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Sample records for ongoing positive selection

  1. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Julie; Nadeau, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Labuda, Damian

    2010-01-28

    Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  2. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefebvre Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. Results The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. Conclusions We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  3. Recent and ongoing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Hellmann, Ines; Hubisz, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The recent availability of genome-scale genotyping data has led to the identification of regions of the human genome that seem to have been targeted by selection. These findings have increased our understanding of the evolutionary forces that affect the human genome, have augmented our knowledge...... of gene function and promise to increase our understanding of the genetic basis of disease. However, inferences of selection are challenged by several confounding factors, especially the complex demographic history of human populations, and concordance between studies is variable. Although such studies...

  4. Ongoing interpretations of accomplishments in smoking cessation : Positive and negative self-efficacy interpretations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A; Ten Wolde, G

    2005-01-01

    Smokers and ex-smokers are considered to make ongoing interpretations of their accomplishments in terms of their ability to refrain from smoking. We assessed positive self-efficacy interpretations (PSEint) and negative self-efficacy interpretations (NSEint) as the frequencies with which smokers and

  5. Why victimology should stay positive: The ongoing need for positive victimology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronel Natti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the need for positive victimology and its unique contribution to victimology. Victimology presented a shift in attention and awareness in practice, research and theory, by focusing on victims of crime and of abuse of power, and on victims’ rights and victims’ services. Positive victimology indicates a more specified shift in attention and awareness, within the larger shift of victimology. This shift stands in line with positive psychology, positive criminology and the idea of victims’ victimology. It denotes an approach to provide the following, as much as possible: 1. A wide range of social responses to the victims and their victimization that victims can experience as positive, 2. Positive outcomes of healing and recovery for victims, and 3. Positive integration of victims. Within each of those, positive victimology suggests a pragmatic coordinated system that ranges from definitions of negative poles to those of positive ones. When moving towards the positive pole at any given coordinate, a sense of justice is an important factor that might reduce the impact of the harm. Support is also a crucial factor and at the very positive pole, stands human, inter-personal love.

  6. The effect of aborting ongoing movements on end point position estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaguchi, Yoshihiro; Fukuzawa, Kazuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigated the impact of motor commands to abort ongoing movement on position estimation. Participants carried out visually guided reaching movements on a horizontal plane with their eyes open. By setting a mirror above their arm, however, they could not see the arm, only the start and target points. They estimated the position of their fingertip based solely on proprioception after their reaching movement was stopped before reaching the target. The participants stopped reaching as soon as they heard an auditory cue or were mechanically prevented from moving any further by an obstacle in their path. These reaching movements were carried out at two different speeds (fast or slow). It was assumed that additional motor commands to abort ongoing movement were required and that their magnitude was high, low, and zero, in the auditory-fast condition, the auditory-slow condition, and both the obstacle conditions, respectively. There were two main results. (1) When the participants voluntarily stopped a fast movement in response to the auditory cue (the auditory-fast condition), they showed more underestimates than in the other three conditions. This underestimate effect was positively related to movement velocity. (2) An inverted-U-shaped bias pattern as a function of movement distance was observed consistently, except in the auditory-fast condition. These findings indicate that voluntarily stopping fast ongoing movement created a negative bias in the position estimate, supporting the idea that additional motor commands or efforts to abort planned movement are involved with the position estimation system. In addition, spatially probabilistic inference and signal-dependent noise may explain the underestimate effect of aborting ongoing movement.

  7. Expectations and positive emotional feelings accompany reductions in ongoing and evoked neuropathic pain following placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gitte L; Finnerup, Nanna B; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Tracey, Irene; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2014-12-01

    Research on placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia has primarily included healthy subjects or acute pain patients, and it is unknown whether these effects can be obtained in ongoing pain in patients with chronic pain caused by an identifiable nerve injury. Eighteen patients with postthoracotomy neuropathic pain were exposed to placebo and nocebo manipulations, in which they received open and hidden administrations of pain-relieving (lidocaine) or pain-inducing (capsaicin) treatment controlled for the natural history of pain. Immediately after the open administration, patients rated their expected pain levels on a mechanical visual analogue scale (M-VAS). They also reported their emotional feelings via a quantitative/qualitative experiential method. Subsequently, patients rated their ongoing pain levels on the M-VAS and underwent quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush, pinprick, area of hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain). There was a significant placebo effect on both ongoing (P=.009 to .019) and evoked neuropathic pain (P=.0005 to .053). Expected pain levels accounted for significant amounts of the variance in ongoing (53.4%) and evoked pain (up to 34.5%) after the open lidocaine administration. Furthermore, patients reported high levels of positive and low levels of negative emotional feelings in the placebo condition compared with the nocebo condition (P⩽.001). Pain increases during nocebo were nonsignificant (P=.394 to 1.000). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate placebo effects in ongoing neuropathic pain. It provides further evidence for placebo-induced reduction in hyperalgesia and suggests that patients' expectations coexist with emotional feelings about treatments. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The contribution of ancestry, chance, and past and ongoing selection to adaptive evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Joshi; Robinson B. Castillo; Laurence D. Mueller

    2003-12-01

    The relative contributions of ancestry, chance, and past and ongoing selection to variation in one adaptive (larval feeding rate) and one seemingly nonadaptive (pupation height) trait were determined in populations of Drosophila melanogaster adapting to either low or high larval densities in the laboratory. Larval feeding rates increased rapidly in response to high density, and the effects of ancestry, past selection and chance were ameliorated by ongoing selection within 15–20 generations. Similarly, in populations previously kept at high larval density, and then switched to low larval density, the decline of larval feeding rate to ancestral levels was rapid (15–20 generations) and complete, providing support for a previously stated hypothesis regarding the costs of faster feeding in Drosophila larvae. Variation among individuals was the major contributor to variation in pupation height, a trait that would superficially appear to be nonadaptive in the environmental context of the populations used in this study because it did not diverge between sets of populations kept at low versus high larval density for many generations. However, the degree of divergence among populations ($F_{\\text{ST}}$) for pupation height was significantly less than expected for a selectively neutral trait, and we integrate results from previous studies to suggest that the variation for pupation height among populations is constrained by stabilizing selection, with a flat, plateau-like fitness function that, consequently, allows for substantial phenotypic variation within populations. Our results support the view that the genetic imprints of history (ancestry and past selection) in outbreeding sexual populations are typically likely to be transient in the face of ongoing selection and recombination. The results also illustrate the heuristic point that different forms of selection—for example directional versus stabilizing selection—acting on a trait in different populations may

  9. Assessing the potential for an ongoing arms race within and between the sexes: selection and heritable variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Urban; Lew, Timothy A; Byrne, Phillip G; Rice, William R

    2005-07-01

    In promiscuous species, sexual selection generates two opposing male traits: offense (acquiring new mates and supplanting stored sperm) and defense (enforcing fidelity on one's mates and preventing sperm displacement when this fails). Coevolution between these traits requires both additive genetic variation and associated natural selection. Previous work with Drosophila melanogaster found autosomal genetic variation for these traits among inbred lines from a mixture of populations, but only nonheritable genetic variation was found within a single outbred population. These results do not support ongoing antagonistic coevolution between offense and defense, nor between either of these male traits and female reproductive characters. Here we use a new method (hemiclonal analysis) to study genomewide genetic variation in a large outbred laboratory population of D. melanogaster. Hemiclonal analysis estimates the additive genetic variation among random, genomewide haplotypes taken from a large, outbred, locally adapted laboratory population and determines the direction of the selection gradient on this variation. In contrast to earlier studies, we found low but biologically significant heritable variation for defensive and offensive offspring production as well as all their components (P1, fidelity, P2, and remating). Genetic correlations between these traits were substantially different from those reported for inbred lines. A positive genetic correlation was found between defense and offense, demonstrating that some shared genes influence both traits. In addition to this common variation, evidence for unique genetic variation for each trait was also found, supporting an ongoing coevolutionary arms race between defense and offense. Reproductive conflict between males can strongly influence female fitness. Correspondingly, we found genetic variation in both defense and offense that affected female fitness. No evidence was found for intersexual conflict in the context of

  10. Long-term ongoing pregnancy rate and mode of conception after a positive and negative post-coital test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Marloes; Brandes, Monique; de Bruin, Jan Peter; Bots, Rob S G M; Kremer, Jan A M; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Hamilton, Carl J C M

    2014-09-01

    Many fertility clinics have decided to abolish the post-coital test. Yet, it is a significant factor in prognostic models that predict the spontaneous pregnancy rate within one year. The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the long-term outcome of infertile couples with a positive or a negative post-coital test during their fertility work-up and (2) the contribution of the different modes of conception. Retrospective cohort study. Three fertility clinics in the Netherlands, of which two are secondary care training hospitals and is a one tertiary care academic training hospital. 2476 newly referred infertile couples, where a post-coital test was performed in 1624 couples. After basic fertility work-up, couples were treated according to the national treatment protocols. Spontaneous and overall ongoing pregnancy rate. The spontaneous and overall ongoing pregnancy rates after three years were 37.7 and 77.5% after a positive post-coital test compared with 26.9 and 68.8% after a negative test (p post-coital test is still associated with a higher spontaneous and a higher overall ongoing pregnancy rate, even in couples with severe male factor infertility. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  12. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, J.P.; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  13. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  14. Positive selection on the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J; Lahn, Bruce T

    2004-10-01

    Positive selection has undoubtedly played a critical role in the evolution of Homo sapiens. Of the many phenotypic traits that define our species--notably the enormous brain, advanced cognitive abilities, complex vocal organs, bipedalism and opposable thumbs--most (if not all) are likely the product of strong positive selection. Many other aspects of human biology not necessarily related to the 'branding' of our species, such as host-pathogen interactions, reproduction, dietary adaptation and physical appearance, have also been the substrate of varying levels of positive selection. Comparative genetics/genomics studies in recent years have uncovered a growing list of genes that might have experienced positive selection during the evolution of human and/or primates. These genes offer valuable inroads into understanding the biological processes specific to humans, and the evolutionary forces that gave rise to them. Here, we present a comprehensive review of these genes, and their implications for human evolution.

  15. Ongoing characterization of the forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source for the selective production of exotic species facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzolaro, M., E-mail: mattia.manzolaro@lnl.infn.it; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Vasquez, J.; Corradetti, S.; Calderolla, M.; Prete, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Universita’ 2 - 35020 Legnaro, Padova,Italy (Italy); Meneghetti, G. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, Via Venezia 1 - 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    An intense research and development activity to finalize the design of the target ion source system for the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility (operating according to the isotope separation on line technique) is at present ongoing at Legnaro National Laboratories. In particular, the characterization of ion sources in terms of ionization efficiency and transversal emittance is currently in progress, and a preliminary set of data is already available. In this work, the off-line ionization efficiency and emittance measurements for the SPES forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source in the case of a stable Ar beam are presented in detail.

  16. Guiding transcranial brain stimulation by EEG/MEG to interact with ongoing brain activity and associated functions: A position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thut, Gregor; Bergmann, Til Ole; Fröhlich, Flavio; Soekadar, Surjo R; Brittain, John-Stuart; Valero-Cabré, Antoni; Sack, Alexander T; Miniussi, Carlo; Antal, Andrea; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Ziemann, Ulf; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have a wide range of applications but also suffer from a number of limitations mainly related to poor specificity of intervention and variable effect size. These limitations motivated recent efforts to focus on the temporal dimension of NTBS with respect to the ongoing brain activity. Temporal patterns of ongoing neuronal activity, in particular brain oscillations and their fluctuations, can be traced with electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), to guide the timing as well as the stimulation settings of NTBS. These novel, online and offline EEG/MEG-guided NTBS-approaches are tailored to specifically interact with the underlying brain activity. Online EEG/MEG has been used to guide the timing of NTBS (i.e., when to stimulate): by taking into account instantaneous phase or power of oscillatory brain activity, NTBS can be aligned to fluctuations in excitability states. Moreover, offline EEG/MEG recordings prior to interventions can inform researchers and clinicians how to stimulate: by frequency-tuning NTBS to the oscillation of interest, intrinsic brain oscillations can be up- or down-regulated. In this paper, we provide an overview of existing approaches and ideas of EEG/MEG-guided interventions, and their promises and caveats. We point out potential future lines of research to address challenges. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term ongoing pregnancy rate and mode of conception after a positive and negative post-coital test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, M.; Brandes, M.; Bruin, J.P.; Bots, R.S.; Kremer, J.A.; Nelen, W.L.; Hamilton, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many fertility clinics have decided to abolish the post-coital test. Yet, it is a significant factor in prognostic models that predict the spontaneous pregnancy rate within one year. The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the long-term outcome of infertile couples with a positive or a

  18. Long-term ongoing pregnancy rate and mode of conception after a positive and negative post-coital test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessel, M.; Brandes, M.; Bruin, J.P.; Bots, R.S.; Kremer, J.A.; Nelen, W.L.; Hamilton, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many fertility clinics have decided to abolish the post-coital test. Yet, it is a significant factor in prognostic models that predict the spontaneous pregnancy rate within one year. The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the long-term outcome of infertile couples with a positive or a

  19. Results of the Ongoing Monitoring of the Position of a Geostationary Telecommunication Satellite by the Method of Spatially Separated Basis Receiving of Digital Satellite Television Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, F.; Kaliuzhnyi, M.; Sybiryakova, Y.; Shulga, O.; Moskalenko, S.; Balagura, O.; Kulishenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    The results of the ongoing monitoring of the position of geostationary telecommunication satellite Eutelsat-13B (13° East) are presented in the article. The results were obtained using a radio engineering complex (RC) of four stations receiving digital satellite television and a data processing centre. The stations are located in Kyiv, Mukachevo, Kharkiv and Mykolaiv. The equipment of each station allows synchronous recording (by the GPS) of fragments of DVB-S signal from the quadrature detector output of the satellite television receiver. Samples of the complex signal are archived and sent to the data processing center through the Internet. Here three linearly independent slant range differences (Δr) for three pairs of the stations are determined as a result of correlation processing of received signals. Every second measured values of Δr are used to calculate Cartesian coordinates (XYZ) of the satellite in the coordinate system WGS84 by multilateration method. The time series of Δr, X, Y and Z obtained during continuous observations from March to May 2015 are presented in the article. Single-measurement errors of Δr, X, Y and Z are equal to 2.6 m, 3540 m, 705 m and 455 m, respectively. The complex is compared with known analogues. Ways of reduction of measurement errors of satellite coordinates are considered. The radio engineering complex could be considered a prototype of a system of independent ongoing monitoring of the position of geostationary telecommunication satellites.

  20. Positive selection on the killer whale mitogenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David; Morin, Phillip A.; Durban, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria produce up to 95 per cent of the eukaryotic cell's energy. The coding genes of the mitochondrial DNA may therefore evolve under selection owing to metabolic requirements. The killer whale, Orcinus orca, is polymorphic, has a global distribution and occupies a range of ecological nich...

  1. Positive Darwinian selection in human population: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU DongDong; ZHANG YaPing

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews a large number of genes under positive Darwinian selection in modern human populations, such as brain development genes, immunity genes, reproductive related genes, percep-tion receptors. The research on the evolutionary property of these genes will provide important insight into human evolution and disease mechanisms. With the increase of population genetics and com-parative genomics data, more and more evidences indicate that positive Darwinian selection plays an indispensable role in the origin and evolution of human beings. This paper will also summarize the methods to detect positive selection, analyze the interference factors faced and make suggestions for further research on positive selection.

  2. Positive Selection and the Evolution of izumo Genes in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Phil; Civetta, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Most genes linked to male reproductive function have been known to evolve rapidly among species and to show signatures of positive selection. Different male species-specific reproductive strategies have been proposed to underlie positive selection, such as sperm competitive advantage and control over females postmating physiology. However, an underexplored aspect potentially affecting male reproductive gene evolution in mammals is the effect of gene duplications. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of members of the izumo gene family in mammals, a family of four genes mostly expressed in the sperm with known and potential roles in sperm-egg fusion. We confirm a previously reported bout of selection for izumo1 and establish that the bout of selection is restricted to the diversification of species of the superorder Laurasiatheria. None of the izumo genes showed evidence of positive selection in Glires (Rodentia and Lagomorpha), and in the case of the non-testes-specific izumo4, rapid evolution was driven by relaxed selection. We detected evidence of positive selection for izumo3 among Primates. Interestingly, positively selected sites include several serine residues suggesting modifications in protein function and/or localization among Primates. Our results suggest that positive selection is driven by aspects related to species-specific adaptations to fertilization rather than sexual selection.

  3. Positive Selection and the Evolution of izumo Genes in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Grayson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most genes linked to male reproductive function have been known to evolve rapidly among species and to show signatures of positive selection. Different male species-specific reproductive strategies have been proposed to underlie positive selection, such as sperm competitive advantage and control over females postmating physiology. However, an underexplored aspect potentially affecting male reproductive gene evolution in mammals is the effect of gene duplications. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of members of the izumo gene family in mammals, a family of four genes mostly expressed in the sperm with known and potential roles in sperm-egg fusion. We confirm a previously reported bout of selection for izumo1 and establish that the bout of selection is restricted to the diversification of species of the superorder Laurasiatheria. None of the izumo genes showed evidence of positive selection in Glires (Rodentia and Lagomorpha, and in the case of the non-testes-specific izumo4, rapid evolution was driven by relaxed selection. We detected evidence of positive selection for izumo3 among Primates. Interestingly, positively selected sites include several serine residues suggesting modifications in protein function and/or localization among Primates. Our results suggest that positive selection is driven by aspects related to species-specific adaptations to fertilization rather than sexual selection.

  4. The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme: Ongoing activities and selected key tasks for the coming years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Decaulne, Armelle

    2012-09-01

    Projected climate change in cold environments is expected to alter melt-season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. In addition, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. The combined effects of these changes will alter surface environments in cold climate regions and change the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of data, coordinated process monitoring and coordinated quantitative analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment are acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists (I.A.G./A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme has been formed to address this key knowledge gap and builds on the earlier European Science Foundation (ESF) SEDIFLUX (Sedimentary Source-to-Sink-Fluxes in Cold Environments) Network. Coordinated efforts are carried out to monitor, quantify, compare and model sedimentary fluxes and possible effects of predicted climate change in currently 44 selected SEDIBUD Key Test Sites (cold climate environment catchments) worldwide.

  5. Patterns of positive selection in six Mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiol, Carolin; Vinar, Tomás; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2008-01-01

    are significantly enriched for PSGs, but no evidence was found for an enrichment for PSGs among brain-specific genes. This study provides additional evidence for widespread positive selection in mammalian evolution and new genome-wide insights into the functional implications of positive selection.......Genome-wide scans for positively selected genes (PSGs) in mammals have provided insight into the dynamics of genome evolution, the genetic basis of differences between species, and the functions of individual genes. However, previous scans have been limited in power and accuracy owing to small...... several new lineage- and clade-specific tests to be applied. Of approximately 16,500 human genes with high-confidence orthologs in at least two other species, 400 genes showed significant evidence of positive selection (FDR

  6. PORTFOLIO SELECTION THEORY WITH STRICTLY POSITIVE SUPPLY OF RISKLESS ASSET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shunming

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers the portfolio selection theory with strictly positive supply of riskless asset. The portfolio selection problem is described as a quadratic program, then this problem is solved by the Kuhn-Tucker condition and the method of artificial variable.

  7. Control selection and participation in an ongoing, population-based, case-control study of birth defects: the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Mary E; Bitsko, Rebecca H; Anderka, Marlene; Caton, Alissa R; Feldkamp, Marcia L; Hockett Sherlock, Stacey M; Meyer, Robert E; Ramadhani, Tunu; Robbins, James M; Shaw, Gary M; Mathews, T J; Royle, Marjorie; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the representativeness of controls in an ongoing, population-based, case-control study of birth defects in 10 centers across the United States, researchers compared 1997-2003 birth certificate data linked to selected controls (n = 6,681) and control participants (n = 4,395) with those from their base populations (n = 2,468,697). Researchers analyzed differences in population characteristics (e.g., percentage of births at > or =2,500 g) for each group. Compared with their base populations, control participants did not differ in distributions of maternal or paternal age, previous livebirths, maternal smoking, or diabetes, but they did differ in other maternal (i.e., race/ethnicity, education, entry into prenatal care) and infant (i.e., birth weight, gestational age, and plurality) characteristics. Differences in distributions of maternal, but not infant, characteristics were associated with participation by selected controls. Absolute differences in infant characteristics for the base population versus control participants were controls from hospitals compared with centers that selected controls from electronic birth certificates. These findings suggest that control participants in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study generally are representative of their base populations. Hospital-based control selection may slightly underascertain infants affected by certain adverse birth outcomes.

  8. A systematic search for positive selection in higher plants (Embryophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Christian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, a database characterizing examples of Embryophyte gene family lineages showing evidence of positive selection was reported. Of the gene family trees, 138 Embryophyte branches showed Ka/Ks>>1 and are candidates for functional adaptation. The database and these examples have now been studied in further detail to better understand the molecular basis for plant genome evolution. Results Neutral modeling showed an excess of positive and/or negative selection in the database over a neutral expectation centered on the mean Ka/Ks ratio. Out of 673 families with assigned structures, 490 have at least one branch with Ka/Ks >>1 in a region of the protein, enabling a picture of selective pressures delineated by protein structure. Most gene families allowed reconstruction back to the last common ancestor of flowering plants (Magnoliophytes without saturation of 4- fold degenerate codon position. Positive selection occurred in a wide variety of gene families with different functions, including in the self incompatibility locus, in defense against pathogens, in embryogenesis, in cold acclimation, and in electrontransport. Structurally, selective pressures were similar between alpha-helices and beta- sheets, but were less negative and more variant on the surface and away from the hydrophobic core. Conclusion Positive selection was detected statistically significantly in a small and nonrandom minority of gene families in a systematic analysis of embryophyte gene families. More sensitive methods increased the level of positive selection that was detected and presented a structural basis for the role of positive selection in plant genomes.

  9. Patterns of positive selection in six Mammalian genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Kosiol

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scans for positively selected genes (PSGs in mammals have provided insight into the dynamics of genome evolution, the genetic basis of differences between species, and the functions of individual genes. However, previous scans have been limited in power and accuracy owing to small numbers of available genomes. Here we present the most comprehensive examination of mammalian PSGs to date, using the six high-coverage genome assemblies now available for eutherian mammals. The increased phylogenetic depth of this dataset results in substantially improved statistical power, and permits several new lineage- and clade-specific tests to be applied. Of approximately 16,500 human genes with high-confidence orthologs in at least two other species, 400 genes showed significant evidence of positive selection (FDR<0.05, according to a standard likelihood ratio test. An additional 144 genes showed evidence of positive selection on particular lineages or clades. As in previous studies, the identified PSGs were enriched for roles in defense/immunity, chemosensory perception, and reproduction, but enrichments were also evident for more specific functions, such as complement-mediated immunity and taste perception. Several pathways were strongly enriched for PSGs, suggesting possible co-evolution of interacting genes. A novel Bayesian analysis of the possible "selection histories" of each gene indicated that most PSGs have switched multiple times between positive selection and nonselection, suggesting that positive selection is often episodic. A detailed analysis of Affymetrix exon array data indicated that PSGs are expressed at significantly lower levels, and in a more tissue-specific manner, than non-PSGs. Genes that are specifically expressed in the spleen, testes, liver, and breast are significantly enriched for PSGs, but no evidence was found for an enrichment for PSGs among brain-specific genes. This study provides additional evidence for

  10. Erasing errors due to alignment ambiguity when estimating positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelings, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Current estimates of diversifying positive selection rely on first having an accurate multiple sequence alignment. Simulation studies have shown that under biologically plausible conditions, relying on a single estimate of the alignment from commonly used alignment software can lead to unacceptably high false-positive rates in detecting diversifying positive selection. We present a novel statistical method that eliminates excess false positives resulting from alignment error by jointly estimating the degree of positive selection and the alignment under an evolutionary model. Our model treats both substitutions and insertions/deletions as sequence changes on a tree and allows site heterogeneity in the substitution process. We conduct inference starting from unaligned sequence data by integrating over all alignments. This approach naturally accounts for ambiguous alignments without requiring ambiguously aligned sites to be identified and removed prior to analysis. We take a Bayesian approach and conduct inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over all alignments on a fixed evolutionary tree topology. We introduce a Bayesian version of the branch-site test and assess the evidence for positive selection using Bayes factors. We compare two models of differing dimensionality using a simple alternative to reversible-jump methods. We also describe a more accurate method of estimating the Bayes factor using Rao-Blackwellization. We then show using simulated data that jointly estimating the alignment and the presence of positive selection solves the problem with excessive false positives from erroneous alignments and has nearly the same power to detect positive selection as when the true alignment is known. We also show that samples taken from the posterior alignment distribution using the software BAli-Phy have substantially lower alignment error compared with MUSCLE, MAFFT, PRANK, and FSA alignments.

  11. Selective control of attention supports the positivity effect in aging.

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    Laura K Sasse

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence for a positivity effect in healthy aging, which describes an age-specific increased focus on positive compared to negative information. Life-span researchers have attributed this effect to the selective allocation of cognitive resources in the service of prioritized emotional goals. We explored the basic principles of this assumption by assessing selective attention and memory for visual stimuli, differing in emotional content and self-relevance, in young and old participants. To specifically address the impact of cognitive control, voluntary attentional selection during the presentation of multiple-item displays was analyzed and linked to participants' general ability of cognitive control. Results revealed a positivity effect in older adults' selective attention and memory, which was particularly pronounced for self-relevant stimuli. Focusing on positive and ignoring negative information was most evident in older participants with a generally higher ability to exert top-down control during visual search. Our findings highlight the role of controlled selectivity in the occurrence of a positivity effect in aging. Since the effect has been related to well-being in later life, we suggest that the ability to selectively allocate top-down control might represent a resilience factor for emotional health in aging.

  12. Molecules and mating: positive selection and reproductive behaviour in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Leslie A; Innocent, Simeon H S

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is generally thought to be more costly than asexual reproduction. However, it does have the advantage of accelerating rates of adaptation through processes such as recombination and positive selection. Comparative studies of the human and nonhuman primate genomes have demonstrated that positive selection has played an important role in the evolutionary history of humans and other primates. To date, many dozens of genes, thought to be affected by positive selection, have been identified. In this chapter, we will focus on genes that are associated with mating behaviours and reproductive processes, concentrating on genes that are most likely to enhance reproductive success and that also show evidence of positive selection. The genes encode phenotypic features that potentially influence mate choice decisions or impact the evolution and function of genes involved in the perception and regulation of, and the response to, phenotypic signals. We will also consider genes that influence precopulatory behavioural traits in humans and nonhuman primates, such as social bonding and aggression. The evolution of post-copulatory strategies such as sperm competition and selective abortion may also evolve in the presence of intense competition and these adaptations will also be considered. Although behaviour may not be solely determined by genes, the evidence suggests that the genes discussed in this chapter have some influence on human and nonhuman primate behaviour and that positive selection on these genes results in some degree of population differentiation and diversity.

  13. A map of recent positive selection in the human genome.

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    Benjamin F Voight

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of signals of very recent positive selection provides information about the adaptation of modern humans to local conditions. We report here on a genome-wide scan for signals of very recent positive selection in favor of variants that have not yet reached fixation. We describe a new analytical method for scanning single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data for signals of recent selection, and apply this to data from the International HapMap Project. In all three continental groups we find widespread signals of recent positive selection. Most signals are region-specific, though a significant excess are shared across groups. Contrary to some earlier low resolution studies that suggested a paucity of recent selection in sub-Saharan Africans, we find that by some measures our strongest signals of selection are from the Yoruba population. Finally, since these signals indicate the existence of genetic variants that have substantially different fitnesses, they must indicate loci that are the source of significant phenotypic variation. Though the relevant phenotypes are generally not known, such loci should be of particular interest in mapping studies of complex traits. For this purpose we have developed a set of SNPs that can be used to tag the strongest approximately 250 signals of recent selection in each population.

  14. Negative selection of murine medullary-type single positive thymocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Negative selection depletes self-reactive T cells, thus ensuring self-tolerance. It is usually considered that negative selection imposed on double-positive (DP) thymocytes that reside at the cortico-medullary junction. Negative selection model was set up by injecting mice with anti-T cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) intraperitoneally in this work. As shown in phenotypic analysis of thymocytes, negative selection destroys not only cortical-type DP thymocytes, but also medullary-type CD3+TCRαβ+CD4SP and CD3+TCRαβ+CD8SP thymocytes. Negative selection of medullary-type single positive (SP) are more susceptible to apoptosis, while with development of the cells, their resistance to apoptosis increases. Therefore, negative selection does not operate on functionally mature thymocytes at the late stage. This result is a supplement to the traditional theory of negative selection. Negative selection of medullary-type thymocytes is probably to further deplete self-reactive T cells, thus producing precise TCR repertoire and inducing self-tolerance.

  15. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  16. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  17. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and bayesian tests to describe the evolution of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected sites that occur later act against other destabilizing mutations to maintain stability across the clade, except for the shallow divers, where late stability relaxation occurs, probably due to the shorter aerobic dive limits of these species. The three main positively selected sites 66, 5, and 35 undergo changes that favor hydrophobic folding, structural integrity, and intra-helical hydrogen bonds.

  18. Evidence of Positive Selection on a Class I ADH Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Gu, Sheng; Oota, Hiroki; Osier, Michael V.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Speed, William C.; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2007-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) family of enzymes catalyzes the reversible oxidation of alcohol to acetaldehyde. Seven ADH genes exist in a segment of ∼370 kb on 4q21. Products of the three class I ADH genes that share 95% sequence identity are believed to play the major role in the first step of ethanol metabolism. Because the common belief that selection has operated at the ADH1B*47His allele in East Asian populations lacks direct biological or statistical evidence, we used genomic data to test the hypothesis. Data consisted of 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the ADH clusters in a global sampling of 42 populations. Both the Fst statistic and the long-range haplotype (LRH) test provided positive evidence of selection in several East Asian populations. The ADH1B Arg47His functional polymorphism has the highest Fst of the 54 SNPs in the ADH cluster, and it is significantly above the mean Fst of 382 presumably neutral sites tested on the same 42 population samples. The LRH test that uses cores including that site and extending on both sides also gives significant evidence of positive selection in some East Asian populations for a specific haplotype carrying the ADH1B*47His allele. Interestingly, this haplotype is present at a high frequency in only some East Asian populations, whereas the specific allele also exists in other East Asian populations and in the Near East and Europe but does not show evidence of selection with use of the LRH test. Although the ADH1B*47His allele conveys a well-confirmed protection against alcoholism, that modern phenotypic manifestation does not easily translate into a positive selective force, and the nature of that selective force, in the past and/or currently, remains speculative. PMID:17273965

  19. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  20. Positive and purifying selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nadia D; Koerich, Leonardo B; Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Y chromosomes, with their reduced effective population size, lack of recombination, and male-limited transmission, present a unique collection of constraints for the operation of natural selection. Male-limited transmission may greatly increase the efficacy of selection for male-beneficial mutations, but the reduced effective size also inflates the role of random genetic drift. Together, these defining features of the Y chromosome are expected to influence rates and patterns of molecular evolution on the Y as compared with X-linked or autosomal loci. Here, we use sequence data from 11 genes in 9 Drosophila species to gain insight into the efficacy of natural selection on the Drosophila Y relative to the rest of the genome. Drosophila is an ideal system for assessing the consequences of Y-linkage for molecular evolution in part because the gene content of Drosophila Y chromosomes is highly dynamic, with orthologous genes being Y-linked in some species whereas autosomal in others. Our results confirm the expectation that the efficacy of natural selection at weakly selected sites is reduced on the Y chromosome. In contrast, purifying selection on the Y chromosome for strongly deleterious mutations does not appear to be compromised. Finally, we find evidence of recurrent positive selection for 4 of the 11 genes studied here. Our results thus highlight the variable nature of the mode and impact of natural selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. African signatures of recent positive selection in human FOXI1

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    Moreno-Estrada Andrés

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human FOXI1 gene codes for a transcription factor involved in the physiology of the inner ear, testis, and kidney. Using three interspecies comparisons, it has been suggested that this may be a gene under human-specific selection. We sought to confirm this finding by using an extended set of orthologous sequences. Additionally, we explored for signals of natural selection within humans by sequencing the gene in 20 Europeans, 20 East Asians and 20 Yorubas and by analysing SNP variation in a 2 Mb region centered on FOXI1 in 39 worldwide human populations from the HGDP-CEPH diversity panel. Results The genome sequences recently available from other primate and non-primate species showed that FOXI1 divergence patterns are compatible with neutral evolution. Sequence-based neutrality tests were not significant in Europeans, East Asians or Yorubas. However, the Long Range Haplotype (LRH test, as well as the iHS and XP-Rsb statistics revealed significantly extended tracks of homozygosity around FOXI1 in Africa, suggesting a recent episode of positive selection acting on this gene. A functionally relevant SNP, as well as several SNPs either on the putatively selected core haplotypes or with significant iHS or XP-Rsb values, displayed allele frequencies strongly correlated with the absolute geographical latitude of the populations sampled. Conclusions We present evidence for recent positive selection in the FOXI1 gene region in Africa. Climate might be related to this recent adaptive event in humans. Of the multiple functions of FOXI1, its role in kidney-mediated water-electrolyte homeostasis is the most obvious candidate for explaining a climate-related adaptation.

  2. Positive darwinian selection at the imprinted MEDEA locus in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Charles; Schmid, Karl J; Laoueillé-Duprat, Sylvia; Pien, Stéphane; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan-Miguel; Baroux, Célia; Gagliardini, Valeria; Page, Damian R; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2007-07-19

    In mammals and seed plants, a subset of genes is regulated by genomic imprinting where an allele's activity depends on its parental origin. The parental conflict theory suggests that genomic imprinting evolved after the emergence of an embryo-nourishing tissue (placenta and endosperm), resulting in an intragenomic parental conflict over the allocation of nutrients from mother to offspring. It was predicted that imprinted genes, which arose through antagonistic co-evolution driven by a parental conflict, should be subject to positive darwinian selection. Here we show that the imprinted plant gene MEDEA (MEA), which is essential for seed development, originated during a whole-genome duplication 35 to 85 million years ago. After duplication, MEA underwent positive darwinian selection consistent with neo-functionalization and the parental conflict theory. MEA continues to evolve rapidly in the out-crossing species Arabidopsis lyrata but not in the self-fertilizing species Arabidopsis thaliana, where parental conflicts are reduced. The paralogue of MEA, SWINGER (SWN; also called EZA1), is not imprinted and evolved under strong purifying selection because it probably retained the ancestral function of the common precursor gene. The evolution of MEA suggests a late origin of genomic imprinting within the Brassicaceae, whereas imprinting is thought to have originated early within the mammalian lineage.

  3. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P

    2013-01-01

    between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected......Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity...... of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests to describe the evolution...

  4. Selective assemblies of giant tetrahedra via precisely controlled positional interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Wang, Jing; Mei, Shan; Dong, Xuehui; Li, Yiwen; Li, Mingxuan; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Aida, Takuzo; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Yue, Kan; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembly of rigid building blocks with explicit shape and symmetry is substantially influenced by the geometric factors and remains largely unexplored. We report the selective assembly behaviors of a class of precisely defined, nanosized giant tetrahedra constructed by placing different polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecular nanoparticles at the vertices of a rigid tetrahedral framework. Designed symmetry breaking of these giant tetrahedra introduces precise positional interactions and results in diverse selectively assembled, highly ordered supramolecular lattices including a Frank-Kasper A15 phase, which resembles the essential structural features of certain metal alloys but at a larger length scale. These results demonstrate the power of persistent molecular geometry with balanced enthalpy and entropy in creating thermodynamically stable supramolecular lattices with properties distinct from those of other self-assembling soft materials.

  5. Colon cancer associated genes exhibit signatures of positive selection at functionally significant positions

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    Morgan Claire C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer, much like most human disease, is routinely studied by utilizing model organisms. Of these model organisms, mice are often dominant. However, our assumptions of functional equivalence fail to consider the opportunity for divergence conferred by ~180 Million Years (MY of independent evolution between these species. For a given set of human disease related genes, it is therefore important to determine if functional equivalency has been retained between species. In this study we test the hypothesis that cancer associated genes have different patterns of substitution akin to adaptive evolution in different mammal lineages. Results Our analysis of the current literature and colon cancer databases identified 22 genes exhibiting colon cancer associated germline mutations. We identified orthologs for these 22 genes across a set of high coverage (>6X vertebrate genomes. Analysis of these orthologous datasets revealed significant levels of positive selection. Evidence of lineage-specific positive selection was identified in 14 genes in both ancestral and extant lineages. Lineage-specific positive selection was detected in the ancestral Euarchontoglires and Hominidae lineages for STK11, in the ancestral primate lineage for CDH1, in the ancestral Murinae lineage for both SDHC and MSH6 genes and the ancestral Muridae lineage for TSC1. Conclusion Identifying positive selection in the Primate, Hominidae, Muridae and Murinae lineages suggests an ancestral functional shift in these genes between the rodent and primate lineages. Analyses such as this, combining evolutionary theory and predictions - along with medically relevant data, can thus provide us with important clues for modeling human diseases.

  6. Colon cancer associated genes exhibit signatures of positive selection at functionally significant positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer, much like most human disease, is routinely studied by utilizing model organisms. Of these model organisms, mice are often dominant. However, our assumptions of functional equivalence fail to consider the opportunity for divergence conferred by ~180 Million Years (MY) of independent evolution between these species. For a given set of human disease related genes, it is therefore important to determine if functional equivalency has been retained between species. In this study we test the hypothesis that cancer associated genes have different patterns of substitution akin to adaptive evolution in different mammal lineages. Results Our analysis of the current literature and colon cancer databases identified 22 genes exhibiting colon cancer associated germline mutations. We identified orthologs for these 22 genes across a set of high coverage (>6X) vertebrate genomes. Analysis of these orthologous datasets revealed significant levels of positive selection. Evidence of lineage-specific positive selection was identified in 14 genes in both ancestral and extant lineages. Lineage-specific positive selection was detected in the ancestral Euarchontoglires and Hominidae lineages for STK11, in the ancestral primate lineage for CDH1, in the ancestral Murinae lineage for both SDHC and MSH6 genes and the ancestral Muridae lineage for TSC1. Conclusion Identifying positive selection in the Primate, Hominidae, Muridae and Murinae lineages suggests an ancestral functional shift in these genes between the rodent and primate lineages. Analyses such as this, combining evolutionary theory and predictions - along with medically relevant data, can thus provide us with important clues for modeling human diseases. PMID:22788692

  7. SELECTION AND PROMOTION PROCESS TO SUPERVISORY POSITIONS IN MEXICO, 2015

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    José Guadalupe Hernández López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Mexico it is starting a process of selection and promotion of teachers to supervisory positions through what has been called competitive examinations. This competition, derived from the Education Reform 2013, is justified by the alleged finding the best teachers to fill them. As a "new" process in the Mexican education system has led to a series of disputes since that examination was confined to the application and resolution of a standardized test consisting of multiple-choice questions applied in a session of eight hours which it determines whether a teacher is qualified or not qualified for the job.

  8. Positive selection on a bacterial oncoprotein associated with gastric cancer

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    Delgado-Rosado Gisela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Helicobacter pylori is a vertically inherited gut commensal that is carcinogenic if it possesses the cag pathogenicity island (cag PaI; infection with H.pylori is the major risk factor for gastric cancer, the second leading cause of death from cancer worldwide (WHO. The cag PaI locus encodes the cagA gene, whose protein product is injected into stomach epithelial cells via a Type IV secretion system, also encoded by the cag PaI. Once there, the cagA protein binds to various cellular proteins, resulting in dysregulation of cell division and carcinogenesis. For this reason, cagA may be described as an oncoprotein. A clear understanding of the mechanism of action of cagA and its benefit to the bacteria is lacking. Results Here, we reveal that the cagA gene displays strong signatures of positive selection in bacteria isolated from amerindian populations, using the Ka/Ks ratio. Weaker signatures are also detected in the gene from bacteria isolated from asian populations, using the Ka/Ks ratio and the more sensitive branches-sites model of the PAML package. When the cagA gene isolated from amerindian populations was examined in more detail it was found that the region under positive selection contains the EPIYA domains, which are known to modulate the carcinogenicity of the gene. This means that the carcinogenicity modulating region of the gene is undergoing adaptation. The results are discussed in relation to the high incidences of stomach cancer in some latin american and asian populations. Conclusion Positive selection on cagA indicates antagonistic coevolution between host and bacteria, which appears paradoxical given that cagA is detrimental to the human host upon which the bacteria depends. This suggests several non-exclusive possibilities; that gastric cancer has not been a major selective pressure on human populations, that cagA has an undetermined benefit to the human host, or that horizontal transmission of H.pylori between hosts

  9. A genome scan for positive selection in thoroughbred horses.

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    Jingjing Gu

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred horses have been selected for exceptional racing performance resulting in system-wide structural and functional adaptations contributing to elite athletic phenotypes. Because selection has been recent and intense in a closed population that stems from a small number of founder animals Thoroughbreds represent a unique population within which to identify genomic contributions to exercise-related traits. Employing a population genetics-based hitchhiking mapping approach we performed a genome scan using 394 autosomal and X chromosome microsatellite loci and identified positively selected loci in the extreme tail-ends of the empirical distributions for (1 deviations from expected heterozygosity (Ewens-Watterson test in Thoroughbred (n = 112 and (2 global differentiation among four geographically diverse horse populations (F(ST. We found positively selected genomic regions in Thoroughbred enriched for phosphoinositide-mediated signalling (3.2-fold enrichment; P<0.01, insulin receptor signalling (5.0-fold enrichment; P<0.01 and lipid transport (2.2-fold enrichment; P<0.05 genes. We found a significant overrepresentation of sarcoglycan complex (11.1-fold enrichment; P<0.05 and focal adhesion pathway (1.9-fold enrichment; P<0.01 genes highlighting the role for muscle strength and integrity in the Thoroughbred athletic phenotype. We report for the first time candidate athletic-performance genes within regions targeted by selection in Thoroughbred horses that are principally responsible for fatty acid oxidation, increased insulin sensitivity and muscle strength: ACSS1 (acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 1, ACTA1 (actin, alpha 1, skeletal muscle, ACTN2 (actinin, alpha 2, ADHFE1 (alcohol dehydrogenase, iron containing, 1, MTFR1 (mitochondrial fission regulator 1, PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 and TNC (tenascin C. Understanding the genetic basis for exercise adaptation will be crucial for the identification of genes

  10. Primate ABO Gene is under Weak Positive Selection

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    Eliane Santos EVANOVICH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABO locus presents three main alleles: A, B and O. A and B encode glycosyltransferases that catalyze the addiction of an N-GalNac and D-galactose to a precursor substance (H substance, producing A and B antigens, while the O allele does not produce a functional protein. The presence of A and B antigens have been associated to resistance against infectious agents which could use them as attachment factors increasing the virulence of some parasitic agents. As these antigens are not restrict to humans, analyses them in others species, for instance non-human primates, may be crucial to understand the relationship between pathogens and ABO phenotypes. Despite of the relevance of this issue, in the last decade few studies have addressed, mainly in New World Monkeys (NWM, natural reservoir of tropical diseases in Amazon Region. In order to understand the evolution of the ABO system in the primates, it has been obtained the partial sequence of the most important exon of ABO gene (exon 7, in platyrrhini families: Atelidae, Pithecidae and Cebidae. Then, it has been compared the sequences obtained those present in the literature, and measured the selective pressure. The present results shown that residues 266 and 268 are also crucial to distinguish A and B phenotypes in the platyrrhines, such as in catarrhines, and the 266 codon is under positive selection, although the most site codons are under action of purifying selection.

  11. Using two on-going HIV studies to obtain clinical data from before, during and after pregnancy for HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntington Susie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC is an observational study that collates data on HIV-positive adults accessing HIV clinical care at (currently 13 large clinics in the UK but does not collect pregnancy specific data. The National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC collates data on HIV-positive women receiving antenatal care from every maternity unit in the UK and Ireland. Both studies collate pseudonymised data and neither dataset contains unique patient identifiers. A methodology was developed to find and match records for women reported to both studies thereby obtaining clinical and treatment data on pregnant HIV-positive women not available from either dataset alone. Results Women in UK CHIC receiving HIV-clinical care in 1996–2009, were found in the NSHPC dataset by initially ‘linking’ records with identical date-of-birth, linked records were then accepted as a genuine ‘match’, if they had further matching fields including CD4 test date. In total, 2063 women were found in both datasets, representing 23.1% of HIV-positive women with a pregnancy in the UK (n = 8932. Clinical data was available in UK CHIC following most pregnancies (92.0%, 2471/2685 pregnancies starting before 2009. There was bias towards matching women with repeat pregnancies (35.9% (741/2063 of women found in both datasets had a repeat pregnancy compared to 21.9% (1502/6869 of women in NSHPC only and matching women HIV diagnosed before their first reported pregnancy (54.8% (1131/2063 compared to 47.7% (3278/6869, respectively. Conclusions Through the use of demographic data and clinical dates, records from two independent studies were successfully matched, providing data not available from either study alone.

  12. Evidence of recombination and positive selection in cetacean papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio, E-mail: refugio.robles1@gmail.com [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Rivera, Rebecca, E-mail: RRivera@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Nollens, Hendrik H., E-mail: Hendrik.Nollens@SeaWorld.com [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); SeaWorld San Diego, 500 SeaWorld Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); St Leger, Judy, E-mail: Judy.St.Leger@SeaWorld.com [SeaWorld San Diego, 500 SeaWorld Drive, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Durden, Wendy N., E-mail: WNoke@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, 3830 South Highway A1A 4-181, Melbourne Beach, FL 32951 (United States); Stolen, Megan, E-mail: MStolen@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, 3830 South Highway A1A 4-181, Melbourne Beach, FL 32951 (United States); Burchell, Jennifer, E-mail: JBurchell@hswri.org [Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute, Center for Marine Veterinary Virology, 2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA 92109 (United States); Wellehan, James F.X., E-mail: WellehanJ@ufl.edu [College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 110885, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-06-05

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are small DNA viruses that have been associated with increased epithelial proliferation. Over one hundred PV types have been identified in humans; however, only three have been identified in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to date. Using rolling circle amplification and degenerate PCR, we identified four novel PV genomes of bottlenose dolphins. TtPV4, TtPV5 and TtPV6 were identified in genital lesions while TtPV7 was identified in normal genital mucosa. Bayesian analysis of the full-length L1 genes found that TtPV4 and TtPV7 group within the Upsilonpapillomavirus genus while TtPV5 and TtPV6 group with Omikronpapillomavirus. However, analysis of the E1 gene did not distinguish these genera, implying that these genes may not share a common history, consistent with recombination. Recombination analyses identified several probable events. Signals of positive selection were found mostly in the E1 and E2 genes. Recombination and diversifying selection pressures constitute important driving forces of cetacean PV evolution.

  13. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  14. The Ongoing Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    intimacy, however, never seemed intimate but rather excessive: the sweets too sweet, the colours too bright, and the laughter too high-pitched. The stark contrast between the light chit-chat and the ongoing suffering of the individual women made these public get together not only pleasant but also...

  15. selscan: an efficient multithreaded program to perform EHH-based scans for positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpiech, Zachary A; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2014-10-01

    Haplotype-based scans to detect natural selection are useful to identify recent or ongoing positive selection in genomes. As both real and simulated genomic data sets grow larger, spanning thousands of samples and millions of markers, there is a need for a fast and efficient implementation of these scans for general use. Here, we present selscan, an efficient multithreaded application that implements Extended Haplotype Homozygosity (EHH), Integrated Haplotype Score (iHS), and Cross-population EHH (XPEHH). selscan accepts phased genotypes in multiple formats, including TPED, and performs extremely well on both simulated and real data and over an order of magnitude faster than existing available implementations. It calculates iHS on chromosome 22 (22,147 loci) across 204 CEU haplotypes in 353 s on one thread (33 s on 16 threads) and calculates XPEHH for the same data relative to 210 YRI haplotypes in 578 s on one thread (52 s on 16 threads). Source code and binaries (Windows, OSX, and Linux) are available at https://github.com/szpiech/selscan.

  16. Improving seed health and seed performance by positive selection in three Kenyan potato varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte-Geldermann, E.; Gildemacher, P.R.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Selecting seed potatoes from healthy-looking mother plants (positive selection) was compared with common Kenyan farmer practice of selection from the harvested bulk of potatoes (farmer selection) in 23 farmer-managed trials. Positive selection assured lower incidences of PLRV (39%), PVY (35%) and PV

  17. Autonomous site selection and instrument positioning for sample acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Barnes, D.; Pugh, S.

    The European Space Agency Aurora Exploration Program aims to establish a European long-term programme for the exploration of Space, culminating in a human mission to space in the 2030 timeframe. Two flagship missions, namely Mars Sample Return and ExoMars, have been proposed as recognised steps along the way. The Exomars Rover is the first of these flagship missions and includes a rover carrying the Pasteur Payload, a mobile exobiology instrumentation package, and the Beagle 2 arm. The primary objective is the search for evidence of past or present life on mars, but the payload will also study the evolution of the planet and the atmosphere, look for evidence of seismological activity and survey the environment in preparation for future missions. The operation of rovers in unknown environments is complicated, and requires large resources not only on the planet but also in ground based operations. Currently, this can be very labour intensive, and costly, if large teams of scientists and engineers are required to assess mission progress, plan mission scenarios, and construct a sequence of events or goals for uplink. Furthermore, the constraints in communication imposed by the time delay involved over such large distances, and line-of-sight required, make autonomy paramount to mission success, affording the ability to operate in the event of communications outages and be opportunistic with respect to scientific discovery. As part of this drive to reduce mission costs and increase autonomy the Space Robotics group at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth is researching methods of autonomous site selection and instrument positioning, directly applicable to the ExoMars mission. The site selection technique used builds on the geometric reasoning algorithms used previously for localisation and navigation [Shaw 03]. It is proposed that a digital elevation model (DEM) of the local surface, generated during traverse and without interaction from ground based operators, can be

  18. Positive Selection of Iris, a Retroviral Envelope-Derived Host Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    outside vertebrates. It is also the first example of a retroviral envelope gene that has been found to be subject to positive selection following its domestication. The unusual selective pressures acting on Iris suggest that it is an active participant in an ongoing genetic conflict. We propose a model in which Iris has "switched sides," having been recruited by host genomes to combat baculoviruses and retroviruses, which employ homologous envelope genes to mediate infection.

  19. Positive Selection on Loci Associated with Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Sadler

    Full Text Available Much of the evolution of human behavior remains a mystery, including how certain disadvantageous behaviors are so prevalent. Nicotine addiction is one such phenotype. Several loci have been implicated in nicotine related phenotypes including the nicotinic receptor gene clusters (CHRNs on chromosomes 8 and 15. Here we use 1000 Genomes sequence data from 3 populations (Africans, Asians and Europeans to examine whether natural selection has occurred at these loci. We used Tajima's D and the integrated haplotype score (iHS to test for evidence of natural selection. Our results provide evidence for strong selection in the nicotinic receptor gene cluster on chromosome 8, previously found to be significantly associated with both nicotine and cocaine dependence, as well as evidence selection acting on the region containing the CHRNA5 nicotinic receptor gene on chromosome 15, that is genome wide significant for risk for nicotine dependence. To examine the possibility that this selection is related to memory and learning, we utilized genetic data from the Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA to test variants within these regions with three tests of memory and learning, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS Block Design, WAIS Digit Symbol and WAIS Information tests. Of the 17 SNPs genotyped in COGA in this region, we find one significantly associated with WAIS digit symbol test results. This test captures aspects of reaction time and memory, suggesting that a phenotype relating to memory and learning may have been the driving force behind selection at these loci. This study could begin to explain why these seemingly deleterious SNPs are present at their current frequencies.

  20. Reduced purifying selection prevails over positive selection in human copy number variant evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc-Quang; Webber, Caleb; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Pfundt, Rolph; Veltman, Joris; Ponting, Chris P

    2008-11-01

    Copy number variation is a dominant contributor to genomic variation and may frequently underlie an individual's variable susceptibilities to disease. Here we question our previous proposition that copy number variants (CNVs) are often retained in the human population because of their adaptive benefit. We show that genic biases of CNVs are best explained, not by positive selection, but by reduced efficiency of selection in eliminating deleterious changes from the human population. Of four CNV data sets examined, three exhibit significant increases in protein evolutionary rates. These increases appear to be attributable to the frequent coincidence of CNVs with segmental duplications (SDs) that recombine infrequently. Furthermore, human orthologs of mouse genes, which, when disrupted, result in pre- or postnatal lethality, are unusually depleted in CNVs. Together, these findings support a model of reduced purifying selection (Hill-Robertson interference) within copy number variable regions that are enriched in nonessential genes, allowing both the fixation of slightly deleterious substitutions and increased drift of CNV alleles. Additionally, all four CNV sets exhibited increased rates of interspecies chromosomal rearrangement and nucleotide substitution and an increased gene density. We observe that sequences with high G+C contents are most prone to copy number variation. In particular, frequently duplicated human SD sequence, or CNVs that are large and/or observed frequently, tend to be elevated in G+C content. In contrast, SD sequences that appear fixed in the human population lie more frequently within low G+C sequence. These findings provide an overarching view of how CNVs arise and segregate in the human population.

  1. Signatures of positive selection in LY96 gene in vertebrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tonghai Dou; Maobin Fu; Yixia Wang; Yang Zhao; Zhengshi Wang; Zhengqian Bian; Yan Zhou

    2013-12-01

    As a secreted glycoprotein that binds to the extracellular domain of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), Lymphocyte Antigen 96 (LY96), also called myeloid differentiation 2 (MD2), is required for the activation of TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and plays an important role in innate immunity, which is the first line of defence against microbial infections. Previous studies have proposed that mammalian toll-like receptors (TLRs) have evolved under diversifying selection due to their role in pathogen detection. Given the fact that LY96 is highly functionally linked to TLR4, it would be interesting to test whether LY96 is under the intense pressure of natural selection. To investigate the natural selection hypothesis, we compared the coding sequences from 13 vertebrates and evaluated the molecular evolution of LY96 gene in these species. Result shows that natural selection at exon 4 has indeed played a role in shaping the function of LY96 in the course of evolution. In addition to the study of Nakajima, we found the two branch nodes with Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1: the one leading to cow and pig and the other to rabbit and the primates.

  2. The role of Parenting and Goal Selection in Positive Youth Development: A Person-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Christopher M.; Bowers, Edmond P.; Gestsdottir, Steinunn; Depping, Miriam; von Eye, Alexander; Chase, Paul; Lerner, Jacqueline V.

    2011-01-01

    Using a person-centered approach, we examined the relations between goal selection, various indicators of parenting, and positive development among 510 Grades 9 to 11 participants (68% female) in the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development (PYD), a longitudinal study involving U.S. adolescents. Goal selection was operationalized by the "Selection"…

  3. Functional divergence of the NIP III subgroup proteins involved altered selective constraints and positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhujun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nod26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs that belong to the aquaporin superfamily are unique to plants. According to homology modeling and phylogenetic analysis, the NIP subfamily can be further divided into three subgroups with distinct biological functions (NIP I, NIP II, and NIP III. In some grasses, the NIP III subgroup proteins (NIP2s were demonstrated to be permeable to solutes with larger diameter, such as silicic acid and arsenous acids. However, to date there is no data-mining or direct experimental evidences for the permeability of such larger solutes for dicot NIP2s, although they exhibit similar three-dimensional structures as those in grasses. It is therefore intriguing to investigate the molecular mechanisms that drive the evolution of plant NIP2s. Results The NIP III subgroup is more ancient with a divergence time that predates the monocot-dicot split. The proliferation of NIP2 genes in modern grass species is primarily attributed to whole genome and segmental chromosomal duplication events. The structure of NIP2 genes is relatively conserved, possessing five exons and four introns. All NIP2s possess an ar/R filter consisting of G, S, G, and R, except for the cucumber CsNIP2;2, where a small G in the H2 is substituted with the bulkier C residue. Our maximum likelihood analysis revealed that NIP2s, especially the loop A (LA region, have undergone strong selective pressure for adaptive evolution. The analysis at the amino acid level provided strong statistical evidences for the functional divergence between monocot and dicot NIP III subgroup proteins. In addition, several SDPs (Specificity Determining Positions responsible for functional specificity were predicted. Conclusions The present study provides the first evidences of functional divergence between dicot and monocot NIP2s, and suggests that positive selection, as well as a radical shift of evolutionary rate at some critical amino acid sites is the primary

  4. A Scan for Positively Selected Genes in the Genomes of Humans and Chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Bustamente, Carlos; Clark, Andrew G.

    2005-01-01

    of these genes may be driven by genomic conflict due to apoptosis during spermatogenesis. Genes with maximal expression in the brain show little or no evidence for positive selection, while genes with maximal expression in the testis tend to be enriched with positively selected genes. Genes on the X chromosome...... such evolutionary changes to leave a noticeable signature throughout the genome. We here compare 13,731 annotated genes from humans to their chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of positive selection. Many of the genes that present a signature of positive selection tend to be involved...... in sensory perception or immune defenses. However, the group of genes that show the strongest evidence for positive selection also includes a surprising number of genes involved in tumor suppression and apoptosis, and of genes involved in spermatogenesis. We hypothesize that positive selection in some...

  5. Ongoing Projects on Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vaz de Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This number of the EAI Transactions on Serious Games is dedicated to a set of ongoing research and development projects in this area. The selected articles represent very well the diversity of approaches, contexts and objectives that foster and render highly dynamic this area of study. In Europe, several funding programmes like the 7th Framework Programme, the Lifelong Learning Programme and the most recent Horizon 2020 made specific provisions to support Serious Games projects. At the same time, enterprises are recognizing more and more the potential of SG to train and to motivate their workforce and are therefore joining forces with the academy and SG producers to design specific SG. Serious Games became one of the most interesting “places to be” due to its growing scientific and practitioner community. We can say that the motivating and addictive character of games has been successfully transmitted to the research and development of Serious Games.

  6. Positive diversifying selection is a pervasive adaptive force throughout the Drosophila radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicconardi, Francesco; Marcatili, Paolo; Arthofer, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    of the most important systems to study adaptive radiation. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of positive diversifying selection on more than 2000 single-copy orthologous groups in 25 species using a recent method of increased accuracy for detecting positive diversifying selection. Adopting...... the Drosophila radiation. Acting on the same biological processes via different routes, positive diversifying selection has promoted diversity of functions and adaptive divergence....

  7. A scan for positively selected genes in the genomes of humans and chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Nielsen

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the divergence of humans and chimpanzees about 5 million years ago, these species have undergone a remarkable evolution with drastic divergence in anatomy and cognitive abilities. At the molecular level, despite the small overall magnitude of DNA sequence divergence, we might expect such evolutionary changes to leave a noticeable signature throughout the genome. We here compare 13,731 annotated genes from humans to their chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of positive selection. Many of the genes that present a signature of positive selection tend to be involved in sensory perception or immune defenses. However, the group of genes that show the strongest evidence for positive selection also includes a surprising number of genes involved in tumor suppression and apoptosis, and of genes involved in spermatogenesis. We hypothesize that positive selection in some of these genes may be driven by genomic conflict due to apoptosis during spermatogenesis. Genes with maximal expression in the brain show little or no evidence for positive selection, while genes with maximal expression in the testis tend to be enriched with positively selected genes. Genes on the X chromosome also tend to show an elevated tendency for positive selection. We also present polymorphism data from 20 Caucasian Americans and 19 African Americans for the 50 annotated genes showing the strongest evidence for positive selection. The polymorphism analysis further supports the presence of positive selection in these genes by showing an excess of high-frequency derived nonsynonymous mutations.

  8. Positive selection, relaxation, and acceleration in the evolution of the human and chimp genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Arbiza

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available For years evolutionary biologists have been interested in searching for the genetic bases underlying humanness. Recent efforts at a large or a complete genomic scale have been conducted to search for positively selected genes in human and in chimp. However, recently developed methods allowing for a more sensitive and controlled approach in the detection of positive selection can be employed. Here, using 13,198 genes, we have deduced the sets of genes involved in rate acceleration, positive selection, and relaxation of selective constraints in human, in chimp, and in their ancestral lineage since the divergence from murids. Significant deviations from the strict molecular clock were observed in 469 human and in 651 chimp genes. The more stringent branch-site test of positive selection detected 108 human and 577 chimp positively selected genes. An important proportion of the positively selected genes did not show a significant acceleration in rates, and similarly, many of the accelerated genes did not show significant signals of positive selection. Functional differentiation of genes under rate acceleration, positive selection, and relaxation was not statistically significant between human and chimp with the exception of terms related to G-protein coupled receptors and sensory perception. Both of these were over-represented under relaxation in human in relation to chimp. Comparing differences between derived and ancestral lineages, a more conspicuous change in trends seems to have favored positive selection in the human lineage. Since most of the positively selected genes are different under the same functional categories between these species, we suggest that the individual roles of the alternative positively selected genes may be an important factor underlying biological differences between these species.

  9. Patterns of Positive Selection of the Myogenic Regulatory Factor Gene Family in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao; Yu, Qi; Huang, Ling; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The functional divergence of transcriptional factors is critical in the evolution of transcriptional regulation. However, the mechanism of functional divergence among these factors remains unclear. Here, we performed an evolutionary analysis for positive selection in members of the myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) gene family of vertebrates. We selected 153 complete vertebrate MRF nucleotide sequences from our analyses, which revealed substantial evidence of positive selection. Here, we show that sites under positive selection were more frequently detected and identified from the genes encoding the myogenic differentiation factors (MyoG and Myf6) than the genes encoding myogenic determination factors (Myf5 and MyoD). Additionally, the functional divergence within the myogenic determination factors or differentiation factors was also under positive selection pressure. The positive selection sites were more frequently detected from MyoG and MyoD than Myf6 and Myf5, respectively. Amino acid residues under positive selection were identified mainly in their transcription activation domains and on the surface of protein three-dimensional structures. These data suggest that the functional gain and divergence of myogenic regulatory factors were driven by distinct positive selection of their transcription activation domains, whereas the function of the DNA binding domains was conserved in evolution. Our study evaluated the mechanism of functional divergence of the transcriptional regulation factors within a family, whereby the functions of their transcription activation domains diverged under positive selection during evolution. PMID:24651579

  10. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Enard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution.

  11. Positive selection and functional divergence of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jieying; Liu, Yong; Chao, Naixia; Ma, Chengtong; Chen, Qicong; Sun, Jian; Wu, Yaosheng

    2017-02-04

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) belongs to the short-chain prenyltransferase family, and it performs a conserved and essential role in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. However, its classification, evolutionary history, and the forces driving the evolution of FPS genes in plants remain poorly understood. Phylogeny and positive selection analysis was used to identify the evolutionary forces that led to the functional divergence of FPS in plants, and recombinant detection was undertaken using the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD) method. The dataset included 68 FPS variation pattern sequences (2 gymnosperms, 10 monocotyledons, 54 dicotyledons, and 2 outgroups). This study revealed that the FPS gene was under positive selection in plants. No recombinant within the FPS gene was found. Therefore, it was inferred that the positive selection of FPS had not been influenced by a recombinant episode. The positively selected sites were mainly located in the catalytic center and functional areas, which indicated that the 98S and 234D were important positively selected sites for plant FPS in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway. They were located in the FPS conserved domain of the catalytic site. We inferred that the diversification of FPS genes was associated with functional divergence and could be driven by positive selection. It was clear that protein sequence evolution via positive selection was able to drive adaptive diversification in plant FPS proteins. This study provides information on the classification and positive selection of plant FPS genes, and the results could be useful for further research on the regulation of triterpenoid biosynthesis.

  12. Positive Selection Analysis of VP1 Genes of Worldwide Human Enterovirus 71 Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-feng SHI; Zhong ZHANG; Ai-she DUN; Yan-zhou ZHANG; Guang-fu YU; Dong-ming ZHUANG; Chao-dong ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 viruses have been long circulating throughout the world. In this study, we performed a positive selection analysis of the VP1 genes of capsid proteins from Enterovirus 71 viruses. Our results showed that although most sites were under negative or neutral evolution, four positions of the VP1 genes were under positive selection pressure. This might account for the spread and frequent outbreaks of the viruses and the enhanced neurovirulence. In particular, position 98 might be involved in neutralizing antibodies, modulating the virus-receptor interaction and enhancing the virulence of the viruses. Moreover, both positions 145 and 241 might correlate to determine the receptor specificity. However, these positions did not display much difference in amino acid polymorphism. In addition, no position in the VP1 genes of viruses isolated from China was under positive selection.

  13. Thymoproteasomes produce unique peptide motifs for positive selection of CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Takada, Kensuke; Ohte, Yuki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahama, Yousuke; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus provides low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement to support the development of potentially useful self-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-restricted T cells. Optimal positive selection of CD8(+) T cells requires cortical thymic epithelial cells that express β5t-containing thymoproteasomes (tCPs). However, how tCPs govern positive selection is unclear. Here we show that the tCPs produce unique cleavage motifs in digested peptides and in MHC-I-associated peptides. Interestingly, MHC-I-associated peptides carrying these tCP-dependent motifs are enriched with low-affinity TCR ligands that efficiently induce the positive selection of functionally competent CD8(+) T cells in antigen-specific TCR-transgenic models. These results suggest that tCPs contribute to the positive selection of CD8(+) T cells by preferentially producing low-affinity TCR ligand peptides.

  14. dbPSHP: a database of recent positive selection across human populations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mulin Jun; Wang, Lily Yan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Wong, Maria P.; Sham, Pak Chung; WANG, JUNWEN

    2013-01-01

    The dbPSHP database (http://jjwanglab.org/dbpshp) aims to help researchers to efficiently identify, validate and visualize putative positively selected loci in human evolution and further discover the mechanism governing these natural selections. Recent evolution of human populations at the genomic level reflects the adaptations to the living environments, including climate change and availability and stability of nutrients. Many genetic regions under positive selection have been identified, ...

  15. Maximum-likelihood approaches reveal signatures of positive selection in IL genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabiana; Abrantes, Joana; Steinke, John W; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-02-01

    ILs are part of the immune system and are involved in multiple biological activities. ILs have been shown to evolve under positive selection; however, little information exists regarding which codons are specifically selected. By using different codon-based maximum-likelihood (ML) approaches, signatures of positive selection in mammalian ILs were searched for. Sequences of 46 ILs were retrieved from publicly available databases of mammalian genomes to detect signatures of positive selection in individual codons. Evolutionary analyses were conducted under two ML frameworks, the HyPhy package implemented in the Data Monkey Web Server and CODEML implemented in PAML. Signatures of positive selection were found in 28 ILs: IL-1A and B; IL-2, IL-4 to IL-10, IL-12A and B; IL-14 to IL-17A and C; IL-18, IL-20 to IL-22, IL-25, IL-26, IL-27B, IL-31, IL-34, IL-36A; and G. Codons under positive selection varied between 1 and 15. No evidence of positive selection was detected in IL-13; IL-17B and F; IL-19, IL-23, IL-24, IL-27A; or IL-29. Most mammalian ILs have sites evolving under positive selection, which may be explained by the multitude of biological processes in which ILs are enrolled. The results obtained raise hypotheses concerning the ILs functions, which should be pursued by using mutagenesis and crystallographic approaches.

  16. Extreme evolutionary disparities seen in positive selection across seven complex diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Corona

    Full Text Available Positive selection is known to occur when the environment that an organism inhabits is suddenly altered, as is the case across recent human history. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have successfully illuminated disease-associated variation. However, whether human evolution is heading towards or away from disease susceptibility in general remains an open question. The genetic-basis of common complex disease may partially be caused by positive selection events, which simultaneously increased fitness and susceptibility to disease. We analyze seven diseases studied by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium to compare evidence for selection at every locus associated with disease. We take a large set of the most strongly associated SNPs in each GWA study in order to capture more hidden associations at the cost of introducing false positives into our analysis. We then search for signs of positive selection in this inclusive set of SNPs. There are striking differences between the seven studied diseases. We find alleles increasing susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, and Crohn's Disease (CD underwent recent positive selection. There is more selection in alleles increasing, rather than decreasing, susceptibility to T1D. In the 80 SNPs most associated with T1D (p-value <7.01 x 10(-5 showing strong signs of positive selection, 58 alleles associated with disease susceptibility show signs of positive selection, while only 22 associated with disease protection show signs of positive selection. Alleles increasing susceptibility to RA are under selection as well. In contrast, selection in SNPs associated with CD favors protective alleles. These results inform the current understanding of disease etiology, shed light on potential benefits associated with the genetic-basis of disease, and aid in the efforts to identify causal genetic factors underlying complex disease.

  17. How to Make a Dolphin: Molecular Signature of Positive Selection in Cetacean Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana F Nery

    Full Text Available Cetaceans are unique in being the only mammals completely adapted to an aquatic environment. This adaptation has required complex changes and sometimes a complete restructuring of physiology, behavior and morphology. Identifying genes that have been subjected to selection pressure during cetacean evolution would greatly enhance our knowledge of the ways in which genetic variation in this mammalian order has been shaped by natural selection. Here, we performed a genome-wide scan for positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We employed models of codon substitution that account for variation of selective pressure over branches on the tree and across sites in a sequence. We analyzed 7,859 nuclear-coding ortholog genes and using a series of likelihood ratio tests (LRTs, we identified 376 genes (4.8% with molecular signatures of positive selection in the dolphin lineage. We used the cow as the sister group and compared estimates of selection in the cetacean genome to this using the same methods. This allowed us to define which genes have been exclusively under positive selection in the dolphin lineage. The enrichment analysis found that the identified positively selected genes are significantly over-represented for three exclusive functional categories only in the dolphin lineage: segment specification, mesoderm development and system development. Of particular interest for cetacean adaptation to an aquatic life are the following GeneOntology targets under positive selection: genes related to kidney, heart, lung, eye, ear and nervous system development.

  18. Positive Selection and Centrality in the Yeast and Fly Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins within a molecular network are expected to be subject to different selective pressures depending on their relative hierarchical positions. However, it is not obvious what genes within a network should be more likely to evolve under positive selection. On one hand, only mutations at genes with a relatively high degree of control over adaptive phenotypes (such as those encoding highly connected proteins are expected to be “seen” by natural selection. On the other hand, a high degree of pleiotropy at these genes is expected to hinder adaptation. Previous analyses of the human protein-protein interaction network have shown that genes under long-term, recurrent positive selection (as inferred from interspecific comparisons tend to act at the periphery of the network. It is unknown, however, whether these trends apply to other organisms. Here, we show that long-term positive selection has preferentially targeted the periphery of the yeast interactome. Conversely, in flies, genes under positive selection encode significantly more connected and central proteins. These observations are not due to covariation of genes’ adaptability and centrality with confounding factors. Therefore, the distribution of proteins encoded by genes under recurrent positive selection across protein-protein interaction networks varies from one species to another.

  19. Identification of positive selection in disease response genes within members of the Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Gabriel E; Vargas, Walter A; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2012-12-01

    Millions of years of coevolution between plants and pathogens can leave footprints on their genomes and genes involved on this interaction are expected to show patterns of positive selection in which novel, beneficial alleles are rapidly fixed within the population. Using information about upregulated genes in maize during Colletotrichum graminicola infection and resources available in the Phytozome database, we looked for evidence of positive selection in the Poaceae lineage, acting on protein coding sequences related with plant defense. We found six genes with evidence of positive selection and another eight with sites showing episodic selection. Some of them have already been described as evolving under positive selection, but others are reported here for the first time including genes encoding isocitrate lyase, dehydrogenases, a multidrug transporter, a protein containing a putative leucine-rich repeat and other proteins with unknown functions. Mapping positively selected residues onto the predicted 3-D structure of proteins showed that most of them are located on the surface, where proteins are in contact with other molecules. We present here a set of Poaceae genes that are likely to be involved in plant defense mechanisms and have evidence of positive selection. These genes are excellent candidates for future functional validation.

  20. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in strongylocentrotid sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Kord M; Pogson, Grant H

    2017-07-21

    Comparative genomics studies investigating the signals of positive selection among groups of closely related species are still rare and limited in taxonomic breadth. Such studies show great promise in advancing our knowledge about the proportion and the identity of genes experiencing diversifying selection. However, methodological challenges have led to high levels of false positives in past studies. Here, we use the well-annotated genome of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, as a reference to investigate the signals of positive selection at 6520 single-copy orthologs from nine sea urchin species belonging to the family Strongylocentrotidae paying careful attention to minimizing false positives. We identified 1008 (15.5%) candidate positive selection genes (PSGs). Tests for positive selection along the nine terminal branches of the phylogeny identified 824 genes that showed lineage-specific adaptive diversification (1.67% of branch-sites tests performed). Positively selected codons were not enriched at exon borders or near regions containing missing data, suggesting a limited contribution of false positives caused by alignment or annotation errors. Alignments were validated at 10 loci with re-sequencing using Sanger methods. No differences were observed in the rates of synonymous substitution (d S), GC content, and codon bias between the candidate PSGs and those not showing positive selection. However, the candidate PSGs had 68% higher rates of nonsynonymous substitution (d N) and 33% lower levels of heterozygosity, consistent with selective sweeps and opposite to that expected by a relaxation of selective constraint. Although positive selection was identified at reproductive proteins and innate immunity genes, the strongest signals of adaptive diversification were observed at extracellular matrix proteins, cell adhesion molecules, membrane receptors, and ion channels. Many candidate PSGs have been widely implicated as targets of pathogen binding

  1. Genome-wide evidence for positive selection and recombination in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Rui

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an economically important animal pathogen that causes contagious pleuropneumonia in pigs. Currently, the molecular evolutionary trajectories for this pathogenic bacterium remain to require a better elucidation under the help of comparative genomics data. For this reason, we employed a comparative phylogenomic approach to obtain a comprehensive understanding of roles of natural selective pressure and homologous recombination during adaptation of this pathogen to its swine host. Results In this study, 12 A. pleuropneumoniae genomes were used to carry out a phylogenomic analyses. We identified 1,587 orthologous core genes as an initial data set for the estimation of genetic recombination and positive selection. Based on the analyses of four recombination tests, 23% of the core genome of A. pleuropneumoniae showed strong signals for intragenic homologous recombination. Furthermore, the selection analyses indicated that 57 genes were undergoing significant positive selection. Extensive function properties underlying these positively selected genes demonstrated that genes coding for products relevant to bacterial surface structures and pathogenesis are prone to natural selective pressure, presumably due to their potential roles in the avoidance of the porcine immune system. Conclusions Overall, substantial genetic evidence was shown to indicate that recombination and positive selection indeed play a crucial role in the adaptive evolution of A. pleuropneumoniae. The genome-wide profile of positively selected genes and/or amino acid residues will provide valuable targets for further research into the mechanisms of immune evasion and host-pathogen interactions for this serious swine pathogen.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of positively selected genes in seasonal and non-seasonal breeding species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhuan Meng

    Full Text Available Some mammals breed throughout the year, while others breed only at certain times of year. These differences in reproductive behavior can be explained by evolution. We identified positively-selected genes in two sets of species with different degrees of relatedness including seasonal and non-seasonal breeding species, using branch-site models. After stringent filtering by sum of pairs scoring, we revealed that more genes underwent positive selection in seasonal compared with non-seasonal breeding species. Positively-selected genes were verified by cDNA mapping of the positive sites with the corresponding cDNA sequences. The design of the evolutionary analysis can effectively lower the false-positive rate and thus identify valid positive genes. Validated, positively-selected genes, including CGA, DNAH1, INVS, and CD151, were related to reproductive behaviors such as spermatogenesis and cell proliferation in non-seasonal breeding species. Genes in seasonal breeding species, including THRAP3, TH1L, and CMTM6, may be related to the evolution of sperm and the circadian rhythm system. Identification of these positively-selected genes might help to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying seasonal and non-seasonal reproductive behaviors.

  3. Isolating "Unknown" Bacteria in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory: A New Selective Medium for Gram-Positives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, John L.; Drake, MaryAnne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, preparation, and use of a medium that can select against a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria while still allowing growth and differentiation of a wide range of Gram-positives. (WRM)

  4. Animal mitochondria, positive selection and cyto-nuclear coevolution: insights from pulmonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmakelis, Aristeidis; Kotsakiozi, Panayiota; Rand, David

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonate snails have remarkably high levels of mtDNA polymorphism within species and divergence between species, making them an interesting group for the study of mutation and selection on mitochondrial genomes. The availability of sequence data from most major lineages - collected largely for studies of phylogeography - provides an opportunity to perform several tests of selection that may provide general insights into the evolutionary forces that have produced this unusual pattern. Several protein coding mtDNA datasets of pulmonates were analyzed towards this direction. Two different methods for the detection of positive selection were used, one based on phylogeny, and the other on the McDonald-Kreitman test. The cyto-nuclear coevolution hypothesis, often implicated to account for the high levels of mtDNA divergence of some organisms, was also addressed by assessing the divergence pattern exhibited by a nuclear gene. The McDonald-Kreitman test indicated multiple signs of positive selection in the mtDNA genes, but was significantly biased when sequence divergence was high. The phylogenetic method identified five mtDNA datasets as affected by positive selection. In the nuclear gene, the McDonald-Kreitman test provided no significant results, whereas the phylogenetic method identified positive selection as likely present. Overall, our findings indicate that: 1) slim support for the cyto-nuclear coevolution hypothesis is present, 2) the elevated rates of mtDNA polymorphims and divergence in pulmonates do not appear to be due to pervasive positive selection, 3) more stringent tests show that spurious positive selection is uncovered when distant taxa are compared and 4) there are significant examples of positive selection acting in some cases, so it appears that mtDNA evolution in pulmonates can escape from strict deleterious evolution suggested by the Muller's ratchet effect.

  5. Recent Positive Selection in Genes of the Mammalian Epidermal Differentiation Complex Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Zane A.; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) is the most rapidly evolving locus in the human genome compared to that of the chimpanzee. Yet the EDC genes that are undergoing positive selection across mammals and in humans are not known. We sought to identify the positively selected genetic variants and determine the evolutionary events of the EDC using mammalian-wide and clade-specific branch- and branch-site likelihood ratio tests and a genetic algorithm (GA) branch test. Significant non-synonymous substitutions were found in filaggrin, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 genes across 14 mammals. By contrast, we identified recent positive selection in SPRR4 in primates. Additionally, the GA branch test discovered lineage-specific evolution for distinct EDC genes occurring in each of the nodes in the 14-mammal phylogenetic tree. Multiple instances of positive selection for FLG, TCHHL1, SPRR4, LELP1, and S100A2 were noted among the primate branch nodes. Branch-site likelihood ratio tests further revealed positive selection in specific sites in SPRR4, LELP1, filaggrin, and repetin across 14 mammals. However, in addition to continuous evolution of SPRR4, site-specific positive selection was also found in S100A11, KPRP, SPRR1A, S100A7L2, and S100A3 in primates and filaggrin, filaggrin2, and S100A8 in great apes. Very recent human positive selection was identified in the filaggrin2 L41 site that was present in Neanderthal. Together, our results identifying recent positive selection in distinct EDC genes reveal an underappreciated evolution of epidermal skin barrier function in primates and humans. PMID:28119736

  6. Positive selection neighboring functionally essential sites and disease-implicated regions of mammalian reproductive proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Alan J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive proteins are central to the continuation of all mammalian species. The evolution of these proteins has been greatly influenced by environmental pressures induced by pathogens, rival sperm, sexual selection and sexual conflict. Positive selection has been demonstrated in many of these proteins with particular focus on primate lineages. However, the mammalia are a diverse group in terms of mating habits, population sizes and germ line generation times. We have examined the selective pressures at work on a number of novel reproductive proteins across a wide variety of mammalia. Results We show that selective pressures on reproductive proteins are highly varied. Of the 10 genes analyzed in detail, all contain signatures of positive selection either across specific sites or in specific lineages or a combination of both. Our analysis of SP56 and Col1a1 are entirely novel and the results show positively selected sites present in each gene. Our findings for the Col1a1 gene are suggestive of a link between positive selection and severe disease type. We find evidence in our dataset to suggest that interacting proteins are evolving in symphony: most likely to maintain interacting functionality. Conclusion Our in silico analyses show positively selected sites are occurring near catalytically important regions suggesting selective pressure to maximize efficient fertilization. In those cases where a mechanism of protein function is not fully understood, the sites presented here represent ideal candidates for mutational study. This work has highlighted the widespread rate heterogeneity in mutational rates across the mammalia and specifically has shown that the evolution of reproductive proteins is highly varied depending on the species and interacting partners. We have shown that positive selection and disease are closely linked in the Col1a1 gene.

  7. Positive selection neighboring functionally essential sites and disease-implicated regions of mammalian reproductive proteins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Claire C

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reproductive proteins are central to the continuation of all mammalian species. The evolution of these proteins has been greatly influenced by environmental pressures induced by pathogens, rival sperm, sexual selection and sexual conflict. Positive selection has been demonstrated in many of these proteins with particular focus on primate lineages. However, the mammalia are a diverse group in terms of mating habits, population sizes and germ line generation times. We have examined the selective pressures at work on a number of novel reproductive proteins across a wide variety of mammalia. RESULTS: We show that selective pressures on reproductive proteins are highly varied. Of the 10 genes analyzed in detail, all contain signatures of positive selection either across specific sites or in specific lineages or a combination of both. Our analysis of SP56 and Col1a1 are entirely novel and the results show positively selected sites present in each gene. Our findings for the Col1a1 gene are suggestive of a link between positive selection and severe disease type. We find evidence in our dataset to suggest that interacting proteins are evolving in symphony: most likely to maintain interacting functionality. CONCLUSION: Our in silico analyses show positively selected sites are occurring near catalytically important regions suggesting selective pressure to maximize efficient fertilization. In those cases where a mechanism of protein function is not fully understood, the sites presented here represent ideal candidates for mutational study. This work has highlighted the widespread rate heterogeneity in mutational rates across the mammalia and specifically has shown that the evolution of reproductive proteins is highly varied depending on the species and interacting partners. We have shown that positive selection and disease are closely linked in the Col1a1 gene.

  8. Positive Selection on Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes of H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Wenfu

    2011-04-21

    Abstract Background Since its emergence in March 2009, the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has posed a serious threat to public health. To trace the evolutionary path of these new pathogens, we performed a selection-pressure analysis of a large number of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences of H1N1 influenza viruses from different hosts. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both HA and NA genes have evolved into five distinct clusters, with further analyses indicating that the pandemic 2009 strains have experienced the strongest positive selection. We also found evidence of strong selection acting on the seasonal human H1N1 isolates. However, swine viruses from North America and Eurasia were under weak positive selection, while there was no significant evidence of positive selection acting on the avian isolates. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the positively selected sites were located in both of the cleaved products of HA (HA1 and HA2), as well as NA. In addition, the pandemic 2009 strains were subject to differential selection pressures compared to seasonal human, North American swine and Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses. Conclusions Most of these positively and\\/or differentially selected sites were situated in the B-cell and\\/or T-cell antigenic regions, suggesting that selection at these sites might be responsible for the antigenic variation of the viruses. Moreover, some sites were also associated with glycosylation and receptor-binding ability. Thus, selection at these positions might have helped the pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses to adapt to the new hosts after they were introduced from pigs to humans. Positive selection on position 274 of NA protein, associated with drug resistance, might account for the prevalence of drug-resistant variants of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses, but there was no evidence that positive selection was responsible for the spread of the drug resistance of the pandemic H1N1 strains.

  9. Bayes Empirical Bayes Inference of Amino Acid Sites Under Positive Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ziheng; Wong, Wendy Shuk Wan; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    Codon-based substitution models have been widely used to identify amino acid sites under positive selection in comparative analysis of protein-coding DNA sequences. The nonsynonymous-synonymous substitution rate ratio (dN/dS, denoted ) is used as a measure of selective pressure at the protein level...

  10. Genetic diversity and positive selection analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates in south China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiyan; Pei, Jingjing; Bai, Jialin; Zhao, Mingqiu; Ju, Chunmei; Yi, Lin; Kang, Yanmei; Zhang, Xuetao; Chen, Lijun; Li, Yinguang; Wang, Jiaying; Chen, Jinding

    2011-10-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease that leads to significant economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the accurate genotyping of CSFV isolates in south China. This study genotyped the E2 gene of 14 CSFV strains isolated during 2008-2010 from domestic pigs in different districts of south China. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all of the 14 CSFV isolates were clustered into genetic subgroup 1.1. This contrasts with most parts of China, where group 2 isolates are predominant. Furthermore, the positive selection pressures acting on the E(rns) and E2 envelope protein genes of CSFV were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed to identify specific codons that undergo diversification under positive selection. While no significant evidence for positive selection was observed in E(rns), two positively selected sites at amino acid residues 49 and 72 in the E2 encoding region were identified. Our results revealed that a predominance of subgroup 1.1 CSFV isolates is currently circulating in some districts of south China, which appear to be unrelated to the Chinese C-strain vaccine. Moreover, the envelope protein gene, E2, has undergone positive selection in 14 CSFV strains and two positively selected sites have been identified in this study. Understanding the molecular epidemiology and functional importance of these positively selected amino acid positions could help to predict possible changes in virulence, the development of vaccines and disease control.

  11. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  12. Gasp, a Grb2-associating protein, is critical for positive selection of thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Michael S; Oda, Hiroyo; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Eshima, Koji; Kirikae, Teruo; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Shirai, Mutsunori; Abe, Takaya; Natsume, Tohru; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Suzuki, Harumi

    2009-09-22

    T cells develop in the thymus through positive and negative selection, which are responsible for shaping the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in selection remains an area of intense interest. Here, we identified and characterized a gene product Gasp (Grb2-associating protein, also called Themis) that is critically required for positive selection. Gasp is a cytosolic protein with no known functional motifs that is expressed only in T cells, especially immature CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) thymocytes. In the absence of Gasp, differentiation of both CD4 and CD8 single positive cells in the thymus was severely inhibited, whereas all other TCR-induced events such as beta-selection, negative selection, peripheral activation, and homeostatic proliferation were unaffected. We found that Gasp constitutively associates with Grb2 via its N-terminal Src homology 3 domain, suggesting that Gasp acts as a thymocyte-specific adaptor for Grb2 or regulates Ras signaling in DP thymocytes. Collectively, we have described a gene called Gasp that is critical for positive selection.

  13. c-Fos enhances the survival of thymocytes during positive selection by upregulating Bcl-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoming Wang; Yafeng Zhang; Gang Xiao; Xiang Gao; Xiaolong Liu

    2009-01-01

    T cells are derived from progenitor thymocytes, of which only a minority receive the appropriate TCR signal, undergo positive selection and mature. Owing to the very short lifespan of thymocytes, the prerequisite for posi-tive selection is survival. TCR signal-induced Bcl-2 expression is believed to play a dominant role in the survival of positively selecting thymocytes, but how Bcl-2 is directly regulated is unknown. Here we report that the immediate early gene (lEG) c-Fos can stimulate the expression of Bcl-2, depending on a specific AP-l-binding site in the Bcl-2 promoter. In c-Fos transgenic (Fos-Tg) mice, c-Fos binds to this site and promotes the expression of Bcl-2. As a result, Fos-Tg thymocytes exhibited enhanced survival, and more mature single-positive (SP) thymocytes were generated, even on a unique TCR background. The TCR repertoire remained normal in Fos-Tg mice. Our results identified e-Fos as the mediator of the stimulatory effect of TCR signaling on Bcl-2 expression. Therefore, c-Fos, as an IEG, because of its early response ability, can quickly rescue the survival of short-lived thymocytes during positive selection. Our results provide novel insight into the mechanism regulating the survival of positively selecting thymocytes.

  14. Voluntary strategy suppresses the positive impact of preferential selection in prisoner’s dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Lin, Pei-jie; Chen, Ya-shan

    2014-11-01

    Impact of aspiration is ubiquitous in social and biological disciplines. In this work, we try to explore the impact of such a trait on voluntary prisoners’ dilemma game via a selection parameter w. w=0 returns the traditional version of random selection. For positive w, the opponent of high payoff will be selected; while negative w means that the partner of low payoff will be chosen. We find that for positive w, cooperation will be greatly promoted in the interval of small b, at variance cooperation is inhibited with large b. For negative w, cooperation is fully restrained, irrespective of b value. It is found that the positive impact of preferential selection is suppressed by the voluntary strategy in prisoner’s dilemma. These observations can be supported by the spatial patterns. Our work may shed light on the emergence and persistence of cooperation with voluntary participation in social dilemma.

  15. dbPSHP: a database of recent positive selection across human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mulin Jun; Wang, Lily Yan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Wong, Maria P; Sham, Pak Chung; Wang, Junwen

    2014-01-01

    The dbPSHP database (http://jjwanglab.org/dbpshp) aims to help researchers to efficiently identify, validate and visualize putative positively selected loci in human evolution and further discover the mechanism governing these natural selections. Recent evolution of human populations at the genomic level reflects the adaptations to the living environments, including climate change and availability and stability of nutrients. Many genetic regions under positive selection have been identified, which assist us to understand how natural selection has shaped population differences. Here, we manually collect recent positive selections in different human populations, consisting of 15,472 loci from 132 publications. We further compiled a database that used 15 statistical terms of different evolutionary attributes for single nucleotide variant sites from the HapMap 3 and 1000 Genomes Project to identify putative regions under positive selection. These attributes include variant allele/genotype properties, variant heterozygosity, within population diversity, long-range haplotypes, pairwise population differentiation and evolutionary conservation. We also provide interactive pages for visualization and annotation of different selective signals. The database is freely available to the public and will be frequently updated.

  16. [Ongoing Health Education in Brazil:education or ongoing management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Cristiane Lopes Simão

    2016-03-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the concept and principles of Ongoing Health Education (OHE) - the Brazilian acronym is PNEPS. The methodology was based on the analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health and related scientific articles. It was revealed that the concept of OHE transcends its pedagogical significance and is undergoing a service restructuring process in the face of the new demands of the model. Precisely at the time in which jobs are increasingly unstable and precarious, the Ministry of Health engages in discourse regarding innovative management, focusing on the issue of OHE. The idea is not one of ongoing education, but of ongoing management. Rather than being an instrument for radical transformation, OHE becomes an attractive ideology due to its appearance as a pedagogical novelty.

  17. Signs of positive selection of somatic mutations in human cancers detected by EST sequence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogozin Igor B

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinogenesis typically involves multiple somatic mutations in caretaker (DNA repair and gatekeeper (tumor suppressors and oncogenes genes. Analysis of mutation spectra of the tumor suppressor that is most commonly mutated in human cancers, p53, unexpectedly suggested that somatic evolution of the p53 gene during tumorigenesis is dominated by positive selection for gain of function. This conclusion is supported by accumulating experimental evidence of evolution of new functions of p53 in tumors. These findings prompted a genome-wide analysis of possible positive selection during tumor evolution. Methods A comprehensive analysis of probable somatic mutations in the sequences of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from malignant tumors and normal tissues was performed in order to access the prevalence of positive selection in cancer evolution. For each EST, the numbers of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions were calculated. In order to identify genes with a signature of positive selection in cancers, these numbers were compared to: i expected numbers and ii the numbers for the respective genes in the ESTs from normal tissues. Results We identified 112 genes with a signature of positive selection in cancers, i.e., a significantly elevated ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, in tumors as compared to 37 such genes in an approximately equal-sized EST collection from normal tissues. A substantial fraction of the tumor-specific positive-selection candidates have experimentally demonstrated or strongly predicted links to cancer. Conclusion The results of EST analysis should be interpreted with extreme caution given the noise introduced by sequencing errors and undetected polymorphisms. Furthermore, an inherent limitation of EST analysis is that multiple mutations amenable to statistical analysis can be detected only in relatively highly expressed genes. Nevertheless, the present results suggest that positive

  18. Evidence for positive selection in the gene fruitless in Anastrepha fruit flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Many genes involved in the sex determining cascade have indicated signals of positive selection and rapid evolution across different species. Even though fruitless is an important gene involved mostly in several aspects of male courtship behavior, the few studies so far have explained its high rates of evolution by relaxed selective constraints. This would indicate that a large portion of this gene has evolved neutrally, contrary to what has been observed for other genes in the sex cascade. Results Here we test whether the fruitless gene has evolved neutrally or under positive selection in species of Anastrepha (Tephritidae: Diptera) using two different approaches, a long-term evolutionary analysis and a populational genetic data analysis. The first analysis was performed by using sequences of three species of Anastrepha and sequences from several species of Drosophila using the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous rates of evolution in PAML, which revealed that the fru region here studied has evolved by positive selection. Using Bayes Empirical Bayes we estimated that 16 sites located in the connecting region of the fruitless gene were evolving under positive selection. We also investigated for signs of this positive selection using populational data from 50 specimens from three species of Anastrepha from different localities in Brazil. The use of standard tests of selection and a new test that compares patterns of differential survival between synonymous and nonsynonymous in evolutionary time also provide evidence of positive selection across species and of a selective sweep for one of the species investigated. Conclusions Our data indicate that the high diversification of fru connecting region in Anastrepha flies is due at least in part to positive selection, not merely as a consequence of relaxed selective constraint. These conclusions are based not only on the comparison of distantly related taxa that show long-term divergence time, but also on

  19. Evidence for positive selection in the gene fruitless in Anastrepha fruit flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Brito Reinaldo A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many genes involved in the sex determining cascade have indicated signals of positive selection and rapid evolution across different species. Even though fruitless is an important gene involved mostly in several aspects of male courtship behavior, the few studies so far have explained its high rates of evolution by relaxed selective constraints. This would indicate that a large portion of this gene has evolved neutrally, contrary to what has been observed for other genes in the sex cascade. Results Here we test whether the fruitless gene has evolved neutrally or under positive selection in species of Anastrepha (Tephritidae: Diptera using two different approaches, a long-term evolutionary analysis and a populational genetic data analysis. The first analysis was performed by using sequences of three species of Anastrepha and sequences from several species of Drosophila using the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous rates of evolution in PAML, which revealed that the fru region here studied has evolved by positive selection. Using Bayes Empirical Bayes we estimated that 16 sites located in the connecting region of the fruitless gene were evolving under positive selection. We also investigated for signs of this positive selection using populational data from 50 specimens from three species of Anastrepha from different localities in Brazil. The use of standard tests of selection and a new test that compares patterns of differential survival between synonymous and nonsynonymous in evolutionary time also provide evidence of positive selection across species and of a selective sweep for one of the species investigated. Conclusions Our data indicate that the high diversification of fru connecting region in Anastrepha flies is due at least in part to positive selection, not merely as a consequence of relaxed selective constraint. These conclusions are based not only on the comparison of distantly related taxa that show long

  20. A Novel Method for Optimum Global Positioning System Satellite Selection Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiancai; Xue, Guixiang; Kang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel method for selecting a navigation satellite subset for a global positioning system (GPS) based on a genetic algorithm is presented. This approach is based on minimizing the factors in the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) with an elite conservation strategy, adaptive selection, adaptive mutation, and a hybrid genetic algorithm that can select a subset of the satellites represented by specific numbers in the interval (4 ∼ n) while maintaining position accuracy. A comprehensive simulation demonstrates that the MGA-based satellite selection method effectively selects the correct number of optimal satellite subsets using receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) or fault detection and exclusion (FDE). This method is more adaptable and flexible for GPS receivers, particularly for those used in handset equipment and mobile phones.

  1. Evidence for positive selection in putative virulence factors within the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis species complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Matute

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most important prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Recently, the existence of three genetically isolated groups in P. brasiliensis was demonstrated, enabling comparative studies of molecular evolution among P. brasiliensis lineages. Thirty-two gene sequences coding for putative virulence factors were analyzed to determine whether they were under positive selection. Our maximum likelihood-based approach yielded evidence for selection in 12 genes that are involved in different cellular processes. An in-depth analysis of four of these genes showed them to be either antigenic or involved in pathogenesis. Here, we present evidence indicating that several replacement mutations in gp43 are under positive balancing selection. The other three genes (fks, cdc42 and p27 show very little variation among the P. brasiliensis lineages and appear to be under positive directional selection. Our results are consistent with the more general observations that selective constraints are variable across the genome, and that even in the genes under positive selection, only a few sites are altered. We present our results within an evolutionary framework that may be applicable for studying adaptation and pathogenesis in P. brasiliensis and other pathogenic fungi.

  2. Tracing evolutionary relicts of positive selection on eight malaria-related immune genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2015-07-01

    Plasmodium-induced malaria widely infects primates and other mammals. Multiple past studies have revealed that positive selection could be the main evolutionary force triggering the genetic diversity of anti-malaria resistance-associated genes in human or primates. However, researchers focused most of their attention on the infra-generic and intra-specific genome evolution rather than analyzing the complete evolutionary history of mammals. Here we extend previous research by testing the evolutionary link of natural selection on eight candidate genes associated with malaria resistance in mammals. Three of the eight genes were detected to be affected by recombination, including TNF-α, iNOS and DARC. Positive selection was detected in the rest five immunogenes multiple times in different ancestral lineages of extant species throughout the mammalian evolution. Signals of positive selection were exposed in four malaria-related immunogenes in primates: CCL2, IL-10, HO1 and CD36. However, selection signals of G6PD have only been detected in non-primate eutherians. Significantly higher evolutionary rates and more radical amino acid replacement were also detected in primate CD36, suggesting its functional divergence from other eutherians. Prevalent positive selection throughout the evolutionary trajectory of mammalian malaria-related genes supports the arms race evolutionary hypothesis of host genetic response of mammalian immunogenes to infectious pathogens.

  3. Physicochemical evolution and positive selection of the gymnosperm matK proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Cheng Hao; Jun Mu; Shi Lin Chen; Pei Gen Xiao

    2010-04-01

    It is not clear whether matK evolves under Darwinian selection. In this study, the gymnosperm Taxaceae, Cephalotaxaceae and Pinaceae were used to illustrate the physicochemical evolution, molecular adaptation and evolutionary dynamics of gene divergence in matKs. matK sequences were amplified from 27 Taxaceae and 12 Cephalotaxaceae species. matK sequences of 19 Pinaceae species were retrieved from GenBank. The phylogenetic tree was generated using conceptual-translated amino acid sequences. Selective influences were investigated using standard $d_{\\text{N}}/d_{\\text{S}}$ ratio methods and more sensitive techniques investigating the amino acid property changes resulting from nonsynonymous replacements in a phylogenetic context. Analyses revealed the presence of positive selection in matKs (N-terminal region, RT domain and domain X) of Taxaceae and Pinaceae, and found positive destabilizing selection in N-terminal region and RT domain of Cephalotaxaceae matK. Moreover, various amino acid properties were found to be influenced by destabilizing positive selection. Amino acid sites relating to these properties and to different secondary structures were found and have the potential to affect group II intron maturase function. Despite the evolutionary constraint on the rapidly evolving matK, this protein evolves under positive selection in gymnosperm. Several regions of matK have experienced molecular adaptation which fine-tunes maturase performance.

  4. Complex positive selection pressures drive the evolution of HIV-1 with different co-receptor tropisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 co-receptor tropism is central for understanding the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We performed a genome-wide comparison between the adaptive evolution of R5 and X4 variants from HIV-1 subtypes B and C. The results showed that R5 and X4 variants experienced differential evolutionary patterns and different HIV-1 genes encountered various positive selection pressures, suggesting that complex selection pressures are driving HIV-1 evolution. Compared with other hypervariable regions of Gp120, significantly more positively selected sites were detected in the V3 region of subtype B X4 variants, V2 region of subtype B R5 variants, and V1 and V4 regions of subtype C X4 variants, indicating an association of positive selection with co-receptor recognition/binding. Intriguingly, a significantly higher proportion (33.3% and 55.6%, P<0.05) of positively selected sites were identified in the C3 region than other conserved regions of Gp120 in all the analyzed HIV-1 variants, indicating that the C3 region might be more important to HIV-1 adaptation than previously thought. Approximately half of the positively selected sites identified in the env gene were identical between R5 and X4 variants. There were three common positively selected sites (96, 113 and 281) identified in Gp41 of all X4 and R5 variants from subtypes B and C. These sites might not only suggest a functional importance in viral survival and adaptation, but also imply a potential cross-immunogenicity between HIV-1 R5 and X4 variants, which has important implications for AIDS vaccine development.

  5. Widespread signatures of positive selection in common risk alleles associated to autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The human brain is the outcome of innumerable evolutionary processes; the systems genetics of psychiatric disorders could bear their signatures. On this basis, we analyzed five psychiatric disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia (SCZ), using GWAS summary statistics from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. Machine learning-derived scores were used to investigate two natural-selection scenarios: complete selection (loci where a selected allele reached fixation) and incomplete selection (loci where a selected allele has not yet reached fixation). ASD GWAS results positively correlated with incomplete-selection (p = 3.53*10−4). Variants with ASD GWAS pgene-expression enrichments for brain and pituitary tissues (p = 2.3*10−5 and p = 3*10−5, respectively) and 53 gene ontology (GO) enrichments, such as nervous system development (GO:0007399, p = 7.57*10−12), synapse organization (GO:0050808, p = 8.29*10−7), and axon guidance (GO:0007411, p = 1.81*10−7). Previous genetic studies demonstrated that ASD positively correlates with childhood intelligence, college completion, and years of schooling. Accordingly, we hypothesize that certain ASD risk alleles were under positive selection during human evolution due to their involvement in neurogenesis and cognitive ability. PMID:28187187

  6. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing of Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus to Identify Putative Positive Selection in Phaseolus and Legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqi Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The identification of genes under positive selection is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Many legume species, including Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean, have important ecological and economic value. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the transcriptome of one Phaseolus species, lima bean. A comparison with the genomes of six other legume species, including the common bean, Medicago, lotus, soybean, chickpea, and pigeonpea, revealed 15 and 4 orthologous groups with signatures of positive selection among the two Phaseolus species and among the seven legume species, respectively. Characterization of these positively selected genes using Non redundant (nr annotation, gene ontology (GO classification, GO term enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analyses revealed that these genes are mostly involved in thylakoids, photosynthesis and metabolism. This study identified genes that may be related to the divergence of the Phaseolus and legume species. These detected genes are particularly good candidates for subsequent functional studies.

  8. SAR studies on carboxylic acid series M(1) selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Scott D; Beshore, Douglas C

    2014-01-01

    There is mounting evidence from preclinical and early proof-of-concept studies suggesting that selective modulation of the M1 muscarinic receptor is efficacious in cognitive models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of nonselective M1 muscarinic agonists have previously shown positive effects on cognitive function in AD patients, but were limited due to cholinergic adverse events thought to be mediated by pan activation of the M2 to M5 sub-types. Thus, there is a need to identify selective activators of the M1 receptor to evaluate their potential in cognitive disorders. One strategy to confer selectivity for M1 is the identification of allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators, which would target an allosteric site on the M1 receptor rather than the highly conserved orthosteric acetylcholine binding site. BQCA has been identified as a highly selective carboxylic acid M1 PAM and this review focuses on an extensive lead optimization campaign undertaken on this compound.

  9. Selective anion exchange with nanogated isoreticular positive metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang; Bu, Xianhui; Wu, Tao; Zheng, Shou-Tian; Wang, Le; Feng, Pingyun

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline porous materials, especially inorganic porous solids such as zeolites, usually have negative frameworks with extra-framework mobile cations and are widely used for cation exchange. It is highly desirable to develop new materials with positive frameworks for selective anion exchange and separation or storage and delivery. Recent advances in metal-organic framework synthesis have created new opportunities in this direction. Here we report the synthesis of a series of positive indium metal-organic frameworks and their utilization as a platform for the anion exchange-based separation process. This process is capable of size- or charge-selective ion-exchange of organic dyes and may form the basis for size-selective ion chromatography. Ion-exchange dynamics of a series of organic dyes and their selective encapsulation and release are also studied, highlighting the advantages of metal-organic framework compositions for designing host materials tailored for applications in anion separation and purification.

  10. The difficulty of avoiding false positives in genome scans for natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Swapan; Gnerre, Sante; Muller, Paul; Reich, David

    2009-05-01

    Several studies have found evidence for more positive selection on the chimpanzee lineage compared with the human lineage since the two species split. A potential concern, however, is that these findings may simply reflect artifacts of the data: inaccuracies in the underlying chimpanzee genome sequence, which is of lower quality than human. To test this hypothesis, we generated de novo genome assemblies of chimpanzee and macaque and aligned them with human. We also implemented a novel bioinformatic procedure for producing alignments of closely related species that uses synteny information to remove misassembled and misaligned regions, and sequence quality scores to remove nucleotides that are less reliable. We applied this procedure to re-examine 59 genes recently identified as candidates for positive selection in chimpanzees. The great majority of these signals disappear after application of our new bioinformatic procedure. We also carried out laboratory-based resequencing of 10 of the regions in multiple chimpanzees and humans, and found that our alignments were correct wherever there was a conflict with the published results. These findings throw into question previous findings that there has been more positive selection in chimpanzees than in humans since the two species diverged. Our study also highlights the challenges of searching the extreme tails of distributions for signals of natural selection. Inaccuracies in the genome sequence at even a tiny fraction of genes can produce false-positive signals, which make it difficult to identify loci that have genuinely been targets of selection.

  11. Tuning transport selectivity of ionic species by phosphoric acid gradient in positively charged nanochannel membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Fan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xizhen; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin

    2015-02-03

    The transport of ionic species through a nanochannel plays important roles in fundamental research and practical applications of the nanofluidic device. Here, we demonstrated that ionic transport selectivity of a positively charged nanochannel membrane can be tuned under a phosphoric acid gradient. When phosphoric acid solution and analyte solution were connected by the positively charged nanochannel membrane, the faster-moving analyte through the positively charged nanochannel membrane was the positively charged dye (methylviologen, MV(2+)) instead of the negatively charged dye (1,5-naphthalene disulfonate, NDS(2-)). In other words, a reversed ion selectivity of the nanochannel membranes can be found. It can be explained as a result of the combination of diffusion, induced electroosmosis, and induced electrophoresis. In addition, the influencing factors of transport selectivity, including concentration of phosphoric acid, penetration time, and volume of feed solution, were also investigated. The results showed that the transport selectivity can further be tuned by adjusting these factors. As a method of tuning ionic transport selectivity by establishing phosphoric acid gradient, it will be conducive to improving the separation of ionic species.

  12. Recruitment and selection for the packer position in a supermarket network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Moraes Cardoso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The method of personnel recruitment and selection is a common practice to hire people in organizations. The goal of this study is to report and to reflect about this process in a supermarket chain, which operates in food and non-food retail in the state of Sao Paulo. The purpose of the present intervention was to facilitate the recruitment and selection process for the packer position. After the intervention, we noticed an improvement on the hiring process, on the working conditions and a turnover reduction in this position.

  13. Positive and purifying selection influence the evolution of doublesex in the Anastrepha fraterculus species group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iderval S Sobrinho

    Full Text Available The gene doublesex (dsx is considered to be under strong selective constraint along its evolutionary history because of its central role in somatic sex differentiation in insects. However, previous studies of dsx used global estimates of evolutionary rates to investigate its molecular evolution, which potentially miss signals of adaptive changes in generally conserved genes. In this work, we investigated the molecular evolution of dsx in the Anastrepha fraterculus species group (Diptera, Tephritidae, and test the hypothesis that this gene evolved solely by purifying selection using divergence-based and population-based methods. In the first approach, we compared sequences from Anastrepha and other Tephritidae with other Muscomorpha species, analyzed variation in nonsynonymous to synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS in the Tephritidae, and investigated radical and conservative changes in amino acid physicochemical properties. We show a general selective constraint on dsx, but with signs of positive selection mainly in the common region. Such changes were localized in alpha-helices previously reported to be involved in dimer formation in the OD2 domain and near the C-terminal of the OD1 domain. In the population-based approach, we amplified a region of 540 bp that spanned almost all of the region common to both sexes from 32 different sites in Brazil. We investigated patterns of selection using neutrality tests based on the frequency spectrum and locations of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations in a haplotype network. As in the divergence-based approach, these analyses showed that dsx has evolved under an overall selective constraint, but with some events of positive selection. In contrast to previous studies, our analyses indicate that even though dsx has indeed evolved as a conserved gene, the common region of dsx has also experienced bouts of positive selection, perhaps driven by sexual selection, during its evolution.

  14. Positive and Purifying Selection Influence the Evolution of Doublesex in the Anastrepha fraterculus Species Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrinho, Iderval S.; de Brito, Reinaldo A.

    2012-01-01

    The gene doublesex (dsx) is considered to be under strong selective constraint along its evolutionary history because of its central role in somatic sex differentiation in insects. However, previous studies of dsx used global estimates of evolutionary rates to investigate its molecular evolution, which potentially miss signals of adaptive changes in generally conserved genes. In this work, we investigated the molecular evolution of dsx in the Anastrepha fraterculus species group (Diptera, Tephritidae), and test the hypothesis that this gene evolved solely by purifying selection using divergence-based and population-based methods. In the first approach, we compared sequences from Anastrepha and other Tephritidae with other Muscomorpha species, analyzed variation in nonsynonymous to synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) in the Tephritidae, and investigated radical and conservative changes in amino acid physicochemical properties. We show a general selective constraint on dsx, but with signs of positive selection mainly in the common region. Such changes were localized in alpha-helices previously reported to be involved in dimer formation in the OD2 domain and near the C-terminal of the OD1 domain. In the population-based approach, we amplified a region of 540 bp that spanned almost all of the region common to both sexes from 32 different sites in Brazil. We investigated patterns of selection using neutrality tests based on the frequency spectrum and locations of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations in a haplotype network. As in the divergence-based approach, these analyses showed that dsx has evolved under an overall selective constraint, but with some events of positive selection. In contrast to previous studies, our analyses indicate that even though dsx has indeed evolved as a conserved gene, the common region of dsx has also experienced bouts of positive selection, perhaps driven by sexual selection, during its evolution. PMID:22428050

  15. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  16. A method to find longevity-selected positions in the mammalian proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Semeiks

    Full Text Available Evolutionary theory suggests that the force of natural selection decreases with age. To explore the extent to which this prediction directly affects protein structure and function, we used multiple regression to find longevity-selected positions, defined as the columns of a sequence alignment conserved in long-lived but not short-lived mammal species. We analyzed 7,590 orthologous protein families in 33 mammalian species, accounting for body mass, phylogeny, and species-specific mutation rate. Overall, we found that the number of longevity-selected positions in the mammalian proteome is much higher than would be expected by chance. Further, these positions are enriched in domains of several proteins that interact with one another in inflammation and other aging-related processes, as well as in organismal development. We present as an example the kinase domain of anti-müllerian hormone type-2 receptor (AMHR2. AMHR2 inhibits ovarian follicle recruitment and growth, and a homology model of the kinase domain shows that its longevity-selected positions cluster near a SNP associated with delayed human menopause. Distinct from its canonical role in development, this region of AMHR2 may function to regulate the protein's activity in a lifespan-specific manner.

  17. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M; Simões, Bruno M; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B; Carrascosa, José L; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2016-02-12

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully  apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  18. Positive selection in extra cellular domains in the diversification of Strigamia maritima chemoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca C Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent publication of a centipede (Strigamia maritima genome has revealed that most members of the chemosensory gene families of ionotropic (IR and gustatory (GR receptors do not have identifiable orthologs in insect species. In other words, the diversity of these chemoreceptors in centipedes appears to have evolved after its split from other arthropod lineages. Here we investigate the role of adaptive evolution in S. maritima chemoreceptor diversification using an approach that allows us to discuss functional aspects of such diversification. We applied codon substitution models in a phylogenetic framework to obtain the distribution of selective constraints across the different domains in the IR and GR proteins, and to assess the impact of positive selection in the evolution of these chemoreceptors. We found low selective constraints in most IR and GR duplicates and significant evidence for the presence of positively selected amino acids in 2 of the 4 IR, and in 6 of the GR recent specific expansions. Mapping the sites with high posterior probability of positive selection in protein structure revealed a remarkable uneven distribution of fast-evolving sites across protein domains. Most of these sites are located in extracellular fragments of these receptors, which likely participate in ligand recognition. We hypothesize that adaptive evolution in ligand-binding domains was a major force driving the functional diversification of centipede chemoreceptors.

  19. Transcriptome analysis reveals positive selection on the divergent between topmouth culter and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Tan, Xing-Jun; Xiong, Ya-Feng; Xu, Kang; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Liu, Yun; Hong, Yun-Han; Liu, Shao-Jun

    2014-12-01

    The topmouth culter (Erythroculter ilishaeformis) is a predatory cyprinid fish that distributes widely in the East Asia. Here we report the liver transcriptome in this organism as a model of predatory fish. Sequencing of 5 Gb raw reads led to 27,741 unigenes and produced 11,131 annotatable genes. A total of 7093 (63.7%) genes were found to have putative functions by gene ontology analysis. Importantly, a blast search revealed 4033 culter genes that were orthologous to the zebrafish. Extracted from 38 candidate positive selection genes, 4 genes exhibit strong positive selection based on the ratio of nonsynonymous (Ka) to synonymous substitutions (Ks). In addition, the four genes also indicated the strong positive selection by comparing them between blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) and zebrafish. These genes were involved in activator of gene expression, metabolic processes and development. The transcriptome variation may be reflective of natural selection in the early life history of Cyprinidae. Based on Ks ratios, date of the separation between topmouth culter and zebrafish is approximately 64 million years ago. We conclude that natural selection acts in diversifying the genomes between topmouth culter and zebrafish.

  20. Positive selection in AvrP4 avirulence gene homologues across the genus Melampsora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Merwe, Marlien M; Kinnear, Mark W; Barrett, Luke G; Dodds, Peter N; Ericson, Lars; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J

    2009-08-22

    Pathogen genes involved in interactions with their plant hosts are expected to evolve under positive Darwinian selection or balancing selection. In this study a single copy avirulence gene, AvrP4, in the plant pathogen Melampsora lini, was used to investigate the evolution of such a gene across species. Partial translation elongation factor 1-alpha sequences were obtained to establish phylogenetic relationships among the Melampsora species. We amplified AvrP4 homologues from species pathogenic on hosts from different plant families and orders, across the inferred phylogeny. Translations of the AvrP4 sequences revealed a predicted signal peptide and towards the C-terminus of the protein, six identically spaced cysteines were identified in all sequences. Maximum likelihood analysis of synonymous versus non-synonymous substitution rates indicated that positive selection played a role in the evolution of the gene during the diversification of the genus. Fourteen codons under significant positive selection reside in the C-terminal 28 amino acid region, suggesting that this region interacts with host molecules in most sequenced accessions. Selection pressures on the gene may be either due to the pathogenicity or avirulence function of the gene or both.

  1. Superoxide dismutase 1 is positively selected to minimize protein aggregation in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2017-08-01

    Positive (adaptive) selection has recently been implied in human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a highly abundant antioxidant protein with energy signaling and antiaging functions, one of very few examples of direct selection on a human protein product (exon); the molecular drivers of this selection are unknown. We mapped 30 extant SOD1 sequences to the recently established mammalian species tree and inferred ancestors, key substitutions, and signatures of selection during the protein's evolution. We detected elevated substitution rates leading to great apes (Hominidae) at ~1 per 2 million years, significantly higher than in other primates and rodents, although these paradoxically generally evolve much faster. The high evolutionary rate was partly due to relaxation of some selection pressures and partly to distinct positive selection of SOD1 in great apes. We then show that higher stability and net charge and changes at the dimer interface were selectively introduced upon separation from old world monkeys and lesser apes (gibbons). Consequently, human, chimpanzee and gorilla SOD1s have a net charge of -6 at physiological pH, whereas the closely related gibbons and macaques have -3. These features consistently point towards selection against the malicious aggregation effects of elevated SOD1 levels in long-living great apes. The findings mirror the impact of human SOD1 mutations that reduce net charge and/or stability and cause ALS, a motor neuron disease characterized by oxidative stress and SOD1 aggregates and triggered by aging. Our study thus marks an example of direct selection for a particular chemical phenotype (high net charge and stability) in a single human protein with possible implications for the evolution of aging.

  2. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2012-03-19

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit.

  3. The effects of alignment error and alignment filtering on the sitewise detection of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Gregory; Goldman, Nick

    2012-04-01

    When detecting positive selection in proteins, the prevalence of errors resulting from misalignment and the ability of alignment filters to mitigate such errors are not well understood, but filters are commonly applied to try to avoid false positive results. Focusing on the sitewise detection of positive selection across a wide range of divergence levels and indel rates, we performed simulation experiments to quantify the false positives and false negatives introduced by alignment error and the ability of alignment filters to improve performance. We found that some aligners led to many false positives, whereas others resulted in very few. False negatives were a problem for all aligners, increasing with sequence divergence. Of the aligners tested, PRANK's codon-based alignments consistently performed the best and ClustalW performed the worst. Of the filters tested, GUIDANCE performed the best and Gblocks performed the worst. Although some filters showed good ability to reduce the error rates from ClustalW and MAFFT alignments, none were found to substantially improve the performance of PRANK alignments under most conditions. Our results revealed distinct trends in error rates and power levels for aligners and filters within a biologically plausible parameter space. With the best aligner, a low false positive rate was maintained even with extremely divergent indel-prone sequences. Controls using the true alignment and an optimal filtering method suggested that performance improvements could be gained by improving aligners or filters to reduce the prevalence of false negatives, especially at higher divergence levels and indel rates.

  4. Signatures of positive selection in Toll-like receptor (TLR genes in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areal Helena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a major class of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed in the cell surface or membrane compartments of immune and non-immune cells. TLRs are encoded by a multigene family and represent the first line of defense against pathogens by detecting foreigner microbial molecular motifs, the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. TLRs are also important by triggering the adaptive immunity in vertebrates. They are characterized by the presence of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs in the ectodomain, which are associated with the PAMPs recognition. The direct recognition of different pathogens by TLRs might result in different evolutionary adaptations important to understand the dynamics of the host-pathogen interplay. Ten mammal TLR genes, viral (TLR3, 7, 8, 9 and non-viral (TLR1-6, 10, were selected to identify signatures of positive selection that might have been imposed by interacting pathogens and to clarify if viral and non-viral TLRs might display different patterns of molecular evolution. Results By using Maximum Likelihood approaches, evidence of positive selection was found in all the TLRs studied. The number of positively selected codons (PSC ranged between 2-26 codons (0.25%-2.65% with the non-viral TLR4 as the receptor with higher percentage of positively selected codons (2.65%, followed by the viral TLR8 (2.50%. The results indicated that viral and non-viral TLRs are similarly under positive selection. Almost all TLRs have at least one PSC located in the LRR ectodomain which underlies the importance of the pathogen recognition by this region. Conclusions Our results are not in line with previous studies on primates and birds that identified more codons under positive selection in non-viral TLRs. This might be explained by the fact that both primates and birds are homogeneous groups probably being affected by only a restricted number of related viruses with equivalent motifs to be

  5. Signatures of positive selection at hemopexin (PEX) domain of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yang Liu; Yang Zhao; Chunlei Lu; Maobin Fu; Tonghai Dou; Xiaoming Tan

    2015-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) is an important cancer-associated, zinc-dependent endopeptidase. To investigate the natural selection hypothesis of MMP-9, the orthologous sequences from 12 vertebrates were compared and a molecular evolution analysis was performed. Results suggest that amino acid residues present in the middle region of the protein are more selectively constrained, whereas amino acid residues in the C-terminal region of the MM~P-9 protein including exon 13 showed lowest conservation level in non-primate species, suggesting that it is an exon with fast evolving rate compared to the others analyzed. InterProScan analysis shows that exon 13 was located in hemopexin (PEX) domain of MM~P-9. Positive selection was detected in PEX domain of MMP-9 protein between human and other species, which indicates that selective pressure may play a role in shaping the function of MM~P-9 in the course of evolution.

  6. Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Oikkonen, Jaana; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Abilities related to musical aptitude appear to have a long history in human evolution. To elucidate the molecular and evolutionary background of musical aptitude, we compared genome-wide genotyping data (641 K SNPs) of 148 Finnish individuals characterized for musical aptitude. We assigned signatures of positive selection in a case-control setting using three selection methods: haploPS, XP-EHH and FST. Gene ontology classification revealed that the positive selection regions contained genes affecting inner-ear development. Additionally, literature survey has shown that several of the identified genes were known to be involved in auditory perception (e.g. GPR98, USH2A), cognition and memory (e.g. GRIN2B, IL1A, IL1B, RAPGEF5), reward mechanisms (RGS9), and song perception and production of songbirds (e.g. FOXP1, RGS9, GPR98, GRIN2B). Interestingly, genes related to inner-ear development and cognition were also detected in a previous genome-wide association study of musical aptitude. However, the candidate genes detected in this study were not reported earlier in studies of musical abilities. Identification of genes related to language development (FOXP1 and VLDLR) support the popular hypothesis that music and language share a common genetic and evolutionary background. The findings are consistent with the evolutionary conservation of genes related to auditory processes in other species and provide first empirical evidence for signatures of positive selection for abilities that contribute to musical aptitude. PMID:26879527

  7. Positive selection in the leucine-rich repeat domain of Gro1 genes in Solanum species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valentino Ruggieri; Angelina Nunziata; Amalia Barone

    2014-12-01

    In pathogen resistant plants, solvent-exposed residues in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are thought to mediate resistance by recognizing plant pathogen elicitors. In potato, the gene Gro1-4 confers resistance to Globodera rostochiensis. The investigation of variablity in different copies of this gene represents a good model for the verification of positive selection mechanisms. Two datasets of Gro1 LRR sequences were constructed, one derived from the Gro1-4 gene, belonging to different cultivated and wild Solanum species, and the other belonging to paralogues of a resistant genotype. Analysis of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates $(K_{a}/K_{s})$ highlighted 14 and six amino acids with $K_{a}/K_{s} \\gt 1$ in orthologue and paralogue datasets, respectively. Selection analysis revealed that the leucine-rich regions accumulate variability in a very specific way, and we found that some combinations of amino acids in these sites might be involved in pathogen recognition. The results confirm previous studies on positive selection in the LRR domain of R protein in Arabidopsis and other model plants and extend these to wild Solanum species. Moreover, positively selected sites in the Gro1 LRR domain show that coevolution mainly occurred in two regions on the internal surface of the three-dimensional horseshoe structure of the domain, albeit with different evolutionary forces between paralogues and orthologues.

  8. 'Obesity' is healthy for cetaceans? Evidence from pervasive positive selection in genes related to triacylglycerol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Ren, Wenhua; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2015-09-18

    Cetaceans are a group of secondarily adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic habitat and subsequent adaptive radiation in waters around the world. Numerous physiological and morphological cetacean characteristics have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition; for example, the thickened blubber is one of the most striking changes that increases their buoyancy, supports locomotion, and provides thermal insulation. However, the genetic basis underlying the blubber thickening in cetaceans remains poorly explored. Here, 88 candidate genes associated with triacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in representative cetaceans and other mammals to test whether the thickened blubber matched adaptive evolution of triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes. Positive selection was detected in 41 of the 88 candidate genes, and functional characterization of these genes indicated that these are involved mainly in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipolysis processes. In addition, some essential regulatory genes underwent significant positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages, whereas no selection signal was detected in the counterpart terrestrial mammals. The extensive occurrence of positive selection in triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes is suggestive of their essential role in secondary adaptation to an aquatic life, and further implying that 'obesity' might be an indicator of good health for cetaceans.

  9. Evolution of peptidoglycan biosynthesis under the selective pressure of antibiotics in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Villet, Régis; Bugg, Timothy D; Mayer, Claudine; Arthur, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Acquisition of resistance to the two classes of antibiotics therapeutically used against Gram-positive bacteria, the glycopeptides and the beta-lactams, has revealed an unexpected flexibility in the peptidoglycan assembly pathway. Glycopeptides select for diversification of the fifth position of stem pentapeptides because replacement of D-Ala by D-lactate or D-Ser at this position prevents binding of the drugs to peptidoglycan precursors. The substitution is generally well tolerated by the classical D,D-transpeptidases belonging to the penicillin-binding protein family, except by low-affinity enzymes. Total elimination of the fifth residue by a D,D-carboxypeptidase requires a novel cross-linking enzyme able to process the resulting tetrapeptide stems. This enzyme, an L,D-transpeptidase, confers cross-resistance to beta-lactams and glycopeptides. Diversification of the side chain of the precursors, presumably in response to the selective pressure of peptidoglycan endopeptidases, is controlled by aminoacyl transferases of the Fem family that redirect specific aminoacyl-tRNAs from translation to peptidoglycan synthesis. Diversification of the side chains has been accompanied by a parallel divergent evolution of the substrate specificity of the L,D-transpeptidases, in contrast to the D,D-transpeptidases, which display an unexpected broad specificity. This review focuses on the role of antibiotics in selecting or counter-selecting diversification of the structure of peptidoglycan precursors and their mode of polymerization.

  10. Detecting signatures of positive selection associated with musical aptitude in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Oikkonen, Jaana; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Järvelä, Irma

    2016-02-16

    Abilities related to musical aptitude appear to have a long history in human evolution. To elucidate the molecular and evolutionary background of musical aptitude, we compared genome-wide genotyping data (641 K SNPs) of 148 Finnish individuals characterized for musical aptitude. We assigned signatures of positive selection in a case-control setting using three selection methods: haploPS, XP-EHH and FST. Gene ontology classification revealed that the positive selection regions contained genes affecting inner-ear development. Additionally, literature survey has shown that several of the identified genes were known to be involved in auditory perception (e.g. GPR98, USH2A), cognition and memory (e.g. GRIN2B, IL1A, IL1B, RAPGEF5), reward mechanisms (RGS9), and song perception and production of songbirds (e.g. FOXP1, RGS9, GPR98, GRIN2B). Interestingly, genes related to inner-ear development and cognition were also detected in a previous genome-wide association study of musical aptitude. However, the candidate genes detected in this study were not reported earlier in studies of musical abilities. Identification of genes related to language development (FOXP1 and VLDLR) support the popular hypothesis that music and language share a common genetic and evolutionary background. The findings are consistent with the evolutionary conservation of genes related to auditory processes in other species and provide first empirical evidence for signatures of positive selection for abilities that contribute to musical aptitude.

  11. Sardinians genetic background explained by runs of homozygosity and genomic regions under positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Di Gaetano

    Full Text Available The peculiar position of Sardinia in the Mediterranean sea has rendered its population an interesting biogeographical isolate. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic population structure, as well as to estimate Runs of Homozygosity and regions under positive selection, using about 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in 1077 Sardinian individuals. Using four different methods--fixation index, inflation factor, principal component analysis and ancestry estimation--we were able to highlight, as expected for a genetic isolate, the high internal homogeneity of the island. Sardinians showed a higher percentage of genome covered by RoHs>0.5 Mb (F(RoH%0.5 when compared to peninsular Italians, with the only exception of the area surrounding Alghero. We furthermore identified 9 genomic regions showing signs of positive selection and, we re-captured many previously inferred signals. Other regions harbor novel candidate genes for positive selection, like TMEM252, or regions containing long non coding RNA. With the present study we confirmed the high genetic homogeneity of Sardinia that may be explained by the shared ancestry combined with the action of evolutionary forces.

  12. Diversification of the ant odorant receptor gene family and positive selection on candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engsontia, Patamarerk; Sangket, Unitsa; Robertson, Hugh M; Satasook, Chutamas

    2015-08-27

    Chemical communication plays important roles in the social behavior of ants making them one of the most successful groups of animals on earth. However, the molecular evolutionary process responsible for their chemosensory adaptation is still elusive. Recent advances in genomic studies have led to the identification of large odorant receptor (Or) gene repertoires from ant genomes providing fruitful materials for molecular evolution analysis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diversification of this gene family is involved in olfactory adaptation of each species. We annotated the Or genes from the genome sequences of two leaf-cutter ants, Acromyrmex echinatior and Atta cephalotes (385 and 376 putative functional genes, respectively). These were used, together with Or genes from Camponotus floridanus, Harpegnathos saltator, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, Linepithema humile, Cerapachys biroi, Solenopsis invicta and Apis mellifera, in molecular evolution analysis. Like the Or family in other insects, ant Or genes evolve by the birth-and-death model of gene family evolution. Large gene family expansions involving tandem gene duplications, and gene gains outnumbering losses, are observed. Codon analysis of genes in lineage-specific expansion clades revealed signatures of positive selection on the candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptor genes (9-exon subfamily) of Cerapachys biroi, Camponotus floridanus, Acromyrmex echinatior and Atta cephalotes. Positively selected amino acid positions are primarily in transmembrane domains 3 and 6, which are hypothesized to contribute to the odor-binding pocket, presumably mediating changing ligand specificity. This study provides support for the hypothesis that some ant lineage-specific Or genes have evolved under positive selection. Newly duplicated genes particularly in the candidate cuticular hydrocarbon receptor clade that have evolved under positive selection may contribute to the highly sophisticated lineage

  13. Partial imputation to improve predictive modelling in insurance risk classification using a hybrid positive selection algorithm and correlation-based feature selection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duma, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hybrid missing data imputation technique using positive selection and correlation-based feature selection for insurance data. The hybrid is used to help supervised learning methods improve their classification accuracy and resilience...

  14. Evidence of Positive Selection of Aquaporins Genes from Pontoporia blainvillei during the Evolutionary Process of Cetaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Lima São Pedro

    Full Text Available Marine mammals are well adapted to their hyperosmotic environment. Several morphological and physiological adaptations for water conservation and salt excretion are known to be present in cetaceans, being responsible for regulating salt balance. However, most previous studies have focused on the unique renal physiology of marine mammals, but the molecular bases of these mechanisms remain poorly explored. Many genes have been identified to be involved in osmotic regulation, including the aquaporins. Considering that aquaporin genes were potentially subject to strong selective pressure, the aim of this study was to analyze the molecular evolution of seven aquaporin genes (AQP1, AQP2, AQP3, AQP4, AQP6, AQP7, and AQP9 comparing the lineages of cetaceans and terrestrial mammals.Our results demonstrated strong positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages acting only in the gene for AQP2 (amino acids 23, 83, 107,179, 180, 181, 182, whereas no selection was observed in terrestrial mammalian lineages. We also analyzed the changes in the 3D structure of the aquaporin 2 protein. Signs of strong positive selection in AQP2 sites 179, 180, 181, and 182 were unexpectedly identified only in the baiji lineage, which was the only river dolphin examined in this study. Positive selection in aquaporins AQP1 (45, AQP4 (74, AQP7 (342, 343, 356 was detected in cetaceans and artiodactyls, suggesting that these events are not related to maintaining water and electrolyte homeostasis in seawater.Our results suggest that the AQP2 gene might reflect different selective pressures in maintaining water balance in cetaceans, contributing to the passage from the terrestrial environment to the aquatic. Further studies are necessary, especially those including other freshwater dolphins, who exhibit osmoregulatory mechanisms different from those of marine cetaceans for the same essential task of maintaining serum electrolyte balance.

  15. Positive Selection Pressure Drives Variation on the Surface-Exposed Variable Proteins of the Pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic species of Neisseria utilize variable outer membrane proteins to facilitate infection and proliferation within the human host. However, the mechanisms behind the evolution of these variable alleles remain largely unknown due to analysis of previously limited datasets. In this study, we have expanded upon the previous analyses to substantially increase the number of analyzed sequences by including multiple diverse strains, from various geographic locations, to determine whether positive selective pressure is exerted on the evolution of these variable genes. Although Neisseria are naturally competent, this analysis indicates that only intrastrain horizontal gene transfer among the pathogenic Neisseria principally account for these genes exhibiting linkage equilibrium which drives the polymorphisms evidenced within these alleles. As the majority of polymorphisms occur across species, the divergence of these variable genes is dependent upon the species and is independent of geographical location, disease severity, or serogroup. Tests of neutrality were able to detect strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families, and were able to locate the majority of these sites within the exposed variable regions of the encoded proteins. Evidence of positive selection acting upon the hypervariable domains of Opa contradicts previous beliefs and provides evidence for selection of receptor binding. As the pathogenic Neisseria reside exclusively within the human host, the strong selection pressures acting upon both the opa and pil gene families provide support for host immune system pressure driving sequence polymorphisms within these variable genes.

  16. Evaluation of an Improved Branch-Site Likelihood Method for Detecting Positive Selection at the Molecular Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Nielsen, Rasmus; Yang, Ziheng

    2005-01-01

    Detecting positive Darwinian selection at the DNA sequence level has been a subject of considerable interest. However, positive selection is difficult to detect because it often operates episodically on a few amino acid sites, and the signal may be masked by negative selection. Several methods have...... of interest, while test 2 had acceptable false-positive rates and appeared robust against violations of model assumptions. As test 2 is a direct test of positive selection on the lineages of interest, it is referred to as the branch-site test of positive selection and is recommended for use in real data...... applied the new tests to reanalyze several real data sets and used computer simulation to examine the performance of the two tests by examining their false-positive rate, power, and robustness. We found that test 1 was unable to distinguish relaxed constraint from positive selection affecting the lineages...

  17. COMPETITIVE POSITION OF SELECTED REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS ON THE GLOBAL AGRI-FOOD MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Sapa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study attempts to determine the CACM, MERCOSUR and NAFTA competitive position in the agri-food market taking into account selected indicators related to GDP, productivity and trade. The analysis allowed to state that only for MERCOSUR the competitive position in global food-market improved. In that groupings, compared to NAFTA and CACM, there was a bigger increase in GDP per capita and labour productivity in agriculture. Furthermore, only the share of MERCOSUR agri-food trade in world trade increased which was accompanied by a greater increase of extra-regional agri-food trade than intra-regional ones.

  18. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator in a Patient With Hormone-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontela, Namratha; Koduri, Vamsi; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Vidal, Gregory A

    2017-03-01

    Androgen receptors (ARs) are highly coexpressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers. Their role in breast tumorigenesis has been postulated, but the mechanism is not yet well-characterized. Steroidal androgens were previously used as an anticancer strategy but fell out of favor because of toxicity and the discovery of alternative therapies. Recent attempts to modulate androgen pathway signaling have focused on AR inhibitors. This report discusses a case using a well-tolerated selective AR modulator to treat a highly pretreated patient with ER-positive breast cancer, which resulted in a durable partial response. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  19. High amino acid diversity and positive selection at a putative coral immunity gene (tachylectin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellberg Michael E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes involved in immune functions, including pathogen recognition and the activation of innate defense pathways, are among the most genetically variable known, and the proteins that they encode are often characterized by high rates of amino acid substitutions, a hallmark of positive selection. The high levels of variation characteristic of immunity genes make them useful tools for conservation genetics. To date, highly variable immunity genes have yet to be found in corals, keystone organisms of the world's most diverse marine ecosystem, the coral reef. Here, we examine variation in and selection on a putative innate immunity gene from Oculina, a coral genus previously used as a model for studies of coral disease and bleaching. Results In a survey of 244 Oculina alleles, we find high nonsynonymous variation and a signature of positive selection, consistent with a putative role in immunity. Using computational protein structure prediction, we generate a structural model of the Oculina protein that closely matches the known structure of tachylectin-2 from the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus, a protein with demonstrated function in microbial recognition and agglutination. We also demonstrate that at least three other genera of anthozoan cnidarians (Acropora, Montastrea and Nematostella possess proteins structurally similar to tachylectin-2. Conclusions Taken together, the evidence of high amino acid diversity, positive selection and structural correspondence to the horseshoe crab tachylectin-2 suggests that this protein is 1 part of Oculina's innate immunity repertoire, and 2 evolving adaptively, possibly under selective pressure from coral-associated microorganisms. Tachylectin-2 may serve as a candidate locus to screen coral populations for their capacity to respond adaptively to future environmental change.

  20. Positive selection at a seminal fluid gene within a QTL for conspecific sperm precedence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civetta, Alberto; Reimer, Angela

    2014-12-01

    The role of sexual selection in driving the rapid evolution of male reproductive proteins has been tested in a wide variety of organisms. Sperm competition is a form of postmating sexual selection that can contribute to reproductive isolation between species by biasing the proportion of progeny fathered by conspecific over heterospecific males. This phenomenon is known as conspecific sperm precedence (CSP). A previous quantitative trait loci study between Drosophila simulans and D. sechellia identified a locus associated with CSP within the second chromosome centered at the 53 cytogenetic map position. Male accessory gland proteins (ACPs) are associated with triggering postmating physiological responses in D. melanogaster females that can contribute to differential male reproductive success. Moreover, a large number of ACPs evolve rapidly and under positive selection among closely-related species of Drosophila. Here we have sequenced five candidate Acp genes (Acp53C14a, Acp53C14b, Acp53C14c, Acp53Ea and Acp54A1) within the previously mapped D. simulans-D. sechellia CSP locus from different D. simulans and D. sechellia strains. Polymorphism data analysis shows evidence of a selective sweep at Acp53Ea within D. simulans. In the context of CSP, the combined use of polymorphism and interspecies sequence divergence shows that Acp53C14c gene tree topology separates D. simulans and D. sechellia. Moreover, Acp53C14c is the only gene showing evidence of positive selection with five fixed amino acid substitutions between species. Our results highlight Acp53C14c as a candidate gene for future gene targeting studies to elucidate its role in CSP between D. simulans and D. sechellia.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis and positive-selection site detecting of vascular endothelial growth factor family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenwu; Tang, Yanyan; Qi, Bin; Lu, Chuansen; Qin, Chao; Wei, Yunfei; Yi, Jiachao; Chen, Mingwu

    2014-02-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), known to play an important role in vascular homeostasis, vascular integrity and angiogenesis, is little known about the evolutionary relationship of its five members especially the role of gene duplication and natural selection in the evolution of the VEGF family. In this study, seventy-five full-length cDNA sequences from 33 vertebrate species were extracted from the NCBI's GenBank, UniProt protein database and the Ensembl database. By phylogenetic analyses, we investigated the origin, conservation, and evolution of the VEGFs. Five VEGF family members in vertebrates might be formed by gene duplication. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate members which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in functional properties. Selection analysis and protein structure analysis were combined to explain the relationship of the site-specific evolution in the vertebrate VEGF family. Eleven positive selection sites, one transmembrane region and the active sites were detected in this process.

  2. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Jan Ejsmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process. Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  3. Positive selection at reproductive ADAM genes with potential intercellular binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassey, Barb; Civetta, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Many genes with a role in reproduction, including those implicated in fertilization and spermatogenesis, have been shown to evolve at a faster rate relative to genes associated with other functions and tissues. These survey studies usually group a wide variety of genes with different characteristics and evolutionary histories as reproductive genes based on their site of expression or function. We have examined the molecular evolution of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) gene family, a structurally and functionally diverse group of genes expressed in reproductive and somatic tissue to test whether a variety of protein characteristics such as phylogenetic clusters, tissue of expression, and proteolytic and adhesive function can group fast evolving ADAM genes. We found that all genes were evolving under purifying selection (d(N)/d(S) < 1), although reproductive ADAMs, including those implicated in fertilization and spermatogenesis, evolved at the fastest rate. Genes with a role in binding to cell receptors in endogenous tissue appear to be evolving under purifying selection, regardless of the tissue of expression. In contrast, positive selection of codon sites in the disintegrin/cysteine-rich adhesion domains was detected exclusively in ADAMs 2 and 32, two genes expressed in the testis with a potential role in sperm-egg adhesion. Positive selection was detected in the transmembrane/cytosolic tail region of ADAM genes expressed in a variety of tissues.

  4. Change of positive selection pressure on HIV-1 envelope gene inferred by early and recent samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Yoshida

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection has been on the rise in Japan recently, and the main transmission route has changed from blood transmission in the 1980s to homo- and/or hetero-sexual transmission in the 2000s. The lack of early viral samples with clinical information made it difficult to investigate the possible virological changes over time. In this study, we sequenced 142 full-length env genes collected from 16 Japanese subjects infected with HIV-1 in the 1980s and in the 2000s. We examined the diversity change in sequences and potential adaptive evolution of the virus to the host population. We used a codon-based likelihood method under the branch-site and clade models to detect positive selection operating on the virus. The clade model was extended to account for different positive selection pressures in different viral populations. The result showed that the selection pressure was weaker in the 2000s than in the 1980s, indicating that it might have become easier for the HIV to infect a new host and to develop into AIDS now than 20 years ago and that the HIV may be becoming more virulent in the Japanese population. The study provides useful information on the surveillance of HIV infection and highlights the utility of the extended clade models in analysis of virus populations which may be under different selection pressures.

  5. Signatures of purifying and local positive selection in human miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Hélène; Barreiro, Luis B; Laval, Guillaume; Zidane, Nora; Patin, Etienne; Kidd, Kenneth K; Kidd, Judith R; Bouchier, Christiane; Veuille, Michel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2009-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene repression, and their role in diverse physiological processes is increasingly recognized. Yet, few efforts have been devoted to evolutionary studies of human miRNAs. Knowledge about the way in which natural selection has targeted miRNAs should provide insight into their functional relevance as well as their mechanisms of action. Here we used miRNAs as a model system for investigating the influence of natural selection on gene regulation by characterizing the full spectrum of naturally occurring sequence variation of 117 human miRNAs from different populations worldwide. We found that purifying selection has globally constrained the diversity of miRNA-containing regions and has strongly targeted the mature miRNA. This observation emphasizes that mutations in these molecules are likely to be deleterious, and therefore they can have severe phenotypic consequences on human health. More importantly, we obtained evidence of population-specific events of positive selection acting on a number of miRNA-containing regions. Notably, our analysis revealed that positive selection has targeted a "small-RNA-rich island" on chromosome 14, harboring both miRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, in Europeans and East Asians. These observations support the notion that the tuning of gene expression contributes to the processes by which populations adapt to specific environments. These findings will fuel future investigations exploring how genetic and functional variation of miRNAs under selection affects the repression of their mRNA targets, increasing our understanding of the role of gene regulation in population adaptation and human disease.

  6. TCR affinity for thymoproteasome-dependent positively selecting peptides conditions antigen responsiveness in CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kensuke; Van Laethem, Francois; Xing, Yan; Akane, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Haruhiko; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Jameson, Stephen C; Singer, Alfred; Takahama, Yousuke

    2015-10-01

    In the thymus, low-affinity T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement facilitates positive selection of a useful T cell repertoire. Here we report that TCR responsiveness of mature CD8(+) T cells is fine tuned by their affinity for positively selecting peptides in the thymus and that optimal TCR responsiveness requires positive selection on major histocompatibility complex class I-associated peptides produced by the thymoproteasome, which is specifically expressed in the thymic cortical epithelium. Thymoproteasome-independent positive selection of monoclonal CD8(+) T cells results in aberrant TCR responsiveness, homeostatic maintenance and immune responses to infection. These results demonstrate a novel aspect of positive selection, in which TCR affinity for positively selecting peptides produced by thymic epithelium determines the subsequent antigen responsiveness of mature CD8(+) T cells in the periphery.

  7. Positive Selection of a Pre-Expansion CAG Repeat of the Human SCA2 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG(8CAA(CAG(4CAA(CAG(8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  8. Positive selection of a pre-expansion CAG repeat of the human SCA2 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuli Yu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A region of approximately one megabase of human Chromosome 12 shows extensive linkage disequilibrium in Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe. This strikingly large linkage disequilibrium block was analyzed with statistical and experimental methods to determine whether natural selection could be implicated in shaping the current genome structure. Extended Haplotype Homozygosity and Relative Extended Haplotype Homozygosity analyses on this region mapped a core region of the strongest conserved haplotype to the exon 1 of the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 gene (SCA2. Direct DNA sequencing of this region of the SCA2 gene revealed a significant association between a pre-expanded allele [(CAG8CAA(CAG4CAA(CAG8] of CAG repeats within exon 1 and the selected haplotype of the SCA2 gene. A significantly negative Tajima's D value (-2.20, p < 0.01 on this site consistently suggested selection on the CAG repeat. This region was also investigated in the three other populations, none of which showed signs of selection. These results suggest that a recent positive selection of the pre-expansion SCA2 CAG repeat has occurred in Utah residents with European ancestry.

  9. Genetic variation and recent positive selection in worldwide human populations: evidence from nearly 1 million SNPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David López Herráez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide scans of hundreds of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have resulted in the identification of new susceptibility variants to common diseases and are providing new insights into the genetic structure and relationships of human populations. Moreover, genome-wide data can be used to search for signals of recent positive selection, thereby providing new insights into the genetic adaptations that occurred as modern humans spread out of Africa and around the world. METHODOLOGY: We genotyped approximately 500,000 SNPs in 255 individuals (5 individuals from each of 51 worldwide populations from the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP-CEPH. When merged with non-overlapping SNPs typed previously in 250 of these same individuals, the resulting data consist of over 950,000 SNPs. We then analyzed the genetic relationships and ancestry of individuals without assigning them to populations, and we also identified candidate regions of recent positive selection at both the population and regional (continental level. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses both confirm and extend previous studies; in particular, we highlight the impact of various dispersals, and the role of substructure in Africa, on human genetic diversity. We also identified several novel candidate regions for recent positive selection, and a gene ontology (GO analysis identified several GO groups that were significantly enriched for such candidate genes, including immunity and defense related genes, sensory perception genes, membrane proteins, signal receptors, lipid binding/metabolism genes, and genes involved in the nervous system. Among the novel candidate genes identified are two genes involved in the thyroid hormone pathway that show signals of selection in African Pygmies that may be related to their short stature.

  10. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  11. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatt, Matthew W; Zang, Trinity; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bartlett, Mackenzie; Fofana, Ismael Ben; Johnson, Welkin E; Neil, Stuart J D; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2009-02-01

    Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh), African green monkeys (agm) and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  12. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  13. Evidence for positive selection on the Osteogenin (BMP3 gene in human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Dong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skeletal system has evolved rapidly since the dispersal of modern humans from Africa, potentially driven by selection and adaptation. Osteogenin (BMP3 plays an important role in skeletal development and bone osteogenesis as an antagonist of the osteogenic bone morphogenetic proteins, and negatively regulates bone mineral density. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we resequenced the BMP3 gene from individuals in four geographically separated modern human populations. Features supportive of positive selection in the BMP3 gene were found including the presence of an excess of nonsynonymous mutations in modern humans, and a significantly lower genetic diversity that deviates from neutrality. The prevalent haplotypes of the first exon region in Europeans demonstrated features of long-range haplotype homogeneity. In contrast with findings in European, the derived allele SNP Arg192Gln shows higher extended haplotype homozygosity in East Asian. The worldwide allele frequency distribution of SNP shows not only a high-derived allele frequency in Asians, but also in Americans, which is suggestive of functional adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, we provide evidence for recent positive selection operating upon a crucial gene in skeletal development, which may provide new insight into the evolution of the skeletal system and bone development.

  14. Selective indication for positive airway pressure (PAP in sleep-related breathing disorders with obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stasche, Norbert

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Positive airway pressure (PAP is the therapy of choice for most sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD. A variety of PAP devices using positive airway pressure (CPAP, BiPAP, APAP, ASV must be carefully considered before application. This overview aims to provide criteria for choosing the optimal PAP device according to severity and type of sleep-related breathing disorder. In addition, the range of therapeutic applications, constraints and side effects as well as alternative methods to PAP will be discussed. This review is based on an analysis of current literature and clinical experience. The data is presented from an ENT-sleep-laboratory perspective and is designed to help the ENT practitioner initiate treatment and provide support. Different titration methods, current devices and possible applications will be described. In addition to constant pressure devices (CPAP, most commonly used for symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA without complicating conditions, BiPAP models will be introduced. These allow two different positive pressure settings and are thus especially suitable for patients with cardiopulmonary diseases or patients with pressure intolerance, increasing compliance in this subgroup considerably. Compliance can also be increased in patients during first night of therapy, patients with highly variable pressure demands or position-dependent OSA, by using self-regulating Auto-adjust PAP devices (Automatic positive airway pressure, APAP. Patients with Cheyne-Stokes breathing, a subtype of central sleep apnoea, benefit from adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV, which analyzes breathing patterns continually and adjusts the actual ventilation pressure accordingly. This not only reduces daytime sleepiness, but can also influence heart disease positively. Therapy with positive airway pressure is very effective in eliminating obstruction-related sleep diseases and symptoms. However, because therapy is generally applied for life, the optimal

  15. Evolutionary pattern in the OXT-OXTR system in primates: coevolution and positive selection footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Pinilla, Pedro; Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Paré, Pamela; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Vieira, Carlos Meton de Alencar Gadelha; Xavier, Agatha; Comas, David; Pissinatti, Alcides; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Rigo, Maurício Menegatti; Vieira, Gustavo Fioravanti; Lucion, Aldo B; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2015-01-06

    Oxytocin is a nonapeptide involved in a wide range of physiologic and behavioral functions. Until recently, it was believed that an unmodified oxytocin sequence was present in all placental mammals. This study analyzed oxytocin (OXT) in 29 primate species and the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) in 21 of these species. We report here three novel OXT forms in the New World monkeys, as well as a more extensive distribution of a previously described variant (Leu8Pro). In structural terms, these OXTs share the same three low-energy conformations in solution during molecular dynamic simulations, with subtle differences in their side chains. A consistent signal of positive selection was detected in the Cebidae family, and OXT position 8 showed a statistically significant (P = 0.013) correlation with litter size. Several OXTR changes were identified, some of them promoting gain or loss of putative phosphorylation sites, with possible consequences for receptor internalization and desensitization. OXTR amino acid sites are under positive selection, and intramolecular and intermolecular coevolutionary processes with OXT were also detected. We suggest that some New World monkey OXT-OXTR forms can be correlated to male parental care through the increase of cross-reactivity with its correlated vasopressin system.

  16. Design and optimization of selective azaindole amide M1 positive allosteric modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Jennifer E; O'Neil, Steven V; Anderson, Dennis P; Brodney, Michael A; Chenard, Lois; Dlugolenski, Keith; Edgerton, Jeremy R; Green, Michael; Garnsey, Michelle; Grimwood, Sarah; Harris, Anthony R; Kauffman, Gregory W; LaChapelle, Erik; Lazzaro, John T; Lee, Che-Wah; Lotarski, Susan M; Nason, Deane M; Obach, R Scott; Reinhart, Veronica; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Steyn, Stefanus J; Webb, Damien; Yan, Jiangli; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-15

    Selective activation of the M1 receptor via a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) is a new approach for the treatment of the cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. A novel series of azaindole amides and their key pharmacophore elements are described. The nitrogen of the azaindole core is a key design element as it forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with the amide N-H thus reinforcing the bioactive conformation predicted by published SAR and our homology model. Representative compound 25 is a potent and selective M1 PAM that has well aligned physicochemical properties, adequate brain penetration and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, and is active in vivo. These favorable properties indicate that this series possesses suitable qualities for further development and studies.

  17. Mitogenomic analyses propose positive selection in mitochondrial genes for high-altitude adaptation in galliform birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Taicheng; Shen, Xuejuan; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yongyi; Zhang, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Galliform birds inhabit very diverse habitats, including plateaus that are above 3000 m in altitude. At high altitude, lower temperature and hypoxia are two important factors influencing survival. Mitochondria, as the ultimate oxygen transductor, play an important role in aerobic respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of six high-altitude phasianidae birds and sixteen low-altitude relatives in an attempt to determine the role of mitochondrial genes in high-altitude adaptation. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of these phasianidae birds and relatives and found at least four lineages that independently occupied this high-altitude habitat. Selective analyses revealed significant evidence for positive selection in the genes ND2, ND4, and ATP6 in three of the high-altitude lineages. This result strongly suggests that adaptive evolution of mitochondrial genes played a critical role during the independent acclimatization to high altitude by galliform birds.

  18. Role of Positive Selection Pressure on the Evolution of H5N1 Hemagglutinin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Venkata R.S.K. Duwuri; Bhargavi Duvvuri; Wilfred R. Cuff; Gillian E. Wu; Jianhong Wu

    2009-01-01

    The surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) helps the influenza A virus to evade the host immune system by antigenic variation and is a major driving force for viral evolution. In this study, the selection pressure on HA of H5N1 influenza A virus was analyzed using bioinformatics algorithms. Most of the identified positive selection (PS) sites were found to be within or adjacent to epitope sites. Some of the identified PS sites are consistent with previous experimental studies, providing further support to the biological significance of our findings. The highest frequency of PS sites was observed in recent strains isolated during 2005-2007. Phylogenetic analysis was also conducted on HA sequences from various hosts. Viral drift is almost similar in both avian and human species with a progressive trend over the years. Our study reports new mutations in functional regions of HA that might provide markers for vaccine design or can be used to predict isolates of pandemic potential.

  19. Area-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Conformal Coating, Subnanometer Thickness Control, and Smart Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming; Ho, Johnny C

    2015-09-22

    Transistors have already been made three-dimensional (3D), with device channels (i.e., fins in trigate field-effect transistor (FinFET) technology) that are taller, thinner, and closer together in order to enhance device performance and lower active power consumption. As device scaling continues, these transistors will require more advanced, fabrication-enabling technologies for the conformal deposition of high-κ dielectric layers on their 3D channels with accurate position alignment and thickness control down to the subnanometer scale. Among many competing techniques, area-selective atomic layer deposition (AS-ALD) is a promising method that is well suited to the requirements without the use of complicated, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-incompatible processes. However, further progress is limited by poor area selectivity for thicker films formed via a higher number of ALD cycles as well as the prolonged processing time. In this issue of ACS Nano, Professor Stacy Bent and her research group demonstrate a straightforward self-correcting ALD approach, combining selective deposition with a postprocess mild chemical etching, which enables selective deposition of dielectric films with thicknesses and processing times at least 10 times larger and 48 times shorter, respectively, than those obtained by conventional AS-ALD processes. These advances present an important technological breakthrough that may drive the AS-ALD technique a step closer toward industrial applications in electronics, catalysis, and photonics, etc. where more efficient device fabrication processes are needed.

  20. Selectivity of Brij-35 in Micellar Liquid Chromatographic Separation of Positional Isomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najma Memon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of Brij-35, a nonionic surfactant, as a mobile phase for separation of positional isomers is investigated. Chromolith C-18 SpeedROD is used as a stationary phase. The effect of surfactant and organic modifier (propanol concentration on the separation of some selected isomers is studied and evaluated in terms of linear solvation energy relationship (LSER. Shape selectivity is assessed by α value of sorbic and benzoic acid, which is found to be 1.339 by using mobile phase composed of 0.5% aqueous solutions of Brij-35 and propanol in 9 : 1. Isomers of parabens, nitroanilines, nitrophenols, and quinolinols are successfully separated using mobile phases composed of various percentages of surfactant and propanol. System constants for nonionic MLC using LSER analysis show that hydrogen bond basicity and dipolarity may be major contributors to selectivity, while excess molar refraction helps fine-tuning the separation which also imparts unique selectivity to nonionic surfactants as compared to ionic ones.

  1. Rapid intrahost evolution of human cytomegalovirus is shaped by demography and positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzette, Nicholas; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Fisher, Donna; Schleiss, Mark R; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    Populations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a large DNA virus, are highly polymorphic in patient samples, which may allow for rapid evolution within human hosts. To understand HCMV evolution, longitudinally sampled genomic populations from the urine and plasma of 5 infants with symptomatic congenital HCMV infection were analyzed. Temporal and compartmental variability of viral populations were quantified using high throughput sequencing and population genetics approaches. HCMV populations were generally stable over time, with ~88% of SNPs displaying similar frequencies. However, samples collected from plasma and urine of the same patient at the same time were highly differentiated with approximately 1700 consensus sequence SNPs (1.2% of the genome) identified between compartments. This inter-compartment differentiation was comparable to the differentiation observed in unrelated hosts. Models of demography (i.e., changes in population size and structure) and positive selection were evaluated to explain the observed patterns of variation. Evidence for strong bottlenecks (>90% reduction in viral population size) was consistent among all patients. From the timing of the bottlenecks, we conclude that fetal infection occurred between 13-18 weeks gestational age in patients analyzed, while colonization of the urine compartment followed roughly 2 months later. The timing of these bottlenecks is consistent with the clinical histories of congenital HCMV infections. We next inferred that positive selection plays a small but measurable role in viral evolution within a single compartment. However, positive selection appears to be a strong and pervasive driver of evolution associated with compartmentalization, affecting ≥ 34 of the 167 open reading frames (~20%) of the genome. This work offers the most detailed map of HCMV in vivo evolution to date and provides evidence that viral populations can be stable or rapidly differentiate, depending on host environment. The

  2. Ancestral resurrection of anthropoid estrogen receptor β demonstrates functional consequences of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckle, Amy; McGowen, Michael R; Xing, Jun; Chen, Caoyi; Sterner, Kirstin N; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2017-09-13

    Anthropoid primates arose during the Eocene approximately 55 million years ago (mya), and extant anthropoids share a most recent common ancestor ∼40mya. Paleontology has been very successful at describing the morphological phenotypes of extinct anthropoids. Less well understood is the molecular biology of these extinct species as well as the phenotypic consequences of evolutionary variation in their genomes. Here we resurrect the most recent common ancestral anthropoid estrogen receptor β gene (ESR2) and demonstrate that the function of this ancestral estrogen receptor has been maintained during human descent but was altered during early New World monkey (NWM) evolution by becoming a more potent transcriptional activator. We tested hypotheses of adaptive evolution in the protein coding sequences of ESR2, and determined that ESR2 evolved via episodic positive selection on the NWM stem lineage. We separately co-transfected ESR2 constructs for human, NWM, and the anthropoid ancestor along with reporter gene vectors and performed hormone binding dose response experiments that measure transactivation activity. We found the transactivation potentials of the ancestral and human sequences to be significantly lower (p<0.0001 in each comparison) than that of the NWM when treated with estradiol, the most prevalent estrogen. We conclude the difference in fold activation is due to positive selection in the NWM ERβ ligand binding domain. Our study validates inferential methods for detecting adaptive evolution that predict functional consequences of nucleotide substitutions and points a way toward examining the functional consequences of positive Darwinian selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid intrahost evolution of human cytomegalovirus is shaped by demography and positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Renzette

    Full Text Available Populations of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, a large DNA virus, are highly polymorphic in patient samples, which may allow for rapid evolution within human hosts. To understand HCMV evolution, longitudinally sampled genomic populations from the urine and plasma of 5 infants with symptomatic congenital HCMV infection were analyzed. Temporal and compartmental variability of viral populations were quantified using high throughput sequencing and population genetics approaches. HCMV populations were generally stable over time, with ~88% of SNPs displaying similar frequencies. However, samples collected from plasma and urine of the same patient at the same time were highly differentiated with approximately 1700 consensus sequence SNPs (1.2% of the genome identified between compartments. This inter-compartment differentiation was comparable to the differentiation observed in unrelated hosts. Models of demography (i.e., changes in population size and structure and positive selection were evaluated to explain the observed patterns of variation. Evidence for strong bottlenecks (>90% reduction in viral population size was consistent among all patients. From the timing of the bottlenecks, we conclude that fetal infection occurred between 13-18 weeks gestational age in patients analyzed, while colonization of the urine compartment followed roughly 2 months later. The timing of these bottlenecks is consistent with the clinical histories of congenital HCMV infections. We next inferred that positive selection plays a small but measurable role in viral evolution within a single compartment. However, positive selection appears to be a strong and pervasive driver of evolution associated with compartmentalization, affecting ≥ 34 of the 167 open reading frames (~20% of the genome. This work offers the most detailed map of HCMV in vivo evolution to date and provides evidence that viral populations can be stable or rapidly differentiate, depending on host environment

  4. Mammalian NPC1 genes may undergo positive selection and human polymorphisms associate with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Daghri Nasser M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NPC1 gene encodes a protein involved in intracellular lipid trafficking; its second endosomal loop (loop 2 is a receptor for filoviruses. A polymorphism (His215Arg in NPC1 was associated with obesity in Europeans. Adaptations to diet and pathogens represented powerful selective forces; thus, we analyzed the evolutionary history of the gene and exploited this information for the identification of variants/residues of functional importance in human disease. Methods We performed phylogenetic analysis, population genetic tests, and genotype-phenotype analysis in a population from Saudi Arabia. Results Maximum-likelihood ratio tests indicated the action of positive selection on loop 2 and identified three residues as selection targets; these were confirmed by an independent random effects likelihood (REL analysis. No selection signature was detected in present-day human populations, but analysis of nonsynonymous polymorphisms showed that a variant (Ile642Met, rs1788799 in the sterol sensing domain affects a highly conserved position. This variant and the previously described His215Arg polymorphism were tested for association with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D in a cohort from Saudi Arabia. Whereas no association with obesity was detected, 642Met allele was found to predispose to T2D. A significant interaction was noted with sex (P = 0.041, and stratification on the basis of gender indicated that the association is driven by men (P = 0.0021, OR = 1.5. Notably, two NPC1 haplotypes were also associated with T2D in men (rs1805081-rs1788799, His-Met: P = 0.0012, OR = 1.54; His-Ile: P = 0.0004, OR = 0.63. Conclusions Our data indicate a sex-specific effect of NPC1 variants on T2D risk and describe putative binding sites for filoviruses entry.

  5. Rapid evolution of plethodontid modulating factor, a hypervariable salamander courtship pheromone, is driven by positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Catherine A; Watts, Richard A; Hastings, Amy P; Houck, Lynne D; Arnold, Stevan J

    2010-05-01

    Sexual communication in plethodontid salamanders is mediated by a proteinaceous pheromone that a male delivers to a female during courtship, boosting her receptivity. The pheromone consists of three proteins from three unrelated protein families. These proteins are among a small group of pheromones known to affect female receptivity in vertebrates. Previously, we showed that the genes of two of these proteins (PRF and SPF) are prone to incessant evolution driven by positive selection, presumably as a consequence of coevolution with female receptors. In this report, we focus on the evolution of the third pheromone protein gene family, plethodontid modulating factor (PMF), to determine whether it shows the same pattern of diversification. We used RT-PCR in mental gland cDNA to survey PMF sequences from three genera of plethodontid salamanders (27 spp.) to measure rates of evolution, level of gene diversification, modes of selection, and types of amino acid substitution. Like PRF and SPF, PMF is produced by a multigene family characterized by gene duplication and high levels of polymorphism. PMF evolution is rapid, incessant, and driven by positive selection. PMF is more extreme in these dimensions than both PRF and SPF. Nestled within this extraordinary variation, however, is a signature of purifying selection, acting to preserve important structural and biochemical features of the PMF protein (i.e., secretion signal, cysteine residues, and pI). Although a pattern of persistent diversification exists at the molecular level, the morphological and behavioral aspects of the pheromone delivery system show evolutionary stasis over millions of years.

  6. Selecting method of districts with science and technology program's priority support and its positive analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-qi; WANG Xue-yuan

    2008-01-01

    According to growth pole theory, this paper puts forward that when allocating regional science and technology (S&T) innovation resources based on S&T program, should abide the principle that important are areceives priority support; Meanwhile, it designs method to ascertain district S&T advantage and S&T innovation resources utilizing efficiency as well as S&T developing speed by using component analysis and DEA method, and then constructs three-dimension selecting model ,by which a positive research on Heilongjiang is made, the purpose of which is to offer scientific method support and decision-making foundation for making regional S&T program.

  7. Non-gated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in bulk water by position-selective detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ye; Xue, Boyang; Song, Jiaojian; Lu, Yuan; Zheng, Ronger, E-mail: rzheng@ouc.edu.cn [Optics and Optoelectronics Laboratory, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-09-14

    Temporal and spatial evolutions of the laser-induced plasma in bulk water are investigated using fast imaging and emission spectroscopic techniques. By tightly focusing a single-pulse nanosecond Nd: YAG laser beam into the bulk water, we generate a strongly expanded plasma with high reproducibility. Such a strong expanding plasma enables us to obtain well-resolved spectral lines by means of position-selective detection; hence, the time-gated detector becomes abdicable. The present results suggest not only a possible non-gated approach for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy but also give an insight into the plasma generation and expansion in bulk water.

  8. Positive evolutionary selection of an HD motif on Alzheimer precursor protein orthologues suggests a functional role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Miklós

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HD amino acid duplex has been found in the active center of many different enzymes. The dyad plays remarkably different roles in their catalytic processes that usually involve metal coordination. An HD motif is positioned directly on the amyloid beta fragment (Aβ and on the carboxy-terminal region of the extracellular domain (CAED of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP and a taxonomically well defined group of APP orthologues (APPOs. In human Aβ HD is part of a presumed, RGD-like integrin-binding motif RHD; however, neither RHD nor RXD demonstrates reasonable conservation in APPOs. The sequences of CAEDs and the position of the HD are not particularly conserved either, yet we show with a novel statistical method using evolutionary modeling that the presence of HD on CAEDs cannot be the result of neutral evolutionary forces (p<0.0001. The motif is positively selected along the evolutionary process in the majority of APPOs, despite the fact that HD motif is underrepresented in the proteomes of all species of the animal kingdom. Position migration can be explained by high probability occurrence of multiple copies of HD on intermediate sequences, from which only one is kept by selective evolutionary forces, in a similar way as in the case of the "transcription binding site turnover." CAED of all APP orthologues and homologues are predicted to bind metal ions including Amyloid-like protein 1 (APLP1 and Amyloid-like protein 2 (APLP2. Our results suggest that HDs on the CAEDs are most probably key components of metal-binding domains, which facilitate and/or regulate inter- or intra-molecular interactions in a metal ion-dependent or metal ion concentration-dependent manner. The involvement of naturally occurring mutations of HD (Tottori (D7N and English (H6R mutations in early onset Alzheimer's disease gives additional support to our finding that HD has an evolutionary preserved function on APPOs.

  9. Investigation of some selected strategies for multi-GNSS instantaneous RTK positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paziewski, Jacek; Wielgosz, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    It is clear that we can benefit from multi-constellation GNSS in precise relative positioning. On the other hand, it is still an open problem how to combine multi-GNSS signals in a single functional model. This study presents methodology and quality assessment of selected methods allowing for multi-GNSS observations combining in relative kinematic positioning using baselines up to tens of kilometers. In specific, this paper characterizes loose and tight integration strategies applied to the ionosphere and troposphere weighted model. Performance assessment of the established strategies was based on the analyses of the integer ambiguity resolution and rover coordinates' repeatability obtained in the medium range instantaneous RTK positioning with the use of full constellation dual frequency GPS and Galileo signals. Since full constellation of Galileo satellites is not yet available, the observational data were obtained from a hardware GNSS signal simulator using regular geodetic GNSS receivers. The results indicate on similar and high performance of the loose, and tight integration with calibrated receiver ISBs strategies. These approaches have undeniable advantage over single system positioning in terms of reliability of the integer ambiguity resolution as well as rover coordinate repeatability.

  10. Positive selection for uracil auxotrophs of the sulfur-dependent thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by use of 5-fluoroorotic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, S; Yamagishi, A; Oshima, T

    1991-01-01

    Uracil auxotrophs of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were positively selected by using 5-fluoroorotic acid. The wild-type strain was unable to grow in medium containing 5-fluoroorotic acid, whereas the mutants grew normally. Positive selection could be done for the auxotrophs. Mutants deficient in orotidine-5'-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase activity were isolated.

  11. School Discipline: The Ongoing Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Marilyn

    1975-01-01

    The positive and negative aspects of classroom punishment were compared and the characteristics of teachers who did not experience discipline problems with their students were discussed. Additionally, programs for overcoming discipline difficulties were presented. (RK)

  12. Positive selection at the ASPM gene coincides with brain size enlargements in cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shixia; Chen, Yuan; Cheng, Yuefeng; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Xuming; Xu, Junxiao; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2012-11-07

    The enlargement of cetacean brain size represents an enigmatic event in mammalian evolution, yet its genetic basis remains poorly explored. One candidate gene associated with brain size evolution is the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated (ASPM), as mutations in this gene cause severe reductions in the cortical size of humans. Here, we investigated the ASPM gene in representative cetacean lineages and previously published sequences from other mammals to test whether the expansion of the cetacean brain matched adaptive ASPM evolution patterns. Our analyses yielded significant evidence of positive selection on the ASPM gene during cetacean evolution, especially for the Odontoceti and Delphinoidea lineages. These molecular patterns were associated with two major events of relative brain size enlargement in odontocetes and delphinoids. It is of particular interest to find that positive selection was restricted to cetaceans and primates, two distant lineages both characterized by a massive expansion of brain size. This result is suggestive of convergent molecular evolution, although no site-specific convergence at the amino acid level was found.

  13. Positive selection on the nonhomologous end-joining factor Cernunnos-XLF in the human lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurka Jerzy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cernunnos-XLF is a nonhomologous end-joining factor that is mutated in patients with a rare immunodeficiency with microcephaly. Several other microcephaly-associated genes such as ASPM and microcephalin experienced recent adaptive evolution apparently linked to brain size expansion in humans. In this study we investigated whether Cernunnos-XLF experienced similar positive selection during human evolution. Results We obtained or reconstructed full-length coding sequences of chimpanzee, rhesus macaque, canine, and bovine Cernunnos-XLF orthologs from sequence databases and sequence trace archives. Comparison of coding sequences revealed an excess of nonsynonymous substitutions consistent with positive selection on Cernunnos-XLF in the human lineage. The hotspots of adaptive evolution are concentrated around a specific structural domain, whose analogue in the structurally similar XRCC4 protein is involved in binding of another nonhomologous end-joining factor, DNA ligase IV. Conclusion Cernunnos-XLF is a microcephaly-associated locus newly identified to be under adaptive evolution in humans, and possibly played a role in human brain expansion. We speculate that Cernunnos-XLF may have contributed to the increased number of brain cells in humans by efficient double strand break repair, which helps to prevent frequent apoptosis of neuronal progenitors and aids mitotic cell cycle progression. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Chris Ponting and Richard Emes (nominated by Chris Ponting, Kateryna Makova, Gáspár Jékely and Eugene V. Koonin.

  14. Positive selection is the main driving force for evolution of citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Jalan, Neha; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Goss, Erica; Jones, Jeffrey B; Setubal, João C; Deng, Xiaoling; Wang, Nian

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history and potential of bacterial pathogens is critical to prevent the emergence of new infectious bacterial diseases. Xanthomonas axonopodis subsp. citri (Xac) (synonym X. citri subsp. citri), which causes citrus canker, is one of the hardest-fought plant bacterial pathogens in US history. Here, we sequenced 21 Xac strains (14 XacA, 3 XacA* and 4 XacA(w)) with different host ranges from North America and Asia and conducted comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of beneficial genes and loss of detrimental genes most likely allowed XacA to infect a broader range of hosts as compared with XacA(w) and XacA*. Recombination was found to have occurred frequently on the relative ancient branches, but rarely on the young branches of the clonal genealogy. The ratio of recombination/mutation ρ/θ was 0.0790±0.0005, implying that the Xac population was clonal in structure. Positive selection has affected 14% (395 out of 2822) of core genes of the citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. The genes affected are enriched in 'carbohydrate transport and metabolism' and 'DNA replication, recombination and repair' genes (Pcitrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. Our results suggest that both metabolism and virulence genes provide advantages to endow XacA with higher virulence and a wider host range. Our analysis advances our understanding of the genomic basis of specialization by positive selection in bacterial evolution.

  15. Detecting positive darwinian selection in brain-expressed genes during human evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI XueBin; Alice A. LIN; Luca L. CAVALLI-SFORZA; WANG Jun; SU Bing; YANG Su; ZHENG HongKun; WANG YinQiu; LIAO ChengHong; LIU Ying; CHEN XiaoHua; SHI Hong; YU XiaoJing

    2007-01-01

    To understand the genetic basis that underlies the phenotypic divergence between human and nonhuman primates, we screened a total of 7176 protein-coding genes expressed in the human brain and compared them with the chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of rapid evolution in the human lineage. Our results showed that the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio for genes expressed in the brain of human and chimpanzee is 0.3854, suggesting that the brain-expressed genes are under functional constraint. The X-linked human brain-expressed genes evolved more rapidly than autosomal ones. We further dissected the molecular evolutionary patterns of 34 candidate genes by sequencing representative primate species to identify lineage-specific adaptive evolution. Fifteen out of the 34 candidate genes showed evidence of positive Darwinian selection in human and/or chimpanzee lineages. These genes are predicted to play diverse functional roles in embryonic development, spermatogenesis and male fertility, signal transduction, sensory nociception, and neural function. This study together with others demonstrated the usefulness and power of phylogenetic comparison of multiple closely related species in detecting lineage-specific adaptive evolution, and the identification of the positively selected brain-expressed genes may add new knowledge to the understanding of molecular mechanism of human origin.

  16. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers.

  17. Molecular phylogenetic and positive selection analysis of Japanese encephalitis virus strains isolated from pigs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Ming; Pei, Jing-Jing; Dong, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Ming-Qiu; Wang, Jia-Ying; Gou, Hong-Chao; Luo, Yong-Wen; Chen, Jin-Ding

    2013-12-26

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of the most important virus which causes encephalitis. This disease is most prevalent in the south, southeast and the east region of Asia. In this study, two JEV strains, named JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 and JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004, were isolated from aborted fetuses and seminal fluid of pigs in China. To determine the characteristic of these virus isolates, the virulence of two newly JEV isolates was investigated, the result evidenced that the JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 did not kill mice, while the JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004 displayed neurovirulence with 0.925log10 p.f.u./LD50. Additionally, the full genome sequences of JEV were determined and compared with other known JEV strains. Results demonstrated that the genome of two JEV isolates was 10,976 nucleotides (nt) in length. As compared to the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2, the JEV/SW/GD/01/2009 and the JEV/SW/GZ/09/2004 showed 99.7% and 97.5% identity at the nucleotide level, 99.6% and 96.7% identity at the amino acid level, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the full-length genome revealed that two JEV isolates were all clustered into genotype III compared to the reference strains. Furthermore, selection analyses revealed that dominant selective pressure acting on the JEV genome was purifying selection. Four sites under positive selection were identified: codon 521 (amino acid E-227), 2296 (amino acid NS4b-24), 3048 (amino acid NS5-521) and 3055 (amino acid NS5-528). Amino acid E-227 was proved to be related to neurovirulence. Taken together, the molecular epidemiology and functional of positively selected amino acid sites of two newly JEV isolates were fully understood, which might be helpful to predict possible changes in virulence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Rotational Nucleosome Positioning on Transcription Start Site Selection in Animal Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of RNA-Pol-II to the transcription start site (TSS) is an important step in gene regulation in all organisms. Core promoter elements (CPE) are conserved sequence motifs that guide Pol-II to the TSS by interacting with specific transcription factors (TFs). However, only a minority of animal promoters contains CPEs. It is still unknown how Pol-II selects the TSS in their absence. Here we present a comparative analysis of promoters’ sequence composition and chromatin architecture in five eukaryotic model organisms, which shows the presence of common and unique DNA-encoded features used to organize chromatin. Analysis of Pol-II initiation patterns uncovers that, in the absence of certain CPEs, there is a strong correlation between the spread of initiation and the intensity of the 10 bp periodic signal in the nearest downstream nucleosome. Moreover, promoters’ primary and secondary initiation sites show a characteristic 10 bp periodicity in the absence of CPEs. We also show that DNA natural variants in the region immediately downstream the TSS are able to affect both the nucleosome-DNA affinity and Pol-II initiation pattern. These findings support the notion that, in addition to CPEs mediated selection, sequence–induced nucleosome positioning could be a common and conserved mechanism of TSS selection in animals. PMID:27716823

  19. Selective Population of Unbound Positive Parity States in 25F and 26F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Nathan; Herman, Jacob; Rabeh, Ali; Tuttle-Timm, Matthew; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Unbound Positive Parity States in 25F and 26F were populated in the one-proton removal reaction from a radioactive 27Ne beam. The experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), where a 101.3 MeV/u 27Ne ion beam impinged on a liquid deuterium target populating states in 26F. States above the one- and two- neutron separation energies lead to 24F and 25F, respectively. The MoNA/LISA setup at NSCL was used to detect the fragments in coincidence with neutrons and the decay energy spectra of 25F and 26F were reconstructed by invariant mass spectroscopy. Resonance energies of approximately 0.35 MeV and 0.5 MeV for 25F* and 26F*, respectively, were extracted. Based on the calculated spectroscopic strength distribution of negative and positive parity states in 26F and the selectivity of one proton-removal reactions both states were assigned positive parity. NSF Grant #1404236.

  20. Genes Regulated by Vitamin D in Bone Cells Are Positively Selected in East Asians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Arciero

    Full Text Available Vitamin D and folate are activated and degraded by sunlight, respectively, and the physiological processes they control are likely to have been targets of selection as humans expanded from Africa into Eurasia. We investigated signals of positive selection in gene sets involved in the metabolism, regulation and action of these two vitamins in worldwide populations sequenced by Phase I of the 1000 Genomes Project. Comparing allele frequency-spectrum-based summary statistics between these gene sets and matched control genes, we observed a selection signal specific to East Asians for a gene set associated with vitamin D action in bones. The selection signal was mainly driven by three genes CXXC finger protein 1 (CXXC1, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2. Examination of population differentiation and haplotypes allowed us to identify several candidate causal regulatory variants in each gene. Four of these candidate variants (one each in CXXC1 and RUNX2 and two in LRP5 had a >70% derived allele frequency in East Asians, but were present at lower (20-60% frequency in Europeans as well, suggesting that the adaptation might have been part of a common response to climatic and dietary changes as humans expanded out of Africa, with implications for their role in vitamin D-dependent bone mineralization and osteoporosis insurgence. We also observed haplotype sharing between East Asians, Finns and an extinct archaic human (Denisovan sample at the CXXC1 locus, which is best explained by incomplete lineage sorting.

  1. Ongoing transients in carbonate compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudreau, B.P.; Middelburg, J.J.; Hofmann, A.F.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Uptake of anthropogenic CO2 is acidifying the oceans. Over the next 2000 years, this will modify the dissolution and preservation of sedimentary carbonate. By coupling new formulas for the positions of the calcite saturation horizon, zsat, the compensation depth, zcc, and the snowline, zsnow, to a b

  2. Selective Inactivation of Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens with a Light-Driven Hybrid Nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüner, Malte; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina; Gonnissen, Dominik; Riehemann, Kristina; Staniford, Mark C; Kynast, Ulrich; Strassert, Cristian A

    2015-09-23

    Herein, we present a straightforward strategy to disperse highly insoluble photosensitizers in aqueous environments, without major synthetic efforts and keeping their photosensitizing abilities unaffected. A layered nanoclay was employed to adsorb and to solubilize a highly efficient yet hydrophobic Si(IV) phthalocyaninate in water. The aggregation of the photoactive dye was correlated with its photophysical properties, particularly with the ability to produce highly cytotoxic singlet oxygen. Moreover, the resulting hybrid nanomaterial is able to selectively photoinactivate Gram-positive pathogens, due to local interactions between the bacterial membranes and the negatively charged nanodiscs. Nanotoxicity assays confirmed its innocuousness toward eukaryotic cells, showing that it constitutes a new class of "phototriggered magic bullet" for the inactivation of pathogens in phototherapy, as well as in the development of coatings for self-disinfecting surfaces.

  3. Analysis of complexity measures and information planes of selected molecules in position and momentum spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Antolín, Juan; Dehesa, Jesús S; López-Rosa, Sheila; Flores-Gallegos, Nelson

    2010-07-14

    The Fisher-Shannon and LMC shape complexities and the Shannon-disequilibrium, Fisher-Shannon and Fisher-disequilibrium information planes, which consist of two localization-delocalization factors, are computed in both position and momentum spaces for the one-particle densities of 90 selected molecules of various chemical types, at the CISD/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. We found that while the two measures of complexity show general trends only, the localization-delocalization planes clearly exhibit chemically significant patterns. Several molecular properties (energy, ionization potential, total dipole moment, hardness, electrophilicity) are analyzed and used to interpret and understand the chemical nature of the composite information-theoretic measures above mentioned. Our results show that these measures detect not only randomness or localization but also pattern and organization.

  4. Retention of duplicated long-wavelength opsins in mosquito lineages by positive selection and differential expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I; Zanis, Michael J; Hill, Catherine A

    2017-03-21

    Opsins are light sensitive receptors associated with visual processes. Insects typically possess opsins that are stimulated by ultraviolet, short and long wavelength (LW) radiation. Six putative LW-sensitive opsins predicted in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and eight in the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, suggest gene expansion in the Family Culicidae (mosquitoes) relative to other insects. Here we report the first detailed molecular and evolutionary analyses of LW opsins in three mosquito vectors, with a goal to understanding the molecular basis of opsin-mediated visual processes that could be exploited for mosquito control. Time of divergence estimates suggest that the mosquito LW opsins originated from 18 or 19 duplication events between 166.9/197.5 to 1.07/0.94 million years ago (MY) and that these likely occurred following the predicted divergence of the lineages Anophelinae and Culicinae 145-226 MY. Fitmodel analyses identified nine amino acid residues in the LW opsins that may be under positive selection. Of these, eight amino acids occur in the N and C termini and are shared among all three species, and one residue in TMIII was unique to culicine species. Alignment of 5' non-coding regions revealed potential Conserved Non-coding Sequences (CNS) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in seven pairs of LW opsin paralogs. Our analyses suggest opsin gene duplication and residues possibly associated with spectral tuning of LW-sensitive photoreceptors. We explore two mechanisms - positive selection and differential expression mediated by regulatory units in CNS - that may have contributed to the retention of LW opsin genes in Culicinae and Anophelinae. We discuss the evolution of mosquito LW opsins in the context of major Earth events and possible adaptation of mosquitoes to LW-dominated photo environments, and implications for mosquito control strategies based on disrupting vision

  5. 2,3,5-Trisubstituted pyridines as selective AKT inhibitors-Part I: Substitution at 2-position of the core pyridine for ROCK1 selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Yamashita, Dennis S; Zeng, Jin; Xie, Ren; Wang, Wenyong; Nidarmarthy, Sirishkumar; Luengo, Juan I; Rhodes, Nelson; Knick, Victoria B; Choudhry, Anthony E; Lai, Zhihong; Minthorn, Elisabeth A; Strum, Susan L; Wood, Edgar R; Elkins, Patricia A; Concha, Nestor O; Heerding, Dirk A

    2010-01-15

    2,3,5-Trisubstituted pyridines have been designed as potent AKT inhibitors that are selective against ROCK1 based on the comparison between AKT and ROCK1 structures. Substitution at the 2-position of the core pyridine is the key element to provide selectivity against ROCK1. An X-ray co-crystal structure of 9p in PKA supports the proposed rationale of ROCK1 selectivity.

  6. Development and application of a positive-negative selectable marker system for use in reverse genetics in Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braks, Joanna A M; Franke-Fayard, Blandine; Kroeze, Hans; Janse, Chris J; Waters, Andrew P

    2006-03-14

    A limitation of transfection of malaria parasites is the availability of only a low number of positive selectable markers for selection of transformed mutants. This is exacerbated for the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei as selection of mutants is performed in vivo in laboratory rodents. We here report the development and application of a negative selection system based upon transgenic expression of a bifunctional protein (yFCU) combining yeast cytosine deaminase and uridyl phosphoribosyl transferase (UPRT) activity in P.berghei followed by in vivo selection with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The combination of yfcu and a positive selectable marker was used to first achieve positive selection of mutant parasites with a disrupted gene in a conventional manner. Thereafter through negative selection using 5-FC, mutants were selected where the disrupted gene had been restored to its original configuration as a result of the excision of the selectable markers from the genome through homologous recombination. This procedure was carried out for a Plasmodium gene (p48/45) encoding a protein involved in fertilization, the function of which had been previously implied through gene disruption alone. Such reversible recombination can therefore be employed for both the rapid analysis of the phenotype by targeted disruption of a gene and further associate phenotype and function by genotype restoration through the use of a single plasmid and a single positive selectable marker. Furthermore the negative selection system may also be adapted to facilitate other procedures such as 'Hit and Run' and 'vector recycling' which in principle will allow unlimited manipulation of a single parasite clone. This is the first demonstration of the general use of yFCU in combination with a positive selectable marker in reverse genetics approaches and it should be possible to adapt its use to many other biological systems.

  7. Evidence of positive selection towards Zebuine haplotypes in the BoLA region of Brangus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goszczynski, D E; Corbi-Botto, C M; Durand, H M; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Munilla, S; Peral-Garcia, P; Cantet, R J C; Giovambattista, G

    2017-07-14

    The Brangus breed was developed to combine the superior characteristics of both of its founder breeds, Angus and Brahman. It combines the high adaptability to tropical and subtropical environments, disease resistance, and overall hardiness of Zebu cattle with the reproductive potential and carcass quality of Angus. It is known that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also known as bovine leucocyte antigen: BoLA), located on chromosome 23, encodes several genes involved in the adaptive immune response and may be responsible for adaptation to harsh environments. The objective of this work was to evaluate whether the local breed ancestry percentages in the BoLA locus of a Brangus population diverged from the estimated genome-wide proportions and to identify signatures of positive selection in this genomic region. For this, 167 animals (100 Brangus, 45 Angus and 22 Brahman) were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array. The local ancestry analysis showed that more than half of the haplotypes (55.0%) shared a Brahman origin. This value was significantly different from the global genome-wide proportion estimated by cluster analysis (34.7% Brahman), and the proportion expected by pedigree (37.5% Brahman). The analysis of selection signatures by genetic differentiation (F st ) and extended haplotype homozygosity-based methods (iHS and Rsb) revealed 10 and seven candidate regions, respectively. The analysis of the genes located within these candidate regions showed mainly genes involved in immune response-related pathway, while other genes and pathways were also observed (cell surface signalling pathways, membrane proteins and ion-binding proteins). Our results suggest that the BoLA region of Brangus cattle may have been enriched with Brahman haplotypes as a consequence of selection processes to promote adaptation to subtropical environments.

  8. Selective targeting of cellular nucleus using positively-charged quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghan; Choi, Youngseon; Cho, Yoojin; Song, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Developing highly selective probes for subcellular regions such as nucleus and cytoplamic organelles is of great interest for cellular imaging and high content screening analysis for biology and medicine. Cytoplasmic delivery of QDs has been well-understood, while nuclear delivery of QDs has been a challenge due to the unique structural characteristics of cell nucleus. In this study, we systematically investigated nucleus penetrating properties of small-sized ligand-exchanged QDs with either positive or negative surface charges in the similar size range of hydrodynamic diameter (7-10 nm). We found that the positively-charged QDs efficiently stain the nucleus in fixed HeLa cells as well as label nucleolar compartments in live HeLa cells. In contrast, the negatively charged QDs with the similar size range stain only the cytoplam in either fixed or live cells. The charge-dependent labeling pattern allowed us to simultaneously perform multiplex imaging of nuclues and cytoplasm. This study offers an insight into efficient nuclear delivery of nanoparticles such as QDs of which surface charge and size are critical for intracelllar localization and delivery.

  9. TCR engagement of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes in vitro induces early aspects of positive selection, but not apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, T; Parsons, M; Miyamoto, N G; Guidos, C J

    1997-01-01

    Immature CD4/CD8 double-positive (DP) thymocytes expressing self MHC-restricted TCR are positively selected in response to TCR signals to survive and differentiate into functionally competent CD4 or CD8 single positive (SP) T cells. In contrast, DP precursors expressing autoreactive TCR are clonally deleted in response to TCR signals. We show here that in vitro TCR engagement of TCR(low) DP thymocytes rapidly triggers a variety of events considered to be hallmarks of positive selection in vivo. These include increased expression of CD5 and Bcl-2, termination of RAG-1 and pre-T(alpha) gene expression, and a switch in lck promoter usage. We also demonstrate that CD4- or CD28-mediated signals synergize with TCR signals to induce these outcomes. Finally, we show that the response of DP thymocytes to TCR engagement is selective in that clonal deletion, CD4/CD8 lineage commitment, and other events associated with maturation, such as changes in expression of Thy-1, HSA, MHC class I, and CD45-RB, were not induced. Thus, only subsets of maturational processes associated with positive selection in vivo were shown to be directly coupled to TCR signaling pathways at the DP stage. These observations support conclusions from in vivo systems suggesting that multiple, temporally separated TCR engagements are required to effect the entire spectrum of developmental changes associated with positive selection, and provide a conceptual and experimental framework for unraveling the complexity of positive selection.

  10. Positive selection in the SLC11A1 gene in the family Equidae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayerova, Zuzana; Janova, Eva; Matiasovic, Jan

    2016-01-01

    diversifying selection. A 3-bp indel resulting in a deletion of the amino acid 321 in the predicted protein was observed in all horses, while it has been maintained in all other equid species. This codon comprised in an N-glycosylation site was found to be under positive selection. Interspecific variation...

  11. Functional divergence caused by ancient positive selection of a Drosophila hybrid incompatibility locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Barbash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrid lethality and sterility are a consequence of divergent evolution between species and serve to maintain the discrete identities of species. The evolution of hybrid incompatibilities has been described in widely accepted models by Dobzhansky and Muller where lineage-specific functional divergence is the essential characteristic of hybrid incompatibility genes. Experimentally tractable models are required to identify and test candidate hybrid incompatibility genes. Several Drosophila melanogaster genes involved in hybrid incompatibility have been identified but none has yet been shown to have functionally diverged in accordance with the Dobzhansky-Muller model. By introducing transgenic copies of the X-linked Hybrid male rescue (Hmr gene into D. melanogaster from its sibling species D. simulans and D. mauritiana, we demonstrate that Hmr has functionally diverged to cause F1 hybrid incompatibility between these species. Consistent with the Dobzhansky-Muller model, we find that Hmr has diverged extensively in the D. melanogaster lineage, but we also find extensive divergence in the sibling-species lineage. Together, these findings implicate over 13% of the amino acids encoded by Hmr as candidates for causing hybrid incompatibility. The exceptional level of divergence at Hmr cannot be explained by neutral processes because we use phylogenetic methods and population genetic analyses to show that the elevated amino-acid divergence in both lineages is due to positive selection in the distant past-at least one million generations ago. Our findings suggest that multiple substitutions driven by natural selection may be a general phenomenon required to generate hybrid incompatibility alleles.

  12. New evidence for positive selection helps explain the paternal age effect observed in achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Deepali N; Elmer, Dominik P; Calabrese, Peter; Boulanger, Jérôme; Arnheim, Norman; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2013-10-15

    There are certain de novo germline mutations associated with genetic disorders whose mutation rates per generation are orders of magnitude higher than the genome average. Moreover, these mutations occur exclusively in the male germ line and older men have a higher probability of having an affected child than younger ones, known as the paternal age effect (PAE). The classic example of a genetic disorder exhibiting a PAE is achondroplasia, caused predominantly by a single-nucleotide substitution (c.1138G>A) in FGFR3. To elucidate what mechanisms might be driving the high frequency of this mutation in the male germline, we examined the spatial distribution of the c.1138G>A substitution in a testis from an 80-year-old unaffected man. Using a technology based on bead-emulsion amplification, we were able to measure mutation frequencies in 192 individual pieces of the dissected testis with a false-positive rate lower than 2.7 × 10(-6). We observed that most mutations are clustered in a few pieces with 95% of all mutations occurring in 27% of the total testis. Using computational simulations, we rejected the model proposing an elevated mutation rate per cell division at this nucleotide site. Instead, we determined that the observed mutation distribution fits a germline selection model, where mutant spermatogonial stem cells have a proliferative advantage over unmutated cells. Combined with data on several other PAE mutations, our results support the idea that the PAE, associated with a number of Mendelian disorders, may be explained primarily by a selective mechanism.

  13. Positive fluorescent selection permits precise, rapid, and in-depth overexpression analysis in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2009-03-01

    Transient genetic modification of plant protoplasts is a straightforward and rapid technique for the study of numerous aspects of plant biology. Recent studies in metazoan systems have utilized cell-based assays to interrogate signal transduction pathways using high-throughput methods. Plant biologists could benefit from new tools that expand the use of cell culture for large-scale analysis of gene function. We have developed a system that employs fluorescent positive selection in combination with flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate responses in the transformed protoplasts exclusively. The system overcomes the drawback that transfected protoplast suspensions are often a heterogeneous mix of cells that have and have not been successfully transformed. This Gateway-compatible system enables high-throughput screening of genetic circuitry using overexpression. The incorporation of a red fluorescent protein selection marker enables combined utilization with widely available green fluorescent protein (GFP) tools. For instance, such a dual labeling approach allows cytometric analysis of GFP reporter gene activation expressly in the transformed cells or fluorescence-activated cell sorting-mediated isolation and downstream examination of overexpression effects in a specific GFP-marked cell population. Here, as an example, novel uses of this system are applied to the study of auxin signaling, exploiting the red fluorescent protein/GFP dual labeling capability. In response to manipulation of the auxin response network through overexpression of dominant negative auxin signaling components, we quantify effects on auxin-responsive DR5::GFP reporter gene activation as well as profile genome-wide transcriptional changes specifically in cells expressing a root epidermal marker.

  14. Lymphotoxin signals from positively selected thymocytes regulate the terminal differentiation of medullary thymic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrea J; Nakamura, Kyoko; Jenkinson, William E; Saini, Manoj; Sinclair, Charles; Seddon, Benedict; Narendran, Parth; Pfeffer, Klaus; Nitta, Takeshi; Takahama, Yousuke; Caamano, Jorge H; Lane, Peter J L; Jenkinson, Eric J; Anderson, Graham

    2010-10-15

    The thymic medulla represents a key site for the induction of T cell tolerance. In particular, autoimmune regulator (Aire)-expressing medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) provide a spectrum of tissue-restricted Ags that, through both direct presentation and cross-presentation by dendritic cells, purge the developing T cell repertoire of autoimmune specificities. Despite this role, the mechanisms of Aire(+) mTEC development remain unclear, particularly those stages that occur post-Aire expression and represent mTEC terminal differentiation. In this study, in mouse thymus, we analyze late-stage mTEC development in relation to the timing and requirements for Aire and involucrin expression, the latter a marker of terminally differentiated epithelium including Hassall's corpuscles. We show that Aire expression and terminal differentiation within the mTEC lineage are temporally separable events that are controlled by distinct mechanisms. We find that whereas mature thymocytes are not essential for Aire(+) mTEC development, use of an inducible ZAP70 transgenic mouse line--in which positive selection can be temporally controlled--demonstrates that the emergence of involucrin(+) mTECs critically depends upon the presence of mature single positive thymocytes. Finally, although initial formation of Aire(+) mTECs depends upon RANK signaling, continued mTEC development to the involucrin(+) stage maps to activation of the LTα-LTβR axis by mature thymocytes. Collectively, our results reveal further complexity in the mechanisms regulating thymus medulla development and highlight the role of distinct TNFRs in initial and terminal differentiation stages in mTECs.

  15. Positive selection within sperm-egg adhesion domains of fertilin: an ADAM gene with a potential role in fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civetta, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Genes with a role in fertilization show a common pattern of rapid evolution. The role played by positive selection versus lack of selective constraints has been more difficult to establish. One problem arises from attempts to detect selection in an overall gene sequence analysis. I have analyzed the pattern of molecular evolution of fertilin, a gene coding for a heterodimeric sperm protein belonging to the ADAM (A disintegrin and A metalloprotease) gene family. A nonsynonymous to synonymous rate ratio (d(N)/d(S)) analysis for different protein domains of fertilin alpha and fertilin beta showed d(N)/d(S) < 1, suggesting that purifying selection has shaped fertilin's evolution. However, an analysis of the distribution of single positively selected codon sites using phylogentic analysis by maximum likelihood (PAML) showed sites within adhesion domains (disintegrin and cysteine-rich) of fertilin beta evolving under positive selection. The region 3' to the EGF-like domain of fertilin alpha, where the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail regions are supposed to be localized, showed higher d(N) and d(S) than any other fertilin alpha region. However, it was not possible to identify positively selected codon sites due to ambiguous alignments of the carboxy-end region (ClustalX vs. DiAlign2). When this region was excluded from the PAML analysis, most single positively selected codon sites were concentrated within adhesion domains (cysteine-rich and EGF-like). The use of an ancestral sequence prior to a recent duplication event of fertilin alpha among non-Hominidae primates (Macaca, Papio, and Saguinus) revealed that the duplication is partially responsible for masking the detection of positively selected sites within the disintegrin domain. Finally, most ADAM genes with a potential role in sperm maturation and/or fertilization showed significantly higher d(N) estimates than other ADAM genes.

  16. Genome-wide analyses reveal lineage specific contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Listeria includes two closely related pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. L. monocytogenes is an opportunistic human foodborne and animal pathogen that includes two common lineages. While lineage I is more commonly found among human listeriosis cases, lineage II appears to be overrepresented among isolates from foods and environmental sources. This study used the genome sequences for one L. innocua strain and four L. monocytogenes strains representing lineages I and II, to characterize the contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of the L. innocua/L. monocytogenes core genome. Results Among the 2267 genes in the L. monocytogenes/L. innocua core genome, 1097 genes showed evidence for recombination and 36 genes showed evidence for positive selection. Positive selection was strongly associated with recombination. Specifically, 29 of the 36 genes under positive selection also showed evidence for recombination. Recombination was more common among isolates in lineage II than lineage I; this trend was confirmed by sequencing five genes in a larger isolate set. Positive selection was more abundant in the ancestral branch of lineage II (20 genes as compared to the ancestral branch of lineage I (9 genes. Additional genes under positive selection were identified in the branch separating the two species; for this branch, genes in the role category "Cell wall and membrane biogenesis" were significantly more likely to have evidence for positive selection. Positive selection of three genes was confirmed in a larger isolate set, which also revealed occurrence of multiple premature stop codons in one positively selected gene involved in flagellar motility (flaR. Conclusion While recombination and positive selection both contribute to evolution of L. monocytogenes, the relative contributions of these evolutionary forces seem to differ by L. monocytogenes lineages and

  17. Ongoing dengue epidemic - Angola, June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    On April 1, 2013, the Public Health Directorate of Angola announced that six cases of dengue had been reported to the Ministry of Health of Angola (MHA). As of May 31, a total of 517 suspected dengue cases had been reported and tested for dengue with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT). A total of 313 (60.5%) specimens tested positive for dengue, including one from a patient who died. All suspected cases were reported from Luanda Province, except for two from Malanje Province. Confirmatory diagnostic testing of 49 specimens (43 RDT-positive and six RDT-negative) at the CDC Dengue Branch confirmed dengue virus (DENV) infection in 100% of the RDT-positive specimens and 50% of the RDT-negative specimens. Only DENV-1 was detected by molecular diagnostic testing. Phylogenetic analysis indicated this virus has been circulating in the region since at least 1968, strongly suggesting that dengue is endemic in Angola. Health-care professionals throughout Angola should be aware of the ongoing epidemic, the recommended practices for clinical management of dengue patients, and the need to report cases to MHA. Persons in Angola should seek medical care for acute febrile illness to reduce the risk for developing complications. Laboratory-confirmed dengue also has been reported from seven countries on four continents among persons who had recently traveled to Luanda, including 79 persons from Portugal. Angola is the third of four African countries to report a dengue outbreak in 2013. Persons returning from Africa with acute febrile illness should seek medical care, including testing for DENV infection, and suspected cases should be reported to public health authorities.

  18. Differential positive selection of malaria resistance genes in three indigenous populations of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuanyao; Yunus, Yushimah; Lu, Dongsheng; Aghakhanian, Farhang; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Deng, Lian; Ali, Mohammad; Wang, Xu; Nor, Fadzilah Mohd; Ghazali, Fadzilah; Rahman, Thuhairah Abdul; Shaari, Shahrul Azlin; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Phipps, Maude E; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Xu, Shuhua; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hoh, Boon-Peng

    2015-04-01

    The indigenous populations from Peninsular Malaysia, locally known as Orang Asli, continue to adopt an agro-subsistence nomadic lifestyle, residing primarily within natural jungle habitats. Leading a hunter-gatherer lifestyle in a tropical jungle environment, the Orang Asli are routinely exposed to malaria. Here we surveyed the genetic architecture of individuals from four Orang Asli tribes with high-density genotyping across more than 2.5 million polymorphisms. These tribes reside in different geographical locations in Peninsular Malaysia and belong to three main ethno-linguistic groups, where there is minimal interaction between the tribes. We first dissect the genetic diversity and admixture between the tribes and with neighboring urban populations. Later, by implementing five metrics, we investigated the genome-wide signatures for positive natural selection of these Orang Asli, respectively. Finally, we searched for evidence of genomic adaptation to the pressure of malaria infection. We observed that different evolutionary responses might have emerged in the different Orang Asli communities to mitigate malaria infection.

  19. Trastuzumab-mediated selective delivery for platinum drug to HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Sun, Yu; Gao, Qihe; Wang, Qiucui; Sun, Baiwang

    2015-10-01

    Oxaliplatin is used widely as an anticancer drug for clinical treatment. However, its applications are limited because of its poor selectivity. In this work, we described the design, synthesis, and characterization of conjugates combining trastuzumab with a platinum (IV) analog of oxaliplatin, in which the trastuzumab acted as an active targeting agent for HER2-positive cancer cells. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence study indicated the platinum (IV)-trastuzumab conjugates retained specific binding activity to HER2 overexpressed SK-BR-3 cells. In the presence of ascorbic acid, platinum (IV)-trastuzumab conjugates were reduced to platinum (II) analogs, which could bind to and unwind PUC19 DNA in a manner similar to oxaliplatin. The cytotoxic study was tested on three breast cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231. Platinum (IV)-trastuzumab conjugates showed promising antiproliferative activity against SK-BR-3 cells, but significantly decreased the inhibition to MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. The flow cytometric analysis showed that the conjugates arrested the cell cycle mainly at the G2/M phase and killed the cells through an apoptotic pathway.

  20. Antibacterial properties of biosurfactants against selected Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz De Rienzo, Mayri A; Stevenson, Paul; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial properties and ability to disrupt biofilms of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids, sophorolipids) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) in the presence and absence of selected organic acids were investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% v/v, and the growth of Escherichia coli NCTC 10418 was also inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% and 0.1% v/v, respectively. Bacillus subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by rhamnolipids, sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >0.5% v/v of all three; the same effect was observed with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144. The ability to attach to surfaces and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, E. coli NCTC 10418 and B. subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by sophorolipids (1% v/v) in the presence of caprylic acid (0.8% v/v). In the case of S. aureus ATCC 9144, the best results were obtained using caprylic acid on its own. It was concluded that sophorolipids are promising compounds for the inhibition/disruption of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms and this activity can be enhanced by the presence of booster compounds such as caprylic acid.

  1. Amerindian-specific regions under positive selection harbour new lipid variants in Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Arthur; Cantor, Rita M.; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Nikkola, Elina; Reddy, Prasad M. V. Linga; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Brown, Robert; Alvarez, Marcus; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Rodriguez-Guillen, Rosario; Bautista, Ivette C.; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Muñoz-Hernández, Linda L.; Salomaa, Veikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Jauhiainen, Matti; Heliövaara, Markku; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Perola, Markus; Lohmueller, Kirk E.; Matikainen, Niina; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Riba, Laura; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemia and obesity are especially prevalent in populations with Amerindian backgrounds, such as Mexican–Americans, which predispose these populations to cardiovascular disease. Here we design an approach, known as the cross-population allele screen (CPAS), which we conduct prior to a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 19,273 Europeans and Mexicans, in order to identify Amerindian risk genes in Mexicans. Utilizing CPAS to restrict the GWAS input variants to only those differing in frequency between the two populations, we identify novel Amerindian lipid genes, receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and salt-inducible kinase 3 (SIK3), and three loci previously unassociated with dyslipidemia or obesity. We also detect lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) harbouring specific Amerindian signatures of risk variants and haplotypes. Notably, we observe that SIK3 and one novel lipid locus underwent positive selection in Mexicans. Furthermore, after a high-fat meal, the SIK3 risk variant carriers display high triglyceride levels. These findings suggest that Amerindian-specific genetic architecture leads to a higher incidence of dyslipidemia and obesity in modern Mexicans. PMID:24886709

  2. Transcriptome-based phylogeny of endemic Lake Baikal amphipod species flock: fast speciation accompanied by frequent episodes of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Sergey A; Logacheva, Maria D; Popova, Nina V; Klepikova, Anna V; Penin, Aleksey A; Bazykin, Georgii A; Etingova, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Yampolsky, Lev Y

    2017-01-01

    Endemic species flocks inhabiting ancient lakes, oceanic islands and other long-lived isolated habitats are often interpreted as adaptive radiations. Yet molecular evidence for directional selection during species flocks radiation is scarce. Using partial transcriptomes of 64 species of Lake Baikal (Siberia, Russia) endemic amphipods and two nonendemic outgroups, we report a revised phylogeny of this species flock and analyse evidence for positive selection within the endemic lineages. We confirm two independent invasions of amphipods into Baikal and demonstrate that several morphological features of Baikal amphipods, such as body armour and reduction in appendages and sensory organs, evolved in several lineages in parallel. Radiation of Baikal amphipods has been characterized by short phylogenetic branches and frequent episodes of positive selection which tended to be more frequent in the early phase of the second invasion of amphipods into Baikal when the most intensive diversification occurred. Notably, signatures of positive selection are frequent in genes encoding mitochondrial membrane proteins with electron transfer chain and ATP synthesis functionality. In particular, subunits of both the membrane and substrate-level ATP synthases show evidence of positive selection in the plankton species Macrohectopus branickii, possibly indicating adaptation to active plankton lifestyle and to survival under conditions of low temperature and high hydrostatic pressures known to affect membranes functioning. Other functional categories represented among genes likely to be under positive selection include Ca-binding muscle-related proteins, possibly indicating adaptation to Ca-deficient low mineralization Baikal waters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Positive selection sites in the surface genes of dengue virus: phylogenetic analysis of the interserotypic branches of the four serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodpothong, Patsarin; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2012-06-01

    The existence of four dengue serotypes is associated with a phenomenon called "Antibody-Dependent Enhancement" that has been suggested to cause a severe form of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. To study the evolutionary event that drove the serotype separation, we employed the maximum likelihood approach by focusing on the Premembrane (prM) and Envelop (E) genes. We showed that the separation of dengue serotypes had been dominantly under purifying selection. In spite of the strong selective constraint, one codon of prM gene and twelve codons of E gene were detected to be under positive selection. This indicates that the E protein might have been under a stronger positive pressure than the PrM protein. The codons under positive selection were identified along the interserotypic branches, suggesting that changes at these sites were probably associated with the emergence of the four serotypes and/or adaptation to the new transmission environments.

  4. The Ongoing and Open-Ended Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores a novel form of classroom simulation that differs from published examples in two important respects. First, it is ongoing. While most simulations represent a single learning episode embedded within a course, the ongoing simulation is a continuous set of interrelated events and decisions that accompany learning throughout…

  5. Transient inflammation-induced ongoing pain is driven by TRPV1 sensitive afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercado Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue injury elicits both hypersensitivity to evoked stimuli and ongoing, stimulus-independent pain. We previously demonstrated that pain relief elicits reward in nerve-injured rats. This approach was used to evaluate the temporal and mechanistic features of inflammation-induced ongoing pain. Results Intraplantar Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA produced thermal hyperalgesia and guarding behavior that was reliably observed within 24 hrs and maintained, albeit diminished, 4 days post-administration. Spinal clonidine produced robust conditioned place preference (CPP in CFA treated rats 1 day, but not 4 days following CFA administration. However, spinal clonidine blocked CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia at both post-CFA days 1 and 4, indicating different time-courses of ongoing and evoked pain. Peripheral nerve block by lidocaine administration into the popliteal fossa 1 day following intraplantar CFA produced a robust preference for the lidocaine paired chamber, indicating that injury-induced ongoing pain is driven by afferent fibers innervating the site of injury. Pretreatment with resiniferatoxin (RTX, an ultrapotent capsaicin analogue known to produce long-lasting desensitization of TRPV1 positive afferents, fully blocked CFA-induced thermal hypersensitivity and abolished the CPP elicited by administration of popliteal fossa lidocaine 24 hrs post-CFA. In addition, RTX pretreatment blocked guarding behavior observed 1 day following intraplantar CFA. In contrast, administration of the selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist, AMG9810, at a dose that reversed CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia failed to reduce CFA-induced ongoing pain or guarding behavior. Conclusions These data demonstrate that inflammation induces both ongoing pain and evoked hypersensitivity that can be differentiated on the basis of time course. Ongoing pain (a is transient, (b driven by peripheral input resulting from the injury, (c dependent on TRPV1 positive

  6. Nourseothricin N-acetyl transferase: a positive selection marker for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose S Kochupurakkal

    Full Text Available Development of Nourseothricin N-acetyl transferase (NAT as a selection marker for mammalian cells is described. Mammalian cells are acutely susceptible to Nourseothricin, similar to the widely used drug Puromycin, and NAT allows for quick and robust selection of transfected/transduced cells in the presence of Nourseothricin. NAT is compatible with other selection markers puromycin, hygromycin, neomycin, blasticidin, and is a valuable addition to the repertoire of mammalian selection markers.

  7. Facilitating creative idea selection: The combined effects of self-affirmation, promotion focus and positive affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisonjé, D.R. de; Ritter, S.M.; Bruin, S. de; Horst, J.M.L. ter; Meeldijk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Generating creative ideas in a brainstorm session is a crucial part of innovation. However, for actual implementation, the most creative ideas must be selected from a pool of ideas. To date, idea selection has remained relatively unexplored and validated instruments to measure idea selection perform

  8. Facilitating creative idea selection: The combined effects of self-affirmation, promotion focus and positive affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisonjé, D.R. de; Ritter, S.M.; Bruin, S. de; Horst, J.M.L. ter; Meeldijk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Generating creative ideas in a brainstorm session is a crucial part of innovation. However, for actual implementation, the most creative ideas must be selected from a pool of ideas. To date, idea selection has remained relatively unexplored and validated instruments to measure idea selection

  9. Silencing, positive selection and parallel evolution: busy history of primate cytochromes C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Pierron

    Full Text Available Cytochrome c (cyt c participates in two crucial cellular processes, energy production and apoptosis, and unsurprisingly is a highly conserved protein. However, previous studies have reported for the primate lineage (i loss of the paralogous testis isoform, (ii an acceleration and then a deceleration of the amino acid replacement rate of the cyt c somatic isoform, and (iii atypical biochemical behavior of human cyt c. To gain insight into the cause of these major evolutionary events, we have retraced the history of cyt c loci among primates. For testis cyt c, all primate sequences examined carry the same nonsense mutation, which suggests that silencing occurred before the primates diversified. For somatic cyt c, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses yielded the same tree topology. The evolutionary analyses show that a fast accumulation of non-synonymous mutations (suggesting positive selection occurred specifically on the anthropoid lineage root and then continued in parallel on the early catarrhini and platyrrhini stems. Analysis of evolutionary changes using the 3D structure suggests they are focused on the respiratory chain rather than on apoptosis or other cyt c functions. In agreement with previous biochemical studies, our results suggest that silencing of the cyt c testis isoform could be linked with the decrease of primate reproduction rate. Finally, the evolution of cyt c in the two sister anthropoid groups leads us to propose that somatic cyt c evolution may be related both to COX evolution and to the convergent brain and body mass enlargement in these two anthropoid clades.

  10. Mutation of the phospholipase C-gamma1-binding site of LAT affects both positive and negative thymocyte selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Connie L; Lee, Jan; Steiner, Kevin L; Gurson, Jordan M; Depersis, Corinne L; El-Khoury, Dalal; Fuller, Claudette L; Shores, Elizabeth W; Love, Paul E; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2005-04-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a scaffolding adaptor protein that is critical for T cell development and function. A mutation of LAT (Y136F) that disrupts phospholipase C-gamma1 activation and subsequent calcium influx causes a partial block in T cell development and leads to a severe lymphoproliferative disease in homozygous knock-in mice. One possible contribution to the fatal disease of LAT Y136F knock-in mice could be from autoreactive T cells generated in these mice because of altered thymocyte selection. To examine the impact of the LAT Y136F mutation on thymocyte positive and negative selection, we bred this mutation onto the HY T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, recombination activating gene-2 knockout background. Female mice with this genotype showed a severe defect in positive selection, whereas male mice exhibited a phenotype resembling positive selection (i.e., development and survival of CD8(hi) HY TCR-specific T cells) instead of negative selection. These results support the hypothesis that in non-TCR transgenic, LAT Y136F knock-in mice, altered thymocyte selection leads to the survival and proliferation of autoreactive T cells that would otherwise be negatively selected in the thymus.

  11. Prediction of Genes Related to Positive Selection Using Whole-Genome Resequencing in Three Commercial Pig Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyoYoung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective sweep can cause genetic differentiation across populations, which allows for the identification of possible causative regions/genes underlying important traits. The pig has experienced a long history of allele frequency changes through artificial selection in the domestication process. We obtained an average of 329,482,871 sequence reads for 24 pigs from three pig breeds: Yorkshire (n = 5, Landrace (n = 13, and Duroc (n = 6. An average read depth of 11.7 was obtained using whole-genome resequencing on an Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. In this study, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity and cross-population composite likelihood ratio tests were implemented to detect genes experiencing positive selection for the genome-wide resequencing data generated from three commercial pig breeds. In our results, 26, 7, and 14 genes from Yorkshire, Landrace, and Duroc, respectively were detected by two kinds of statistical tests. Significant evidence for positive selection was identified on genes ST6GALNAC2 and EPHX1 in Yorkshire, PARK2 in Landrace, and BMP6, SLA-DQA1, and PRKG1 in Duroc.These genes are reportedly relevant to lactation, reproduction, meat quality, and growth traits. To understand how these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related positive selection affect protein function, we analyzed the effect of non-synonymous SNPs. Three SNPs (rs324509622, rs80931851, and rs80937718 in the SLA-DQA1 gene were significant in the enrichment tests, indicating strong evidence for positive selection in Duroc. Our analyses identified genes under positive selection for lactation, reproduction, and meat-quality and growth traits in Yorkshire, Landrace, and Duroc, respectively.

  12. Searching for Footprints of Positive Selection in Whole-Genome SNP Data From Nonequilibrium Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlidis, Pavlos; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    A major goal of population genomics is to reconstruct the history of natural populations and to infer the neutral and selective scenarios that can explain the present-day polymorphism patterns. However, the separation between neutral and selective hypotheses has proven hard, mainly because both may predict similar patterns in the genome. This study focuses on the development of methods that can be used to distinguish neutral from selective hypotheses in equilibrium and nonequilibrium populati...

  13. A Mixed Approach to Similarity Metric Selection in Affinity Propagation-Based WiFi Fingerprinting Indoor Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Giuseppe; de Nardis, Luca; di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    2015-10-30

    The weighted k-nearest neighbors (WkNN) algorithm is by far the most popular choice in the design of fingerprinting indoor positioning systems based on WiFi received signal strength (RSS). WkNN estimates the position of a target device by selecting k reference points (RPs) based on the similarity of their fingerprints with the measured RSS values. The position of the target device is then obtained as a weighted sum of the positions of the k RPs. Two-step WkNN positioning algorithms were recently proposed, in which RPs are divided into clusters using the affinity propagation clustering algorithm, and one representative for each cluster is selected. Only cluster representatives are then considered during the position estimation, leading to a significant computational complexity reduction compared to traditional, flat WkNN. Flat and two-step WkNN share the issue of properly selecting the similarity metric so as to guarantee good positioning accuracy: in two-step WkNN, in particular, the metric impacts three different steps in the position estimation, that is cluster formation, cluster selection and RP selection and weighting. So far, however, the only similarity metric considered in the literature was the one proposed in the original formulation of the affinity propagation algorithm. This paper fills this gap by comparing different metrics and, based on this comparison, proposes a novel mixed approach in which different metrics are adopted in the different steps of the position estimation procedure. The analysis is supported by an extensive experimental campaign carried out in a multi-floor 3D indoor positioning testbed. The impact of similarity metrics and their combinations on the structure and size of the resulting clusters, 3D positioning accuracy and computational complexity are investigated. Results show that the adoption of metrics different from the one proposed in the original affinity propagation algorithm and, in particular, the combination of different

  14. The Evaluation and Selection of a Fifth Ground Antenna Site for the Global Positioning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-07

    selection was the region between Australia and South America and north of the Antartic . Using the performance results of this study, further study...indicated that the best region for selection was between Australia and South America and north of the Antartic . Using the performance results of this

  15. Superoxide dismutase 1 is positively selected to minimize protein aggregation in great apes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    of this selection are unknown. We mapped 30 extant SOD1 sequences to the recently established mammalian species tree and inferred ancestors, key substitutions, and signatures of selection during the protein's evolution. We detected elevated substitution rates leading to great apes (Hominidae) at ~1 per 2 million...

  16. Distinct quasispecies characteristics and positive selection within the core gene in chronic hepatitis B virus infected child and adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haijun, Deng; Yong, Huang; Ailong, Huang; Quanxin, Long

    2015-05-01

    There are significant differences in clinical characteristics between chronic hepatitis B virus infected (CHB) child and adult patients. Viral quasispecies characteristics are associated with its pathogenic properties. For hepatitis B virus (HBV), its core region is the main immune recognition region for its enriched epitopes. In our study, we discuss the quasispecies characteristics and positive selection within core gene within chronic HBV infected child and adult patients. By analyzing 170 core gene sequences from child CHB patients and 121 core genes sequences from adult CHB patients, quasispecies characteristics were described by sequence complexity, diversity, non-synonymous substitution ratio (dN) and synonymous substitution ratios (dS). In addition, positive selection sites were also determined by bioinformatics tools. Then, all these parameters were compared between child and adult CHB patient groups. Compared with child patients, adult patients with CHB showed distinct quasispecies characteristics within the core region, had a higher sequence complexity and diversity and more positive selection sites, suggesting that the adult CHB patients had a higher immune selection pressure on the HBV core gene. Reduced selection pressure on the HBV core gene in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive CHB patients than HBeAg negative CHB patients were observed in both adult and child patient groups. The majority of the screened positive selection sites lay within human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-restricted epitopes. In conclusion, this study analyzed the quasispecies characteristics discrepancy between child and adult patients with CHB, and revealed the possible reason for the distinct clinical characteristics in the perspective of population genetics.

  17. Whole-Genome Analysis Revealed the Positively Selected Genes during the Differentiation of indica and Temperate japonica Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinli; Jia, Qi; Guo, Yuchun; Zheng, Xiujuan; Liang, Kangjing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the selective pressures acting on the protein-coding genes during the differentiation of indica and japonica, all of the possible orthologous genes between the Nipponbare and 93–11 genomes were identified and compared with each other. Among these genes, 8,530 pairs had identical sequences, and 27,384 pairs shared more than 90% sequence identity. Only 2,678 pairs of genes displaying a Ka/Ks ratio significantly greater than one were revealed, and most of these genes contained only nonsynonymous sites. The genes without synonymous site were further analyzed with the SNP data of 1529 O. sativa and O. rufipogon accessions, and 1068 genes were identified to be under positive selection during the differentiation of indica and temperate japonica. The positively selected genes (PSGs) are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes, and the proteins encoded by the PSGs are dominant with binding, transferase and hydrolase activities, and especially enriched in the plant responses to stimuli, biological regulations, and transport processes. Meanwhile, the most PSGs of the known function and/or expression were involved in the regulation of biotic/abiotic stresses. The evidence of pervasive positive selection suggested that many factors drove the differentiation of indica and japonica, which has already started in wild rice but is much lower than in cultivated rice. Lower differentiation and less PSGs revealed between the Or-It and Or-IIIt wild rice groups implied that artificial selection provides greater contribution on the differentiation than natural selection. In addition, the phylogenetic tree constructed with positively selected sites showed that the japonica varieties exhibited more diversity than indica on differentiation, and Or-III of O. rufipogon exhibited more than Or-I. PMID:25774680

  18. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  19. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillon, Blandine; Luisi, Pierre; Blanché, Hélène; Patin, Etienne; Cann, Howard M; Génin, Emmanuelle; Sabbagh, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2) is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK). This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8), and PRSS8) with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  20. Evolution of species-specific major seminal fluid proteins in placental mammals by gene death and positive selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meslin, C.; Laurin, M.; Callebaut, I.; Druart, X.; Monget, P.

    2015-01-01

    The seminal fluid is a complex substance composed of a variety of secreted proteins and has been shown to play an important role in the fertilisation process in mammals and also in Drosophila. Several genes under positive selection have been documented in some rodents and primates. Our study documen

  1. Enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in human skin is found selectively in a fraction of CD68-positive dermal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, J B; Lund, Marianne; Stengaard-Pedersen, K

    1997-01-01

    psoriasis, sections of skin from psoriatic patients were immunohistochemically stained with antisera against methionine and leucine enkephalin, CD68 (KP1, PG-M1), calprotectin (M747), M130 (Ber-MAC3), CD1a and CD3. Enkephalin-like activity was detected selectively in dermal CD68-positive macrophages...

  2. Role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne Cornelia Maria; Elferink-Gemser, Marije Titia; Tromp, Eveline Jenny Yvonne; Vaeyens, Roel; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth male basketball. Forty-three talented Dutch players (14.66 +/- 1.09years) participated in this study. Maturity timing (age at peak height velocity), anthropometric, phy

  3. Role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth basketball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Wierike, Sanne Cornelia Maria; Elferink-Gemser, Marije Titia; Tromp, Eveline Jenny Yvonne; Vaeyens, Roel; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth male basketball. Forty-three talented Dutch players (14.66 +/- 1.09years) participated in this study. Maturity timing (age at peak height velocity), anthropometric, phy

  4. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.;

    2009-01-01

    mutations). Additional sequences from 13 patients were included for longitudinal analysis. We assessed positive selection pressure on the gag/protease region using a test for the overall influence of positive selection and a total of five tests to identify positively selected single codons. We found...... that positive selection pressure was the driving evolutionary force for the gag region in all three patient groups. An increase in positive selection was observed in gag cleavage site regions p7/p1/p6 only after the acquisition of major PI mutations, suggesting that amino acids in gag cleavage sites under...

  5. Ventrolateral Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Positively Regulate Food-Incentive, Goal-Directed Behavior Independently of D1 and D2 Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Nishida, Hiroshi; Bouchekioua, Youcef; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Mimura, Masaru; Takata, Norio; Tanaka, Kenji F

    2017-03-08

    The ventral striatum is involved in motivated behavior. Akin to the dorsal striatum, the ventral striatum contains two parallel pathways: the striatomesencephalic pathway consisting of dopamine receptor Type 1-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs) and the striatopallidal pathway consisting of D2-MSNs. These two genetically identified pathways are thought to encode opposing functions in motivated behavior. It has also been reported that D1/D2 genetic selectivity is not attributed to the anatomical discrimination of two pathways. We wanted to determine whether D1- and D2-MSNs in the ventral striatum functioned in an opposing manner as previous observations claimed, and whether D1/D2 selectivity corresponded to a functional segregation in motivated behavior of mice. To address this question, we focused on the lateral portion of ventral striatum as a region implicated in food-incentive, goal-directed behavior, and recorded D1 or D2-MSN activity by using a gene-encoded ratiometric Ca(2+) indicator and by constructing a fiberphotometry system, and manipulated their activities via optogenetic inhibition during ongoing behaviors. We observed concurrent event-related compound Ca(2+) elevations in ventrolateral D1- and D2-MSNs, especially at trial start cue-related and first lever press-related times. D1 or D2 selective optogenetic inhibition just after the trial start cue resulted in a reduction of goal-directed behavior, indicating a shared coding of motivated behavior by both populations at this time. Only D1-selective inhibition just after the first lever press resulted in the reduction of behavior, indicating D1-MSN-specific coding at that specific time. Our data did not support opposing encoding by both populations in food-incentive, goal-directed behavior.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT An opposing role of dopamine receptor Type 1 or Type 2-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs or D2-MSNs) on striatum-mediated behaviors has been widely accepted. However, this idea has

  6. Positive selection in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus and its effect on vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Shunlin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the relationship between the selective pressure and the sequence variation of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN protein, we performed the positive selection analysis by estimating the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with 132 complete HN gene sequences of Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs isolated in China. Results The PAML software applying a maximum likelihood method was used for the analysis and three sites (residues 266, 347 and 540 in the HN protein were identified as being under positive selection. Codon 347 was located exactly in a recognized antigenic determinant (residues 345-353 and codon 266 in a predicted linear B-cell epitope. Substitutions at codon 540 contributed to the N-linked glycosylation potential of residue 538. To further evaluate the effect of positively selected sites on the vaccine efficacy, we constructed two recombinant fowlpox viruses rFPV-JS6HN and rFPV-LaSHN, expressing the HN proteins from a genotype VII field isolate Go/JS6/05 (with A266, K347 and A540 and vaccine strain La Sota (with V266, E347 and T540, respectively. Two groups of SPF chickens, 18 each, were vaccinated with the two recombinant fowlpox viruses and challenged by Go/JS6/05 at 3 weeks post-immunization. The results showed that rFPV-JS6HN could elicit more effective immunity against the prevalent virus infection than rFPV-LaSHN in terms of reducing virus shedding. Conclusions The analysis of positively selected codons and their effect on the vaccine efficacy indicated that the selective pressure on the HN protein can induce antigenic variation, and new vaccine to control the current ND epidemics should be developed.

  7. Selective localization of Shanks to VGLUT1-positive excitatory synapses in the mouse hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eHeise

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMembers of the Shank family of multidomain proteins (Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are core components of the postsynaptic density (PSD of excitatory synapses. At synaptic sites Shanks serve as scaffolding molecules that cluster neurotransmitter receptors as well as cell adhesion molecules attaching them to the actin cytoskeleton. In this study we investigated the synapse specific localization of Shank1-3 and focused on well-defined synaptic contacts within the hippocampal formation. We found that all three family members are present only at VGLUT1-positive synapses, which is particularly visible at mossy fiber contacts. No costaining was found at VGLUT2-positive contacts indicating that the molecular organization of VGLUT2-associated PSDs diverges from classical VGLUT1-positive excitatory contacts in the hippocampus. In light of SHANK mutations in neuropsychiatric disorders, this study indicates which glutamatergic networks within the hippocampus will be primarily affected by shankopathies.

  8. Exposure to selected fragrance materials. A case study of fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, T

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess exposure to constituents of the fragrance mix from cosmetic products used by fragrance-mix-positive eczema patients. 23 products, which had either given a positive patch and/or use test in a total of 11 fragrance-mix-positive patients, were analyzed....... In all cases, the use of these cosmetics completely or partly explained present or past episodes of eczema. Between 1 to 6 constituents of the fragrance mix were found in 22 out of 23 products. The cosmetics of all the patients sensitive to hydroxycitronellal, eugenol, cinnamic alcohol and alpha....... It is concluded that exposure to constituents of the fragrance mix is common in fragrance-allergic patients with cosmetic eczema, and that the fragrance mix is a good reflection of actual exposure....

  9. Positive selection of novel peroxisome biogenesis-defective mutants of the yeast Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Monique A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Ksheminska, Galyna P.; Fayura, Liubov R.; Cereghino, Joan Lin; Stasyk, Oleh V.; Veenhuis, Marten; Kulachkovsky, Aleksander R.; Sibirny, Andrei A.; Cregg, James M.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed two novel schemes for the direct selection of peroxisome-biogenesis-defective (pex) mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Both schemes take advantage of our observation that methanol-induced pex mutants contain little or no alcohol oxidase (AOX) activity. AOX is a pe

  10. Is self-selection the main driver of positive interpretations of general health checks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Anne Mette; Jørgensen, Torben; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the lower mortality among participants of a health check followed by lifestyle intervention of high risk persons is explained by self-selection. METHODS: All persons residing in the study area (Copenhagen; Denmark) were randomized to intervention (n=11,629) or control...

  11. Response to Comment on "Positive Selection of Tyrosine Loss in Metazoan Evolution"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Chris Soon Heng; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2011-01-01

    Su et al. claim guanine-cytosine (GC) content variation can largely explain the observed tyrosine frequency variation, independent of adaptive evolution of cell-signaling complexity. We found that GC content variation, in the absence of selection for amino acid changes, can only maximally account...

  12. Female promiscuity is positively associated with neutral and selected genetic diversity in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohli, Jostein; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Johnsen, Arild; Kleven, Oddmund; Borge, Thomas; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-05-01

    Passerine birds show large interspecific variation in extrapair paternity rates. There is accumulating evidence that such promiscuous behavior is driven by indirect, genetic benefits to females. Sexual selection theory distinguishes between two types of genetic benefits, additive and nonadditive effects, mediated by preferences for good and compatible genes, respectively. Good genes preferences should imply directional selection and mating skew among males, and thus reduced genetic diversity in the population. In contrast, compatible genes preferences should give balancing selection that retains genetic diversity. Here, we test how well these predictions fit with patterns of variation in genetic diversity and promiscuity levels among passerine birds. We found that more promiscuous species had higher nucleotide diversity at autosomal introns, but not at Z-chromosome introns. We also found that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIB alleles had higher sequence diversity, and therefore should recognize a broader spectrum of pathogens, in more promiscuous species. Our results suggest that female promiscuity targets a multitude of autosomal genes for their nonadditive, compatibility benefits. Also, as immunity genes seem to be of particular importance, we hypothesize that interspecific variation in female promiscuity among passerine birds has arisen in response to the strength of pathogen-mediated selection. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Enrollees are positive about selective contracting, but not if it limits their freedom of choice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bes, R.E.; Brabers, A.E.M.; Reitsma-van Rooijen, P.M.; Jong, J.D. de

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the last decades, health care systems in several European countries changed from a supply-oriented system to a demand-oriented system based on managed competition. In The Netherlands managed competition was introduced in 2006. Health insurers are allowed to selectively contract care

  14. Enrollees are positive about selective contracting, but not if it limits their freedom of choice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bes, R.E.; Brabers, A.E.M.; Reitsma-van Rooijen, P.M.; Jong, J.D. de

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the last decades, health care systems in several European countries changed from a supply-oriented system to a demand-oriented system based on managed competition. In The Netherlands managed competition was introduced in 2006. Health insurers are allowed to selectively contract care p

  15. ‘Obesity’ is healthy for cetaceans? Evidence from pervasive positive selection in genes related to triacylglycerol metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Shixia; Ren, Wenhua; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Cetaceans are a group of secondarily adapted marine mammals with an enigmatic history of transition from terrestrial to fully aquatic habitat and subsequent adaptive radiation in waters around the world. Numerous physiological and morphological cetacean characteristics have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition; for example, the thickened blubber is one of the most striking changes that increases their buoyancy, supports locomotion, and provides thermal insulation. However, the genetic basis underlying the blubber thickening in cetaceans remains poorly explored. Here, 88 candidate genes associated with triacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in representative cetaceans and other mammals to test whether the thickened blubber matched adaptive evolution of triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes. Positive selection was detected in 41 of the 88 candidate genes, and functional characterization of these genes indicated that these are involved mainly in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipolysis processes. In addition, some essential regulatory genes underwent significant positive selection in cetacean-specific lineages, whereas no selection signal was detected in the counterpart terrestrial mammals. The extensive occurrence of positive selection in triacylglycerol metabolism-related genes is suggestive of their essential role in secondary adaptation to an aquatic life, and further implying that ‘obesity’ might be an indicator of good health for cetaceans. PMID:26381091

  16. Evolution of CCL11: genetic characterization in lagomorphs and evidence of positive and purifying selection in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabiana; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between chemokines and their receptors are crucial for differentiation and activation of inflammatory cells. CC chemokine ligand 11 (CCL11) binds to CCR3 and to CCR5 that in leporids underwent gene conversion with CCR2. Here, we genetically characterized CCL11 in lagomorphs (leporids and pikas). All lagomorphs have a potentially functional CCL11, and the Pygmy rabbit has a mutation in the stop codon that leads to a longer protein. Other mammals also have mutations at the stop codon that result in proteins with different lengths. By employing maximum likelihood methods, we observed that, in mammals, CCL11 exhibits both signatures of purifying and positive selection. Signatures of purifying selection were detected in sites important for receptor binding and activation. Of the three sites detected as under positive selection, two were located close to the stop codon. Our results suggest that CCL11 is functional in all lagomorphs, and that the signatures of purifying and positive selection in mammalian CCL11 probably reflect the protein's biological roles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigham Abigail W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-altitude environments (>2,500 m provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF-targeted genes, however, suggest that genes in this pathway could play a role in Andean adaptation to high altitude, even if the pathway as a whole does not show higher relative rates of evolution. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaptation and provide a basis for genotype/phenotype association studies that are necessary to confirm the role of putative natural selection candidate genes and gene regions in adaptation to altitude.

  18. Selective and Nonselective Transfer: Positive and Negative Priming in a Multiple-Task Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboe, Jason P.; Whittlesea, Bruce W. A.; Milliken, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Processing of a probe stimulus can be affected either positively or negatively by presenting a related stimulus immediately before it. According to structural accounts, such effects occur because processing of the prime activates or inhibits the mental representation of the probe before it is presented. In contrast, transfer-appropriate processing…

  19. Genomic organization and differential signature of positive selection in the alpha and beta globin gene clusters in two cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Mariana F; Arroyo, José Ignacio; Opazo, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The hemoglobin of jawed vertebrates is a heterotetramer protein that contains two α- and two β-chains, which are encoded by members of α- and β-globin gene families. Given the hemoglobin role in mediating an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia, it is likely that this molecule may have experienced a selective pressure during the evolution of cetaceans, which have to deal with hypoxia tolerance during prolonged diving. This selective pressure could have generated a complex history of gene turnover in these clusters and/or changes in protein structure themselves. Accordingly, we aimed to characterize the genomic organization of α- and β-globin gene clusters in two cetacean species and to detect a possible role of positive selection on them using a phylogenetic framework. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogeny reconstructions revealed that both cetacean species had retained a similar complement of putatively functional genes. For the α-globin gene cluster, the killer whale presents a complement of genes composed of HBZ, HBK, and two functional copies of HBA and HBQ genes, whereas the dolphin possesses HBZ, HBK, HBA and HBQ genes, and one HBA pseudogene. For the β-globin gene cluster, both species retained a complement of four genes, two early expressed genes-HBE and HBH-and two adult expressed genes-HBD and HBB. Our natural selection analysis detected two positively selected sites in the HBB gene (56 and 62) and four in HBA (15, 21, 49, 120). Interestingly, only the genes that are expressed during the adulthood showed the signature of positive selection.

  20. Positive Selection during the Evolution of the Blood Coagulation Factors in the Context of Their Disease-Causing Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M.; Orengo, Christine A.; Studer, Romain A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy. PMID:25158795

  1. Positive selection in development and growth rate regulation genes involved in species divergence of the genus Radix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Greshake, Bastian; Funke, Elisabeth; Ebersberger, Ingo; Pfenninger, Markus

    2015-08-19

    Life history traits like developmental time, age and size at maturity are directly related to fitness in all organisms and play a major role in adaptive evolution and speciation processes. Comparative genomic or transcriptomic approaches to identify positively selected genes involved in species divergence can help to generate hypotheses on the driving forces behind speciation. Here we use a bottom-up approach to investigate this hypothesis by comparative analysis of orthologous transcripts of four closely related European Radix species. Snails of the genus Radix occupy species specific distribution ranges with distinct climatic niches, indicating a potential for natural selection driven speciation based on ecological niche differentiation. We then inferred phylogenetic relationships among the four Radix species based on whole mt-genomes plus 23 nuclear loci. Three different tests to infer selection and changes in amino acid properties yielded a total of 134 genes with signatures of positive selection. The majority of these genes belonged to the functional gene ontology categories "reproduction" and "genitalia" with an overrepresentation of the functions "development" and "growth rate". We show here that Radix species divergence may be primarily enforced by selection on life history traits such as (larval-) development and growth rate. We thus hypothesise that life history differences may confer advantages under the according climate regimes, e.g., species occupying warmer and dryer habitats might have a fitness advantage with fast developing susceptible life stages, which are more tolerant to habitat desiccation.

  2. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...

  3. Placental Development in Ongoing Pregnancy and Miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Reus (Averil)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In this thesis three-dimensional ultrasound, three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound, virtual reality and histologic examination of the chorionic villous vascularization were used to investigate early placental development in normal ongoing pregnancy as well as misca

  4. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...... an overview of the structure of the research and a summary of current status archived so far....

  5. Improving retouched Bloom filter for trading off selected false positives against false negatives

    OpenAIRE

    Donnet, Benoît; Baynat, Bruno; Friedman, Timur

    2010-01-01

    Where distributed agents must share voluminous set membership information, Bloom fil- ters provide a compact, though lossy, way for them to do so. Numerous recent networking papers have examined the trade-offs between the bandwidth consumed by the transmis- sion of Bloom filters, and the error rate, which takes the form of false positives. This paper is about the retouched Bloom filter (RBF). An RBF is an extension that makes the Bloom fil- ter more flexible by permitting the removal of false...

  6. Position-Related Differences in Selected Morphological Body Characteristics of Top-Level Female Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Marta; Pori, Primoz; Sibila, Marko

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to establish the main morphological characteristics of Slovenian junior and senior female national handball team players. Morphological characteristics of various player subgroups (goalkeepers, wings, back players and pivots) were also determined so as to establish whether they had distinct profiles. The subjects were 87 handball players who were members of the Slovenian junior and senior female national teams in the period from 2003 to 2009. A standardised anthropometric protocol was used to assess the subjects' morphological characteristics. The measurements included 23 different anthropometric measures. First, basic statistical characteristics of anthropometric measures were obtained for all subjects together and then for each group separately. Somatotypes were determined using Heath-Carter's method. Endomorphic, mesomorphic and ectomorphic components were calculated by computer on the basis of formulas. In order to determine differences in the body composition and anthropometric data of the subjects playing in different positions, a one-way analysis of variance was employed. The results show that, on average, the wings differed the most from the other player groups in terms of their morphological body characteristics. The wings differed most prominently from the other player groups in terms of their morphological body parameters as they were significantly smaller and had a statistically significantly lower body mass than the other groups. In terms of transversal measures of the skeleton and the circumferences, the wings significantly differed mainly from the pivots and goalkeepers and less from the backs. The goalkeepers were the tallest, with high values of body mass and low values of transversal measures compared to P. Their skin folds were the most pronounced among all the groups on average and their share of subcutaneous fat in total body mass was the highest. Consequently, their endomorphic component of the somatotype was pronounced

  7. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  8. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  9. A large new subset of TRIM genes highly diversified by duplication and positive selection in teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbomel Philippe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, the members of the tripartite motif (TRIM protein family are involved in various cellular processes including innate immunity against viral infection. Viruses exert strong selective pressures on the defense system. Accordingly, antiviral TRIMs have diversified highly through gene expansion, positive selection and alternative splicing. Characterizing immune TRIMs in other vertebrates may enlighten their complex evolution. Results We describe here a large new subfamily of TRIMs in teleosts, called finTRIMs, identified in rainbow trout as virus-induced transcripts. FinTRIMs are formed of nearly identical RING/B-box regions and C-termini of variable length; the long variants include a B30.2 domain. The zebrafish genome harbors a striking diversity of finTRIMs, with 84 genes distributed in clusters on different chromosomes. A phylogenetic analysis revealed different subsets suggesting lineage-specific diversification events. Accordingly, the number of fintrim genes varies greatly among fish species. Conserved syntenies were observed only for the oldest fintrims. The closest mammalian relatives are trim16 and trim25, but they are not true orthologs. The B30.2 domain of zebrafish finTRIMs evolved under strong positive selection. The positions under positive selection are remarkably congruent in finTRIMs and in mammalian antiviral TRIM5α, concentrated within a viral recognition motif in mammals. The B30.2 domains most closely related to finTRIM are found among NOD-like receptors (NLR, indicating that the evolution of TRIMs and NLRs was intertwined by exon shuffling. Conclusion The diversity, evolution, and features of finTRIMs suggest an important role in fish innate immunity; this would make them the first TRIMs involved in immunity identified outside mammals.

  10. Positive selection in bone morphogenetic protein 15 targets a natural mutation associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in human.

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    Sylvain Auclair

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15 is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the

  11. James Cook University's rurally orientated medical school selection process: quality graduates and positive workforce outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robin A; Woolley, Torres; Sen Gupta, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    The regionally based James Cook University (JCU) College of Medicine and Dentistry aims to meet its mission to address the health needs of the region by using a selection policy favouring rural origin applicants and providing students with early and repeated exposure to rural experiences during training. This study seeks to determine if the JCU medical school's policy of preferentially selecting rural and remote background students is associated with differing patterns of undergraduate performance or graduate practice location. Data at application to medical school and during the undergraduate years was retrieved from administrative databases held by the university and the medical school. Postgraduate location data were obtained either from personal contact via email, telephone or Facebook or electronically from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority website. Practice location was described across Australian Standard Geographical Classification Remoteness Area (ASGC-RA) categories, with 1 being a major city and 5 being a very remote location. The 856 Australian-based students accepted into the JCU medical program between 2000 and 2008 came from all geographical regions across Australia: 20% metropolitan (ASGC-RA 1), 20% inner regional (ASGC-RA 2), 56% outer regional (ASGC-RA 3), and 5% from remote or very remote locations (ASGC-RA 4 and 5). Having a rural or remote hometown at application (ASGC-RA 3-5) was significantly associated with a lower tertiary entrance score (pScholarship (p=0.005), taking longer to complete the 6-year course (p=exams in the clinical years (years 4-6) and are much more likely to practise in rural and remote areas. These data suggest that JCU's selection process favouring rural origin applicants does not compromise academic standards, but does produce graduates whose patterns of practice accord with the mission of the school.

  12. Comparison Of Selected Characteristics Of Brushless DC Motors For Optoelectronic Sensors Positioning

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    Zieleźnicki Jan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their advantageous properties such as higher durability, reliability and wide scope of speed achievable with a given load, brushless DC motors are often used in Line-of-Sight stabilization systems of the optoelectronic aircraft gimbals. Since there are many sub-types and configurations of such motors, choosing the optimal structure is not a trivial issue. This paper presents the selection process of a motor with properties that would make it ideal for use in an optoelectronic gimbal drive.

  13. Optimal Growth Conditions for Selective Ge Islands Positioning on Pit-Patterned Si(001

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    Bergamaschini R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate ordered nucleation of Ge islands on pit-patterned Si(001 using an original hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo model. The method allows us to explore long time-scale evolution while using large simulation cells. We analyze the possibility to achieve selective nucleation and island homogeneity as a function of the various parameters (flux, temperature, pit period able to influence the growth process. The presence of an optimal condition where the atomic diffusivity is sufficient to guarantee nucleation only within pits, but not so large to induce significant Ostwald ripening, is clearly demonstrated.

  14. Surface layer proteins from virulent Clostridium difficile ribotypes exhibit signatures of positive selection with consequences for innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark; Walsh, Thomas A; Marszalowska, Izabela; Webb, Andrew E; MacAogain, Micheál; Rogers, Thomas R; Windle, Henry; Kelleher, Dermot; O'Connell, Mary J; Loscher, Christine E

    2017-03-23

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen prevalent in hospitals worldwide and increasingly common in the community. Sequence differences have been shown to be present in the Surface Layer Proteins (SLPs) from different C. difficile ribotypes (RT) however whether these differences influence severity of infection is still not clear. We used a molecular evolutionary approach to analyse SLPs from twenty-six C. difficile RTs representing different slpA sequences. We demonstrate that SLPs from RT 027 and 078 exhibit evidence of positive selection (PS). We compared the effect of these SLPs to those purified from RT 001 and 014, which did not exhibit PS, and demonstrate that the presence of sites under positive selection correlates with ability to activate macrophages. SLPs from RTs 027 and 078 induced a more potent response in macrophages, with increased levels of IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-10, MIP-1α, MIP-2 production relative to RT 001 and 014. Furthermore, RTs 027 and 078 induced higher expression of CD40, CD80 and MHC II on macrophages with decreased ability to phagocytose relative to LPS. These results tightly link sequence differences in C. difficile SLPs to disease susceptibility and severity, and suggest that positively selected sites in the SLPs may play a role in driving the emergence of hyper-virulent strains.

  15. Molecular cloning, characterization and positively selected sites of the glutathione S-transferase family from Locusta migratoria.

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    Xueyao Zhang

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs are multifunctional enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds and are related to insecticide resistance. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on the molecular characteristics and the positive selection of locust GSTs. Based on the transcriptome database, we sequenced 28 cytosolic GSTs and 4 microsomal GSTs from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria. We assigned the 28 cytosolic GSTs into 6 classes--sigma, epsilon, delta, theta, omega and zeta, and the 4 microsomal GSTs into 2 subclasses--insect and MGST3. The tissue- and stage-expression patterns of the GSTs differed at the mRNA level. Further, the substrate specificities and kinetic constants of the cytosolic GSTs differed markedly at the protein level. The results of likelihood ratio tests provided strong evidence for positive selection in the delta class. The result of Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis identified 4 amino acid sites in the delta class as positive selection sites. These sites were located on the protein surface. Our findings will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular characteristics and evolutionary aspects of insect GST superfamily.

  16. Molecular cloning, characterization and positively selected sites of the glutathione S-transferase family from Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyao; Wang, Jianxin; Zhang, Min; Qin, Guohua; Li, Daqi; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds and are related to insecticide resistance. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on the molecular characteristics and the positive selection of locust GSTs. Based on the transcriptome database, we sequenced 28 cytosolic GSTs and 4 microsomal GSTs from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria). We assigned the 28 cytosolic GSTs into 6 classes--sigma, epsilon, delta, theta, omega and zeta, and the 4 microsomal GSTs into 2 subclasses--insect and MGST3. The tissue- and stage-expression patterns of the GSTs differed at the mRNA level. Further, the substrate specificities and kinetic constants of the cytosolic GSTs differed markedly at the protein level. The results of likelihood ratio tests provided strong evidence for positive selection in the delta class. The result of Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis identified 4 amino acid sites in the delta class as positive selection sites. These sites were located on the protein surface. Our findings will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular characteristics and evolutionary aspects of insect GST superfamily.

  17. Positive selection results in frequent reversible amino acid replacements in the G protein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Viviane F Botosso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children under 5 years of age and the elderly, causing annual disease outbreaks during the fall and winter. Multiple lineages of the HRSVA and HRSVB serotypes co-circulate within a single outbreak and display a strongly temporal pattern of genetic variation, with a replacement of dominant genotypes occurring during consecutive years. In the present study we utilized phylogenetic methods to detect and map sites subject to adaptive evolution in the G protein of HRSVA and HRSVB. A total of 29 and 23 amino acid sites were found to be putatively positively selected in HRSVA and HRSVB, respectively. Several of these sites defined genotypes and lineages within genotypes in both groups, and correlated well with epitopes previously described in group A. Remarkably, 18 of these positively selected tended to revert in time to a previous codon state, producing a "flip-flop" phylogenetic pattern. Such frequent evolutionary reversals in HRSV are indicative of a combination of frequent positive selection, reflecting the changing immune status of the human population, and a limited repertoire of functionally viable amino acids at specific amino acid sites.

  18. Neanderthal introgression at chromosome 3p21.31 was under positive natural selection in East Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Studies of the Neanderthal and Denisovan genomes demonstrate archaic hominin introgression in Eurasians. Here, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression within the chromosome 3p21.31 region, occurring with a high frequency in East Asians (ranging from 49.4% to 66.5%) and at a low frequency in Europeans. We also detected a signal of strong positive selection in this region only in East Asians. Our data indicate that likely candidate targets of selection include rs12488302-T and its associated alleles--among which four are nonsynonymous, including rs35455589-G in HYAL2, a gene related to the cellular response to ultraviolet-B irradiation. Furthermore, suggestive evidence supports latitude-dependent selection, implicating a role of ultraviolet-B. Interestingly, the distribution of rs35455589-G suggests that this allele was lost during the exodus of ancestors of modern Eurasians from Africa and reintroduced to Eurasians from Neanderthals.

  19. Position of the Mental Foramen in Panoramic Radiography and Its Relationship to Age in a Selected Iranian Population

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    Dehghani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The position of the mental foramen is critical for surgery and local anesthesia. Objectives This study was conducted to assess the position of the mental foramen and its relationship to age in a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Three hundred panoramic radiographs were assessed. Three variables were assessed for each radiograph: anterior-posterior position, superior-inferior position, and radiographic appearance. The position and appearance of the mental foramen were recorded according to gender and age. The results were analyzed using Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Results Considering the anterior-posterior position, the mental foramina were located in the following positions: between premolars (41.5%, at the apex of the second premolars (31.7%, in the posterior area of the second premolars (19.2%, in the anterior area of the first premolars (4.3%, and at the apex of the first premolars (3.3%.The superior-inferior position of the mental foramina were below, above, and at the level of the apices of the premolars in 78.8%, 2.5%, and 18.7% of cases, respectively. The appearance of the mental foramen was continuous in relation to the mandibular canal in 55.9% of cases, while it was separated, diffuse, and unidentified in 29.5%, 9.7%, and 5% of cases, respectively. Age was found to affect the position and appearance of mental foramen. Conclusions The mental foramina were most commonly located between the first and second premolars and below the apex. A continuous appearance was the most common appearance for the mental foramen, which was similar in males and females.

  20. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

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    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  1. Detecting loci under recent positive selection in dairy and beef cattle by combining different genome-wide scan methods.

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    Yuri Tani Utsunomiya

    Full Text Available As the methodologies available for the detection of positive selection from genomic data vary in terms of assumptions and execution, weak correlations are expected among them. However, if there is any given signal that is consistently supported across different methodologies, it is strong evidence that the locus has been under past selection. In this paper, a straightforward frequentist approach based on the Stouffer Method to combine P-values across different tests for evidence of recent positive selection in common variations, as well as strategies for extracting biological information from the detected signals, were described and applied to high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data generated from dairy and beef cattle (taurine and indicine. The ancestral Bovinae allele state of over 440,000 SNP is also reported. Using this combination of methods, highly significant (P<3.17×10(-7 population-specific sweeps pointing out to candidate genes and pathways that may be involved in beef and dairy production were identified. The most significant signal was found in the Cornichon homolog 3 gene (CNIH3 in Brown Swiss (P = 3.82×10(-12, and may be involved in the regulation of pre-ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. Other putative pathways under selection are the glucolysis/gluconeogenesis, transcription machinery and chemokine/cytokine activity in Angus; calpain-calpastatin system and ribosome biogenesis in Brown Swiss; and gangliosides deposition in milk fat globules in Gyr. The composite method, combined with the strategies applied to retrieve functional information, may be a useful tool for surveying genome-wide selective sweeps and providing insights in to the source of selection.

  2. Molecular population genetics of human CYP3A locus: signatures of positive selection and implications for evolutionary environmental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Wang, Haijian; Zhou, Gangqiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Dong, Xiaojia; Zhi, Lianteng; Jin, Li; He, Fuchu

    2009-10-01

    The human CYP3A gene cluster codes for cytochrome P450 (CYP) subfamily enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of various exogenous and endogenous chemicals and is an obvious candidate for evolutionary and environmental genomic study. Functional variants in the CYP3A locus may have undergone a selective sweep in response to various environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to profile the allelic structure across the human CYP3A locus and investigate natural selection on that locus. From the CYP3A locus spanning 231 kb, we resequenced 54 genomic DNA fragments (a total of 43,675 bases) spanning four genes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, and CYP3A43) and two pseudogenes (CYP3AP1 and CYP3AP2), and randomly selected intergenic regions at the CYP3A locus in Africans (24 individuals), Caucasians (24 individuals), and Chinese (29 individuals). We comprehensively investigated the nucleotide diversity and haplotype structure and examined the possible role of natural selection in shaping the sequence variation throughout the gene cluster. Neutrality tests with Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F*, and Fay and Wu's H indicated possible roles of positive selection on the entire CYP3A locus in non-Africans. Sliding-window analyses of nucleotide diversity and frequency spectrum, as well as haplotype diversity and phylogenetically inferred haplotype structure, revealed that CYP3A4 and CYP3A7 had recently undergone or were undergoing a selective sweep in all three populations, whereas CYP3A43 and CYP3A5 were undergoing a selective sweep in non-Africans and Caucasians, respectively. The refined allelic architecture and selection spectrum for the human CYP3A locus highlight that evolutionary dynamics of molecular adaptation may underlie the phenotypic variation of the xenobiotic disposition system and varied predisposition to complex disorders in which xenobiotics play a role.

  3. Rank Based Selection of Electrode Positions for a Multi-Lead ECG Electrode Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermuller, Christoph; Fischer, Gerald; Seger, Michael; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    Methods for noninvasive imaging of electrical function of the heart seem to become a clinical standard procedure the next years. Thus, the overall procedure has to meet clinical requirements as easy and fast application. In this study we propose a new electrode array meeting clinical requirements such as easy to apply and compatibility with routine leads. Within body surface regions of high sensitivity, identified in a prior, information content based study, the number of required electrodes was optimized using effort-gain plots. These plots were generated by applying a so called type one detector criterion. The optimal array was selected from a set of 12 electrode arrays. Each of them consists of two L-shaped regular spaced parts. The optimal array was found by comparing several layouts and electrode densities to the electrode array we use for clinical studies. It consists of 125 electrodes with a regular spacing between 2cm and 3cm.

  4. Positive selection on NIN, a gene involved in neurogenesis, and primate brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, S H; Mundy, N I

    2012-11-01

    A long-held dogma in comparative neurobiology has been that the number of neurons under a given area of cortical surface is constant. As such, the attention of those seeking to understand the genetic basis of brain evolution has focused on genes with functions in the lateral expansion of the developing cerebral cortex. However, new data suggest that cortical cytoarchitecture is not constant across primates, raising the possibility that changes in radial cortical development played a role in primate brain evolution. We present the first analysis of a gene with functions relevant to this dimension of brain evolution. We show that NIN, a gene necessary for maintaining asymmetric, neurogenic divisions of radial glial cells (RGCs), evolved adaptively during anthropoid evolution. We explored how this selection relates to neural phenotypes and find a significant association between selection on NIN and neonatal brain size in catarrhines. Our analyses suggest a relationship with prenatal neurogenesis and identify the human data point as an outlier, possibly explained by postnatal changes in development on the human lineage. A similar pattern is found in platyrrhines, but the highly encephalized genus Cebus departs from the general trend. We further show that the evolution of NIN may be associated with variation in neuron number not explained by increases in surface area, a result consistent with NIN's role in neurogenic divisions of RGCs. Our combined results suggest a role for NIN in the evolution of cortical development. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  5. Impact of low-energy CT imaging on selection of positive oral contrast media concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Manuel; Murcia, Diana J; Iamurri, Andrea Prochowski; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2017-05-01

    To determine to what extent low-energy CT imaging affects attenuation of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) opacified with positive oral contrast media (OCM). Second, to establish optimal OCM concentrations for low-energy diagnostic CT exams. One hundred patients (38 men and 62 women; age 62 ± 11 years; BMI 26 ± 5) with positive OCM-enhanced 120-kVp single-energy CT (SECT), and follow-up 100-kVp acquisitions (group A; n = 50), or 40-70-keV reconstructions from rapid kV switching-single-source dual-energy CT (ssDECT) (group B; n = 50) were included. Luminal attenuation from different GIT segments was compared between exams. Standard dose of three OCM and diluted solutions (75%, 50%, and 25% concentrations) were introduced serially in a gastrointestinal phantom and scanned using SECT (120, 100, and 80 kVp) and DECT (80/140 kVp) acquisitions on a ssDECT scanner. Luminal attenuation was obtained on SECT and DECT images (40-70 keV), and compared to 120-kVp scans with standard OCM concentrations. Luminal attenuation was higher on 100-kVp (328 HU) and on 40-60-keV images (410-924 HU) in comparison to 120-kVp scans (298 HU) in groups A and B (p concentration.

  6. Structure refinement and membrane positioning of selectively labeled OmpX in phospholipid nanodiscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagn, Franz, E-mail: franz.hagn@tum.de; Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    NMR structural studies on membrane proteins are often complicated by their large size, taking into account the contribution of the membrane mimetic. Therefore, classical resonance assignment approaches often fail. The large size of phospholipid nanodiscs, a detergent-free phospholipid bilayer mimetic, prevented their use in high-resolution solution-state NMR spectroscopy so far. We recently introduced smaller nanodiscs that are suitable for NMR structure determination. However, side-chain assignments of a membrane protein in nanodiscs still remain elusive. Here, we utilized a NOE-based approach to assign (stereo-) specifically labeled Ile, Leu, Val and Ala methyl labeled and uniformly {sup 15}N-Phe and {sup 15}N-Tyr labeled OmpX and calculated a refined high-resolution structure. In addition, we were able to obtain residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) of OmpX in nanodiscs using Pf1 phage medium for the induction of weak alignment. Back-calculated NOESY spectra of the obtained NMR structures were compared to experimental NOESYs in order to validate the quality of these structures. We further used NOE information between protonated lipid head groups and side-chain methyls to determine the position of OmpX in the phospholipid bilayer. These data were verified by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments obtained with Gd{sup 3+}-modified lipids. Taken together, this study emphasizes the need for the (stereo-) specific labeling of membrane proteins in a highly deuterated background for high-resolution structure determination, particularly in large membrane mimicking systems like phospholipid nanodiscs. Structure validation by NOESY back-calculation will be helpful for the structure determination and validation of membrane proteins where NOE assignment is often difficult. The use of protein to lipid NOEs will be beneficial for the positioning of a membrane protein in the lipid bilayer without the need for preparing multiple protein samples.

  7. Selective internalization of self-assembled artificial oil bodies by HER2/neu-positive cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Li-Jen [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng, E-mail: cjchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw, E-mail: ypchao@fcu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-07

    A novel delivery carrier was developed using artificial oil bodies (AOBs). Plant seed oil bodies (OBs) consist of a triacylglycerol matrix surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with the storage protein oleosin (Ole). Ole consists of a central hydrophobic domain with two amphiphatic arms that extrude from the surface of OBs. In this study, a bivalent anti-HER2/neu affibody domain (ZH2) was fused with Ole at the C terminus. After overproduction in Escherichia coli, the fusion protein (Ole-ZH2) was recovered to assemble AOBs. The size of self-assembled AOBs was tailored by varying the oil/Ole-ZH2 ratio and pH to reach a nanoscale. Upon co-incubation with tumor cells, the nanoscale AOBs encapsulated with a hydrophobic fluorescence dye were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-overexpressing cells and displayed biocompatibility with the cells. In addition, the ZH2-mediated endosomal entry of AOBs occurred in a time- and AOB dose-dependent manner. The internalization efficiency was as high as 90%. The internalized AOBs disintegrated at the non-permissive pH (e.g. in acidic endosomes) and the cargo dye was released. Results of in vitro study revealed a sustained and prolonged release profile. Taken together, our findings indicate the potential of AOBs as a delivery carrier.

  8. Evidence of positive selection for a glycogen synthase (GYS1) mutation in domestic horse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Annette M; Schaefer, Robert; Petersen, Jessica L; Morrell, Peter L; Slamka, Megan A; Mickelson, James R; Valberg, Stephanie J; McCue, Molly E

    2014-01-01

    A dominantly inherited gain-of-function mutation in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, resulting in excess skeletal muscle glycogen, has been identified in more than 30 horse breeds. This mutation is associated with the disease Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy Type 1, yet persists at high frequency in some breeds. Under historical conditions of daily work and limited feed, excess muscle glycogen may have been advantageous, driving the increase in frequency of this allele. Fine-scale DNA sequencing in 80 horses and genotype assays in 279 horses revealed a paucity of haplotypes carrying the mutant allele when compared with the wild-type allele. Additionally, we found increased linkage disequilibrium, measured by relative extended haplotype homozygosity, in haplotypes carrying the mutation compared with haplotypes carrying the wild-type allele. Coalescent simulations of Belgian horse populations demonstrated that the high frequency and extended haplotype associated with the GYS1 mutation were unlikely to have arisen under neutrality or due to population demography. In contrast, in Quarter Horses, elevated relative extended haplotype homozygosity was associated with multiple haplotypes and may be the result of recent population expansion or a popular sire effect. These data suggest that the GYS1 mutation underwent historical selection in the Belgian, but not in the Quarter Horse.

  9. Selective internalization of self-assembled artificial oil bodies by HER2/neu-positive cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Li-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2011-01-01

    A novel delivery carrier was developed using artificial oil bodies (AOBs). Plant seed oil bodies (OBs) consist of a triacylglycerol matrix surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with the storage protein oleosin (Ole). Ole consists of a central hydrophobic domain with two amphiphatic arms that extrude from the surface of OBs. In this study, a bivalent anti-HER2/neu affibody domain (ZH2) was fused with Ole at the C terminus. After overproduction in Escherichia coli, the fusion protein (Ole-ZH2) was recovered to assemble AOBs. The size of self-assembled AOBs was tailored by varying the oil/Ole-ZH2 ratio and pH to reach a nanoscale. Upon co-incubation with tumor cells, the nanoscale AOBs encapsulated with a hydrophobic fluorescence dye were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-overexpressing cells and displayed biocompatibility with the cells. In addition, the ZH2-mediated endosomal entry of AOBs occurred in a time- and AOB dose-dependent manner. The internalization efficiency was as high as 90%. The internalized AOBs disintegrated at the non-permissive pH (e.g. in acidic endosomes) and the cargo dye was released. Results of in vitro study revealed a sustained and prolonged release profile. Taken together, our findings indicate the potential of AOBs as a delivery carrier.

  10. Positive selection of a CD36 nonsense variant in sub-Saharan Africa, but no association with severe malaria phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Andrew E.; Ghansa, Anita; Small, Kerrin S.; Palma, Alejandro; Auburn, Sarah; Diakite, Mahamadou; Green, Angela; Campino, Susana; Teo, Yik Y.; Clark, Taane G.; Jeffreys, Anna E.; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Griffiths, Michael J.; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Newton, Charles R.; Marsh, Kevin; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.; Koram, Kwadwo A.; Oduro, Abraham R.; Rogers, William O.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of CD36 deficiency in East Asian and African populations suggests that the causal variants are under selection by severe malaria. Previous analysis of data from the International HapMap Project indicated that a CD36 haplotype bearing a nonsense mutation (T1264G; rs3211938) had undergone recent positive selection in the Yoruba of Nigeria. To investigate the global distribution of this putative selection event, we genotyped T1264G in 3420 individuals from 66 populations. We confirmed the high frequency of 1264G in the Yoruba (26%). However, the 1264G allele is less common in other African populations and absent from all non-African populations without recent African admixture. Using long-range linkage disequilibrium, we studied two West African groups in depth. Evidence for recent positive selection at the locus was demonstrable in the Yoruba, although not in Gambians. We screened 70 variants from across CD36 for an association with severe malaria phenotypes, employing a case–control study of 1350 subjects and a family study of 1288 parent–offspring trios. No marker was significantly associated with severe malaria. We focused on T1264G, genotyping 10 922 samples from four African populations. The nonsense allele was not associated with severe malaria (pooled allelic odds ratio 1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.89–1.12; P = 0.98). These results suggest a range of possible explanations including the existence of alternative selection pressures on CD36, co-evolution between host and parasite or confounding caused by allelic heterogeneity of CD36 deficiency. PMID:19403559

  11. A design of a valid signal selecting and position decoding ASIC for PET using silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M.; Lim, K.-t.; Kim, H.; Yeom, J.-y.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Choi, H.; Cho, G.

    2017-01-01

    In most cases, a PET system has numerous electrical components and channel circuits and thus it would rather be a bulky product. Also, most existing systems receive analog signals from detectors which make them vulnerable to signal distortions. For these reasons, channel reduction techniques are important. In this work, an ASIC for PET module is being proposed. An ASIC chip for 16 PET detector channels, VSSPDC, has been designed and simulated. The main function of the chip is 16-to-1 channel reduction, i.e., finding the position of only the valid signals, signal timing, and magnitudes in all 16 channels at every recorded event. The ASIC comprises four of 4-channel modules and a 2nd 4-to-1 router. A single channel module comprises a transimpedance amplifier for the silicon photomultipliers, dual comparators with high and low level references, and a logic circuitry. While the high level reference was used to test the validity of the signal, the low level reference was used for the timing. The 1-channel module of the ASIC produced an energy pulse by time-over-threshold method and it also produced a time pulse with a fixed delayed time. Since the ASIC chip outputs only a few digital pulses and does not require an external clock, it has an advantage over noise properties. The cadence simulation showed the good performance of the chip as designed.

  12. Selection of HyspIRI optimal band positions for the earth compositional mapping using HyTES data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Saleem; Khalid, Noora; Iqbal, Arshad

    2016-07-01

    In near future, NASA/JPL will orbit a new space-borne sensor called HyspIRI (Hyperspectral and Infrared Imager) which will cover the spectral range from 0.4 -14μm. Two instruments will be mounted on HyspIRI platform; one is hyperspectral instrument which can sense earth surface between 0.4-2.5μm with 10 nm intervals and a multispectral TIR sensor will acquire images between 3 to 14μm in 8 (1 in MIR and 7 in TIR) spectral bands. The TIR spectral wavebands will be positioned based on their importance in various applications. This study aimed to find HyspIRI optimal TIR wavebands position for earth compositional mapping. Genetic algorithms coupled with Spectral Angle Mapper (GA-SAM) were used as spectral bands selector. High dimensional HyTES (Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer) data comprised of 256 spectral bands of Cuprite and Death Valley regions were used to select meaningful subsets of bands for earth compositional mapping. The GA-SAM was trained for eight mineral classes and the algorithms were run iteratively 40 times. High calibration (> 98 %) and validation (> 96 %) accuracies were achieved with limited numbers (seven) of spectral bands selected by GA-SAM. Knowing the important band positions will help scientist of HyspIRI group to place spectral bands at regions were accuracies of earth compositional mapping can be enhanced.

  13. Positions of selective leukocytapheresis in the medical therapy of ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Hanai

    2006-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) are the major forms of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both UC and CD are debilitating chronic disorders that afflict millions of individuals throughout the world with symptoms which impair function and quality of life. The etiology of IBD is inadequately understood and therefore, drug therapy has been empirical instead of being based on sound understanding of IBD pathogenesis. This is a major factor for poor drug efficacy and drug related side effects that often add to the disease complexity. The development of biologicals notably infliximab to intercept tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α reflects some progress, albeit major concern about their side effects and lack of long-term safety and efficacy profiles. However, IBD seems to be perpetuated by inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β,IL-6 and IL-8 for which activated peripheral granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages (GM) are major sources.Further, in IBD, peripheral GMs are elevated with activation behavior, increased survival time and are found in vast numbers within the inflamed intestinal mucosa; they are suspected to be major factors in the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Hence, peripheral blood GMs should be appropriate targets of therapy. The Adacolumn is a medical device developed for selective depletion of GM by receptor-mediated adsorption (GMA). Clinical data show GMA, in patients with steroid dependent or steroid refractory UC, is associated with up to 85% efficacy and tapering or discontinuation of steroids, while in steroid na(i)ve patients (the best responders), GMA spares patients from exposure to steroids. Likewise, GMA at appropriate intervals in patients at a high risk of clinical relapse suppresses relapse thus sparing the patients from the morbidity associated with IBD relapse. Further, GMA appears to reduce the number of patients being submitted to colectomy or exposure to unsafe immunosupressants.First UC episode

  14. Micronutrient Availability in Relation to Selected Soil Properties and landscape Position in Calcareous Soils of Golpayegan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Fathi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Variety of soil reactions govern the distribution of metal micronutrients that includes complexation with organic and inorganic ligands, ion exchange, adsorption and desorption processes, precipitation and dissolution of solids and acid-based equilibria. The relative importance of these reactions depends on many factors such as soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties and the nature of metal ions. Environmental factors such as climate, physiographic position, and soil development may affect variability of some soil properties and thereby nutrient availability. The present research was conducted to find relationships between Iron, manganese, zinc, and copper availability and some major soil properties, physiographic condition and soil development. Materials and Methods: Golpayegan region is located in northwest of Isfahan province in central Iran. The mean elevation of the studied area is 1790 above sea level. Annual precipitation was about 244mm and mean monthly temperature ranges from -6 in January to 34°C in August. The soils were developed on different physiographic conditions including piedmont plains, alluvial-fan, plateaus, and flood plains belonging to Entisols and Aridisols. Soil samples (0–60 cm were collected from 98 grid points with 2000m distance in the agricultural area of Golpayegan. Particle size distribution, calcium carbonate, organic carbon, available potassium and phosphorus of the soils were measured by SWRI standard methods. Available Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe were determined by addition of 10 g soil to 20mL 0.005M diethylentriaminepentacetic‏. The solutions were shaken for 2 h at 25°C, centrifuged, filtered, and Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu concentrations were measured by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Discussion: Studied soils were developed on calcareous material and about 60% of samples have more than 20% of calcium carbonate. Available Fe ranged from 1.4 to 6.5 mg kg-1 (mean 15.8 mg kg-1

  15. HIV-positive patients’ perceptions of care received at a selected antiretroviral therapy clinic in Vhembe district, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshifhiwa V. Ndou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients’ experiences are a reflection of what has happened during the care process and, therefore, provide information about the performance of health care professional workers. They refer to the process of care provision at the antiretroviral therapy (ART sites.Aim and setting: This article explored the perceptions of HIV-positive patients of care received at the Gateway Clinic of the regional hospital that provides antiretroviral treatment in the Vhembe district.Methods: A qualitative, explorative and descriptive design was used. A non-probability, convenient sampling method was used to select 20 HIV-positive patients who were above 18 years of age. In-depth individual interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed through Tech’s open coding method.Results: One theme and two sub-themes emerged, namely positive experiences related to the environment and attitudes of health professionals, and negative experiences concerning the practices by health care providers.Conclusion: Patients’ perceptions of quality of, and satisfaction with, health care may affect health outcomes. Recommendations are made to consider, practice and strengthen the protocols, the standard operating procedures and the principles of infection control in the health facilities.Keywords: Human Immunodeficiecy Virus, Antiretroviral Treatment, HIV positive, Limpopo

  16. Eye-movements and ongoing task processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, David T; Meleger, Alec; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Snyder, Jim; Dorvlo, Atsu S S; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2003-06-01

    This study tests the relation between eye-movements and thought processing. Subjects were given specific modality tasks (visual, gustatory, kinesthetic) and assessed on whether they responded with distinct eye-movements. Some subjects' eye-movements reflected ongoing thought processing. Instead of a universal pattern, as suggested by the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis, this study yielded subject-specific idiosyncratic eye-movements across all modalities. Included is a discussion of the neurolinguistic programming hypothesis regarding eye-movements and its implications for the eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing theory.

  17. Universal patterns underlying ongoing wars and terrorism

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, N F; Restrepo, J A; Becerra, O; Bohorquez, J C; Suárez, N; Restrepo, E M; Zarama, R; Johnson, Neil F.; Spagat, Mike; Restrepo, Jorge A.; Becerra, Oscar; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Suarez, Nicolas; Restrepo, Elvira Maria; Zarama, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    We report a remarkable universality in the patterns of violence arising in three high-profile ongoing wars, and in global terrorism. Our results suggest that these quite different conflict arenas currently feature a common type of enemy, i.e. the various insurgent forces are beginning to operate in a similar way regardless of their underlying ideologies, motivations and the terrain in which they operate. We provide a microscopic theory to explain our main observations. This theory treats the insurgent force as a generic, self-organizing system which is dynamically evolving through the continual coalescence and fragmentation of its constituent groups.

  18. Different positively selected sites at the gametophytic self-incompatibility pistil S-RNase gene in the Solanaceae and Rosaceae (Prunus, Pyrus, and Malus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jorge; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Santos, Raquel A M; Vieira, Cristina P

    2007-08-01

    In this work we perform a comparative study on the location of positively selected sites (those likely responsible for defining specificity differences) at the S-RNase gene, the pistil component of the gametophytic self-incompatibility system. For Plantaginaceae and Rosaceae (Prunus and Pyrus/Malus) this is the first study of this kind. A clear sign of positive selection was observed for 13, 17, and 27 amino acid sites in Solanaceae, Prunus, and Pyrus/Malus, respectively, using two different methodologies. In Plantaginaceae no clear positively selected sites were identified. Possible reasons for this result are discussed. Indirect experimental evidence suggests that the identified positively selected amino acid sites play a role in specificity determination. The percentage of positively selected sites is similar in Solanaceae and Rosaceae but the location of those sites is different.

  19. A genomic survey of positive selection in Burkholderia pseudomallei provides insights into the evolution of accidental virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannistha Nandi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain environmental microorganisms can cause severe human infections, even in the absence of an obvious requirement for transition through an animal host for replication ("accidental virulence". To understand this process, we compared eleven isolate genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp, a tropical soil microbe and causative agent of the human and animal disease melioidosis. We found evidence for the existence of several new genes in the Bp reference genome, identifying 282 novel genes supported by at least two independent lines of supporting evidence (mRNA transcripts, database homologs, and presence of ribosomal binding sites and 81 novel genes supported by all three lines. Within the Bp core genome, 211 genes exhibited significant levels of positive selection (4.5%, distributed across many cellular pathways including carbohydrate and secondary metabolism. Functional experiments revealed that certain positively selected genes might enhance mammalian virulence by interacting with host cellular pathways or utilizing host nutrients. Evolutionary modifications improving Bp environmental fitness may thus have indirectly facilitated the ability of Bp to colonize and survive in mammalian hosts. These findings improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of melioidosis, and establish Bp as a model system for studying the genetics of accidental virulence.

  20. Role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Wierike, Sanne Cornelia Maria; Elferink-Gemser, Marije Titia; Tromp, Eveline Jenny Yvonne; Vaeyens, Roel; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of maturity timing in selection procedures and in the specialisation of playing positions in youth male basketball. Forty-three talented Dutch players (14.66 ± 1.09 years) participated in this study. Maturity timing (age at peak height velocity), anthropometric, physiological, and technical characteristics were measured. Maturity timing and height of the basketball players were compared with a matched Dutch population. One-sample t-tests showed that basketball players were taller and experienced their peak height velocity at an earlier age compared to their peers, which indicates the relation between maturity timing and selection procedures. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that guards experienced their peak height velocity at a later age compared to forwards and centres (P < .01). In addition, positional differences were found for height, sitting height, leg length, body mass, lean body mass, sprint, lower body explosive strength, and dribble (P < .05). Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) (age and age at peak height velocity as covariate) showed only a significant difference regarding the technical characteristic dribbling (P < .05). Coaches and trainers should be aware of the inter-individual differences between boys related to their maturity timing. Since technical characteristics appeared to be least influenced by maturity timing, it is recommended to focus more on technical characteristics rather than anthropometric and physiological characteristics.

  1. Natural resistance to experimental feline infectious peritonitis virus infection is decreased rather than increased by positive genetic selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Niels C; Liu, Hongwei; Durden, Monica; Lyons, Leslie A

    2016-03-01

    A previous study demonstrated the existence of a natural resistance to feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) among 36% of randomly bred laboratory cats. A genome wide association study (GWAS) on this population suggested that resistance was polygenic but failed to identify any strong specific associations. In order to enhance the power of GWAS or whole genome sequencing to identify strong genetic associations, a decision was made to positively select for resistance over three generations. The inbreeding experiment began with a genetically related parental (P) population consisting of three toms and four queens identified from among the survivors of the earlier study and belonging to a closely related subgroup (B). The subsequent effects of inbreeding were measured using 42 genome-wide STR markers. P generation cats produced 57 first filial (F1) kittens, only five of which (9.0%) demonstrated a natural resistance to FIPV infection. One of these five F1 survivors was then used to produce six F1/P-backcrosses kittens, only one of which proved resistant to FIP. Six of eight of the F1 and F1/P survivors succumbed to a secondary exposure 4-12 months later. Therefore, survival after both primary and secondary infection was decreased rather than increased by positive selection for resistance. The common genetic factor associated with this diminished resistance was a loss of heterozygosity.

  2. Positive Darwinian selection in Vipera palaestinae phospholipase A2 genes is unexpectedly limited to the third exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordis, D; Bdolah, A; Gubensek, F

    1998-10-20

    The venom of Vipera palaestinae contains a two-component toxin, consisting of an acidic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a basic protein. Here we report the cloning and sequence analysis of the complete V. palaestinae PLA2 genes. Since in all Viperidae PLA2 multigene families the 5' and 3' flanking regions are highly conserved, we designed oligonucleotide primers that allow amplification of the whole PLA2 multigene family in a single step. The structural organization of both genes is the same as in the Vipera ammodytes PLA2 multigene family, there being five exons separated by four introns. Comparison of V. palaestinae PLA2 genes with other Viperidae PLA2 genes has shown that the structural organization of the genes and the nucleotide sequence of all introns and flanking regions are highly conserved, whereas the third exon clearly shows a higher number of amino acid replacements, an indication of positive Darwinian selection. The positive Darwinian selection is surprisingly limited to the third exon, in contrast to other Viperidae PLA2 genes, where it is present in all mature protein coding exons. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  3. Effective gene-viral therapy for telomerase-positive cancers by selective replicative-competent adenovirus combining with endostatin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Q; Liu C; Jiang M; Fang G; Liu X; Wu M; Qian Q; Nie M; Sham J; Su C; Xue H; Chua D; Wang W; Cui Z; Liu Y

    2005-01-01

    Gene-viral therapy, which uses replication-selective transgene-expressing viruses to manage tumors, can exploit the virtues of gene therapy and virotherapy and overcome the limitations of conventional gene therapy. Using a human telomerase reverse transcriptase-targeted replicative adenovirus as an antiangiogenic gene transfer vector to target new angiogenesis and making use of its unrestrained proliferation are completely new concepts in tumor management. CNHK300-mE is a selective replication transgene-expressing adenovirus constructed to carry mouse endostatin gene therapeutically. Infection with CNHK300-mE was associated with selective replication of the adenovirus and production of mouse endostatin in telomerase-positive cancer cells. Endostatin secreted from a human gastric cell line, SGC-7901, infected with CNHK300-mE was significantly higher than that infected with nonreplicative adenovirus Ad-mE in vitro (800±94.7 ng/ml versus 132.9±9.9 ng/ml) and in vivo (610±42 ng/ml versus 126 +/- 13 ng/ml). Embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay showed that the mouse endostatin secreted by CNHK300-mE inhibited angiogenesis efficiently and also induced distortion of pre-existing vasculature. CNHK300-mE exhibited a superior suppression of xenografts in nude mice compared with CNHK300 and Ad-mE. In summary, we provided a more efficient gene-viral therapy strategy by combining oncolysis with antiangiogenesis.

  4. Phylodynamic Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Vibrio cholerae Isolates from Haiti Reveals Diversification Driven by Positive Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A.; Mohr, David; Prosperi, Mattia; Veras, Nazle M.; Jubair, Mohammed; Strickland, Samantha L.; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Alam, Meer T.; Weppelmann, Thomas A.; Katz, Lee S.; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Colwell, Rita R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phylodynamic analysis of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is a powerful tool to investigate underlying evolutionary processes of bacterial epidemics. The method was applied to investigate a collection of 65 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti collected between 2010 and 2012. Characterization of isolates recovered from environmental samples identified a total of four toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates, four non-O1/O139 isolates, and a novel nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate with the classical tcpA gene. Phylogenies of strains were inferred from genome-wide SNPs using coalescent-based demographic models within a Bayesian framework. A close phylogenetic relationship between clinical and environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains was observed. As cholera spread throughout Haiti between October 2010 and August 2012, the population size initially increased and then fluctuated over time. Selection analysis along internal branches of the phylogeny showed a steady accumulation of synonymous substitutions and a progressive increase of nonsynonymous substitutions over time, suggesting diversification likely was driven by positive selection. Short-term accumulation of nonsynonymous substitutions driven by selection may have significant implications for virulence, transmission dynamics, and even vaccine efficacy. PMID:25538191

  5. Footprint of positive selection in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum genome sequences suggests adaptive microevolution of the syphilis pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Jeffrey, Brendan M; Le, Hoavan T; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Rockey, Daniel D

    2012-01-01

    In the rabbit model of syphilis, infection phenotypes associated with the Nichols and Chicago strains of Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), though similar, are not identical. Between these strains, significant differences are found in expression of, and antibody responses to some candidate virulence factors, suggesting the existence of functional genetic differences between isolates. The Chicago strain genome was therefore sequenced and compared to the Nichols genome, available since 1998. Initial comparative analysis suggested the presence of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 103 small (≤3 nucleotides) indels, and 1 large (1204 bp) insertion in the Chicago genome with respect to the Nichols genome. To confirm the above findings, Sanger sequencing was performed on most loci carrying differences using DNA from Chicago and the Nichols strain used in the original T. pallidum genome project. A majority of the previously identified differences were found to be due to errors in the published Nichols genome, while the accuracy of the Chicago genome was confirmed. However, 20 SNPs were confirmed between the two genomes, and 16 (80.0%) were found in coding regions, with all being of non-synonymous nature, strongly indicating action of positive selection. Sequencing of 16 genomic loci harboring SNPs in 12 additional T. pallidum strains, (SS14, Bal 3, Bal 7, Bal 9, Sea 81-3, Sea 81-8, Sea 86-1, Sea 87-1, Mexico A, UW231B, UW236B, and UW249C), was used to identify "Chicago-" or "Nichols -specific" differences. All but one of the 16 SNPs were "Nichols-specific", with Chicago having identical sequences at these positions to almost all of the additional strains examined. These mutations could reflect differential adaptation of the Nichols strain to the rabbit host or pathoadaptive mutations acquired during human infection. Our findings indicate that SNPs among T. pallidum strains emerge under positive selection and, therefore, are likely to be functional in nature.

  6. A qualitative analysis of partner selection, HIV serostatus disclosure, and sexual behaviors among HIV-positive urban men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relf, Michael V; Bishop, Tammi L; Lachat, Maryanne F; Schiavone, Deborah B; Pawlowski, Lora; Bialko, Matthew F; Boozer, Diedre L; Dekker, Debra

    2009-06-01

    Using grounded theory, 18 interviews with HIV-positive urban men were conducted to understand their sexual relationships. Analysis of the verbatim transcripts revealed that regardless of age, sexual orientation or race/ethnicity, the participants were "making choices" related to their sexual relationships. Some men were "avoiding sex" whereas others were engaging in "just sex" or having sex in a relationship that was "going somewhere." However, dependent upon the type of sexual relationship, these HIV-positive urban men struggled with issues associated with "disclosure" of serostatus, the sexual "behaviors" in which they engaged, and selecting sexual "partners." Health care providers can facilitate sexual health and well-being among HIV-positive urban men by recognizing that men may be seeking sexual intimacy for different purposes, in different types of relationships, or avoiding it entirely. By exploring these decision-making processes, it is possible to facilitate sexual relationships that prevent new infections as well as manage the dissonance associated with this decision-making associated with disclosure, behaviors and their sexual partners.

  7. Anencephaly: An Ongoing Investigation in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Sara

    2016-03-01

    : In the spring of 2012, a nurse in Washington State detected a cluster of babies born with anencephaly-a fatal condition in which infants are born without parts of the brain or skull. The resulting investigation initially confirmed a rate of anencephaly between January 2010 and January 2013 of 8.4 per 10,000 live births-more than four times the national average. As of November 2015, cases of anencephaly in Washington State have continued to increase, with the current rate estimated at 9.5 per 10,000 live births. While no distinct cause has yet been determined, neural tube defects-including anencephaly-are known to have multiple causes, including folic acid deficit, genetic variants in the folate pathway, and exposure to a variety of environmental and occupational toxins. This article describes many of these risk factors and explores the findings of Washington's ongoing investigation.

  8. The Fukushima nuclear disaster is ongoing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Andrew R

    2016-07-01

    The 5th anniversary of the Fukushima disaster and the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, the two most catastrophic nuclear accidents in history, both occurred recently. Images of Chernobyl are replete with the international sign of radioactive contamination (a circle with three broad spokes radiating outward in a yellow sign). In contrast, ongoing decontamination efforts at Fukushima lack international warnings about radioactivity. Decontamination workers at Fukushima appear to be poorly protected against radiation. It is almost as if the effort is to make the Fukushima problem disappear. A more useful response would be to openly acknowledge the monumental problems inherent in managing a nuclear plant disaster. Lessons from Chernobyl are the best predictors of what the Fukushima region of Japan is coping with in terms of health and environmental problems following a nuclear catastrophe.

  9. Ongoing challenges in the management of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2009-10-12

    This article gives an overview of some of the ongoing challenges that are faced in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Malaria causes approximately 881,000 deaths every year, with nine out of ten deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to the human burden of malaria, the economic burden is vast. It is thought to cost African countries more than US$12 billion every year in direct losses. However, great progress in malaria control has been made in some highly endemic countries. Vector control is assuming a new importance with the significant reductions in malaria burden achieved using combined malaria control interventions in countries such as Zanzibar, Zambia and Rwanda. The proportion of patients treated for malaria who have a confirmed diagnosis is low in Africa compared with other regions of the world, with the result that anti-malarials could be used to treat patients without malaria, especially in areas where progress has been made in reducing the malaria burden and malaria epidemiology is changing. Inappropriate administration of anti-malarials could contribute to the spread of resistance and incurs unnecessary costs. Parasite resistance to almost all commonly used anti-malarials has been observed in the most lethal parasite species, Plasmodium falciparum. This has presented a major barrier to successful disease management in malaria-endemic areas. ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) has made a significant contribution to malaria control and to reducing disease transmission through reducing gametocyte carriage. Administering ACT to infants and small children can be difficult and time consuming. Specially formulating anti-malarials for this vulnerable population is vital to ease administration and help ensure that an accurate dose is received. Education of healthworkers and communities about malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment is a vital component of effective case management, especially as diagnostic policies change

  10. Positive Darwinian selection in the singularly large taste receptor gene family of an 'ancient' fish, Latimeria chalumnae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Adnan S; Korsching, Sigrun I

    2014-08-05

    Chemical senses are one of the foremost means by which organisms make sense of their environment, among them the olfactory and gustatory sense of vertebrates and arthropods. Both senses use large repertoires of receptors to achieve perception of complex chemosensory stimuli. High evolutionary dynamics of some olfactory and gustatory receptor gene families result in considerable variance of chemosensory perception between species. Interestingly, both ora/v1r genes and the closely related t2r genes constitute small and rather conserved families in teleost fish, but show rapid evolution and large species differences in tetrapods. To understand this transition, chemosensory gene repertoires of earlier diverging members of the tetrapod lineage, i.e. lobe-finned fish such as Latimeria would be of high interest. We report here the complete T2R repertoire of Latimeria chalumnae, using thorough data mining and extensive phylogenetic analysis. Eighty t2r genes were identified, by far the largest family reported for any species so far. The genomic neighborhood of t2r genes is enriched in repeat elements, which may have facilitated the extensive gene duplication events resulting in such a large family. Examination of non-synonymous vs. synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) suggests pronounced positive Darwinian selection in Latimeria T2Rs, conceivably ensuring efficient neo-functionalization of newly born t2r genes. Notably, both traits, positive selection and enrichment of repeat elements in the genomic neighborhood, are absent in the twenty v1r genes of Latimeria. Sequence divergence in Latimeria T2Rs and V1Rs is high, reminescent of the corresponding teleost families. Some conserved sequence motifs of Latimeria T2Rs and V1Rs are shared with the respective teleost but not tetrapod genes, consistent with a potential role of such motifs in detection of aquatic chemosensory stimuli. The singularly large T2R repertoire of Latimeria may have been generated by facilitating local

  11. Phylodynamic analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio cholerae isolates from Haiti reveals diversification driven by positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A; Mohr, David; Prosperi, Mattia; Veras, Nazle M; Jubair, Mohammed; Strickland, Samantha L; Rashid, Mohammad H; Alam, Meer T; Weppelmann, Thomas A; Katz, Lee S; Tarr, Cheryl L; Colwell, Rita R; Morris, J Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2014-12-23

    Phylodynamic analysis of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is a powerful tool to investigate underlying evolutionary processes of bacterial epidemics. The method was applied to investigate a collection of 65 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti collected between 2010 and 2012. Characterization of isolates recovered from environmental samples identified a total of four toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates, four non-O1/O139 isolates, and a novel nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate with the classical tcpA gene. Phylogenies of strains were inferred from genome-wide SNPs using coalescent-based demographic models within a Bayesian framework. A close phylogenetic relationship between clinical and environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains was observed. As cholera spread throughout Haiti between October 2010 and August 2012, the population size initially increased and then fluctuated over time. Selection analysis along internal branches of the phylogeny showed a steady accumulation of synonymous substitutions and a progressive increase of nonsynonymous substitutions over time, suggesting diversification likely was driven by positive selection. Short-term accumulation of nonsynonymous substitutions driven by selection may have significant implications for virulence, transmission dynamics, and even vaccine efficacy. Cholera, a dehydrating diarrheal disease caused by toxigenic strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, emerged in 2010 in Haiti, a country where there were no available records on cholera over the past 100 years. While devastating in terms of morbidity and mortality, the outbreak provided a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary dynamics of V. cholerae and its environmental presence. The present study expands on previous work and provides an in-depth phylodynamic analysis inferred from genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms of clinical and environmental strains from dispersed geographic settings in

  12. Review of EGFR TKIs in metastatic NSCLC, including ongoing trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eMelosky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI in the treatment of patients with advanced metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Most of these recent trials were conducted in patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumours. As our knowledge of the EGFR mutation and its resistant pathways develops, the complexity of the situation expands. This article briefly reviews the pivotal trials leading to approval of EGFR TKIs in the first-line setting for patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung carcinomas. It discusses the historical use of EGFR TKIs after the first line setting in unselected patients and briefly describes ongoing trials.

  13. A Positive Buck Boost Converter with Mode Select Circuit and Feed Forward Techniques Using Fuzzy Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha. S. C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The portable devices development of semiconductor manufacturing technology, conversion efficiency, power consumption, and the size of devices have become the most important design criteria of switching power converters. For portable applications better conveniences extension of battery life and improves the conversion efficiency of power converters .It is essential to develop accurate switching power converters, which can reduce more wasted power energy. The proposed topology can achieve faster transient responses when the supply voltages are changed for the converter by making use of the feed forward network .With mode select circuit the conduction & switching losses are reduced the positive buck–boost converter operate in buck, buck–boost, or boost converter. By adding feed-forward techniques, the proposed converter can improve transient response when the supply voltages are changed. The designing, modeling & experimental results were verified in MATLAB/ Simulink. The fuzzy logic controller is used as controller.

  14. THE IMPACT OF CONCENTRATION OF PRODUCTION ON MARKET POSITION OF SELECTED BRANCHES OF FOOD INDUSTRY IN POLAND

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    Joanna Szwacka-Mokrzycka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present differences in concentration of production and their impact on the market position of the companies active in the fat and dairy sectors. The analysis covered the period from 2008 to 2012, including the global crisis and post-crisis situation in Poland, which accompanied it. The conducted research shows that the processes of adjustment of supply to market demand include: changes in the profi le of manufacturing enterprises, rationalisation of behaviour in the sphere of production and resource management. For the research two branches: fat and dairy products, which are diverse in terms of supply and demand and concentration of production. This paper focuses on the production and revenue concentration in the branches of the food industry selected for the study. The study used a rich empirical material based on both the author’s own research and secondary sources.

  15. A high efficiency gene disruption strategy using a positive-negative split selection marker and electroporation for Fusarium oxysporum.

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    Liang, Liqin; Li, Jianqiang; Cheng, Lin; Ling, Jian; Luo, Zhongqin; Bai, Miao; Xie, Bingyan

    2014-11-01

    The Fusarium oxysporum species complex consists of fungal pathogens that cause serial vascular wilt disease on more than 100 cultivated species throughout the world. Gene function analysis is rapidly becoming more and more important as the whole-genome sequences of various F. oxysporum strains are being completed. Gene-disruption techniques are a common molecular tool for studying gene function, yet are often a limiting step in gene function identification. In this study we have developed a F. oxysporum high-efficiency gene-disruption strategy based on split-marker homologous recombination cassettes with dual selection and electroporation transformation. The method was efficiently used to delete three RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) genes. The gene-disruption cassettes of three genes can be constructed simultaneously within a short time using this technique. The optimal condition for electroporation is 10μF capacitance, 300Ω resistance, 4kV/cm field strength, with 1μg of DNA (gene-disruption cassettes). Under these optimal conditions, we were able to obtain 95 transformants per μg DNA. And after positive-negative selection, the transformants were efficiently screened by PCR, screening efficiency averaged 85%: 90% (RdRP1), 85% (RdRP2) and 77% (RdRP3). This gene-disruption strategy should pave the way for high throughout genetic analysis in F. oxysporum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Positively Selected Sites at HCMV gB Furin Processing Region and Their Effects in Cleavage Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangherlin, Lucas M; de Paula, Felipe N; Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Ruiz, Leonardo G P; Nogueira, Maurício L; Braz, Antônio S K; Juliano, Luiz; da Silva, Maria C C

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous infectious agent that affects mainly immunosuppressed, fetuses, and newborns. The virus has several polymorphic regions, in particular in the envelope glycoproteins. The UL55 gene encodes the glycoprotein B that has a variable region, containing a furin cleavage site and according to the variability different genotypes are characterized. Here we investigated variability and existence of selective pressure on the UL55 variable region containing the furin cleavage site in 213 clinical sequences from patients worldwide. We showed the occurrence of positive selective pressure on gB codons 461 and 462, near the furin cleavage site. Cleavage analysis of synthesized peptides demonstrated that most mutations confer better cleavage by furin, suggesting that evolution is acting in order to increase the efficiency cleavage and supporting the hypothesis that gB processing is important in the host. We also demonstrated that peptides containing sequences, that characterize genotypes gB2 and 3, are differentially cleaved by furin. Our data demonstrate for the first time that variability in the cleavage site is related to degree of gB processing by furin.

  17. Positive genetic correlation between brain size and sexual traits in male guppies artificially selected for brain size.

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    Kotrschal, A; Corral-Lopez, A; Zajitschek, S; Immler, S; Maklakov, A A; Kolm, N

    2015-04-01

    Brain size is an energetically costly trait to develop and maintain. Investments into other costly aspects of an organism's biology may therefore place important constraints on brain size evolution. Sexual traits are often costly and could therefore be traded off against neural investment. However, brain size may itself be under sexual selection through mate choice on cognitive ability. Here, we use guppy (Poecilia reticulata) lines selected for large and small brain size relative to body size to investigate the relationship between brain size, a large suite of male primary and secondary sexual traits, and body condition index. We found no evidence for trade-offs between brain size and sexual traits. Instead, larger-brained males had higher expression of several primary and precopulatory sexual traits--they had longer genitalia, were more colourful and developed longer tails than smaller-brained males. Larger-brained males were also in better body condition when housed in single-sex groups. There was no difference in post-copulatory sexual traits between males from the large- and small-brained lines. Our data do not support the hypothesis that investment into sexual traits is an important limiting factor to brain size evolution, but instead suggest that brain size and several sexual traits are positively genetically correlated.

  18. Positively Selected Sites at HCMV gB Furin Processing Region and Their Effects in Cleavage Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas M. Stangherlin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous infectious agent that affects mainly immunosuppressed, fetuses, and newborns. The virus has several polymorphic regions, in particular in the envelope glycoproteins. The UL55 gene encodes the glycoprotein B that has a variable region, containing a furin cleavage site and according to the variability different genotypes are characterized. Here we investigated variability and existence of selective pressure on the UL55 variable region containing the furin cleavage site in 213 clinical sequences from patients worldwide. We showed the occurrence of positive selective pressure on gB codons 461 and 462, near the furin cleavage site. Cleavage analysis of synthesized peptides demonstrated that most mutations confer better cleavage by furin, suggesting that evolution is acting in order to increase the efficiency cleavage and supporting the hypothesis that gB processing is important in the host. We also demonstrated that peptides containing sequences, that characterize genotypes gB2 and 3, are differentially cleaved by furin. Our data demonstrate for the first time that variability in the cleavage site is related to degree of gB processing by furin.

  19. Selective agonists and antagonists of formylpeptide receptors: duplex flow cytometry and mixture-based positional scanning libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Clemencia; Edwards, Bruce S; Appel, Jon R; Yates-Gibbins, Tina; Giulianotti, Marc A; Medina-Franco, Jose L; Young, Susan M; Santos, Radleigh G; Sklar, Larry A; Houghten, Richard A

    2013-09-01

    The formylpeptide receptor (FPR1) and formylpeptide-like 1 receptor (FPR2) are G protein-coupled receptors that are linked to acute inflammatory responses, malignant glioma stem cell metastasis, and chronic inflammation. Although several N-formyl peptides are known to bind to these receptors, more selective small-molecule, high-affinity ligands are needed for a better understanding of the physiologic roles played by these receptors. High-throughput assays using mixture-based combinatorial libraries represent a unique, highly efficient approach for rapid data acquisition and ligand identification. We report the superiority of this approach in the context of the simultaneous screening of a diverse set of mixture-based small-molecule libraries. We used a single cross-reactive peptide ligand for a duplex flow cytometric screen of FPR1 and FPR2 in color-coded cell lines. Screening 37 different mixture-based combinatorial libraries totaling more than five million small molecules (contained in 5,261 mixture samples) resulted in seven libraries that significantly inhibited activity at the receptors. Using positional scanning deconvolution, selective high-affinity (low nM K(i)) individual compounds were identified from two separate libraries, namely, pyrrolidine bis-diketopiperazine and polyphenyl urea. The most active individual compounds were characterized for their functional activities as agonists or antagonists with the most potent FPR1 agonist and FPR2 antagonist identified to date with an EC₅₀ of 131 nM (4 nM K(i)) and an IC₅₀ of 81 nM (1 nM K(i)), respectively, in intracellular Ca²⁺ response determinations. Comparative analyses of other previous screening approaches clearly illustrate the efficiency of identifying receptor selective, individual compounds from mixture-based combinatorial libraries.

  20. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution.

  1. Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection.

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    Yoichiro Shibata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis for phenotypic differences between humans and other primates remains an outstanding challenge. Mutations in non-coding regulatory DNA that alter gene expression have been hypothesized as a key driver of these phenotypic differences. This has been supported by differential gene expression analyses in general, but not by the identification of specific regulatory elements responsible for changes in transcription and phenotype. To identify the genetic source of regulatory differences, we mapped DNaseI hypersensitive (DHS sites, which mark all types of active gene regulatory elements, genome-wide in the same cell type isolated from human, chimpanzee, and macaque. Most DHS sites were conserved among all three species, as expected based on their central role in regulating transcription. However, we found evidence that several hundred DHS sites were gained or lost on the lineages leading to modern human and chimpanzee. Species-specific DHS site gains are enriched near differentially expressed genes, are positively correlated with increased transcription, show evidence of branch-specific positive selection, and overlap with active chromatin marks. Species-specific sequence differences in transcription factor motifs found within these DHS sites are linked with species-specific changes in chromatin accessibility. Together, these indicate that the regulatory elements identified here are genetic contributors to transcriptional and phenotypic differences among primate species.

  2. Ongoing Mars Missions: Extended Mission Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Richard; Diniega, Serina; Crisp, Joy; Fraeman, Abigail; Golombek, Matt; Jakosky, Bruce; Plaut, Jeff; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie; Thompson, Thomas W.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    Many key scientific discoveries in planetary science have been made during extended missions. This is certainly true for the Mars missions both in orbit and on the planet's surface. Every two years, ongoing NASA planetary missions propose investigations for the next two years. This year, as part of the 2016 Planetary Sciences Division (PSD) Mission Senior Review, the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter project submitted a proposal for its 7th extended mission, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B) Opportunity submitted for its 10th, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for its 4th, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MVN) orbiter for their 2nd extended missions, respectively. Continued US participation in the ongoing Mars Express Mission (MEX) was also proposed. These missions arrived at Mars in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2003, respectively. Highlights of proposed activities include systematic observations of the surface and atmosphere in twilight (early morning and late evening), building on a 13-year record of global mapping (ODY); exploration of a crater rim gully and interior of Endeavour Crater, while continuing to test what can and cannot be seen from orbit (MER-B); refocused observations of ancient aqueous deposits and polar cap interiors, while adding a 6th Mars year of change detection in the atmosphere and the surface (MRO); exploration and sampling by a rover of mineralogically diverse strata of Mt. Sharp and of atmospheric methane in Gale Crater (MSL); and further characterization of atmospheric escape under different solar conditions (MVN). As proposed, these activities follow up on previous discoveries (e.g., recurring slope lineae, habitable environments), while expanding spatial and temporal coverage to guide new detailed observations. An independent review panel evaluated these proposals, met with project representatives in May, and made recommendations to NASA in June 2016. In this

  3. Improved methods in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of almond using positive (mannose/pmi) or negative (kanamycin resistance) selection-based protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Kaiser, Brent N; Franks, Tricia; Collins, Graham; Sedgley, Margaret

    2006-08-01

    A protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with either kanamycin or mannose selection was developed for leaf explants of the cultivar Prunus dulcis cv. Ne Plus Ultra. Regenerating shoots were selected on medium containing 15 muM kanamycin (negative selection), while in the positive selection strategy, shoots were selected on 2.5 g/l mannose supplemented with 15 g/l sucrose. Transformation efficiencies based on PCR analysis of individual putative transformed shoots from independent lines relative to the initial numbers of leaf explants tested were 5.6% for kanamycin/nptII and 6.8% for mannose/pmi selection, respectively. Southern blot analysis on six randomly chosen PCR-positive shoots confirmed the presence of the nptII transgene in each, and five randomly chosen lines identified to contain the pmi transgene by PCR showed positive hybridisation to a pmi DNA probe. The positive (mannose/pmi) and the negative (kanamycin) selection protocols used in this study have greatly improved transformation efficiency in almond, which were confirmed with PCR and Southern blot. This study also demonstrates that in almond the mannose/pmi selection protocol is appropriate and can result in higher transformation efficiencies over that of kanamycin/nptII selection protocols.

  4. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy.

  5. Methylated spirit burns: an ongoing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansbeken, J R H; Vloemans, A F P M; Tempelman, F R H; Breederveld, R S

    2012-09-01

    Despite many educational campaigns we still see burns caused by methylated spirit every year. We undertook a retrospective study to analyse the impact of this problem. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with burns caused by methylated spirit over twelve years from 1996 to 2008. Our main endpoints were: incidence, age, mechanism of injury, total body surface area (TBSA) burned, burn depth, need for surgery and length of hospital stay. Ninety-seven patients with methylated spirit burns were included. During the study period there was no decrease in the number of patients annually admitted to the burn unit with methylated spirit burns. 28% of the patients (n=27) were younger than eighteen years old, 15% (n=15) were ten years old or younger. The most common cause of burns was carelessness in activities involving barbecues, campfires and fondues. Mean TBSA burned was 16% (SD 12.4). 70% (n=68) had full thickness burns. 66% (n=64) needed grafting. Mean length of hospital stay was 23 days (SD 24.7). The use of methylated spirit is an ongoing problem, which continues to cause severe burns in adults and children. Therefore methylated spirit should be banned in households. We suggest sale only in specialised shops, clear labelling and mandatory warnings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioequivalence accomplishments, ongoing initiatives, and remaining challenges.

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    Martinez, M N

    2014-02-01

    Although bioequivalence (BE) concepts date back to the late 1960s, there has been a steady evolution in the tools applied to the assessment of product comparability. Despite these advancements, we continue to face a multitude of unresolved challenges. Several of these challenges are unique to veterinary medicine due to issues such as multiple species approvals, unique dosage forms (e.g., intramammary infusion and medicated premixes), physiological challenges (e.g., limitations in blood volume and stress reactions), and the need to evaluate product equivalence for products intended to release drug over a duration of months. Thus, while in some instances, we can adopt advancements implemented by our human health counterparts but in other situations, we need to pioneer our own method for resolving these challenges. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an update on recent advances, achievements, and ongoing initiatives associated with the assessment of product BE in veterinary medicine. This review reflects the highlights of a presentation given at the 2012 meeting of the European Association for Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology. Published (2013). This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Thymic commitment of regulatory T cells is a pathway of TCR-dependent selection that isolates repertoires undergoing positive or negative selection.

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    Coutinho, A; Caramalho, I; Seixas, E; Demengeot, J

    2005-01-01

    The seminal work of Le Douarin and colleagues (Ohki et al. 1987; Ohki et al. 1988; Salaun et al. 1990; Coutinho et al. 1993) first demonstrated that peripheral tissue-specific tolerance is centrally established in the thymus, by epithelial stromal cells (TEC). Subsequent experiments have shown that TEC-tolerance is dominant and mediated by CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg) that are generated intrathymically by recognition of antigens expressed on TECs (Modigliani et al. 1995; Modigliani et al. 1996a). From these and other observations, in 1996 Modigliani and colleagues derived a general model for the establishment and maintenance of natural tolerance (MM96) (Modigliani et al. 1996b), with two central propositions: (1) T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent sorting of emergent repertoires generates TEC-specific Treg displaying the highest TCR self-affinities below deletion thresholds, thus isolating repertoires undergoing positive and negative selection; (2) Treg are intrathymically committed (and activated) for a unique differentiative pathway with regulatory effector functions. The model explained the embryonic/perinatal time window of natural tolerance acquisition, by developmental programs determining (1) TCR multireactivity, (2) the cellular composition in the thymic stroma (relative abundance of epithelial vs hemopoietic cells), and (3) the dynamics of peripheral lymphocyte pools, built by accumulation of recent thymic emigrants (RTE) that remain recruitable to regulatory functions. We discuss here the MM96 in the light of recent results demonstrating the promiscuous expression of tissue-specific antigens by medullary TECs (Derbinski et al. 2001; Anderson et al. 2002; Gotter et al. 2004) and indicating that Treg represent a unique differentiative pathway (Fontenot et al. 2003; Hori et al. 2003; Khattri et al. 2003), which is adopted by CD4 T cells with high avidity for TEC-antigens (Bensinger et al. 2001; Jordan et al. 2001; Apostolou et al. 2002). In the likelihood that

  8. Positive selection in the adhesion domain of Mus sperm Adam genes through gene duplications and function-driven gene complex formations.

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    Grayson, Phil; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-09-30

    Sperm and testes-expressed Adam genes have been shown to undergo bouts of positive selection in mammals. Despite the pervasiveness of positive selection signals, it is unclear what has driven such selective bouts. The fact that only sperm surface Adam genes show signals of positive selection within their adhesion domain has led to speculation that selection might be driven by species-specific adaptations to fertilization or sperm competition. Alternatively, duplications and neofunctionalization of Adam sperm surface genes, particularly as it is now understood in rodents, might have contributed to an acceleration of evolutionary rates and possibly adaptive diversification. Here we sequenced and conducted tests of selection within the adhesion domain of sixteen known sperm-surface Adam genes among five species of the Mus genus. We find evidence of positive selection associated with all six Adam genes known to interact to form functional complexes on Mus sperm. A subset of these complex-forming sperm genes also displayed accelerated branch evolution with Adam5 evolving under positive selection. In contrast to our previous findings in primates, selective bouts within Mus sperm Adams showed no associations to proxies of sperm competition. Expanded phylogenetic analysis including sequence data from other placental mammals allowed us to uncover ancient and recent episodes of adaptive evolution. The prevailing signals of rapid divergence and positive selection detected within the adhesion domain of interacting sperm Adams is driven by duplications and potential neofunctionalizations that are in some cases ancient (Adams 2, 3 and 5) or more recent (Adams 1b, 4b and 6).

  9. Consequences of ongoing retrotransposition in mammalian genomes

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    Maxwell PH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrick H Maxwell Department of Biological Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Retrotransposons can have significant influences on gene expression and genome stability through their ability to integrate reverse-transcript copies of their sequences at new genomic locations by retrotransposition. These elements have been long known to retrotranspose in mammalian germ cells to give rise to inherited insertion alleles, but more recent work has also shown that retrotransposition can occur in mammalian somatic cells, particularly in brain tissue and tumors. Retrotransposition makes appreciable contributions to spontaneous disease-causing alleles in humans and a more significant contribution to spontaneous mutations in mice. Genome-wide studies have found high levels of polymorphic retrotransposon insertions in human populations that are consistent with ongoing retrotransposition. Many insertions do not disrupt exons, but insertions into introns or flanking genes can alter gene expression patterns, generate truncated or antisense gene transcripts, alter splicing patterns, or result in premature polyadenylation of gene transcripts. Furthermore, the very high genomic copy numbers of these elements can lead to nonallelic homologous recombination events that produce gene deletions/duplications and genome rearrangements, and can also lead to evolution of particular insertions or types of elements to have cellular functions through exaptation. Mobility of these elements occurs despite multiple epigenetic mechanisms to restrict their expression. While the potential for retrotransposons to significantly influence mammalian health and cellular functions is clear, substantial research efforts will be needed to fully elucidate the actual contributions of natural levels of mobility of endogenous elements to the health and development of humans and other mammals. Keywords: retrotransposon, human, mouse, mutations, epigenetics

  10. A counting renaissance: combining stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes to quickly detect amino acid sites under positive selection

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    Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Statistical methods for comparing relative rates of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions maintain a central role in detecting positive selection. To identify selection, researchers often estimate the ratio of these relative rates () at individual alignment sites. Fitting a codon substitution model that captures heterogeneity in across sites provides a reliable way to perform such estimation, but it remains computationally prohibitive for massive datasets. By using crude estimates of the numbers of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions at each site, counting approaches scale well to large datasets, but they fail to account for ancestral state reconstruction uncertainty and to provide site-specific estimates. Results: We propose a hybrid solution that borrows the computational strength of counting methods, but augments these methods with empirical Bayes modeling to produce a relatively fast and reliable method capable of estimating site-specific values in large datasets. Importantly, our hybrid approach, set in a Bayesian framework, integrates over the posterior distribution of phylogenies and ancestral reconstructions to quantify uncertainty about site-specific estimates. Simulations demonstrate that this method competes well with more-principled statistical procedures and, in some cases, even outperforms them. We illustrate the utility of our method using human immunodeficiency virus, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus evolution examples. Availability: Renaissance counting is implemented in the development branch of BEAST, freely available at http://code.google.com/p/beast-mcmc/. The method will be made available in the next public release of the package, including support to set up analyses in BEAUti. Contact: philippe.lemey@rega.kuleuven.be or msuchard@ucla.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23064000

  11. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

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    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  12. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

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    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  13. Whole-gene positive selection, elevated synonymous substitution rates, duplication, and indel evolution of the chloroplast clpP1 gene.

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    Per Erixon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synonymous DNA substitution rates in the plant chloroplast genome are generally relatively slow and lineage dependent. Non-synonymous rates are usually even slower due to purifying selection acting on the genes. Positive selection is expected to speed up non-synonymous substitution rates, whereas synonymous rates are expected to be unaffected. Until recently, positive selection has seldom been observed in chloroplast genes, and large-scale structural rearrangements leading to gene duplications are hitherto supposed to be rare. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We found high substitution rates in the exons of the plastid clpP1 gene in Oenothera (the Evening Primrose family and three separate lineages in the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae, the Carnation family. Introns have been lost in some of the lineages, but where present, the intron sequences have substitution rates similar to those found in other introns of their genomes. The elevated substitution rates of clpP1 are associated with statistically significant whole-gene positive selection in three branches of the phylogeny. In two of the lineages we found multiple copies of the gene. Neighboring genes present in the duplicated fragments do not show signs of elevated substitution rates or positive selection. Although non-synonymous substitutions account for most of the increase in substitution rates, synonymous rates are also markedly elevated in some lineages. Whereas plant clpP1 genes experiencing negative (purifying selection are characterized by having very conserved lengths, genes under positive selection often have large insertions of more or less repetitive amino acid sequence motifs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found positive selection of the clpP1 gene in various plant lineages to correlated with repeated duplication of the clpP1 gene and surrounding regions, repetitive amino acid sequences, and increase in synonymous substitution rates. The present study sheds light on the

  14. "Smartening Up": Ongoing Challenges for Australia's Outback

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    Cradduck, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    As the international community moves inexorably towards a "smart" future, the position of Australia's non-urban areas in that future is less certain. The (re-elected) Australian federal government made a commitment to moving Australian cities forward as part of the international "smart city" movement. However, the effectiveness…

  15. A haplotype at STAT2 Introgressed from neanderthals and serves as a candidate of positive selection in Papua New Guinea.

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    Mendez, Fernando L; Watkins, Joseph C; Hammer, Michael F

    2012-08-10

    Signals of archaic admixture have been identified through comparisons of the draft Neanderthal and Denisova genomes with those of living humans. Studies of individual loci contributing to these genome-wide average signals are required for characterization of the introgression process and investigation of whether archaic variants conferred an adaptive advantage to the ancestors of contemporary human populations. However, no definitive case of adaptive introgression has yet been described. Here we provide a DNA sequence analysis of the innate immune gene STAT2 and show that a haplotype carried by many Eurasians (but not sub-Saharan Africans) has a sequence that closely matches that of the Neanderthal STAT2. This haplotype, referred to as N, was discovered through a resequencing survey of the entire coding region of STAT2 in a global sample of 90 individuals. Analyses of publicly available complete genome sequence data show that haplotype N shares a recent common ancestor with the Neanderthal sequence (~80 thousand years ago) and is found throughout Eurasia at an average frequency of ~5%. Interestingly, N is found in Melanesian populations at ~10-fold higher frequency (~54%) than in Eurasian populations. A neutrality test that controls for demography rejects the hypothesis that a variant of N rose to high frequency in Melanesia by genetic drift alone. Although we are not able to pinpoint the precise target of positive selection, we identify nonsynonymous mutations in ERBB3, ESYT1, and STAT2-all of which are part of the same 250 kb introgressive haplotype-as good candidates.

  16. Duplications and positive selection drive the evolution of parasitism associated gene families in the nematode Strongyloides papillosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Praveen; Jaleta, Tegegn G; Streit, Adrian; Rödelsperger, Christian

    2017-03-02

    Gene duplication is one major mechanism playing a role in the evolution of phenotypic complexity and in the generation of novel traits. By comparing parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes, a recent study found that the evolution of parasitism in Strongyloididae is associated with a large expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families.To gain novel insights into the developmental processes in the sheep parasite Strongyloides papillosus, we sequenced transcriptomes of different developmental stages and sexes. Overall, we found that the majority of genes are developmentally regulated and have one-to-one orthologs in the diverged S. ratti genome. Together with the finding of similar expression profiles between S. papillosus and S. ratti, these results indicate a strong evolutionary constraint acting against change at sequence and expression levels. However, the comparison between parasitic and free-living females demonstrates a quite divergent pattern that is mostly due to the previously mentioned expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families. More detailed phylogenetic analysis of both gene families shows that most members date back to single expansion events early in the Strongyloides lineage and have undergone subfunctionalization resulting in clusters that are highly expressed either in infective larvae or in parasitic females. Finally, we found increased evidence for positive selection in both gene families relative to the genome-wide expectation.In summary, our study reveals first insights into the developmental transcriptomes of S. papillosus and provides a detailed analysis of sequence and expression evolution in parasitism associated gene families.

  17. Hydrothermal conditions of South Eastern Siberia under the ongoing warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voropay, N. N.; Maksyutova, E. V.; Riazanova, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    A great increase in air temperature has been observed since 1976. Siberia is a region with most severe ongoing climate change. To monitor the extreme weather events is important. To evaluate moisture conditions we used the D.A. Ped index (Si). Monthly air temperature and precipitation data from 19 weather stations of South Eastern Siberia (50-60° N 90-120° E) were used for the index calculation during the vegetation period. During 1976-2010 the number of droughts in the study region was more than the number of excessive moisture periods. The maximal statistically significant trend (0.4-0.6 per 10 years) in Eastern Siberia was observed in May. The characteristics of the winter-spring period preceding the vegetation season were analyzed. Significant positive trends exist in the study area for the May temperature (0.5-0.9 °C per 10 years) and the May sum of positive temperatures (14-28 °C per 10 years). There are tendencies to increase the number of days with temperatures above zero in March (1-3 days per 10 years) and the sum of positive temperatures in April (5-16 °C per 10 years). The stable transition of air temperature over 0 °C shifts into early dates by 1-7 days every 10 years.

  18. EIDA Next Generation: ongoing and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strollo, Angelo; Quinteros, Javier; Sleeman, Reinoud; Trani, Luca; Clinton, John; Stammler, Klaus; Danecek, Peter; Pedersen, Helle; Ionescu, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA; http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/eida.html) is the distributed Data Centre system within ORFEUS, providing transparent access and services to high quality, seismic data across (currently) 9 large data archives in Europe. EIDA is growing, in terms of the number of participating data centres, the size of the archives, the variability of the data in the archives, the number of users, and the volume of downloads. The on-going success of EIDA is thus providing challenges that are the driving force behind the design of the next generation (NG) of EIDA, which is expected to be implemented within EPOS IP. EIDA ORFEUS must cope with further expansion of the system and more complex user requirements by developing new techniques and extended services. The EIDA NG is being designed to work on standard FDSN web services and two additional new web services: Routing Service and QC (quality controlled) service. This presentation highlights the challenges EIDA needs to address during the EPOS IP and focuses on these 2 new services. The Routing Service can be considered as the core of EIDA NG. It was designed to assist users and clients to locate data within a federated, decentralized data centre (e.g. EIDA). A detailed, FDSN-compliant specification of the service has been developed. Our implementation of this service will run at every EIDA node, but is also capable of running on a user's computer, allowing anyone to define virtual or integrate existing data centres. This (meta)service needs to be queried in order to locate the data. Some smart clients (in a beta status) have been also provided to offer the user an integrated view of the whole EIDA, hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication. The QC Service is developed to cope with user requirements to query for relevant data only. The web service provides detailed information on the

  19. Positive Changes in Perceptions and Selections of Healthful Foods by College Students after a Short-Term Point-of-Selection Intervention at a Dining Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sharon; Duncan, Diana Poovey; Null, Dawn Bloyd; Roth, Sara Long; Gill, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Determine the effects of a short-term, multi-faceted, point-of-selection intervention on college students' perceptions and selection of 10 targeted healthful foods in a university dining hall and changes in their self-reported overall eating behaviors. Participants: 104 college students, (age 18-23) completed pre-I and post-I surveys.…

  20. Positive Changes in Perceptions and Selections of Healthful Foods by College Students after a Short-Term Point-of-Selection Intervention at a Dining Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sharon; Duncan, Diana Poovey; Null, Dawn Bloyd; Roth, Sara Long; Gill, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Determine the effects of a short-term, multi-faceted, point-of-selection intervention on college students' perceptions and selection of 10 targeted healthful foods in a university dining hall and changes in their self-reported overall eating behaviors. Participants: 104 college students, (age 18-23) completed pre-I and post-I surveys.…

  1. Contrasting signals of positive selection in genes involved in human skin-color variation from tests based on SNP scans and resequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gruijter Johanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous genome-wide scans conducted by genotyping previously ascertained single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have provided candidate signatures for positive selection in various regions of the human genome, including in genes involved in pigmentation traits. However, it is unclear how well the signatures discovered by such haplotype-based test statistics can be reproduced in tests based on full resequencing data. Four genes (oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1, dopachrome tautomerase (DCT, and KIT ligand (KITLG implicated in human skin-color variation, have shown evidence for positive selection in Europeans and East Asians in previous SNP-scan data. In the current study, we resequenced 4.7 to 6.7 kb of DNA from each of these genes in Africans, Europeans, East Asians, and South Asians. Results Applying all commonly used neutrality-test statistics for allele frequency distribution to the newly generated sequence data provided conflicting results regarding evidence for positive selection. Previous haplotype-based findings could not be clearly confirmed. Although some tests were marginally significant for some populations and genes, none of them were significant after multiple-testing correction. Combined P values for each gene-population pair did not improve these results. Application of Approximate Bayesian Computation Markov chain Monte Carlo based to these sequence data using a simple forward simulator revealed broad posterior distributions of the selective parameters for all four genes, providing no support for positive selection. However, when we applied this approach to published sequence data on SLC45A2, another human pigmentation candidate gene, we could readily confirm evidence for positive selection, as previously detected with sequence-based and some haplotype-based tests. Conclusions Overall, our data indicate that even genes that are strong biological candidates for positive

  2. A genome-wide metabolic QTL analysis in Europeans implicates two loci shaped by recent positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nicholson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a metabolite quantitative trait locus (mQTL study of the (1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H NMR metabolome in humans, building on recent targeted knowledge of genetic drivers of metabolic regulation. Urine and plasma samples were collected from two cohorts of individuals of European descent, with one cohort comprised of female twins donating samples longitudinally. Sample metabolite concentrations were quantified by (1H NMR and tested for association with genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Four metabolites' concentrations exhibited significant, replicable association with SNP variation (8.6×10(-11positive selection in European populations. Genes NAT8 and PYROXD2, both with relatively uncharacterized functional roles, are good candidates for mediating the corresponding mQTL associations. The study's longitudinal twin design allowed detailed variance-components analysis of the sources of population variation in metabolite levels. The mQTLs explained 40%-64% of biological population variation in the corresponding metabolites' concentrations. These effect sizes are stronger than those reported in a recent, targeted mQTL study of metabolites in serum using the targeted-metabolomics Biocrates platform. By re-analysing our plasma samples using the Biocrates platform, we replicated the mQTL findings of the previous study and discovered a previously uncharacterized yet substantial familial component of variation in metabolite levels in addition to the heritability contribution from

  3. Enzyme-like specificity in zeolites: a unique site position in mordenite for selective carbonylation of methanol and dimethyl ether with CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Mercedes; Martínez-Sánchez, Cristina; Law, David; Corma, Avelino

    2008-12-03

    The mechanism of methanol carbonylation at different positions of zeolite MOR is investigated by quantum-chemical methods in order to discover which are the active sites that can selectively catalyze the desired reaction. It is shown that when methanol carbonylation competes with hydrocarbon formation, the first reaction occurs preferentially within 8MR channels. However, the unique selectivity for the carbonylation of methanol and dimethyl ether in mordenite is not only due to the size of the 8MR channel: neither process occurs equally at the two T3-O31 and T3-O33 positions. We show that only the T3-O33 positions are selective and that this selectivity is due to the unusual orientation of the methoxy group in relation to the 8MR channel (parallel to the cylinder axis). Only in this situation does the transition state for the attack of CO fit perfectly in the 8MR channel, while the reaction with methanol or DME is sterically impeded. This result explains why T3-O31, while also located in the 8MR channel of mordenite, is not as selective as the T3-O33 position and why ferrierite, although it contains 8MR channels, is less selective than mordenite. The competing effect of water is explained at the molecular level, and the molecular microkinetic reaction model has been established.

  4. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  5. Rootstock breeding in Prunus species: Ongoing efforts and new challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Gainza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The current global agricultural challenges imply the need to generate new technologies and farming systems. In this context, rootstocks are an essential component in modern agriculture. Most currently used are those clonally propagated and there are several ongoing efforts to develop this type of plant material. Despite this tendency, lesser number of rootstock breeding programs exists in comparison to the large number of breeding programs for scion cultivars. In the case of rootstocks, traits evaluated in new selection lines are quite different: From the agronomic standpoint vigor is a key issue in order to establish high-density orchards. Other important agronomic traits include compatibility with a wide spectrum of cultivars from different species, good tolerance to root hypoxia, water use efficiency, aptitude to extract or exclude certain soil nutrients, and tolerance to soil or water salinity. Biotic stresses are also important: Resistance/tolerance to pests and diseases, such as nematodes, soil-borne fungi, crown gall, bacterial canker, and several virus, viroids, and phytoplasms. In this sense, the creation of new rootstocks at Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Fruticultura (CEAF offers an alternative to stone fruit crop, particularly in Chile, where just a few alternatives are commercially available, and there are site-specific problems. The implementation of molecular markers in order to give support to the phenotypic evaluation of plant breeding has great potential assisting the selection of new genotypes of rootstocks. Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS can shorten the time required to obtain new cultivars and can make the process more cost-effective than selection based exclusively on phenotype, but more basic research is needed to well understood the molecular and physiological mechanisms behind the studied trait.

  6. Mutation of the phospholipase C-γ1–binding site of LAT affects both positive and negative thymocyte selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Connie L.; Lee, Jan; Steiner, Kevin L.; Gurson, Jordan M.; DePersis, Corinne L.; El-Khoury, Dalal; Fuller, Claudette L.; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2005-01-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a scaffolding adaptor protein that is critical for T cell development and function. A mutation of LAT (Y136F) that disrupts phospholipase C-γ1 activation and subsequent calcium influx causes a partial block in T cell development and leads to a severe lymphoproliferative disease in homozygous knock-in mice. One possible contribution to the fatal disease of LAT Y136F knock-in mice could be from autoreactive T cells generated in these mice because of altered thymocyte selection. To examine the impact of the LAT Y136F mutation on thymocyte positive and negative selection, we bred this mutation onto the HY T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, recombination activating gene-2 knockout background. Female mice with this genotype showed a severe defect in positive selection, whereas male mice exhibited a phenotype resembling positive selection (i.e., development and survival of CD8hi HY TCR-specific T cells) instead of negative selection. These results support the hypothesis that in non-TCR transgenic, LAT Y136F knock-in mice, altered thymocyte selection leads to the survival and proliferation of autoreactive T cells that would otherwise be negatively selected in the thymus. PMID:15795236

  7. Positive selection of protective variants for type 2 diabetes from the Neolithic onward: a case study in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségurel, Laure; Austerlitz, Frederic; Toupance, Bruno; Gautier, Mathieu; Kelley, Joanna L; Pasquet, Patrick; Lonjou, Christine; Georges, Myriam; Voisin, Sarah; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Hegay, Tatyana; Aldashev, Almaz; Vitalis, Renaud; Heyer, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes and its uneven distribution among human populations is both a major public health concern and a puzzle in evolutionary biology. Why is this deleterious disease so common, while the associated genetic variants should be removed by natural selection? The 'thrifty genotype' hypothesis proposed that the causal genetic variants were advantageous and selected for during the majority of human evolution. It remains, however, unclear whether genetic data support this scenario. In this study, we characterized patterns of selection at 10 variants associated with type 2 diabetes, contrasting one herder and one farmer population from Central Asia. We aimed at identifying which alleles (risk or protective) are under selection, dating the timing of selective events, and investigating the effect of lifestyle on selective patterns. We did not find any evidence of selection on risk variants, as predicted by the thrifty genotype hypothesis. Instead, we identified clear signatures of selection on protective variants, in both populations, dating from the beginning of the Neolithic, which suggests that this major transition was accompanied by a selective advantage for non-thrifty variants. Combining our results with worldwide data further suggests that East Asia was particularly prone to such recent selection of protective haplotypes. As much effort has been devoted so far to searching for thrifty variants, we argue that more attention should be paid to the evolution of non-thrifty variants.

  8. Positive Effect of Severe Nakagami-m Fading on the Performance of Multiuser TAS/MRC Systems with High Selection Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chun Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the positive effect of severe Nakagami-m fading on the performance of multiuser transmit antenna selection/maximal-ratio combining (TAS/MRC systems with high selection gain. Both amount of fading (AF and symbol error rate (SER of M-QAM are derived as closed-form expressions for integer m. For arbitrary m, the AF and the SER are expressible as a single infinite series of Gamma function and Gauss hypergeometric function, respectively. The analytical results lead to the following observations. First, the SER performance can demonstrate the positive effect of severe Nakagami-m fading on multiuser TAS/MRC systems with high selection gain. Second, the AF performance only exhibits the negative impact of severe fading regardless of high selection gain. Last, the benefit of severe fading to the system performance diminishes at high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR.

  9. Single substitutions to closely related amino acids contribute to the functional diversification of an insect-inducible, positively selected plant cystatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Cloutier, Conrad; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    A causal link has been reported between positively selected amino acids in plant cystatins and the inhibitory range of these proteins against insect digestive cysteine (Cys) proteases. Here we assessed the impact of single substitutions to closely related amino acids on the contribution of positive selection to cystatin diversification. Cystatin sequence alignments, while confirming hypervariability, indicated a preference for related amino acids at positively selected sites. For example, the non-polar residues leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val) were shown to predominate at positively selected site 2 in the N-terminal region, unlike selected sites 6 and 10, where polar residues are preferred. The model cystatin SlCYS8 and single variants with Leu, Ile or Val at position 2 were compared with regard to their ability to bind digestive proteases of the coleopteran pest Leptinotarsa decemlineata and to induce compensatory responses in this insect. A functional proteomics procedure to capture target Cys proteases in midgut extracts allowed confirmation of distinct binding profiles for the cystatin variants. A shotgun proteomics procedure to monitor whole Cys protease complements revealed protease family specific compensatory responses in the insect, dependent on the variant ingested. Our data confirm the contribution of closely related amino acids to the functional diversity of positively selected plant cystatins in a broader structure/function context imposing physicochemical constraints to primary structure alterations. They also underline the complexity of protease/inhibitor interactions in plant-insect systems, and the challenges still to be met in order to harness the full potential of ectopically expressed protease inhibitors in crop protection.

  10. The promastigote surface antigen gene family of the Leishmania parasite: differential evolution by positive selection and recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bañuls Anne-Laure

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSA (promastigote surface antigen is one of the major classes of membrane proteins present at the surface of the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. While it harbours leucine rich repeats, which are suggestive of its involvement in parasite-to-host physical interactions, its exact role is largely unknown. Furthermore, the extent of diversity of this gene family, both in copy number and sequence has not been established. Results From the newly available complete genome sequences of L. major, L. infantum and L. braziliensis, we have established the complete list of PSA genes, based on the conservation of specific domain architecture. The latter includes an array of leucine rich repeats of unique signature flanked by conserved cysteine-rich domains. All PSA genes code either for secreted or membrane-anchored surface proteins. Besides the few previously identified PSA genes, which are shown here to be part of a relatively large subclass of PSA genes located on chromosome 12, this study identifies seven other PSA subtypes. The latter, whose genes lie on chromosomes 5, 9, 21 and 31 in all three species, form single gene (two genes in one instance subfamilies, which phylogenetically cluster as highly related orthologs. On the other hand, genes found on chromosome 12 generally show high diversification, as reflected in greater sequence divergence between species, and in an extended set of divergent paralogs. Moreover, we show that the latter genes are submitted to strong positive selection. We also provide evidence that evolution of these genes is driven by intra- and intergenic recombination, thereby modulating the number of LRRs in protein and generating chimeric genes. Conclusion PSA is a Leishmania family of membrane-bound or secreted proteins, whose main signature consists in a specific LRR sequence. All PSA genes found in the genomes of three sequenced Leishmania species unambiguously distribute into eight subfamilies of orthologs

  11. A large new subset of TRIM genes highly diversified by duplication and positive selection in teleost fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der L.M.; Levraud, J.P.; Yahmi, M.; Lauret, E.; Briolat, V.; Herbomel, P.; Benmansour, A.; Boudinot, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In mammals, the members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family are involved in various cellular processes including innate immunity against viral infection. Viruses exert strong selective pressures on the defense system. Accordingly, antiviral TRIMs have diversified highly through

  12. A large new subset of TRIM genes highly diversified by duplication and positive selection in teleost fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, van der L.M.; Levraud, J.P.; Yahmi, M.; Lauret, E.; Briolat, V.; Herbomel, P.; Benmansour, A.; Boudinot, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In mammals, the members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family are involved in various cellular processes including innate immunity against viral infection. Viruses exert strong selective pressures on the defense system. Accordingly, antiviral TRIMs have diversified highly through

  13. Positive genetic correlation between brain size and sexual traits in male guppies artificially selected for brain size

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain size is an energetically costly trait to develop and maintain. Investments into other costly aspects of an organism's biology may therefore place important constraints on brain size evolution. Sexual traits are often costly and could therefore be traded off against neural investment. However, brain size may itself be under sexual selection through mate choice on cognitive ability. Here, we use guppy ( Poecilia reticulata) lines selected for large and small brain size relative t...

  14. Buyer-Seller Interaction Patterns During Ongoing Service Exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. van der Valk (Wendy)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation focuses on the ongoing interactions that take place between buyers and sellers of business services after the contract has been signed. This ongoing interaction is important since services are produced and consumed simultaneously; therefore, both buyer and seller have t

  15. The ongoing Digitalization of an Introductory Programming Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about the ongoing digitalization of a C programming course. The paper describes our considerations about the use of video resources, as well as other digital learning resources. In particular, we discuss the ongoing transition from using a number of supplementary videos (in...

  16. dN/dS-based methods detect positive selection linked to trade-offs between different fitness traits in the coat protein of potato virus Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moury, Benoît; Simon, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The dN/dS ratio between nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution rates has been used extensively to identify codon positions involved in adaptive processes. However, the accuracy of this approach has been questioned, and very few studies have attempted to validate experimentally its predictions. Using the coat protein (CP) of Potato virus Y (PVY; genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae) as a case study, we identified several candidate positively selected codon positions that differed between clades. In the CP of the N clade of PVY, positive selection was detected at codon positions 25 and 68 by both the softwares PAML and HyPhy. We introduced nonsynonymous substitutions at these positions in an infectious cDNA clone of PVY and measured the effect of these mutations on virus accumulation in its two major cultivated hosts, tobacco and potato, and on its efficiency of transmission from plant to plant by aphid vectors. The mutation at codon position 25 significantly modified the virus accumulation in the two hosts, whereas the mutation at codon position 68 significantly modified the virus accumulation in one of its hosts and its transmissibility by aphids. Both mutations were involved in adaptive trade-offs. We suggest that our study was particularly favorable to the detection of adaptive mutations using dN/dS estimates because, as obligate parasites, viruses undergo a continuous and dynamic interaction with their hosts that favors the recurrent selection of adaptive mutations and because trade-offs between different fitness traits impede (or at least slow down) the fixation of these mutations and maintain polymorphism within populations.

  17. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  18. Genome wide signatures of positive selection: The comparison of independent samples and the identification of regions associated to traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Merle B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of genome wide analyses of polymorphisms is to achieve a better understanding of the link between genotype and phenotype. Part of that goal is to understand the selective forces that have operated on a population. Results In this study we compared the signals of selection, identified through population divergence in the Bovine HapMap project, to those found in an independent sample of cattle from Australia. Evidence for population differentiation across the genome, as measured by FST, was highly correlated in the two data sets. Nevertheless, 40% of the variance in FST between the two studies was attributed to the differences in breed composition. Seventy six percent of the variance in FST was attributed to differences in SNP composition and density when the same breeds were compared. The difference between FST of adjacent loci increased rapidly with the increase in distance between SNP, reaching an asymptote after 20 kb. Using 129 SNP that have highly divergent FST values in both data sets, we identified 12 regions that had additive effects on the traits residual feed intake, beef yield or intramuscular fatness measured in the Australian sample. Four of these regions had effects on more than one trait. One of these regions includes the R3HDM1 gene, which is under selection in European humans. Conclusion Firstly, many different populations will be necessary for a full description of selective signatures across the genome, not just a small set of highly divergent populations. Secondly, it is necessary to use the same SNP when comparing the signatures of selection from one study to another. Thirdly, useful signatures of selection can be obtained where many of the groups have only minor genetic differences and may not be clearly separated in a principal component analysis. Fourthly, combining analyses of genome wide selection signatures and genome wide associations to traits helps to define the trait under selection or

  19. Relation of Landscape Position and Irrigation to Concentrations of Alachlor, Atrazine, and Selected Degradates in Regolith in Northeastern Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Lewis, D.T.; McCallister, D.L.; Parkhurst, A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of alachlor, its ethanesulfonic acid degradate, atrazine and its degradates, deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, in the upper regolith and associated shallow aquifers were determined in relation to landscape position (floodplains, terraces, and uplands) and irrigation (nonirrigated and irrigated corn cropland) in 1992. Irrigated and nonirrigated sites were located on each landscape position. Samples were collected from three depths. Canonical discriminant and multivariate analyses were used to interpret data. Herbicides and their degradation products tended to be present in soils with high percent organic matter, low pH, and low sand content. Atrazine was present more frequently on the floodplain at all depths than the other compounds. Atrazine (maximum 17.5 ??g/kg) and ethanesulfonic acid (maximum 10 ??g/kg) were associated with landscape position, but not with irrigation. Alachlor (maximum 24 ??g/kg), deethylatrazine (maximum 1.5 ??g/kg), and deisopropylatrazine (maximum 3.5 ??g/kg) were not significantly associated with either landscape position or irrigation. Ground-water analytical results suggested that concentrations of these herbicides and degradates in ground water did not differ among landscape position or between irrigated and nonirrigated corn cropland.

  20. Testing the prediction from sexual selection of a positive genetic correlation between human mate preferences and corresponding traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.; Burri, A.V.; Zietsch, B.P.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection can cause evolution in traits that affect mating success, and it has thus been implicated in the evolution of human physical and behavioural traits that influence attractiveness. We use a large sample of identical and nonidentical female twins to test the prediction from mate choice

  1. Selection on Feed intake or Feed Efficiency: A Position Paper from gDMI Breeding Goal Discussions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerkamp, R.F.; Pryce, J.; Spurlock, D.M.; Berry, D.P.; Coffey, M.; Lovendahl, P.; Linde, van der R.; Bryant, J.M.; Migliore, G.; Wang, Z.; Winters, M.; Krattenmacher, N.; Haas, de Y.

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of genomic information in dairy cattle breeding programs has opened up the possibility to select for novel traits, especially for traits that are traditionally difficult to record in a progeny testing scheme. Feed intake and efficiency is such a difficult to measure trait. In Febr

  2. Production of marker-free disease-resistant potato using isopentenyl transferase gene as a positive selection marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raham Sher; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Chin, Dong Poh; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of antibiotic or herbicide resistant genes as selection markers for production of transgenic plants and their continuous presence in the final transgenics has been a serious problem for their public acceptance and commercialization. MAT (multi-auto-transformation) vector system has been one of the different strategies to excise the selection marker gene and produce marker-free transgenic plants. In the present study, ipt (isopentenyl transferase) gene was used as a selection marker gene. A chitinase gene, ChiC (isolated from Streptomyces griseus strain HUT 6037) was used as a gene of interest. ChiC gene was cloned from the binary vector, pEKH1 to an ipt-type MAT vector, pMAT21 by gateway cloning and transferred to Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105. The infected tuber discs of potato were cultured on hormone- and antibiotic-free MS medium. Seven of the 35 explants infected with the pMAT21/ChiC produced shoots. The same antibiotic- and hormones-free MS medium was used in subcultures of the shoots (ipt like and normal shoots). Molecular analyses of genomic DNA from transgenic plants confirmed the integration of gene of interest and excision of the selection marker in 3 of the 7 clones. Expression of ChiC gene was confirmed by Northern blot and western blot analyses. Disease-resistant assay of the marker-free transgenic, in vitro and greenhouse-grown plants exhibited enhanced resistance against Alternaria solani (early blight), Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) and Fusarium oxysporum (Fusarium wilt). From these results it could be concluded that ipt gene can be used as a selection marker to produce marker-free disease-resistant transgenic potato plants on PGR- and antibiotic-free MS medium.

  3. Competition between "Meta Effect" Photochemical Reactions of Selected Benzophenone Compounds Having Two Different Substituents at Meta Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiani; Li, Huai; Zhang, Xiting; Tang, Wen-Jian; Li, Mingde; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-10-21

    Recent studies conducted on some "meta effect" photochemical reactions focused on aromatic carbonyls having a substitution on one meta position of the benzophenone (BP) and anthraquinone parent compound. In this paper, two different substitutions were introduced with one at each meta position of the BP parent compound to investigate possible competition between different types of meta effect photochemistry observed in acidic solutions containing water. The photochemical pathways of 3-hydroxymethyl-3'-fluorobenzophenone (1) and 3-fluoro-3'-methylbenzophenone (2) were explored in several solvents, including acidic water-containing solutions, using time-resolved spectroscopic experiments and density functional theory computations. It is observed that 1 can undergo a photoredox reaction and 2 can undergo a meta-methyl deprotonation reaction in acidic water-containing solutions. Comparison of these results to those previously reported for the analogous BP derivatives that contain only one substituent at a meta position indicates the introduction of electron-donating (such as hydroxyl) and electron-withdrawing groups (such as F) on the meta positions of BP can influence the meta effect photochemical reactions. It was found that involvement of an electron-donating moiety facilitates the meta effect photochemical reactions by stabilizing the crucial reactive biradical intermediate associated with the meta effect photochemical reactions.

  4. Selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex of maternally stressed Gad1-heterozygous mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T; Furukawa, T; Iwata, S; Yanagawa, Y; Fukuda, A

    2014-03-11

    Exposure to maternal stress (MS) and mutations in GAD1, which encodes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67, are both risk factors for psychiatric disorders. However, the relationship between these risk factors remains unclear. Interestingly, the critical period of MS for psychiatric disorders in offspring corresponds to the period of GABAergic neuron neurogenesis and migration in the fetal brain, that is, in the late stage of gestation. Indeed, decrement of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HIP) has often been observed in schizophrenia patients. In the present study, we used GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice (that is, mice in which the Gad1 gene is heterozygously deleted; GAD67(+/GFP)) that underwent prenatal stress from embryonic day 15.0 to 17.5 and monitored PV-positive GABAergic neurons to address the interaction between Gad1 disruption and stress. Administration of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine revealed that neurogenesis of GFP-positive GABAergic neurons, but not cortical plate cells, was significantly diminished in fetal brains during MS. Differential expression of glucocorticoid receptors by different progenitor cell types may underlie this differential outcome. Postnatally, the density of PV-positive, but not PV-negative, GABAergic neurons was significantly decreased in the mPFC, HIP and somatosensory cortex but not in the motor cortex of GAD67(+/GFP) mice. By contrast, these findings were not observed in wild-type (GAD67(+/+)) offspring. These results suggest that prenatal stress, in addition to heterozygous deletion of Gad1, could specifically disturb the proliferation of neurons destined to be PV-positive GABAergic interneurons.

  5. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machkovech, Heather M; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2015-11-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8(+) T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8(+) T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8(+) T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  6. Verification of selected anatomic landmarks used as reference points for universal goniometer positioning during knee joint mobility range measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, P; Lewandowski, J; Marecki, B

    2001-01-01

    The study was concerned with verification of the selection of reference points used for knee joint mobility range goniometry. The verification was based on photometric and electrogoniometric methods of femorotibial angle measurements. The material for measurements were three knee joint preparations. The obtained data were subjected to descriptive analysis; photographic documentation of geometric relations between the reference points was also prepared. Considerable divergence of measurement results was observed with respect to the actual knee joint flexion angle, amounting even to 16 degrees. The differences are due to the selection of anatomic landmarks, and depend in particular on the distance of the point to which the goniometer axis is applied from the approximate location of the mechanical joint axis. The corrections of knee joint flexion angle measurements were also estimated on the basis of data obtained from the photographs and the derived mathematical formula.

  7. Single domain antibodies with VH hallmarks are positively selected during panning of llama (Lama glama) naïve libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monegal, Ana; Olichon, Aurelien; Bery, Nicolas; Filleron, Thomas; Favre, Gilles; de Marco, Ario

    2012-01-01

    Independent variable domains with VH hallmarks have been repeatedly identified in immune and pre-immune VHH libraries. In some cases, stable independent VH domains have been also isolated in mouse and human recombinant antibody repertoires. However, we have come to realize that VHs were selected with a higher efficiency than VHHs during biopanning of a pre-immune (VHH) library. The biochemical and biophysical comparison did not indicate a presence of any feature that would favor the VH binders during the selection process. In contrast, selected VHHs seemed to be more stable than the VHs, ruling out the existence of a thermodynamically - favored VH sub-class. Therefore, we reasoned that a certain degree of thermodynamic instability may be beneficial for both displaying and expression of VH(H)s when the Sec-pathway is used for their secretion to avoid the cytoplasmic trapping of fast-folding polypeptides. Indeed, VHHs, but not VHs, were accumulated at higher concentrations when expressed fused to the dsbA leader peptide, a sequence that drives the linked polypeptides to the co-translational SRP secretion machinery. These data suggest that the thermodynamically favored VHHs can be lost during biopanning, as previously observed for DARPins and in contrast to the recombinant antibodies in scFv format.

  8. Using ArcMap, Google Earth, and Global Positioning Systems to select and locate random households in rural Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wampler Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A remote sensing technique was developed which combines a Geographic Information System (GIS; Google Earth, and Microsoft Excel to identify home locations for a random sample of households in rural Haiti. The method was used to select homes for ethnographic and water quality research in a region of rural Haiti located within 9 km of a local hospital and source of health education in Deschapelles, Haiti. The technique does not require access to governmental records or ground based surveys to collect household location data and can be performed in a rapid, cost-effective manner. Methods The random selection of households and the location of these households during field surveys were accomplished using GIS, Google Earth, Microsoft Excel, and handheld Garmin GPSmap 76CSx GPS units. Homes were identified and mapped in Google Earth, exported to ArcMap 10.0, and a random list of homes was generated using Microsoft Excel which was then loaded onto handheld GPS units for field location. The development and use of a remote sensing method was essential to the selection and location of random households. Results A total of 537 homes initially were mapped and a randomized subset of 96 was identified as potential survey locations. Over 96% of the homes mapped using Google Earth imagery were correctly identified as occupied dwellings. Only 3.6% of the occupants of mapped homes visited declined to be interviewed. 16.4% of the homes visited were not occupied at the time of the visit due to work away from the home or market days. A total of 55 households were located using this method during the 10 days of fieldwork in May and June of 2012. Conclusions The method used to generate and field locate random homes for surveys and water sampling was an effective means of selecting random households in a rural environment lacking geolocation infrastructure. The success rate for locating households using a handheld GPS was excellent and only

  9. Selection of the new position for the instrumented fuel Flip type; Seleccion de la nueva posicion para el combustible instrumentado tipo Flip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.C

    1991-12-15

    It was selected and proved the new position for the instrumented fuel, in function of the smallest influence on the temperature of the fuel due to movements of the control bars, as well as to its functionality regarding their geometric localization in the core. Therefore, it intends that the instrumented fuel Flip type, pass from the position C-9 to the C-6. It was selected the turn angle of the fuel of 180 C, for to be the one that presents a smaller influence of the control bars and it allows to register the values of temperature but high. It was as the movements of the control bars they produce local interferences of the neutron flow in the fuels and that in the case of the ring C, these interferences became maximum variations of the fuel temperature of 125 C, for operations to 1 MW in the thermal column. (Author)

  10. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J; Getz, Wayne M; van Helden, Paul D; Zwaan, Bas J; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  11. Position-controlled III-V compound semiconductor nanowire solar cells by selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Takashi; Yoshimura, Masatoshi; Nakai, Eiji; Tomioka, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate position-controlled III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) by using selective-area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and their application to solar cells. Efficiency of 4.23% is achieved for InP core-shell NW solar cells. We form a 'flexible NW array' without a substrate, which has the advantage of saving natural resources over conventional thin film photovoltaic devices. Four junction NW solar cells with over 50% efficiency are proposed and discussed.

  12. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J.; Getz, Wayne M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Zwaan, Bas J.; Bastos, Armanda D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  13. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  14. Identification of selective agonists and positive allosteric modulators for µ- and δ-opioid receptors from a single high-throughput screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Neil T; Wehrman, Tom; Bassoni, Daniel; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Zhang, Litao; Alt, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Hetero-oligomeric complexes of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) may represent novel therapeutic targets exhibiting different pharmacology and tissue- or cell-specific site of action compared with receptor monomers or homo-oligomers. An ideal tool for validating this concept pharmacologically would be a hetero-oligomer selective ligand. We set out to develop and execute a 1536-well high-throughput screen of over 1 million compounds to detect potential hetero-oligomer selective ligands using a β-arrestin recruitment assay in U2OS cells coexpressing recombinant µ- and δ-opioid receptors. Hetero-oligomer selective ligands may bind to orthosteric or allosteric sites, and we might anticipate that the formation of hetero-oligomers may provide novel allosteric binding pockets for ligand binding. Therefore, our goal was to execute the screen in such a way as to identify positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) as well as agonists for µ, δ, and hetero-oligomeric receptors. While no hetero-oligomer selective ligands were identified (based on our selection criteria), this single screen did identify numerous µ- and δ-selective agonists and PAMs as well as nonselective agonists and PAMs. To our knowledge, these are the first µ- and δ-opioid receptor PAMs described in the literature.

  15. Effects of Gene Duplication, Positive Selection, and Shifts in Gene Expression on the Evolution of the Venom Gland Transcriptome in Widow Spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Robert A; Clarke, Thomas H; Gadgil, Rujuta; Fitzpatrick, Ryan; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Ayoub, Nadia A; Garb, Jessica E

    2016-01-05

    Gene duplication and positive selection can be important determinants of the evolution of venom, a protein-rich secretion used in prey capture and defense. In a typical model of venom evolution, gene duplicates switch to venom gland expression and change function under the action of positive selection, which together with further duplication produces large gene families encoding diverse toxins. Although these processes have been demonstrated for individual toxin families, high-throughput multitissue sequencing of closely related venomous species can provide insights into evolutionary dynamics at the scale of the entire venom gland transcriptome. By assembling and analyzing multitissue transcriptomes from the Western black widow spider and two closely related species with distinct venom toxicity phenotypes, we do not find that gene duplication and duplicate retention is greater in gene families with venom gland biased expression in comparison with broadly expressed families. Positive selection has acted on some venom toxin families, but does not appear to be in excess for families with venom gland biased expression. Moreover, we find 309 distinct gene families that have single transcripts with venom gland biased expression, suggesting that the switching of genes to venom gland expression in numerous unrelated gene families has been a dominant mode of evolution. We also find ample variation in protein sequences of venom gland-specific transcripts, lineage-specific family sizes, and ortholog expression among species. This variation might contribute to the variable venom toxicity of these species.

  16. Effects of protein transduction domain (PTD) selection and position for improved intracellular delivery of PTD-Hsp27 fusion protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Ain, Qurrat; Lee, Jong Hwan; Woo, Young Sun; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Protein drugs have attracted considerable attention as therapeutic agents due to their diversity and biocompatibility. However, hydrophilic proteins possess difficulty in penetrating lipophilic cell membrane. Although protein transduction domains (PTDs) have shown effectiveness in protein delivery, the importance of selection and position of PTDs in recombinant protein vector constructs has not been investigated. This study intends to investigate the significance of PTD selection and position for therapeutic protein delivery. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) would be a therapeutic protein for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases, but itself is insufficient to prevent systemic degradation and overcoming biochemical barriers during cellular transport. Among all PTD-Hsp27 fusion proteins we cloned, Tat-Hsp27 fusion protein showed the highest efficacy. Nona-arginine (9R) conjugation to the N-terminal of Hsp27 (Hsp27-T) showed higher efficacy than C-terminal. To test the synergistic effect of two PTDs, Tat was inserted to the N-terminal of Hsp27-9R. Tat-Hsp27-9R exhibited enhanced transduction efficiency and significant improvement against oxidative stress and apoptosis. PTD-Hsp27 fusion proteins have strong potential to be developed as therapeutic proteins for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases and selection and position of PTDs for improved efficacy of PTD-fusion proteins need to be optimized considering protein's nature, transduction efficiency and stability.

  17. Constraints on the Richness-Mass Relation and the Optical-SZE Positional Offset Distribution for SZE-Selected Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Saro, A; Rozo, E; Benson, B A; Mohr, J; Rykoff, E S; Soares-Santos, M; Bleem, L; Dodelson, S; Melchior, P; Sobreira, F; Upadhyay, V; Weller, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Bayliss, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brodwin, M; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Chiu, I; Covarrubias, R; Crawford, T M; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; de Haan, T; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gangkofner, C; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gupta, N; Hennig, C; Holzapfel, W L; Honscheid, K; Jain, B; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lin, H; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; McDonald, M; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reichardt, C L; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Strazzullo, V; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; von der Linden, A; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Zenteno, A; Ziegler, K E

    2015-01-01

    We cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg$^2$ of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between $0.1\\lesssim z\\lesssim 0.8$ in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness $\\lambda$-mass relation with the following function $\\langle\\ln\\lambda|M_{500}\\rangle\\propto B_\\lambda\\ln M_{500}+C_\\lambda\\ln E(z)$ and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses $\\lambda$ to constrain the parameters. We find $B_\\lambda= 1.14^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ and $C_\\lambda=0.73^{+0.77}_{-0.75}$. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is $\\sigma_{\\ln M|\\lambda} = 0.18^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ at a characteristic richness $\\lambda=70$. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the ma...

  18. Molecular modeling of Gram-positive bacteria peptidoglycan layer, selected glycopeptide antibiotics and vancomycin derivatives modified with sugar moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ślusarz, Rafał; Szulc, Monika; Madaj, Janusz

    2014-05-07

    Proper understanding of the mechanisms of binding to Gram-positive bacteria cell wall layers-especially to the peptidoglycan (PG) layer, seems to be crucial for proper development of new drug candidates which are effective against these bacteria. In this work we have constructed two different models of the Gram-positive bacteria PG layer: the layered and the scaffold models. PG conformational changes during geometry optimization, models relaxation, and molecular dynamics were described and discussed. We have found that the border surface of both PG layer models differs from the surface located away from the edge of models and the chains formed by disaccharide units prefer helix-like conformation. This curling of PG chains significantly affects the shape of antibiotic-accessible surface and the process is thus crucial for new drug development. Glycopeptide antibiotics effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin and its semisynthetic derivatives-oritavancin and telavancin, bind to d-alanyl-d-alanine stem termini on the peptidoglycan precursors of the cell wall. This binding inhibits cross-linking between the peptides and subsequently prevents cell wall synthesis. In this study some of the aspects of conformational freedom of vancomycin and restrictions from the modifications of vancomycin structure introduced into oritavancin and telavancin and five other vancomycin derivatives (with addition of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-galactopyranosylamine, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucopyranosylamine, 1-amine-1-deoxy-d-glucitol, 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-galactitol, or 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucitol to the C-terminal amino acid group in the vancomycin) are presented and discussed. The resulting molecular dynamics trajectories, root mean square deviation changes of aglycon and saccharide moieties as well as a comparative study of possible interactions with cyclic and chain forms of modified groups have been carried out, measured, and analyzed. Energetically advantageous

  19. Use of "biokit HSV-2 Rapid Assay" to improve the positive predictive value of Focus HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich David

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercially available assays to detect antibodies to the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2-specific glycoprotein gG-2 have markedly improved serologic diagnosis of HSV-2 infection. However, even tests with high specificity can have low positive predictive values in low prevalence populations. HSV-2 is a chronic, life-long viral infection that requires both medical attention and potential alterations in health care strategy. As such, the concern for false positive diagnoses is high confirmatory testing is routine for other viral serologies such as HIV and hepatitis C. We evaluated such a strategy for HSV-2 serology by using an easily performed commercial test, biokitHSV-2 rapid test ("Biokit"; Biokit USA, Lexington MA as a confirmatory test for the widely used gG-2 specific serology ("Focus;" HerpeSelect HSV-2 ELISA; Focus Diagnostics, Cypress CA. Methods We tested 782 sera by Focus HSV-2 ELISA, Biokit, and the current gold standard test, Western blot (WB. Results The positive predictive value of the Focus HSV-2 ELISA increased from 80.5% to 95.6% when Biokit testing was performed on sera that were initially positive by Focus HSV-2 ELISA. Confirmatory testing increased the specificity markedly among sera with Focus EIA values between 1.1 and 3.5: only 35% of low positive (index values 1.1–3.5 Focus HSV-2 ELISA results confirmed as positive by Biokit and WB compared with 92% of those with index values >3.5. Mathematical modeling of the data resulted in expected positive predictive values over 98% for populations with antibody prevalences typical of clinical practices in the US and Europe. Conclusion Confirmatory Biokit testing of positive Focus HSV-2 ELISA results is fast, easy, and effective in reducing falsely positive HSV-2 antibody results. Patients, clinicians, and laboratories could benefit from the enhanced specificity of this simple HSV-2 serologic test combination.

  20. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Ongoing Efforts in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.; Woodman, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in spaceflight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers, and from industry. It is our intent to develop a common core avionic system that has standard capabilities and interfaces, and contains the basic elements and functionality needed for any spacecraft. This common core will be scalable and tailored to specific missions. It will incorporate hardware and software from multiple vendors, and be upgradeable in order to infuse incremental capabilities and new technologies. It will maximize the use of reconfigurable open source software (e.g., Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Core Flight Software (CFS)). Our long-term focus is on improving functionality, reliability, and autonomy, while reducing size, weight, and power. Where possible, we will leverage terrestrial commercial capabilities to drive down development and sustaining costs. We will select promising technologies for evaluation, compare them in an objective manner, and mature them to be available for future programs. The remainder of this paper describes our approach, technical areas of emphasis, integrated test experience and results as of mid-2014, and future plans. As a part of the AES

  1. Improvement of mannitol lysine crystal violet brilliant green agar for the selective isolation of H2S-positive Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, H; Mizuochi, S; Honda, T; Yamaguchi, K

    2000-12-01

    Mannitol lysine crystal violet brilliant green agar (MLCB) is widely used in Japan for Salmonella isolation because the medium has been commercially available. Colonies of Salmonella on MLCB appear colorless with black centers due to H2S gas production; however, most Citrobacter freundii also produce H2S gas. In order to distinguish H2S-positive Salmonella from C. freundii we have improved MLCB. To MLCB was added 1% lactose (L-MLCB). The relation for pH and black center colony formation was examined. The pH of MLCB and L-MLCB inoculated with Salmonella species was slightly acid after 7 h, but the pH of L-MLCB inoculated with C. freundii did not become acid for 24 h. The colony of C. freundii did not have a black center because the production of acid from lactose lowers the pH below 10 where it is needed for H2S to react with iron to produce black pigments. Of 99 Salmonella strains including 13 serotypes tested, all strains had the same colony morphologies on MLCB and L-MLCB. When MLCB and L-MLCB were evaluated with 36 C. freundii strains isolated from foods, only colonies on MLCB had black centers. We conclude that L-MLCB is useful for detection of nonlactose-fermenting, H2S-positive Salmonella in food samples.

  2. Positive correlation between recombination rate and nucleotide diversity is shown under domestication selection in the chicken genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Lin; YE Jia; LI Ning; ZHANG Yong; LI SongGang; GANE KaShu WONG; WANG Jun

    2008-01-01

    Positive correlation between recombination rate and nucleotide diversity has been observed in a wide variety of eukaryotes on megabase scale. On the basis of genome-wide chicken genetic variation map generated by comparing three domestic breeds with wild ancestor and the positions of markers on the genetic linkage map, we found that SNPs rates were similar for all chromosomes while the recombina-tion rates increased in micro chromosomes. In other words no correlation exists in chromosome size. Nevertheless, when we scanned the genome by calculating the values of each characteristic within non-overlapping windows, instead of single value for each chromosomes, the nucleotide diversity was found to be significantly correlated with the recombination rate (r=0.27, P<0.0005). Furthermore, the significant association not only existed between these two features, but also existed between all 6 pairwise combinations of nucleotide diversity, recombination rate, GC content and average gene length. This co-variation is very meaningful for the studies of sequence evolution.

  3. 《元曲选》中方位短语及其功能(下)%POSITIONAL PHRASES AND THEIR FUNCTIONS IN 《THE SELECTION OF YUANQU》

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐韵

    2001-01-01

    《元曲选》中,方位短语前不加介词可直接充当句子的状语、补语。方位短语直接充当状语是近代汉语中较为常见的语法现象,现代汉语当中虽不普遍,但仍有少量用例。充当补语时,方位短语多数表处所,且动词一般是非行走义类。方位短语直接作补语是《元曲选》中也是近代汉语中不常见的现象,在现代汉语中仍有遗留。%In 《The Selection of Yuanqu》,the positional phrases with no prepositions before them were used as adverbials and complements. Positional phrases directly used as adverbials were common grammatical phenomena in modern Chinese and there are a few examples in present Chinese. When they are used as complements, most of them indicate positions, with which used the verbs mean non-going and non-coming. The positional phrases directly used as complements in 《The Selection of Yuanqu》were not common in modern Chinese but there are some remnants in present Chinese.

  4. Lineage-specific positive selection at the merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1 locus of Plasmodium vivax and related simian malaria parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Satoru

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 200 kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1 of malaria parasites, a strong vaccine candidate, plays a key role during erythrocyte invasion and is a target of host protective immune response. Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread human malaria parasite, is closely related to parasites that infect Asian Old World monkeys, and has been considered to have become a parasite of man by host switch from a macaque malaria parasite. Several Asian monkey parasites have a range of natural hosts. The same parasite species shows different disease manifestations among host species. This suggests that host immune responses to P. vivax-related malaria parasites greatly differ among host species (albeit other factors. It is thus tempting to invoke that a major immune target parasite protein such as MSP-1 underwent unique evolution, depending on parasite species that exhibit difference in host range and host specificity. Results We performed comparative phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of the gene encoding MSP-1 (msp1 from P. vivax and nine P. vivax-related simian malaria parasites. The inferred phylogenetic tree of msp1 significantly differed from that of the mitochondrial genome, with a striking displacement of P. vivax from a position close to P. cynomolgi in the mitochondrial genome tree to an outlier of Asian monkey parasites. Importantly, positive selection was inferred for two ancestral branches, one leading to P. inui and P. hylobati and the other leading to P. vivax, P. fieldi and P. cynomolgi. This ancestral positive selection was estimated to have occurred three to six million years ago, coinciding with the period of radiation of Asian macaques. Comparisons of msp1 polymorphisms between P. vivax, P. inui and P. cynomolgi revealed that while some positively selected amino acid sites or regions are shared by these parasites, amino acid changes greatly differ, suggesting that diversifying selection is acting species

  5. Thermal Filters for the ATHENA X-IFU: Ongoing Activities Toward the Conceptual Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Marco; Argan, A.; Bozzo, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Ciaravella, A.; Collura, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Gatti, F.; Jimenez Escobar, A.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Nuzzo, F.; Paltani, S.; Parodi, G.; Piro, L.; Rauw, G.; Sciortino, L.; Sciortino, S.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    ATHENA is the L2 mission selected by ESA to pursue the science theme "Hot and Energetic Universe." One of the two focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit, an array of TES microcalorimeters operated at T RF electromagnetic interferences on TES sensors and SQUID electronics, and to protect the detector from contamination. This paper reviews the ongoing activities driving the design of the X-IFU thermal filters.

  6. When and Whom to Join: The Expansion of Ongoing Violent Interstate Conflicts

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Reşat; Joyce, Kyle A.; Ghosn, Faten

    2014-01-01

    The opportunity and willingness framework has received much attention in research on interstate conflict expansion. This framework is extended here by examining when and what side third parties join during ongoing conflicts. It is maintained that without examining both timing and side selection, understanding of conflict expansion is limited. The timing and side joined in interstate disputes between 1816 and 2001 are analysed using a competing risks duration model. The findings contribute nov...

  7. Evidence for positive selection on a number of MicroRNA regulatory interactions during recent human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA-mediated gene regulation is of critical functional importance in animals and is thought to be largely constrained during evolution. However, little is known regarding evolutionary changes of the miRNA network and their role in human evolution. Here we show that a number of miRNA binding sites display high levels of population differentiation in humans and thus are likely targets of local adaptation. In a subset we demonstrate that allelic differences modulate miRNA regulation in mammalian cells, including an interaction between miR-155 and TYRP1, an important melanosomal enzyme associated with human pigmentary differences. We identify alternate alleles of TYRP1 that induce or disrupt miR-155 regulation and demonstrate that these alleles are selected with different modes among human populations, causing a strong negative correlation between the frequency of miR-155 regulation of TYRP1 in human populations and their latitude of residence. We propose that local adaptation of microRNA regulation acts as a rheostat to optimize TYRP1 expression in response to differential UV radiation. Our findings illustrate the evolutionary plasticity of the microRNA regulatory network in recent human evolution.

  8. Artificial selection on relative brain size reveals a positive genetic correlation between brain size and proactive personality in the guppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J P; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-04-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection lines of large- and small-brained guppies (Poecilia reticulata), with known differences in cognitive ability, through three standard personality assays. First, we found that large-brained animals were faster to habituate to, and more exploratory in, open field tests. Large-brained females were also bolder. Second, large-brained animals excreted less cortisol in a stressful situation (confinement). Third, large-brained animals were slower to feed from a novel food source, which we interpret as being caused by reduced behavioral flexibility rather than lack of innovation in the large-brained lines. Overall, the results point toward a more proactive personality type in large-brained animals. Thus, this study provides the first experimental evidence linking brain size and personality, an interaction that may affect important fitness-related aspects of ecology such as dispersal and niche exploration.

  9. The roles of gene duplication, gene conversion and positive selection in rodent Esp and Mup pheromone gene families with comparison to the Abp family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Three proteinaceous pheromone families, the androgen-binding proteins (ABPs), the exocrine-gland secreting peptides (ESPs) and the major urinary proteins (MUPs) are encoded by large gene families in the genomes of Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. We studied the evolutionary histories of the Mup and Esp genes and compared them with what is known about the Abp genes. Apparently gene conversion has played little if any role in the expansion of the mouse Class A and Class B Mup genes and pseudogenes, and the rat Mups. By contrast, we found evidence of extensive gene conversion in many Esp genes although not in all of them. Our studies of selection identified at least two amino acid sites in β-sheets as having evolved under positive selection in the mouse Class A and Class B MUPs and in rat MUPs. We show that selection may have acted on the ESPs by determining K(a)/K(s) for Exon 3 sequences with and without the converted sequence segment. While it appears that purifying selection acted on the ESP signal peptides, the secreted portions of the ESPs probably have undergone much more rapid evolution. When the inner gene converted fragment sequences were removed, eleven Esp paralogs were present in two or more pairs with K(a)/K(s) >1.0 and thus we propose that positive selection is detectable by this means in at least some mouse Esp paralogs. We compare and contrast the evolutionary histories of all three mouse pheromone gene families in light of their proposed functions in mouse communication.

  10. A new method with flexible and balanced control of false negatives and false positives for hit selection in RNA interference high-throughput screening assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2007-08-01

    The z-score method and its variants for testing mean difference are commonly used for hit selection in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) offers a way to measure and classify the short interfering RNA (siRNA) effects. In this article, based on SSMD, the authors propose a new testing method for hit selection in RNA interference (RNAi) HTS assays. This SSMD-based method allows the differentiation between siRNAs with large and small effects on the assay output and maintains flexible and balanced control of both the false-negative rate, in which the siRNAs with strong effects are not selected as hits, and the restricted false-positive rate, in which the siRNAs with weak or no effects are selected as hits. This method directly addresses the size of siRNA effects represented by the strength of difference between an siRNA and a negative reference, whereas the classic z-score method and t-test of testing no mean difference address whether the mean of an siRNA is exactly the same as the mean of a negative reference. This method can readily control the false-negative rate, whereas it is nontrivial for the classic z-score method and t-test to control the false-negative rate. Therefore, theoretically, the SSMD-based method offers better control of the sizes of siRNA effects and the associated false-positive and false-negative rates than the commonly used z-score method and t-test for hit selection in HTS assays. The SSMD-based method should generally be applicable to any assay in which the end point is a difference in signal compared to a reference sample, including those for RNAi, receptor, enzyme, and cellular function.

  11. Platelets augment respiratory burst in neutrophils activated by selected species of gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Pytel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils and platelets circulate in blood system and play important physiological roles as part of immunological system. Neutrophils are the first line of host defense against various intruders, and platelets are satellite cells cooperating with other components of defense system. Recent studies report about the cooperation among these types of cells. We analyzed the effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils triggered by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria in vitro. The effect of platelets on oxygen burst in neutrophils was measured by luminol enhanced chemiluminescence. Opsonized and non-opsonized bacteria were used as activators. Activation of neutrophils with live non-opsonized and opsonized bacteria in the presence of platelets increased the oxygen burst as compared to the same system without platelets. The gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus were causing higher activation than gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli. This work demonstrate that platelets potentate the response of neutrophils augmenting their respiratory burst in vitro when triggered by bacteria.

  12. Structure-Activity Relationships of 3,3′-Phenylmethylene-bis-4-hydroxycoumarins: Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokporn Petnapapun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dicoumarols and coumarin derivatives have shown a variety of pharmaceutical activities and have been found to be potent inhibitor for the NAD(PH-dependent flavoproteins. In this report, dicoumarol and its derivatives containing the substituted benzene ring at the methylenebis position were synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, and gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella sp. The results showed that the synthesized dicoumarols affect cell growth but are selective against gram-positive over gram-negative bacterial cells. However, for most derivatives, the substitution of steric bulky benzene group on the methylenebis position appears to decrease in the efficacy of antibacterial effect. This finding is roughly described by the predicted poorer docked structure of the derivatives to a homology model of S. aureus flavoprotein. 3D-QSAR study highlighted structural features around the substituted benzene ring of dicoumarols as the antibacterial activity. CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps support the idea that steric repulsion at the para position could diminish the antibacterial activity. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the molecular basis for the antibacterial activity of dicoumarols.

  13. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  14. Selectable marker elimination in the T0 generation by Agrobacterium-mediated co-transformation involving Mungbean yellow mosaic virus TrAP as a non-conditional negative selectable marker and bar for transient positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamanaRao, Mangu Venkata; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2010-05-01

    Transient selection involving the bar gene and non-conditional negative selection against stable T-DNA integration through the use of the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) transcriptional activator protein gene (TrAP) were used in a novel co-transformation strategy to generate selectable marker gene (SMG)-eliminated transgenic tobacco plants in the T(0) generation itself. Two compatible binary plasmids, pCam-bar-TrAP-gus harbouring bar as an SMG and the MYMV TrAP gene as a non-conditional negative selectable marker, and pGA472 with the nptII gene as an unselected experimental gene of interest (GOI) were placed in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 and used for co-transformation. Transient selection with 5 mg l(-1) phosphinothricin (PPT) for 2-4 weeks and subsequent establishment in a PPT-minus medium yielded 114 plants from 200 leaf discs. The unselected nptII gene was detected by Southern blot analysis in 13 plants, revealing a co-transformation efficiency of 11.5%. Five of these plants harboured only the nptII gene (GOI) and not the bar gene (SMG). Thus, SMG elimination was achieved in the T(0) generation itself in 4.4% (5/114) of plants, which were transiently selected for 2-4 weeks on PPT. MYMV TrAP, a non-conditional negative selectable marker, effectively reduced the recovery of plants with stable integration of the SMG (bar).

  15. Ongoing adaptive evolution of ASPM, a brain size determinant in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekel-Bobrov, Nitzan; Gilbert, Sandra L; Evans, Patrick D; Vallender, Eric J; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Hudson, Richard R; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Lahn, Bruce T

    2005-09-09

    The gene ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) is a specific regulator of brain size, and its evolution in the lineage leading to Homo sapiens was driven by strong positive selection. Here, we show that one genetic variant of ASPM in humans arose merely about 5800 years ago and has since swept to high frequency under strong positive selection. These findings, especially the remarkably young age of the positively selected variant, suggest that the human brain is still undergoing rapid adaptive evolution.

  16. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlschläger, Afra M; Glim, Sarah; Shao, Junming; Draheim, Johanna; Köhler, Lina; Lourenço, Susana; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human brain's ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants' left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness.

  17. Hepatic tissue environment in NEMO-deficient mice critically regulates positive selection of donor cells after hepatocyte transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Kaldenbach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte transplantation (HT is a promising alternative treatment strategy for end-stage liver diseases compared with orthotopic liver transplantation. A limitation for this approach is the low engraftment of donor cells. The deletion of the I-kappa B kinase-regulatory subunit IKKγ/NEMO in hepatocytes prevents nuclear factor (NF-kB activation and triggers spontaneous liver apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and the development of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that NEMOΔhepa mice may therefore serve as an experimental model to study HT. METHODS: Pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice were transplanted with donor-hepatocytes from wildtype (WT and mice deficient for the pro-apoptotic mediator Caspase-8 (Casp8Δhepa. RESULTS: Transplantation of isolated WT-hepatocytes into pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice resulted in a 6-7 fold increase of donor cells 12 weeks after HT, while WT-recipients showed no liver repopulation. The use of apoptosis-resistant Casp8Δhepa-derived donor cells further enhanced the selection 3-fold after 12-weeks and up to 10-fold increase after 52 weeks compared with WT donors. While analysis of NEMOΔhepa mice revealed strong liver injury, HT-recipient NEMOΔhepa mice showed improved liver morphology and decrease in serum transaminases. Concomitant with these findings, the histological examination elicited an improved liver tissue architecture associated with significantly lower levels of apoptosis, decreased proliferation and a lesser amount of liver fibrogenesis. Altogether, our data clearly support the therapeutic benefit of the HT procedure into NEMOΔhepa mice. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of the NEMOΔhepa mouse as an in vivo tool to study liver repopulation after HT. The improvement of the characteristic phenotype of chronic liver injury in NEMOΔhepa mice after HT suggests the therapeutic potential of HT in liver diseases with a chronic inflammatory phenotype and

  18. Hepatic Tissue Environment in NEMO-Deficient Mice Critically Regulates Positive Selection of Donor Cells after Hepatocyte Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldenbach, Michaela; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Erschfeld, Stephanie; Liedtke, Christian; Trautwein, Christian; Streetz, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) is a promising alternative treatment strategy for end-stage liver diseases compared with orthotopic liver transplantation. A limitation for this approach is the low engraftment of donor cells. The deletion of the I-kappa B kinase-regulatory subunit IKKγ/NEMO in hepatocytes prevents nuclear factor (NF)-kB activation and triggers spontaneous liver apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and the development of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that NEMOΔhepa mice may therefore serve as an experimental model to study HT. Methods Pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice were transplanted with donor-hepatocytes from wildtype (WT) and mice deficient for the pro-apoptotic mediator Caspase-8 (Casp8Δhepa). Results Transplantation of isolated WT-hepatocytes into pre-conditioned NEMOΔhepa mice resulted in a 6-7 fold increase of donor cells 12 weeks after HT, while WT-recipients showed no liver repopulation. The use of apoptosis-resistant Casp8Δhepa-derived donor cells further enhanced the selection 3-fold after 12-weeks and up to 10-fold increase after 52 weeks compared with WT donors. While analysis of NEMOΔhepa mice revealed strong liver injury, HT-recipient NEMOΔhepa mice showed improved liver morphology and decrease in serum transaminases. Concomitant with these findings, the histological examination elicited an improved liver tissue architecture associated with significantly lower levels of apoptosis, decreased proliferation and a lesser amount of liver fibrogenesis. Altogether, our data clearly support the therapeutic benefit of the HT procedure into NEMOΔhepa mice. Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of the NEMOΔhepa mouse as an in vivo tool to study liver repopulation after HT. The improvement of the characteristic phenotype of chronic liver injury in NEMOΔhepa mice after HT suggests the therapeutic potential of HT in liver diseases with a chronic inflammatory phenotype and opens a new door for

  19. Lateralization of noise-burst trains based on onset and ongoing interaural delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, Richard L; Balakrishnan, Uma; Zurek, Patrick M

    2010-07-01

    The lateralization of 250-ms trains of brief noise bursts was measured using an acoustic pointing technique. Stimuli were designed to assess the contribution of the interaural time delay (ITD) of the onset binaural burst relative to that of the ITDs in the ongoing part of the train. Lateralization was measured by listeners' adjustments of the ITD of a pointer stimulus, a 50-ms burst of noise, to match the lateral position of the target train. Results confirmed previous reports of lateralization dominance by the onset burst under conditions in which the train is composed of frozen tokens and the ongoing part contains multiple ambiguous interaural delays. In contrast, lateralization of ongoing trains in which fresh noise tokens were used for each set of two alternating (left-leading/right-leading) binaural pairs followed the ITD of the first pair in each set, regardless of the ITD of the onset burst of the entire stimulus and even when the onset burst was removed by gradual gating. This clear lateralization of a long-duration stimulus with ambiguous interaural delay cues suggests precedence mechanisms that involve not only the interaural cues at the beginning of a sound, but also the pattern of cues within an ongoing sound.

  20. Investigation for improving Global Positioning System (GPS) orbits using a discrete sequential estimator and stochastic models of selected physical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Clyde C.; Chadwell, C. David

    1993-01-01

    GEODYNII is a conventional batch least-squares differential corrector computer program with deterministic models of the physical environment. Conventional algorithms were used to process differenced phase and pseudorange data to determine eight-day Global Positioning system (GPS) orbits with several meter accuracy. However, random physical processes drive the errors whose magnitudes prevent improving the GPS orbit accuracy. To improve the orbit accuracy, these random processes should be modeled stochastically. The conventional batch least-squares algorithm cannot accommodate stochastic models, only a stochastic estimation algorithm is suitable, such as a sequential filter/smoother. Also, GEODYNII cannot currently model the correlation among data values. Differenced pseudorange, and especially differenced phase, are precise data types that can be used to improve the GPS orbit precision. To overcome these limitations and improve the accuracy of GPS orbits computed using GEODYNII, we proposed to develop a sequential stochastic filter/smoother processor by using GEODYNII as a type of trajectory preprocessor. Our proposed processor is now completed. It contains a correlated double difference range processing capability, first order Gauss Markov models for the solar radiation pressure scale coefficient and y-bias acceleration, and a random walk model for the tropospheric refraction correction. The development approach was to interface the standard GEODYNII output files (measurement partials and variationals) with software modules containing the stochastic estimator, the stochastic models, and a double differenced phase range processing routine. Thus, no modifications to the original GEODYNII software were required. A schematic of the development is shown. The observational data are edited in the preprocessor and the data are passed to GEODYNII as one of its standard data types. A reference orbit is determined using GEODYNII as a batch least-squares processor and the

  1. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Kyung Choi

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots.

  2. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot) or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots.

  3. Can Autonomy Be Imposed? Examining Teacher (Re)positioning during the Ongoing Curriculum Change in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Stavroula; Kontovourki, Stavroula; Theodorou, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    For the past few years, the Republic of Cyprus has been pursuing a major educational reform across all levels of mandatory education, focusing especially on curriculum change, for the implementation of which in-service teachers have undergone a series of professional development seminars. Individual and focus group interviews with in-service…

  4. Filter-based feature selection and support vector machine for false positive reduction in computer-aided mass detection in mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Nguyen, D. T.; Nguyen, T. D.; Phan, V. A.; Truong, Q. D.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a method for reducing false positive in computer-aided mass detection in screening mammograms is proposed. A set of 32 features, including First Order Statistics (FOS) features, Gray-Level Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) features, Block Difference Inverse Probability (BDIP) features, and Block Variation of Local Correlation coefficients (BVLC) are extracted from detected Regions-Of-Interest (ROIs). An optimal subset of 8 features is selected from the full feature set by mean of a filter-based Sequential Backward Selection (SBS). Then, Support Vector Machine (SVM) is utilized to classify the ROIs into massive regions or normal regions. The method's performance is evaluated using the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC or AZ). On a dataset consisting about 2700 ROIs detected from mini-MIAS database of mammograms, the proposed method achieves AZ=0.938.

  5. Mass spectrometric proteomics reveals that nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhifeng; Luo, Qun; Yang, Liping; Bing, Tao; Li, Xianchan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Kui; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Fuyi

    2014-02-26

    An MS-based proteomic strategy combined with chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles as affinity probes was developed and validated by successful identification and quantification of HMGB1, which is well characterized to interact selectively with 1,2-cross-linked DNA by cisplatin, from whole cell lysates. The subsequent application of this method to identify proteins responding to 1,3-cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex, trans-PtTz (Tz = thiazole), revealed that the human nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to the damaged DNA, implying that PC4 may play a role in cellular response to DNA damage by trans-PtTz.

  6. Selectively catalytic activity of metal–organic frameworks depending on the N-position within the pyridine ring of their building blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haitao, E-mail: xuhaitao@ecust.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Gou, Yongxia; Ye, Jing; Xu, Zhen-liang [School of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Zixuan [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Iron metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) [Fe(L){sub 2}(SCN){sub 2}]{sub ∝} (L1: 4-bpdh=2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene for 1Fe; and L2: 3-bpdh=2,5-bis(3-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene for 2Fe) were assembled in a MeOH–H{sub 2}O solvent system. 1Fe exhibits a two-dimensional extended-grid network, whereas 2Fe exhibits a stair-like double-chain; the N-position within the pyridine ring of the complexes was observed to regulate the MOF structure as layers or chains. Furthermore, selectively catalytic activity was observed for the layered MOF but not the chain-structured MOF; micro/nanoparticles of the layered MOF were therefore investigated for new potential applications of micro/nano MOFs. - Graphical abstract: Iron metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) [Fe(L){sub 2}(SCN){sub 2}]{sub ∝} (L1: 4-bpdh=2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene for 1Fe; and L2: 3-bpdh=2,5-bis(3-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene for 2Fe) were assembled in a MeOH–H{sub 2}O solvent system. The N-position within the pyridine ring of the complexes was observed to regulate the MOF structure as layers or chains. Selectively catalytic activity was observed for the layered MOF but not the chain-structured MOF. - Highlights: • Synthesis and structure of metal–organic framework [Fe(L){sub 2}(SCN){sub 2}]{sub ∝}. • Selectively catalytic activity depending on the N-position within the pyridine ring. • The degradation and conversion of methyl orange.

  7. Increased positive selection pressure within the complementarity determining regions of the T-cell receptor β gene in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Takaji; Fujii, Yoshiki; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Satsuki; Tsuruta, Yuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Ogasawara, Kouetsu; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2011-10-01

    Because of the long-term co-evolution of TCR and MHC molecules, numerous nucleotide substitutions have accumulated within the domains of TCRβ genes. We previously found that nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions occurred more frequently in complementarity determining region (CDR)β than in CDRα, even though only a limited number of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) and human T-cell receptor β variable (TRBV) sequences were compared. This interesting finding raised the question of whether the increased selective pressure within CDRβ was species-specific. In this study, we identified 21 TRBV region sequences from the common marmoset and performed comparative sequence analyses of the T-cell receptor α variable (TRAV) and TRBV regions from human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, cotton-top tamarin, Ma's night monkey, and common marmoset. The ratios of the number of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions per site (d(N) ) to the d(S) values (d(N) /d(S) ) were less than 1 within the framework regions (FRs) of TRAV and TRBV region sequences, suggesting that purifying selection is largely dominant within the FRs. In contrast, the d(N) values were statistically significantly greater for CDRβ than for CDRα only in New World monkeys. Also, increased d(N) /d(S) ratios (d(N) /d(S) >1) were observed within CDRβ between humans and New World monkeys and, interestingly, between New World monkeys, which share a relatively recent common ancestor. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood analysis provided firm evidence to support that positive selection occurred within CDRβ along New World monkey lineages. These results suggest that increased positive selection pressure within CDRβ is common in New World monkeys rather than being species-specific. This study provides an intriguing insight into the co-evolution of TCR and MHC molecules within primates. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. One-pot enzymatic synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid-rich triacylglycerols at the sn-1(3) position using by-product from selective hydrolysis of tuna oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Yomi; Maruyama, Kazuaki; Momokawa, Yuusuke; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Shimada, Yuji

    2011-01-31

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich oil has been industrially produced by selective hydrolysis of tuna oil with a lipase that acts weakly on DHA. The free fatty acids (FFAs) generated in this process as by-products contain a high DHA concentration (46wt%) but are treated as industrial waste. This study attempted to reuse these by-product FFAs using a one-pot process, and succeeded in producing triacylglycerols (TAGs) through the esterification of the by-product FFAs with glycerol using immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase. Regiospecific analysis of the resulting TAGs showed that the content of DHA at the sn-1(3) position (51.7mol%) was higher than the content of DHA at the sn-2 position (17.3mol%). The DHA distribution in TAGs synthesized in this study was similar to the DHA distribution in TAGs from seal oil.

  9. Fast adjustments of ongoing movements in spastic hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiel, E. van; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Hulstijn, W.

    2002-01-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of participants with spastic hemiparesis caused by cerebral palsy to adjust an ongoing movement. Typical symptoms associated with the disorder would lead one to expect that people with spastic hemiparesis would be unable to adjust their movements quickly and

  10. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Pál; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an...

  11. Fast adjustments of ongoing movements in spastic hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiel, E. van; Meulenbroek, R.G.J.; Smeets, J.B.J.; Hulstijn, W.

    2002-01-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of participants with spastic hemiparesis caused by cerebral palsy to adjust an ongoing movement. Typical symptoms associated with the disorder would lead one to expect that people with spastic hemiparesis would be unable to adjust their movements quickly and

  12. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  13. Examples of Important Ongoing Research Topics for Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Bredmose, Henrik; Schløer, Signe

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to address some challenges related to offshore wind energy. A first example shows some results from an ongoing project on accurate computation of wave loads on monopole foundations. The effects of wave nonlinearity and bottom slope are examined and detailed CFD computation...

  14. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth Who Experience Ongoing Traumas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Murray, Laura K.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth experience ongoing trauma exposure, such as domestic or community violence. Clinicians often ask whether evidence-based treatments containing exposure components to reduce learned fear responses to historical trauma are appropriate for these youth. Essentially the question is, if youth are desensitized to their trauma experiences, will…

  15. Behavioral and neurochemical analysis of ongoing bone cancer pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeniuk, Bethany; Sukhtankar, Devki; Okun, Alec; Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain is described as dull, aching ongoing pain. Ongoing bone cancer pain was characterized after intratibial injection of breast cancer cells in rats. Cancer produced time-dependent bone remodeling and tactile hypersensitivity but no spontaneous flinching. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and enhanced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell was observed after peripheral nerve block (PNB) selectively in tumor-bearing rats revealing nociceptive-driven ongoing pain. Oral diclofenac reversed tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity but did not block PNB-induced CPP or NAc DA release. Tumor-induced tactile hypersensitivity, and PNB-induced CPP and NAc DA release, was blocked by prior subcutaneous implantation of a morphine pellet. In sham rats, morphine produced a modest but sustained increase in NAc DA release. In contrast, morphine produced a transient 5-fold higher NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats compared with sham morphine rats. The possibility that this increased NAc DA release reflected the reward of pain relief was tested by irreversible blockade of rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) μ-opioid receptors (MORs). The rACC MOR blockade prevented the morphine-induced transient increased NAc DA release in tumor bearing rats but did not affect morphine-induced effects in sham-operated animals. Consistent with clinical experience, ongoing cancer pain was controlled by morphine but not by a dose of diclofenac that reversed evoked hypersensitivity. Additionally, the intrinsic reward of morphine can be dissociated from the reward of relief of cancer pain by blockade of rACC MOR. This approach allows mechanistic and therapeutic assessment of ongoing cancer pain with likely translation relevance.

  16. Patterns of Nucleotide Diversity at the Regions Encompassing the Drosophila Insulin-Like Peptide (dilp) Genes: Demography vs. Positive Selection in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao-Rico, Sara; Aguadé, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the insulin-signaling pathway controls some life history traits, such as fertility and lifespan, and it is considered to be the main metabolic pathway involved in establishing adult body size. Several observations concerning variation in body size in the Drosophila genus are suggestive of its adaptive character. Genes encoding proteins in this pathway are, therefore, good candidates to have experienced adaptive changes and to reveal the footprint of positive selection. The Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) are the ligands that trigger the insulin-signaling cascade. In Drosophila melanogaster, there are several peptides that are structurally similar to the single mammalian insulin peptide. The footprint of recent adaptive changes on nucleotide variation can be unveiled through the analysis of polymorphism and divergence. With this aim, we have surveyed nucleotide sequence variation at the dilp1-7 genes in a natural population of D. melanogaster. The comparison of polymorphism in D. melanogaster and divergence from D. simulans at different functional classes of the dilp genes provided no evidence of adaptive protein evolution after the split of the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. However, our survey of polymorphism at the dilp gene regions of D. melanogaster has provided some evidence for the action of positive selection at or near these genes. The regions encompassing the dilp1-4 genes and the dilp6 gene stand out as likely affected by recent adaptive events. PMID:23308258

  17. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Peng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Li, De-Zhu; Guo, Zhen-Hua

    2013-01-01

    BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae) is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs) were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P) E) topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  18. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    Full Text Available BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P E topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  19. Positive selection on the osteoarthritis-risk and decreased-height associated variants at the GDF5 gene in East Asians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Dong Wu

    Full Text Available GDF5 is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP gene family, and plays an important role in the development of the skeletal system. Variants of the gene are associated with osteoarthritis and height in some human populations. Here, we resequenced the gene in individuals from four geographically separated human populations, and found that the evolution of the promoter region deviated from neutral expectations, with the sequence evolution driven by positive selection in the East Asian population, especially the haplotypes carrying the derived alleles of 5' UTR SNPs rs143384 and rs143383. The derived alleles of rs143384 and rs143383, which are associated with a risk of osteoarthritis and decreased height, have high frequencies in non-Africans and show strong extended haplotype homozygosity and high population differentiation in East Asian. It is concluded that positive selection has driven the rapid evolution of the two osteoarthritis osteoarthritis-risk and decreased height associated variants of the human GDF5 gene, and supports the suggestion that the reduction in body size during the terminal Pleistocene and Holocene period might have been an adaptive process influenced by genetic factors.

  20. Dynamics of selected MHC class I and II molecule expression in the course of HPV positive CIN treatment with the use of human recombinant IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Marek; Bobek, Malgorzata; Zrubek, HenryK; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2004-03-01

    Studies consistently reveal downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules or/and selective loss of individual MHC-I alleles and upregulation of MHC-II molecules in the areas of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and in cervical cancers. In vitro studies demonstrated the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) potential of MHC class I and II molecule upregulation followed by increased cytolytic response against some cervical cancer cell lines. In vivo assessment of the correlation between regression/persistence state of CIN and the IFN-gamma-induced changes in both class of selected MHC molecule expression. Seventeen subjects with CIN I/CIN II associated with high-risk HPV infection underwent uniform IFN-gamma treatment (four intracervical injections over 2-day interval for a total dose of 6,000,000 IU). Immunohistochemical staining has been performed within cervical punch biopsy specimens with the use of monoclonal antibody reacting with HLA-DR, HLA-HC and HLA-Bw4, and the mean proportion of given molecules expressing keratinocytes was counted before, immediately after and 2 months after IFN-gamma treatment The analysis revealed a rapid and significant increase of the HLA-Bw4 proportion in response to IFN-gamma, persistent in the group of complete responders (with CIN clearance). No significant changes in the proportion of HLA-HC 10 positive cells in response to IFN-gamma administration was demonstrated, nor a significant increase in HLA-DR positivity; however, the transient trend towards increasing the proportion of HLA-DR immediately after treatment completion was observed. Upregulation of selected MHC class I allele expression, but not necessary MHC class II or heavy chain fragments of MHC-I, induced by IFN-gamma correlates with the resolution of cervical intraepithelial lesions and high-risk HPV DNA clearance in vivo.

  1. Kr/Kc but not dN/dS correlates positively with body mass in birds, raising implications for inferring lineage-specific selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Claudia C; Nabholz, Benoit; Romiguier, Jonathan; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of the rates of non-synonymous and synonymous substitution (dN/dS) is commonly used to estimate selection in coding sequences. It is often suggested that, all else being equal, dN/dS should be lower in populations with large effective size (Ne) due to increased efficacy of purifying selection. As Ne is difficult to measure directly, life history traits such as body mass, which is typically negatively associated with population size, have commonly been used as proxies in empirical tests of this hypothesis. However, evidence of whether the expected positive correlation between body mass and dN/dS is consistently observed is conflicting. Employing whole genome sequence data from 48 avian species, we assess the relationship between rates of molecular evolution and life history in birds. We find a negative correlation between dN/dS and body mass, contrary to nearly neutral expectation. This raises the question whether the correlation might be a method artefact. We therefore in turn consider non-stationary base composition, divergence time and saturation as possible explanations, but find no clear patterns. However, in striking contrast to dN/dS, the ratio of radical to conservative amino acid substitutions (Kr/Kc) correlates positively with body mass. Our results in principle accord with the notion that non-synonymous substitutions causing radical amino acid changes are more efficiently removed by selection in large populations, consistent with nearly neutral theory. These findings have implications for the use of dN/dS and suggest that caution is warranted when drawing conclusions about lineage-specific modes of protein evolution using this metric.

  2. Discovery of GluN2A-Selective NMDA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): Tuning Deactivation Kinetics via Structure-Based Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgraf, Matthew; Sellers, Benjamin D; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Guosheng; Ly, Cuong Q; Villemure, Elisia; Pastor, Richard M; Yuen, Po-wai; Lu, Aijun; Luo, Xifeng; Liu, Mingcui; Zhang, Shun; Sun, Liang; Fu, Yuhong; Lupardus, Patrick J; Wallweber, Heidi J A; Liederer, Bianca M; Deshmukh, Gauri; Plise, Emile; Tay, Suzanne; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; Dirksen, Akim; Dietz, Matthias G A; Liu, Yanzhou; Wang, Tzu-Ming; Hanson, Jesse E; Hackos, David; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Schwarz, Jacob B

    2016-03-24

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a Na(+) and Ca(2+) permeable ionotropic glutamate receptor that is activated by the coagonists glycine and glutamate. NMDARs are critical to synaptic signaling and plasticity, and their dysfunction has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Herein we describe the discovery of potent GluN2A-selective NMDAR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) starting from a high-throughput screening hit. Using structure-based design, we sought to increase potency at the GluN2A subtype, while improving selectivity against related α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). The structure-activity relationship of channel deactivation kinetics was studied using a combination of electrophysiology and protein crystallography. Effective incorporation of these strategies resulted in the discovery of GNE-0723 (46), a highly potent and brain penetrant GluN2A-selective NMDAR PAM suitable for in vivo characterization.

  3. Differential selection on carotenoid biosynthesis genes as a function of gene position in the metabolic pathway: a study on the carrot and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Clotault

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selection of genes involved in metabolic pathways could target them differently depending on the position of genes in the pathway and on their role in controlling metabolic fluxes. This hypothesis was tested in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway using population genetics and phylogenetics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Evolutionary rates of seven genes distributed along the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, IPI, PDS, CRTISO, LCYB, LCYE, CHXE and ZEP, were compared in seven dicot taxa. A survey of deviations from neutrality expectations at these genes was also undertaken in cultivated carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, a species that has been intensely bred for carotenoid pattern diversification in its root during its cultivation history. Parts of sequences of these genes were obtained from 46 individuals representing a wide diversity of cultivated carrots. Downstream genes exhibited higher deviations from neutral expectations than upstream genes. Comparisons of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates between genes among dicots revealed greater constraints on upstream genes than on downstream genes. An excess of intermediate frequency polymorphisms, high nucleotide diversity and/or high differentiation of CRTISO, LCYB1 and LCYE in cultivated carrot suggest that balancing selection may have targeted genes acting centrally in the pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with relaxed constraints on downstream genes and selection targeting the central enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway during carrot breeding history.

  4. Lgals6, a 2-million-year-old gene in mice: a case of positive Darwinian selection and presence/absence polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzelstein, Denis; Gonçalves, Isabelle R; Orth, Annie; Bonhomme, François; Netter, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    Duplications of genes are widely considered to be a driving force in the evolutionary process. The fate of such duplicated genes (paralogs) depends mainly on the early stages of their evolution. Therefore, the study of duplications that have already started to diverge is useful to better understand their evolution. We present here the example of a 2-million-year-old segmental duplication at the origin of the Lgals4 and Lgals6 genes in the mouse genome. We analyzed the distribution of these genes in samples from 110 wild individuals and wild-derived inbred strains belonging to eight mouse species from Mus (Coelomys) pahari to M. musculus and 28 laboratory strains. Using a maximum-likelihood method, we show that the sequence of the Lgals6 gene has evolved under the influence of strong positive selection that is likely to result in its neofunctionalization. Surprisingly, despite this selection pressure, the Lgals6 gene is present in some mouse species, but not all. Furthermore, even within the species and populations where it is present, the Lgals6 gene is never fixed. To explain this paradox, we propose different hypotheses such as balanced selection and neutral retention of ancient polymophism and we discuss this unexpected result with regard to known galectin properties and response to infections by pathogens.

  5. Genetic diversity of MHC class I loci in six non-model frogs is shaped by positive selection and gene duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, K M; Richmond, J Q; Savage, A E; Lips, K R; Zamudio, K R

    2012-01-01

    Comparative studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal the evolutionary processes that shape the structure and function of immune regulatory proteins. In this study, we characterized MHC class I sequences from six frog species representing three anuran families (Hylidae, Centrolenidae and Ranidae). Using cDNA from our focal species, we amplified a total of 79 unique sequences spanning exons 2–4 that encode the extracellular domains of the functional alpha chain protein. We compared intra- and interspecific nucleotide and amino-acid divergence, tested for recombination, and identified codon sites under selection by estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with multiple codon-based maximum likelihood methods. We determined that positive (diversifying) selection was acting on specific amino-acid sites located within the domains that bind pathogen-derived peptides. We also found significant signals of recombination across the physical distance of the genes. Finally, we determined that all the six species expressed two or three putative classical class I loci, in contrast to the single locus condition of Xenopus laevis. Our results suggest that MHC evolution in anurans is a dynamic process and that variation in numbers of loci and genetic diversity can exist among taxa. Thus, the accumulation of genetic data for more species will be useful in further characterizing the relative importance of processes such as selection, recombination and gene duplication in shaping MHC loci among amphibian lineages. PMID:22549517

  6. Myopia as a latent phenotype of a pleiotropic gene positively selected for facilitating neurocognitive development, and the effects of environmental factors in its expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, W; Kwan, M W M; Cheng, T S; Chan, K H; Cheung, R T F; Ho, S L

    2006-01-01

    Myopia has become an almost pandemic problem in many populations. There are compelling evidence to suggest that myopia is a hereditary condition. However, myopia would constitute a definite selection disadvantage during most stages of human evolution, which is incompatible with its moderate to high prevalence in most modern populations. The rapid upsurge of myopia over just a few decades also implies that its inheritance does not follow any of the usual patterns, and environmental factors may have an important role in precipitating its occurrence in those who are genetically predisposed. Previous studies showed that myopes were, on average, more intelligent than non-myopes, and this association had been attributed to a biological link between eye growth and brain development. We propose a pleiotropic genetic model to explain the atypical epidemiologic and inheritance pattern of myopia and its relationship with neurocognitive development. This pleiotropic gene was positively selected for its facilitation of human intelligence. The myopic component is a latent phenotype; myopia will not be expressed unless some novel external factors are encountered (i.e. a "quirk" phenomenon). Therefore, the myopic component was selectively neutral in our ancestral environment. The net gain in Darwinian fitness enables the pleiotropic gene to attain a high frequency in the human population, as reflected by our current prevalence of myopia.

  7. Oxidative stress-mediated selective antimicrobial ability of nano-VO2 against Gram-positive bacteria for environmental and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Huaijuan; Wang, Jiaxing; Wang, Donghui; Shen, Ruxiang; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Ping; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a unique thermochromic material as a result of its semiconductor-metal transition, holding great promise for energy-saving intelligent windows. Herein, pure nano-VO2 from discrete nanoparticles to continuous films were successfully deposited on quartz glass by controlling the sputtering parameters. It was demonstrated that, for Gram-positive S. aureus and S. epidermidis, the nano-VO2 could effectively disrupt bacteria morphology and membrane integrity, and eventually cause death. By contrast, the nano-VO2 did not exhibit significant toxicity towards Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a selective antimicrobial effect of nano-VO2 materials on Gram-positive bacteria. Based on the experimental results, a plausible mechanism was proposed for the antimicrobial selectivity, which might originate from the different sensitivity of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Elevated intracellular ROS levels exceed the threshold that bacteria can self-regulate to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and thus cause oxidative stress, which can be alleviated by the intervention of glutathione (GSH) antioxidant. In addition, nano-VO2 did not produce significant cytotoxicity (hemolysis) against human erythrocytes within 12 h. Meanwhile, potential cytotoxicity against HIBEpiC revealed a time- and dose-dependent behavior that might be controlled and balanced by careful design. The findings in the present work may contribute to understanding the antimicrobial behavior of nano-VO2, and to expanding the new applications of VO2-based nanomaterials in environmental and biomedical fields.

  8. Primary radiotherapy of breast cancer; Treatment results in locally advanced breast cancer and in operable patients selected by positive axillay apex biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borger, J.H.; Tienhoven, G. van; Passchier, D.H.; Hart, A.A.M.; Bartelink, H.; Dongen, J.A. van; Rutgers, E.J.T. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1992-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy without surgery, treatment results in patients treated for locally advanced breast cancer (n=209) and those selected by positive axillary apex biopsy (n=289) in the period 1977 -1985 have been analysed retrospectively. Treatment consisted of primary irradiation to the breast and regional lymph nodes followed by a boost to the primary breast tumour and palpable regional disease to a mean normalised dose (NTD) of 64.7 Gy with a range of 33.4-93 Gy (2 Gy fractions, [alpha]/[beta] 5 Gy). Adjuvant systemic treatment was given in 30% of the locally advanced and in 40% of the apex positive patients. Thirty percent of the apex positive patients had an excisional biopsy of the breast tumour. Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy and patients irradiated to a NTD of 60 Gy or more had significantly better local control. For overall survival primary tumour size, clinical nodal size and age are independent prognostic factors. Patients irradiated to a NTD above 60 Gy had significantly better results. (author). 39 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. UP states protect ongoing cortical activity from thalamic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon O Watson

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo fluctuate spontaneously between two stable membrane potentials: a depolarized UP state and a hyperpolarized DOWN state. UP states temporally correspond with multineuronal firing sequences which may be important for information processing. To examine how thalamic inputs interact with ongoing cortical UP state activity, we used calcium imaging and targeted whole-cell recordings of activated neurons in thalamocortical slices of mouse somatosensory cortex. Whereas thalamic stimulation during DOWN states generated multineuronal, synchronized UP states, identical stimulation during UP states had no effect on the subthreshold membrane dynamics of the vast majority of cells or on ongoing multineuronal temporal patterns. Both thalamocortical and corticocortical PSPs were significantly reduced and neuronal input resistance was significantly decreased during cortical UP states -- mechanistically consistent with UP state insensitivity. Our results demonstrate that cortical dynamics during UP states are insensitive to thalamic inputs.

  10. Implementation of Sustainability in Ongoing Supply Chain Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørsfeldt, Liliyana Makarowa; Meulengracht Jensen, Peter; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The need to take the sustainable agenda beyond its technological outset and include operational and supply chain practices is well-established, but still very little has happened and the supply chain and operational logics have remained largely unaffected. This paper asks why this may be the case...... and investigates what happens in the translation from ambitious strategic goals to operational practices. To do this an exploratory case study is presented detailing the efforts of a large Danish manufacturing company to introduce an ambitious sustainability agenda in its ongoing supply chain operations. The study...... aims to develop a deeper un-derstanding of the, inter-functional coordination and operational practices related to introducing the sustainable agenda in the supply chain. The study points to a lack of tangible environmental performance measurements related to day-to-day practice in the ongoing supply...

  11. Linear superposition of sensory-evoked and ongoing cortical hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Saka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern non-invasive brain imaging techniques utilise changes in cerebral blood flow, volume and oxygenation that accompany brain activation. However, stimulus-evoked hemodynamic responses display considerable inter-trial variability even when identical stimuli are presented and the sources of this variability are poorly understood. One of the sources of this response variation could be ongoing spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations. To investigate this issue, 2-dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy was used to measure cortical hemodynamics in response to sensory stimuli in anaesthetised rodents Pre-stimulus cortical hemodynamics displayed spontaneous periodic fluctuations and as such, data from individual stimulus presentation trials were assigned to one of four groups depending on the phase angle of pre-stimulus hemodynamic fluctuations and averaged. This analysis revealed that sensory evoked cortical hemodynamics displayed distinctive response characteristics and magnitudes depending on the phase angle of ongoing fluctuations at stimulus onset. To investigate the origin of this phenomenon, ‘null-trails’ were collected without stimulus presentation. Subtraction of phase averaged ‘null trials’ from their phase averaged stimulus-evoked counterparts resulted in four similar time series that resembled the mean stimulus-evoked response. These analyses suggest that linear superposition of evoked and ongoing cortical hemodynamic changes may be a property of the structure of inter-trial variability.

  12. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stewart I; Chan, Stephen; Houweling, Peter J; Quinlan, Kate G R; Murphy, Robyn; Wagner, Sören; Friedrich, Oliver; North, Kathryn N

    2015-01-01

    Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X) in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i) an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii) a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii) a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv) enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments during recent

  13. Altered Ca2+ kinetics associated with α-actinin-3 deficiency may explain positive selection for ACTN3 null allele in human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available Over 1.5 billion people lack the skeletal muscle fast-twitch fibre protein α-actinin-3 due to homozygosity for a common null polymorphism (R577X in the ACTN3 gene. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint performance in elite athletes and beneficial to endurance activities. In the human genome, it is very difficult to find single-gene loss-of-function variants that bear signatures of positive selection, yet intriguingly, the ACTN3 null variant has undergone strong positive selection during recent evolution, appearing to provide a survival advantage where food resources are scarce and climate is cold. We have previously demonstrated that α-actinin-3 deficiency in the Actn3 KO mouse results in a shift in fast-twitch fibres towards oxidative metabolism, which would be more "energy efficient" in famine, and beneficial to endurance performance. Prolonged exposure to cold can also induce changes in skeletal muscle similar to those observed with endurance training, and changes in Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR are a key factor underlying these adaptations. On this basis, we explored the effects of α-actinin-3 deficiency on Ca2+ kinetics in single flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibres from Actn3 KO mice, using the Ca2+-sensitive dye fura-2. Compared to wild-type, fibres of Actn3 KO mice showed: (i an increased rate of decay of the twitch transient; (ii a fourfold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ leak; (iii a threefold increase in the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping; and (iv enhanced maintenance of tetanic Ca2+ during fatigue. The SR Ca2+ pump, SERCA1, and the Ca2+-binding proteins, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin, showed markedly increased expression in muscles of KO mice. Together, these changes in Ca2+ handling in the absence of α-actinin-3 are consistent with cold acclimatisation and thermogenesis, and offer an additional explanation for the positive selection of the ACTN3 577X null allele in populations living in cold environments

  14. Evaluation of the nanosphere verigene gram-positive blood culture assay with the VersaTREK blood culture system and assessment of possible impact on selected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Stacy G; Ciurca, Jane; Smith, Geremy; John, Jeffrey; Lee, Francesca; Doern, Christopher D; Gander, Rita M

    2013-12-01

    The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture (BC-GP) assay (Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL) is a molecular method for the rapid identification of Gram-positive organisms and resistance markers directly from blood culture bottles. A total of 148 VersaTREK REDOX 1 40-ml aerobic bottles demonstrating Gram-positive bacteria were tested. Results were compared with those from conventional biochemical and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) identifications. We obtained isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (24), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (14), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) (17), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis (MSSE) (9), other coagulase-negative staphylococci (19), Streptococcus salivarius (5), Streptococcus parasanguinis (2), Streptococcus sanguinis (1), Streptococcus cristatus (1), the Streptococcus bovis group (5), Streptococcus agalactiae (9), the Streptococcus anginosus group (1), Streptococcus pneumoniae (6), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE FCM) (16), vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis (3), Aerococcus viridans (2), Bacillus (6), Corynebacterium (8), Lactobacillus (2), Micrococcus (2), Neisseria mucosa (1), Escherichia coli (3), Candida tropicalis (1), Propionibacterium (1), and Rothia (1). Overall agreement with the culture results was 95%. A total of 137 of 138 (99%) monomicrobial cultures were concordant. We tested 9 polymicrobial samples and found 33% agreement. A chart review of 31 patients with MRSA, MSSA, or VRE demonstrated that the Nanosphere BC-GP assay might have led to more appropriate antibiotic selection for these patients an average of 42 h earlier. Additionally, contact isolation could have been initiated an average of 37 h earlier for patients with MRSA or VRE. The BC-GP assay may have a positive impact on patient care, health care costs, and antibiotic stewardship.

  15. Rejection Positivity Predicts Trial-to-Trial Reaction Times in an Auditory Selective Attention Task: A Computational Analysis of Inhibitory Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufen eChen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of computer simulations using variants of a formal model of attention (Melara & Algom, 2003 probed the role of rejection positivity (RP, a slow-wave electroencephalographic (EEG component, in the inhibitory control of distraction. Behavioral and EEG data were recorded as participants performed auditory selective attention tasks. Simulations that modulated processes of distractor inhibition accounted well for reaction-time (RT performance, whereas those that modulated target excitation did not. A model that incorporated RP from actual EEG recordings in estimating distractor inhibition was superior in predicting changes in RT as a function of distractor salience across conditions. A model that additionally incorporated momentary fluctuations in EEG as the source of trial-to-trial variation in performance precisely predicted individual RTs within each condition. The results lend support to the linking proposition that RP controls the speed of responding to targets through the inhibitory control of distractors.

  16. 水平极化EMP模拟器参考场位置的选取%Selection of Position for Reference Field of Horizontally Polarized EMP Simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向跃; 孙蓓云; 刘顺坤; 孙东阳

    2009-01-01

    水平极化EMP模拟器是开展大型系统电磁脉冲效应试验的典型装置,参考场是效应试验中最重要的测量参数.分析了地面和受试对象对辐射波电场环境的影响,对水平极化EMP模拟器参考场位置的选取给出建议.%Horizontally polarized EMP simulator is a typical facility to progress researching EMP effect of complex system. The reference field is the most important parameter. The effect of the electromagnetic environment caused by ground and equipment under test (EUT) is researched. Some suggestions about selection of position for reference field of horizontally polarized EMP simulators are put forward.

  17. Selectively catalytic activity of metal-organic frameworks depending on the N-position within the pyridine ring of their building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haitao; Gou, Yongxia; Ye, Jing; Xu, Zhen-liang; Wang, Zixuan

    2016-05-01

    Iron metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [Fe(L)2(SCN)2]∝ (L1: 4-bpdh=2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene for 1Fe; and L2: 3-bpdh=2,5-bis(3-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene for 2Fe) were assembled in a MeOH-H2O solvent system. 1Fe exhibits a two-dimensional extended-grid network, whereas 2Fe exhibits a stair-like double-chain; the N-position within the pyridine ring of the complexes was observed to regulate the MOF structure as layers or chains. Furthermore, selectively catalytic activity was observed for the layered MOF but not the chain-structured MOF; micro/nanoparticles of the layered MOF were therefore investigated for new potential applications of micro/nano MOFs.

  18. Positive selection pressure within teleost Toll-like receptors tlr21 and tlr22 subfamilies and their response to temperature stress and microbial components in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Arvind Y M; Consuegra, Sonia; Kiron, Viswanath; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2012-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in host defence, since they trigger immune response following recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in potential infectious agents. TLRs have been found in numerous organisms, including mammals, birds and teleosts. Some TLR members are commonly retained across all species, whilst others were lost, gained or diverged independently during evolution. Our knowledge about the evolution and specific functions of tlr21, tlr22 and tlr23 in teleosts are still scarce. Phylogenetic analysis of 18 tlr13, tlr21, tlr22 and tlr23 genes from 9 different fish species divided them in two groups. All tlr21 genes were under the first clade, while the second comprised tlr22, tlr23 and tlr13 from Atlantic salmon. Evidence of positive selection was detected at three sites within the leucine-rich repeat regions of Tlr22, which may influence PAMP recognition. Immunostimulation experiments revealed that expression of zebrafish tlr22 is modulated by several unrelated PAMPs. Up to a 3-fold increase in tlr21 and tlr22 expression was detected in larvae exposed to immunostimulants such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan or poly I:C. We found that zebrafish tlrs are expressed mainly in immune-related organs, such as spleen and kidney as well as in testis and temperature stress did not have an effect on the expression of tlr21 and tlr22 in the early stages of development in zebrafish larvae. Our data indicates that these teleost tlrs may play a role in innate host defence. In particular, tlr22 is evolving under positive selection, which indicates functional diversification and adaptation of the response to different PAMPs.

  19. Independent Losses of Function in a Polyphenol Oxidase in Rice: Differentiation in Grain Discoloration between Subspecies and the Role of Positive Selection under Domestication[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanchun; Tang, Tian; Qian, Qian; Wang, Yonghong; Yan, Meixian; Zeng, Dali; Han, Bin; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Li, Jiayang

    2008-01-01

    Asian rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars originated from wild rice and can be divided into two subspecies by several criteria, one of which is the phenol reaction (PHR) phenotype. Grains of indica cultivars turn brown in a phenol solution that accelerates a similar process that occurs during prolonged storage. By contrast, the grains of japonica do not discolor. This distinction may reflect the divergent domestication of these two subspecies. The PHR is controlled by a single gene, Phr1; here, we report the cloning of Phr1, which encodes a polyphenol oxidase. The Phr1 gene is indeed responsible for the PHR phenotype, as transformation with a functional Phr1 can complement a PHR negative cultivar. Phr1 is defective in all japonica lines but functional in nearly all indica and wild strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the defects in Phr1 arose independently three times. The multiple recent origins and rapid spread of phr1 in japonica suggest the action of positive selection, which is further supported by several population genetic tests. This case may hence represent an example of artificial selection driving the differentiation among domesticated varieties. PMID:19033526

  20. Selective versus comprehensive neck dissection in the treatment of patients with a pathologically node-positive neck with or without microscopic extracapsular spread in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z; Gao, Y; Niu, L X; Peng, X; Guo, C B

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prognosis and complications between selective neck dissection (SND) and comprehensive neck dissection (CND) for patients with a pathologically node-positive neck in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the floor of the mouth. This was a retrospective cohort study. There was no significant difference between the SND group and the CND group in 3-year neck control rate (86.2% vs. 85.9%, P=0.797) or disease-specific survival (DSS) rate (64.6% vs. 61.9%, P=0.646). Further analyses of the respective 3-year DSS rates in the SND and CND subgroups were as follows: pN1 without extracapsular spread (ECS), 67.7% vs. 72.2%, P=0.851; pN2b without ECS, 64.7% vs. 68.8%, P=0.797; and pN+ with ECS, 57.1% vs. 60.0%, P=0.939. Of note, there were significantly fewer complications in the SND group compared with the CND group (7.3% vs. 20.0%, P=0.032). Multivariate analysis showed that the modality of neck treatment, pN+ status, and microscopic ECS did not serve as independent prognostic factors. SND plus adjuvant radiotherapy is a management strategy of high efficiency and minor morbidity for selected oral cancer patients with a pN+ neck with or without microscopic ECS.

  1. Control of HIV-1 in Elite Suppressors despite Ongoing Replication and Evolution in Plasma Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Karen A; Brennan, Timothy P.; Bailey, Justin R.; Ray, Stuart C.; Robert F. Siliciano; Blankson, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    A subset of HIV-1-infected patients known as elite controllers or suppressors (ES) control the virus naturally. We have previously demonstrated sequence discordance between proviral and plasma gag clones in ES, much of which can be attributed to selective pressure from the host (J. R. Bailey, T. M. Williams, R. F. Siliciano, and J. N. Blankson, J. Exp. Med. 203:1357-1369, 2006). However, it is not clear whether ongoing viral replication continues in ES once the control of viremia has been est...

  2. Incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genetic structure of new world screwworm fly populations due to positive selection of mutations associated with dimethyl- and diethyl-organophosphates resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Luana Walravens; Fresia, Pablo; Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria L

    2015-01-01

    that these mutations evolved under positive selection.

  3. Survival of the fittest: positive selection of CD4+ T cells expressing a membrane-bound fusion inhibitor following HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Kimpel

    Full Text Available Although a variety of genetic strategies have been developed to inhibit HIV replication, few direct comparisons of the efficacy of these inhibitors have been carried out. Moreover, most studies have not examined whether genetic inhibitors are able to induce a survival advantage that results in an expansion of genetically-modified cells following HIV infection. We evaluated the efficacy of three leading genetic strategies to inhibit HIV replication: 1 an HIV-1 tat/rev-specific small hairpin (sh RNA; 2 an RNA antisense gene specific for the HIV-1 envelope; and 3 a viral entry inhibitor, maC46. In stably transduced cell lines selected such that >95% of cells expressed the genetic inhibitor, the RNA antisense envelope and viral entry inhibitor maC46 provided the strongest inhibition of HIV-1 replication. However, when mixed populations of transduced and untransduced cells were challenged with HIV-1, the maC46 fusion inhibitor resulted in highly efficient positive selection of transduced cells, an effect that was evident even in mixed populations containing as few as 1% maC46-expressing cells. The selective advantage of the maC46 fusion inhibitor was also observed in HIV-1-infected cultures of primary T lymphocytes as well as in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. These results demonstrate robust inhibition of HIV replication with the fusion inhibitor maC46 and the antisense Env inhibitor, and importantly, a survival advantage of cells expressing the maC46 fusion inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Evaluation of the ability of genetic inhibitors of HIV-1 replication to confer a survival advantage on genetically-modified cells provides unique information not provided by standard techniques that may be important in the in vivo efficacy of these genes.

  4. The Role of Glutamic or Aspartic Acid in Position Four of the Epitope Binding Motif and Thyrotropin Receptor-Extracellular Domain Epitope Selection in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hidefumi; Martin, William; Ardito, Matt; De Groot, Anne Searls; De Groot, Leslie J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Development of Graves' disease (GD) is related to HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3),and more specifically to arginine at position 74 of the DRB1 molecule. The extracellular domain (ECD) of human TSH receptor (hTSH-R) contains the target antigen. Objective and Design: We analyzed the relation between hTSH-R-ECD peptides and DR molecules to determine whether aspartic acid (D) or glutamic acid (E) at position four in the binding motif influenced selection of functional epitopes. Results: Peptide epitopes from TSH-R-ECD with D or E in position four (D/E+) had higher affinity for binding to DR3 than peptides without D/E (D/E−) (IC50 29.3 vs. 61.4, P = 0.0024). HLA-DR7, negatively correlated with GD, and DRB1*0302 (HLA-DR18), not associated with GD, had different profiles of epitope binding. Toxic GD patients who are DR3+ had higher responses to D/E+ peptides than D/E− peptides (stimulation index 1.42 vs. 1.22, P = 0.028). All DR3+ GD patients (toxic + euthyroid) had higher responses, with borderline significance (Sl; 1.32 vs. 1.18, P = 0.051). Splenocytes of DR3 transgenic mice immunized to TSH-R-ECD responded to D/E+ peptides more than D/E− peptides (stimulation index 1.95 vs. 1.69, P = 0.036). Seven of nine hTSH-R-ECD peptide epitopes reported to be reactive with GD patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells contain binding motifs with D/E at position four. Conclusions: TSH-R-ECD epitopes with D/E in position four of the binding motif bind more strongly to DRB1*0301 than epitopes that are D/E− and are more stimulatory to GD patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to splenocytes from mice immunized to hTSH-R. These epitopes appear important in immunogenicity to TSH-R due to their favored binding to HLA-DR3, thus increasing presentation to T cells. PMID:20392871

  5. Ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Davignon

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Jean Davignon1, Lawrence A Leiter21Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The multiple effects (ie, pleiotropic effects of statins have received increasing recognition and may have clinical applicability across a broad range of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions. Objective: To determine the relevance and significance of ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins, focusing on nonlipid effects. Method: Ongoing trials were identified through personal communication, reports presented at scientific meetings (2000–2004, and queries made to AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, Merck & Co, Novartis, and Pfizer, manufacturers of the currently marketed statins. Published trials and other source material were identified through electronic searches on MEDLINE (1990–2003, abstract books, and references identified from bibliographies of pertinent articles. Eligible studies were the clinical trials of statins currently under way in which primary or secondary outcomes included the statins’ nonlipid (ie, pleiotropic effect(s. Data were extracted and trial quality was assessed by the authors. Results: Of the 22 ongoing trials of the nonlipid effects of statins identified, 10 assessed inflammatory markers and plaque stabilization, 4 assessed oxidized low density lipoprotein/vascular oxidant stress, 3 assessed end-stage renal disease, 3 assessed fibrinogen/viscosity, 2 assessed endothelial function, 2 assessed acute coronary syndrome, 2 assessed aortic stenosis progression, and 1 each assessed hypertension, osteoporosis, ischemic burden, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke (outcomes often overlapped. Conclusion: Given the excellent safety and tolerability of statins as a class, full exploration of their pleiotropic effects has the potential to provide additional benefits to many patients

  6. Offsetting Ongoing Methane Emissions --- An Alternative to Emission Equivalence Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisby, N.; Enting, I. G.; Lauder, A.; Carter, J.; Cowie, A.; Henry, B.; Raupach, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Warming Potential (GWP) has been widely adopted as a metric for comparing the climate impact of different greenhouse gases. As has been frequently noted, there are many problems with using GWPs to define emission equivalence in spite of the use of GWPs for this purpose in contexts such as the Kyoto Protocol. We propose that for methane, rather than define emission equivalence, the appropriate comparison is between ongoing emissions of 0.9 to 1.0 kg of CH4 per year and one-off emissions of 1 tonne of carbon. This approach represents an approximate solution to the inverse problem of defining a forcing equivalent index (FEI) that gives exact equivalence of radiative forcing over a range of timescales. In our approach, if ongoing methane emissions are offset by a one-off carbon removal that is built up with 40-year e-folding time, then the result is close to radiatively neutral over periods from years to centuries. In contrast, the GWP provides radiative equivalence (in integrated terms) only at a single time, with large discrepancies at other times. Our approach also follows from consideration of greenhouse gas stabilisation, since stabilising atmospheric CO2 requires an approximate cap on total emissions, while stabilising methane requires stabilisation of ongoing emissions. Our quantitative treatment recognises that, on time scales of centuries, removal of 1 tonne of carbon only lowers the atmospheric carbon content by 0.3 to 0.35 tonnes. We discuss the implications for rangeland grazing systems. In the absence of effective mitigation techniques for methane from rangeland systems, this approach may provide an attractive offset mechanism in spite of requiring that woody vegetation be established and maintained over about 15% of the landscape, or an equivalent amount of carbon storage in soil.

  7. Ongoing outbreak of invasive listeriosis, Germany, 2012 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppitsch, Werner; Prager, Rita; Halbedel, Sven; Hyden, Patrick; Pietzka, Ariane; Huhulescu, Steliana; Lohr, Dorothee; Schönberger, Katharina; Aichinger, Elisabeth; Hauri, Anja; Stark, Klaus; Vygen, Sabine; Tietze, Erhard; Allerberger, Franz; Wilking, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Listeriosis patient isolates in Germany have shown a new identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern since 2012 (n = 66). Almost all isolates (Listeria monocytogenes serotype 1/2a) belonged to cases living in southern Germany, indicating an outbreak with a so far unknown source. Case numbers in 2015 are high (n = 28). No outbreak cases outside Germany have been reported. Next generation sequencing revealed the unique cluster type CT1248 and confirmed the outbreak. Investigations into the source are ongoing.

  8. On the Ongoing Evolution of Very High Frequency Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Toke Meyer; Kamby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in radio frequency transmission equipment helps to overcome those. However those circuits were not designed to meet the same requirements as power converters. This paper summarizes the contributions in recent years in application of very high frequency (VHF) technologies in power electronics, describes......The ongoing demand for smaller and lighter power supplies is driving the motivation to increase the switching frequencies of power converters. Drastic increases however come along with new challenges, namely the increase of switching losses in all components. The application of power circuits used...

  9. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál Weihe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an article in this journal, whereas another paper describes the effects associated with contaminant exposure in the Arctic. The cohort descriptions have been arranged geographically, beginning in Norway and moving east to Finland, Sweden, Russia and the other Arctic countries and ultimately to the Faroe Islands. No cohort studies have been reported for Alaska or Iceland.

  10. Overview of ongoing cohort and dietary studies in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihe, Pál; Bjerregaard, Peter; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva; Dudarev, Alexey; Halling, Jónrit; Hansen, Solrunn; Muckle, Gina; Nøst, Therese; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Rautio, Arja; Veyhe, Anna Sofía; Wennberg, Maria; Bergdahl, Ingvar

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the ongoing cohort and dietary studies underlying the assessment of population health in the Arctic. The emphasis here is on a description of the material, methods and results or preliminary results for each study. Detailed exposure information is available in an article in this journal, whereas another paper describes the effects associated with contaminant exposure in the Arctic. The cohort descriptions have been arranged geographically, beginning in Norway and moving east to Finland, Sweden, Russia and the other Arctic countries and ultimately to the Faroe Islands. No cohort studies have been reported for Alaska or Iceland. PMID:27974135

  11. Preparedness for ongoing Ebola virus infection: how to welcome it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Yasri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of Ebola virus infection is the big global concern. Preparedness for ongoing Ebola virus infection is the topic that should be discussed. In fact, it is necessary to set up a biosecurity system to protect against the present Ebola outbreak. The medical personnel have to prepare for fighting the problem. The management of the present outbreak requires international collaboration and control of cross-border disease transmission is also the big challenge. The good case study is the Hajj scenario.

  12. Lack of experimental evidence to support mcr-1-positive escherichia coli strain selection during oral administration of colistin at recommended and higher dose given by gavage in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Alexis; Henri, Jérôme; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnès; Laroche, Julian; Couet, William; Grégoire, Nicolas; Laurentie, Michel

    2017-06-28

    In this study, we assessed the selective effect of colistin orally administered to healthy weaned piglets harbouring an intestinal mcr-1-positive Escherichia coli strain. Maximum recommended dose and a higher dose often used in European pig farms were given by gavage. No selection of the mcr-1-positive strain was observed in our controlled conditions whatever the dose. Further investigations in real farming conditions seem necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  13. Litigation Provides Clues to Ongoing Challenges in Implementing Insurance Parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kelsey N; Huskamp, Haiden A; Goldman, Howard H; Rutkow, Lainie; Barry, Colleen L

    2017-08-11

    Over the past twenty-five years, thirty-seven states and the US Congress have passed mental health and substance use disorder (MH/SUD) parity laws to secure nondiscriminatory insurance coverage for MH/SUD services in the private health insurance market and through certain public insurance programs. However, in the intervening years, litigation has been brought by numerous parties alleging violations of insurance parity. We examine the critical issues underlying these legal challenges as a framework for understanding the areas in which parity enforcement is lacking, as well as ongoing areas of ambiguity in the interpretation of these laws. We identified all private litigation involving federal and state parity laws and extracted themes from a final sample of thirty-seven lawsuits. The primary substantive topics at issue include the scope of services guaranteed by parity laws, coverage of certain habilitative therapies such as applied behavioral analysis for autism spectrum disorders, credentialing standards for MH/SUD providers, determinations regarding the medical necessity of MH/SUD services, and the application of nonquantitative treatment limitations under the 2008 federal parity law. Ongoing efforts to achieve nondiscriminatory insurance coverage for MH/SUDs should attend to the major issues subject to private legal action as important areas for facilitating and monitoring insurer compliance. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  14. The Rare Cancer Network: ongoing studies and future strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Ozsahin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Rare Cancer Network (RCN was formed in the early 1990’s to create a global network that could pool knowledge and resources in the studies of rare malignancies whose infrequency prevented both their study with prospective clinical trials. To date, the RCN has initiated 74 studies resulting in 46 peer reviewed publications. The First International Symposium of the Rare Cancer Network took place in Nice in March of 2014. Status updates and proposals for new studies were heard for fifteen topics. Ongoing studies continue for cardiac sarcomas, thyroid cancers, glomus tumors, and adult medulloblastomas. New proposals were presented at the symposium for primary hepatic lymphoma, solitary fibrous tumors, Rosai-Dorfman disease, tumors of the ampulla of Vater, salivary gland tumors, anorectal melanoma, midline nuclear protein in testes carcinoma, pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea, osteosarcomas of the mandible, and extra-cranial hemangiopericytoma. This manuscript presents the abstracts of those proposals and updates on ongoing studies, as well a brief summary of the vision and future of the RCN.

  15. Positive selection and multiple losses of the LINE-1-derived L1TD1 gene in mammals suggest a dual role in genome defense and pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Richard N; Young, Janet M; Yang, Lei; Neme, Rafik; Wichman, Holly A; Malik, Harmit S

    2014-09-01

    Mammalian genomes comprise many active and fossilized retroelements. The obligate requirement for retroelement integration affords host genomes an opportunity to 'domesticate' retroelement genes for their own purpose, leading to important innovations in genome defense and placentation. While many such exaptations involve retroviruses, the L1TD1 gene is the only known domesticated gene whose protein-coding sequence is almost entirely derived from a LINE-1 (L1) retroelement. Human L1TD1 has been shown to play an important role in pluripotency maintenance. To investigate how this role was acquired, we traced the origin and evolution of L1TD1. We find that L1TD1 originated in the common ancestor of eutherian mammals, but was lost or pseudogenized multiple times during mammalian evolution. We also find that L1TD1 has evolved under positive selection during primate and mouse evolution, and that one prosimian L1TD1 has 'replenished' itself with a more recent L1 ORF1 from the prosimian genome. These data suggest that L1TD1 has been recurrently selected for functional novelty, perhaps for a role in genome defense. L1TD1 loss is associated with L1 extinction in several megabat lineages, but not in sigmodontine rodents. We hypothesize that L1TD1 could have originally evolved for genome defense against L1 elements. Later, L1TD1 may have become incorporated into pluripotency maintenance in some lineages. Our study highlights the role of retroelement gene domestication in fundamental aspects of mammalian biology, and that such domesticated genes can adopt different functions in different lineages.

  16. Positive selection and multiple losses of the LINE-1-derived L1TD1 gene in mammals suggest a dual role in genome defense and pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N McLaughlin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes comprise many active and fossilized retroelements. The obligate requirement for retroelement integration affords host genomes an opportunity to 'domesticate' retroelement genes for their own purpose, leading to important innovations in genome defense and placentation. While many such exaptations involve retroviruses, the L1TD1 gene is the only known domesticated gene whose protein-coding sequence is almost entirely derived from a LINE-1 (L1 retroelement. Human L1TD1 has been shown to play an important role in pluripotency maintenance. To investigate how this role was acquired, we traced the origin and evolution of L1TD1. We find that L1TD1 originated in the common ancestor of eutherian mammals, but was lost or pseudogenized multiple times during mammalian evolution. We also find that L1TD1 has evolved under positive selection during primate and mouse evolution, and that one prosimian L1TD1 has 'replenished' itself with a more recent L1 ORF1 from the prosimian genome. These data suggest that L1TD1 has been recurrently selected for functional novelty, perhaps for a role in genome defense. L1TD1 loss is associated with L1 extinction in several megabat lineages, but not in sigmodontine rodents. We hypothesize that L1TD1 could have originally evolved for genome defense against L1 elements. Later, L1TD1 may have become incorporated into pluripotency maintenance in some lineages. Our study highlights the role of retroelement gene domestication in fundamental aspects of mammalian biology, and that such domesticated genes can adopt different functions in different lineages.

  17. CoMFA analyses of C-2 position salvinorin A analogs at the kappa-opioid receptor provides insights into epimer selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Donna L; Mosier, Philip D; Roth, Bryan L; Westkaemper, Richard B

    2010-04-01

    The highly potent and kappa-opioid (KOP) receptor-selective hallucinogen Salvinorin A and selected analogs have been analyzed using the 3D quantitative structure-affinity relationship technique Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) in an effort to derive a statistically significant and predictive model of salvinorin affinity at the KOP receptor and to provide additional statistical support for the validity of previously proposed structure-based interaction models. Two CoMFA models of Salvinorin A analogs substituted at the C-2 position are presented. Separate models were developed based on the radioligand used in the kappa-opioid binding assay, [(3)H]diprenorphine or [(125)I]6 beta-iodo-3,14-dihydroxy-17-cyclopropylmethyl-4,5 alpha-epoxymorphinan ([(125)I]IOXY). For each dataset, three methods of alignment were employed: a receptor-docked alignment derived from the structure-based docking algorithm GOLD, another from the ligand-based alignment algorithm FlexS, and a rigid realignment of the poses from the receptor-docked alignment. The receptor-docked alignment produced statistically superior results compared to either the FlexS alignment or the realignment in both datasets. The [(125)I]IOXY set (Model 1) and [(3)H]diprenorphine set (Model 2) gave q(2) values of 0.592 and 0.620, respectively, using the receptor-docked alignment, and both models produced similar CoMFA contour maps that reflected the stereoelectronic features of the receptor model from which they were derived. Each model gave significantly predictive CoMFA statistics (Model 1 PSET r(2)=0.833; Model 2 PSET r(2)=0.813). Based on the CoMFA contour maps, a binding mode was proposed for amine-containing Salvinorin A analogs that provides a rationale for the observation that the beta-epimers (R-configuration) of protonated amines at the C-2 position have a higher affinity than the corresponding alpha-epimers (S-configuration).

  18. The effect mechanism of trust on ongoing team' s performance%信任对持续性团队绩效的作用机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珣; 徐彪; 彭纪生

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of team processes framework, team processes are divided into three phases, i.e. transition phase processes, action phase processes, and interpersonal processes. Then representative team processes are selected and a multiple mediator model which transmits the positive effects of trust to team performance is proposed. Then empirical studies of ongoing teams' data are given. It is found that trust has the significant influence on the team performance in ongoing teams. Team reflexivity, team monitoring, and team effort are the mediator variables between them. The results possess the important enlightment for the management of ongoing teams.%在已有文献基础上,依据团队循环阶段模型,把团队发展过程分为三个阶段:过渡阶段、行动阶段和人际阶段,对每个阶段选择了具有代表性的团队过程变量,提出信任对团队绩效影响机制的概念模型,并基于持续性团队进行了实证分析。研究发现,对于持续性团队,信任对团队绩效有显著的影响,且团队自省、团队监督和团队努力三个变量在二者关系中起完全中介作用,研究结果对于持续性团队的管理具有重要的启示意义。

  19. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X; Guilarte, T R

    2015-03-10

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb(2+)) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb(2+) is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVGI) in the brain. Loss of PVGI inhibitory control to pyramidal cells alters the excitatory drive to midbrain dopamine neurons increasing subcortical dopaminergic activity. We hypothesized that if Pb(2+) exposure in early life is an environmental risk factor for SZ, it should recapitulate the loss of PVGI and reproduce subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. We report that on postnatal day 50 (PN50), adolescence rats chronically exposed to Pb(2+) from gestation through adolescence exhibit loss of PVGI in SZ-relevant brain regions. PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) protein were significantly decreased in Pb(2+) exposed rats with no apparent change in calretinin or calbindin protein levels suggesting a selective effect on the PV phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We also show that Pb(2+) animals exhibit a heightened locomotor response to cocaine and express significantly higher levels of dopamine metabolites and D2-dopamine receptors relative to controls indicative of subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. Our results show that developmental Pb(2+) exposure reproduces specific neuropathology and functional dopamine system changes present in SZ. We propose that exposure to environmental toxins that produce NMDAR hypofunction during critical periods of brain development may contribute significantly to the etiology of mental disorders.

  20. Selective determination of tobacco-specific nitrosamines in mainstream cigarette smoke by GC coupled to positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Da; Lu, Yifeng; Lin, Huaqing; Zhou, Wanhong; Gu, Wenbo

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method for the selective determination of four kinds of tobacco-specific nitrosamines, N-nitrosonornicotine, N-nitrosoanatabine, N-nitrosoanabasine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, in mainstream cigarette smoke was developed by GC coupled to positive chemical ionization triple-quadrupole MS. After mainstream cigarette smoke was collected on a cambridge filter pad, the particulate matter was extracted with 0.1 M HCL aqueous solution, cleaned by positive cation-exchange solid extraction, and finally injected into GC-MS/MS using isotopically labeled analogues as internal standards. Excellent linearity was obtained over the concentration range of 0.5-200.0 ng mL(-1) for all tobacco-specific nitrosamines with values for correlation coefficient between 0.9996-0.9999. Limits of detection of each tobacco specific nitrosamine varied from 0.023-0.028 ng cig(-1), and lower limits of quantification varied from 0.077-0.093 ng cig(-1). The recovery of each tobacco specific nitrosamine was from 90.0-109.0%. The relative standard deviations of the intra-day and inter-day precisions were 3.1-5.8 and 3.9-6.6, respectively. This method was applied to reference and domestic cigarettes. The result showed that the method was consistent with traditional methods and can be used as an effective approach for the routine analysis of tobacco-specific nitrosamines. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Evolution of type 2 vaccine derived poliovirus lineages. Evidence for codon-specific positive selection at three distinct locations on capsid wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapani Hovi

    Full Text Available Partial sequences of 110 type 2 poliovirus strains isolated from sewage in Slovakia in 2003-2005, and most probably originating from a single dose of oral poliovirus vaccine, were subjected to a detailed genetic analysis. Evolutionary patterns of these vaccine derived poliovirus strains (SVK-aVDPV2 were compared to those of type 1 and type 3 wild poliovirus (WPV lineages considered to have a single seed strain origin, respectively. The 102 unique SVK-aVDPV VP1 sequences were monophyletic differing from that of the most likely parental poliovirus type 2/Sabin (PV2 Sabin by 12.5-15.6%. Judging from this difference and from the rate of accumulation of synonymous transversions during the 22 month observation period, the relevant oral poliovirus vaccine dose had been administered to an unknown recipient more than 12 years earlier. The patterns of nucleotide substitution during the observation period differed from those found in the studied lineages of WPV1 or 3, including a lower transition/transversion (Ts/Tv bias and strikingly lower Ts/Tv rate ratios at the 2(nd codon position for both purines and pyrimidines. A relatively low preference of transitions at the 2(nd codon position was also found in the large set of VP1 sequences of Nigerian circulating (cVDPV2, as well as in the smaller sets from the Hispaniola cVDPV1 and Egypt cVDPV2 outbreaks, and among aVDPV1and aVDPV2 strains recently isolated from sewage in Finland. Codon-wise analysis of synonymous versus non-synonymous substitution rates in the VP1 sequences suggested that in five codons, those coding for amino acids at sites 24, 144, 147, 221 and 222, there may have been positive selection during the observation period. We conclude that pattern of poliovirus VP1 evolution in prolonged infection may differ from that found in WPV epidemics. Further studies on sufficiently large independent datasets are needed to confirm this suggestion and to reveal its potential significance.

  2. Evidence for positive selection of taurine genes within a QTL region on chromosome X associated with testicular size in Australian Brahman cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Russell E; Loan, Nguyen To; Dierens, Leanne; Fortes, Marina R S; Kelly, Matthew; McWilliam, Sean S; Li, Yutao; Bunch, Rowan J; Harrison, Blair E; Barendse, William; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Moore, Stephen S

    2014-01-10

    Previous genome-wide association studies have identified significant regions of the X chromosome associated with reproductive traits in two Bos indicus-influenced breeds: Brahman cattle and Tropical Composites. Two QTL regions on this chromosome were identified in both breeds as strongly associated with scrotal circumference measurements, a reproductive trait previously shown to be useful for selection of young bulls. Scrotal circumference is genetically correlated with early age at puberty in both male and female offspring. These QTL were located at positions 69-77 and 81-92 Mb respectively, large areas each to which a significant number of potential candidate genes were mapped. To further characterise these regions, a bioinformatic approach was undertaken to identify novel non-synonymous SNP within the QTL regions of interest in Brahman cattle. After SNP discovery, we used conventional molecular assay technologies to perform studies of two candidate genes in both breeds. Non-synonymous SNP mapped to Testis-expressed gene 11 (Tex11) were associated (P Brahman and Tropical Composite cattle with greatest reproductive potential. Association of non-synonymous SNP presented here are a first step to functional genetic studies. Bovine species may serve as a model for studying the role of Tex11 in male fertility, warranting further in-depth molecular characterisation.

  3. [GISE/AIAC position paper on percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: recommendations for patient selection, facilities, competences, organizing and training requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Sergio; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Santoro, Gennaro; De Ponti, Roberto; Danna, Paolo; Zecchin, Massimo; Bedogni, Francesco; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    Thromboembolism from the left atrial appendage is the most feared complication in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The cornerstone for the management of chronic nonvalvular AF is stroke reduction with oral anticoagulation (OAC). However, poor compliance, maintaining a narrow therapeutic window, and major side effects such as bleeding have severely limited its use, creating a therapeutic dilemma. About 20% of AF patients do not receive OAC due to contraindications and less than half of AF patients are not on OAC due to reluctance of the prescribing physician and/or patient non-compliance. Fortunately, over the past decade, the introduction of percutaneous approaches for left atrial appendage occlusion has offered a viable alternative to the management of nonvalvular AF in patients with OAC contraindication. Occlusion devices such as the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug and Watch man device have shown their noninferiority to OAC for stroke prophylaxis with less bleeding complications, while more recently some new devices have been introduced. The aim of this position paper is to review the most relevant clinical aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion from patient selection to periprocedural and follow-up management. In addition, the importance of a medical team and an organizational environment adequate to optimize all the steps of this procedure is discussed.

  4. First study on antimicriobial activity and synergy between isothiocyanates and antibiotics against selected Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria from clinical and animal source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Bennett, Richard N; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2012-05-01

    The emergence of new diseases and the resurgence of several infections that were controlled in the past, associated with recent increase of bacterial resistance have created the necessity for more studies towards to the development of new antimicrobials and new treatment strategies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro synergy between different classes of important glucosinolates hydrolysis products-isothiocyanates with antibiotics (gentamycin and vancomycin), against important pathogenic bacteria: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. A disc diffusion method was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity. The antimicrobial activity of phytochemicals and combinations between gentamycin, vancomycin and phytochemicals were quantitatively assessed by measuring the inhibitory halos. The results showed a selective antimicrobial effect of isothiocyanates, and this effect was strictly related with their chemical structure. In general the benzylisothiocyanate was the most effective compound against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were the bacteria most affected either by the phytochemicals alone or by the combination phytochemical-antibiotic. The bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the less affected pathogen. The most important synergism detected occurred between the commercial antibiotics with benzylisothiocyanate and 2-phenylethylisothiocyanate. In conclusion, some isothiocyanates are effective inhibitors of in vitro bacterial growth, and they can act synergistically with antibiotics.

  5. Selective photochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles on position-controlled ZnO nanorods for the enhancement of yellow-green light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Zhang, Xin; Lee, Keun Woo; Sohn, Ahrum; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Joondong; Song, Jin-Won; Choi, Young Su; Lee, Hee Kwan; Jung, Sang Hyun; Lee, In-Geun; Cho, Young-Dae; Shin, Hyun-Beom; Sung, Ho Kun; Park, Kyung Ho; Kang, Ho Kwan; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-28

    A novel technique for the selective photochemical synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on ZnO nanorod arrays is established by combining ultraviolet-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) for the definition of growth sites, hydrothermal reaction for the position-controlled growth of ZnO nanorods, and photochemical reduction for the decoration of Ag NPs on the ZnO nanorods. During photochemical reduction, the size distribution and loading of Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods can be tuned by varying the UV-irradiation time. The photochemical reduction is hypothesized to facilitate the adsorbed citrate ions on the surface of ZnO, allowing Ag ions to preferentially form Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods. The ratio of visible emission to ultraviolet (UV) emission for the Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized for 30 min, is 20.5 times that for the ZnO nanorod arrays without Ag NPs. The enhancement of the visible emission is believed to associate with the surface plasmon (SP) effect of Ag NPs. The Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays show significant SP-induced enhancement of yellow-green light emission, which could be useful in optoelectronic applications. The technique developed here requires low processing temperatures (120 °C and lower) and no high-vacuum deposition tools, suitable for applications such as flexible electronics.

  6. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-04

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi.

  7. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  8. Ongoing Space Nuclear Systems Development in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Werner; S. Johnson; Michael G. Houts; Donald T. Palac; Lee S. Mason; David I. Poston; A. Lou Qualls

    2011-10-01

    Reliable, long-life power systems are required for ambitious space exploration missions. Nuclear power and propulsion options can enable a bold, new set of missions and introduce propulsion capabilities to achieve access to science destinations that are not possible with more conventional systems. Space nuclear power options can be divided into three main categories: radioisotope power for heating or low power applications; fission power systems for non-terrestrial surface application or for spacecraft power; and fission power systems for electric propulsion or direct thermal propulsion. Each of these areas has been investigated in the United States since the 1950s, achieving various stages of development. While some nuclear systems have achieved flight deployment, others continue to be researched today. This paper will provide a brief overview of historical space nuclear programs in the U.S. and will provide a summary of the ongoing space nuclear systems research, development, and deployment in the United States.

  9. Asymptomatic moyamoya disease: literature review and ongoing AMORE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of a non-invasive magnetic resonance examination has increased the opportunity to identify asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease who have experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, their clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategy are still unclear because of small number of subjects and short follow-up periods. Therefore, we have designed Asymptomatic Moyamoya Registry (AMORE) study in Japan. The objectives of this nation-wide, multi-center prospective study are to clarify long-term prognosis of asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease and to determine the risk factors that cause ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in them. In this article, we review the published data on asymptomatic moyamoya disease and report the on-going multi-center prospective cohort study, AMORE study. We would like to emphasize the importance to determine the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategies of asymptomatic moyamoya disease in very near future.

  10. Planned and ongoing projects (pop) database: development and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Claudia; Erdös, Judit; Warmuth, Marisa; Hinterreiter, Gerda; Krämer, Peter; Chalon, Patrice

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to present the development, structure and results of a database on planned and ongoing health technology assessment (HTA) projects (POP Database) in Europe. The POP Database (POP DB) was set up in an iterative process from a basic Excel sheet to a multifunctional electronic online database. The functionalities, such as the search terminology, the procedures to fill and update the database, the access rules to enter the database, as well as the maintenance roles, were defined in a multistep participatory feedback loop with EUnetHTA Partners. The POP Database has become an online database that hosts not only the titles and MeSH categorizations, but also some basic information on status and contact details about the listed projects of EUnetHTA Partners. Currently, it stores more than 1,200 planned, ongoing or recently published projects of forty-three EUnetHTA Partners from twenty-four countries. Because the POP Database aims to facilitate collaboration, it also provides a matching system to assist in identifying similar projects. Overall, more than 10 percent of the projects in the database are identical both in terms of pathology (indication or disease) and technology (drug, medical device, intervention). In addition, approximately 30 percent of the projects are similar, meaning that they have at least some overlap in content. Although the POP DB is successful concerning regular updates of most national HTA agencies within EUnetHTA, little is known about its actual effects on collaborations in Europe. Moreover, many non-nationally nominated HTA producing agencies neither have access to the POP DB nor can share their projects.

  11. Leadership Succession Planning in Catholic Education: An Ongoing Plan for Leadership Development, Identification, and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Mary; Sabatino, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental elements of successful leadership succession in any organization are recognizing the inevitability of leadership change and the necessity of a plan for leadership succession. This book provides a rationale and planning guideline for board chairs, superintendents, and superiors of religious communities to use when the need arises to…

  12. Methodological approach to the optimization of management system selection in the sphere of industrial enterprises` corporate culture from position of its effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Ovcharenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The article presents the methodological approach to optimization of the choice of management actions in the sphere of corporate culture development from position of its economic efficiency. The author suggests four levels of corporate culture high, heightened, medium and low in accordance with two management instruments of evolutionary and revolutionary character.The results of the analysis. The author found that the cost of managing the development of corporate culture are derived from differentiation and development of personnel incentives. The amount and structure of the cost of management measure implementation depends on selected instrument of corporate culture.Finding of optimal value in terms of tangible and intangible incentives that provides a balance of economic interests of employees and managers is very important in this case.To assess the economic efficiency of corporate culture we offer an original model that consists of the following phases:assessment and determination of the current state of corporate culture at the enterprise;identifying of key directions of corporate culture development;planning of actual management costs dynamics;formation of mechanism of economic benefits calculating;the implementation of expert evaluating the impact of interventions using selected indicators;final calculation of economic efficiency of corporate culture improvement using two methods the diagnostic and control and diagnostic search.The author indicated that at the present stage of domestic industries` development it is important to use diagnostic search in efficiency of corporate culture assessing.We believe that for the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness , it is appropriate to limit the application of methods aimed at determining the degree of deviation of actual results from potentially possible in the market, with appropriate adaptation to the specific conditions of carrying out in domestic industry

  13. Ongoing functional evolution of the bacterial atrazine chlorohydrolase AtzA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sajid; Changey, Frédérique; Oakeshott, John G; Scott, Colin; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2014-02-01

    Triazine herbicides such as atrazine and simazine which were heavily used in the latter half of the twentieth century constituted a rich new source of nitrogen for soil microbes. An atzA dechlorinase active against both atrazine and simazine was isolated from various soil bacteria from diverse locations in the mid 1990s. We have surveyed the atzA genes from eight triazine-degrading Aminobacter aminovorans strains isolated from French agricultural soils recurrently exposed to triazines in 2000. Six amino acid differences from the original isolate were each found in more than one of the A. aminovorans strains. Three of these in particular (V92L, A170T and A296T) were recovered from a majority of the isolates and from locations separated by up to 900 km, so may reflect ongoing selection for the new function. Two of the latter (A170T and A296T) were indeed found to confer higher specificity for simazine, albeit not atrazine, and greater affinity for a metal ion required for activity, than did the original variant. In contrast, we found that ongoing maintenance of the original atzA-containing isolate in laboratory culture for 12 years in a medium containing high concentrations of atrazine has led to the fixation of another amino acid substitution that substantially reduces activity for the triazines. The high concentrations of atrazine in the medium may have relaxed the selection for a highly efficient triazine dechlorinase activity, and that there is some, as yet uncharacterised, counter selection against the activity of this enzyme under these conditions.

  14. Selective photochemical synthesis of Ag nanoparticles on position-controlled ZnO nanorods for the enhancement of yellow-green light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Zhang, Xin; Lee, Keun Woo; Sohn, Ahrum; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Joondong; Song, Jin-Won; Choi, Young Su; Lee, Hee Kwan; Jung, Sang Hyun; Lee, In-Geun; Cho, Young-Dae; Shin, Hyun-Beom; Sung, Ho Kun; Park, Kyung Ho; Kang, Ho Kwan; Park, Won-Kyu; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2015-12-01

    A novel technique for the selective photochemical synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on ZnO nanorod arrays is established by combining ultraviolet-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) for the definition of growth sites, hydrothermal reaction for the position-controlled growth of ZnO nanorods, and photochemical reduction for the decoration of Ag NPs on the ZnO nanorods. During photochemical reduction, the size distribution and loading of Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods can be tuned by varying the UV-irradiation time. The photochemical reduction is hypothesized to facilitate the adsorbed citrate ions on the surface of ZnO, allowing Ag ions to preferentially form Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods. The ratio of visible emission to ultraviolet (UV) emission for the Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized for 30 min, is 20.5 times that for the ZnO nanorod arrays without Ag NPs. The enhancement of the visible emission is believed to associate with the surface plasmon (SP) effect of Ag NPs. The Ag NP-decorated ZnO nanorod arrays show significant SP-induced enhancement of yellow-green light emission, which could be useful in optoelectronic applications. The technique developed here requires low processing temperatures (120 °C and lower) and no high-vacuum deposition tools, suitable for applications such as flexible electronics.A novel technique for the selective photochemical synthesis of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) on ZnO nanorod arrays is established by combining ultraviolet-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) for the definition of growth sites, hydrothermal reaction for the position-controlled growth of ZnO nanorods, and photochemical reduction for the decoration of Ag NPs on the ZnO nanorods. During photochemical reduction, the size distribution and loading of Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods can be tuned by varying the UV-irradiation time. The photochemical reduction is hypothesized to facilitate the adsorbed citrate ions on the surface of ZnO, allowing Ag ions to

  15. Continuously on-going hindcast simulations for impact applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Ivonne; Geyer, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Observations for e.g. temperature, precipitation, radiation, or wind are often used as meteorological forcing for different impact models, like e.g. crop models, urban models, economic models and energy system models. To assess a climate signal, the time period covered by the observation is often too short, they have gaps in between, and are inhomogeneous over time, due to changes in the measurements itself or in the near surrounding. Thus output from global and regional climate models can close the gap and provide homogeneous and physically consistent time series of meteorological parameters. CORDEX evaluation runs performed for the IPCC-AR5 provide a good base for the regional scale. However, with respect to climate services, continuously on-going hindcast simulations are required for regularly updated applications. In this study two projects are presented where hindcast-simulations optimized for a region of interest are performed continuously. The hindcast simulation performed by HZG covering Europe includes the EURO-CORDEX domain with a wider extend to the north to cover the ice edge. The simulation under consideration of the coastDat-experiences is available for the period of 1979 - 2015, prolonged ongoing and fulfills the customer's needs with respect of output variables, levels, intervals and statistical measures. CoastDat - customers are dealing e.g. with naval architecture, renewable energies, offshore wind farming, shipping emissions, coastal flood risk and others. The evaluation of the hindcast is done for Europe by using the EVAL-tool of the CCLM community and by comparison with HYRAS - data for Germany and neighbouring countries. The Climate Research group at the national Austrian weather service, ZAMG, is focusing on high mountain regions and, especially on the Alps. The hindcast-simulation is forced by ERA-interim and optimized for the Alpine Region. One of the main tasks is to capture strong precipitation events which often occur during summer when

  16. Positive selection and intragenic recombination contribute to high allelic diversity in effector genes of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of the black leaf streak disease of banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Cordovez, Viviane; Okmen, Bilal; Beenen, Henriek G; Kema, Gert H J; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we have determined the nonhost-mediated recognition of the MfAvr4 and MfEcp2 effector proteins from the banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in tomato, by the cognate Cf-4 and Cf-Ecp2 resistance proteins, respectively. These two resistance proteins could thus mediate resistance against M. fijiensis if genetically transformed into banana (Musa spp.). However, disease resistance controlled by single dominant genes can be overcome by mutated effector alleles, whose products are not recognized by the cognate resistance proteins. Here, we surveyed the allelic variation within the MfAvr4, MfEcp2, MfEcp2-2 and MfEcp2-3 effector genes of M. fijiensis in a global population of the pathogen, and assayed its impact on recognition by the tomato Cf-4 and Cf-Ecp2 resistance proteins, respectively. We identified a large number of polymorphisms that could reflect a co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. The analysis of nucleotide substitution patterns suggests that both positive selection and intragenic recombination have shaped the evolution of M. fijiensis effectors. Clear differences in allelic diversity were observed between strains originating from South-East Asia relative to strains from other banana-producing continents, consistent with the hypothesis that M. fijiensis originated in the Asian-Pacific region. Furthermore, transient co-expression of the MfAvr4 effector alleles and the tomato Cf-4 resistance gene, as well as of MfEcp2, MfEcp2-2 and MfEcp2-3 and the putative Cf-Ecp2 resistance gene, indicated that effector alleles able to overcome these resistance genes are already present in natural populations of the pathogen, thus questioning the durability of resistance that can be provided by these genes in the field. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  18. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D; Granados-Silvestre, Ma de Angeles; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M; Knowler, William C; Bortolini, M Cátira; Hayden, Michael R; Baier, Leslie J; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-07-15

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressin