues, (3) gaining access to standards-aligned lesson plans, kits that promote hands-on learning, and scientific content that are easily implemented in their classrooms, and (4) becoming a part of a community of educators with whom they may continue to discuss the challenges of pedagogy and content comprehension in teaching climate change in the Earth system context. Three courses make up the Climate Discovery series: Introduction to Climate Change; Earth System Science - A Climate Change Perspective; and Understanding Climate Change Today. Each course, instructed by science education specialists, combines geoscience content, information about current climate research, hands-on activities, and group discussion. The online courses use the web-based Moodle courseware system (open- source software similar to

  20. Quality Assurance in Large Scale Online Course Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsombach-Ebner, Cinda

    2013-01-01

    The course design and development process (often referred to here as the "production process") at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU-Worldwide) aims to produce turnkey style courses to be taught by a highly-qualified pool of over 800 instructors. Given the high number of online courses and tremendous number of live sections…

  1. Lecture Videos in Online Courses: A Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather K.; Cordova, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study regarding online lecture videos, Evans (2014) shows that lecture videos are not superior to still slides. Using two Introduction to American Government courses, taught in a 4-week summer session, she shows that students in a non-video course had higher satisfaction with the course and instructor and performed better on exams than…

  2. Massive open online courses are relevant for postgraduate medical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles in postgraduate training, but training and courses relevant to these roles can be limited. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) - free online courses in which anyone can participate, anywhere - may improve course participation. This study...... investigates the relevance of MOOCs for postgraduate medical training within the CanMEDS framework. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We extracted a list of all courses posted by the two largest MOOC providers, Coursera and EdX, and reviewed all course descriptions and categorised each course into one of three categories...... predominantly from North American universities. CONCLUSION: A large number of MOOCs are relevant for postgraduate medical training. A weekly workload of 4.5 hours may enable course participation even for busy clinicians. Physicians should consider these free and universally available courses as relevant...

  3. Teaching the Principles of Effective Online Course Design: What Works?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Gormley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available While much has been written about the pedagogy and challenges of online learning, there is comparatively little research that advises how online course design competencies can be achieved. Certainly a growing range of course design resources is being created and made openly available, but there is a need to evaluate their actual impact on practice. This predominantly qualitative study describes the impact of two learning interventions – open online tutorials and a design and development workshop – aimed at introducing the fundamentals of online course design. Four online course developers at an Irish university were interviewed about their experiences creating multimedia-based online courses. Two of the developers were given access to targeted learning interventions and were subsequently interviewed about their experiences using those interventions. The main findings were that novice online course developers can potentially learn and apply design principles through a dedicated introductory phase, techniques that promote discussion of effective pedagogy, and ongoing collaboration in course design. These strategies could be adapted to specific contexts elsewhere.

  4. Online Course Quality Assurance: Development of a Quality Checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. McGhan, MSEd

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The University of Nebraska at Kearney’s Online Course Checklist is the main instrument for assessing the quality of online courses at UNK. A number of issues were faced when developing and deploying this quality assurance checklist at a small four-year university. The process including development, implementation, and revision is discussed along with the need for faculty buy-in. Special considerations included how to assess the quality of an online course while ensuring academic freedom in accordance with a union contract. The purpose of this case study is to provide a roadmap for institutions that are developing an instrument of their own.

  5. Student Participation Patterns in Online Discussion: Incorporating Constructivist Discussion into Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoe Kyeung; Bateman, Betzi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to explore student participation patterns in online discussion boards related to their characteristics and question types. The characteristics of students enrolled in an online course and the impact of types of discussion questions on student posts were examined. During the 16 weeks of a course, the participation…

  6. Online Course Best Practices as Precision Teaching: Case Study of Quality Systems Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Best practices for online courses are explored as precision teaching (PT) within the context of a case study analysis. The case study focuses on courses taught, 100 per cent online, as part of Quality Systems (QS) at Bowling Green State University (BGSU). PT literature establishes main attributes desired as the basis for best practices. The…

  7. Online Facilitation and Motivation in Online MBA Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Lu, Xiaojing; Lee, Seung-hee; Bonk, Curtis J.; Magjuka, Richard J.; Liu, Shijuan; Zhai, Mengyu; Su, Bude; Wise, Alyssa

    2004-01-01

    Online teaching and learning is making a significant impact on the fabric of higher education. In particular, online MBA programs have seen a rapid rise in student enrollments in recent years while the student enrollments in traditional in-residence MBA programs are in decline (Hayward, 2004; Lorenzo, 2004). This appears to be due, in part, to the…

  8. Professor Created On-line Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Arthur W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will share the creation, implementation, and modification of an online college level general biology laboratory course offered for non-science majors as a part of a General Education Curriculum. The ability of professors to develop quality online laboratories will address a growing need in Higher Education as more institutions combine course sections and look for suitable alternative course delivery formats due to declining departmental budgets requiring reductions in staffing, equipment, and supplies. Also, there is an equal or greater need for more professors to develop the ability to create online laboratory experiences because many of the currently available online laboratory course packages from publishers do not always adequately parallel on-campus laboratory courses, or are not as aligned with the companion lecture sections. From a variety of scientific simulation and animation web sites, professors can easily identify material that closely fit the specific needs of their courses, instructional environment, and students that they serve. All too often, on-campus laboratory courses in the sciences provide what are termed confirmation experiences that do NOT allow students to experience science as would be carried out by scientists. Creatively developed online laboratory experiences can often provide the type of authentic investigative experiences that are not possible on-campus due to the time constraints of a typical two-hour, once-per-week-meeting laboratory course. In addition, online laboratory courses can address issues related to the need for students to more easily complete missing laboratory assignments, and to have opportunities to extend introductory exercises into more advanced undertakings where a greater sense of scientific discovery can be experienced. Professors are strongly encourages to begin creating online laboratory exercises for their courses, and to consider issues regarding assessment, copyrights, and Intellectual Property

  9. Using reflection triggers while learning in an online course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Using reflection triggers while learning in an online course. British Journal of Educational Technology, 43(6), 1030-1040. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2011.01257.x

  10. Can SPOC (Self-Paced Online Course) Live Long and Prosper? A Comparison Study of a New Species of Online Course Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Sheryne; Meddaugh, Joshua; France-Harris, Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Numerous formats exist for online course delivery: pure online, blended or hybrid, flipped and web-enhanced. The literature is replete with comparison studies on the efficacy of online, hybrid and traditional format courses. However, the self-paced online course, a relatively new and rare variation, has received very little coverage in the body of…

  11. Student Equity: Discouraging Cheating in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Timothy B.; Williams, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    As online programs at conventional universities continue to expand, administrators and faculty face new challenges. Academic dishonesty is nothing new, but an online testing environment requires different strategies and tactics from what we have had to consider in the past. Our university has recently adapted successful face-to-face programs in…

  12. Piloting an Online Art Therapy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feen-Calligan, Holly

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and assessment of a graduate level online art therapy class. An introduction briefly defines art therapy and the need for distance learning in this field. The challenges inherent in teaching art therapy online, including working with art media and developing appropriate interpersonal skills and group…

  13. Minimizing Attrition in Online Degree Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boton, Eliani Colferai; Gregory, Sue

    2015-01-01

    The number of online programs in the higher education sector has increased dramatically in the last decade, and with it, an increase in attrition has become a recurring problem worldwide. Literature suggests that elements of culture, motivation, learning management systems and online pedagogy play a major role in attrition rates in the higher…

  14. Predictors of Enrolling in Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Students in Undergrad Marketing Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée J. Fontenot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory study of undergraduate students enrolled in marketing courses at a Southeastern regional university was conducted to determine the motivations and characteristics of marketing students who plan to be online learners and examined for differences between those who have taken and those who have not taken online classes. An online survey of Likert scales, open-ended questions and demographic questions was sent via class learning management websites. A total of 165 students of the 438 invited to participate completed the survey. A structural model was developed using SMART-PLS to estimate the relationships of constructs that predict taking online courses. Results of the study showed differences in predictors of those that have taken online courses compared to those who plan on taking online courses. A significant predictor of those planning on taking online courses is quality of learning while a significant predictor of those who have taken online courses is scheduling and timing. The results can be used to examine ways to improve/enhance the student’s educational experience, as well as an institution’s effectiveness in attracting the growing body of online learners.

  15. "Sensemaking" in a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course)

    OpenAIRE

    Pauschenwein, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Der Bedarf an Weiterbildungsangeboten und die neuen Möglichkeiten im Internet zusammenzuarbeiten führen zu vielen Online-Lernangeboten. In den letzten Jahren gaben Massive Open Online Courses Personen, die im Kontext von E-Learning arbeiten, die Möglichkeit online gemeinsam mit tausenden Anderen zu lernen. Der Konnektivismus versucht eine theoretische Basis für diese Lernprozesse zu geben. Doch wie gewinnt man in einem MOOC, einem Angebot an digitalen Medien, neue Erkenntnisse? Wie gehen die ...

  16. Multiple Intelligences in Online, Hybrid, and Traditional Business Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Salvador; Patron, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    According to Howard Gardner, Professor of Cognition and Education at Harvard University, intelligence of humans cannot be measured with a single factor such as the IQ level. Instead, he and others have suggested that humans have different types of intelligence. This paper examines whether students registered in online or mostly online courses have…

  17. Persistence Patterns in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Brent J.; Baker, Rachel B.; Dee, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Using a unique dataset of 44 Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), this article examines critical patterns of enrollment, engagement, persistence, and completion among students in online higher education. By leveraging fixed-effects specifications based on over 2.1 million student observations across more than 2,900 lectures, we analyzed…

  18. Students' Research Self-Efficacy during Online Doctoral Research Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Beate; Hoffman-Kipp, Peter; Lynn, Laura; Weltzer-Ward, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This study will explore student skill development and research self-efficacy as related to online doctoral students' first core research course experience. Findings from this study will be used to inform instructors in effective ways to support doctoral students during their early research experiences. This support will ensure that online graduate…

  19. Community College First-Year Business Student Online Course Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the online learning environment through the experiences of the individual learner and to gain more insight into the elements of Business online courses, as framed by the Keller ARCS Model of Motivation. This study explored the following three Research Questions: 1. How do undergraduate first-year…

  20. Effective Practices for Online Delivery of Quantitative Business Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Helen; Khare, Anshuman

    2010-01-01

    Online delivery of university-level courses has grown exponentially in the last decade and is increasingly being recognised as a viable and effective alternative to face-to-face classroom teaching. Many scholars have already written about the benefits and best practices of online teaching in general. However, not many studies have paid specific…

  1. Facilitating Interactivity in an Online Business Writing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrito, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Suggests ways of developing an online business writing course that uses technology to simulate features of the face-to-face classroom and that achieves an interactive learning experience for students. Uses the author's online business writing class as an example of one which manages to simulate, through the judicious use of software, the…

  2. Teaching Multiple Online Sections/Courses: Tactics and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Rodger; LaBrecque, Bryan; Fortner, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of teaching online increases as the number of sections or courses increase in a semester. The tactics and techniques which enrich online instruction in the tradition of quality matters can be modified and adapted to the demands of multiple instructional needs during a semester. This paper addresses time management and instructional…

  3. Online Course Designs: Are Special Needs Being Met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Christy G.; Horney, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the intersections between online education and special education in terms of instructional design. The relevant elements of online instructional design, which require particular attention when teaching students with special needs, are examined. The overall finding is that contemporary courses generally include design…

  4. Increasing Student Engagement in Online Educational Leadership Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschaine, Mark E.; Whale, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Utilization of online instruction continues to increase at universities, placing more emphasis on the exploration of issues related to adult graduate student engagement. This reflective case study reviews nontraditional student engagement in online courses. The goals of the study are to enhance student focus, attention, and interaction. Findings…

  5. Self- and Peer Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Huisman, Bart; van de Ven, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lecture content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in…

  6. Online Leader Training Course: Nebraska Equine Extension Leader Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Lena; D'Angelo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The Nebraska Equine Advancement Level Leader Certification Program is an online learning tool that clarifies principles of the Nebraska 4-H Equine Advancement Programs. Through an online Moodle course through eXtension.org, 4-H leaders and Extension educators are able to fulfill the certification requirement from any location before allowing youth…

  7. Using Learning Analytics to Assess Student Learning in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Ndoye, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics can be used to enhance student engagement and performance in online courses. Using learning analytics, instructors can collect and analyze data about students and improve the design and delivery of instruction to make it more meaningful for them. In this paper, the authors review different categories of online assessments and…

  8. Improving The Learning Design of Massive Open Online Courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubens, Wilfred; Kalz, Marco; Koper, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) can be regarded as a promising next step in the evolution of distance education. However, they have been criticised for their poor learning design. This article describes the development of an adequate learning design in a series of nineteen MOOCs (called online m

  9. Improving the Learning Design of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubens, Wilfred

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) can be regarded as a promising next step in the evolution of distance education. However, they have been criticised for their poor learning design. This article describes the development of an adequate learning design in a series of nineteen MOOCs (called online master classes). A formative evaluation focuses on…

  10. Course-Embedded Student Support for Online English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an embedded approach to learner support in online English language courses. The support model is based on language acquisition, transactional distance, and self-regulated learning theories. Based on these theories, courses were designed to provide the interaction necessary for academic English language gains, decrease the…

  11. The Challenge of Teaching Educational Technology Courses Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Marge

    Based on the author's experiences teaching educational technology courses at Western Kentucky University, this paper presents time-saving ideas and survival tips for teaching online. The first section covers planning and organization, including development of a course CD that is mailed to all students at the beginning of the semester, online…

  12. Promoting Quantitative Literacy in an Online College Algebra Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstall, Luke; Bossé, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    College algebra (a university freshman level algebra course) fulfills the quantitative literacy requirement of many college's general education programs and is a terminal course for most who take it. An online problem-based learning environment provides a unique means of engaging students in quantitative discussions and research. This article…

  13. Massive Open Online Courses: Designing for the Unknown Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Hamish; Sinclair, Christine; Haywood, Jeff; Woodgate, Amy

    2016-01-01

    University teachers are faced with a problem of "knowing" their learners when teaching on a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). This paper explores and analyses what the University of Edinburgh has come to know about its recent MOOC participants, highlighting one particular course. We draw attention to barriers and enablers from…

  14. Designing for Enhanced Conceptual Understanding in an Online Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Joanna C.; Furtak, Thomas E.; Tucker, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    The calculus-based, introductory physics course is the port of entry for any student interested in pursuing a college degree in the sciences, mathematics, or engineering. There is increasing demand for online delivery options that make the course more widely available, especially those that use best practices in student engagement. However,…

  15. Interaction in Online Courses: More Is NOT Always Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandzol, Christian J.; Grandzol, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive theory suggests more interaction in learning environments leads to improved learning outcomes and increased student satisfaction, two indicators of success useful to program administrators. Using a sample of 359 lower-level online, undergraduate business courses, we investigated course enrollments, student and faculty time spent in…

  16. Design Considerations for Integrating Twitter into an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Linda E.; Costello, Jane; Hawkins, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    While the use of Twitter for communication and assessment activities in online courses is not new, it has not been without its challenges. This is increasingly true of high enrolment courses. The use of a Twitter Evaluation application which leverages a Learning Management System's (LMS's) application programming interface (API) provides a…

  17. Team Building in an Online Organizational Behavior Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeda, Maurice; Haq, Rana; LeBrasseur, Rolland

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe the development and delivery of a team-building exercise in an online organizational behavior undergraduate course. Qualitative data of student perceptions, collected at the end of the course, revealed both positive and negative reactions to various aspects of the team-building exercise. Based on these reactions, the authors…

  18. Research to Go: Taking an Information Literacy Credit Course Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jessica; Burke, John J.; Tumbleson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Adapting an existing face-to-face information literacy course that teaches undergraduates how to successfully conduct research and creating an online or hybrid version is a multi-step process. It begins with a desire to reach more students and help them achieve academic success. The primary learning outcomes for any information literacy course are…

  19. Research to Go: Taking an Information Literacy Credit Course Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jessica; Burke, John J.; Tumbleson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Adapting an existing face-to-face information literacy course that teaches undergraduates how to successfully conduct research and creating an online or hybrid version is a multi-step process. It begins with a desire to reach more students and help them achieve academic success. The primary learning outcomes for any information literacy course are…

  20. Student Satisfaction of Online Courses for Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Pauline M.; Leonard, John; Ballenger, Julia W.; Coleman, J. Craig

    2010-01-01

    This survey research was completed at a regional university to determine students' satisfaction of online courses in a principal and superintendent certification program in one educational leadership department. This study explored the students' satisfaction of course components: instruction, communication, assessment, leadership, teamwork,…

  1. Auditing the Accessibility of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Francisco; McAndrew, Patrick; Minocha, Shailey; Coughlan, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The outcome from the research being reported in this paper is the design of an accessibility audit to evaluate Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for accessibility and to arrive at solutions and adaptations that can meet user needs. This accessibility audit includes expert-based heuristic evaluations and user-based evaluations of the MOOC platforms and individual courses.

  2. Advanced Mathematics Online: Assessing Particularities in the Online Delivery of a Second Linear Algebra Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Mariana; Bhatti, Uzma

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of some issues that were confronted when delivering an online second Linear Algebra course (assuming a previous Introductory Linear Algebra course) to graduate students enrolled in a Secondary Mathematics Education program. The focus is on performance in one particular aspect of the course: "change of basis" and…

  3. FROM TRADITIONAL DISTANCE LEARNING TO MASS ONLINE OPEN COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Vasilev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of transition for higher education institutions of Russia from traditional distance learning to mass electronic education on the basis of the online open courses is considered, its relevance is proved. Analysis of the major prerequisites for transition success is carried out (a demand for the educational Internet resources from mobile devices; existence of a large number of various electronic resources which are successfully used in practice by higher education institutions in remote educational technologies; maintaining experience for electronic magazines of students’ progress for planning and estimation of training results; essential growth of material costs in the world online training market. Key issues of transition are defined and the basic principles of electronic online courses development are formulated. A technique for electronic online course development aimed at the result is given. The technique contains the following four stages: planning of expected training results, course electronic content structuring and training scenarios creation, development of the tests plan and electronic estimated means for automatic control of the planned training results; course realization by means of game mechanics and technologies of network communication between students. Requirements to various forms of control planned in the course of learning results are defined. Two kinds of electronic online courses are assigned (knowledge-intensive and technological courses. Examples of their realization in the authors’ online courses "Wave Optics", "Theory of Graphs ", "Development of Web Interfaces on the Basis of HTML and CSS" created and practically used in NRU ITMO in 2013 are given. Finally, the actual tasks of mass open education development in the leading higher education institutions of Russia are set forth.

  4. MALAYSIAN LEARNERS AND THEIR PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS ONLINE ENGLISH LANGUAGE COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramela KRISH

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available With more emphasis given to the concept of lifelong learning, the number of learners who enroll for distance and online learning programmes in local tertiary institutions has increased. The flexibility of the online learning mode enables learners to prepare themselves to develop confidence and to learn with greater independence. This paper reports the findings of a study on the teaching and learning and technology factors of online English language courses at UNITaR (University Tun Abdul Razak, a virtual university in Malaysia. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches were employed in eliciting data via a questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews. Specifically, the paper reports on learners’ perceptions towards the teaching and learning as well as technology factors during the online English course they were engaged in. The findings with regard to the perceptions of the learners brought more new perspectives which could be incorporated or taken into consideration for an online language learning programme.

  5. OJPOT: online judge & practice oriented teaching idea in programming courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui Ping; Chen, Shu Yu; Yang, Xin; Feng, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Practical abilities are important for students from majors including Computer Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering. Along with the popularity of ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ACM/ICPC) and other programming contests, online judge (OJ) websites achieve rapid development, thus providing a new kind of programming practice, i.e. online practice. Due to fair and timely feedback results from OJ websites, online practice outperforms traditional programming practice. In order to promote students' practical abilities in programming and algorithm designing, this article presents a novel teaching idea, online judge & practice oriented teaching (OJPOT). OJPOT is applied to Programming Foundation course. OJPOT cultivates students' practical abilities through various kinds of programming practice, such as programming contests, online practice and course project. To verify the effectiveness of this novel teaching idea, this study conducts empirical research. The experimental results show that OJPOT works effectively in enhancing students' practical abilities compared with the traditional teaching idea.

  6. On-line Classical Guitar Course: Blogs for Music Education

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Navarro; Gilles Lavigne; G. Guadalupe Martínez Salgado

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces an on-line course constructed by means of a blog. The tool was the main goal of a research project titled “Develop, Implementation and evaluation of a Hybrid Course Face to face-On Line for Teaching the Beginning to Play the Classical Guitar”. This work was a three steep project in which it was implemented, applied and evaluated. The on-line course was intended to prepare the students to learn the basic principles to start in classical music with the guitar. The result...

  7. Massive open online courses are relevant for postgraduate medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Yousif; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe; Mørkeberg Nilsson, Philip; Konge, Lars

    2014-10-01

    The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles in postgraduate training, but training and courses relevant to these roles can be limited. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) - free online courses in which anyone can participate, anywhere - may improve course participation. This study investigates the relevance of MOOCs for postgraduate medical training within the CanMEDS framework. We extracted a list of all courses posted by the two largest MOOC providers, Coursera and EdX, and reviewed all course descriptions and categorised each course into one of three categories--"relevant," "possibly relevant" or "not relevant"--reflecting the degree of relevance to each of the seven CanMEDS roles. We also noted course workload, duration and the name of the educational institution. We agreed the most on the role of health advocate (Cronbach's α = 0.85) and the least on the role of collaborator (Cronbach's α = 0.46). After a consensus-building process, 165 courses were found to be relevant or possibly relevant, mostly to the roles as scholar (n = 75) and medical expert (n = 57). The courses had a median duration of seven weeks and a median weekly workload of 4.5 hours, and were predominantly from North American universities. A large number of MOOCs are relevant for postgraduate medical training. A weekly workload of 4.5 hours may enable course participation even for busy clinicians. Physicians should consider these free and universally available courses as relevant and potentially effective means of education. not relevant. not relevant.

  8. Massive Open Online Courses: what will be their legacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, John

    2016-04-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) dominated discussions of online learning and higher education in the news media and in universities between 2012 and 2015. However, fashions pass, needs change and technology evolves. This Commentary looks back, pauses on the present, and then looks forward. Whilst MOOCs are a significant milestone on the road that online teaching and learning is following, open, distance and online learning started long before MOOCs and will continue to grow in importance when MOOCs are just an interesting footnote in its development.

  9. An online doctoral education course using problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Carver, Lara; Diaz, Anne; Edmunds, Johnna; Talusan, Richard; Tarrant, Theresa A

    2009-02-01

    The number of doctoral nursing programs has greatly increased over the past several years. There has also been a shift toward delivering programs either partially or fully online. The literature lacks discussions about doctoral-level teaching methods in the online environment. This article describes the use of a semester-long problem-based learning activity in an online doctoral course focusing on nurse educator leadership. The Students-As-Faculty Experience created for this course features the use of a virtual nursing program in which students are cast as faculty members confronting issues via faculty meetings and sharing rotating roles as chairperson. Students were vested in the process by co-designing the course in terms of developing agenda items for the meetings and evaluation rubrics. Through playing the roles of faculty and chairperson, the students reported a distinct improvement in their leadership abilities and confidence at the end of the course.

  10. US Universities Offer Free Courses Online

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>A not so very famous US philosopher and self made millionaire by the name of Jim Rohn said"Everything is within reach... But you’ve got to reach"Did you ever wish you could attend a famous university course, but your financial or other life circumstances prevented you form doing so? Well now there is no excuse. Now you can find easy to follow course work which is

  11. An Online Graduate Requirements Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicay-Ergin, N.; Laplante, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Requirements engineering is one of the fundamental knowledge areas in software and systems engineering graduate curricula. Recent changes in educational delivery and student demographics have created new challenges for requirements engineering education. In particular, there is an increasing demand for online education for working professionals.…

  12. An Online Graduate Requirements Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicay-Ergin, N.; Laplante, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Requirements engineering is one of the fundamental knowledge areas in software and systems engineering graduate curricula. Recent changes in educational delivery and student demographics have created new challenges for requirements engineering education. In particular, there is an increasing demand for online education for working professionals.…

  13. Preparing Students for an Online Accounting Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Barbara W.; Walsh, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Accounting education has been under intense examination for at least the past 20 years (American Accounting Association, 1986; Big Eight Accounting Firms, 1989; AECC, 1990). Similarly, the value of an MBA education has been scrutinized (Leonhardt, 2000 and Mintzberg and Lampel, 2001). Over the past 10 years, online education has grown…

  14. Affirming Diversity in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Beate

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Numerous attempts have been made to link a particular learning style to either a particular culture, gender, or even a generation. In a typically heterogeneous online class, it is impossible to address every participant's culture or the degree of assimilation to a particular culture. Consequently, the aim of this paper is to recommend…

  15. Introducing students to patient safety through an online interprofessional course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Amy V; Charles, Laurine; Howell, David; Koutalos, Yiannis; Mitcham, Maralynne; Nappi, Jean; Zoller, James

    2010-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is increasingly called upon to improve health care systems and patient safety. Our institution is engaged in a campus-wide IPE initiative. As a component of this initiative, a required online interprofessional patient-safety-focused course for a large group (300) of first-year medical, dental, and nursing students was developed and implemented. We describe our efforts with developing the course, including the use of constructivist and adult learning theories and IPE competencies to structure students' learning in a meaningful fashion. The course was conducted online to address obstacles of academic calendars and provide flexibility for faculty participation. Students worked in small groups online with a faculty facilitator. Thematic modules were created with associated objectives, online learning materials, and assignments. Students posted completed assignments online and responded to group members' assignments for purposes of group discussion. Students worked in interprofessional groups on a project requiring them to complete a root cause analysis and develop recommendations based on a fictional sentinel event case. Through project work, students applied concepts learned in the course related to improving patient safety and demonstrated interprofessional collaboration skills. Projects were presented during a final in-class session. Student course evaluation results suggest that learning objectives and content goals were achieved. Faculty course evaluation results indicate that the course was perceived to be a worthwhile learning experience for students. We offer the following recommendations to others interested in developing an in-depth interprofessional learning experience for a large group of learners: 1) consider a hybrid format (inclusion of some face-to-face sessions), 2) address IPE and broader curricular needs, 3) create interactive opportunities for shared learning and working together, 4) provide support to faculty

  16. Learning through Learning: Experiential Resonance in an Online Management Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Starr-Glass

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiential resonance is a pedagogic approach that allows learners to gaina deeper understanding of the subject matter theory by using that theorydirectly in the structure, dynamics, and learning spaces of the course. Learnersinformed about the application of course theory are asked to reflect onits use. In this preliminary study, management principles were embedded inthe learning spaces of two online distance learning management courses. Apost-course survey, although statistically limited because of the sample size,showed strong learner agreement that management theory had been a resonanttheme in the learning experiences and that its uses had been beneficial.

  17. Predictors of Enrolling in Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Students in Undergraduate Marketing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Renée J.; Mathisen, Richard E.; Carley, Susan S.; Stuart, Randy S.

    2015-01-01

    An exploratory study of undergraduate students enrolled in marketing courses at a Southeastern regional university was conducted to determine the motivations and characteristics of marketing students who plan to be online learners and examined for differences between those who have taken and those who have not taken online classes. An online…

  18. Programming for physicians: A free online course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubben, Pieter L.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an introduction for clinical readers into programming and computational thinking using the programming language Python. Exercises can be done completely online without any need for installation of software. Participants will be taught the fundamentals of programming, which are necessarily independent of the sort of application (stand-alone, web, mobile, engineering, and statistical/machine learning) that is to be developed afterward. PMID:27127694

  19. Programming for physicians: A free online course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter L Kubben

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is an introduction for clinical readers into programming and computational thinking using the programming language Python. Exercises can be done completely online without any need for installation of software. Participants will be taught the fundamentals of programming, which are necessarily independent of the sort of application (stand-alone, web, mobile, engineering, and statistical/machine learning that is to be developed afterward.

  20. Programming for physicians: A free online course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubben, Pieter L

    2016-01-01

    This article is an introduction for clinical readers into programming and computational thinking using the programming language Python. Exercises can be done completely online without any need for installation of software. Participants will be taught the fundamentals of programming, which are necessarily independent of the sort of application (stand-alone, web, mobile, engineering, and statistical/machine learning) that is to be developed afterward.

  1. Successful online course design: Virtual frameworks for discourse construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Pincas

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available A mental representation of the virtual context is a necessary basis of successful online conversations. Such a representation is impossible to create without a method of reference back to previous parts of the discussion in order to develop cohesive discourse. The paper surveys the way two different groups of students in recent online courses handled referencing conventions in asynchronous discourse and suggests a way of providing the scaffolding for virtual discourse construction.

  2. MOOCs 101: an introduction to massive open online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a new type of online class that allow anyone, anywhere, to participate via video lectures, computer graded tests, and discussion forums. This article will give a basic overview of what MOOCs are, how they work, and some of their inherent advantages and disadvantages. It will also explore what MOOCs mean for medical education and libraries. A list of MOOC-related resources is also included.

  3. Designing Online Courses: User-Centered Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Compares two models for design--systems and user-centered--each of which embodies different values. Argues that models of technology design can be applied to the development of Web-based courses and that various forms of user-centered design embody the values most compatible with writing instruction. Presents strategies for adopting a…

  4. Digital Stones: Teaching an Archaeological Lab Course Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Lohse

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of our efforts to provide training and educational resource materials in lithic analysis for beginners to intermediate level university students. We scripted a CD-ROM entitled Digital Stones that presents an interactive introduction to analysis of stone tools (Lohse and Sammons 1998; 1999. The analytical system presented in the CD has been used at Idaho State University as part of standard laboratory and field training for the past decade (Lohse 1998. In the Fall semester of 1999, we used these materials as the basis for a completely online course entitled 'Anthropology 491: Stone Tool Analysis'. This course included online chat rooms with recognised experts in lithic analysis and these conversations are preserved as online documentation. Some aspects of our work have added to a solid foundation for future building of this online lab course. Some aspects need to be drastically revised and others need refinement. Our online experience in teaching a hands-on subject has reinforced some concerns expressed for online education in general and has led to some strong conclusions regarding the potential for this type of teaching.

  5. Effectiveness of Online Module for Graduate Astronomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Lauren E. P.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Brame, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    We noticed that teaching an important galaxy formation model in a graduate-level course (Structure and Dynamics of Galaxies) with lecture-style instruction did not promote active learning on the part of the student and that the level and quality of in-class discussion varied wildly from semester to semester. Hoping to improve the learning experience for the students, we designed and incorporated an online module to deliver course content, activities, and assessments. We investigate the effectiveness of this online module as a teaching tool by monitoring students’ learning gains and present our preliminary results.

  6. MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES IN EDUCATION OF ROBOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyula Mester

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the requirement for learning is constantly increasing. MOOC – massive open online courses represent educational revolution of the century. A MOOC is an online course accessible to unlimited number of participation and is an open access via the web. Mayor participants in the MOOCS are: Coursera, Udacity (Stanford, since 2012 and edX (Harvard, MIT, since 2012. In this paper two MOOCs are considered: Introduction for Robotics and Robotics Vision, both from the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

  7. NEW APPROACHES TO EFFICIENCY OF MASSIVE ONLINE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov S. Lysitsina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on efficiency of e-learning, in general, and massive online course in programming and information technology, in particular. Several innovative approaches and scenarios have been proposed, developed, implemented and verified by the authors, including 1 a new approach to organize and use automatic immediate feedback that significantly helps a learner to verify developed code and increases an efficiency of learning, 2 a new approach to construct learning interfaces – it is based on “develop a code – get a result – validate a code” technique, 3 three scenarios of visualization and verification of developed code, 4 a new multi-stage approach to solve complex programming assignments, 5 a new implementation of “perfectionism” game mechanics in a massive online course. Overall, due to implementation of proposed and developed approaches, the efficiency of massive online course has been considerably increased, particularly 1 the additional 27.9 % of students were able to complete successfully “Web design and development using HTML5 and CSS3” massive online course at ITMO University, and 2 based on feedback from 5588 students a “perfectionism” game mechanics noticeably improves students’ involvement into course activities and retention factor.

  8. Using Online Tools for Communication and Collaboration: Understanding Educators' Experiences in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boling, Erica C.; Holan, Erica; Horbatt, Brent; Hough, Mary; Jean-Louis, Jennifer; Khurana, Chesta; Krinsky, Hindi; Spiezio, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This designed-based research study explored educators' experiences in an online course to better understand how course design and pedagogical delivery can best support student learning. Using the Cognitive Apprenticeship Model (Collins et al., 1987) as a theoretical lens, researchers investigated the following: 1) What methods of instruction, as…

  9. The Impact of Course Length on Online Numeric-Based Course Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, Scott

    2013-01-01

    When offering online classes, it is necessary to ensure that all course material and objectives will be covered and learners will be successful in the course. This becomes especially important when the same class material and objectives are offered in a three-, five-, and fourteen-week format. This paper outlines the difficulty of delivering…

  10. Using a Web-Based System to Estimate the Cost of Online Course Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stuart; He, Wu; Abdous, M'hammed

    2009-01-01

    The increasing demand for online courses requires efficient and low cost production. Since the decision to develop online courses is often affected by financial factors, it is becoming increasingly important to determine, upfront, the cost of online course production. Many of the programs and educators interested in developing online courses…

  11. Using a Web-Based System to Estimate the Cost of Online Course Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stuart; He, Wu; Abdous, M'hammed

    2009-01-01

    The increasing demand for online courses requires efficient and low cost production. Since the decision to develop online courses is often affected by financial factors, it is becoming increasingly important to determine, upfront, the cost of online course production. Many of the programs and educators interested in developing online courses…

  12. The role of the trainer in online courses

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Ana Augusta

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the main challenges faced by teachers and trainers when guiding or "tutoring" online courses. The focus is on their emerging role as e-tutors or e-trainers. The challenges are related with the processes of orientation, guidance and monitoring e-learners within an e-course. European Union DGXXII - Education and Training, Leoardo da VINCI Programme "Trainers Training for Virtual Learning Communities" ( ttVLC)

  13. Digital Knowledge Resources Sharing Through Online Distance Education Course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josephine; Yu; Chen; Sche

    2002-01-01

    Since the electronic resources and Internet Web sites became popular, distance education courses offered via the Internet could play an important role in providing global digital resources and teaching the knowledge of international library and information standards for bibliographic databases with electronic and web resources.This paper uses the example of the author's new online course: ILS 608 Cataloging and Development of a Digital Union Catalog for Ancient Chinese Books to demonstrate the global re...

  14. Toward Emotionally Accessible Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire, Garron; Iniesto, Francisco; Rienties, Bart

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines an approach to evaluating the emotional content of three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) using the affective computing approach of prosody detection on two different text-to-speech voices in conjunction with human raters judging the emotional content of course text. The intent of this work is to establish the potential variation on the emotional delivery of MOOC material through synthetic voice.

  15. Developing a constructivist learning environment in online postsecondary science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackworth, Sylvester N.

    This Delphi study addressed the concerns of postsecondary educators regarding the quality of education received by postsecondary science students who receive their instruction online. This study was framed with the constructivist learning theory and Piaget's and Dewey's cognitive development theories. The overarching question addressed a gap in research literature surrounding the pedagogical practices that could be successfully applied to future postsecondary online science education. The panel consisted of 30 experts in the area of online postsecondary education. Qualitative data from the initial seed questions were used to create a Likert-type survey to seek consensus of the themes derived from participant responses. Participants reached agreement on six items: apply constructivism to science curricula, identify strengths and challenges of online collegiate students, explicate students' consequences due to lack of participation in discussion forums, ensure that online course content is relevant to students' lives, reinforce academic integrity, and identify qualities face-to-face collegiate science instructors need when transitioning to online science instructors. The majority of participants agreed that gender is not an important factor in determining the success of an online collegiate science student. There was no consensus on the efficacy of virtual labs in an online science classroom. This study contributes to positive social change by providing information to new and struggling postsecondary science teachers to help them successfully align their instruction with students' needs and, as a result, increase students' success.

  16. What Really Matters? Technological Proficiency in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Stacy; Bailey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the student population becomes more diverse, university administrators are challenged with meeting those needs in a variety of settings. Specifically, most universities are offering courses through three delivery methods: face-to-face, hybrid, and online. Although all three methods have existed for quite some time, pedagogical concerns…

  17. Perceptions of authority in a Massive Open Online Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarke Lindsø; Hasse, Cathrine; Na-songkhla, Jaitip

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we highlight culture as an important but often overlooked aspect in the conduct, research and design of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses). Firstly, we review the role of culture in MOOCs research and conclude that it has been somewhat ignored. Secondly, we present a methodologi...

  18. Are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Pedagogically Innovative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellini, Alejandro; Padilla Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    While claims about pedagogic innovation in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are common, most reports provide no evidence to justify those claims. This paper reports on a survey aimed at exploring how different stakeholders describe MOOCs, focusing on whether they would consider them pedagogically innovative, and if so, why. Respondents (n =…

  19. Massive Open Online Courses for Africa by Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyo, Benedict; Kalema, Billy Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Africa is known for inadequate access to all sorts of human needs including health, education, food, shelter, transport, security, and energy. Before the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs), open access to higher education (HE) was exclusive of Africa. However, as a generally affordable method of post-secondary education delivery,…

  20. Exploring Engaging Gamification Mechanics in Massive Online Open Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jen-Wei; Wei, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have developed rapidly and become tremendously popular because of their plentiful gamification designs, such as reputation points, rewards, and goal setting. Although previous studies have mentioned a broad range of gamification designs that might influence MOOC learner engagement, most gamified MOOCs fail to…

  1. Massive Open Online Courses: Disruptive Innovations or Disturbing Inventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Langen, Frank; van den Bosch, Herman

    2013-01-01

    According to Christensen and Horn, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are serving non-consumers. Although they are limited in the services they provide compared with traditional colleges, they offer free and accessible education to a broader audience, who cannot afford the traditional provision. However, this is a characteristic of online…

  2. Determining the Drivers of Student Performance in Online Business Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    An emerging question in business education is whether all students would benefit from distance learning and if student performance can be predicted prior to enrollment in an online course based on student characteristics. In this paper, the role of student characteristics on academic performance is examined in the context two different online…

  3. Exploring Engaging Gamification Mechanics in Massive Online Open Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jen-Wei; Wei, Hung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have developed rapidly and become tremendously popular because of their plentiful gamification designs, such as reputation points, rewards, and goal setting. Although previous studies have mentioned a broad range of gamification designs that might influence MOOC learner engagement, most gamified MOOCs fail to…

  4. Language Course Taught with Online Supplement Material: Is It Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Y. M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of the Internet is expected in foreign-language classrooms. The present study investigated and evaluated the effectiveness of a language course supplemented with online material for college-level Japanese learners. The study compared exam scores from students enrolled in traditional inclass instruction taught 5 consecutive days for 50…

  5. Video Lecture Watching Behaviors of Learners in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, Ozlem; Ozarslan, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines learners' behaviors while watching online video lectures to understand learner preferences. 2927 students' 18,144 video events across 13 courses on Sakai CLE LMS, which were integrated with Kaltura Video Platform and Google Analytics, were analyzed. For the analysis of the quantitative data, one-way ANOVA, Chi-square test of…

  6. Combining Online and Hybrid Teaching Environments in German Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Lucrecia

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we briefly offer the main characteristics of a hybrid design for Face-to-Face (FtF) and online German courses in the degree of Translation and Interpreting that combines the textbook with activities moderated with technology. We particularly focus on the activities designed for practicing oral production at level A2.2., where we…

  7. Online Learning: Is It Meant for Science Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Lau; Mohamad, Fitri Suraya

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a case study experience in conducting scientific courses with undergraduates at the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) using Web-based learning environments to support conventional teaching sessions. Results showed online learning helped students become more interested, encouraged participation in class discussions, and provided more…

  8. Integrating Online Discussion in an Australian Intensive English Language Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the Internet was used for online interaction in a 10-week English-as-a-Second-Language course. Students were highly motivated and seeking eventual admittance to undergraduate programs through successful completion of International English language Testing System (IELTS) examinations. (Author/VWL)

  9. Using Three Online Course Management Systems in EFL Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarf, Reima Sado

    2005-01-01

    Nicenet, WebCT and Moodle were used to teach grammar to freshman students at the College of Languages and Translation, King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. The subjects were divided into three groups and were randomly assigned to the three online courses. The same questions, discussion threads, grammar websites, daily grammar lesson, exercises…

  10. Online Courses and Optimal Class Size: A Complex Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzt, Judy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct descriptive, exploratory research to answer the questions: What is the ideal class size for online courses? What are the variables that affect optimal class size in this environment? As a study of the literature, the goal was to collect research-based evidence supporting optimal class size. The initial…

  11. A New Framework for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenack, Lindsie

    2013-01-01

    The challenges that massive open online courses (MOOCs) bring to the learning arena spur adult educators to improve delivery. A framework for a new type of MOOC is presented to address some of the challenges presented by earlier models. This new MOOC, called a mesoMOOC, can bridge several challenges that hinder current effective delivery of MOOCs…

  12. Narratives of Teaching, Learning, and Service in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Garza, Maria Celia; Ehimika, Mabel; Pena, Elida; Miller, Ava

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the service learning activities that surrounded the implementation of eight holistic approaches to chronic disease throughout the community served. Faculty facilitated independent practice related activities that brought knowledge to community agencies. Students, as a part of an online course, developed close relationships…

  13. An online astrobiology course for teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Edward E; Slater, Timothy F

    2002-01-01

    A continuing challenge for scientists is to keep K-12 teachers informed about new scientific developments. Over the past few years, this challenge has increased as new research findings have come from the field of astrobiology. In addition to trying to keep abreast of these new discoveries, K-12 teachers must also face the demands of the content and pedagogical goals imposed by state and national science education standards. Furthermore, many teachers lack the scientific content knowledge or training in current teaching methods to create their own activities or to implement appropriately new teaching materials designed to meet the standards. There is a clear need for special courses designed to increase the scientific knowledge of K-12 science teachers. In response to this need, the authors developed a suite of innovative, classroom-ready lessons for grades 5-12 that emphasize an active engagement instructional strategy and focus on the recent discoveries in the field of astrobiology. They further created a graduate-level, Internet-based distance-learning course for teachers to help them become familiar with these astrobiology concepts and to gain firsthand experience with the National Science Education Standards-based instructional strategies.

  14. Writing Across the Curriculum -- An Online Course in Computer Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Sinha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing fosters both critical thinking and student learning, serving as one of the most effective ways to understand a topic. Writing across the Curriculum (WAC began in the late 1970’s, as a pedagogical reform movement in response to a perceived deficiency in literacy among college students. Over the past two decades universities have worked to broaden the scope of student writing from composition classes to classes in the students’ major. This paper chronicles the application of WAC into the discipline of Computer Science. The purpose of this study is to develop an online Computer Security course (for sophomores and juniors in Computer Science, under the umbrella of WAC, to help improve the students’ writing overall and focus on skills students require in upper level courses in the major. Developing this course as an online course (rather than a traditional face-to-face course offers flexible configurability and scalability, features that are useful to prepare students for constantly changing real world security challenges. This paper includes all aspects of course design and insight into lessons learned. Results indicate that both the faculty and students benefit from such a writing intensive course. Reading and responding to the students’ writing enables faculty to gain valuable insights into the students’ thoughts, ideas, problems, and other issues. Students reported increased knowledge and comprehension of the subject material, deeper understanding of the conventions within Computer Science, improved analysis and reporting skills, ability to understand and present abstract concepts effectively, and skill in producing professional documents.

  15. Multiple Intelligences in Online, Hybrid, and Traditional Business Statistics Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Lopez

    Full Text Available According to Howard Garner, Professor of Cognition and Education at Harvard University, intelligence of humans cannot be measured with a single factor such as the IQ level. Instead, he and others have suggested that humans have different types of intelligence. This paper examines whether students registered in online or mostly online courses have a different type of intelligence from students registered in traditional face-to-face courses. At the beginning of the fall semester of 2011, a group of 128 students from four different courses in Business Statistics completed a survey to determine their types of intelligence. Our findings reveal surprising results with important consequences in terms of teaching styles that better fit our students.

  16. Experiences of successful undergraduate students in online science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Carolyn A.

    This qualitative phenomenological study explored successful undergraduate experiences in online science courses to determine factors that contributed the necessary support for their success. The research questions were: (1) What personal factors contributed to student success in an online science course? (2) What university supports and interventions were available that contributed to student success? (3) What challenges or barriers to success were encountered? and (4) What advice or suggestions can be offered to enable future students to be successful? Thirteen undergraduate students were interviewed. After the interviews were transcribed and coded, the researcher analyzed the data to establish commonalities among student experiences. Finally, interpretations of the themes were applied to the research questions. The findings in the study indicated there was no one characteristic or single factor that contributed to the successful experiences of all online students, but a myriad of characteristics and factors that combined to play a role in student success in an online science course. Identifying and understanding the characteristics and factors presented may enable the university to create better support systems to promote future student success and retention.

  17. Most Courses Are Not Born Digital: An Overview of the Quality Matters Peer Review Process for Online Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varonis, Evageline Marlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss benefits of and barriers to online learning and describe utilization of the Quality Matters (QM) peer review process as a method to assure the quality of online courses. It outlines the QM higher education rubric, explains how the collaborative QM peer review process facilitates online course design…

  18. On-Line Education in a Management Science Course--Effectiveness and Performance Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellana, Scott A.; Collins, William H.; West, David

    2000-01-01

    A study compared traditional lecture class in management science (70 students) with its online component (151 students). The course with the online option was found to be as effective as the traditional course. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/JOW)

  19. Lost in Translation: Adapting a Face-to-Face Course Into an Online Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzig, Melissa J

    2015-09-01

    Online education has grown dramatically over the past decade. Instructors who teach face-to-face courses are being called on to adapt their courses to the online environment. Many instructors do not have sufficient training to be able to effectively move courses to an online format. This commentary discusses the growth of online learning, common challenges faced by instructors adapting courses from face-to-face to online, and best practices for translating face-to-face courses into online learning opportunities. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Overview of the Earth System Science Education Alliance Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, J.; Myers, R.

    2002-12-01

    Science education reform has skyrocketed over the last decade in large part thanks to technology-and one technology in particular, the Internet. The World Wide Web has opened up dynamic new online communities of learners. It has allowed educators from around the world to share thoughts about Earth system science and reexamine the way science is taught. A positive offshoot of this reform effort is the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). This partnership among universities, colleges, and science education organizations is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the Center for Educational Technologiestm at Wheeling Jesuit University. ESSEA's mission is to improve Earth system science education. ESSEA has developed three Earth system science courses for K-12 teachers. These online courses guide teachers into collaborative, student-centered science education experiences. Not only do these courses support teachers' professional development, they also help teachers implement Earth systems science content and age-appropriate pedagogical methods into their classrooms. The ESSEA courses are open to elementary, middle school, and high school teachers. Each course lasts one semester. The courses begin with three weeks of introductory content. Then teachers develop content and pedagogical and technological knowledge in four three-week learning cycles. The elementary school course focuses on basic Earth system interactions between land, life, air, and water. In week A of each learning cycle, teachers do earth system activities with their students. In week B teachers investigate aspects of the Earth system-for instance, the reason rocks change to soil, the relationship between rock weathering and soil nutrients, and the consequent development of biomes. In week C teachers develop classroom activities and share them online with other course participants. The middle school course stresses the effects of real-world events-volcanic eruptions

  1. Course-embedded student support for online English language learners

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    Maureen Andrade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an embedded approach to learner support in online English language courses. The support model is based on language acquisition, transactional distance, and self-regulated learning theories. Based on these theories, courses were designed to provide the interaction necessary for academic English language gains, decrease the transactional distance between the teacher and learner, and assist learners in developing the ability to control the factors that affect their learning; in other words, to be self-regulated learners. The latter is critical for those who lack the autonomy needed for successful distance learning. In this paper, three course activities are described and analyzed to demonstrate how the embedded support model responds to the needs of diverse learners and assists them in achieving identified outcomes. The courses were designed for off-site international students enrolled in traditional English-speaking higher education institutions.http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.1.90

  2. Selection into Online Community College Courses and Their Effects on Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington-Klein, Nick; Cowan, James; Goldhaber, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Online courses at the college level are growing in popularity, and nearly all community colleges offer online courses (Allen and Seaman in "Tracking online education in the United States," Babson Survey Research Group, Babson Park, 2015). What is the effect of the expanded availability of online curricula on persistence in the field and…

  3. A Decade of Change: Motivating and Discouraging Factors Affecting Faculty Participation in Online Business Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Ransom Todd

    2014-01-01

    The number of college students enrolled in online courses increased more than 22 percent between 2002 and 2011. Despite this rapid rise in online course enrollment, only a two-percent gain in faculty acceptance of online learning occurred during this same time period. The majority of teaching faculty remain resistant to online instruction with…

  4. Supporting Professional Learning in a Massive Open Online Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Milligan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Professional learning, combining formal and on the job learning, is important for the development and maintenance of expertise in the modern workplace. To integrate formal and informal learning, professionals have to have good self-regulatory ability. Formal learning opportunities are opening up through massive open online courses (MOOCs, providing free and flexible access to formal education for millions of learners worldwide. MOOCs present a potentially useful mechanism for supporting and enabling professional learning, allowing opportunities to link formal and informal learning. However, there is limited understanding of their effectiveness as professional learning environments. Using self-regulated learning as a theoretical base, this study investigated the learning behaviours of health professionals within Fundamentals of Clinical Trials, a MOOC offered by edX. Thirty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed to explore how the design of this MOOC supported professional learning to occur. The study highlights a mismatch between learning intentions and learning behaviour of professional learners in this course. While the learners are motivated to participate by specific role challenges, their learning effort is ultimately focused on completing course tasks and assignments. The study found little evidence of professional learners routinely relating the course content to their job role or work tasks, and little impact of the course on practice. This study adds to the overall understanding of learning in MOOCs and provides additional empirical data to a nascent research field. The findings provide an insight into how professional learning could be integrated with formal, online learning.

  5. Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Amy; Doering, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Student retention rates are a constant concern in higher education, but this concern has become especially challenging as online courses become more common and there are widespread reports of low completion rates for online, self-study courses. We evaluated four self-study online pharmacy courses with a history of very high completion rates for…

  6. Correlates of Perceived Favorability of Online Courses for Quantitative versus Qualitative Undergraduate Business Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Pred, Robert; Drennan, Rob B., Jr.; Kapanjie, Darin

    2016-01-01

    An online survey tested the association among background, technological, and course-related variables with perceived favorability of online courses for two independent samples of fall 2015 and spring 2016 business undergraduates taking at least one online or hybrid course. Results showed that perceived learning was a consistent positive correlate…

  7. Predictors of Student Success in Online Courses: Quantitative versus Qualitative Subject Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Krisandra

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine whether the predictors of success for students in an online quantitative course are different than those for an online qualitative course. Data were collected from students taking online courses offered by an AACSB accredited College of Business at a medium sized state university (total student population 7,000) in…

  8. Open, Online, and Blended: Transactional Interactions with MOOC Content by Learners in Three Different Course Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Jeffrey P.; Lamb, Anne

    2017-01-01

    During the 2013-14 academic year, Harvard University piloted the use of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as tools for blended learning in select undergraduate and graduate residential and online courses. One of these courses, The Ancient Greek Hero, combined for-credit (Harvard College and Harvard Extension School) and open online (HarvardX)…

  9. Influence of Motivational Design on Completion Rates in Online Self-Study Pharmacy-Content Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Amy; Doering, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Student retention rates are a constant concern in higher education, but this concern has become especially challenging as online courses become more common and there are widespread reports of low completion rates for online, self-study courses. We evaluated four self-study online pharmacy courses with a history of very high completion rates for…

  10. Online vs. On-Campus: An Analysis of Course Prices of U.S. Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouhong

    2015-01-01

    Pricing online courses is an important issue for managing online education. This research note reports a statistical analysis of price differences between online courses and on-campus courses at 103 US educational institutions based on the data available on the Internet. The finding indicates that educational institutions set significantly lower…

  11. Reflective Pedagogy: Making Meaning in Experiential Based Online Courses

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    Kathy L. Guthrie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of reflective pedagogies has long been considered critical to facilitating meaningful learning through experientially based curricula; however, the use of such methods has not been extensively explored as implemented in virtual environments. The study reviewed utilizes a combination of survey research and individual interviews to examine student perceptions of the meaningful learning which occurred as a result of their participation in two Web-based courses that utilized reflective pedagogies. One course focuses on topics related to service-learning and the second on placement-based internships. Both were instructed using online coursework based in reflective pedagogies to compliment on-site placements within local communities.

  12. Students’ and Teachers’ Perceptions of After School Online Course

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    Gamze Yalavaç

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes students' and teachers' perceptions of after school online courses (ASOC undertaken by an institutional private middle school, which manages several campuses across Turkey. The aim of ASOC is to support students when they are home by helping them to revise the lessons, practice topics synchronously with hundreds of other students. The results of the survey, interviews, and observations show that both students and teachers prefer face-to-face lessons to online lessons. They think that ASOC can be effective only if it is implemented in small groups with more interaction and sound instructional design with engaging methods and adequate feedback is structured for students and teachers’ needs. This study may contribute to similar future research studies of online education in middle schools by revealing the upsides and downsides of this blended learning environment with recommendations offered.

  13. Experiences as an embedded librarian in online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Embedded librarianship gives librarians a prime opportunity to have a direct, positive impact in a clinical setting, classroom setting, or within a working group by providing integrated services that cater to the group's needs. Extending embedded librarian services beyond the various physical settings and into online classrooms is an exceptional way for librarians to engage online learners. This group of students is growing rapidly in numbers and could benefit greatly from having library services and resources incorporated into their classes. The author's services as an embedded librarian in fully online courses at a medium-sized university will be discussed, as will strategies, lessons learned, and opportunities for engaging in this realm. To develop a foundation of knowledge on embedded librarianship, an overview of this topic is provided.

  14. Design And Delivery Of Online Courses In YCMOU

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    Chetana H. KAMLASKAR

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The School of Science and Technology of ‘Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (YCMOU’ has proposed to offer ‘Web Based Live Teaching Learning Support’ from 'real' teacher, with ‘Live Virtual Online Class (LVOC’ integrated with ‘Learning Management System (LMS’ for all courses of all programmes on offer. In the first phase, school has started LVOC for total ten courses in from Feb 2014. This web-based system is designed to provide an opportunity to: Ø maximize interaction, discussion and spontaneous exchanges with ‘real’ teacher during live virtual class Ø present quality learning material to individual to suit his/her learning styles, interests, needs, and at their own pace. Further, LVOC is integrated with LMSs to present a set of features designed to provide an effective continuous assessment. The strategies adopted to provide learning support with guidance at every step of the way is elaborated here. In the next phase, school is planning to launch ‘Online Certificate Course’ for which all planned LVOC are already developed. As Learning is a collaborative process, authors have suggested additional strategies to be incorporated by ‘real teacher’ to offer ‘Online Course’. This will help to ensure better quality and to develop confidence, comfort, and experience in online teaching.

  15. Learning Online: Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), Connectivism, and Cultural Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Marc; Barbera, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this reflection, we discuss the connectivist conception of learning in Web 2.0 environments, which underpins the pedagogy of what are known as cMOOCs (connectivist massive open online courses). We argue that this conception of learning is inadequate and problematic, and we propose that cultural psychology is best suited to address the…

  16. Assessment Worlds Colliding? Negotiating between Discourses of Assessment on an Online Open Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura; Hughes, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Using the badged open course, "Taking your first steps into Higher Education", this case study examines how assessment on online open courses draws on concepts of assessment used within formal and informal learning. Our experience was that assessment used within open courses, such as massive open online courses, is primarily determined…

  17. Performance Outcomes of an Online First Aid and CPR Course for Laypersons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Carolyn L.; Stiller, Janeth

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study evaluated the effectiveness of an online first aid course by comparing it with the traditional instructor-led course. An effective online course increases course accessibility and mitigates the major deterrent to widespread layperson training. Design: A comparison group design evaluated performances among 25 laypersons…

  18. Assessing Student Attitudes Towards Science in an Adaptive Online Astrobiology Course: Comparing Online and On-Campus Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Perera, V.; Mead, C.; Horodyskyj, L.; Semken, S. C.; Lopatto, D.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    General-education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses are considered essential to a college education, in part, to train students to think critically and to make informed decisions about complex scientific issues such as climate change and public health. Therefore, the goals of these STEM courses go beyond content knowledge to include generating positive attitudes towards science, developing competence in evaluating scientific information in everyday life, and understanding the nature of science. The Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) survey is frequently used to measure these attitudes, but it has not previously been used in an online, general education course. In this work, we administered the CURE survey for three semesters (N = 774) before and after completion of an online astrobiology course called Habitable Worlds. We compare students taking this course as part of fully-online degree programs (o-course) with those taking it as part of traditional undergraduate programs (i-course). More females and older students were among the o-course group, while overall the course had more white students than the Arizona State University average. Mean course grades were similar between the two groups but attitudes toward science differred significantly. O-course students began the course with more positive attitudes than i-course students, and o-course students also showed more positive changes at the end of the course. These differences suggest lesser intrinsic motivation among the i-course students. Additionally, pre-course attitudes correlated with final course grade for o-course students, but not for i-course students, which implies that success among o-course students is influenced by different factors than i-course students. Thus, effective student support strategies may differ for online-only students. Future work will include student interviews to better calibrate the CURE survey to online science courses.

  19. Evaluation of an online bioterrorism continuing medical education course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical education (CME) activity designed to address clinical issues involving suspected bioterrorism and reporting procedures in the United States. This was a retrospective survey of physicians who had completed an online CME activity on bioterrorism compared with a nonparticipant group who had completed at least 1 unrelated online CME course from the same medical school Web site and were matched on similar characteristics. An online survey instrument was developed to assess clinical and systems knowledge and confidence in recognition of illnesses associated with a potential bioterrorism attack. A power calculation indicated that a sample size of 100 (50 in each group) would achieve 90% power to detect a 10% to 15% difference in test scores between the two groups. Compared with nonparticipant physicians, participants correctly diagnosed anthrax (p = .01) and viral exanthem (p = .01), but not smallpox, more frequently than nonparticipants. Participants knew more frequently than nonparticipants who to contact regarding a potential bioterrorism event (p = .03) Participants were more confident than nonparticipants about finding information to guide diagnoses of patients with biologic exposure (p = .01), chemical exposure (p = .02), and radiation exposure (p = .04). An online bioterrorism course shows promise as an educational intervention in preparing physicians to better diagnose emerging rare infections, including those that may be associated with a bioterrorist event, in increasing confidence in diagnosing these infections, and in reporting of such infections for practicing physicians.

  20. Facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Sara G.; Robin, Bernard R.; Miller, Robert M.

    2000-07-01

    As the Internet evolves into a truly world wide communications medium, the roles of faculty and students at institutions of higher learning are changing. Traditional face-to-face classes are being converted to an online setting, where materials from syllabi to lectures to assignments are available at the click of a mouse. New technological options are challenging and changing the very nature of teaching as faculty migrate from being deliverers of information to facilitators and mentors. Students are also undergoing a transformation from passive recipients to participants in an active learning environment. Interactions are at the heart of this revolution as students and faculty create new methodologies for the online classroom. New types of interactions are emerging between faculty and students, between students and other students and between students and the educational resources they are exploring. As the online teaching and learning environment expands and matures, new social and instructional interactions are replacing the traditional occurrences in face-to-face classrooms. New communication options are also evolving as a critical component of the online classroom. The shift from a synchronous to an asynchronous communication structure has also had a significant impact on the way students and faculty interact. The use of e-mail, listservs and web-based conferencing has given teachers and learners new flexibility and has fostered a climate where learning takes place wherever and whenever it is convenient. HyperGroups, a communication tool that was developed at the University of Houston, allows students and faculty to seamlessly participate in course-related discussions and easily share multimedia resources. This article explores the many issues associated with facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses.

  1. Blended Learning and Sense of Community: A Comparative Analysis with Traditional and Fully Online Graduate Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Rovai and Hope Jordan

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning is a hybrid of classroom and online learning that includes some of the conveniences of online courses without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. The present study used a causal-comparative design to examine the relationship of sense of community between traditional classroom, blended, and fully online higher education learning environments. Evidence is provided to suggest that blended courses produce a stronger sense of community among students than either traditional or fully online courses.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of MOOC (Massive Open Online Course Platforms

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    Maria CONACHE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MOOC platforms have known a considerable development in recent years due to the enlargement of online space and the shifting between traditional to virtual activities. These plat-forms made it possible for people almost everywhere to take online academic courses offered by top universities via open access to web and with unlimited participation. Thus, it came naturally to us to address the question what makes them so successful? The purpose of this paper is to report comparatively MOOC platforms in terms of features, based on the user’s implication and demands. First, we chose four relevant lifelong learning platforms and then we structured three main categories for the platforms' qualification, depending on which we built our theory regarding the comparison between them. Our analysis consists of three sets of criteria: business model, course design and popularity among online users. Starting from this perspective, we built a range of representative factors for which we highlighted the major aspects for each plat-form in our comparative research

  3. Peer Assessment for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs

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    Hoi K. Suen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The teach-learn-assess cycle in education is broken in a typical massive open online course (MOOC. Without formative assessment and feedback, MOOCs amount to information dump or broadcasting shows, not educational experiences. A number of remedies have been attempted to bring formative assessment back into MOOCs, each with its own limits and problems. The most widely applicable approach for all MOOCs to date is to use peer assessment to provide the necessary feedback. However, unmoderated peer assessment results suffer from a lack of credibility. Several methods are available today to improve on the accuracy of peer assessment results. Some combination of these methods may be necessary to make peer assessment results sufficiently accurate to be useful for formative assessment. Such results can also help to facilitate peer learning, online discussion forums, and may possibly augment summative evaluation for credentialing.

  4. Massive Open Online Courses for Africa by Africa

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    Benedict Oyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Africa is known for inadequate access to all sorts of human needs including health, education, food, shelter, transport, security, and energy. Before the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs, open access to higher education (HE was exclusive of Africa. However, as a generally affordable method of post-secondary education delivery, MOOCs place the developing countries at the centre of universal access to HE. This paper provides the strategy for MOOC implementation in the context of limited resources in Africa. The strategy is clustered under five baseline requirements: national accredited MOOC curriculum, electronic content development, development of an online and offline eLearning platform, establishment and funding of MOOC coordination units at public HEIs, and establishment of MOOC access hubs at strategic locations. Emerging from this paper is the insight that a new era of universal access to HE in Africa is achievable through MOOCs only if initial requirements are met by the respective governments.

  5. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  6. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  7. The Development of a Discussion Rubric for Online Courses: Standardizing Expectations of Graduate Students in Online Scholarly Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Vanessa L.; Freedman, Debra; Siebert, Cathy J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of a rubric for assessing discussions in online graduate level education courses. The aims of the research were twofold. The first goal was to develop a discussion rubric that provides guidance to graduate students participating in online courses that are heavily discussion based. The second goal was…

  8. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  9. Use of Contemporary Film as a Medium for Teaching an Online Death and Grief Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Barbara A; Smith, Lisa C

    2016-01-01

    Online education is becoming commonplace in the academic world. Schools now offer totally online degree programs or provide a hybrid of face-to-face and online courses for fulfilling academic requirements. Developing courses and teaching online requires instructors to rethink the educational paradigms they have relied upon in the past. The Net Generation of learners brings a different set of expectations, styles, and needs to the classroom than those of previous generations; this mandates that instructors redesign courses and use contemporary teaching modalities. This article describes how film was successfully used as the primary medium to teach a graduate online Social Work course, Death and Grief.

  10. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  11. How to Involve Students in an Online Course: A Redesigned Online Pedagogy of Collaborative Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In an online course, students learn independently in the virtual environment without teacher's on-the-spot support. However, many students are addicted to the Internet which is filled with a plethora of shopping websites, online games, and social networks (e.g. Facebook). To help keep students focused on and involved in online or blended…

  12. Webs of activity in online course design and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Peruski

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we followed three faculty members' experiences with designing and teaching online courses for the first time. In order to complete the activity, the faculty members had to work collaboratively with others across the university. Activity theory provided a framework within which to study faculty members' collaborative activities with members of different activity systems that had different goals, tools, divisions of labor and accountabilities. In concordance with activity theory, such differences led to contradictions, disturbances, and transformations in thinking and work activities. The results of the study have implications for individuals and systems undertaking technology integration in teaching.

  13. Communication Barriers: A Study of Eastern Mediterranean University Students' and Teachers' of Online Program and Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Altinay, Fahriye

    2005-01-01

    This research study defines communication barriers in online programs and courses by determining the perceptions of students and teachers at Eastern Mediterranean University. It aims to get the answers to the questions of what sorts of problems students and teachers face while being involved in online courses and online programs. Distance…

  14. Benchmarks and Quality Assurance for Online Course Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    As online education has entered the main stream of the U.S. higher education, quality assurance in online course development has become a critical topic in distance education. This short article summarizes the major benchmarks related to online course development, listing and comparing the benchmarks of the National Education Association (NEA),…

  15. Over two decades of blended and online physics courses at Michigan State University

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    Gerd Kortemeyer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Fall 1992, our first physics course offered online homework. Over two decades later, we have seven physics courses online, spanning the whole range of introductory course offerings, with a total of over 1600 students in 2014. We found that several of the the purely online courses had better learning success than traditional lecture courses, as measured by exam scores. Particularly successful were online materials with embedded assessment. This result can be interpreted in different ways, but may serve as an indicator that during in-class lectures, we are oftentimes not taking advantage of the fact that we have the students on-site.

  16. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for Physics - and for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, David E.

    2014-03-01

    We will describe several of the currently available Massive Open Online Courses in Physics-the topics, level, author, and special features of each. Then we will discuss the interesting demographics of the students taking them, presenting evidence showing that students of widely different initial skills and students of all major demographic groups learn at least as much conceptual knowledge as students in a traditional classroom. We will present MOOC research on student habits, use of eTexts and other resources, and indicate what resources impart measured learning. We'll describe a collectivistic MOOC where you can help develop instructional and assessment resources that will be in a library for future use by you and other teachers. Many of these resources are designed for blending with on-campus introductory courses in college or Advanced Placement courses in High School. They will ultimately be displayed in a searchable library with lots of useful information from which you can assemble your own course in the free and open edX.org platform (or simply download them for in-class use). We Acknowledge support from NSF, a Google Faculty Award, and MIT.

  17. An Exploratory Study of the Drivers of Student Satisfaction and Learning Experience in Hybrid-Online and Purely Online Marketing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2012-01-01

    Much of the existing research in distance education has focused on contrasting the outcomes between traditional face-to-face teaching and purely online courses, in which the entire course content is delivered online. However, research has not examined the effectiveness of hybrid-online courses, in which a combination of online delivery and…

  18. The Chalkboard versus the Avatar: Comparing the Effectiveness of Online and In-class Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrand, Kelly; Savage, Scott V.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, colleges and universities are relying on fully online classes to teach students. This article investigates how students evaluate online courses in comparison to more traditional face-to-face courses. Data come from undergraduate student evaluations of 118 sociology courses, and results of a series of hierarchical linear models…

  19. From Bricks to Clicks: Building Quality K-12 Online Classes through an Innovative Course Review Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huett, Kim C.; Huett, Jason B.; Ringlaben, Ravic

    2011-01-01

    Using an explanatory mixed methods design, this study uses the National Standards of Quality for Online Courses to measure the extent to which teachers in a blended middle school and a fully online supplemental high school are designing quality online learning environments for students. As a part of fully online graduate coursework, graduate…

  20. Assessing Attitudes Towards Science During an Adaptive Online Astrobiology Course: Comparing Online and On-Campus Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Viranga; Mead, Chris; Buxner, Sanlyn; Horodyskyj, Lev; Semken, Steven; Lopatto, David; Anbar, Ariel

    2016-10-01

    General-education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses are accepted as essential to a college education. An often cited reason is to train a scientifically literate populace who can think critically and make informed decisions about complex issues such as climate change, health care, and atomic energy. Goals of these STEM courses, therefore, go beyond content knowledge to include generating positive attitudes towards science, developing competence in evaluating scientific information in everyday life and understanding the nature of science. To gauge if such non-content learning outcomes are being met in our course, an online astrobiology course called Habitable Worlds, we administered the Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) survey to students. The survey was administered before and after completion of the course for three semesters starting with the Fall 2014 semester and ending with the Fall 2015 semester (N = 774). A factor analysis indicated three factors on attitudes: toward science education, toward the interconnectedness of science with non-science fields, and toward the nature of science. Here we present some differences between students enrolled in online degree programs (o-course) and those enrolled in traditional undergraduate programs (i-course). While mean course grades were similar, changes in attitudes toward science differ significantly between o-course and i-course students. The o-course students began the course with more positive attitudes across all three factors than the i-course students. Their attitudes toward science education improved during the course, while the i-course students showed no change. Attitudes toward the other two factors declined in both populations during the course, but declines were smaller among o-course students. These differences may indicate lesser intrinsic motivation among the i-course students. The CURE survey has not been used before in an online course; therefore, we will

  1. Massive open online course for health informatics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This paper outlines a new method of teaching health informatics to large numbers of students from around the world through a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). The Health Informatics Forum is a social networking site for educating health informatics students and professionals [corrected]. It is running a MOOC for students from around the world that uses creative commons licenced content funded by the US government and developed by five US universities. The content is delivered through narrated lectures with slides that can be viewed online with discussion threads on the forum for class interactions. Students can maintain a professional profile, upload photos and files, write their own blog posts and post discussion threads on the forum. The Health Informatics Forum MOOC has been accessed by 11,316 unique users from 127 countries from August 2, 2012 to January 24, 2014. Most users accessed the MOOC via a desktop computer, followed by tablets and mobile devices and 55% of users were female. Over 400,000 unique users have now accessed the wider Health Informatics Forum since it was established in 2008. Advances in health informatics and educational technology have both created a demand for online learning material in health informatics and a solution for providing it. By using a MOOC delivered through a social networking platform it is hoped that high quality health informatics education will be able to be delivered to a large global audience of future health informaticians without cost.

  2. Elderly Learners and Massive Open Online Courses: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shirley Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have become commonplace in the e-learning landscape. Thousands of elderly learners are participating in courses offered by various institutions on a multitude of platforms in many different languages. However, there is very little research into understanding elderly learners in MOOCs. Objective We aim to show that a considerable proportion of elderly learners are participating in MOOCs and that there is a lack of research in this area. We hope this assertion of the wide gap in research on elderly learners in MOOCs will pave the way for more research in this area. Methods Pre-course survey data for 10 University of Reading courses on the FutureLearn platform were analyzed to show the level of participation of elderly learners in MOOCs. Two MOOC aggregator sites (Class Central and MOOC List) were consulted to gather data on MOOC offerings that include topics relating to aging. In parallel, a selected set of MOOC platform catalogues, along with a recently published review on health and medicine-related MOOCs, were searched to find courses relating to aging. A systematic literature search was then employed to identify research articles on elderly learners in MOOCs. Results The 10 courses reviewed had a considerable proportion of elderly learners participating in them. For the over-66 age group, this varied from 0.5% (on the course “Managing people”) to 16.3% (on the course “Our changing climate”), while for the over-56 age group it ranged from 3.0% (on “A beginners guide to writing in English”) to 39.5% (on “Heart health”). Only six MOOCs were found to include topics related to aging: three were on the Coursera platform, two on the FutureLearn platform, and one on the Open2Study platform. Just three scholarly articles relating to MOOCs and elderly learners were retrieved from the literature search. Conclusions This review presents evidence to suggest that elderly learners are already participating in MOOCs

  3. PDF Lecture Materials for Online and ``Flipped'' Format Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kary, D. M.; Eisberg, J.

    2013-04-01

    Online astronomy courses typically rely on students reading the textbook and/or a set of text-based lecture notes to replace the “lecture” material. However, many of our students report that this is much less engaging than in-person lectures, especially given the amount of interactive work such as “think-pair-share” problems done in many astronomy classes. Students have similarly criticized direct lecture-capture. To address this, we have developed a set of PowerPoint-style presentations with embedded lecture audio combined with prompts for student interaction including think-pair-share questions. These are formatted PDF packages that can be used on a range of different computers using free software. The presentations are first developed using Microsoft PowerPoint software. Audio recordings of scripted lectures are then synchronized with the presentations and the entire package is converted to PDF using Adobe Presenter. This approach combines the ease of editing that PowerPoint provides along with the platform-independence of PDF. It's easy to add, remove, or edit individual slides as needed, and PowerPoint supports internal links so that think-pair-share questions can be inserted with links to feedback based on the answers selected. Modern PDF files support animated visuals with synchronized audio and they can be read using widely available free software. Using these files students in an online course can get many of the benefits of seeing and hearing the course material presented in an in-person lecture format. Students needing extra help in traditional lecture classes can use these presentations to help review the materials covered in lecture. Finally, the presentations can be used in a “flipped” format in which students work through the presentations outside of class time while spending the “lecture” time on in-class interaction.

  4. Developing an Online Course Profile Builder to Promote Pedagogical Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Humphries

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of an online databasedriven electronic tool for building profiles for university courses (or subjects. We take the view that any technology, including a pedagogic one, needs to be designed for, understood as and evaluated within its place in a complex socio-technic system of human-to-human as well as human-to-tool relationships. Many academics are reluctant to make changes to their practice either because of change fatigue or insufficient commitment to or understanding of the new requirements for transparency and accountability. In our institution, adoption of a new policy for the production of standardised course profiles gave us the opportunity to draw all of the school staff into the new processes. We designed an electronic tool which embodies both the course profile policy and the explicit identification of and planning for graduate attributes and which seeks to pay attention to the socio-technic system within which it operates. Intended as a tool to aid academics meet requirements, it has had the benefit of encouraging users to reconsider their understanding of such educational issues as objectives and criteria and reconsider their educational aims. This paper describes the design of the tool from both technological and social viewpoints. This paper also addresses the relationship between the technical design of the tool, university policy and good pedagogical practice, the mapping of learning objectives to assessment and the mapping of graduate attributes to programs.

  5. Student Engagement in Pharmacology Courses Using Online Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaksha, Abdullah; Grant, Gary; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Nirthanan, S. Niru

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess factors influencing student engagement with e-tools used as a learning supplement to the standard curriculum in pharmacology courses. Design. A suite of 148 e-tools (interactive online teaching materials encompassing the basic mechanisms of action for different drug classes) were designed and implemented across 2 semesters for third-year pharmacy students. Assessment. Student engagement and use of this new teaching strategy were assessed using a survey instrument and usage statistics for the material. Use of e-tools during semester 1 was low, a finding attributable to a majority (75%) of students either being unaware of or forgetting about the embedded e-tools and a few (20%) lacking interest in accessing additional learning materials. In contrast to semester 1, e-tool use significantly increased in semester 2 with the use of frequent reminders and announcements (pmarketing strategy” that included e-mail reminders and motivation. PMID:23966728

  6. Learning from Experience: The Realities of Developing Mathematics Courses for an Online Engineering Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Diana; Albrecht, Amie; Webby, Brian; White, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Rarely do university departments of mathematics redesign their basic mathematics courses. Through developing an online version of our associate degree in engineering in collaboration with Open Universities Australia, we redesigned the first in a sequence of five engineering mathematics courses. The online cohort proved different to our…

  7. System, Scholar or Students? Which Most Influences Online MBA Course Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Considering the increasingly challenging resource environments in many business schools, this study examined whether course technologies, learner behaviors or instructor behaviors best predict online course outcomes so that administrators and support personnel can prioritize their efforts and investments. Based on reviewing prior online and…

  8. A Blended Model: Simultaneously Teaching a Quantitative Course Traditionally, Online, and Remotely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightner, Constance A.; Lightner-Laws, Carin A.

    2016-01-01

    As universities seek to bolster enrollment through distance education, faculty are tasked with maintaining comparable teaching/learning standards in traditional, blended, and online courses. Research has shown that there is an achievement gap between students taking courses exclusively offered online versus those enrolled in face-to-face classes.…

  9. A Case Study: Motivating and Supporting Faculty Members Who Teach Online Courses in a Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Cristen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how faculty members teaching online courses at one private university perceived the types of pedagogical training and support they needed in order to effectively facilitate online courses. Building on the theoretical foundation of andragogy, the study of adult education, this study explored…

  10. Online and Paper Evaluations of Courses: A Literature Review and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on comparing online and paper course evaluations in higher education and provides a case study of a very large randomised trial on the topic. It presents a mixed but generally optimistic picture of online course evaluations with respect to response rates, what they indicate, and how to increase them. The paper…

  11. Strategies for securing participant motivation and engagement in a 19 week online course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüders, Bo; Hansen, Pernille Stenkil; Kjær, Christopher

    Presentation of results from an exit survey exploring participant experiences in an online course aimed at teachers from higher education institutions in southern Denmark and northern Germany.......Presentation of results from an exit survey exploring participant experiences in an online course aimed at teachers from higher education institutions in southern Denmark and northern Germany....

  12. The Development and Assessment of an Online Microscopic Anatomy Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Michele L.; Johnson, Marjorie; Gibson, Candace; Rogers, Kem A.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing enrollment in post-secondary institutions across North America, along with an increase in popularity of and demand for distance education is pressuring institutions to offer a greater number and variety of courses online. A fully online laboratory course in microscopic anatomy (histology) which can be taught simultaneously with a…

  13. Online and Paper Evaluations of Courses: A Literature Review and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on comparing online and paper course evaluations in higher education and provides a case study of a very large randomised trial on the topic. It presents a mixed but generally optimistic picture of online course evaluations with respect to response rates, what they indicate, and how to increase them. The paper…

  14. Korean Student's Online Learning Preferences and Issues: Cultural Sensitivity for Western Course Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Earlene

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: While online courses offer educational solutions, they are not academically suited for everyone. International students find distractions in online courses constructed with American philosophy, epistemology, values, and cultures as compared to experiences in their home country. Learner's culture, value system, learning…

  15. Comparing Asynchronous and Synchronous Video vs. Text Based Discussions in an Online Teacher Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Cynthia; Strudler, Neal; Grove, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether asynchronous video posts and synchronous videoconferencing would create higher levels of teaching and social presence within an online course when compared with the university's current text-based discussion platform. Undergraduate students in an online teacher education course were randomly…

  16. Online Training for Working with Student Veterans: A Social Work Elective Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Wright, Micah C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one school of social work's innovative online elective course to prepare Masters of Social Work (MSW) students for practice with the military, veterans and their families. Developed as part of a university-wide Veterans Initiative, this online course keeps the focus on the student veteran and uses the best practices of…

  17. Designing Online Management Education Courses Using the Community of Inquiry Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Lee E.

    2013-01-01

    Online learning has grown as a program delivery option for many colleges and programs of business. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework consisting of three interrelated elements--social presence, cognitive presence, and teaching presences--provides a model to guide business faculty in their online course design. The course design of an online…

  18. How Can Discussion Forum Questions Be Effective in Online MBA Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A quasi-experiment compared two instructional approaches for an existing MBA online business strategy course at an accredited university to answer the question: how can discussion questions become more effective in online MBA courses? The treatment was an instructional approach that integrated Socratic questioning and conversation theory…

  19. Interaction, Critical Thinking, and Social Network Analysis (SNA) in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Joan; Gable, Samuel; Fidalgo, Patricia Seferlis; Blakeslee, George

    2013-01-01

    This study tried to ascertain a possible relationship between the number of student moderators (1, 2, and 3), online interactions, and critical thinking of K-12 educators enrolled in an online course that was taught from a constructivist approach. The course topic was use of technology in special education. Social network analysis (SNA) and…

  20. Student Performance in a Quantitative Methods Course under Online and Face-to-Face Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Penny; Wakeling, Victor

    2011-01-01

    In a study conducted at a large public university, the authors assessed, for an upper-division quantitative methods business core course, the impact of delivery method (online versus face-toface) on the success rate (percentage of enrolled students earning a grade of A, B, or C in the course). The success rate of the 161 online students was 55.3%,…

  1. Using Instructor-Generated Video Lectures in Online Mathematics Courses Improves Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegeman, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Low retention rates in online freshman-level mathematics courses are a concern, especially at postsecondary institutions that serve academically unprepared students. The purpose of this study was to determine if student performance in an online College Algebra course that relies heavily on text-based multimedia tools can be improved by replacing…

  2. Teaching Lab Science Courses Online: Resources for Best Practices, Tools, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschofnig, Linda; Jeschofnig, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching Lab Science Courses Online" is a practical resource for educators developing and teaching fully online lab science courses. First, it provides guidance for using learning management systems and other web 2.0 technologies such as video presentations, discussion boards, Google apps, Skype, video/web conferencing, and social media…

  3. Publishers See Online Mega-Courses as Opportunity to Sell Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Colleges are not the only enterprises interested in the possibilities of free, online courses. Publishers have begun to investigate whether so-called MOOC's, or massive open online courses, can help them reach new readers and sell more books. For the moment, providers of the classes encourage professors not to require students to buy texts, in…

  4. Hybrid Identities & MOOCs: The Implications of Massive Open Online Courses for Multicultural Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari-Mamagani, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs), delivered through platforms like Coursera, edX, and Udacity, offer content from well-known universities and professors, at no cost, to students across the globe. Although they deliver thematically coherent material in instructional videos and supplemental materials, these online courses demand that users…

  5. Comparing Student Reflectiveness in Online Discussion Forums across Modes of Instruction and Levels of Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Fostering reflective deliberation in the online classroom ensures that students reach a high level of achievement in virtual courses. Student peer exchanges were evaluated on a collaborative web site structured around interactive weekly discussions offered across an online, face-to-face, and upper- and lower-division political science courses.…

  6. Using Wikis to Enhance Website Peer Evaluation in an Online Website Development Course: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Peer evaluations are often used to improve learning in educational settings. As more and more online courses are offered, it is becoming increasingly important to explore new techniques for conducting peer evaluation in online courses. In recent years, wikis have increasingly been used in higher education to support learning and group work.…

  7. An Analysis of Student Engagement Patterns and Online Course Outcomes in Wisconsin. REL 2016-147

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Angela M.; Clements, Margaret; Lavigne, Heather J.; Stafford, Erin T.

    2016-01-01

    Student enrollment in online courses has increased in the past 15 years and continues to grow. However, little is known about students' education experiences or online course outcomes. These are areas of particular interest to the Midwest Virtual Education Research Alliance, whose goal is to understand how to support student success in online…

  8. Socialization in the Asynchronous Online Course Discussion of Graduate Nursing Administration Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Cox, Annie

    2010-01-01

    Over the last several years there has been an increase in the amount of graduate education in nursing offered online in Web-based programs. There is a lack of research into the role played by online graduate nursing course discussion, an important component of many courses, in the process of socialization for advanced nursing roles. To understand…

  9. Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) Network Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Shaun; Edelmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) network dataset. It entails information on two online communication networks resulting from two consecutive offerings of the MOOC called "The Digital Learning Transition in K-12 Schools" in spring and fall 2013. The courses were offered to educators from the USA…

  10. Korean Student's Online Learning Preferences and Issues: Cultural Sensitivity for Western Course Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Earlene

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: While online courses offer educational solutions, they are not academically suited for everyone. International students find distractions in online courses constructed with American philosophy, epistemology, values, and cultures as compared to experiences in their home country. Learner's culture, value system, learning…

  11. Lessons Learned from Migrating to an Online Electronic Business Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstrom, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the lessons learned while migrating an Electronic Business Management course from traditional face-to-face delivery to online delivery across a six and a half year time frame. The course under review teaches students how to develop and construct a working information-based online business using free versions of online…

  12. The Anatomy of Program Design for an On-Line Business Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Bonita

    2008-01-01

    How does one design an on-line course to bridge theory and practice? How can the feedback of on-going stakeholder (student and administration) be incorporated into the design process to enhance quality? This paper presents the theoretical underpinning of designing an on-line management course recognized as best practice for a "well organized…

  13. Course developers as students: a designer perspective of the experience of learning online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain McAlpine

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic developers of online courses may not have experienced this mode of learning and teaching from the learner perspective. This article makes a comparison between suggestions for online course design from research literature and user perspectives from a focus group, responses to questions on the most and least effective aspects of online study and lasting impressions, and from reflective diaries kept by two of the authors while they were engaged in study from online courses. This direct evidence is used to highlight key issues in the literature from the viewpoint of the learner.

  14. The Journalism Writing Course: Evaluation of Hybrid versus Online Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen; Jones, Khristen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined introductory journalism writing courses and compared hybrid (part online/part classroom) versus online grammar instruction. The hybrid structure allowed for grammar topics to be taught online, with a pretest following, and then reviewing missed/difficult pretest concepts in class prior to a posttest. The quasi-experimental…

  15. The Journalism Writing Course: Evaluation of Hybrid versus Online Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen; Jones, Khristen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined introductory journalism writing courses and compared hybrid (part online/part classroom) versus online grammar instruction. The hybrid structure allowed for grammar topics to be taught online, with a pretest following, and then reviewing missed/difficult pretest concepts in class prior to a posttest. The quasi-experimental…

  16. Maps and the Geospatial Revolution: Teaching a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Anthony C.; Kerski, Joseph; Long, Erin C.; Luo, Heng; DiBiase, David; Lee, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The massive open online course (MOOC) is a new approach for teaching online. MOOCs stand apart from traditional online classes in that they support thousands of learners through content and assessment mechanisms that can scale. A reason for their size is that MOOCs are free for anyone to take. Here we describe the design, development, and teaching…

  17. Mixed Methods Student Evaluation of an Online Systemic Human Anatomy Course with Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Stefanie M.; Choi, Suwhan; Barnett, John; Rogers, Kem A.

    2016-01-01

    A fully online section of an existing face-to-face (F2F) systemic human anatomy course with a prosection laboratory was offered for the first time in 2012-2013. Lectures for F2F students (N = 365) were broadcast in both live and archived format to online students (N = 40) using virtual classroom software. Laboratories were delivered online by a…

  18. The Effectiveness of Mutual Aid Learning Communities in Online MSW Practice Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, M. Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Online social work education has grown rapidly in recent years, and practice courses now are frequently taught online. The present study contributes to the growing body of knowledge regarding best practices in online social work education by examining the effects of small-group learning communities on student learning and on student satisfaction…

  19. Assessing the Value of Embedded Librarians in an Online Graduate Educational Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary; Kumar, Swapna; Ochoa, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    The increase in online programs has been accompanied by the need for library instruction and support for online students. Students enrolled in off-campus programs have to be able to successfully access and use digital library resources to complete course requirements. An embedded librarian project in an online graduate educational technology…

  20. Student Satisfaction with Blended and Online Courses Based on Personality Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Doris U.; Erichsen, Elizabeth Anne

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate differences in perceived student satisfaction in blended and online learning environments based on personality type. A total of 72 graduate students enrolled in blended and online courses at two research universities in the United States completed an abbreviated online version of the Myers-Briggs Type…

  1. Maps and the Geospatial Revolution: Teaching a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Anthony C.; Kerski, Joseph; Long, Erin C.; Luo, Heng; DiBiase, David; Lee, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The massive open online course (MOOC) is a new approach for teaching online. MOOCs stand apart from traditional online classes in that they support thousands of learners through content and assessment mechanisms that can scale. A reason for their size is that MOOCs are free for anyone to take. Here we describe the design, development, and teaching…

  2. Massive open online courses on health and medicine: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu Rekha; Williams, Shirley Ann

    2014-08-14

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have become immensely popular in a short span of time. However, there is very little research exploring MOOCs in the discipline of health and medicine. We aim to provide a review of MOOCs related to health and medicine offered by various MOOC platforms in 2013, by analyzing and comparing the various offerings, their target audience, typical length of course, and credentials offered. We also discuss opportunities and challenges presented by MOOCs in health and medicine. Health and medicine-related MOOCs were gathered using several methods to ensure the richness and completeness of data. Identified MOOC platform websites were used to gather the lists of offerings. In parallel, these MOOC platforms were contacted to access official data on their offerings. Two MOOC aggregator sites (Class Central and MOOC List) were also consulted to gather data on MOOC offerings. Eligibility criteria were defined to concentrate on the courses that were offered in 2013 and primarily on the subject of health and medicine. All language translations in this paper were done using Google Translate. The search identified 225 courses, of which 98 were eligible for the review. Over half (58%, 57/98) of the MOOCs considered were offered on the Coursera platform, and 94% (92/98) of all the MOOCs were offered in English. Universities offered 90 MOOCs, and the John Hopkins University offered the largest number of MOOCs (12/90). Only three MOOCs were offered by developing countries (China, West Indies, and Saudi Arabia). The duration of MOOCs varied from 3-20 weeks with an average length of 6.7 weeks. On average, MOOCs expected a participant to work on the material for 4.2 hours a week. Verified certificates were offered by 14 MOOCs, while three others offered other professional recognition. The review presents evidence to suggest that MOOCs can be used as a way to provide continuous medical education. It also shows the potential of MOOCs as a means of

  3. Determinants of Perceived Learning and Satisfaction in Online Business Courses: An Extension to Evaluate Differences between Qualitative and Quantitative Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jacqueline K.; Aviles, Maria; Hanna, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the determinants of perceived learning and satisfaction in online courses and the moderating effect of course type. For perceived learning outcomes, those students who perceive a higher level of interaction and those students who are satisfied will report higher levels of learning outcomes. There were significant differences…

  4. NEON's Citizen Science Academy: Exploring online professional development courses for educators to enhance participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Ward, D.; Wasser, L.; Meymaris, K.; Newman, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The NEON Citizen Science Academy (CSA) (citizenscienceacademy.org) was created to explore the need for online professional development (PD) resources and opportunities that explicitly focused on citizen science in diverse educational settings. In the past decade, there has been more widespread acceptance of online PD courses as viable alternatives to face to face classes and workshops. This acceptance, along with the current proliferation of online based citizen science programs, spurred the development of the CSA dedicated to providing online courses and resources to facilitate effective implementation of citizen science programs. For the pilot, an online, self paced course for informal and formal educators was developed based on NEON' Project BudBurst (budburst.org). An intended outcome of this pilot project was the development of best practices based on lessons learned that could be used for the development of future NEON online courses and shared with the citizen science community, The pilot clearly demonstrated the interest in an online citizen science course. Initial registration far exceeded expectations and additional sessions had to be offered to meet demand. A second online course was developed and offered in the fall to similar interest. Additional courses will be offered in the winter of 2013. We will report on lessons learned and early best practices based, in large part, from field testing and feedback of over 400 educators who have taken participated in the CSA to date.

  5. Study on the Application of the Online Course-Translation of English for Science and Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gui-li

    2013-01-01

    Computer technology is indispensable to modern education and the online education is a useful platform for online re-sources which integrates computer technology into teaching process. This paper, based on the research of online course-Transla-tion of English for Science and Technology, demonstrates the function of the online educational technology in the teaching of Translation of English for Science and Technology and points out the shortcomings of this platform.

  6. Guest Editorial ~ Converting to Online Course and Program Delivery: Global perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique A.M.X. Abrioux

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As former practitioners and advocates for classroom instruction seek to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of face-to-face and online teaching by reporting on their primarily one-off experiences with developing and delivering online courses within a more traditional university culture, forays by more traditional universities into online education have begun to dominate the distance education and online literature.

  7. Comparing Success Rates for General and Credit Recovery Courses Online and Face to Face: Results for Florida High School Courses. REL 2015-095

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John; Zhou, Chengfu; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the results of a REL Southeast study comparing student success in online credit recovery and general courses taken online compared to traditional face-to-face courses. Credit recovery occurs when a student fails a course and then retakes the same course to earn high school credit. This research question was motivated by the…

  8. A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH TO THE DESIGN AND DELIVERY OF AN ONLINE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSE: A CASE OF THE iEARN ONLINE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockias Chitanana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the International Education and Resource Network Science Technology and Math (iEARN-STM online professional development course. The study used the constructivist framework as the conceptual model to examine the way in which the constructivist theory has shaped the design and implementation of the course, as reflected by the interactions of a cohort of participants in the course. The participants were 28 educators enrolled in the course, who were either teacher educators or teachers, working in different educational institutions in different countries throughout the world. The purpose of the study was to understand how the iEARN online professional development course supported teachers’ learning through effective discourse in an online environment and to identify the constructivist learning principles that were behind the success of the course. The design of the course appeared to have a positive impact on participants’ collaboration with peers. Results of the study confirms earlier research findings that the constructivist approach to course design and delivery provides a powerful structure for creating learning environments conducive to the development of professional skills among educators. Results of this study can be used to assist professional development coordinators and administrators to plan effective professional development. The results of the study are also expected to contribute to improvements in the design of professional development course content, instruction, delivery and administration, focusing on factors such as program model, delivery, contextual factors or best practices.

  9. Developing and providing an online (web-based) clinical research design course in Japan: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T; Mulligan, Roseann; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2011-04-01

    This article reports on the lessons learned while teaching an 8-week-long online course about the principles of clinical research design in Japan. Student activity data and how it relates to performance in the course are presented. As prolog, this article focuses on the barriers and solutions to creating and delivering a web-based course and it lists and discusses the most common concerns that educators often have about this process, namely, cost of the system and time requirement of the faculty. Options that must be considered when selecting the support software and hardware needed to conduct live streaming lecture, online video-based conference course are presented. The ancillary role of e-mail based distribution lists as an essential instruction tool within an interactive, instructor-supervised online course is discussed. This article then discusses the inclusion of active learning elements within an online course as well as the pros and cons regarding open-book versus closed book, proctored testing. Lastly, copyright issues the online instructor should know about are discussed. The student tracking data show that as the course progresses, students will reduce the number for page viewings. We speculate that this reduction is due to a combination of conflicting priorities plus increasing efficiency of the students at extracting the critical information. The article also concludes that software and hardware costs to deliver an online course are relatively minor but the faculty's time requirement is initially substantially higher than teaching in a conventional face-to-face course.

  10. A strategy for monitoring and evaluating massive open online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S A; Goodman, S; Jawitz, J; Deacon, A

    2016-08-01

    We argue that the complex, innovative and adaptive nature of Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) initiatives poses particular challenges to monitoring and evaluation, in that any evaluation strategy will need to follow a systems approach. This article aims to guide organizations implementing MOOCs through a series of steps to assist them in developing a strategy to monitor, improve, and judge the merit of their initiatives. We describe how we operationalise our strategy by first defining the different layers of interacting agents in a given MOOC system. We then tailor our approach to these different layers. Specifically, a two-pronged approach was developed, where we suggest that individual projects be assessed through performance monitoring; assessment criteria for which would be defined at the outset to include coverage, participation, quality and student achievement. In contrast, the success of an overall initiative should be considered within a more adaptive, emergent evaluation inquiry framework. We present the inquiry framework we developed for MOOC initiatives, and show how this framework might be used to develop evaluation questions and an assessment methodology. We also define the more fixed indicators and measures for project performance monitoring. Our strategy is described as it was developed to inform the evaluation of a MOOC initiative at the University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa.

  11. Online versus Traditional Classroom Instruction: An Examination of Developmental English Courses at an Alabama Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, B. Matthew; Saxon, D. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted at a community college in northeast Alabama to determine how the format of developmental English courses impacted student withdrawal rates and final grades. The two course formats examined were online/hybrid and face-to-face courses. Data were obtained from a 4-semester time frame: fall 2012, spring 2013, summer 2013, and…

  12. Comparison of Instructors' and Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Soonhwa; DaCosta, Boaventura; Kinsell, Carolyn; Tung, Chan K.

    2010-01-01

    This study used an extensive online course evaluation inventory to analyze the subjects' perceptions of course effectiveness in the following subscales: flexibility, user interface, navigation, getting started, technical assistance, course management, universal design, communications, instructional design, and content. Survey results compared…

  13. Comparison of Instructors' and Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Soonhwa; DaCosta, Boaventura; Kinsell, Carolyn; Tung, Chan K.

    2010-01-01

    This study used an extensive online course evaluation inventory to analyze the subjects' perceptions of course effectiveness in the following subscales: flexibility, user interface, navigation, getting started, technical assistance, course management, universal design, communications, instructional design, and content. Survey results compared…

  14. Construction and Evaluation of an Online Microbiology Course for Nonscience Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hughes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of web-based technologies provides a new method for course delivery. As with any new technique, evaluation is a necessary tool to determine if the method is consistent with expectations. This study describes the conversion of a nonscience majors’ microbiology lecture course to online delivery and evaluates the hypothesis that the online course can be as effective as the traditional course. Course examination scores are compared between the face-to-face and online sections over a 3-year period. On all but one of the course examinations, no significant difference is found for those students in these two distinctly different course types. The success rate, as defined by those students earning grades of C or better, is high for both course types, although the traditional course success rate is slightly higher. Student evaluations of the courses are also positive, though some differences are noted. Overall, student performance in the online course is equivalent to that in the traditional course.

  15. The S-Star Trial Bioinformatics Course: An On-line Learning Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yun Ping; Hoog, Jan-Olov; Gardner, Phyllis; Ranganathan, Shoba; Andersson, Siv; Subbiah, Subramanian; Tan, Tin Wee; Hide, Winston; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2003-01-01

    The S-Star Trial Bioinformatics on-line course (www.s-star.org) is a global experiment in bioinformatics distance education. Six universities from five continents have participated in this project. One hundred and fifty students participated in the first trial course of which 96 followed through the entire course and 70 fulfilled the overall…

  16. Online Student Evaluation Improves Course Experience Questionnaire Results in a Physiotherapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Beatrice; Jones, Sue; Straker, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an online student evaluation system, Course Experience on the Web (CEW), in a physiotherapy program to improve their Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results. CEW comprises a course survey instrument modeled on the CEQ and a tailored unit survey instrument. Closure of the feedback loop is integral in the CEW…

  17. A new hybrid model for exploring the adoption of online nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Feng-Cheng; Chang, Su-Chao

    2008-04-01

    With the advancement in educational technology and internet access in recent years, nursing academia is searching for ways to widen nurses' educational opportunities. The online nursing courses are drawing more attention as well. The online nursing courses are very important e-learning tools for nursing students. The research combines the innovation diffusion theory and technology acceptance model, and adds two research variables, perceived financial cost and computer self-efficacy to propose a new hybrid technology acceptance model to study nursing students' behavioral intentions to use the online nursing courses. Based on 267 questionnaires collected from six universities in Taiwan, the research finds that studies strongly support this new hybrid technology acceptance model in predicting nursing students' behavioral intentions to use the online nursing courses. This research finds that compatibility, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived financial cost and computer self-efficacy are critical factors for nursing students' behavioral intentions to use the online nursing courses. By explaining nursing students' behavioral intentions from a user's perspective, the findings of this research help to develop more user friendly online nursing courses and also provide insight into the best way to promote new e-learning tools for nursing students. This research finds that compatibility is the most important research variable that affects the behavioral intention to use the online nursing courses.

  18. Student Perspectives of Assessment Strategies in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Scott; Hendricks, Stacy; Applewhite, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Engaging professional adults in an online environment is a common challenge for online instructors. Often the temptation or commonly used approach is to mirror face-to-face strategies and practices. One premise of this study is that all strategies used in an online environment are assessment strategies, and as such should be considered for their…

  19. Learning Outcomes in an Online vs Traditional Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Relative enrollment in online classes has tripled over the last ten years, but the efficacy of learning online remains unclear. While two recent Meta analyses report higher exam grades for online vs. traditional classes, this body of research has been marked by two recurrent limitations: (1) a possible problem of selection bias wherein students…

  20. Student Experiences in Online Courses: A Qualitative Research Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Stephanie J.; Major, Claire

    2012-01-01

    As online learning continues to grow, it is important to investigate students' overall experiences in online learning environments. Understanding students' perspectives on their online classes or programs moves beyond the sole question of student satisfaction to more nuanced questions about how factors inside and outside of the classroom impact…

  1. The motivations and experiences of students enrolled in online science courses at the community college

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Urbi

    An important question in online learning involves how to effectively motivate and retain students in science online courses. There is a dearth of research and knowledge about the experiences of students enrolled in online science courses in community colleges which has impeded the proper development and implementation of online courses and retention of students in the online environment. This study sought to provide an understanding of the relationships among each of the following variables: self-efficacy, task value, negative-achievement emotions, self-regulation learning strategies (metacognition), learning strategy (elaboration), and course satisfaction to student's performance (course final grade). Bandura's social-cognitive theory was used as a framework to describe the relationships among students' motivational beliefs (perceived task value, self-efficacy, and self-regulation) and emotions (frustration and boredom) with the dependent variables (elaboration and overall course satisfaction). A mixed-method design was used with a survey instrumentation and student interviews. A variety of science online courses in biology, genetics, astronomy, nutrition, and chemistry were surveyed in two community colleges. Community colleges students (N = 107) completed a questionnaire during enrollment in a variety of online science online courses. Upon course completion, 12 respondents were randomly selected for follow-up in-depth interviews. Multiple regression results from the study indicate perceived task value and self-regulatory learning strategies (metacognition) were as important predictors for students' use of elaboration, while self-efficacy and the number of prior online courses was not significant predictors for students' elaboration when all four predictors were included. Frustration was a significant negative predictor of overall course satisfaction, and boredom unexpectedly emerged as a positive predictor when frustration was also in the model. In addition, the

  2. Online to offline teaching model in optics education: resource sharing course and flipped class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Cen, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiangdong; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2016-09-01

    Since the platform "Coursera" is created by the professors of Stanford University Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller, more and more universities have joined in it. From the very beginning, online education is not only about education itself, but also connected with social equality. This is especially significant for the economic transformation in China. In this paper the research and practice on informatization of optical education are described. Online to offline (O2O) education activities, such as online learning and offline meeting, online homework and online to offline discussion, online tests and online to offline evaluation, are combined into our teaching model in the course of Applied Optics. These various O2O strategies were implemented respectively in the autumn-winter small class and the spring-summer middle class according to the constructivism and the idea of open education. We have developed optical education resources such as videos of lectures, light transmission or ray trace animations, online tests, etc. We also divide the learning procedure into 4 steps: First, instead of being given a course offline, students will learn the course online; Second, once a week or two weeks, students will have a discussion in their study groups; Third, students will submit their homework and study reports; Fourth, they will do online and offline tests. The online optical education resources have been shared in some universities in China, together with new challenges to teachers and students when facing the revolution in the e-learning future.

  3. Experiential learning to influence faculty resistance and motivation when developing science-with-lab online courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Sheri Lu

    The purpose of the study was to observe science faculty resistance and motivation before and after exposure to an experiential learning event about online science learning. In order to offer degree program's fully online, campuses needed to have online science with-lab courses offered online. The qualitative study observed the motivational and resistance change that occurred when ten science faculty members were exposed to an experiential learning event that was constructed of a variety of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) scientific research, observation, instruments, and online science laboratory best practices. The extent that an experiential learning event could reduce resistance and motivate faculty to teach online science with lab courses may enable colleges to improve online offerings. Two questions guided the study: 1. What are reasons for resistance by science faculty members to offering courses online? 2. To what extent does an experiential learning event motivate science faculty members to begin teaching online? Data collection consisted of four components: (a) pre-learning event resistance and motivation collection survey, (b) focus group session, (c) two experiential learning events, and (d) interviews after the experiential learning event. The results revealed that quality of online education, lack of time, lack of face-to-face interaction and lack of skills as factors of resistance. The motivation results revealed interest in teaching online, personal desire to use technology and distance education training provided are factors. Instructional designers and trainers can use this information to better understand how to work with resistant faculty.

  4. Feedback in online course for non-native English-speaking students

    CERN Document Server

    Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Feedback in Online Course for Non-Native English-Speaking Students is an investigation of the effectiveness of audio and text feedback provided in English in an online course for non-native English-speaking students. The study presents results showing how audio and text feedback can impact on non-native English-speaking students' higher-order learning as they participate in an asynchronous online course. It also discusses the results of how students perceive both types of the feedback provided. In addition, the study examines how the impact and perceptions differ when the instructor giving the

  5. Experiential learning online - experiences from designing and running a nordic course in agroecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sriskandarajah, Nadarajah; Christensen, Dorthe; Lieblein, Geir

    2005-01-01

    The paper reports experiences from designing and running the Nordic online course "Ecology of Farming and Food Systems". The aim was two-fold: 1) to design an online course which uses an explicit experiential learning approach and 2) to design a structure for online faculty collaboration across...... institutional and national boundaries. The experience of using Kolb's learning cycle to structure course processes and teacher collaboration onlinemay be useful in other contexts, where student-centred learning is the focus and cooperation among instructors across institutions and national borders...

  6. Common Challenges for Instructors in Large Online Courses: Strategies to Mitigate Student and Instructor Frustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A. Trammell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Teaching in the online classroom is becoming commonplace for instructors as universities seek to grow enrollments and tap into unexplored markets. Many instructors, however, are often unprepared for the nuances of distance education and apprehensive about making the transition to online learning. This article aims to discuss common challenges for instructors of high-enrollment online courses (70+ students. Course design and instructional effectiveness are some of the most significant challenges facing instructors tasked with managing large online courses and those challenges align with the areas students commonly consider as necessary for successful online delivery. Using examples from large online classes and the existing research on best practices in online education, ways to minimize those challenges will be discussed. These suggestions include recommendations for assignment construction, including the use of group work, collaborative assignments, e-portfolios, as well as for planning course design, including consistent deadlines and course structure. These suggestions are aimed at mitigating student and instructor frustration with high enrollment online classes.

  7. Massive Open Online Courses in Dental Education: Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Massive Open Online Courses Offer Transformative Technology for Dental Education and Viewpoint 2: Massive Open Online Courses Are Not Ready for Primetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Rachel C; Premaraj, Sundaralingam; Smith, Becky M; Olson, Gregory W; Williamson, Anne E; Romanos, Georgios

    2016-02-01

    This point/counterpoint article discusses the strengths and weaknesses of incorporating Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) into dental education, focusing on whether this relatively new educational modality could impact traditional dental curricula. Viewpoint 1 asserts that MOOCs can be useful in dental education because they offer an opportunity for students to learn through content and assessment that is delivered online. While specific research on MOOCs is limited, some evidence shows that online courses may produce similar learning outcomes to those in face-to-face courses. Given that MOOCs are intended to be open source, there could be opportunities for dental schools with faculty shortages and financial constraints to incorporate these courses into their curricula. In addition to saving money, dental schools could use MOOCs as revenue sources in areas such as continuing education. Viewpoint 2 argues that the hype over MOOCs is subsiding due in part to weaker than expected evidence about their value. Because direct contact between students, instructors, and patients is essential to the dental curriculum, MOOCs have yet to demonstrate their usefulness in replacing more than a subset of didactic courses. Additionally, learning professionalism, a key component of health professions education, is best supported by mentorship that provides significant interpersonal interaction. In spite of the potential of early MOOC ideology, MOOCs in their current form require either further development or altered expectations to significantly impact dental education.

  8. Online review courses as preparation for first term remedial exams

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Domínguez-Reyes; Juan Meléndez; Aarón Hernández-Pérez

    2015-01-01

    At Universidad Carlos III de Madrid we have developed a review course (R-Course) with a SPOC structure intended for students who failed the first term regular exams. The purpose of the course is to help students prepare for the remedial exams at the same time they study the second term courses. The R-Course is implemented in an Open-EDX platform that holds digital documents, both theory and solved exercise videos, platform integrated exercises, and forums. The content of the course is divided...

  9. Factors that impact students’ motivation in an online course: Using the MUSIC model of academic motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehmuz Akalin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the factors that motivate students in large online courses. Specifically, the purposes were: (a to document how highly men and women rated motivational beliefs in a large online course; (b to determine why men and women rated their motivational beliefs the way in which they did; and (c to provide recommendations for how to intentionally design online courses to motivate students. Using a mixed methods design, we used a questionnaire to assess undergraduate students’ perceptions of the components of the MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation (i.e., eMpowerment, Usefulness, Success, Interest, and Caring in an online course and their suggestions for changing the course. Overall, men and women provided high ratings for their motivational beliefs in the course. The suggestions students provided for changing the course were similar for both sexes and revealed a preference for instructional strategies that were consistent with the tenets of the MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation, including: offering more and/or varied assessments, providing interactive activities, including videos and/or video lectures, and offering face-toface meetings. Other suggestions for improving the online course design are provided.

  10. MOOCs are dead! Open Education and the Quality of Online Courses Towards a Common QRF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Paper Presentation at the 25th EDEN Annual Conference 2016, Budapest, Hungary, by Stracke, C. M. (2016, 16 June): "MOOCs are dead! Open Education and the Quality of Online Courses Towards a Common QRF"

  11. A comparative analysis of traditional and online lab science transfer courses in the rural community college

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrea

    Through distance learning, the community college system has moved beyond geographical boundaries to serve all students and provide educational opportunities at a distance to individuals previously out of reach of the college community. With the inception of the Mississippi Virtual Community College (MSVCC) in January 2000, Mississippi's public community colleges have experienced unprecedented growth in online enrollments and online course offerings to include the laboratory sciences; however, transfer of online lab science courses are problematic for individuals who wish to gain admittance to Medical, Dental, and Pharmacy schools in Mississippi. Currently online lab science courses are not accepted for transfer for students seeking admission to Mississippi Medical, Dental, or Pharmacy schools. The need for this study, the statement of the problem, and the purpose of the study address transfer issues related to the transfer of online lab science courses in Mississippi and the impact of such on the student and community college. The study also addresses existing doubts regarding online course delivery as a viable method of lab science delivery. The purpose of the study was to investigate differences between online instructional delivery as compared to traditional face-to-face delivery with the following research questions to: (1) Investigate the perception of quality of online courses as compared to traditional face-to-face courses. (2) Investigate the difference in student performance in online transfer lab science courses as compared to student performance in traditional face-to-face lab science courses. The results of this 13 semester study show significant differences in both perception of quality and student performance between online instructional delivery as compared to traditional face-to-face delivery. The findings demonstrate a need for Mississippi Dental, Medical, and Pharmacy schools to reexamine the articulation agreement between IHL and Community and

  12. Technology Acceptance and Course Completion Rates in Online Education: A Non-experimental, Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Colelia

    As the need for quality online courses increase in demand, the acceptance of technology and completion rates become the focus of higher education. The purpose of this non-experimental, mixed method study was to examine the relationship between the university students' perceptions and acceptance of technology and learner completion rates with respect to the development of online courses. This study involved 61 participants from two universities regarding their perceived usefulness (PU) of technology, intent to use technology, and intent to complete a course. Two research questions were examined regarding student perceptions regarding technology employed in an online course and the relationship, if any, between technology acceptance and completion of an online university course. The technology acceptance model (TAM) was used to collect data on the usefulness of course activities and student intent to complete the course. An open-ended questionnaire was administered to collect information concerning student perceptions of course activities. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS and Qualtrics, which indicated there was not a significant relationship between technology acceptance and course completion (p = .154). Qualitative data were examined by pattern matching to create a concept map of the theoretical patterns between constructs. Pattern matching revealed many students favored the use of the Internet over Canvas. Furthermore, data showed students enrolled in online courses because of the flexibility and found the multimedia used in the courses as helpful in course completion. Insight was investigated to offer reasons and decisions concerning choice that were made by the students. Future recommendations are to expand mixed methods studies of technology acceptance in various disciplines to gain a better understanding of student perceptions of technology uses, intent to use, and course completion.

  13. Accommodating student learning styles and preferences in an online occupational therapy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Nancy Wolcott; Jacobs, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy's online education must be research-based and inclusive. One way to provide a more inclusive online learning experience is to attend to individual learning styles and preferences. This study uses the best available evidence on learning styles and online education to develop, implement, and study occupational therapy students' experiences with an online learning module and related assignment. Eight students consented to take an online survey after completing a learning module and related assignment in an online post-professional graduate course in occupational therapy. The survey explored their learning experience and its applicability to clinical work. Data gathered from multiple-choice, Likert-scale, and open-ended questions were descriptively analyzed. Results from this study suggest that students find the study of learning styles and preferences enjoyable and applicable to their clinical work, but are often motivated by factors such as time and technology when selecting the format of a course assignment.

  14. Interaction matters: Strategies to promote engaged learning in an online introductory nutrition course

    OpenAIRE

    Banna, Jinan; Grace Lin, Meng-Fen; Stewart, Maria; Fialkowski, Marie K.

    2015-01-01

    Fostering interaction in the online classroom is an important consideration in ensuring that students actively create their own knowledge and reach a high level of achievement in science courses. This study focuses on fostering interaction in an online introductory nutrition course offered in a public institution of higher education in Hawai‘i, USA. Interactive features included synchronous discussions and polls in scheduled sessions, and social media tools for sharing of information and reso...

  15. Online review courses as preparation for first term remedial exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Domínguez-Reyes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At Universidad Carlos III de Madrid we have developed a review course (R-Course with a SPOC structure intended for students who failed the first term regular exams. The purpose of the course is to help students prepare for the remedial exams at the same time they study the second term courses. The R-Course is implemented in an Open-EDX platform that holds digital documents, both theory and solved exercise videos, platform integrated exercises, and forums. The content of the course is divided in videos of less than 10 minutes in length, allowing students to include the R-Course in any schedule and making it compatible with the second term courses. Interactive platform integrated exercises have been devised under different types of methodologies to increase the motivation of the students, and the platform forums give students and tutors a space to discuss and interact for a well-rounded academic experience.

  16. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs, embedded systems, blended courses, sentiment analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Bogdan Chirila

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, regional IT industry lacks human resources because of the pressure created on the labor market by the high-value economic projects. Tutors tend to be more and more loaded with teaching, research, and administrative tasks. Students tend to use more and more electronically devices like laptops, tablets, and mobile phones in their learning sessions. In this context, universities should rely more on technologies like: LMSs (Learning Management Systems, MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses, and why not GLOs (Generative Learning Objects or evenAGLOs (Auto-generative Learning Objects. Auto-generative learning objects are reusable pedagogical patterns to be instantiated with generated content based on random numbers to fulfill the learning objectives. Many online e-learning resources are available containing interactive presentations, gamifications of several learning objectives. Such e-learning resources are hard to reuse and even harder to modify and adapt to; each discipline needs this because it needs access to the source code, programming knowledge to change, test and deploy etc. In this paper, we will focus on computer science disciplines needed in the regional IT industry, namely data structures and algorithms. We will show how a tutor can build several auto-generative learning objects in order to assess the knowledge of a class of students. We will start with the design of the generic models, then we will assess the generated content created with the help of a tool based on meta-programming, afterwards, we will deploy the content to a webserver to be consumed by the students. Finally, we will evaluate the assessed results and discuss the approach both from the student’s and the tutor’s perspective.

  17. Student's Perspectives on Taking Courses Online, Blended, or a Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifter, Catherine C.; Ifenthaler, Dirk; White, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Online education has a relatively short history in the grand history of education. With options for online delivery modes developed over the last two decades, understanding student motivations for choosing one option over another will be helpful to any institution of higher education planning new offerings. This reflective paper presents the…

  18. Performing a Course Material Enhancement Process with Asynchronous Interactive Online System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hei-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Online systems have come to be heavily used in education, particularly for online learning and collecting information not otherwise readily available. Most e-learning systems, including interactive learning systems, have been designed to "push" course materials to students but rarely to "collect" or "pull" ideas from them. The interactive…

  19. Teaching Physiology Online: Successful Use of Case Studies in a Graduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casotti, Giovanni; Beneski, John T.; Knabb, Maureen T.

    2013-01-01

    To address the need for greater flexibility in access to higher education, an online graduate course in physiology using case studies was developed and offered in summer 2012. Topics in both animal and human physiology were organized as modules that contained a case study with questions, a prerecorded online lecture, and three research journal…

  20. Quality Matters: A Faculty-Centred Program to Assure Quality in Online Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Kay

    2010-01-01

    One of the dilemmas faced by today's faculty is assuring quality in online courses. As one solution to that dilemma, Quality Matters (QM), a program of MarylandOnline, built a rubric of design standards informed by existing research literature and best practices. The rubric was implemented within a faculty-centred, peer review process in which…

  1. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  2. Performance-Based Assessment in an Online Course: Comparing Different Types of Information Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mery, Yvonne; Newby, Jill; Peng, Ke

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether the type of instruction (a single face-to-face librarian-led instruction, instructor-led instruction, or an online IL course--the Online Research Lab) has an impact on student information literacy gains in a Freshman English Composition program. A performance-based assessment was carried out by analyzing…

  3. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  4. The Impact of Self-Regulation Strategies on Student Success and Satisfaction in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Fethi; Yukselturk, Erman; Kurucay, Murat; Flores, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether students' self-regulation skills impact their success and satisfaction in an online learning environment. Data was collected from one hundred and fifty-five students taking an online introductory programming course offered as a part of certification curriculum in a public university in Turkey. The…

  5. Assessing Faculty Perceptions and Techniques to Combat Academic Dishonesty in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paullet, Karen; Chawdhry, Adnan A.; Douglas, David M.; Pinchot, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Online Education is growing as it provides an added convenience to students, especially ones who have life circumstances that prevent them from attending traditional classes. With this growing trend, faculty and universities are facing increased risks with validating student identities in online courses and combatting unethical student behavior.…

  6. Academic Dishonesty in Online Courses: The Influence of Students' Characteristics, Perception of Connectedness, and Deterrents

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    Chase, Artyce-Joy E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate students' behaviors related to academic dishonesty. Additionally, this study examined students' perceptions of their own connectedness within the online classroom, and perceptions of the effectiveness of deterrents to cheating. Participants in the study were enrolled in online courses within…

  7. Building Innovative Online Korean and Japanese Courses: A Pilot on Technology-Enhanced Curriculum Development

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    Sato, Eriko; Sohn, Heejeong; Chen, Julian ChengChiang; Adebowale, Kayode C. V.; Jourdain, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Our pilot project created blended/online courses to accommodate the growing needs of precollegiate and collegiate students interested in learning Korean and Japanese. In the initial phase, we conducted a survey of students' experiences with and perceptions about blended/online Asian language learning. We found a general lack of familiarity with,…

  8. Activity Systems and Conflict Resolution in an Online Professional Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Conflicts often arise in online professional communication class discussions as students discuss sensitive ethical issues relating to the workplace. When conflicts arise in an online class, the activity system of the class has to be kept in balance for the course to continue functioning effectively. Activity theory and distributed learning theory…

  9. How Does Early Feedback in an Online Programming Course Change Problem Solving?

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    Ebrahimi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    How does early feedback change the programming problem solving in an online environment and help students choose correct approaches? This study was conducted in a sample of students learning programming in an online course entitled Introduction to C++ and OOP (Object Oriented Programming) using the ANGEL learning management system platform. My…

  10. Supporting Access to Open Online Courses for Learners of Developing Countries

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    Nti, Kwame

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how access to, and use of, open online courses may be enhanced for learners of developing countries from a learner perspective. Using analysis of the open education concept, factors that affect access to open educational resources content, and universal standards for delivering online learning, the author demonstrates that the…

  11. High School Open On-Line Courses (HOOC): A Case Study from Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canessa, Enrique; Pisani, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The first implementation of complete high school, open on-line courses (HOOC) aiming to support the training and basic scientific knowledge of young students from the Liceo Ginnasio Dante Alighieri in Gorizia, Italy, is discussed. Using the open source and automated recording system openEyA, HOOC give a student the opportunity to watch on-line, at…

  12. Student Learning and Instructor Investment in Online and Face-to-Face Natural Resources Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuellner, Melissa R.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial growth in online education in the United States has prompted questions on the levels of student learning and satisfaction achieved and the amount of instructor time investment required in the online environment compared to the face-to-face (F2F) environment. To date, very few have studied these measurements in science courses, and none…

  13. Facebook as an Online Teaching Tool: Effects on Student Participation, Learning, and Overall Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Melinda; Hurt, Nicole E.; Larson, Lincoln R.; Prevost, Luanna

    2016-01-01

    Online discussions are widely viewed as a valuable tool for encouraging student engagement and promoting interaction with course material outside of the traditional classroom. Strategies for conducting online discussions vary and are not confined to traditional, university-sponsored learning management systems (LMS). Social media platforms such as…

  14. A Computational Method for Enabling Teaching-Learning Process in Huge Online Courses and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Higinio; Ferrández, Antonio; Gil, David; Peral, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses and e-learning represent the future of the teaching-learning processes through the development of Information and Communication Technologies. They are the response to the new education needs of society. However, this future also presents many challenges such as the processing of online forums when a huge number of…

  15. The Impact of Online Algorithm Visualization on ICT Students' Achievements in Introduction to Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltan, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Online Algorithm Visualization (OAV) is one of the recent developments in the instructional technology field that aims to help students handle difficulties faced when they begin to learn programming. This study aims to investigate the effect of online algorithm visualization on students' achievement in the introduction to programming course. To…

  16. An Exploratory Study of Student Motivations for Taking Online Courses and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonis, Sarath A.; Fenner, Grant H.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of students taking online classes exposed crucial student perceptions important to their selecting online/web-assisted courses. An exploratory factor analysis provided three factors of "convenience," "enjoyment & independence," and "no other option available" as motivations for students taking…

  17. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  18. The Effects of Technology on the Community of Inquiry and Satisfaction with Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Beth; Fernandes, Ron; Avgerinou, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the research on the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework of understanding features of successful online learning to include the effects of the software used to support and facilitate it. This study examines how the Learning Management System (LMS) affords people the ability to take actions in an online course. A model is…

  19. Design and Enactment of Online Components during Four Blended Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayer, Nicola; Crippen, Kent; Dawson, Kara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the ways in which four K-12 teachers, following professional development in blended learning, designed the online portion of their blended learning courses and how these online components were ultimately enacted with students. Specifically, the study investigates what kind of content, resources, or activities were developed…

  20. Emerging Roles: Key Insights from Librarians in a Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Michael; Jones, Kyle M. L.

    2015-01-01

    From the cutting edge of innovations in online education comes the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), a potentially disruptive and transformational mechanism for large-scale learning. What's the role of librarians in a MOOC? What can librarians learn from participating in a large-scale professional development opportunity delivered in an open…

  1. Activity Systems and Conflict Resolution in an Online Professional Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Conflicts often arise in online professional communication class discussions as students discuss sensitive ethical issues relating to the workplace. When conflicts arise in an online class, the activity system of the class has to be kept in balance for the course to continue functioning effectively. Activity theory and distributed learning theory…

  2. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  3. Emerging Roles: Key Insights from Librarians in a Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Michael; Jones, Kyle M. L.

    2015-01-01

    From the cutting edge of innovations in online education comes the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), a potentially disruptive and transformational mechanism for large-scale learning. What's the role of librarians in a MOOC? What can librarians learn from participating in a large-scale professional development opportunity delivered in an open…

  4. Adapting Peer Review to an Online Course: An Exploratory Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Linda V.; Steinbach, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    With demonstrated benefits to higher level learning, peer review in the classroom has been well researched and popular since at least the 1990s. However, little or no prior studies exist into the peer review process for online courses. Further, we found no prior research specifically addressing the operational aspects of online peer review. This…

  5. Benefits and Limitations of Online Instruction in Natural Science Undergraduate Liberal Arts Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Roberts, Godfrey; Liddicoat, Kendra; Porzecanski, Ana Luz; Mendez, Martin; McMullen, David

    2013-04-01

    Online courses in the Natural Sciences are taught three ways at New York University to undergraduate students majoring in the liberal arts and professional programs - synchronous courses in which students communicate online with the instructor and classmates in real time, asynchronous courses when faculty present course material for students to access and learn at their leisure, and hybrid or blended courses when part is taught asynchronously and part is taught face-to-face in a classroom with all students present. We have done online courses each way - Global Ecology (synchronous); Stars, Planets, and Life (synchronous and asynchronous); Darwin to DNA: An Overview of Evolution (asynchronous); Biodiversity Conservation (asynchronous); and Biology of Hunger and Population (blended). We will present the advantages and challenges we experienced teaching courses online in this fashion. Besides the advantages listed in the description for this session, another can be programmed learning that allows a set of sequential steps or a more complex branching of steps that allows students to repeat lessons multiple times to master the material. And from an academic standpoint, course content and assessment can be standardized, making it possible for each student to learn the same material. Challenges include resistance to online learning by a host of stakeholders who might be educators, students, parents, and the community. Equally challenging might be the readiness of instructors and students to teach and learn online. Student integrity issues such as plagiarism and cheating are a concern in a course taught online (Thormann and Zimmerman, 2012), so we will discuss our strategies to mitigate them.

  6. SOAR Online Course Increases Capacity for Assisting Individuals with Disabilities in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eLupfer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For adults with disabilities who are experiencing homelessness, chances of being approved for Social Security disability benefits are very low without assistance. Assisting with the SSI/SSDI application process can be challenging for case managers who lack capacity and expertise. Training caseworkers to document disability and submit complete, high-quality applications using the SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access and Recovery (SOAR model improves efficiency and outcomes. Nationally, 65% of applications using the SOAR model are approved, with decisions received in an average of 81 days in 2015. The SOAR Online Course was created to expand training opportunities for individuals to learn how to effectively assist with SSI/SSDI applications for individuals experiencing or at risk for homelessness. From October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015, 1049 individuals from 49 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico successfully completed the SOAR online course. The course is a unique public health training model, in that it incorporates a realistic and multimodal practice SSI/SSDI application with comprehensive feedback provided by experts. Local SOAR leaders around the county are trained to facilitate and guide groups through the course. This study evaluated data on online course usage, user experience, and the translation from learning to practice for online course trainees. We found that successful course completions were most concentrated in areas that had local SOAR Leaders, trainees through the online course had higher data entry rates about case outcomes in the SOAR Online Application Tracking (OAT system, and that trainees reported a high satisfaction rate with the course and comprehensive feedback. The evaluation found that key success factors for online training models include the integration of a practice case component (or other generative learning activity, support from local facilitators, and feedback and technical assistance for trainees.

  7. High School Teachers' Course Designs and Their Professional Knowledge of Online Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu VALTONEN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the process of expanding the virtual secondary education school network, aiming to provide daily basis, online teaching. The context of this research is the ESR funded Eastern Finland Educational Network Project, which is a network of 36 high schools providing courses via web-based learning environments. The project is a shared activity between teachers and researchers. The aim of the present study is to investigate teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge by finding out what kind of pedagogical solutions the teachers use while designing and carrying out online teaching. In this study thirteen online courses were analysed and based on the analysis, four different course design patterns were found. The most general approach in course designs seems to be teacher centred, focusing on well guided individual learning processes. There seems to be need for development of teacher technological pedagogical content knowledge, to support approaches of more collaborative course designs.

  8. Scaling-up undergraduate medical education: enabling virtual mobility by online elective courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolja-Taradi, Suncana; Dogas, Zoran; Dabić, Marina; Drenjancevic Perić, Ines

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate online elective courses at Croatian medical schools with respect to the virtual mobility of national teachers and students and virtual team collaboration. A student-centered virtual learning environment developed within the framework of the European Union Tempus Programme allowed national educational services to design and deliver online undergraduate elective courses. Three online elective courses were created for second-year medical students of four Croatian medical schools by using Moodle, an open-source learning management system. The courses supported problem-, project-, and decision-based learning and required students to work in small collaborative teams using problem-solving and decision-making activities. The purpose was to foster teamwork and produce better outcomes than those potentially achieved through individual work. We evaluated the results of these online courses on the basis of the course test results and students' evaluation questionnaires. Of 68 students enrolled in all e-courses, 97% (n=66) successfully passed the final exam. An anonymous online questionnaire was filled out by 83% (n=50) of the students. The majority expressed their satisfaction with the online electives, mostly because they had more contact with tutors and peers (n=47), better possibilities of self-assessment (n=38), more flexible learning (n=33), better access to learning materials (n=32), faster and easier information retrieval (n=31), and better quality of communication with tutors and peers (n=28). Although 38 of 50 students claimed that participating in e-courses was more demanding than participating in traditional electives, more than half (n=27) would enroll in an e-course again. Elective e-courses may be a successful model of how faculty and students at higher education institutions can collaborate and integrate e-learning into their current curricula.

  9. Evaluation of a university general education health and wellness course delivered by lecture or online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Ronald; George, James D; LeCheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W; Vincent, William J

    2012-01-01

    To assess a single-semester university general education (GE) health and wellness course influence on physical activity (PA) and dietary habits among university students and to compare the course delivered through lecture or online for these outcomes. A 15-week intervention with pre-post one-group design, allowing for comparative assessments in dietary and PA habits across time by delivery method (classroom lecture vs. online). A large Western university. Participants (n = 1638, female; n = 1333, male) were 82% university freshman or sophomores. Participants were required to take a GE health and wellness course either by classroom lecture or online. The lecture and online curriculum content were similar. Participation in the study was entirely voluntary and was not connected to course grade. PA and dietary outcomes were determined from questions used in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey and were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Other validated questions were used to assess fitness. The general linear model was utilized to determine group x period interactions when comparing the classroom lecture vs. online course. Students improved overall level of PA by 12%, daily minutes of moderate-intensity PA by 8%, and fitness level by 2%. Students improved fruit/vegetable consumption by 4%, bran/whole grain cereal consumption by 8%, and brown rice/whole wheat bread consumption by 11%. All improvements were statistically significant (p lecture course yielded stronger improvements in several PA and dietary outcomes than the online course. A single-semester university wellness course may positively influence multiple PA and dietary behaviors; however, classroom lecture may be superior to online delivery.

  10. Implementation of an Online Climate Science Course at San Antonio College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Strybos, J.

    2016-12-01

    San Antonio College (SAC) plans to incorporate an online climate science class into the curriculum with a focus on local weather conditions and data. SAC is part of a network of five community colleges based around San Antonio, Texas, has over 20,000 students enrolled, and its student population reflects the diversity in ethnicity, age and gender of the San Antonio community. The college understands the importance of educating San Antonio residents on climate science and its complexities. San Antonio residents are familiar with weather changes and extreme conditions. The region has experienced an extreme drought, including water rationing in the city. Then, this year's El Niño intensified expected annual rainfalls and flash floods. The proposed climate science course will uniquely prepare students to understand weather data and the evidence of climate change impacting San Antonio at a local level. This paper will discuss the importance and challenges of introducing the new climate science course into the curriculum, and the desired class format that will increase the course's success. Two of the most significant challenges are informing students about the value of this class and identifying the best teaching format. Additionally, measuring and monitoring enrollment will be essential to determine the course performance and success. At the same time, Alamo Colleges is modifying the process of teaching online classes and is officially working to establish an online college. Around 23% of students enrolled in SAC offered courses are currently enrolled in online courses only, representing an opportunity to incorporate the climate science class as an online course. Since the proposed course will be using electronic textbooks and online applications to access hyperlocal weather data, the class is uniquely suited for online students.

  11. Leaving the Nest: Evaluating the First National Flight of the Online Ethics Course CHRPP (Course of Human Participant Protection)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, Denise; Balkwill, Laura-Lee; Hoessler, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, Queen's University launched an online tutorial called CHRPP, the Course in Human Research Participant Protection, and published a paper about its purpose, design, and usability in Balkwill, Stevenson, Stockley, and Marlin (2009). CHRPP was originally created to raise awareness among research students about the federal policy regarding…

  12. The Technological Dimension of a Massive Open Online Course: The Case of the CCK08 Course Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a new term emerged in the already crowded e-learning landscape: MOOC, or massive open online course. Lifelong learners can now use various tools to build and manage their own learning networks, and MOOCs may provide opportunities to test such networks. This paper focuses on the technological aspects of one MOOC, the Connectivism and…

  13. Discussing Course Literature Online: Analysis of Macro Speech Acts in an Asynchronous Computer Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosunen, Riitta

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a macro speech act analysis of computer-mediated conferencing on a university course on language pedagogy. Students read scholarly articles on language learning and discussed them online, in order to make sense of them collaboratively in preparation for a reflective essay. The study explores how the course participants made use…

  14. Motivating Learners in Massive Open Online Courses: A Design-Based Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing interest among educators and researchers in studying Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and their impact on education. Issues and problems have been reported in the research and in practice, including problems related to MOOC learners' motivation and engagement during the course. However, very few studies have adopted a…

  15. Building Course Cohesion: The Use of Online Forums in Distance Chinese Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kan; McCormick, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a sample of online discussion data from the course forum for the large-scale beginners' Chinese course offered by the UK Open University. This forum is open to all registered students, their participation is completely voluntary and they (rather than tutors) initiate communications. The aim of this study is (i) to seek to…

  16. The Effects of Flow on Learning Outcomes in an Online Information Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Don; Ro, Young K.; Klein, Barbara D.; Guo, Yi Maggie

    2009-01-01

    As online courses and programs expand in business schools, it becomes increasingly important to understand the link between students' experiences in these courses and learning outcomes. The study reported here investigates the relationship between students' experiences of flow, a psychological state generally associated with improved task…

  17. Anxiety and Attitude of Graduate Students in On-Campus vs. Online Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVaney, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared levels of statistics anxiety and attitude toward statistics for graduate students in on-campus and online statistics courses. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics and three subscales of the Statistics Anxiety Rating Scale were administered at the beginning and end of graduate level educational statistic courses.…

  18. Online courses do not help us to interpret non-verbal cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Karen

    Daniel Allen's 'Learning in a virtual world' (Careers December 18) pondered the future of nursing education as massive open online courses (MOOCs) gain popularity and expand their content and offerings. Could MOOCs eventually replace face-to-face courses in a nursing degree programme?

  19. Follow-Up of Online Instruction: Effectiveness of Peer Coaching Seminar Course. PRISM Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Breann

    This paper presents an evaluation of the Peer Coaching Seminar Course offered through the Peer Coaching Rural Inservice Model (PRISM) project at the North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities. This online course was designed to help rural teachers learn both peer coaching and classroom management skills. Twenty first- or second-year…

  20. Using Narrative Case Studies in an Online World Religions Course to Stimulate Deep Learning about Islam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sherman Lee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to examine how a narrative case study in an online asynchronous world religions course affected learners' understandings, appreciation, and respect for the beliefs and values of others. The world religions course examined a variety of religions including Islam. Ten participants received information about the…

  1. Designing an Online Course Content Structure Using a Design Patterns Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Dawn; Norton, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    Despite the central role that well organized and structured course content plays in engaging online learners with content, the authors point to the absence of guidelines for organizing content in ways that meet course learning goals. Recognizing the need for a design solution and, perhaps, the need for a new design model, "design…

  2. Fostering Experiential Learning and Service through Client Projects in Graduate Business Courses Offered Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Linda M.

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate marketing and public relations capstone courses utilize client projects to allow students to apply their knowledge and encourage collaboration. Yet, at the graduate level, especially with courses offered in an online modality, experiential service learning in the form of client project assignments presents unique challenges. However,…

  3. Communication and Security Issues in Online Education: Student Self-Disclosure in Course Introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillion, Tonya; Tucker King, Carie S.

    2017-01-01

    In designing online and hybrid courses, instructors should consider structure, student motivation, and interaction (per Moore's 1993 Theory of Transactional Distance). To motivate students to interact and to build course community, instructors may assign student introductions. However, after examining students' introductions in a hybrid…

  4. The Integration of an Anatomy Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) into a Medical Anatomy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnerton, Bronwen J.; Morris, Neil P.; Hotchkiss, Stephanie; Pickering, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are designed as stand-alone courses which can be accessed by any learner around the globe with only an internet-enabled electronic device required. Although much research has focused on the enrolment and demographics of MOOCs, their impact on undergraduate campus-based students is still unclear. This article…

  5. Developing Fully Online Pre-Service Music and Arts Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierse, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Charles Darwin University (CDU) offers education courses for students who want to teach in Australian schools. The university is unique due to its geographic location, proximity to Asia and its high Indigenous population compared to the rest of the country. Many courses are offered fully online including music education for pre-service teachers.…

  6. The Added Value of Conducting Learning Design Meeting to the Online Course Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Do you find it challenging to have discussions with instructors about designing online courses and best practices in teaching? This article will highlight key components to conducting effective Learning Design meetings. It outlines techniques used by this institution that inspires faculty to design coherent courses that lead to meaningful learning…

  7. Using Online Video Lectures to Enrich Traditional Face-to-Face Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C. Makarem

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available University educators need to meet changing needs of the digital generation by integrating technology through online content delivery. Despite the many advantages of online education, a large number of university professors are reluctant to make the transition from traditional-face-to-face lectures to online delivery, mainly due to the time, cost, and technical competence requirements to make this transition, in addition to the lack of beliefs in the legitimacy of online education. This article demonstrates the use of online video lectures to adapt traditional university courses to a blended format. The study is implemented for a School of Business Marketing course. We illustrate a cost-effective and timeefficient way for faculty members to record and share online video lectures with limited training and technical support. Using a student sample from two sections of the same marketing course, the study findings support the use of online video lectures as an effective way to free class time for learner-centred activities, without sacrificing student performance outcomes or course satisfaction.

  8. Promoting Numeracy in an Online College Algebra Course through Projects and Discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Tunstall

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research stems from efforts to infuse quantitative literacy (QL in an online version of college algebra. College algebra fulfills a QL requirement at many universities, and it is a terminal course for most who take it. In light of the course’s traditional content and teaching methods, students often leave with little gained in QL. An online platform provides a unique means of engaging students in quantitative discussions and research, yet little research exists on online courses in the context of QL. The course studied included weekly news discussions as well as “messy” projects requiring data analysis. Students in online and face-to-face sections of the course took the Quantitative Literacy and Reasoning Assessment ( QLRA; developed by members of the National Numeracy Network during the first and final weeks of the fall 2014 semester. There were significant statistical gains in the online students’ QLRA performance and mathematical affect but none for the face-to-face students. Notwithstanding limitations of the study, the results support the notion that project-based learning in an online environment is a promising strategy for promoting QL in terminal math courses.

  9. Predictors of Improvement in Critical Thinking Skills among Nursing Students in an Online Graduate Nursing Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine predictors of improvement in critical thinking skills among online graduate nursing students in a graduate nursing research course. Thirty-five students who had taken an online Nursing research course within the prior 12 months and who were currently enrolled in the online graduate Nursing program at…

  10. Relationship Between Age, Experience, and Student Preference for Types of Learning Activities in Online Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Simonds

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two researchers explored student learning preferences in online courses. They used the scholarship of teaching and learning process as a research model, and embedded a web-based survey and online focus groups in the online courses they were teaching. After collecting data, the researchers conducted multiple logistic regression analyses to test their hypothesis that a relationship existed between some student factors and student preferences for types of online learning activities. The results of the data analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship between student age and student preference for certain types of online learning activities. Older students in the study indicated a much stronger preference for videos of the professor lecturing, while younger students tended to prefer more interactive learning strategies. Focus group comments from the older students provide insights into some of the reasons why they found watching video lectures to be helpful for their learning, and comments from younger students illustrate how they learn best in online courses. The researchers offer suggestions for online instructors based on the findings of this study, and they explain why online instructors may find the scholarship of teaching and learning research process especially helpful for both teaching and research efforts.

  11. Peer-Review Writing Workshops in College Courses: Students’ Perspectives about Online and Classroom Based Workshops

    OpenAIRE

    Erin B. Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Peer-review workshops are commonly used in writing courses as a way for students to give their peers feedback as well as help their own writing. Most of the research on peer-review workshops focuses on workshops held in traditional in-person courses, with less research on peer-review workshops held online. Students in a freshman writing course experienced both a classroom based writing workshop and an online workshop and then took a survey about their experiences. The majority of the students...

  12. On-line Peer Review in Teaching Design-oriented Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Ning

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Peer review has been one of the very important designfacilitating processes practiced in education field, particularly in design-oriented courses such as MIT's 2.007 Robot Design. Typically students exchange ideas sketched on a piece of paper and critique on each other's design within a small team. We designed PREP web application backed up by a range of web services that handle the peer-review process on-line, and we argue that this is a significant step towards supporting designoriented course on-line. We believe that the lessons learned could be applied to other interested institutes that offer designoriented courses.

  13. Community building and cross-border collaboration through online courses in wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Monty, A.; Badger, Jake

    2013-01-01

    A new online course in wind energy has been developed by the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) as part of the EU-funded project Virtual Campus Hub (FP7 RI-283746, www.virtualcampushub.eu). The course builds upon a successful physical course, which has been offered to the wind energy industry ...... of the course. The course is then placed in the larger context of project Virtual Campus Hub where participants from four technical universities in Europe collaborate in a virtual framework utilizing state-of-the-art European E-infrastructure....

  14. The Perception on Fundamentals of Online Courses: A Case on Prospective Instructional Designers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülfü Genç

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on prospective instructional designers’ perception toward creating online courses including which elements are essential for developing such platforms. The study is significant for revealing what the prospective instructional designers focus on while they design certain learning opportunities. The participants of the study were the “Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT” students from a university in Turkey (n=133 ranging from freshman to senior grades. Since the study aimed to obtain data to determine specific characteristics of a group, a non-experimental survey research design was employed. The participants were asked to assess the importance of fifteen online course elements (such as texts and videos. Afterwards, the participants were provided with seventeen sentences to reveal their thorough perceptions toward designing online courses. The study identified that the participants value feedback mechanism (M=4.69 at the most. The participants believed that the type of web browsers (M=4.50, the course login system (M=4.48, emailing tools (M=4.42, texts (M=4.32 and pictures (M=4.22 are fundamental elements of any online course. The study revealed that prospective instructional designers for online platforms were furnished themselves with the essence of offering online instructional activities. In this study as an example of gender related study, the significant differences on study items were found between males and females participants in terms of their perceptions on online courses. The results showed that voice mechanism was more important for female participants than male and female participants were logically-oriented and visual learners’ during the entire online session.

  15. TESTING OF ONLINE ESP COURSE FOR STUDENTS OF ECONOMIC SCHOOLS. FIRST FINDINGS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V. Vasilchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a detailed analysis of the Russian course-books for students of Economic Schools. The authoress exposes the discrepancies along with proposing the solutions. In the second part, the article possesses a brief description as well as highlights the advantages of the new online ESP course on Economics, Banking and Insurance for colleges. In conclusion, the authoress contemplates over the first findings the course appraisal suggests. 

  16. A case study of students' experiences in an on-line college physics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Kadriye

    Online courses are a new paradigm in education. Many universities have adopted these courses to provide instruction to a diverse population. There were numerous issues that were addressed when delivering online courses. However, there were not many case studies conducted to take into account the students' reactions and perceptions of online learning. A qualitative case study was designed to bring out the details from the viewpoint of the students by using multiple sources of data. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected in the fall of 1999. Data sources included surveys, email messages between the students and the instructor, interviews and field notes from observations and informal meetings. Qualitative data were analyzed using grounded theory principles. Content analysis was applied to find out the type of email interaction between the students and the instructor. One Sample t-test was applied to find out the difference between successful students and less successful students. Fifteen students who enrolled in an introductory College Physics course at the large midwestern university participated in this study. This study focused on the students' experiences with an online course as taught via the Internet. To attain deeper understanding of student learning experiences with the course, the study looked at the elements of how students respond to the instructional system delivering the materials online, the learning environments created online by the instructor, the learning materials provided online or offline, the nature of interactions, sources of motivation, advantages and issues associated with online learning and technology-mediated learning. The findings indicated that the online learning puts a high premium on the students becoming independent learners. Therefore, the students needed to have a specific study guideline that provides direction on how to approach the subject and physics problems including some highlights pertaining to the subject

  17. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently......, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment......-2015) of Diabetes - a Global Challenge. Using an online based questionnaire (nine sections) software (Survey Monkey), email invitations were send out using a Coursera based database to the 29.469 course participants. Responses were analyzed and stratified, according to the United Nations stratification method...

  18. Effectiveness of an Online Social Constructivist Mathematical Problem Solving Course for Malaysian Pre-Service Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Leong Lai

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effectiveness of an online mathematical problem solving course designed using a social constructivist approach for pre-service teachers. Thirty-seven pre-service teachers at the Batu Lintang Teacher Institute, Sarawak, Malaysia were randomly selected to participate in the study. The participants were required to complete the course online without the typical face-to-face classes and they were also required to solve authentic mathematical problems in small groups of 4-5 participants based on the Polya’s Problem Solving Model via asynchronous online discussions. Quantitative and qualitative methods such as questionnaires and interviews were used to evaluate the effects of the online learning course. Findings showed that a majority of the participants were satisfied with their learning experiences in the course. There were no significant changes in the participants’ attitudes toward mathematics, while the participants’ skills in problem solving for “understand the problem” and “devise a plan” steps based on the Polya Model were significantly enhanced, though no improvement was apparent for “carry out the plan” and “review”. The results also showed that there were significant improvements in the participants’ critical thinking skills. Furthermore, participants with higher initial computer skills were also found to show higher performance in mathematical problem solving as compared to those with lower computer skills. However, there were no significant differences in the participants’ achievements in the course based on gender. Generally, the online social constructivist mathematical problem solving course is beneficial to the participants and ought to be given the attention it deserves as an alternative to traditional classes. Nonetheless, careful considerations need to be made in the designing and implementing of online courses to minimize problems that participants might encounter while

  19. A Comparison of Learning Outcomes in Skills-Based Courses: Online versus Face-to-Face Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Ronda Roberts; Love, Mary Sue

    2016-01-01

    In comparing the learning outcomes of online versus face-to-face courses, skills-based forms of instruction have received little attention. This study asks the question "Can skills-based courses taught online achieve the same outcomes as face-to-face courses in which the instructor and students interacting in real time may have higher levels…

  20. Using Free Online Materials as the Basis of an Upper-Level IEP Listening and Speaking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Freely available online videos are the basis of an Intensive English Program (IEP) listening and speaking course described in this article. Strands and activities of this course could easily be adapted for use in other institutions. For each strand of the course, rationales are stated, activities are described, and suggested online resources are…

  1. Design Lessons about Participatory Self-Directed Online Learning in a Graduate-Level Instructional Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa C.; Do, Jaewoo; Skutnik, Anne L.; Thompson, Duren J.; Stephens, Adam F.; Tays, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a case of participatory self-directed online learning within the context of a graduate-level instructional technology course. The course was about online learning environments and relied on both asynchronous and synchronous technologies. In this case, the instructor and students engaged in collaborative course design…

  2. Quality in Online Courses: Technical Production Regarding Clinical Biochemistry Online Course Performed by Students in Advanced Learning in Scientific Education Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Maia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is important to consider quality and efficacy concerning online courses. This study was accomplished with Master’s students in order to promote technical production regardingClinical Biochemistry online course. In web, www.bioq.educacao.biz, it was accessible strategic and organizational management training in distance learning course. Enrolled students(7, monitors (3 and the manager (1 have made use of thevirtual environment asa channel of communication as well as to construct the extension course (80 hours. Some strategies were discussed and planned for the purpose of a significant apprenticeship. In all, there were 173 standard contents available, which were 4 audiovisual presentations, 13 debating forums, 1 chat, 10 classes,77 scientific articles, 30 tests, 3 glossaries, 1 mini-library, 18 links, 3 texts and 13 folders. Although the managerwas not responsible for the construction ofthe contents, system reports have shown that the manager’s attendance and permanence online were three times superior to other users. It once more revealed that new Information and Communication Technologies(ICTs requires from the manager to plan an efficient pedagogical orientation.

  3. An Analysis of Learners in Introductory Astronomy Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Formanek, Martin; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    We describe learners enrolled in three iterations of introductory astronomy massive open online courses (MOOCs). These courses are offered through commercial providers and facilitated by an instructional team at the University of Arizona. We describe an ongoing study of those who enroll, engage in, and complete these courses. The course has undergone several revisions, including integrating pedagogical techniques, found to be effective for in-person courses, to increase engagement including peer review, online discussions, and the use of cohorts. In its current version, learners enroll on a continual basis and complete 11 weeks of course content; they watch videos, complete content quizzes, submit writing assignments, complete peer review of other students’ work, and complete online citizen science projects. Tens of thousands of students has signed up for these courses but completion rates are much lower, around 10%. We have collected survey data from over 8,500 of these learners to assess their basic science knowledge, attitudes towards science and technology, motivations for taking the courses, and information about other ways they engage in science related activities. We present information about these learners, including their demographics, motivations, how they use the courses, and what factors lead to increased engagement and completion. Additionally, we present how survey data from these learners compare to 26 years of data we have collected from parallel group of undergraduate non-science major students enrolled in astronomy courses at the University of Arizona. Overall, we find that learners who enroll in the MOOCs have more interest in science and higher basic science knowledge that undergraduates who pay tuition for a similar course. Our work is helping us understand how to better serve learners in MOOCs and bridge more traditional courses with these types of courses.

  4. COURSERA ONLINE COURSE: A PLATFORM FOR ENGLISH TEACHERS’ MEANINGFUL AND VIBRANT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnis Silvia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on English teachers‘ attitudes towards a professional development program run by Coursera (coursera.org. These teachers were participants of Foundation of Teaching for Learning 1: Introduction online course. Using a survey case study, the findings reveal that most of the participants perceive the course as a well-organized and effective platform to engage in professional learning. Coursera is an online learning platform offering various courses for teacher educators which are meaningful (closely related to their daily teaching practice and vibrant (involves active collaboration among peer participants to review and assess their projects. Albeit this nature, another finding shows that the participants lament that their institutions do not provide professional development (PD support. In fact, PD programs are not constrained to face-to-face encounters, since it can be designed using online platforms such as Coursera, a massive open online course (MOOC. Accordingly, the contribution of the article is to show how online platforms make meaningful and vibrant teacher professional development (TPD possible. The implication of the study is that school administrators and policy makers should provide support for their teachers to take online PD programs. This professional learning should contribute to the best teaching practice and student learning attainment.

  5. Taking a Case Method Capstone Course Online: A Comparative Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandon Gill

    2015-06-01

    The results of the conversion proved to be consistent with some of our expectations and surprising in other ways. Consistent with expectations, the online tools that we employed allowed us to create an online design that was relatively faithful to the original version in terms of meeting learning objectives. Also consistent with our expectations, student perceptions of the course—while quite positive overall—were more mixed for the online course than for its face-to-face predecessor. The course offering produced two surprises, however. First, the online approach to the project component of the course actually seemed to result in higher quality project presentations than the face-to-face version. Second, when results were compared from the instrument we used to evaluate student learning gains, the classroom and online versions of the class proved to be nearly indistinguishable. Given the very different delivery mechanisms employed, we had anticipated far more differences in student perceptions of what they had learned over the course of the semester. Given the challenges of taking a highly interactive class online, we viewed this surprise to be a very pleasant one.

  6. Teachers in an online earth systems science course: Mediating tensions of resistance and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey-Skochdopole, Laura

    This study explored the perceptions and experiences of teacher participants in an online Earth Science Systems course that took place in the fall of 2004. The teacher participants in this study engaged in a course that was designed to foster increased conceptual understandings of the interrelationships existing in earth systems, while modeling and promoting constructivist pedagogies. Utilizing a case study approach, with theoretical underpinnings of constructivism, critical theory and sociocultural theory, the researcher explored elements of reproduction and resistance to traditional power structures within school settings as related to the teachers' beliefs as well as the mediations the teacher participants underwent while engaging within this constructivist-based online Earth Science Systems course. Tensions resulting from deeply entrenched beliefs about teaching and learning were deconstructed within the study and explorations of roles of power as they impact the social setting of the course are utilized to make meaning of the teacher participants' experiences. This study suggests that constructivist pedagogies can be applied with success in an online learning setting. This study further suggests that there is a need for both technological enhancements within online course designs as well as application of emancipatory teaching strategies to fully realize the potential of constructivist-based online learning environments for teachers.

  7. Impact of Online Lecture-capture on Student Outcomes in a Therapeutics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Philip J.; Forinash, Alicia B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the correlation between students accessing recorded lecture files (audio and slides) online and course grades and class attendance. Methods Second professional year (of 6-year program) students in a therapeutics course had access to recorded online lectures for 72 hours following live lectures. The number and duration of lecture accessions were compared to final course grades and class attendance. Course grades were compared to those of a historical control group. At the end of the semester, students completed a brief survey instrument regarding their use and perceptions of online lectures. Results No correlation was found between final course grades and the number of lecture accessions (r = 0.0014) or total number of minutes lectures were viewed (r = 0.033), nor between class attendance and minutes viewed (r = 0.2158). Students with access to recorded lectures outperformed the historical control group on the final examination (p students reported no influence of online files on class attendance. Conclusions Posting lectures online did not affect student outcomes, but students did score higher on the final examination. PMID:21088733

  8. Design and implementation of an online systemic human anatomy course with laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Stefanie M; Rogers, Kem A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Human Anatomy is a full credit, upper year undergraduate course with a (prosection) laboratory component at Western University Canada. To meet enrollment demands beyond the physical space of the laboratory facility, a fully online section was developed to run concurrently with the traditional face to face (F2F) course. Lectures given to F2F students are simultaneously broadcasted to online students using collaborative software (Blackboard Collaborate). The same collaborative software is used by a teaching assistant to deliver laboratory demonstrations in which three-dimensional (3D) virtual anatomical models are manipulated. Ten commercial software programs were reviewed to determine their suitability for demonstrating the virtual models, resulting in the selection of Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy. Supplementary online materials for the central nervous system were developed by creating 360° images of plastinated prosected brain specimens and a website through which they could be accessed. This is the first description of a fully online undergraduate anatomy course with a live, interactive laboratory component. Preliminary data comparing the online and F2F student grades suggest that previous student academic performance, and not course delivery format, predicts performance in anatomy. Future qualitative studies will reveal student perceptions about their learning experiences in both of the course delivery formats.

  9. Developing a Constructivist Learning Environment in Online Postsecondary Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackworth, Sylvester N.

    2010-01-01

    This Delphi study addressed the concerns of postsecondary educators regarding the quality of education received by postsecondary science students who receive their instruction online. This study was framed with the constructivist learning theory and Piaget's and Dewey's cognitive development theories. The overarching question addressed a gap in…

  10. Design Recommendations for Self-Paced Online Faculty Development Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    An increased need for self-paced, online professional development opportunities in higher education has emerged from a variety of factors including dispersed geographic locations of faculty, full teaching loads, and institutional evaluation requirements. This article is a report of the examination of the design and evaluation of a self-paced…

  11. Expert Reflections on Effective Online Instruction: Importance of Course Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael; Jonick, Christine; Langub, Lee Woodham

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to identify common factors that leaders in online instruction consider most critical to successful teaching and learning at a distance. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of the teaching philosophy narratives of the nominees for the "University System of Georgia Regents' Teaching Excellence Award for Online…

  12. Evaluation of an Online Bioterrorism Continuing Medical Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical…

  13. Faculty Incentives for Online Course Design, Delivery, and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jennifer H.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the types and frequency of incentives for online instruction at non-profit institutions of higher education with an established teaching and learning development unit. While up to 70% of institutions offer incentives, this support is not universal and varies by incentive type and purpose.

  14. Prompting Authentic Blogging Practice in an Online Graduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Wendy; Brett, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Blogging is characterized by an individual exploration of ideas of personal interest through frequent online posts, documenting ideas as they emerge over time. Community emerges as bloggers read and link across blogs, based on shared interests. Blogs have gained acceptance in higher education for a variety of instructional activities, among which,…

  15. OJPOT: Online Judge & Practice Oriented Teaching Idea in Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui Ping; Chen, Shu Yu; Yang, Xin; Feng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Practical abilities are important for students from majors including Computer Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering. Along with the popularity of ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ACM/ICPC) and other programming contests, online judge (OJ) websites achieve rapid development, thus providing a new kind of programming…

  16. Developing Online Courses: A Human-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branon, Rovy; Beatty, Brian; Wilson, Jack

    Companies and universities are increasingly moving to online delivery for much of their training and education needs, and designing and building quality distance education is a challenge facing many organizations. Option Six is an independent company that is building customized e-learning solutions. Over the last 2 years, the instructional…

  17. Connectivism in Postsecondary Online Courses: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Nanette; Lomicky, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores 465 postsecondary students' experiences in online classes through the lens of connectivism. Downes' 4 properties of connectivism (diversity, autonomy, interactivity, and openness) were used as the study design. An exploratory factor analysis was performed. This study found a 4-factor solution. Subjects indicated that autonomy…

  18. A Study of the Causes of Attrition Among Adult on a Fully Online Training Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael McMahon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An online course was piloted in an Institute of Technology in Ireland for the purpose of providing training in best practice in presenting to people with dyslexia. The course was delivered fully online with no required attendances and with no interaction between participants. None of the participants in the pilot of the course completed the course. This study applies a model developed by Chyung to focus on the possible causes of the attrition and examine means by which attrition can be ameliorated. The findings show that the sense of isolation attached to learning alone is a very significant factor which often has a negative effect on the persistence of the learner to complete the course of study. Strategies to reduce this isolation are suggested.

  19. Distributed Learning for Geographically Dispersed Students: Lessons Learned From an Online Graduate Business Course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Cleveland

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a program at a University that serves a large but sparsely populated state. It offers two MBA programs, a traditional full-time program and a part-time, off-campus program. Students in the off-campus program are typically early to mid-career professionals. To reach them the University’s School of Business Administration developed expertise in innovative, distributed learning. The objective of the distributed learning program was to integrate networked delivery to students across the region. Professional courses are conducted on interactive, compressed video delivered to nine sites scattered around the state. Graduate-level foundation courses, i.e., courses in the fundamentals of business administration, are delivered online to the same students. The Systems and Operations course described in this paper was the first of five foundation courses developed for delivery online.

  20. Students’ Opinions on Administering Optional Online Quizzes in a two-year College Mathematics Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun ÇİĞDEM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine students’ opinions about optional online quiz used under the content of blended instruction. Blended instruction has been created using a combination of face-to-face instruction with web-based learning management system. This is a descriptive study. This study was conducted on students of Mathematics-I course at a military vocational college. Courses have been conducted in the classroom setting and MS Power Point presentations, lecture notes, and quizzes were presented to the students via the intranet. Optional online quizzes based unit with multiple-choice question item pool was provided for the benefit of students. In the end of the semester Online Quiz Evaluation Form was applied to students to determine their opinions on online quizzes. 103 students have filled out the form. Data was analyzed using frequency, mean and t-test. In general it has been found that students are undecided about online quizzes. According to findings of this study, students who have a computer, internet connection in their home, and the web-based exam experience were more positive than students who have not own a computer, internet connection in their home, and the web-based exam experience about online quizzes. The online quiz applications and question bank creation especially for Mathematics were quite time consuming. The most important advantages of online quiz applications are the reduction in the time required for to read the students’ quiz and effective use of resources.

  1. Gender Differences in Online Participation: Examining a History and a Mathematics Open Foundation Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante, Annette; Djenidi, Valerie; Clark, Helene; West, Susan

    2017-01-01

    With enrolment and completion rates in the University of Newcastle's online Open Foundation enabling program being considerably higher for women than for men, this case study investigates the engagement of male and female students in two different subject areas. History and Mathematics students' online behaviour is examined to identify whether…

  2. Measuring Student Engagement in the Online Course: The Online Student Engagement Scale (OSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixson, Marcia D.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is critical to student learning, especially in the online environment, where students can often feel isolated and disconnected. Therefore, teachers and researchers need to be able to measure student engagement. This study provides validation of the Online Student Engagement scale (OSE) by correlating student self-reports of…

  3. What Drives Students to Complete Online Courses? What Drives Faculty to Teach Online? Validating a Measure of Motivation Orientation in University Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ruth; Stewart, Cindy; Bachman, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although online student enrollment has shown double digit growth for almost a decade and academic leaders recognize that online education is necessary for enrollment growth, little is known about what motivates students to enroll in or faculty to teach face-to-face (F2F) versus online courses. The psychometric properties of a motivation scale were…

  4. What Drives Students to Complete Online Courses? What Drives Faculty to Teach Online? Validating a Measure of Motivation Orientation in University Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ruth; Stewart, Cindy; Bachman, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although online student enrollment has shown double digit growth for almost a decade and academic leaders recognize that online education is necessary for enrollment growth, little is known about what motivates students to enroll in or faculty to teach face-to-face (F2F) versus online courses. The psychometric properties of a motivation scale were…

  5. The Intersection of hte Scholarship of Teaching and Learning with Online Course Design in Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Lee, PhD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study employed a web-based survey investigating graduate students' perceptions of effectiveness of various learning activities in an online teacher education course designed to teach instructional strategies. Learner-centered evaluation allows for insights into the teaching and learning process, and learner satisfaction is particularly critical in determining quality in distance education. The findings would inform a redesign of the course with the goal to enhance learning, using students as evaluators. The students’ ratings and comments of course activities are discussed, and implications related to course redesign are examined.

  6. Online Finance and Economics Courses: A Comparative Study of Course Satisfaction and Outcomes across Learning Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechowski, Linda; Washburn, Terri L.

    2014-01-01

    Student learning outcomes and course satisfaction scores are two key considerations when assessing the success of any degree program. This empirical study was based upon more than 3,000 end-of-semester course evaluations collected from 171 courses in the 2010-2011 academic year. The study, conducted at a Midwestern business college, considered the…

  7. An Online Training Course to Learn How to Teach Online | Former en ligne pour apprendre à former en ligne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylviane Bachy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study deals with the implementation of ongoing training, offered wholly through distance and online learning, and conducted within the framework of an inter-university partnership linking two European countries. The case story relates the experience of several instructional designers (called Academic Advisors in this part of French-speaking Europe who were in charge of designing, developing, and implementing an online course as well as conducting follow-up assessment on the skills acquired. The project occurred over a period of two years, from the initial course design during the first year to its implementation during the second year. During the design phase, a number of issues arose with regard to the didactic method used, institutional isomorphism, and the digital platforms operating in the two universities. Hindrances and facilitating factors encountered in the second year, during the trainees’ tutorship and guidance, are also analysed.

  8. Learning experience of Chinese nursing students in an online clinical English course: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson C Y; Wong, Nick; Wong, Thomas K S

    2015-02-01

    The low English proficiency of Chinese nurse/nursing students affects their performance when they work in English-speaking countries. However, limited resources are available to help them improve their workplace English, i.e. English used in a clinical setting. To this end, it is essential to look for an appropriate and effective means to assist them in improving their clinical English. The objective of this study is to evaluate the learning experience of Chinese nursing students after they have completed an online clinical English course. Focus group interview was used to explore their learning experience. 100 students in nursing programs at Tung Wah College were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: (1) currently enrolled in a nursing program; and (2) having clinical experience. Eligible participants self-registered for the online English course, and were required to complete the course within 3 months. After that, semi-structured interviews were conducted on students whom completed the whole and less than half of the course. One of the researchers joined each of the interviews as a facilitator and an observer. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Finally, 7 themes emerged from the interviews: technical issues, adequacy of support, time requirement, motivation, clarity of course instruction, course design, and relevancy of the course. Participants had varied opinions on the 2 themes: motivation and relevancy of the course. Overall, results of this study suggest that the online English course helped students improve their English. Factors which support their learning are interactive course design, no time constraint, and relevancy to their work/study. Factors which detracted from their learning are poor accessibility, poor technical and learning support and no peer support throughout the course.

  9. Online Courses Assessment through Measuring and Archetyping of Usage Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanidis, Ioannis; Theodosiou, Theodosios; Petasakis, Ioannis; Valsamidis, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    Database files and additional log files of Learning Management Systems (LMSs) contain an enormous volume of data which usually remain unexploited. A new methodology is proposed in order to analyse these data both on the level of both the courses and the learners. Specifically, "regression analysis" is proposed as a first step in the…

  10. MIT Orients Course Materials Online to K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Many science and mathematics educators across the country are taking advantage of a Web site created by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the famed research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which offers free video, audio, and print lectures and course material taken straight from the school's classes. Those resources…

  11. Spiral Learning: An Introductory Course on Reading LOTE Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    In teaching reading, authentic texts with abundant lexical items and complex grammatical structures are typically used (Roche, 1992). Unfortunately, this has been a challenge for students enrolled in reading courses developed for English as a Second Language (ESL) as well as Languages Other Than English (LOTE) students. Students often translate…

  12. Online Scenarios in FCS College Courses: Enhancing Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynda; Thompson, Stacy D.; Richards, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is a vital skill for higher education students. The Virtual Exchange was created by the authors to provide instructors with a unique approach to helping students enhance their critical thinking skills. Pilot data were collected from three universities where instructors used Virtual Exchange scenarios in their courses in different…

  13. Quality indicators for the analysis of communication in an online course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pezzotti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the development and validation of quality indicators for analyzing forums interactions in an online course in biology teaching. The aim is to evaluate the quality of communication so as to strengthen the tutor’s role and help students learn fundamental biology concepts while enhancing their collaboration competencies. The indicators are used to analyze cognitive, metacognitive and relational aspects, drawing on a content analysis methodology. The model appears to have a wide range of possible applications in other online courses.

  14. Implementing a writing course in an online RN-BSN program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carol J; D'Angelo, Barbara; Rennell, Nathalie; Muzyka, Diann; Pannabecker, Virginia; Maid, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly writing is an essential skill for nurses to communicate new research and evidence. Written communication directly relates to patient safety and quality of care. However, few online RN-BSN programs integrate writing instruction into their curricula. Nurses traditionally learn how to write from instructor feedback and often not until midway into their baccalaureate education. Innovative strategies are needed to help nurses apply critical thinking skills to writing. The authors discuss a collaborative project between nursing faculty and technical communication faculty to develop and implement a writing course that is 1 of the 1st courses the students take in the online RN-BSN program.

  15. Boosting Higher Education in Africa through Shared Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Escher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Massive open online courses (MOOCs have taken the world of higher education by storm. Ubiquitous use of tablets and smartphones, rapid increase of broadband penetration, and the coming-of-college-age of the ‘digital native’ generation have led many top universities to offer some of their courses to a wider audience online, free of charge. Millions of students are actively engaging. We present lessons learned after two years of experience with these new educational platforms and explore the opportunities and challenges of delivering MOOCs to students in Africa (and other developing regions through a North-South partnership involving universities and teaching staff.

  16. Using cognitive dissonance to enhance faculty members' attitudes toward teaching online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2006-10-01

    Adopting a reward strategy for inducing college faculty to teach online courses is expected to cause a positive shift of their attitudes. Based upon dissonance theory, a smaller reward will lead to greater attitude change, and this effect will be more pronounced in individualists. The results of an experimental study showed that individualist teachers exhibited greater attitude change under low reward than under high reward, but the reward effect was not prominent in collectivist teachers. Implications for enhancing college teachers' attitudes toward teaching online courses are discussed.

  17. Online and Certifiable Spectroscopy Courses Using Information and Communication Tools. a Model for Classrooms and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mangala Sunder

    2015-06-01

    Online education tools and flipped (reverse) class models for teaching and learning and pedagogic and andragogic approaches to self-learning have become quite mature in the last few years because of the revolution in video, interactive software and social learning tools. Open Educational resources of dependable quality and variety are also becoming available throughout the world making the current era truly a renaissance period for higher education using Internet. In my presentation, I shall highlight structured course content preparation online in several areas of spectroscopy and also the design and development of virtual lab tools and kits for studying optical spectroscopy. Both elementary and advanced courses on molecular spectroscopy are currently under development jointly with researchers in other institutions in India. I would like to explore participation from teachers throughout the world in the teaching-learning process using flipped class methods for topics such as experimental and theoretical microwave spectroscopy of semi-rigid and non-rigid molecules, molecular complexes and aggregates. In addition, courses in Raman, Infrared spectroscopy experimentation and advanced electronic spectroscopy courses are also envisaged for free, online access. The National Programme on Technology Enhanced Learning (NPTEL) and the National Mission on Education through Information and Communication Technology (NMEICT) are two large Government of India funded initiatives for producing certified and self-learning courses with financial support for moderated discussion forums. The learning tools and interactive presentations so developed can be used in classrooms throughout the world using flipped mode of teaching. They are very much sought after by learners and researchers who are in other areas of learning but want to contribute to research and development through inter-disciplinary learning. NPTEL is currently is experimenting with Massive Open Online Course (MOOC

  18. The successful use of problem-based learning in an online nurse practitioner course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Linda R; Rappaport, Bethany A

    2008-01-01

    The development of technology and online education has opened the door to creative use of new and existing teaching methodologies. The authors describe how they used problem-based learning in an online course as a method for teaching clinical decision making to nurse practitioner students. The close match between problem-based learning and the characteristics of adult learners and successful distance learners is outlined as support for use of this methodology. In addition, the authors describe the challenges, rewards, and lessons learned in this innovative approach to online education.

  19. Interaction, Critical Thinking, and Social Network Analysis (SNA in Online Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Thormann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to ascertain a possible relationship between the number of student moderators (1, 2, and 3, online interactions, and critical thinking of K-12 educators enrolled in an online course that was taught from a constructivist approach. The course topic was use of technology in special education. Social network analysis (SNA and measures of critical thinking (Newman, Webb, & Cochrane, 1995 were used to research and assess if there was a difference in interaction and critical thinking between 1, 2, or 3 student moderators who facilitated a forum discussion of an assignment in an online course. The same course was repeated over three years. Each year either 1, 2, or 3 students moderated. The analysis indicated more discussion per non-moderating student with the three student moderated group. Using SNA we found that there was only one noticeable difference among the three groups which was in the value of network centralization. Using critical thinking measures the three student moderator group scored higher in five of the eight critical thinking categories. Variations in instructor presence in the online courses may have influenced these findings.

  20. A psychobiological model for managing student engagement in online courses using gamification principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamification principles were applied to three online courses for undergraduate college students. A theoretical framework is presented for describing how student motivation and engagement are produced by psychological and biological underpinnings that operate at a micro-behavioral level to produce student engagement and involvement. The model makes visible the behavioral micro-units out of which emerges the flow of interactions in an online task team or community. Online instructional activities can be managed to allow students to satisfice many of these needs, and at the same time to provide optimizing venues for their continued satisficing. An instructional architecture illustrates the combination of gamification strategies that we currently use in our online classes. It involves task collaboration, group chat, and social networking affordances. A list of 22 game mechanics is defined and applied to online instructional activities.

  1. Preventing Chronic Pain: A Human Systems Approach—Results From a Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kathleen; Clavel, Alfred; Fricton, Regina; Hathaway, Kate; Kang, Wenjun; Jaeger, Bernadette; Maixner, William; Pesut, Daniel; Russell, Jon; Weisberg, Mark B.; Whitebird, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain conditions are the top reason patients seek care, the most common reason for disability and addiction, and the biggest driver of healthcare costs; their treatment costs more than cancer, heart disease, dementia, and diabetes care. The personal impact in terms of suffering, disability, depression, suicide, and other problems is incalculable. There has been much effort to prevent many medical and dental conditions, but little effort has been directed toward preventing chronic pain. To address this deficit, a massive open online course (MOOC) was developed for students and healthcare professionals. “Preventing Chronic Pain: A Human Systems Approach” was offered by the University of Minnesota through the online platform Coursera. The first offering of this free open course was in the spring of 2014 and had 23 650 participants; 53% were patients or consumers interested in pain. This article describes the course concepts in preventing chronic pain, the analytic data from course participants, and postcourse evaluation forms. PMID:26421231

  2. Preventing Chronic Pain: A Human Systems Approach-Results From a Massive Open Online Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricton, James; Anderson, Kathleen; Clavel, Alfred; Fricton, Regina; Hathaway, Kate; Kang, Wenjun; Jaeger, Bernadette; Maixner, William; Pesut, Daniel; Russell, Jon; Weisberg, Mark B; Whitebird, Robin

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain conditions are the top reason patients seek care, the most common reason for disability and addiction, and the biggest driver of healthcare costs; their treatment costs more than cancer, heart disease, dementia, and diabetes care. The personal impact in terms of suffering, disability, depression, suicide, and other problems is incalculable. There has been much effort to prevent many medical and dental conditions, but little effort has been directed toward preventing chronic pain. To address this deficit, a massive open online course (MOOC) was developed for students and healthcare professionals. "Preventing Chronic Pain: A Human Systems Approach" was offered by the University of Minnesota through the online platform Coursera. The first offering of this free open course was in the spring of 2014 and had 23 650 participants; 53% were patients or consumers interested in pain. This article describes the course concepts in preventing chronic pain, the analytic data from course participants, and postcourse evaluation forms.

  3. ESSEA On-Line Courses and the WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognier, E.

    2001-12-01

    The WestEd Eisenhower Regional Consortium (WERC) is in its second year of offering two Earth Systems Science On-line Graduate courses from IGES - one for High School teachers, and one for Middle School teachers. These high-quality courses support WERC's commitment to "supporting increased scientific and mathematical literacy among our nation's youth through services and other support aimed at enhancing the efforts of those who provide K-12 science and mathematics education." WERC has been able to use its EdGateway online community network to offer these courses to environmental education and science teachers nationwide. Through partnerships with the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE), the National Environmental Education Advancement Project (NEEAP), and other regional, state and local science and environmental education organizations, WERC has a broad reach in connecting with science educators nationwide. WERC manages several state and national listservs, which enable us to reach thousands of educators with information about the courses. EdGateway also provides a private online community in which we offer the courses. WERC partners with two Master Teachers from Utah, who facilitate the courses, and with the Center for Science and Mathematics Education at Weber State University, who provides low-cost graduate credit for the courses. Our students have included classroom teachers from upper elementary through high school, community college science teachers, and environmental science center staff who provide inservice for teachers. Educators from Hawaii to New Jersey have provided diverse personal experiences of Earth Systems Science events, and add richness to the online discussions. Two Earth Science Experts, Dr. Rick Ford from Weber State University, and Dr. Art Sussman from WestEd also contribute to the high caliber of learning the students experience in the courses. (Dr. Sussman's book, Dr. Art's Guide to Planet Earth, is used as one of

  4. EVALUATION OF FREE PLATFORMS FOR DELIVERY OF MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES (MOOCS)

    OpenAIRE

    Airton ZANCANARO; Nunes, Carolina Schmitt; DOMINGUES, Maria Jose Carvalho de Souza

    2017-01-01

    For the hosting, management and delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) it is necessary a technological infrastructure that supports it. Various educational institutions do not have or do not wish to invest in such a structure, possibly because MOOCs are not yet part of official programs of universities, but initiatives by a particular teacher or a research group. Focusing on this problem, this study seeks to identify platforms that make it possible to create, host and provide courses ...

  5. An online academic writing and publishing skills course: Help Syrians find their voice

    OpenAIRE

    Sabouni, Ammar; Chaar, Abdelkader; Bdaiwi, Yamama; Masrani, Abdulrahman; Abolaban, Heba; Alahdab, Fares; Firwana, Belal; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: A group of Arab-American physicians and researchers in the United States organized a blended online course in academic writing and publishing in medicine targeting medical students and physicians in war-torn Syria. This was an effort to address one of the reasons behind the poor quantity and quality of scientific research papers in Syria and the Arab region. In this paper, we report on the design, conduct, and outcome of this course and attempt to evaluate its effectiveness. Methods:...

  6. Peer Grading in Astronomy Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formanek, Martin; Wenger, Matthew; Impey, Christopher; Buxner, Sanlyn

    In this work we thoroughly investigate the peer grading process as it happened in the University of Arizona session based MOOC ``Astronomy: Exploring Time and Space'' offered during Spring 2015 through Coursera. Overall, 25400 learners from over 100 countries registered for this course. Of those, 14900 accessed at least one part of the course and 1332 users engaged in the peer grading. First of all we provide description of the peer graded assignments and we identify trends in behavior of people who participated in these exercises. E.g. time they spent on grading, number of assignments graded and patterns arising from comparing all three assignments. Furthermore, for the second assignment, we graded random sample of 300 essays by a group of trained undergraduate students and a group consisting of one of the course instructors together with graduate TAs and we compared results with grades from the peer grading. Specifically we look on Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for all three groups of graders to determine reliability of each group and correlations between final grades. Finally we assess factors influencing reliability of the peer graders participating in the MOOC based on the difference from our grades. This research was supported by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Grant No. 415580.

  7. An online academic writing and publishing skills course: Help Syrians find their voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouni, Ammar; Chaar, Abdelkader; Bdaiwi, Yamama; Masrani, Abdulrahman; Abolaban, Heba; Alahdab, Fares; Firwana, Belal; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    A group of Arab-American physicians and researchers in the United States organized a blended online course in academic writing and publishing in medicine targeting medical students and physicians in war-torn Syria. This was an effort to address one of the reasons behind the poor quantity and quality of scientific research papers in Syria and the Arab region. In this paper, we report on the design, conduct, and outcome of this course and attempt to evaluate its effectiveness. The educational intervention was a 2-month blended online course. We administered a questionnaire to assess satisfaction and self-reported improvement in knowledge, confidence, and skills of academic writing and publishing. The course succeeded in reaching more than 2588 physicians and medical students from the region; 159 of them completed most of the course. Eighty-three percent of the participants felt that they were confident enough to write an academic paper after the course and 95% felt the learning objectives were achieved with an average student satisfaction of 8.4 out of 10. Physicians in Syria and neighboring countries are in need of training to become an active part of the global scientific community and to document and communicate the crisis their countries are going through from a medical perspective. Low-cost online educational initiatives help respond, at least partially, to those needs.

  8. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) as a window into the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, J; Hughes, K; Steer, L; Das Gupta, M; Boyd, S; Bell, C; Rhind, S

    2017-02-18

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are freely available online courses open to anyone who registers and typically are associated with thousands or hundreds of thousands of participants. Using an established online platform, the authors created and delivered a five-week MOOC aimed primarily at prospective veterinary students, but open to anyone with an interest in finding out more about the veterinary profession in general. 11,911 people signed up for the course, and of these, 8137 interacted in some way with the course and 1716 received a certificate of completion. The majority of participants (84 per cent) were female, and there was a wide age range (under 18 to over 65). Most participants were from North America or the UK. 65 per cent of those completing the entry survey were hoping or intending to work in the vet profession in the future, while 33 per cent were not. Qualitative data indicated that the course was helpful in aiding those undecided as to whether they wanted to be a veterinarian or not to decide one way or another whether they want to pursue veterinary medicine as a career. Furthermore, the course was seen as being a useful introduction to the veterinary profession even for those who had no intention of working in the field. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Interaction matters: Strategies to promote engaged learning in an online introductory nutrition course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banna, Jinan; Grace Lin, Meng-Fen; Stewart, Maria; Fialkowski, Marie K

    2015-06-01

    Fostering interaction in the online classroom is an important consideration in ensuring that students actively create their own knowledge and reach a high level of achievement in science courses. This study focuses on fostering interaction in an online introductory nutrition course offered in a public institution of higher education in Hawai'i, USA. Interactive features included synchronous discussions and polls in scheduled sessions, and social media tools for sharing of information and resources. Qualitative student feedback was solicited regarding the new course features. Findings indicated that students who attended monthly synchronous sessions valued live interaction with peers and the instructor. Issues identified included technical difficulties during synchronous sessions, lack of participation on the part of fellow students in discussion and inability to attend synchronous sessions due to scheduling conflicts. In addition, few students made use of the opportunity to interact via social media. While students indicated that the interactive components of the course were valuable, several areas in which improvement may be made remain. Future studies may explore potential solutions to issues identified with new features to further promote interaction and foster learning in the course. Recommendations for instructors who are interested in offering online science courses in higher education are provided.

  10. The effects of an online basic life support course on undergraduate nursing students' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobase, Lucia; Peres, Heloisa H C; Gianotto-Oliveira, Renan; Smith, Nicole; Polastri, Thatiane F; Timerman, Sergio

    2017-08-25

    To describe learning outcomes of undergraduate nursing students following an online basic life support course (BLS). An online BLS course was developed and administered to 94 nursing students. Pre- and post-tests were used to assess theoretical learning. Checklist simulations and feedback devices were used to assess the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of the 62 students who completed the course. A paired t-test revealed a significant increase in learning [pre-test (6.4 ± 1.61), post-test (9.3 ± 0.82), p < 0.001]. The increase in the average grade after taking the online course was significant (p<0.001). No learning differences (p=0.475) had been observed between 1st and 2nd year (9.20 ± 1.60), and between 3rd and 4th year (9.67 ± 0.61) students. A CPR simulation was performed after completing the course: students checked for a response (90%), exposed the chest (98%), checked for breathing (97%), called emergency services (76%), requested for a defibrillator (92%), checked for a pulse (77%), positioned their hands properly (87%), performed 30 compressions/cycle (95%), performed compressions of at least 5 cm depth (89%), released the chest (90%), applied two breaths (97%), used the automated external defibrillator (97%), and positioned the pads (100%). The online course was an effective method for teaching and learning key BLS skills wherein students were able to accurately apply BLS procedures during the CPR simulation. This short-term online training, which likely improves learning and self-efficacy in BLS providers, can be used for the continuing education of health professionals.

  11. The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Designing and Teaching Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Joan; Zimmerman, Isa Kaftal

    2012-01-01

    In this valuable resource, experts share deep knowledge including practical "how-to" and preventive trouble-shooting tips. Instructors will learn about course design and development, instructional methods for online teaching, and student engagement and community building techniques. The book contains successful teaching strategies, guidance for…

  12. Mobile App Design for Teaching and Learning: Educators' Experiences in an Online Graduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chang; Ching, Yu-Hui

    2013-01-01

    This research explored how educators with limited programming experiences learned to design mobile apps through peer support and instructor guidance. Educators were positive about the sense of community in this online course. They also considered App Inventor a great web-based visual programming tool for developing useful and fully functioning…

  13. Evaluation of Free Platforms for Delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zancanaro, Airton; Nunes, Carolina Schmitt; Domingues, Maria Jose Carvalho de Souza

    2017-01-01

    For the hosting, management and delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) it is necessary a technological infrastructure that supports it. Various educational institutions do not have or do not wish to invest in such a structure, possibly because MOOCs are not yet part of official programs of universities, but initiatives by a particular…

  14. Ensuring Quality in Online Courses: Applying the AACSB International's Distance Learning Quality Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaytan, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the Distance Learning Quality Issues published by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB-International) to document the various characteristics that high-quality online courses must possess. A content analysis methodology was employed to examine the seven…

  15. The Disruptive Potential of the Massive Open Online Course: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is a rapidly evolving phenomenon which has stimulated discussion in universities around the world. A central theme of these discussions, and much of the published literature on the phenomenon, is the potential of the MOOC to disrupt the way universities do business. The aim of this narrative literature review…

  16. Academic Performance, Age, Gender, and Ethnicity in Online Courses Delivered by Two-Year Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Bruce; Rude-Parkins, Carolyn; Githens, Rod P.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects the demographic variables age, gender, and ethnicity and their interactions had on academic performance in online courses delivered by public two-year colleges in Kentucky. The study controlled for previous academic performance measured by cumulative grade point average (GPA). The study used a random sample (N =…

  17. A Survey of Knowledge Management Skills Acquisition in an Online Team-Based Distributed Computing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates students' perceptions of their acquisition of knowledge management skills, namely thinking and team-building skills, resulting from the integration of various resources and technologies into an entirely team-based, online upper level distributed computing (DC) information systems (IS) course. Results seem to indicate that…

  18. Competence based learning for an on-line course on flood modelling for management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popescu, Ioanna; Jonoski, Andreja; Keuls, Carel

    2009-01-01

    Popescu, I., Jonoski, A., & Keuls, C. (2009). Competence based learning for an on-line course on flood modelling for management. Proceedings of the 33rd International Association of Hydraulic Engineering & Research (IAHR Congress). August, 9-14, 2009, Vancouver, Canada: TENCompetence.

  19. Investigating the Perceptions of UKM Undergraduates towards an English for Science and Technology Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Siew Ming; Bidmeshki, Leila

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the perceptions of Malaysian undergraduates of the Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) towards an online English for science and technology course in terms of their improvement in reading skills and strategies, their autonomy and their motivation. These three areas were used as the focal…

  20. Learning at the Speed of Light: Deep Learning and Accelerated Online Graduate Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trekles, Anastasia M.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of university programs, particularly at the graduate level, are moving to an accelerated, time-compressed model for online degree offerings. However, the literature revealed that research in distance education effectiveness is still confounded by many variables, including course design and student approach to learning.…

  1. Learning Specialised Vocabulary through Facebook in a Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Patricia; Martín-Monje, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how the incorporation of a social network such as Facebook can enhance the acquisition of specialised vocabulary in the context of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). Such initiative took place in the second edition of the MOOC Professional English, the first ever English for Specific Purposes (ESP) MOOC to be launched in…

  2. How MOOC Instructors View the Pedagogy and Purposes of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Suzannah; Myrick, Jessica Gall

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have proliferated in recent years despite disagreement about the role of MOOCs in higher education and whether student outcomes are satisfactory. Taking a mixed-methods approach, the current study surveys professors who have taught MOOCs (n = 162) in order to better understand how MOOCs are perceived by…

  3. MOOCs: Massive Open Online Courses. An Update of EUA's First Paper (January 2013). EUA Occasional Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), the European Union Association (EUA) published an occasional paper in January 2013 on MOOCs for discussion at the EUA Council, and for information for EUA membership. The present paper aims to provide an update on these developments, particularly as they concern European higher…

  4. Comparing Learner Community Behavior in Multiple Presentations of a Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Silvia Elena; Savage, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) can create large scale communities of learners who collaborate, interact and discuss learning materials and activities. MOOCs are often delivered multiple times with similar content to different cohorts of learners. However, research into the differences of learner communication, behavior and expectation between…

  5. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): Insights and Challenges from a Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, Melody M.; Ramsay, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) offer an exciting range of opportunities to widen access and participation in education. The massive and open nature of MOOCs places the control of learning at the discretion of the learner. Therefore, it is essential to understand learner behaviour. This paper examines the psychological considerations inherent…

  6. Development of Online Cognitive and Algorithm Tests as Assessment Tools in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori; Vergara, John Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the online cognitive and algorithm tests, which were developed in order to determine if certain cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms correlate with the performance of students in their introductory computer science course. The tests were implemented among Management Information Systems majors from the Philippines and…

  7. The Role of Students' Attitudes and Motivation in Second Language Learning in Online Language Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushida, Eiko

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the role of students' motivation and attitudes in second language (L2) study within an online language course context (LOL). Students' attitudes and motivation were examined within a socioeducational framework (Gardner & MacIntyre, 1993) while learning contexts were examined based on Dorneyi's (1994) components of foreign…

  8. The Intersection of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning with Online Course Design in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn S.

    2009-01-01

    This study employed a web-based survey investigating graduate students' perceptions of effectiveness of various learning activities in an online teacher education course designed to teach instructional strategies. Learner-centered evaluation allows for insights into the teaching and learning process, and learner satisfaction is particularly…

  9. Applying Rhetorical Genre Studies to a Stand-Alone Online Professional Writing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Heather Brook; Jenkins, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This program profile explains and illustrates a pedagogical application of Rhetorical Genre Studies (RGS) to a one-semester, upper-division online Professional Writing course. We explain our use of a heuristic, which we liken to "night-vision goggles," that enables students to systematically analyze field data that they gather from a…

  10. Utilizing Twitter and #Hashtags toward Enhancing Student Learning in an Online Course Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, T. Scott; Harmeyer, Dave; Wu, Shuang Frances

    2014-01-01

    The authors offer an answer to the research question, To what extent and in what ways is Twitter helpful to student learning when group hashtags are created and used in collaborative educational environments? Sixty-two students in a spring 2012 graduate online Research Methodology course worked individually and in groups to create discussions on…

  11. The Use of Deep Learning Strategies in Online Business Courses to Impact Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLotell, Pam Jones; Millam, Loretta A.; Reinhardt, Michelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Interest, application and understanding--these are key elements in successful online classroom experiences and all part of what is commonly referred to as deep learning. Deep learning occurs when students are able to connect with course topics, find value in them and see how to apply them to real-world situations. Asynchronous discussion forums in…

  12. Online Statistics Labs in MSW Research Methods Courses: Reducing Reluctance toward Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, William; Choi, Eunhee; Friedline, Terri

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from an evaluation of an online statistics lab as part of a foundations research methods course for master's-level social work students. The article discusses factors that contribute to an environment in social work that fosters attitudes of reluctance toward learning and teaching statistics in research methods…

  13. Developing Asynchronous Online Courses: Key Instructional Strategies in a Social Metacognitive Constructivist Learning Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, Margaret; Gillow-Wiles, Henry

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, design-based research study resulted in a proposal for a comprehensive set of best instructional practices immersed in a learning trajectory, outlining the tools, processes and the content development for online asynchronous, text-based learning in graduate level professional development courses. The outcome provides a rich…

  14. Student Access of Supplemental Multimedia and Success in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions are developing online courses that contain rich multimedia, but research shows there is little difference in student achievement when these types of materials are included. However, many studies report the results of the presence, not the access, of multimedia learning objects. In addition, they do not categorize the multimedia as…

  15. Animal Agriculture in a Changing Climate Online Course: An Effective Tool for Creating Extension Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitefield, Elizabeth; Schmidt, David; Witt-Swanson, Lindsay; Smith, David; Pronto, Jennifer; Knox, Pam; Powers, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to create competency among Extension professionals on the topic of climate change adaptation and mitigation in animal agriculture. The Animal Agriculture in a Changing Climate online course provides an easily accessible, user-friendly, free, and interactive experience for learning science-based information on a national and…

  16. Asynchronous Knowledge Sharing and Conversation Interaction Impact on Grade in an Online Business Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2011-01-01

    Student knowledge sharing and conversation theory interactions were coded from asynchronous discussion forums to measure the effect of learning-oriented utterances on academic performance. The sample was 3 terms of an online business course (in an accredited MBA program) at a U.S.-based university. Correlation, stepwise regression, and multiple…

  17. An Online Course of Business Statistics: The Proportion of Successful Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Sanchez, Rolando

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the students' academic progress in an online course of business statistics through interactive software assignments and diverse educational homework, which helps these students to build their own e-learning through basic competences; i.e. interpreting results and solving problems. Cross-tables were built for the categorical…

  18. Perceptions of Lakota Native American Students Taking Online Business Course at Oglala Lakota College (OLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asfour, Ahmed; Bryant, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This research examined the perceptions of Lakota Native American students taking a Business online course at the Oglala Lakota College on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The study was conducted in the fall of 2010 and spring of 2011. The themes found in this study were flexibility, transportation, communication, and technical support. Furthermore, the…

  19. Activity-Based Costing Models for Alternative Modes of Delivering On-Line Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Chris

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been growth in online distance learning courses. This has been prompted by; new technology such as the Internet, mobile learning, video and audio conferencing: the explosion in student numbers in Higher Education, and the need for outreach to a world wide market. Web-based distance learning is seen as a solution to…

  20. Hold on to This!: Strategies for Teacher Feedback in Online Dance Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Drawn from current research on web-based learning, this practical article presents applied research and informed applications for online dance educators engaged in undergraduate and graduate dance education course work. With a focus on written assessment feedback, the author provides a review of recent literature, an overview of written feedback…

  1. Optimizing Instructional Video for Preservice Teachers in an Online Technology Integration Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Callaway, Rebecca; Bell, David

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of design instructional video based on the Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning by applying segmentation and signaling on the learning outcome of students in an online technology integration course. The study assessed the correlation between students' personal preferences (preferred learning styles and area…

  2. Describing Learning in An Advanced Online Case-Based Course in Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missett, Tracy C.; Reed, Christine B.; Scot, Tammy P.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Slade, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Researchers increasingly embrace online courses to compensate for lack of access to educational opportunities otherwise available in traditional school settings. Researchers also recommend alternatives to traditional AP coursework to better meet the diverse learning styles and needs of advanced learners. These recommendations have particular…

  3. Analysis of Learners' Navigational Behaviour and Their Learning Styles in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, S.; Liu, T.-C.; Kinshuk,

    2010-01-01

    Providing adaptive features and personalized support by considering students' learning styles in computer-assisted learning systems has high potential in making learning easier for students in terms of reducing their efforts or increasing their performance. In this study, the navigational behaviour of students in an online course within a learning…

  4. Investigating the Perceptions of UKM Undergraduates towards an English for Science and Technology Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Siew Ming; Bidmeshki, Leila

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the perceptions of Malaysian undergraduates of the Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) towards an online English for science and technology course in terms of their improvement in reading skills and strategies, their autonomy and their motivation. These three areas were used as the focal…

  5. Developing Asynchronous Online Courses: Key Instructional Strategies in a Social Metacognitive Constructivist Learning Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niess, Margaret; Gillow-Wiles, Henry

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, design-based research study resulted in a proposal for a comprehensive set of best instructional practices immersed in a learning trajectory, outlining the tools, processes and the content development for online asynchronous, text-based learning in graduate level professional development courses. The outcome provides a rich…

  6. A Systematic Review of Small-Group Communication in Post-Secondary Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Namsook

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review establishes a comprehensive understanding of research trends and the findings of current studies that focus on small-group communication in post-secondary online courses. The review includes 18 journal articles which are categorised and summarised on the basis of their common themes. This review finds that a majority of the…

  7. Connecting and Collaborating within and beyond a Massive Open Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytash, Kristine E.; Hicks, Troy; Ferdig, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we draw on the experiences of two young adults, Beth and Jamie (pseudonyms), who participated in a connectivist Massive Open Online Course (cMOOC) to explore how adolescents can become active members in a community of learners and the digital literacy practices that support this entry. We argue that Beth and Jamie engaged in…

  8. SPED 590 Peer Coaching Seminar: An Online Course about Peer Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askvig, Brent A.; Garnes, Lori

    This manual presents an online course about peer coaching derived from the Interactive Peer Coaching/Mentoring (IPCM) Project, a program designed to prepare teachers of students with severe behavioral disorders residing in a rural, remote area in North Dakota. The IPCM project was conducted from July 1997 through July 2000 and developed an…

  9. The Advance of the MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses): The Impending Globalisation of Business Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the rapid development of the massive open online courses (MOOCs) and the implications for business education, to critically examine the educational and business models of the MOOCs, to assess their present scale and scalability, and to explore the responses of the universities to this challenge.…

  10. An Assessment of Online Instructor E-Learning Readiness Before, During, and after Course Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Glenda H.

    2016-01-01

    Online instructors in higher education play a key role in the success or failure of electronic learning systems (ELSs). Their expertise in and use of technology tools in ELSs influence the quality of information presented, their system use and satisfaction during course delivery. This study adapted Holsapple and Lee-Post's ("Decis Sci J Innov…

  11. Employing Self-Assessment, Journaling, and Peer Sharing to Enhance Learning from an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Shadiev, Rustam; Chang, Chia-Ling; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the use of self-assessments, journaling, and peer sharing in an online computer programming course. We conducted an experiment using a pretest-intervention-posttest design in which 64 undergraduate first-year students participated. We aimed to investigate whether self-assessment, journaling, and peer sharing can facilitate…

  12. Findings from an Independent Evaluation of the AMNH's Online Seminars on Science Course: "The Solar System"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverness Research, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Inverness Research studied the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) Seminars on Science program for eight years, from its inception in 1998 to 2006. In 2009, Inverness Research conducted additional studies of the AMNH's new online course, The Solar System. This paper presents teacher survey ratings for The Solar System, along with profiles of…

  13. Use of an online writing tutorial to improve writing skills in nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Susan T; Goss, Gay

    2009-01-01

    Nursing students often struggle with writing style and the presentation of a logical flow of ideas. To help students enhance their scholastic writing skills, nursing faculty implemented an online program to improve syntax, grammar, and presentation of thoughts. The authors discuss a descriptive study and its results, which did demonstrate the effectiveness of the writing tutorial in Web-based nursing courses.

  14. Using Television Sitcoms to Facilitate Asynchronous Discussions in the Online Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Elizabeth; Asbury, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous discussions are a useful instructional resource in the online communication course. In discussion groups students have the opportunity to actively participate and interact with students and the instructor. Asynchronous communication allows for flexibility because "participants can interact with significant amounts of time between…

  15. Learning by Doing: Using an Online Simulation Game in an International Relations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Integrating interactive learning activities into undergraduate courses is one method for increasing student interest, engagement, and skills development. Online simulation games in particular offer students the unique applied opportunity to "learn by doing" in a virtual space to further their overall knowledge base and critical thinking…

  16. Discriminating Factors between Completers of and Dropouts from Online Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngju; Choi, Jaeho; Kim, Taehyun

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the differences between persistent and dropout students enrolled in an online course with five factors: support from family and work, academic locus of control, academic self-efficacy, time and environment management skills, and metacognitive self-regulation skills. Moreover, this study investigated the most significant factors…

  17. Online Statistics Labs in MSW Research Methods Courses: Reducing Reluctance toward Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, William; Choi, Eunhee; Friedline, Terri

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from an evaluation of an online statistics lab as part of a foundations research methods course for master's-level social work students. The article discusses factors that contribute to an environment in social work that fosters attitudes of reluctance toward learning and teaching statistics in research methods…

  18. Student Access of Supplemental Multimedia and Success in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions are developing online courses that contain rich multimedia, but research shows there is little difference in student achievement when these types of materials are included. However, many studies report the results of the presence, not the access, of multimedia learning objects. In addition, they do not categorize the multimedia as…

  19. An Investigation of Collaboration Processes in an Online Course: How Do Small Groups Develop over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahng, Namsook

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated communication patterns and behavior in problem-solving groups in a graduate online course. An inductive qualitative analysis method was employed to analyze 732 messages that were retrieved from small group forums. The current study identified a temporal pattern of group development was in comparison with existing…

  20. Findings from an Independent Evaluation of the AMNH's Online Seminars on Science Course: "The Solar System"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverness Research, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Inverness Research studied the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) Seminars on Science program for eight years, from its inception in 1998 to 2006. In 2009, Inverness Research conducted additional studies of the AMNH's new online course, The Solar System. This paper presents teacher survey ratings for The Solar System, along with profiles of…

  1. The Development of a Holistic Online Course Development Model (Year 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFeeters, Forrest; Moore, Antionette; Chief, Irene

    2008-01-01

    This article includes a reflection on the experiences, both positive and negative, in using a collaborative approach to the development of an online instructional design model. It outlines the processes and points out the challenges associated in the creation of courses to be taught on the Internet using this model. There are reflections on the…

  2. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  3. Problem-Based Learning in an Online Course: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaney, James D.; Ingebritsen, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is the use of a "real world" problem or situation as a context for learning. The present study explores the use of PBL in an online biotechnology course. In the PBL unit, student groups dealt with the ethical, legal, social, and human issues surrounding pre-symptomatic DNA testing for a genetic disease. Issues…

  4. Theories and Applications of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs): The Case for Hybrid Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Abram

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies of learning in massive open online courses (MOOCs) primarily focused on participation patterns and participant experiences. More recently, research has addressed learning theories and offered case studies of different pedagogical designs for MOOCs. Based on a meta-analysis and synthesis of the research literature, this study…

  5. Sentiments and Perspectives of Academics about Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have made a dramatic entry into higher education. Promising to provide an affordable, if not free, education, MOOCs are celebrated for promoting learning in lieu of the physical classroom. This exploratory study employs content analysis to make visible how MOOCs are viewed by academically oriented observers.…

  6. Research Trends in Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Theses and Dissertations: Surfing the Tsunami Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Aras; Keskin, Nilgun Ozdamar; de Waard, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have attracted a great deal of attention by higher education and private enterprises. MOOCs have evolved considerably since their emergence in 2008, all the while given rise to academic discussions on MOOC impact, design and reach. In an effort to understand MOOCs more comprehensively, this study analyzes theses…

  7. How MOOC Instructors View the Pedagogy and Purposes of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Suzannah; Myrick, Jessica Gall

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have proliferated in recent years despite disagreement about the role of MOOCs in higher education and whether student outcomes are satisfactory. Taking a mixed-methods approach, the current study surveys professors who have taught MOOCs (n = 162) in order to better understand how MOOCs are perceived by…

  8. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): Insights and Challenges from a Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, Melody M.; Ramsay, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) offer an exciting range of opportunities to widen access and participation in education. The massive and open nature of MOOCs places the control of learning at the discretion of the learner. Therefore, it is essential to understand learner behaviour. This paper examines the psychological considerations inherent…

  9. Applying Universal Design for Learning in Online Courses: Pedagogical and Practical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Cindy Ann; Dell, Thomas F.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of the universal design for learning (UDL) model as a guiding set of principles for online curriculum development in higher education is discussed. Fundamentally, UDL provides the student with multiple means of accessing the course based on three overarching principles: presentation; action and expression; and engagement and interaction.…

  10. A Pilot Study of Problem Formulation and Resolution in an Online Problem-based Learning Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Kenny

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses an exploratory study to investigate the existence, and nature, of student problem formulation and resolution processes in an undergraduate online Problem-Based Learning (PBL course in Agricultural Sciences. We report on the use of a content analysis instrument developed to measure problem formulation and resolution (PFR processes in online asynchronous discussions (Murphy, 2004a, 2004b to analyze students' text-based, online discussions. The results offer evidence that students do engage in problem formulation and resolution and that these processes appear to be consistent with the PBL process carried out in this course. However, the nature of the PBL pedagogy, at least in this instructional context, ties the PBL problems to be solved tightly to a marked assignment structure and, therefore, appears to restrict the PFR process in its early and late stages.

  11. A Comparison of the Usage of Tablet PC, Lecture Capture, and Online Homework in an Introductory Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Three emerging technologies were used in a large introductory chemistry class: a tablet PC, a lecture capture and replay software program, and an online homework program. At the end of the semester, student usage of the lecture replay and online homework systems was compared to course performance as measured by course grade and by a standardized…

  12. An Examination of How Community of Inquiry Relates to Student Performance in an Online Community College Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Robert Rowe

    2013-01-01

    Research has revealed that students in online classes may have higher rates of attrition than those in traditional face-to-face classes. Effective teaching and learning in an online environment requires different pedagogical skills than those used in traditional face-to-face classes. Online courses must focus on the quality of interaction. As an…

  13. Exploring Learner’s Patterns of Using the Online Course Tool in University Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Yamamoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Online course tools such as WebCT or Manaba+R are popularly used in university classes and enhance learners’ understanding of their course contents. In addition, teachers try to utilize these online course tools for their students such as giving their students online discussions, providing students with additional materials and so forth. However, based on the authors’ observation of students, students often do not see these additional materials and messages on Manaba+R. The authors encourage their students to use it and, in fact, they put a lot of additional materials of the course or useful messages for their students on Manaba+R. The aims of this study are here. Firstly, this study investigates what extent students actually use Manaba+R through the semester. Secondly, it tries to find suggestions of how teachers can promote their students to maximize making use of Manaba+R. To collect the data, coding actual access to Manaba+R by students and questionnaires were used. The total of 335 responses of questionnaires were collected and total of 380 were coded for actual access to Manaba+R. The questionnaire results show that many students showed positive attitudes towards using Manaba+R. The results of coding numbers of access reveal that using Manaba+R was part of their assessment of their course, students tended to use it.

  14. Facilitating Cooperative Learning in Online and Blended Courses: An Example from an Integrated Marketing Communications Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katryna

    2013-01-01

    Employers today expect that students will be able to work in teams. Cooperative learning theory addresses how skills such as decision making, problem solving and communication can be learned by individuals in group settings. This paper discusses how cooperative learning can be used in an online and blended environment to increase active learning…

  15. Enriching Student Learning of Astronomy in Online Courses via Hybrid Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, M.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid texts such as Horizons: Exploring the Universe, Hybrid (with CengageNOW) and Universe, Hybrid (with CengageNOW) are designed for higher education learning of astronomy in undergraduate online courses. In these hybrid texts, quiz and test bank questions have been revised to minimize easy look-up of answers by students via the Internet and discussion threads have been re-designed to allow for student selection of learning and for personalized learning, for example. By establishing connections between the student and the course content, student learning is enriched, students spend more time learning the material, student copying of answers is minimized, and student social engagement on the subject matter is increased. In this presentation, we discuss how Hybrid texts in Astronomy can increase student learning in online courses.

  16. Democratizing education? Examining access and usage patterns in massive open online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John D; Reich, Justin

    2015-12-04

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are often characterized as remedies to educational disparities related to social class. Using data from 68 MOOCs offered by Harvard and MIT between 2012 and 2014, we found that course participants from the United States tended to live in more-affluent and better-educated neighborhoods than the average U.S. resident. Among those who did register for courses, students with greater socioeconomic resources were more likely to earn a certificate. Furthermore, these differences in MOOC access and completion were larger for adolescents and young adults, the traditional ages where people find on-ramps into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) coursework and careers. Our findings raise concerns that MOOCs and similar approaches to online learning can exacerbate rather than reduce disparities in educational outcomes related to socioeconomic status.

  17. Twelve tips for developing and delivering a massive open online course in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Henningsohn, Lars; DeRuiter, Marco C; de Jong, Peter G M; Reinders, Marlies E J

    2017-07-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are a novel mode of online learning. They are typically based on higher education courses and can attract a high number of learners, often in the thousands. They are distinct from on-campus education and deliver the learning objectives through a series of short videos, recommended readings and discussion fora, alongside automated assessments. Within medical education the role of MOOCs remains unclear, with recent proposals including continuing professional development, interprofessional education or integration into campus-based blended learning curricula. In this twelve tips article, we aim to provide a framework for readers to use when developing, delivering and evaluating a MOOC within medical education based on the literature and our own experience. Practical advice is provided on how to design the appropriate curriculum, engage with learners on the platform, select suitable assessments, and comprehensively evaluate the impact of your course.

  18. Online learning: the brave new world of massive open online courses and the role of the health librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    In a wired, virtual and information rich society, MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) are leading us into a brave new world in which their key role is to support lifelong networked learning. This feature looks at the broad role of MOOCs and considers them within the context of health, and health librarianship. In particular, it provides examples of where health librarians have developed MOOCs and what opportunities there are in the future for health librarians to collaborate in the development and delivery of health MOOCs. H.S.

  19. The impact of an online interprofessional course in disaster management competency and attitude towards interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atack, Lynda; Parker, Kathryn; Rocchi, Marie; Maher, Janet; Dryden, Trish

    2009-11-01

    A recent national assessment of emergency planning in Canada suggests that health care professionals are not properly prepared for disasters. In response to this gap, an interprofessional course in disaster management was developed, implemented and evaluated in Toronto, Canada from 2007 to 2008. Undergraduate students from five educational institutions in nursing, medicine, paramedicine, police, media and health administration programs took an eight-week online course. The course was highly interactive and included video, a discussion forum, an online board game and opportunity to participate in a high fidelity disaster simulation with professional staff. Curriculum developers set interprofessional competency as a major course outcome and this concept guided every aspect of content and activity development. A study was conducted to examine change in students' perceptions of disaster management competency and interprofessional attitudes after the course was completed. Results indicate that the course helped students master basic disaster management content and raised their awareness of, and appreciation for, other members of the interdisciplinary team. The undergraduate curriculum must support the development of collaborative competencies and ensure learners are prepared to work in collaborative practice.

  20. Discover Dentistry: encouraging wider participation in dentistry using a massive open online course (MOOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, C W; Towers, A C; Jinks, P V; Symington, A

    2015-07-24

    This paper describes how a relatively new style of online learning, a massive open online course (MOOC), may be used to raise aspirations and widen participation in dental professions. A MOOC was designed and run with the aim of engaging prospective students of dental professions in learning and discussion. Over 4,200 learners signed up, and 450 students fully completed this first run of the course. The course attracted a significantly younger demographic than is typical for MOOCs, and nearly a third who responded to the pre-course survey reported they were doing the course specifically as preparation for a dental degree. The approach also provided a platform for public engagement on the subject of dentistry with participants, both dental professionals and members of the public, contributing to discussion around the learning materials from around the world, providing a unique, internationalised perspective of oral healthcare for learners. This study shows that there is genuine potential for MOOCs to involve people from disadvantaged backgrounds in higher education by offering free, accessible, enjoyable and engaging educational experiences. The data gives us cautious optimism that these courses can play a significant role within a platform of other WP interventions.

  1. Investigating Changes in Students’ Attitudes Towards Science During an Adaptive Online Astrobiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Viranga; Buxner, Sanlyn R.; Horodyskyj, Lev; Anbar, Ariel; Semken, Steven; Mead, Chris; Lopatto, David

    2015-11-01

    Online education is an emergent sector of formal education and Arizona State University (ASU) is a leader in offering online courses. One that garners very strong positive feedback on student surveys is Habitable Worlds, which is an interdisciplinary online science course offered every semester since Fall 2011. Primary goals of this course are to teach understanding of scientific reasoning and practices by using principles from trans-disciplinary research in astrobiology. To examine course outcomes we administered the Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) survey, which has been previously developed to measure student experiences. Here we use the survey for the first time for an online course. The survey was taken before and after completing the course during the Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 semesters (N = 544). Here, we present students’ views of science represented by 22 questions on the survey. For the questions, students responded either "not applicable," "strongly disagree," "disagree," "neutral," "agree," or "strongly agree." In order to interpret the data, we divided the questions into three broader categories for analysis: students’ understanding of the scientific process, students’ scientific self-efficacy and students’ views on science teaching. We study how the sample of students changed their responses to each of the questions as a group by using a paired-samples sign test to gauge the statistical significance of the difference between pre and post responses. We further analyze how individual students changed their responses. For example, we designated a change from “strongly disagree” to “disagree” differently than a change from “agree” to “disagree” since the latter indicated a notable change in the student’s opinion. We found statistically significant changes on 12 of the 22 questions. These early results indicate that there are measurable changes on several identified course objectives. By measuring changes that

  2. A massive open online course for teaching physiotherapy students and physiotherapists about spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, L A; Glinsky, J V; Lowe, R; Lowe, T

    2014-12-01

    A descriptive audit. To audit the participation and satisfaction in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) for teaching physiotherapy students and physiotherapists about spinal cord injuries. Global and online. A 5-week MOOC about the physiotherapy management of spinal cord injuries was hosted by Physiopedia and run in partnership with the International Spinal Cord Society. The MOOC was based on the physiotherapy-specific module of www.elearnSCI.org, and also involved extra readings, activities and online discussion through a closed Facebook group. Participation and satisfaction was quantified through a pre- and post-MOOC knowledge assessment and an online course evaluation. Participation was also gauged through Facebook activity and internet-based usage statistics. Three thousand five hundred and twenty-three people from 108 countries registered for the MOOC and 2527 joined the Facebook group. One thousand one hundred and twenty-one completed the pre- and post-MOOC knowledge assessments, with more completing one or the other. The median (interquartile range) results for those who completed the pre and post-MOOC knowledge assessments were 70% (60-80%) and 90% (80-95%), respectively. One thousand and twenty-nine completed the online course evaluation, with more than 80% agreeing or strongly agreeing with 12 of the 13 positive statements posed to them about the course. Most participants who completed the MOOC performed well on the post-MOOC knowledge assessment and enjoyed the learning experience. However, these results may be biased if those who did not complete the MOOC were dissatisfied and/or did not sit the post-MOOC knowledge assessment.

  3. Development and testing of a Hyperlearning Model for design of an online critical care course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Pamela R

    2005-08-01

    Many U.S. colleges and universities are discovering innovative and exciting ways of using information technology to promote the process of teaching and learning and to extend education to new populations of students. Nurse educators in academia and service settings are developing interactive e-learning programs or courses to meet this need, and to either enhance practice concepts and basic skills or orient new associates to the clinical organization. In continuing education programs, students need flexibility and convenience to concurrently meet their personal and academic goals, and consumer demand for online instruction is increasing. The challenge is to prepare a comprehensive, high-quality, cost-effective e-learning course to meet educational standards and competencies. To meet this challenge, an instructional design model, the Hyperlearning Model, was developed based on Chickering and Gamson's principles of best practices in undergraduate education, to guide the development of an online course for basic critical care content. In this article, I describe the creation and testing of an instructional design model for developing content in this online course.

  4. Beginning the Dialogue on the e-Transformation: Behavior Analysis' First Massive Open Online Course (MOOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Jung, Heidi L; Aguirre, Angelica; Nichols, Jane L; Root, William B

    2016-03-01

    The e-Transformation in higher education, in which Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are playing a pivotal role, has had an impact on the modality in which behavior analysis is taught. In this paper, we survey the history and implications of online education including MOOCs and describe the implementation and results for the discipline's first MOOC, delivered at Southern Illinois University in spring 2015. Implications for the globalization and free access of higher education are discussed, as well as the parallel between MOOCs and Skinner's teaching machines.

  5. Applying Neurological Learning Research to an Intro Astronomy Online Lab Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Gene G.; Byrd, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The neurological research used the 'Tower of London', a well-tested puzzle requiring multi-step planning toward a solution. Four and five year-olds are starting multistep reasoning and provide good puzzle subjects. Preschoolers who talked to themselves about future moves had greatly improved performance over those who did not. Adults given preplanning time prior to solving the same puzzle showed more neural activation during preplanning, especially in brain areas which serve higher level thinking. Applying these results to teaching astronomy, we modified an online introductory lab course in which students take a multiple choice final exam. We composed questions related to the learning objectives of the course modules (LOQs). Students could 'talk to themselves' by discursively answering these for extra credit prior to the final. Results were compared to an otherwise identical previous unmodified class. Modified classes showed statistically much better final exam average scores (78% vs. 66%). This modification helped those students who most need help. Students in the lower third of the class preferentially answered the LOQs to improve their scores and the class average on the exam. These results also show the effectiveness of relevant extra credit work. For more details plus an application to a lecture course, see Byrd and Byrd http://www.ncolr.org/issues/jiol/v12/n2/3 (Journal of Interactive Online Learning). The online lab course emphasized real photographic and quantitative astronomical observations. We also discuss and show equipment found to be most useful for the online lab course, including a 'pin-hole protractor', telescope kit and "AL-henge" telescope mount..

  6. Relevancy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC about Sustainable Energy for Adolescents

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    Maija Aksela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy is one of the biggest global challenges today. This paper discusses how we can promote adolescents’ learning of sustainable energy with the help of an international massive open online course (MOOC. The aim of this case study is to understand: (i What do the adolescents find relevant in the MOOC course about sustainable energy? and (ii What are the opportunities and challenges of the MOOC for the adolescents to learn sustainable energy? In our study, 80 voluntary adolescents around the world, who were at least 15 year old, took part in two surveys. The themes of our MOOC course were, e.g., sustainable growth, solar power, wind power, biofuel production and smart power generation. This 38 work-hour, free of charge, online course includes an introduction video, interviews of specialists, lecture videos, reading materials of the newest research and multiple choice questions on the topics. Research data was classified by using content analysis. The study indicates that adolescents feel that both the MOOC course and sustainable energy as a subject are relevant to them. Their decision to take part in an online course was mostly influenced by individual relevance and partly influenced by both societal and vocational relevance, according to the relevancy theory used. The MOOC was experienced to be relevant for the three following reasons: (i good content (e.g., energy production and implementation of the course; (ii the course makes it possible to study in a new way; and (iii the course is personally useful. The characteristics of the MOOC, such as being available anywhere and anytime, free access, and online learning, bringing out a flexible, new way of learning and thus promoting Education for Sustainable Development (ESD in the context of sustainable energy at school level around the world. This MOOC provided the school students with choice-based learning and expanded their learning opportunities in understanding sustainable

  7. Using Team-based Learning to teach a Large-enrollment Environmental Science Course Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, V.

    2013-12-01

    Student enrollment in many online courses is usually limited to small classes, ranging from 20-25 students. Over two summers Environmental Science 1301, with an enrollment of 50, has been piloted online using team-based learning (TBL) methods. Teams, consisting of 7 members, were assigned randomly using the group manager tool found in the learning management system. The course was organized around Learning Modules, which consisted of a quiz (individual) over the reading, a team assignment, which covered a topic from one of the chapters was completed for each learning module, and a class/group discussion. The discussion usually entailed a presentation of findings to the class by each team. This allowed teams to interact with one another and was also designed to encourage competition among the teams. Over the course of the class it was observed that as the students became comfortable with the course procedures they developed a commitment to the goals and welfare of their team. They found that as a team they could accomplish much more than an individual; they discovered strengths in their team mates that they, themselves, lacked, and they helped those team mates who struggled with the material. The teams tackled problems that would be overwhelming to an individual in the time allotted, such as running multiple scenarios with the simulations and tackling a large amount of data. Using TBL shifted the majority of responsibility of learning the material to the student with the instructor functioning as a facilitator instead of dispenser of knowledge. Dividing the class into teams made the course load manageable for the instructor while at the same time created a small-class environment for the students. In comparing this course to other, nonTBL-based online courses taught, the work load was very manageable. There were only 7-10 items to be graded per Learning Module and only 7-10 teams to monitor and provide guidance to instead of 50 individuals. Retention rates (86

  8. Developing an on-line course in health economics: if I had known then what I know now...

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Health economics is an important component of professional education in health services administration, public health, and related fields. This article describes the development of an on-line course in health economics for web-based programs in health services administration and pharmacy. The on-line environment offered solutions for some of the problems often encountered in teaching this subject, but raised a set of new issues. The author explains 13 lessons learned in the process of course development and course revision. The course remains a work-in-progress, with some issues, especially in student assessment and course evaluation, yet to be resolved.

  9. Can Online Course-Based Assessment Methods Be Fair and Equitable? Relationships between Students' Preferences and Performance within Online and Offline Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, C.

    2012-01-01

    To address concerns raised regarding the use of online course-based summative assessment methods, a quasi-experimental design was implemented in which students who completed a summative assessment either online or offline were compared on performance scores when using their self-reported "preferred" or "non-preferred" modes. Performance scores…

  10. Online Learning Perceptions and Effectiveness of Research Methods Courses in a Hispanic-Serving Higher Education Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Tsan Pierre; Cavazos Vela, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors first reviewed related literature on possible factors that influence learning between an online learning (OL) course format and a face-to-face (F2F) course format. The authors investigated OL and F2F learning perceptions and effectiveness of a graduate-level research methods course at a Hispanic-serving institution…

  11. Online Learning Perceptions and Effectiveness of Research Methods Courses in a Hispanic-Serving Higher Education Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Tsan Pierre; Cavazos Vela, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors first reviewed related literature on possible factors that influence learning between an online learning (OL) course format and a face-to-face (F2F) course format. The authors investigated OL and F2F learning perceptions and effectiveness of a graduate-level research methods course at a Hispanic-serving institution…

  12. An Analysis of Student Engagement Patterns and Online Course Outcomes in Wisconsin. Stated Briefly. REL 2016-157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Angela M.; Clements, Margaret; Lavigne, Heather J.; Stafford, Erin T.

    2016-01-01

    This study used administrative data from Wisconsin Virtual School to identify patterns of student engagement in online courses (defined as the amount of time students were logged in to their course each week and how this varied over time). The study also examined whether the patterns were associated with course outcomes (defined as the percentage…

  13. SYSTEM EXPERTISE TRAINING COURSES IN PRIVATE SECTOR: Can They Be Given Online?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birim BALCI DEMIRCI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that there are many schools in the private sector offering courses in Computer Technology, Computer Engineering, Information Systems and similar disciplines in addition to Universities presenting such courses. The private sector programs are extremely popular with students already studying at university as well as being of great interest to previously graduated university students. The first purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of university students who attend theses education programs. Both previously graduated and presently studying students have been included. Secondly it aims to understand the reasons behind the attendance of such courses by students who are already studying a similar curriculum or have previously studied and graduated in similar and related fields. In the light of this information, some suggestions have been made about giving these courses as online.

  14. Using wikis to stimulate collaborative learning in two online health sciences courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzelsberger, Hilde; Campbell, Karen A; Service, Dorothea; Sanchez, Otto

    2015-06-01

    The use of wiki technology fits well in courses that encourage constructive knowledge building and social learning by a community of learners. Pedagogically, wikis have attracted interest in higher education environments because they facilitate the collaborative processes required for developing student group assignments. This article describes a pilot project to assess the implementation of wikis in two online small- and mid-sized elective courses comprising nursing students in third- or fourth-year undergraduate levels within interdisciplinary health sciences courses. The need exists to further develop the pedagogical use of wiki environments before they can be expected to support collaboration among undergraduate nursing students. Adapting wiki implementation to suitable well-matched courses will make adaptation of wikis into nursing curricula more effective and may increase the chances that nursing students will hone the collaborative abilities that are essential in their future professional roles in communities of practice. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Evaluating the Validity and Applicability of Automated Essay Scoring in Two Massive Open Online Courses

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    Erin Dawna Reilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of massive open online courses (MOOCs to expand students’ access to higher education has raised questions regarding the extent to which this course model can provide and assess authentic, higher level student learning. In response to this need, MOOC platforms have begun utilizing automated essay scoring (AES systems that allow students to engage in critical writing and free-response activities. However, there is a lack of research investigating the validity of such systems in MOOCs. This research examined the effectiveness of an AES tool to score writing assignments in two MOOCs. Results indicated that some significant differences existed between Instructor grading, AES-Holistic scores, and AES-Rubric Total scores within two MOOC courses. However, use of the AES system may still be useful given instructors’ assessment needs and intent. Findings from this research have implications for instructional technology administrators, educational designers, and instructors implementing AES learning activities in MOOC courses.

  16. Development of an online nursing management course: successful experience between Brazil and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronchin, Daisy Maria Rizatto; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Alavarce, Débora Cristina; Prata, Ana Paula; Santos, Margarida Reis; Aroldi, Juscilynne Barros da Costa

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe the experience of planning and developing online refresher courses in nursing management for nurses in the contexts of Brazil and Portugal. Method The instructional design was based on meaningful learning theory, andragogy, and dialectical methodology, so it valued interaction between the actors, emphasizing the scenarios of practice and applying the concepts covered. The course structure is divided into nine theoretical units, four case studies, and an essay exam. Results The course was positively evaluated by the participants, who reported opportunities for acquisition of new knowledge, interaction and exchange of experiences, motivation to study the topics, and self-learning. Conclusion It is expected that description of this experience will stimulate proposals for new courses and programs in distance education modalities, improving the processes of teaching and learning so as to give support to future analyses of their impact on the development and enhancement of management skills in nursing.

  17. Re-Examining the Way We Teach: The Earth System Science Education Alliance Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, J. A.; Myers, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Science education reform has skyrocketed over the last decade thanks in large part to the technology of the Internet, opening up dynamic new online communities of learners. It has allowed educators worldwide to share thoughts about Earth system science and reexamine the way science is taught. The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) is one positive offshoot of this reform effort. This developing partnership among universities, colleges, and science education organizations is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the Center for Educational TechnologiesTM at Wheeling Jesuit University. ESSEA's mission is to improve Earth system science education. ESSEA has developed three Earth system science courses for K-12 teachers. These online courses guide teachers into collaborative, student-centered science education experiences. Not only do these courses support teachers' professional development, they also help teachers implement Earth systems science content and age-appropriate pedagogical methods into their classrooms. The ESSEA semester-long courses are open to elementary, middle school, and high school educators. After three weeks of introductory content, teachers develop content and pedagogical and technological knowledge in four three-week learning cycles. The elementary school course focuses on basic Earth system interactions between land, life, air, and water. The middle school course stresses the effects of real-world events-volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, rainforest destruction-on Earth's lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere, using "jigsaw" to study the interactions between events, spheres, and positive and negative feedback loops. The high school course uses problem-based learning to examine critical areas of global change, such as coral reef degradation, ozone depletion, and climate change. This ESSEA presentation provides examples of learning environments from each of the three courses.

  18. EVALUATION OF FREE PLATFORMS FOR DELIVERY OF MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES (MOOCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airton ZANCANARO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the hosting, management and delivery of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC it is necessary a technological infrastructure that supports it. Various educational institutions do not have or do not wish to invest in such a structure, possibly because MOOCs are not yet part of official programs of universities, but initiatives by a particular teacher or a research group. Focusing on this problem, this study seeks to identify platforms that make it possible to create, host and provide courses free of charges for the offeror; find in the respective literature, the basic requirements for MOOC platforms and to evaluate the platforms based on the raised requirements. In order to identify the platforms, information was sought in scientific articles and websites dealing with the comparison of platforms and listing the existing MOOC providers. For the definition of evaluation requirements, there was a search in the Web of Science and Scopus databases, looking for the term "Massive Open Online Courses". After applying some filters, 62 works that address platforms and technology were selected for analysis. As a result there is the identification of six platforms that allow the free supply of courses, the proposal for 14 requirements for reviewing them and a frame containing the evaluation of the identified platforms. This assessment is important since it brings knowledge as a basis for selecting a platform that is the most suitable one in terms of the chosen structure and method to store, manage and deliver courses in MOOC format.

  19. An analysis of online courses in research ethics in the Fogarty-sponsored bioethics training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry; Strosberg, Martin; Luna, Florencia; Philpott, Sean; Hemmerle, Cheryl A

    2013-12-01

    Several training programs sponsored by the NIH/Fogarty International Center's International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development Program offer online graduate-level courses in research ethics to participants in lowand middle-income countries. This paper describes the evaluation of four of these online courses and recommendations for improvements to achieve the highest-quality design and delivery. We used an evaluation matrix consisting of 95 criteria based on recommended best practices in eLearning. Our results showed that these courses are developing or meeting nearly 73% of the criteria, while they are not meeting approximately 21% of the criteria. Together, one or more of the courses are developing or meeting 89 of the 95 criteria. These results suggest that the necessary skills and expertise exist in these programs to bring all of the eLearning courses close to 100% proficiency by sharing a common set of best practices. This paper is part of a collection of articles analyzing the Fogarty International Center's International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development Program.

  20. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø; Jensen, Lasse; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S

    2017-05-31

    Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity had any impact on the knowledge, skills, and career of health care professionals contrasting participants from developing countries versus developed countries. 52.006 participants signed up and 29.469 participants were active in one of the three sessions (2014-2015) of Diabetes - a Global Challenge. Using an online based questionnaire (nine sections) software (Survey Monkey), email invitations were send out using a Coursera based database to the 29.469 course participants. Responses were analyzed and stratified, according to the United Nations stratification method, by developing and developed countries. 1.303 (4.4%) of the 29.469 completed the questionnaire. 845 of the 1303 were defined as health care professionals, including medical doctors (34%), researchers (15%), nurses (11%) and medical students (8%). Over 80% of the health care participants report educational benefits, improved knowledge about the prevention and treatment therapies of diabetes and furthermore improved professional life and practice. Over 40% reported that their professional network expanded after course participation. Study participants who did not complete all modules of the course reported similar impact as the ones that completed the entire course(P = 0.9). Participants from developing countries gained more impact on their clinical practice (94%) compared to health care professionals from

  1. MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSES AS A STAGE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF E-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola M. Berezytskyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to trace back the history of e-Learning which encompasses the advent of m-Learning, the emergence of Smart University, massive open online courses (MOOCs and cloud technologies. Special attention is given to the study of MOOCs phenomena. The article highlights characteristic features of two main types of MOOC: cMOOC and xMOOC in particular. The comparison of the MOOCs and traditional learning limitations and shortcomings, the statistic data regarding the MOOC platforms and students’ enrolment, the analysis of differences between traditional distance courses and MOOCs, the main problems of MOOCs are considered in the paper.

  2. Using Gephi to visualize online course participation: a Social Learning Analytics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Hernández-García

    2014-12-01

    Social learning analytics provides tools and methods for extracting information that is useful for improving the learning process. This case study shows how instructors and course coordinators can use the tool Gephi to generate relevant information that would otherwise be difficult to gain. Analysis of empirical data from a cross-curricular course with 656 students proves the usefulness of Gephi for social learning analytics studies and demonstrates how the tool can provide relevant indicators of student activity and engagement. The study also discusses the potential of social learning analytics for improving online instruction via learning data visualization.

  3. Exploring University Students' Engagement with Online Video Lectures in a Blended Introductory Mechanics Course

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Seaton, Daniel T; Douglas, Scott S; Greco, Edwin F; Thoms, Brian D; Schatz, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    The advent of MOOCs has stimulated interest in using online videos to deliver content in university courses. We examined student engagement with 78 online videos that we created and were incorporated into a one-semester blended introductory mechanics course at the Georgia Institute of Technology. We found that students were more engaged with videos that supported laboratory activities than with videos that presented lecture content. In particular, the percentage of students accessing laboratory videos was consistently greater than 80 percent throughout the semester while the percentage of students accessing lecture videos dropped to less than 40 percent by the end of the term. Moreover, students were more likely to access the entirety of a laboratory video than a lecture video. Our results suggest that students may access videos based on perceived value: students appear to consider the laboratory videos as essential for successfully completing the laboratories while students appear to consider the lecture vid...

  4. Delivering a medical school elective with massive open online course (MOOC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The educational technology of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has been successfully applied in a wide variety of disciplines and are an intense focus of educational research at this time. Educators are now looking to MOOC technology as a means to improve professional medical education, but very little is known about how medical MOOCs compare with traditional content delivery. A retrospective analysis of the course evaluations for the Medicine as a Business elective by fourth-year medical students at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) for the 2012-2015 academic years was conducted. This course was delivered by small group flipped classroom discussions for 2012-2014 and delivered via MOOC technology in 2015. Learner ratings were compared between the two course delivery methods using routinely collected course evaluations. Course enrollment has ranged from 6-19 students per year in the 2012-2015 academic years. Student evaluations of the course are favorable in the areas of effective teaching, accurate course objectives, meeting personal learning objectives, recommending the course to other students, and overall when rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The majority of all student ratings (76-95%) of this elective course are for the highest possible choice (Strongly agree or Excellent) for any criteria, regardless if the course was delivered via a traditional or MOOC format. Statistical analysis of these ratings suggests that the Effective Teacher and Overall Evaluations did not statistically differ between the two delivery formats. Student ratings of this elective course were highly similar when delivered in a flipped classroom format or by using MOOC technology. The primary advantage of this new course format is flexibility of time and place for learners, allowing them to complete the course objectives when convenient for them. The course evaluations suggest this is a change that is acceptable to the target audience. This study suggests that

  5. Experience of e-learning implementation through massive open online courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, N. V.; Fibikh, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    E-learning is considered to be one of the most prospective directions in education development worldwide. To have a competitive advantage over other institutions offering a wide variety of educational services it is important to introduce information and communication technologies into the educational process to develop e-learning on the whole. The aim of the research is to reveal problems which prevent from full implementation of e-learning at the Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University (SibSAU) and to suggest ways on solving those problems through optimization of e-learning introduction process at the university by motivating students and teaching staff to participate in massive open online courses and formation of tailored platforms with the view to arrange similar courses at the premises of the university. The paper considers the introduction and development level of e-learning in Russia and at SibSAU particularly. It substantiates necessity to accelerate e-learning introduction process at an aerospace university as a base for training of highly-qualified specialists in the area of aviation, machine building, physics, info-communication technologies and also in other scientific areas within which university training is carried out. The paper covers SibSAU’s experience in e-learning implementation in the educational process through students and teaching staff participation in massive open online courses and mastering other up-to-date and trendy educational platforms and their usage in the educational process. Key words. E-learning, distance learning, online learning, massive open online course.

  6. Attitudes of RN-to-BSN students regarding teaching strategies utilized in online courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Cathy; Williams, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    In this descriptive study, researchers examined RN-to-BSN students' attitudes regarding different teaching/learning strategies incorporated in courses offered utilizing the online delivery format. A semantic differential scale was used to measure attitudes regarding the use of wikis, podcasts, video capture, talking PowerPoint, and discussion boards. The results indicated that students had the most favorable attitude toward tegrity lectures as a teaching strategy. This was followed by talking PowerPoint lectures and discussion board.

  7. Design and Zmplementation of Online Experimental Platform for Computer Networks Course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ben; ZHANG Tao

    2012-01-01

    Practice training is very important for students learning Computer networks. But building a real laboratory is constrained and expensive. In this paper, we present an online experimental platform for computer networks course based on Dynamips simulator. Instructors and students can access the platform by IE Browser to manage and take router experiments. On the basis of deployment and testing, the platform is effective and flexible.

  8. Being in the Users' Shoes: Anticipating Experience while Designing Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanta, Chrysi; Cantoni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    While user-centred design and user experience are given much attention in the e-learning design field, no research has been found on how users are actually represented in the discussions during the design of online courses. In this paper we identify how and when end-users' experience--be they students or tutors--emerges in designers'…

  9. Environmental Literacy Development: A Comparison between Online and Traditional Campus Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James Young

    As traditional educational efforts expand into the online environment, academic research is needed to determine if effective environmental education could be replicated in the virtual classroom in higher education. Although previous research showed that the online course delivery could be an effective means of teaching environmental facts, what had yet to be determined is if there was a significance difference in the development of an environmental literacy, represented by attitudes and behaviors between online and traditional campus students, at a university within the Western United States. To determine if there was a measured statistical difference in environmental literacy following course completion this causal comparative quantitative study built on the theoretical foundations of environmental literacy development and used the Measures of Ecological Attitudes and Knowledge Scale and New Ecological Paradigm. From a sample of 205 undergraduate environmental science students it was determined, through the use of two tailed t tests at the 0.05 significance level, that no statistical difference in environmental knowledge, actual commitment, and global environmental awareness were evident. However, statistical differences existed in verbal commitment and emotional connection to the environment. Both the online and the traditional campus classroom are shown to be effective in the development of environmental literacy. As technology continues to be incorporated in higher education, environmental educators should see technology as an additional tool in environmental literacy development. However, the identified differences in emotional and verbal commitment should be further investigated.

  10. Initial Trends in Enrolment and Completion of Massive Open Online Courses

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    Katy Jordan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The past two years have seen rapid development of massive open online courses (MOOCs with the rise of a number of MOOC platforms. The scale of enrolment and participation in the earliest mainstream MOOC courses has garnered a good deal of media attention. However, data about how the enrolment and completion figures have changed since the early courses is not consistently released. This paper seeks to draw together the data that has found its way into the public domain in order to explore factors affecting enrolment and completion. The average MOOC course is found to enroll around 43,000 students, 6.5% of whom complete the course. Enrolment numbers are decreasing over time and are positively correlated with course length. Completion rates are consistent across time, university rank, and total enrolment, but negatively correlated with course length. This study provides a more detailed view of trends in enrolment and completion than was available previously, and a more accurate view of how the MOOC field is developing.

  11. Sustainability Education in Massive Open Online Courses: A Content Analysis Approach

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    Zehui Zhan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of sustainability education in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs. Sample MOOCs were searched for from seven popular platforms and three search engines. After screening, 51 courses were identified as the final sample. Course description, content outlines, reading materials, recommended textbooks and discussion threads were coded to obtain insights into sustainability education learning contents, pedagogical methods, and interaction situations. Results indicated that: (1 Edx and Coursera are platforms that incorporated the most sustainability-related courses, and most instructors were senior academics with the title of professor. American and European countries outperformed other English speaking countries as early birds in sustainability education using MOOCs. The average course length of our MOOC samples is 7.6 weeks, which is much shorter than a typical face-to-face college course; (2 Current MOOCs provided mainly introductory-level courses without prerequisites. Fourteen sustainability-related hot topics and five most popular textbooks were identified; (3 The pedagogical means used most frequently were discussion forums and lecture videos, while pedagogies such as team-based learning were not used to a large extent; (4 Learner interaction flourished in MOOCs, and sub-forums regarding Lecture Reflection, Welcome and Introduction were posted with most threads, replies, and votes. Our findings suggest that the MOOC is an innovative method in sustainability education and research. A variety of information and strategies could be used when preparing sustainability-related MOOCs.

  12. Canine theriogenology for dog enthusiasts: teaching methodology and outcomes in a massive open online course (MOOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root Kustritz, Margaret V

    2014-01-01

    A massive open online course (MOOC) in canine theriogenology was offered for dog owners and breeders and for veterinary professionals as a partnership between the University of Minnesota and Coursera. The six-week course was composed of short video lectures, multiple-choice quizzes with instant feedback to assess understanding, weekly case studies with peer evaluation to promote integration of course materials, and discussion forums to promote participant interaction. Peak enrollment was 8,796 students. The grading policy for completion was strict and was upheld; completion rate for all participants was 7.5%. About 12% of participants achieved a grade of over 90% in the course, with those who had any deficiency mostly missing one quiz or assignment. Ninety-nine individuals were enrolled in a for-cost, credentialed pathway, and 50% of those individuals completed all required course components. Pre- and postcourse surveys were used to demonstrate that learning objectives were met by the participants and to identify that lack of time to commit to study was the biggest impediment to completion. Positive aspects of the course were active engagement by participants from all over the world and the ability of this university and instructor to reach those learners. Negative aspects concerned technical support and negative feedback from some participants who were unable to meet course requirements for reasons beyond the control of the instructor.

  13. Massive Open Online Courses as a Tool for Global Animal Welfare Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Jill R D; Langford, Fritha; Waran, Natalie

    Animal Behaviour and Welfare was a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) hosted on Coursera as a free introductory animal welfare course. Through interrogating Coursera data and pre-/post-course student experience surveys, we investigated student retention, student experience, changes in attitudes, and changes in knowledge. The course ran for 5 weeks, and 33,501 students signed up, of which 16.4% (n=5,501) received a Certificate of Achievement, indicating they had completed all assessments within the course. This retention rate is above the industry standard of 10%; however, the value of retention rate as a metric to judge MOOC success is questionable. Instead, we focus on demographics, with Coursera data estimating that 41% of learners came from Europe, 35% from North America, 11% from Asia, 6% from Oceania, 5% from South America, and 2% from Africa. Most learners had completed an undergraduate degree. Despite this wide range of backgrounds, 57.2% of post-course respondents (n=2,399) strongly agreed that the information presented was at the right level and 64.9% strongly agreed that the course was interesting. After completion, more students (χ(2)[4]=132.40, pMOOCs are an appropriate vehicle for providing animal welfare learning to a wide audience, but require a significant level of investment.

  14. Measurable parameters analysis for designing a profile of courses online training; Analisis de parametros cuantificables para el diseno de un perfiel de cursos de formacion online

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy Anton, J. L.; Izquierdo Soriano, J. V.; Ribes Llopis, L.; Buendia Garcia, F.

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this study is to quantify the connections and actions performed by students and teachers in online courses related to the field of ionizing radiation, analyzing the number of training hours and number of students and teachers, so that we can establish a profile of course adapted to the demands and possibilities teachers. (Author)

  15. Tapping the Power of an Online Course to Allow for Differentiated Introductory Astronomy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Online classes are here to stay. This appears to be true regardless of whether or not student performance in online environments is really comparable to performance levels in comparable face-to-face instruction (e.g., Ury & Ury 2005, Slater & Jones 2004, Brown & Liedholm 2002). This report avoids that unwieldy question and instead concentrates on the opportunities for online courses to build on their potential to improve upon standard classroom settings. An introductory astronomy course has been designed that utilizes MasteringAstronomy and Blackboard to provide a course structure that varies depending on the results of pre-tests and quizzes. Software flags unlock additional tutorials and formative assessments for students who perform poorly on the pre-tests and gatekeeper quizzes. This "long track” involves no grade penalty, but does require additional time on task. While some students withdraw in frustration, the majority of students who find themselves on the "long track” express appreciation at being encouraged to finally learn the material. Meanwhile, the high performing students proceed quickly toward the unit exams, completing their work fairly quickly but tending to spend more time interacting within the Discussion Forums. Overall, this ability to provide differentiated instruction is a meaningful improvement over instructional approaches that can be implemented in a large enrollment face-to-face classroom. Brown, B. & Liedholm, C., 2002, Am. Economic Review, 92, 444 Slater, T. & Jones L., 2004 Astronomy Education Review, 3(1) Ury, G. & Ury, C., 2005, Proc ISECON, 22

  16. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantorn Chaiprasurt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an online course based on an e-learning system with and without the support of mobile communication tools, respectively. These tools, which are implemented on a mobile phone, extend the use of the existing Moodle learning management system (LMS under the guidance of a mobile communication tools framework. This framework is considered to be effective in promoting learner motivation and encouraging interaction between learners and instructors as well as among learner peers in online learning environments. A quasi-experimental research design was used to empirically investigate the influence of these tools on learner motivation using subjective assessment (for attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction, and social ability and objective assessment (for disengagement, engagement, and academic performance. The results indicate that the use of the tools was effective in improving learner motivation, especially in terms of the attention and engagement variables. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in subjective motivation, with a higher level achieved by experimental-group learners (supported by the tools than control-group learners (unsupported by the tools.

  17. Exploring Lifelong Learners Engaged in an Astronomy-Related Massively Open Online Course

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    Buxner, Sanlyn; Impey, Chris David; Wenger, Matthew; Formanek, Martin; Romine, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are becoming increasingly popular ways to reach diverse lifelong learners all over the world. Although MOOCs resemble more formal classes (e.g. videos of content, quizzes, activities), they are often used by informal audiences from home. Recently, MOOCs have become more utilized by universities to conduct outreach as they explore how to use MOOCs to reach new potential learners. Despite the rapid adaption of MOOCs, little is known about individuals who choose to take a MOOC, how they interact with the course materials, and what motivates them to finish the course.We present results of a study of lifelong learners engaged in an astronomy "101" MOOC. Through analysis of registered learners' behaviors as well as self-reported responses to a survey about science, we were able to characterize a subset of the learners engaged in the MOOC during its first offering. Overall, 25363 learners from over 100 countries registered for the MOOC. Of those, 14900 accessed at least one part of the course. Learners were recruited to complete a survey of their knowledge and attitudes towards science. Of the learner group who opened the course, 2889 individuals completed the survey, 2465 of those were able to be linked to their usage of the MOOC through a unique identifier.Learners represented a wide-range of ages, professions, and previous science experience. The best predictors for MOOC completion were engagement in the first activity and first writing assignment and engagement in the online forum. Learners were very interested in science prior to their registration, had higher basic science knowledge that most undergraduate students enrolled in a parallel astronomy course, and used online searches and science sites to get their information about science. As we reach out to a worldwide audience to learners in these massively open online courses, understanding their motivations and behaviors will be essential. This work is helping us understand and

  18. Architectural education online and in-class synergies: reshaping the course and the learner

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    Olga Ioannou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Architectural courses have been traditionally planned in the context of a physical classroom where the direct rapport of the students with the instructor is an unswerving condition for learning. This model was formed, however, at a time when learning was not impacted by technology. Although digital media have infiltrated architectural practice, they still elude architectural design education. The author argues that the integration of online educational practices in architectural curricula can benefit design education immensely by raising interaction and making students assume responsibility for their learning. To demonstrate the gains of online and in-class synergy in architectural education a blended course was set up at the postgraduate program of the National Technical University of Athens, School of Architecture. Current trends of online learning were carefully examined in regard to their compatibility with the architectural design culture of “learning by doing”. The course was eventually founded on the core principles of the connectivist model where learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse networks of connections (Downes, 2012. This approach was chosen because of its affinity to the design praxis where similarly students are required to make critical connections in order to map spatial phenomena and reconstruct the real. Course content was redesigned to comply with its new medium. Students were offered multiple channels of communication. They were also asked to contribute to the content material. Course data analysis demonstrated an unprecedented level of participation, exchange and student satisfaction as expressed in the surveys that followed the course’s completion.

  19. “E-courses Unified Process” For Development of Online Courses

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    Abdulaziz Omar Alsadhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement in computers and technology, traditional way of education has changed from being confined to a classroom to an open anytime, anywhere learning. The system of education and learning has been changed with the introduction of E-Learning system. Over the past few years, there has been a tremendous growth in the development of E-Learning system and applications. There is an increased importance associated with the E-Learning courseware for the successful implementation of educational process. In spite of the importance, there are still some E-Learning courseware that fail to meet the teaching and learning objectives and expectations. These failures can be overcome by the introduction of software development methodology in the development of E-Learning courses. Keeping this idea in mind, this study proposes “E-courses unified process” which is a modification of well-known software development model; the unified process. This proposed process is based on five activities or workflows; requirement gathering, Analysis and design, Content development and assessment, production and implementation and test and Evaluation. Each of these activities is carried out with the four phases of the Unified process which are inception, elaboration, construction and transition.

  20. An Exploratory Study of Effective Online Learning: Assessing Satisfaction Levels of Graduate Students of Mathematics Education Associated with Human and Design Factors of an Online Course

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    Joohi Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research project investigated graduate students’ satisfaction levels with online learning associated with human (professor/instructor and instructional associate and design factors (course structure and technical aspects using a survey study. A total of 81 graduate students (master’s students who majored in math and science education enrolled in an online math methods course (Conceptual Geometry participated in this study. According to the results of this study, student satisfaction level is closely associated with clear guidelines on assignment, rubrics, and constructive feedback. In addition, student satisfaction level is related to professor’s (or course instructor’s knowledge of materials.