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Sample records for oneidensis mr-1 fluxome

  1. The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various OxygenConditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-17

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited(micro-aerobic) chemostat conditions using 13C labeled lactate as thesole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids inbiomass were probed using both GC-MS and 13C-NMR. Based on the genomeannotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify thecentral metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that thetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route underboth conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways weremainly utilized for biomass synthesis (flux below 5 percent of thelactate uptake rate). The anapleurotic reactions (pyruvate to malate andoxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt wereactive. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount of carbonwas oxidized via the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Fluxesthrough the TCA cycle were less whereas acetate production was more underoxygen limitation than under carbon limitation. Although fluxdistributions under aerobic, micro-aerobic, and shake-flask cultureconditions were dramatically different, the relative flux ratios of thecentral metabolic reactions did not vary significantly. Hence, S.oneidensis metabolism appears to be quite robust to environmentalchanges. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13CNMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C labeledsubstrates and to obtain more accurate flux values.

  2. Electroanalysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumyantseva, V V; Shebanova, A S; Chalenko, Ya M; Voeikova, T A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V; Debabov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of bacterial cells Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were investigated. For registration of the direct electron transfer between S. oneidensis MR-1 and electrode, bacterial cells were pretreated with didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), a synthetic membrane-like substance of polycationic nature that exhibits membrane-loosening properties. Such pretreatment of S. oneidensis MR-1 allowed increasing the efficiency of extracellular electron transfer by the proteobacterium due to better availability of electroactive proteins for registration of electron transfer processes. The electroanalysis of bacterial cells S. oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions allows registering redox-active proteins and biomolecules in the range of potentials of-0.40,-0.16, and-0 V, which corresponds to flavohemoproteins, quinone derivatives, and c-type cytochromes of the external membrane of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells.

  3. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, J.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-15

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 20 _C or 2.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 37 _C) to generate U(IV) solids at ‘‘fast” and ‘‘slow” rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9–3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  4. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, Jeffrey T.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-01

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO 2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO 3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O 2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 × 10 8 cell ml -1 at 20 °C or 2.0 × 10 8 cell ml -1 at 37 °C) to generate U(IV) solids at "fast" and "slow" rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9-3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  5. The Role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Surface Structures in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    bacteria such as Shewanella putrefaciens sp200, Geobacter metallireducens, and G. sulfurreducens [14 – 17]. In several of these bacteria, target- ing of c...Full Paper The Role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Surface Structures in Extracellular Electron Transfer Rachida A. Bouhenni,a, f Gary J. Vora,b...metal reducer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) depends on the activity of a predicted type IV prepilin

  6. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Chromate Insult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Melissa R.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Chourey, Karuna; Brown, Steven D.; Hettich, Robert L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterium originally isolated from a freshwater lake. S. oneidensis MR-1 has the ability to reduce toxic metal ions [e.g., Cr(VI) and U(VI)] found in industrial and governmental waste sites. Cells were grown and exposed to three different metal concentrations in order to probe the dosage response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to Cr(VI) in the form of chromate. Protein fractions were digested with trypsin and analyzed with a multidimensional HPLC-NanoESIMS/MS protocol. The goal of this work is to identify protein components of pathways/mechanisms responsible for both detoxification and reduction of chromate.

  7. Electrochemical Catalysis of Inorganic Complex K4[Fe(CN)6] by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Xiao, Yong

    to the redox proteins localized to the outer-membrane, for example, the MtrC, MtrB,MtrA and CymA2. Here we investigate its electrochemical properties towards redox inorganic redox compounds. It shows strong electrocatalysis toward electrochemical oxidation of K4[Fe(CN)6]. As a redox molecule, K4[Fe(CN)6] gives...... on the selectivity and electrocatalysis mechanisms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are under investigation. The ability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to catalyze redox action of inorganic metal complex compounds will provide an insight on metal cycles in nature....... disappearance of the cathodic peak and strengthen of the anodic peak, which is a typical catalysis feature of electrochemical oxidation. Further experiments show that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 does not give such electrocatalysis to redox compounds such as Ru[(NH3)6]Cl3 and Resorufin. Systematic study...

  8. Survival of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 to GPa pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Daniel, Isabelle; Eakins, Daniel; Meersman, Filip; McMillian, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Most life on Earth is thought to occupy near-surface environments under relatively mild conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salinity etc. That view is changing following discovery of extremophile organisms that prefer environments based on high or low T, extreme chemistries, or very high pressures. Over the past three decades, geomicrobiologists have discovered an extensive subsurface biosphere, that may account for between 1/10 to 1/3 of Earth's living biomass. We subjected samples of Shewanella oneidensis to several pressure cycles to examine its survival to static high pressures to above 1.5 GPa. Shewanella forms part of a genus that contains several piezophile species like S. violacea and S. benthica. We have obtained growth curves for populations recovered from high P conditions and cultured in the laboratory, before being subjected to even higher pressures. We have also carried out dynamic shock experiments using a specially designed cell to maintain high-P, low-T conditions during shock-recovery experiments and observe colony formation among the survivors. Colony counts, shape and growth curves allow us to compare the static vs dynamic pressure resistance of wild type vs pressure-adapted strains. Leverhulme

  9. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  10. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cyclin...

  11. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendall, Matthew L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Luong, Khai [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wetmore, Kelly M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blow, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Korlach, Jonas [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutschbauer, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malmstrom, Rex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  12. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  13. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 -a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment.

  14. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Learman, Deric R.; Yi, Haakrho; Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Stanton L.; Geesey, Gill G.; Stevens, Ann M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-01-05

    The role of LuxS in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been examined by transcriptomic profiling, biochemical, and physiological experiments. The results indicate that a mutation in luxS alters biofilm development, not by altering quorum-sensing abilities but by disrupting the activated methyl cycle (AMC). The S. oneidensis wild type can produce a luminescence response in the AI-2 reporter strain Vibrio harveyi MM32. This luminescence response is abolished upon the deletion of luxS. The deletion of luxS also alters biofilm formations in static and flowthrough conditions. Genetic complementation restores the mutant biofilm defect, but the addition of synthetic AI-2 has no effect. These results suggest that AI-2 is not used as a quorum-sensing signal to regulate biofilm development in S. oneidensis. Growth on various sulfur sources was examined because of the involvement of LuxS in the AMC. A mutation in luxS produced a reduced ability to grow with methionine as the sole sulfur source. Methionine is a key metabolite used in the AMC to produce a methyl source in the cell and to recycle homocysteine. These data suggest that LuxS is important to metabolizing methionine and the AMC in S. oneidensis.

  15. The octahaem SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha; Romine, Margie; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors including thiosulfate, polysulfide and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyses six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones but was independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octahaem c cytochrome with an atypical haem binding site. The sulfite reductase of S. oneidensis MR-1 does not appear to be a sirohaem enzyme, but represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The gene that encodes SirA is located within a 10-gene locus that is predicted to encode a component of a specialized haem lyase, a menaquinone oxidase and copper transport proteins. This locus was identified in the genomes of several Shewanella species and appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  16. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  17. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS......It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...

  18. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  19. Purification and Characterization of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Herve; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-02

    The γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that was implicated in both H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned into a protein expression vector. The resulting plasmid was transformed into a MR-1 mutant deficient in H2 formation. Expression of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant’s ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for wild type. Following expression, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase was purified to near homogeneity. The purified MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase could couple H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII) and methyl viologen directly. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated Tc(VII) but not methyl viologen reductions. Under the conditions tested, Tc(VII) reduction was complete in Tris buffer but not in HEPES buffer. The reduced Tc(IV) was soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc(IV) precipitates formed in HEPES buffer were packed with crystallites. Although X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the reduction products found in both buffers were Tc(IV), extended X-ray adsorption fine-structure measurements revealed that these products were very different. While the product in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2•nH2O. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase is a bidirectional enzyme that catalyzes both H2 formation and oxidation as well as Tc(VII) reduction directly by coupling H2 oxidation.

  20. Purification and characterization of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M; Plymale, Andrew E; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-08-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase) that has been implicated in H(2) production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H(2) at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase coupled H(2) oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O(4)(-) used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O(2)·nH(2)O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction directly by coupling to H(2) oxidation.

  1. Changes in Carbon Electrode Morphology Affect Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. P. Sanchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm-electrodes is crucial for microbial fuel cell current production because optimal performance is often associated with thick biofilms. However, the influence of the electrode structure and morphology on biofilm formation is only beginning to be investigated. This study provides insight on how changing the electrode morphology affects current production of a pure culture of anode-respiring bacteria. Specifically, an analysis of the effects of carbon fiber electrodes with drastically different morphologies on biofilm formation and anode respiration by a pure culture (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were examined. Results showed that carbon nanofiber mats had ~10 fold higher current than plain carbon microfiber paper and that the increase was not due to an increase in electrode surface area, conductivity, or the size of the constituent material. Cyclic voltammograms reveal that electron transfer from the carbon nanofiber mats was biofilm-based suggesting that decreasing the diameter of the constituent carbon material from a few microns to a few hundred nanometers is beneficial for electricity production solely because the electrode surface creates a more relevant mesh for biofilm formation by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

  2. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCoursolle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA, an integral outer membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB and an outer membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC. Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC / mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA / MtrE / OmcA is able to reduce iron(III citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications towards the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production.

  3. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, Charles E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Beliaev, Alex S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zakrajsek, Brian A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reardon, Catherine L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lowy, Daniel A. [Nova Research Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States); Poppy, Tara E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Maloney, Andrea [Winthrop Univ., Rock Hill, SC (United States); Ekechukwu, Amy A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  4. CRP Regulates D-Lactate Oxidation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kasai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a heterotrophic facultative anaerobe that respires using various organic and inorganic compounds. This organism has served as a model to study bacterial metabolic and regulatory systems that facilitate their survival in redox-stratified environments. The expression of many anaerobic respiratory genes in MR-1, including those for the reduction of fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and metal oxides, is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP. However, relatively little is known about how this organism regulates the expression of catabolic enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of organic compounds, including lactate. Here, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms for the lldP (SO_1522 and dld (SO_1521 genes, which encode putative lactate permease and D-lactate dehydrogenase, respectively, and demonstrate that CRP regulates their expression in MR-1. We found that a crp-deletion mutant of MR-1 (Δcrp showed impaired growth on D-lactate. Complementary expression of dld in Δcrp restored the ability to grow on D-lactate, indicating that the deficient growth of Δcrp on D-lactate is attributable to decreased expression of dld. In vivo transcription and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that CRP positively regulates the expression of the lldP and dld genes by directly binding to an upstream region of lldP. Taken together, these results indicate that CRP is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates the expression of catabolic and respiratory pathways in MR-1, including D-lactate dehydrogenase and anaerobic terminal reductases.

  5. CRP Regulates D-Lactate Oxidation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a heterotrophic facultative anaerobe that respires using various organic and inorganic compounds. This organism has served as a model to study bacterial metabolic and regulatory systems that facilitate their survival in redox-stratified environments. The expression of many anaerobic respiratory genes in MR-1, including those for the reduction of fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and metal oxides, is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). However, relatively little is known about how this organism regulates the expression of catabolic enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of organic compounds, including lactate. Here, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms for the lldP (SO_1522) and dld (SO_1521) genes, which encode putative lactate permease and D-lactate dehydrogenase, respectively, and demonstrate that CRP regulates their expression in MR-1. We found that a crp-deletion mutant of MR-1 (Δcrp) showed impaired growth on D-lactate. Complementary expression of dld in Δcrp restored the ability to grow on D-lactate, indicating that the deficient growth of Δcrp on D-lactate is attributable to decreased expression of dld. In vivo transcription and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that CRP positively regulates the expression of the lldP and dld genes by directly binding to an upstream region of lldP. Taken together, these results indicate that CRP is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates the expression of catabolic and respiratory pathways in MR-1, including D-lactate dehydrogenase and anaerobic terminal reductases.

  6. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eShi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III] (oxy(hydroxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 has evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway for transferring electrons across the entire cell envelope to the surface of extracellular Fe(III oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt that is proposed to oxidize the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons across the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. Functioning as terminal reductases, the outer membrane and decaheme c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III oxides. MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III. Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III oxides.

  7. Growth Inhibition and Stimulation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by Surfactants and Calcium Polysulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Kathryn L.; Tilton, Fred A.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Ergas, Sarina J.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miracle, Ann L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-06-14

    Foam delivery technology (FDT) uses surfactant based foam to immobilize subsurface contaminants in situ. Where traditional approaches are impractical, FDT has the potential to overcome many of the technical challenges facing the remediation of contaminated deep vadose zone environments. However, little is known about the effects these reactive chemicals may have on microorganisms inhabiting the contaminated subsurface. In addition, there are currently no standard assays to assess microbial responses to subsurface remedial treatments while these agents are under development. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid laboratory assay to assess the potential growth inhibition and/or stimulation of microorganisms following exposure to candidate FDT components. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) and several surfactants (i.e. sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and NINOL40-CO) have diverse chemistries and are candidate components of FDT. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of these chemicals to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and the growth and viability potential of these components. Concentrations of SDS higher than 700 {micro}M were toxic to S. oneidensis MR-1 growth over the course of four days of exposure. The relative acute toxicity order for these compounds was SDS>>CPS>>NINOL40-CO>SLES-CAPB. Dose dependent growth decreases (20 to 100 mM) were observed in the CAPB and SLES treated cultures and both CPS and NINOL 40-CO were toxic at all concentrations tested (1.45 to 7.25 mM CPS). Both SLES (20 to 100 mM) and SDS at lower concentrations (20 to 500 {micro}M) were stimulatory to S. oneidensis MR-1 indicating a capacity to be used as a carbon source. These studies also identified potentially key component characteristics, such as precipitate formation and oxygen availability, which may prove valuable in assessing the response of subsurface

  8. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  9. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  10. Biosynthesis of selemium nanobars by Shewallena oneidensis MR-1%希瓦氏菌Shewallena oneidensis MR-1合成硒纳米棒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓欢; 郑志勇; 赵峰

    2015-01-01

    [目的]探索采用希瓦氏菌合成硒(Se)纳米棒,并阐明合成底物Se(Ⅳ)的浓度与细菌培养时间对生物合成的影响.[方法]将希瓦氏菌Shewallena oneidensis MR-1接种至Luria-Bertani(LB)液体培养基,分别以Se(Ⅳ)浓度0.1、1、10和100 mmol/L的Na2S03作为电子受体,厌氧培养并绘制生长曲线.再将希瓦氏菌接种到含最适Se(Ⅳ)浓度的LB培养基中,在厌氧培养后第24和72 h离心获取沉淀.采用扫描电镜、X射线能谱和X射线衍射对沉淀进行分析.[结果]在Se(Ⅳ)浓度1 mmol/L的培养基中培养24 h形成的纳米棒沉淀截面直径约80 nm,长度2-3 μm.而培养72 h形成的沉淀较大,超出纳米物质范畴.采用X射线能谱和X射线衍射确定纳米棒组成为单质Se.[结论]本研究为生物合成Se纳米棒提供了一种可行的方法.希瓦氏菌最适宜在1 mmol/L Se(Ⅳ)浓度下以及在对数生长期大量合成Se纳米棒,具有潜在应用价值.

  11. The outer membrane cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    2004-01-01

    To determine if the outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA and OmcB of the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins, and to assess cell surface exposure of the cytochromes by radioiodination. In anaerobic MR-1 cells grown with (3)H-palmitoleic acid, both OmcA and OmcB were radiolabelled. The identities of these bands were confirmed by the absence of each radiolabelled band in the respective mutants lacking individual OM cytochromes. Radioiodination of cell surface proteins in anaerobic cells resulted in (125)I-labelled OmcA. The identity of this band was confirmed by its absence in an OmcA-minus mutant. A ubiquitous radioiodinated band that migrates similarly to OmcB precluded the ability to determine the potential cell surface exposure of OmcB by this method. Both OmcA and OmcB are lipoproteins, and OmcA is cell surface exposed. The lipoprotein modification of these OM cytochromes could be important for their localization or incorporation into the OM. The cell surface exposure of OmcA could allow it to directly transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors (e.g. manganese oxides) and is consistent with its in vivo role.

  12. Synthetic and Evolutionary Construction of a Chlorate-Reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Iain C; Melnyk, Ryan A; Youngblut, Matthew D; Carlson, Hans K; Iavarone, Anthony T; Coates, John D

    2015-05-19

    Despite evidence for the prevalence of horizontal gene transfer of respiratory genes, little is known about how pathways functionally integrate within new hosts. One example of a mobile respiratory metabolism is bacterial chlorate reduction, which is frequently encoded on composite transposons. This implies that the essential components of the metabolism are encoded on these mobile elements. To test this, we heterologously expressed genes for chlorate reduction from Shewanella algae ACDC in the non-chlorate-reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The construct that ultimately endowed robust growth on chlorate included cld, a cytochrome c gene, clrABDC, and two genes of unknown function. Although strain MR-1 was unable to grow on chlorate after initial insertion of these genes into the chromosome, 11 derived strains capable of chlorate respiration were obtained through adaptive evolution. Genome resequencing indicated that all of the evolved chlorate-reducing strains replicated a large genomic region containing chlorate reduction genes. Contraction in copy number and loss of the ability to reduce chlorate were also observed, indicating that this phenomenon was extremely dynamic. Although most strains contained more than six copies of the replicated region, a single strain with less duplication also grew rapidly. This strain contained three additional mutations that we hypothesized compensated for the low copy number. We remade the mutations combinatorially in the unevolved strain and determined that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of cld enabled growth on chlorate and was epistatic to a second base pair change in the NarP binding sequence between narQP and nrfA that enhanced growth. The ability of chlorate reduction composite transposons to form functional metabolisms after transfer to a new host is an important part of their propagation. To study this phenomenon, we engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into a chlorate reducer. We defined a set of

  13. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Majors, Paul D.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms are known to possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments within that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and also the spatial arrangement of the community members. Using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated anaerobic reduction kinetics, structural variation, and the stratification of metabolism within live biofilms of the facultative anaerobic dissimilatory metal-reducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pregrown using a defined minimal media in a homebuilt constant depth film fermenter and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. The sample was subjected to various, rapidly switched substrate/ anaerobic electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate electron acceptors). Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively monitored the spectra of hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under oxygen-limited conditions. Anaerobic reduction was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicate that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch between fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate electron acceptors. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate structural changes in response to the availability of electron acceptor and also the outcome of metabolic competition under oxygen-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how this possibly translates to the environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described here.

  14. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  15. Extracellular biosynthesis of copper sulfide nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a photothermal agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan-Qing; Tian, Li-Jiao; Wang, Yu-Cai; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Xing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally invasive and effective cancer treatment method and has a great potential for innovating the conventional chemotherapy approaches. Copper sulfide (CuS) exhibits photostability, low cost, and high absorption in near infrared region, and is recognized as an ideal candidate for PTT. However, CuS, as a photothermal agent, is usually synthesized with traditional chemical approaches, which require high temperature, additional stabilization and hydrophilic modification. Herein, we report, for the first time, the preparation of CuS nanoparticles as a photothermal agent by a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella. oneidensis MR-1. The prepared nanoparticles are homogenously shaped, hydrophilic, small-sized (∼5nm) and highly stable. Furthermore, the biosynthesized CuS nanoparticles display a high photothermal conversion efficiency of 27.2% because of their strong absorption at 1100nm. The CuS nanoparticles could be effectively used as a PTT agent under the irradiation of 1064nm. This work provides a simple, eco-friendly and cost-effective approach for fabricating PTT agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-06

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the BarA/UvrY two-component system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Binnenkade

    Full Text Available The BarA/UvrY two-component system is well conserved in species of the γ-proteobacteria and regulates numerous processes predominantly by controlling the expression of a subset of noncoding small RNAs. In this study, we identified and characterized the BarA/UvrY two-component system in the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Functional interaction of sensor kinase BarA and the cognate response regulator UvrY was indicated by in vitro phosphotransfer studies. The expression of two predicted small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs, CsrB1 and CsrB2, was dependent on UvrY. Transcriptomic analysis by microarrays revealed that UvrY is a global regulator and directly or indirectly affects transcript levels of more than 200 genes in S. oneidensis. Among these are genes encoding key enzymes of central carbon metabolism such as ackA, aceAB, and pflAB. As predicted of a signal transduction pathway that controls aspects of central metabolism, mutants lacking UvrY reach a significantly higher OD than the wild type during aerobic growth on N-acetylglucosamine (NAG while under anaerobic conditions the mutant grew more slowly. A shorter lag phase occurred with lactate as carbon source. In contrast, significant growth phenotypes were absent in complex medium. Based on these studies we hypothesize that, in S. oneidensis MR-1, the global BarA/UvrY/Csr regulatory pathway is involved in central carbon metabolism processes.

  18. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  19. Constraint-based model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism: a tool for data analysis and hypothesis generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy E Pinchuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and utilization of electron transfer networks, as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism. To understand how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 utilizes its resources, the metabolic network was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii developed an approach to identify cycles (such as futile cycles and circulations, (iii classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism at a

  20. Integrating flux balance analysis into kinetic models to decipher the dynamic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyang Feng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sequentially utilizes lactate and its waste products (pyruvate and acetate during batch culture. To decipher MR-1 metabolism, we integrated genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA into a multiple-substrate Monod model to perform the dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA. The dFBA employed a static optimization approach (SOA by dividing the batch time into small intervals (i.e., ∼400 mini-FBAs, then the Monod model provided time-dependent inflow/outflow fluxes to constrain the mini-FBAs to profile the pseudo-steady-state fluxes in each time interval. The mini-FBAs used a dual-objective function (a weighted combination of "maximizing growth rate" and "minimizing overall flux" to capture trade-offs between optimal growth and minimal enzyme usage. By fitting the experimental data, a bi-level optimization of dFBA revealed that the optimal weight in the dual-objective function was time-dependent: the objective function was constant in the early growth stage, while the functional weight of minimal enzyme usage increased significantly when lactate became scarce. The dFBA profiled biologically meaningful dynamic MR-1 metabolisms: 1. the oxidative TCA cycle fluxes increased initially and then decreased in the late growth stage; 2. fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis were stable in the exponential growth period; and 3. the glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated when acetate became the main carbon source for MR-1 growth.

  1. An iTRAQ characterisation of the role of TolC during electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Gregory J S; Pereira-Medrano, Ana G; Jaffe, Stephen; Pasternak, Grzegorz; Pham, Trong Khoa; Ledezma, Pablo; Hall, Simon T E; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-11-01

    Anodophilic bacteria have the ability to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by extracellular electron transfer to the anode. We investigated the anode-specific responses of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an exoelectroactive Gammaproteobacterium, using for the first time iTRAQ and 2D-LC MS/MS driven membrane proteomics to compare protein abundances in S. oneidensis when generating power in MFCs, and growing in a continuous culture. The regulated dataset produced was enriched in membrane proteins. Proteins shown to be more abundant in anaerobic electroactive anodic cells included efflux pump TolC and an uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein, whilst the TonB2 system and associated uncharacterised proteins such as TtpC2 and DUF3450 were more abundant in microaerobic planktonic cells. In order to validate the iTRAQ data, the functional role for TolC was examined using a δTolC knockout mutant of S. oneidensis. Possible roles for the uncharacterised proteins were identified using comparative bioinformatics. We demonstrate that employing an insoluble extracellular electron acceptor requires multiple proteins involved in cell surface properties. All MS and processed data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004090.

  2. Confirmation of the Expression of a Large Set of Conserved Hypothetical Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-08-01

    High-throughput “omic” technologies have allowed for a relatively rapid, yet comprehensive analysis of the global expression patterns within an organism in response to perturbations. In the current study, tryptic peptides were identified with high confidence from capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of 26 chemostat cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under various conditions. Using at least one distinctive and a total of two total peptide identifications per protein, we detected the expression of 758 conserved hypothetical proteins. This included 359 such proteins previously described (Kolker et al, 2005) with an additional 399 reported herein for the first time. The latter 399 proteins ranged from 5.3 to 208.3 kDa, with 44 being of 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some conserved hypothetical proteins. Such proteins were found not only to be expressed, but 19 were only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby providing insight into potential functions. These findings also impact the genomic annotation for S. oneidensis MR-1 by confirming that these genes code for expressed proteins. Our results indicate that 399 proteins can now be upgraded from “conserved hypothetical protein” to “expressed protein in Shewanella,” 19 of which appeared to be expressed under specific culture conditions.

  3. Recombinant engineering of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewanella oneidensis is known to respire with extracellular solid metal oxides (i.e., iron, manganese, uranium) as a terminal electron acceptor. It has become the focus of intensive research not only due to its important bioremediation features, but also as a potential organism for biological elec...

  4. Involvement of cytochrome c CymA in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Nancy N; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-02-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a cyclic nitramine explosive commonly used for military applications that is responsible for severe soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was shown to efficiently degrade RDX anaerobically (3.5 µmol·h(-1)·(g protein)(-1)) via two initial routes: (1) sequential N-NO(2) reductions to the corresponding nitroso (N-NO) derivatives (94% of initial RDX degradation) and (2) denitration followed by ring cleavage. To identify genes involved in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX, a library of ~2500 mutants of MR-1 was constructed by random transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants with a reduced ability to degrade RDX compared with the wild type. An RDX-defective mutant (C9) was isolated that had the transposon inserted in the c-type cytochrome gene cymA. C9 transformed RDX at ~10% of the wild-type rate, with degradation occurring mostly via early ring cleavage caused by initial denitration leading to the formation of methylenedinitramine, 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal, formaldehyde, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Genetic complementation of mutant C9 restored the wild-type phenotype, providing evidence that electron transport components have a role in the anaerobic reduction of RDX by MR-1.

  5. H₂-dependent azoreduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: involvement of secreted flavins and both [Ni-Fe] and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Lorquin, Jean; Brugna, Myriam; Rousset, Marc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen (H2)-dependent discoloration of azo dye amaranth by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Experiments with hydrogenase-deficient strains demonstrated that periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (HyaB) and periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase (HydA) are both respiratory hydrogenases of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. oneidensis MR-1. These findings suggest that HyaB and HydA can function as uptake hydrogenases that couple the oxidation of H2 to the reduction of amaranth to sustain cellular growth. This constitutes to our knowledge the first report of the involvement of [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase in a bacterial azoreduction process. Assays with respiratory inhibitors indicated that a menaquinone pool and different cytochromes were involved in the azoreduction process. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin were secreted in culture supernatant by S. oneidensis MR-1 under H2-dependent conditions with concentration of 1.4 and 2.4 μmol g protein(-1), respectively. These endogenous flavins were shown to significantly accelerate the reduction of amaranth at micromolar concentrations acting as electron shuttles between the cell surface and the extracellular azo dye. This work may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms of azoreduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 and may have practical applications for microbiological treatments of dye-polluted industrial effluents.

  6. Structural and spectroscopic studies on the porin-cytochrome complex from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Lawes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The"outer"membrane,"hetero!trimeric"multi!heme"cytochrome"complex"MtrCAB,"enables"the" process"of"dissimilatory"metal"reduction"(DMR)"in"Shewanella(oneidensis." "" The"properties"of" the"decaheme"protein"MtrA"as"well"as"a" truncated"version"of" this"protein" were" investigated" using" analytical" ultracentrifugation" (AUC)," small" angle" X!ray" scattering" (SAXS)" and" spectropotentiometric" techniques." MtrA" and" a" truncated"N!terminal" MtrA" construct"containing" the" f...

  7. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  8. Fnr (EtrA acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gralnick Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is complex and not well understood. Results The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and fumarate reductase gene expression was down-regulated at least 2-fold in the mutant, which, showed lower or no reduction of these electron acceptors when compared to the wild type, suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down-regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. Conclusion In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and, in conjunction with other regulators, fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1. Transcriptomic and sequence analyses of the genes differentially expressed showed that those mostly affected by the mutation belonged to the "Energy metabolism" category, while stress-related genes were indirectly regulated in the mutant possibly as a result of a secondary perturbation (e.g. oxidative stress, starvation. We also conclude based on sequence, physiological and expression analyses that this regulator is more appropriately termed Fnr and recommend this descriptor be used in future publications.

  9. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...... the extraction (Figure 1.a and 1.b). Comparing to cells in control group, MR-1 treated at 38 °C for EPS extraction showed different electrochemical characterizations as revealed by differential pulse voltammetry (Figure 1.c). EPS extracted from MR-1 also was proved to be electrochemically active. The present...

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chourey Karuna

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon. Results Inactivation of so2426 by an in-frame deletion resulted in enhanced chromate sensitivity and a reduced capacity to remove extracellular Cr(VI relative to the parental strain. Time-resolved microarray analysis was used to compare transcriptomic profiles of wild-type and SO2426-deficient mutant S. oneidensis under conditions of chromate exposure. In total, 841 genes (18% of the arrayed genome were up- or downregulated at least twofold in the Δso2426 mutant for at least one of six time-point conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis of temporal transcriptional profiles identified a distinct cluster (n = 46 comprised of co-ordinately regulated genes exhibiting significant downregulated expression (p e.g., siderophore biosynthetic enzymes, TonB-dependent receptors, and the iron-storage protein ferritin. A conserved hypothetical operon (so1188-so1189-so1190, previously identified as a potential target of Fur-mediated repression, as well as a putative bicyclomycin resistance gene (so2280 and cation efflux family protein gene (so2045 also were repressed in the so2426 deletion mutant. Furthermore, the temporal expression profiles of four regulatory genes including a cpxR homolog were perturbed in the

  11. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of various culture condition on Cr (VI)reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a novel high-throughputmini-bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Laidlaw, David; Gani, Kishen; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-16

    The growth and Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensisMR-1 was examined using a mini-bioreactor system that independentlymonitors and controls pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature for each ofits 24, 10-mL reactors. Independent monitoring and control of eachreactor in the cassette allows the exploration of a matrix ofenvironmental conditions known to influence S. oneidensis chromiumreduction. S. oneidensis MR-1 grew in minimal medium without amino acidor vitamin supplementation under aerobic conditions but required serineand glycine supplementation under anaerobic conditions. Growth wasinhibited by dissolved oxygen concentrations>80 percent. Lactatetransformation to acetate was enhanced by low concentration of dissolvedoxygen during the logarithmic growth phase. Between 11 and 35oC, thegrowth rate obeyed the Arrhenius reaction rate-temperature relationship,with a maximum growth rate occurring at 35oC. S. oneidensis MR-1 was ableto grow over a wide range of pH (6-9). At neutral pH and temperaturesranging from 30-35oC, S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced 100 mu M Cr(VI) toCr(III) within 20 minutes in the exponential growth phase, and the growthrate was not affected by the addition of chromate; it reduced chromateeven faster at temperatures between 35 and 39oC. At low temperatures(<25oC), acidic (pH<6.5), or alkaline (pH>8.5) conditions, 100mu M Cr(VI) strongly inhibited growth and chromate reduction. Themini-bioreactor system enabled the rapid determination of theseparameters reproducibly and easily by performing very few experiments.Besides its use for examining parameters of interest to environmentalremediation, the device will also allow one to quickly assess parametersfor optimal production of recombinant proteins or secondarymetabolites

  13. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J; Wigginton, Nicholas S; Reardon, Catherine L; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Droubay, Timothy C; Boily, Jean-François; Lower, Steven K

    2009-05-01

    Antibody recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells when Fe(III), including solid-phase hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), was the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface between the cell and mineral. MtrC displayed a more uniform distribution across the cell surface. Both cytochromes were associated with an extracellular polymeric substance.

  14. Fate of Fe and Cd upon microbial reduction of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenchen; Yi, Xiaoyun; Dang, Zhi; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Tao; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Polyferric sulphate has been widely used for emergent control on incidental release of heavy metals such as Cd to surface water, causing precipitation of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs to the sediment. To date, little is known about whether the dissolution of the flocs in the presence of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) can occur and how the dissolution influences the fate of Fe and Cd in the sediment. Here, we demonstrated that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, as representative DIRB, has the ability to reduce the flocs, resulting in the release of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) to the solution. Batch experiment results showed that the concentrations of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+)reached the maximum values at 48 h and then decreased over the remaining incubation time. The characterizations on the solid phase by the scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technologies revealed the formation of iron minerals such as goethite and magnetite as a consequence of microbial Fe(III) reduction. The newly formed iron minerals played a significant role in re-immobilizing Cd by sorption. These results imply that microbial reduction of polyferric flocs is an important contributor to the transport and transformation of metals in the sediment-water interface.

  15. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettich, Robert L.

    2006-10-30

    Although microbial metal reduction has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform, detoxify, or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE-relevant environments. The major goal of this work is to elucidate the molecular components comprising the chromium(VI) response pathway, with an emphasis on components involved in Cr(VI) detoxification and the enzyme complex catalyzing the terminal step in Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator [SO2426] and a putative azoreductase [SO3585]) the genes and gene products involved in the molecular response of MR-1 to chromium(VI) stress using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and recently developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. The proteome datasets were integrated with information from whole-genome expression arrays for S. oneidensis MR-1 (as illustrated in Figure 1). The genes and their encoded products identified in this study are of value in understanding metal reduction and bacterial resistance to metal toxicity and in developing effective metal immobilization strategies.

  16. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica N. Alves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1 relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR, but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR. In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA, the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  17. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  18. 奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1的Fe(Ⅲ)还原特性及其影响因素%Dissimilatory Fe(Ⅲ) reduction by Shewanclla oneidensis MR-1 and impact factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁; 储茵; 司友斌

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory Fe(Ul) reduction by Shewanclla oneidensis MR-1 was studied, and impact factors such as electronic donors, Fe(III) forms, dissolved oxygen content and pH were investigated. The results showed that Feoneidensis MR-1, and iron reduction rates were 39.12%, 50.89% and 44.98% using the acetate, lactate and pyruvate as the sole electronic donor of strain MR-1, respectively. The forms of Fe(III) could influence their reduction, and iron reduction rates were 44.72%, 51.54% and 10.45% using ferric trichloride, ferric hydroxide and ferric citrate as the sole electronic receptor of strain MR-1, respectively. Dissolved oxygen inhibited the dissimilatory iron reduction. Strain MR-1 could reduce Fe(III) in the range of pH 5.0 to 9.0. The effects of protein denaturants SDS and OGP suggested that Fe(Ⅲ) reduction function proteins of strain MR-1 were mainly localized to the soluble outer membrane fraction. Tannins acid and pyrogallic acid could enhance Fe(III) reduction, and iron reduction rates were 76.37% and 68.73%, respectively.%研究奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1的Fe(Ⅲ)还原特性,并考察不同电子供体、不同形态Fe(Ⅲ)、溶解氧、pH等对奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1还原Fe(Ⅲ)的影响.结果表明,奥奈达希瓦氏菌MR-1对Fe(Ⅲ)有还原能力,以乙酸盐、乳酸盐和丙酮酸盐作为Fe(Ⅲ)还原的唯一电子供体,Fe(Ⅲ)还原率分别达到39.12%,50.89%和44.98%;以FeCl3、Fe(OH)3和柠檬酸铁等不同形态Fe(Ⅲ)为菌株MR-1的唯一电子受体,Fe(Ⅲ)还原率分别达到44.72%,51.54%和10.45%;溶解氧的存在可抑制Fe(Ⅲ)异化还原;菌株MR-1可在pH 5.0-9.0范围内进行Fe(Ⅲ)还原;两种不同的蛋白质变性剂SDS和OGP作用下的Fe(Ⅲ)还原结果表明,菌株MR-1的Fe(Ⅲ)还原功能蛋白主要位于细胞外膜;同时,投加一定量的单宁酸和焦性没食子酸可提高Fe(Ⅲ)还原率,螯合铁的还原率分别达到76.37%和68.73%.

  19. Enhancing Extracellular Electron Transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through Coupling Improved Flavin Synthesis and Metal-Reducing Conduit for Pollutant Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Di; Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Huang, Xue-Na; Li, Dao-Bo; Liu, Dong-Feng; Lau, Tai-Chu; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-05-02

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides, which are used as external electron acceptors by DMRB for their anaerobic respiration. The EET process has important contribution to environmental remediation mineral cycling, and bioelectrochemical systems. However, the low EET efficiency remains to be one of the major bottlenecks for its practical applications for pollutant degradation. In this work, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model DMRB, was used to examine the feasibility of enhancing the EET and its biodegradation capacity through genetic engineering. A flavin biosynthesis gene cluster ribD-ribC-ribBA-ribE and metal-reducing conduit biosynthesis gene cluster mtrC-mtrA-mtrB were coexpressed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Compared to the control strain, the engineered strain was found to exhibit an improved EET capacity in microbial fuel cells and potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells, with an increase in maximum current density by approximate 110% and 87%, respectively. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis showed that the current increase correlated with the lower interfacial charge-transfer resistance of the engineered strain. Meanwhile, a three times more rapid removal rate of methyl orange by the engineered strain confirmed the improvement of its EET and biodegradation ability. Our results demonstrate that coupling of improved synthesis of mediators and metal-reducing conduits could be an efficient strategy to enhance EET in S. oneidensis MR-1, which is essential to the applications of DMRB for environmental remediation, wastewater treatment, and bioenergy recovery from wastes.

  20. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  1. Electrochemical interaction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC with hematite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitl, Leisa A.; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Colberg, Patricia J. S.; Khare, Nidhi; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial metal reduction is an important biogeochemical process in anaerobic environments. An understanding of electron transfer pathways from dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) to solid phase metal (hydr)oxides is important for understanding metal redox cycling in soils and sediments, for utilizing DMRB in bioremedation, and for developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells. Here we hypothesize that the outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are the only terminal reductases capable of direct electron transfer to a hematite working electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study electron transfer between hematite electrodes and protein films, S. oneidensis MR-1 wild-type cell suspensions, and cytochrome deletion mutants. After controlling for hematite electrode dissolution at negative potential, the midpoint potentials of adsorbed OmcA and MtrC were measured (-201 mV and -163 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively). Cell suspensions of wild-type MR-1, deletion mutants deficient in OmcA (Δ omcA), MtrC (Δ mtrC), and both OmcA and MtrC (Δ mtrC-Δ omcA) were also studied; voltammograms for Δ mtrC-Δ omcA were indistinguishable from the control. When the control was subtracted from the single deletion mutant voltammograms, redox peaks were consistent with the present cytochrome (i.e., Δ omcA consistent with MtrC and Δ mtrC consistent with OmcA). The results indicate that OmcA and MtrC are capable of direct electron exchange with hematite electrodes, consistent with a role as terminal reductases in the S. oneidensis MR-1 anaerobic respiratory pathway involving ferric minerals. There was no evidence for other terminal reductases operating under the conditions investigated. A Marcus-based approach to electron transfer kinetics indicated that the rate constant for electron transfer ket varies from 0.025 s -1 in the absence of a barrier to 63.5 s -1 with a 0.2 eV barrier.

  2. Electrochemical interaction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC with hematite electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meitl, Leisa A.; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Colberg, Patricia J.; Khare, Nidhi; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang

    2009-09-15

    Bacterial metal reduction is an important biogeochemical process in anaerobic environments. An understanding of electron transfer pathways from dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) to solid phase metal (hydr)oxides is important for understanding metal redox cycling in soils and sediments, for utilizing DMRB in bioremedation, and for developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells. Here we hypothesize that the outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are the only terminal reductases capable of direct electron transfer to a hematite working electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study electron transfer between hematite electrodes and protein films, S. oneidensis MR-1 wild-type cell suspensions, and cytochrome deletion mutants. After controlling for hematite electrode dissolution at negative potential, the midpoint potentials of adsorbed OmcA and MtrC were measured (-201 mV and -163 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively). Cell suspensions of wild-type MR-1, deletion mutants deficient in OmcA (ΔomcA), MtrC (ΔmtrC), and both OmcA and MtrC (ΔmtrC-ΔomcA) were also studied; voltammograms for ΔmtrC-ΔomcA were indistinguishable from the control. When the control was subtracted from the single deletion mutant voltammograms, redox peaks were consistent with the present cytochrome (i.e., ΔomcA consistent with MtrC and ΔmtrC consistent with OmcA). The results indicate that OmcA and MtrC are capable of direct electron exchange with hematite electrodes, consistent with a role as terminal reductases in the S. oneidensis MR-1 anaerobic respiratory pathway involving ferric minerals. There was no evidence for other terminal reductases operating under the conditions investigated. A Marcus-based approach to electron transfer kinetics indicated that the rate constant for electron transfer ket varies from 0.025 s-1 in the absence of a barrier to 63.5 s-1 with a 0.2 eV barrier.

  3. Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Msh Pilin Proteins are Involved in Extracellular Electron Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    comparison of the 16 MR-1 Msh pilin complex proteins to Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar El Tor (tax id: 686) using the BLAST-search algorithm [21] for proteins... Vibrio cholerae mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin type 4 pilus gene locus. J Bacteriol 1999;181:1110–7. [23] Ringeisen BR, Henderson E, Wu PK...BLASTp) with default algorithm parameters. Sequence homology of MR-1 Msh proteins to the well-studied Msh pilin complex from V. cholera [22] allowed

  4. Identifying the role of cytochromes upon the attachment, growth and detachment of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on hematite during dissimilatory iron reduction under natural- flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. C.; Geesey, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    Current understanding of bacterial respiration by dissimilatory iron (Fe) reduction is based primarily on studies of closed systems using soluble Fe(III). However, natural environments likely to support Fe reduction are typically open systems and contain Fe(III) primarily in the form of crystalline (hydr)oxides. Mechanisms by which electrons are transported between bacteria and mineral terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) under open system conditions are still poorly understood. However, a number of cytochromes have been identified as potentially playing a critical role in the electron transport system of some Fe reducing bacteria. Experiments were performed using (i) omcA, (ii) mtrC, or (iii) omcA and mtrC cytochrome deficient mutants of the Fe-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, in transparent-window flow- reactors containing hematite as the only TEA. These were operated under defined hydrodynamic and anaerobic conditions. Cells expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp), allowing real time measurement of cells at the mineral surface by epifluorescence microscopy. Cytochromes which play a critical role in the anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis by Fe reduction under open system natural-flow conditions could then be identified. Differences in the accumulation, maximum density, detachment and total production of surface-associated cells growing on hematite surfaces were apparent between the mutants, and between the mutants and the wild-type. Mutants deficient in cytochromes grew to a lower max density by up to 2 orders of magnitude than the wild-type, and exhibited no reduced Fe in the reactor effluent or at the surface of the hematite at the conclusion of the experiment, as revealed by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Therefore omcA and / or mtrC cytochromes appear critical for electron shuttling and anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis on hematite under natural-flow conditions.

  5. Generation and validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 clone set for protein expression and phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichun Gao

    Full Text Available A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85% have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST-tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis, and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Role of outer-membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the biomineralization of ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, C L; Dohnalkova, A C; Nachimuthu, P; Kennedy, D W; Saffarini, D A; Arey, B W; Shi, L; Wang, Z; Moore, D; McLean, J S; Moyles, D; Marshall, M J; Zachara, J M; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer-membrane cytochromes (OMCs), MtrC and OmcA, were characterized for the ability to reduce ferrihydrite (FH) using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemical techniques. Analysis of purified recombinant proteins demonstrated that both cytochromes undergo rapid electron exchange with FH in vitro with MtrC displaying faster transfer rates than OmcA. Immunomicroscopy with cytochrome-specific antibodies revealed that MtrC co-localizes with iron solids on the cell surface while OmcA exhibits a more diffuse distribution over the cell surface. After 3-day incubation of MR-1 with FH, pronounced reductive transformation mineral products were visible by electron microscopy. Upon further incubation, the predominant phases identified were ferrous phosphates including vivianite [Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x8H(2)O] and a switzerite-like phase [Mn(3),Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x7H(2)O] that were heavily colonized by MR-1 cells with surface-exposed outer-membrane cytochromes. In the absence of both MtrC and OmcA, the cells ability to reduce FH was significantly hindered and no mineral transformation products were detected. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of the outer-membrane cytochromes in the reductive transformation of FH and support a role for direct electron transfer from the OMCs at the cell surface to the mineral.

  7. Knock-out of SO1377 gene, which encodes the member of a conserved hypothetical bacterial protein family COG2268, results in alteration of iron metabolism, increased spontaneous mutation and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingeman Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative, gram-negative bacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to a wide range of electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate and metals, and has potential for bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites. The complete 5-Mb genome of S. oneidensis MR-1 was sequenced and standard sequence-comparison methods revealed approximately 42% of the MR-1 genome encodes proteins of unknown function. Defining the functions of hypothetical proteins is a great challenge and may need a systems approach. In this study, by using integrated approaches including whole genomic microarray and proteomics, we examined knockout effects of the gene encoding SO1377 (gi24372955, a member of the conserved, hypothetical, bacterial protein family COG2268 (Clusters of Orthologous Group in bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under various physiological conditions. Results Compared with the wild-type strain, growth assays showed that the deletion mutant had a decreased growth rate when cultured aerobically, but not affected under anaerobic conditions. Whole-genome expression (RNA and protein profiles revealed numerous gene and protein expression changes relative to the wild-type control, including some involved in iron metabolism, oxidative damage protection and respiratory electron transfer, e. g. complex IV of the respiration chain. Although total intracellular iron levels remained unchanged, whole-cell electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR demonstrated that the level of free iron in mutant cells was 3 times less than that of the wild-type strain. Siderophore excretion in the mutant also decreased in iron-depleted medium. The mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and gave rise to 100 times more colonies resistant to gentamicin or kanamycin. Conclusion Our results showed that the knock-out of SO1377 gene had pleiotropic effects and suggested that SO1377 may play a role in iron

  8. The outer membrane protein Omp35 affects the reduction of Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

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    Myers Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses several electron acceptors to support anaerobic respiration including insoluble species such as iron(III and manganese(IV oxides, and soluble species such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and many others. MR-1 has complex branched electron transport chains that include components in the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane (OM. Previous studies have implicated a role for anaerobically upregulated OM electron transport components in the use of insoluble electron acceptors, and have suggested that other OM components may also contribute to insoluble electron acceptor use. In this study, the role for an anaerobically upregulated 35-kDa OM protein (Omp35 in the use of anaerobic electron acceptors was explored. Results Omp35 was purified from the OM of anaerobically grown cells, the gene encoding Omp35 was identified, and an omp35 null mutant (OMP35-1 was isolated and characterized. Although OMP35-1 grew on all electron acceptors tested, a significant lag was seen when grown on fumarate, nitrate, and Fe(III. Complementation studies confirmed that the phenotype of OMP35-1 was due to the loss of Omp35. Despite its requirement for wild-type rates of electron acceptor use, analysis of Omp35 protein and predicted sequence did not identify any electron transport moieties or predicted motifs. OMP35-1 had normal levels and distribution of known electron transport components including quinones, cytochromes, and fumarate reductase. Omp35 is related to putative porins from MR-1 and S. frigidimarina as well as to the PorA porin from Neisseria meningitidis. Subcellular fraction analysis confirmed that Omp35 is an OM protein. The seven-fold anaerobic upregulation of Omp35 is mediated post-transcriptionally. Conclusion Omp35 is a putative porin in the OM of MR-1 that is markedly upregulated anaerobically by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Omp35 is required for normal rates of growth on Fe

  9. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Dale, Jason R

    2013-04-08

    We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft-particle model is a useful tool

  10. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer

  11. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  12. [Study of some aspects of the mechanism of bacterial synthesis of silver sulfide nanoparticles by mMetal-reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebanova, A S; Voeĭkova, T A; Egorov, A V; Novikova, L M; Krest'ianova, I N; Emel'ianova, L K; Debabov, V G; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaĭtan, K V

    2014-01-01

    In the present work it was shown that biosynthesis of silver sulfide nanoparticles from silver nitrate and sodium thiosulfate solutions of millimolar concentration occurs efficiently by living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells, as well as by ultrasonically-disrupted cells and by the membrane fraction of the cells. The size of nanoparticles synthesized in the presence of living cells was 7.8 ± 1.5 nm, while in the presence of ultrasonically-disrupted cells--it was 6.52 nm. The shape of nanoparticles in both cases was close to spherical. It was also shown, that synthesis of nanoparticles occurs in a cell-free solution of sodium thiosulfate that has been incubated with cells previously and to which then a silver nitrate solution was added. In this case the nanoparticles were of elongated shape and their size was (11 ± 4) x (24 ± 6) nm. In the control experiment, when only silver nitrate and sodium thiosulfate solutions not incubated with cells were used, the nanoparticles were not detected. It was shown that biosynthesis of nanoparticles occurs both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Nanoparticles are not formed by using thermally inactivated cells as it was shown by us previously. The results show the important role of the native structures of cells for the nanoparticles formation.

  13. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  14. Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass Spectrometry Results in Several Terminal Fe(III)-reducing Candidate Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Yang, Feng; Mottaz, Heather M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2007-02-01

    Identification of the proteins directly involved in microbial metal-reduction is important to understanding the biochemistry involved in heavy metal reduction/immobilization and the ultimate cleanup of DOE contaminated sites. Although previous strategies for the identification of these proteins have traditionally required laborious protein purification/characterization of metal-reducing capability, activity is often lost before the final purification step, thus creating a significant knowledge gap. In the current study, subcellular fractions of S. oneidensis MR-1 were enriched for Fe(III)-NTA reducing proteins in a single step using several orthogonal column matrices. The protein content of eluted fractions that demonstrated activity were determined by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/ MS). A comparison of the proteins identified from active fractions in all separations produced 30 proteins that may act as the terminal electron-accepting protein for Fe(III)-reduction. These include MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA as well as a number of other proteins not previously associated with Fe(III)-reduction. This is the first report of such an approach where the laborious procedures for protein purification are not required for identification of metal-reducing proteins. Such work provides the basis for a similar approach with other cultured organisms as well as analysis of sediment and groundwater samples from biostimulation efforts at contaminated sites.

  15. Kinetics of reduction of Fe(III) complexes by outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J; Zachara, John M; Rosso, Kevin M; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, James K; Heald, Steve; Shi, Liang

    2008-11-01

    Because of their cell surface locations, the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have been suggested to be the terminal reductases for a range of redox-reactive metals that form poorly soluble solids or that do not readily cross the outer membrane. In this work, we determined the kinetics of reduction of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and EDTA by MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction proceeded in two stages, a fast stage that was completed in less than 1 s, followed by a second, relatively slower stage. For a given complex, electron transfer by MtrC was faster than that by OmcA. For a given cytochrome, the reaction was completed in the order Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. The kinetic data could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 microM(-1) s(-1) for the reaction between MtrC and the Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 microM(-1) s(-1) for the reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate. The biphasic reaction kinetics was attributed to redox potential differences among the heme groups or redox site heterogeneity within the cytochromes. The results of redox potential and reorganization energy calculations showed that the reaction rate was influenced mostly by the relatively large reorganization energy. The results demonstrate that ligand complexation plays an important role in microbial dissimilatory reduction and mineral transformation of iron, as well as other redox-sensitive metal species in nature.

  16. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, James K.; Heald, Steve; Shi, Liang

    2008-01-01

    Because of their cell surface locations, the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 have been suggested to be the terminal reductases for a range of redox-reactive metals that form poorly soluble solids or that do not readily cross the outer membrane. In this work, we determined the kinetics of reduction of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and EDTA by MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction proceeded in two stages, a fast stage that was completed in less than 1 s, followed by a second, relatively slower stage. For a given complex, electron transfer by MtrC was faster than that by OmcA. For a given cytochrome, the reaction was completed in the order Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. The kinetic data could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 μM−1 s−1 for the reaction between MtrC and the Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 μM−1 s−1 for the reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate. The biphasic reaction kinetics was attributed to redox potential differences among the heme groups or redox site heterogeneity within the cytochromes. The results of redox potential and reorganization energy calculations showed that the reaction rate was influenced mostly by the relatively large reorganization energy. The results demonstrate that ligand complexation plays an important role in microbial dissimilatory reduction and mineral transformation of iron, as well as other redox-sensitive metal species in nature. PMID:18791025

  17. Oxygen tension and riboflavin gradients cooperatively regulate the migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 revealed by a hydrogel-based microfluidic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beum Jun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs. It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: 1 shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and 2 direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+ using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production.

  18. Oxygen Tension and Riboflavin Gradients Cooperatively Regulate the Migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Revealed by a Hydrogel-Based Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beum Jun; Chu, Injun; Jusuf, Sebastian; Kuo, Tiffany; TerAvest, Michaela A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: (1) shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and (2) direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in BESs such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+), using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production. PMID:27703448

  19. A mechanistic study of TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with UV-containing simulated solar irradiation: Bacterial growth, riboflavin secretion, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian A; Meyer, Ben M; Christenson, Ky G; Klaper, Rebecca D; Haynes, Christy L

    2017-02-01

    Toxicity of nanomaterials to ecological systems has recently emerged as an important field of research, and thus, many researchers are exploring the mechanisms of how nanoparticles impact organisms. Herein, we probe the mechanisms of bacteria-nanoparticle interaction by investigating how TiO2 nanoparticles impact a model organism, the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In addition to examining the effect of TiO2 exposure, the effect of synergistic simulated solar irradiation containing UV was explored in this study, as TiO2 nanoparticles are known photocatalysts. The data reveal that TiO2 nanoparticles cause an inhibition of S. oneidensis growth at high dosage without compromising cell viability, yet co-exposure of nanoparticles and illumination does not increase the adverse effects on bacterial growth relative to TiO2 alone. Measurements of intracellular reactive oxygen species and riboflavin secretion, on the same nanoparticle-exposed bacteria, reveal that TiO2 nanoparticles have no effect on these cell functions, but application of UV-containing illumination with TiO2 nanoparticles has an impact on the level of riboflavin outside bacterial cells. Finally, gene expression studies were employed to explore how cells respond to TiO2 nanoparticles and illumination, and these results were correlated with cell growth and cell function assessment. Together these data suggest a minimal impact of TiO2 NPs and simulated solar irradiation containing UV on S. oneidensis MR-1, and the minimal impact could be accounted for by the nutrient-rich medium used in this work. These measurements demonstrate a comprehensive scheme combining various analytical tools to enable a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell interactions and to evaluate the potential adverse effects of nanoparticles beyond viability/growth considerations.

  20. Roxarsone Transformation by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at Different Moisture Content in Porous Media%多孔介质含水率变化对洛克沙胂的希瓦氏菌生物转化影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯正辰; 辛梓; 肖雅玲; 陈国炜

    2016-01-01

    作为一种广泛使用的饲料添加剂,洛克沙胂经由畜禽粪便进入环境,产生潜在的砷污染.自然环境中,降雨变化具有时空分布不均匀性,导致土壤含水率时刻发生变化,从而对洛克沙胂的生物转化产生影响.本研究选取自然界中常见的奥奈达湖希瓦氏菌(Shewanella oneidensis MR-1)为模型微生物,利用多孔介质石英砂作为模拟土壤的介质,研究洛克沙胂在不同含水率情形下的生物转化情况.研究结果表明,含水率的变化对于洛克沙胂的生物转化过程影响明显.在低含水率的条件下(12.50%),洛克沙胂难以被希瓦氏菌转化;而当含水率提升后,洛克沙胂才能够被S.oneidensis MR-1转化.通过砷平衡分析可以看出3-氨基-4-羟基苯胂酸为洛克沙胂生物转化的唯一产物,未检测出无机形态砷.

  1. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hill, Eric A.; Moran, James J.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Hui, Yang; Hegg, Eric L.

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organism, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  2. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth’s near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  3. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth's near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  4. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  5. Characterization of cytochrome mutants for pellicle formation in Shewanella onedensis MR-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-li; HE Zhi-li; GAO Hai-chun; QIU Guan-zhou; ZHOU Ji-zhong; LIU Xue-duan

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm systems are effective for biosorption of metal ions. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, is a natural pellicle-like biofilm former. The mechanisms of pellicle formation by S. oneidensis MR-1 have not yet been understood. 17 S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants, including 12 c-type cytochromes were generated and tested if they were involved in pellicle formation. The results show that △SO4666, △SO1777, △SO1782, △SO2361 and △SO2363 have varying deficiency in pellicle formation. The deletion mutant △SO4666 cannot form a pellicle under non-shake conditions, suggesting that it may play an important role in pellicle formation by S. oneidensis MR-1. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of aerobic respiration by S. oneidensis MR-1.

  6. Methods for Imaging Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Nanofilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Delineation of pilin domains required for bacterial association into microcolonies and intestinal colonization by vibrio cholerae . Mol. Microbiol. 35, 896–910...Konnov, N.P., Baibyrin, V.B., Zadnova, S.P., Volkov, U.P., 1999. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella. Scanning and force...transcriptional analyses of the Vibrio choleraemannose-sensitive hemagglutinin type 4 pilus gene locus. J. Bacteriol. 181, 1110–1117. Reardon, C.L., Dohnalkova

  7. Electrochemical Catalysis of Inorganic Complex K4[Fe(CN)6] by Shewanellaoneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Xiao, Yong

    The interaction between metal and bacteria is a universal and important biogeochemical processin environment. As a dissimilatory metal reduction bacterium, the electrochemically activebacteriium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can transfer intracellular electrons to minerals. This ability is attribute...... andelectrocatalysis mechanisms of S. oneidensis MR-1 are under investigation. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to catalyze redoxaction of inorganic metal complex compounds will provide an insight on metal cycles in nature....... to the redox proteins localized on the outer-membrane, for example, the MtrC, MtrB, MtrA and CymA2. Here we investigate its electrochemical properties towards redoxinorganic redox compounds. It shows strong electrocatalysis toward electrochemical oxidation of K4[Fe(CN)6]. As a redox molecule, K4[Fe(CN)6] gives......, with almost disappearance of the cathodic peak and strengthen of the anodic peak, which is a typical catalysis feature of electrochemical oxidation. Further experiments show that S. oneidensis MR-1 does not give such electrocatalysis toredox compounds such as Ru[(NH3)6]Cl3and Resorufin. Selectivity...

  8. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0192 BOUND FLAVIN−CYTOCHROME MODEL OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS: ANALYSIS BY FREE...23 June 2016 Interim 11 January 2013- 10 October 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BOUND FLAVIN−CYTOCHROME MODEL OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN...Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer

  9. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  10. Bridging the Gap between Fluxomics and Industrial Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyang Feng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic flux analysis is a vital tool used to determine the ultimate output of cellular metabolism and thus detect biotechnologically relevant bottlenecks in productivity. 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA and flux balance analysis (FBA have many potential applications in biotechnology. However, noteworthy hurdles in fluxomics study are still present. First, several technical difficulties in both 13C-MFA and FBA severely limit the scope of fluxomics findings and the applicability of obtained metabolic information. Second, the complexity of metabolic regulation poses a great challenge for precise prediction and analysis of metabolic networks, as there are gaps between fluxomics results and other omics studies. Third, despite identified metabolic bottlenecks or sources of host stress from product synthesis, it remains difficult to overcome inherent metabolic robustness or to efficiently import and express nonnative pathways. Fourth, product yields often decrease as the number of enzymatic steps increases. Such decrease in yield may not be caused by rate-limiting enzymes, but rather is accumulated through each enzymatic reaction. Fifth, a high-throughput fluxomics tool hasnot been developed for characterizing nonmodel microorganisms and maximizing their application in industrial biotechnology. Refining fluxomics tools and understanding these obstacles will improve our ability to engineer highlyefficient metabolic pathways in microbial hosts.

  11. Fluxomics: mass spectrometry versus quantitative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Schweissgut, Oliver; Takanaga, Hitomi; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-06-01

    The recent development of analytic high-throughput technologies enables us to take a bird's view of how metabolism is regulated in real time. We have known for a long time that metabolism is highly regulated at all levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational and allosteric controls. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation by following the flux. Two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. Pulse labeling of the organism or cell with a tracer, such as 13C, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds provides an efficient tool to study flux and to compare the effect of mutations on flux. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. In contrast to the mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound. Both methods provide high time resolution. The major advantages of FRET nanosensors are that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution and the method is minimally invasive.

  12. Fluxomics links cellular functional analyses to whole-plant phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salon, Christophe; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Colombié, Sophie; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Gallardo, Karine; Jeudy, Christian; Ourry, Alain; Prudent, Marion; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Rolin, Dominique

    2017-04-01

    Fluxes through metabolic pathways reflect the integration of genetic and metabolic regulations. While it is attractive to measure all the mRNAs (transcriptome), all the proteins (proteome), and a large number of the metabolites (metabolome) in a given cellular system, linking and integrating this information remains difficult. Measurement of metabolome-wide fluxes (termed the fluxome) provides an integrated functional output of the cell machinery and a better tool to link functional analyses to plant phenotyping. This review presents and discusses sets of methodologies that have been developed to measure the fluxome. First, the principles of metabolic flux analysis (MFA), its 'short time interval' version Inst-MFA, and of constraints-based methods, such as flux balance analysis and kinetic analysis, are briefly described. The use of these powerful methods for flux characterization at the cellular scale up to the organ (fruits, seeds) and whole-plant level is illustrated. The added value given by fluxomics methods for unravelling how the abiotic environment affects flux, the process, and key metabolic steps are also described. Challenges associated with the development of fluxomics and its integration with 'omics' for thorough plant and organ functional phenotyping are discussed. Taken together, these will ultimately provide crucial clues for identifying appropriate target plant phenotypes for breeding. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Towards a quantitative prediction of the fluxome from the proteome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossell, S.L.; Solem, C.; Jensen, P.R.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The promise of proteomics and fluxomics is limited by our current inability to integrate these two levels of cellular organization. Here we present the derivation, experimental parameterization, and appraisal of flux functions that enable the quantitative prediction of changes in metabolic fluxes fr

  14. Identification and analysis of the Shewanella oneidensis major oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sheboul, Suhaila; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that can use a large number of electron acceptors including metal oxides. During anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 synthesizes a large number of c cytochromes that give the organism its characteristic orange color. Using a modified mariner transposon, a number of S. oneidensis mutants deficient in anaerobic respiration were generated. One mutant, BG163, exhibited reduced pigmentation and was deficient in c cytochromes normally synthesized under anaerobic condition. The deficiencies in BG163 were due to insertional inactivation of hemN1, which exhibits a high degree of similarity to genes encoding anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidases that are involved in heme biosynthesis. The ability of BG163 to synthesize c cytochromes under anaerobic conditions, and to grow anaerobically with different electron acceptors was restored by the introduction of hemN1 on a plasmid. Complementation of the mutant was also achieved by the addition of hemin to the growth medium. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains three putative anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes. The protein encoded by hemN1 appears to be the major enzyme that is involved in anaerobic heme synthesis of S. oneidensis. The other two putative anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes may play a minor role in this process.

  15. Cell adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to iron oxide minerals: Effect of different single crystal faces

    OpenAIRE

    Hochella Michael F; Bank Tracy L; Neal Andrew L; Rosso Kevin M

    2005-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001) face of hematite,...

  16. Promotion of iron oxide reduction and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis by DMSO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Cheng

    Full Text Available The dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, known for its capacity of reducing iron and manganese oxides, has great environmental impacts. The iron oxides reducing process is affected by the coexistence of alternative electron acceptors in the environment, while investigation into it is limited so far. In this work, the impact of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, a ubiquitous chemical in marine environment, on the reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO by S. oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Results show that DMSO promoted HFO reduction by both wild type and ΔdmsE, but had no effect on the HFO reduction by ΔdmsB, indicating that such a promotion was dependent on the DMSO respiration. With the DMSO dosing, the levels of extracellular flavins and omcA expression were significantly increased in WT and further increased in ΔdmsE. Bioelectrochemical analysis show that DMSO also promoted the extracellular electron transfer of WT and ΔdmsE. These results demonstrate that DMSO could stimulate the HFO reduction through metabolic and genetic regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1, rather than compete for electrons with HFO. This may provide a potential respiratory pathway to enhance the microbial electron flows for environmental and engineering applications.

  17. Fluxomers: a new approach for 13C metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jamey D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to perform quantitative studies using isotope tracers and metabolic flux analysis (MFA is critical for detecting pathway bottlenecks and elucidating network regulation in biological systems, especially those that have been engineered to alter their native metabolic capacities. Mathematically, MFA models are traditionally formulated using separate state variables for reaction fluxes and isotopomer abundances. Analysis of isotope labeling experiments using this set of variables results in a non-convex optimization problem that suffers from both implementation complexity and convergence problems. Results This article addresses the mathematical and computational formulation of 13C MFA models using a new set of variables referred to as fluxomers. These composite variables combine both fluxes and isotopomer abundances, which results in a simply-posed formulation and an improved error model that is insensitive to isotopomer measurement normalization. A powerful fluxomer iterative algorithm (FIA is developed and applied to solve the MFA optimization problem. For moderate-sized networks, the algorithm is shown to outperform the commonly used 13CFLUX cumomer-based algorithm and the more recently introduced OpenFLUX software that relies upon an elementary metabolite unit (EMU network decomposition, both in terms of convergence time and output variability. Conclusions Substantial improvements in convergence time and statistical quality of results can be achieved by applying fluxomer variables and the FIA algorithm to compute best-fit solutions to MFA models. We expect that the fluxomer formulation will provide a more suitable basis for future algorithms that analyze very large scale networks and design optimal isotope labeling experiments.

  18. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  19. Final Summary of "Interdisciplinary Study of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1's Metabolism & Metal Reduction"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolker, Eugene

    2007-06-26

    Our project focused primarily on analysis of different types of data produced by global high-throughput technologies, data integration of gene annotation, and gene and protein expression information, as well as on getting a better functional annotation of Shewanella genes. Specifically, four of our numerous major activities and achievements include the development of: statistical models for identification and expression proteomics, superior to currently available approaches (including our own earlier ones); approaches to improve gene annotations on the whole-organism scale; standards for annotation, transcriptomics and proteomics approaches; and generalized approaches for data integration of gene annotation, gene and protein expression information.

  20. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O' Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  1. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Brennan

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  2. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Christopher M; Mazzucca, Nicholas Q; Mezoian, Taylor; Hunt, Taylor M; Keane, Meaghan L; Leonard, Jessica N; Scola, Shelby E; Beer, Emma N; Perdue, Sarah; Pellock, Brett J

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA) function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  3. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA. TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1 previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2 flux balance analysis (FBA predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  4. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  5. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  6. Dynamics in the Dual Fuel Flagellar Motor of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenzinger, Susanne; Thormann, Kai M

    2017-01-01

    The stator is an eminent component of the flagellar motor and determines a number of the motor's properties, such as the rotation-energizing coupling ion (H(+) or Na(+)) or the torque that can be generated. The stator consists of several units located in the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the flagellar drive shaft. Studies on flagellar motors of several bacterial species have provided evidence that the number as well as the retention time of stators coupled to the motor is highly dynamic and depends on the environmental conditions. Notably, numerous species possess more than a single distinct set of stators. It is likely that the presence of different stator units enables these bacteria to adjust the flagellar motor properties and function to meet the environmental requirements. One of these species is Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 that is equipped with a single polar flagellum and two stator units, the Na(+)-dependent PomAB and the H(+)-dependent MotAB. Here, we describe a method to determine stator dynamics by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating how bacteria can change the composition of an intricate molecular machine according to environmental conditions.

  7. Fluxomics of the Eastern Oyster for Environmental Stress Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey P. Tikunov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of 2-13C/15N-glycine and U-13C-glucose was determined in four tissue blocks (adductor muscle, stomach and digestive gland, mantle, and gills of the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica using proton (1H and carbon-13 (13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The oysters were treated in aerated seawater with three treatments (5.5 mM U-13C-glucose, 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine, and 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine and the relative mass balance and 13C fractional enrichments were determined in the four tissue blocks. In all tissues, glycine was metabolized by the glycine cycle forming serine exclusively in the mitochondria by the glycine cleavage system forming 2,3-13C-serine. In muscle, a minor amount of serine-derived pyruvate entered the Krebs cycle as substantiated by detection of a trace of 2,3-13C-aspartate. In all tissues, U-13C-glucose formed glycogen by glycogen synthesis, alanine by glycolysis, and glutamate and aspartate through the Krebs cycle. Alanine was formed exclusively from glucose via alanine transaminase and not glycine via alanine-glyoxylate transaminase. Based on isotopomer analysis, pyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate dehydrogenase appeared to be equal points for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle. In the 5.5 mM U-13C-glucose plus 2.7 mM 2-13C/15N-glycine emergence treatment used to simulate 12 h of “low tide”, oysters accumulated more 13C-labeled metabolites, including both anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic Krebs cycle intermediates. The aerobic metabolites could be the biochemical result of the gaping behavior of mollusks during emergence. The change in tissue distribution and mass balance of 13C-labeled nutrients (U-13C-glucose and 2-13C/15N-glycine provides the basis for a new quantitative fluxomic method for elucidating sub-lethal environmental effects in marine organisms called whole body mass balance phenotyping (WoMBaP.

  8. Rapid Precipitation of Amorphous Silica in Experimental Systems with Nontronite (NAu-1) and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-15

    Prog. Ser. aquacultured penaeid shrimp stored at 0, 12, 24, and 36 degrees C. J. 135 (1-3), 299-308. Food Prot. 67 (1), 124-133. Heldal, M., Scanlan...NAu-1 was the only TEA. Experimental solutions were mation of its immediate recrystallization product , poorly investigated using aqueous chemical...polysilicic acids due to the each experimental condition as shown in Table 4. These balance between continuous polysilicic acid production kD’ values lead

  9. Probing Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using a Nanoelectrode Platform and Single-Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    nanowires The capability of bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter ,to transfer electrons from metabolism of organic sources to electrodes without...filamentous pili growth from Shewanella and Geobacter cells report a third mechanism for extracellular electron transfer through biological nanowires (12

  10. Molecular Dynamics of the Shewanella oneidensis Response to Chromate Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Thompson, Melissa R [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Thompson, Dorothea K [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Temporal genomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses were performed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to an acute chromate shock. The complex dynamics of cellular processes demand the integration of methodologies that describe biological systems at the levels of regulation, gene and protein expression, and metabolite production. Genomic microarray analysis of the transcriptome dynamics of midexponential phase cells subjected to 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) at exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min revealed 910 genes that were differentially expressed at one or more time points. Strongly induced genes included those encoding components of a TonB1 iron transport system (tonB1-exbB1-exbD1), hemin ATP-binding cassette transporters (hmuTUV), TonB-dependent receptors as well as sulfate transporters (cysP, cysW-2, and cysA-2), and enzymes involved in assimilative sulfur metabolism (cysC, cysN, cysD, cysH, cysI, and cysJ). Transcript levels for genes with annotated functions in DNA repair (lexA, recX, recA, recN, dinP, and umuD), cellular detoxification (so1756, so3585, and so3586), and two-component signal transduction systems (so2426) were also significantly upregulated (p < 0.05) in Cr(VI)-exposed cells relative to untreated cells. By contrast, genes with functions linked to energy metabolism, particularly electron transport (e.g. so0902-03-04, mtrA, omcA, and omcB), showed dramatic temporal alterations in expression with the majority exhibiting repression. Differential proteomics based on multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS was used to complement the transcriptome data, resulting in comparable induction and repression patterns for a subset of corresponding proteins. In total, expression of 2,370 proteins were confidently verified with 624 (26%) of these annotated as hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins. The initial response of S. oneidensis to chromate shock appears to

  11. Photoreduction of Shewanella oneidensis Extracellular Cytochromes by Organic Chromophores and Dye-Sensitized TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Emma V; Lockwood, Colin W J; White, Gaye F; Hwang, Ee Taek; Sakai, Tsubasa; Gross, Manuela A; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A; Jeuken, Lars J C; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N

    2016-12-14

    The transfer of photoenergized electrons from extracellular photosensitizers across a bacterial cell envelope to drive intracellular chemical transformations represents an attractive way to harness nature's catalytic machinery for solar-assisted chemical synthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), trans-outer-membrane electron transfer is performed by the extracellular cytochromes MtrC and OmcA acting together with the outer-membrane-spanning porin⋅cytochrome complex (MtrAB). Here we demonstrate photoreduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and the MtrCAB complex by soluble photosensitizers: namely, eosin Y, fluorescein, proflavine, flavin, and adenine dinucleotide, as well as by riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide, two compounds secreted by MR-1. We show photoreduction of MtrC and OmcA adsorbed on Ru(II) -dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles and that these protein-coated particles perform photocatalytic reduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and MtrCAB. These findings provide a framework for informed development of strategies for using the outer-membrane-associated cytochromes of MR-1 for solar-driven microbial synthesis in natural and engineered bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  12. Disruption of putrescine biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis enhances biofilm cohesiveness and performance in Cr(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Peng, Ni; Du, Yonghua; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Although biofilm-based bioprocesses have been increasingly used in various applications, the long-term robust and efficient biofilm performance remains one of the main bottlenecks. In this study, we demonstrated that biofilm cohesiveness and performance of Shewanella oneidensis can be enhanced through disrupting putrescine biosynthesis. Through random transposon mutagenesis library screening, one hyperadherent mutant strain, CP2-1-S1, exhibiting an enhanced capability in biofilm formation, was obtained. Comparative analysis of the performance of biofilms formed by S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type (WT) and CP2-1-S1 in removing dichromate (Cr2O7(2-)), i.e., Cr(VI), from the aqueous phase showed that, compared with the WT biofilms, CP2-1-S1 biofilms displayed a substantially lower rate of cell detachment upon exposure to Cr(VI), suggesting a higher cohesiveness of the mutant biofilms. In addition, the amount of Cr(III) immobilized by CP2-1-S1 biofilms was much larger, indicating an enhanced performance in Cr(VI) bioremediation. We further showed that speF, a putrescine biosynthesis gene, was disrupted in CP2-1-S1 and that the biofilm phenotypes could be restored by both genetic and chemical complementations. Our results also demonstrated an important role of putrescine in mediating matrix disassembly in S. oneidensis biofilms.

  13. Cell adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to iron oxide minerals: Effect of different single crystal faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochella Michael F

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001 face of hematite, and the (100 and (111 faces of magnetite. A role for electrostatic interactions is apparent. The trend in relative forces of adhesion generated at the mineral surfaces is in agreement with predicted ferric site densities published previously. These results suggest that near-surface structure does indeed influence initial cell attachment to iron oxide surfaces; whether this is mediated via specific cell surface-mineral surface interactions or by more general interfacial phenomena remains untested.

  14. Rapid Prediction of Bacterial Heterotrophic Fluxomics Using Machine Learning and Constraint Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen Gang; Wang, Yuxuan; Jiang, Wu; Oyetunde, Tolutola; Yao, Ruilian; Zhang, Xuehong; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Tang, Yinjie J.; Bao, Forrest Sheng

    2016-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) has been widely used to measure in vivo enzyme reaction rates (i.e., metabolic flux) in microorganisms. Mining the relationship between environmental and genetic factors and metabolic fluxes hidden in existing fluxomic data will lead to predictive models that can significantly accelerate flux quantification. In this paper, we present a web-based platform MFlux (http://mflux.org) that predicts the bacterial central metabolism via machine learning, leveraging data from approximately 100 13C-MFA papers on heterotrophic bacterial metabolisms. Three machine learning methods, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN), and Decision Tree, were employed to study the sophisticated relationship between influential factors and metabolic fluxes. We performed a grid search of the best parameter set for each algorithm and verified their performance through 10-fold cross validations. SVM yields the highest accuracy among all three algorithms. Further, we employed quadratic programming to adjust flux profiles to satisfy stoichiometric constraints. Multiple case studies have shown that MFlux can reasonably predict fluxomes as a function of bacterial species, substrate types, growth rate, oxygen conditions, and cultivation methods. Due to the interest of studying model organism under particular carbon sources, bias of fluxome in the dataset may limit the applicability of machine learning models. This problem can be resolved after more papers on 13C-MFA are published for non-model species. PMID:27092947

  15. Rapid Prediction of Bacterial Heterotrophic Fluxomics Using Machine Learning and Constraint Programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gang Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA has been widely used to measure in vivo enzyme reaction rates (i.e., metabolic flux in microorganisms. Mining the relationship between environmental and genetic factors and metabolic fluxes hidden in existing fluxomic data will lead to predictive models that can significantly accelerate flux quantification. In this paper, we present a web-based platform MFlux (http://mflux.org that predicts the bacterial central metabolism via machine learning, leveraging data from approximately 100 13C-MFA papers on heterotrophic bacterial metabolisms. Three machine learning methods, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN, and Decision Tree, were employed to study the sophisticated relationship between influential factors and metabolic fluxes. We performed a grid search of the best parameter set for each algorithm and verified their performance through 10-fold cross validations. SVM yields the highest accuracy among all three algorithms. Further, we employed quadratic programming to adjust flux profiles to satisfy stoichiometric constraints. Multiple case studies have shown that MFlux can reasonably predict fluxomes as a function of bacterial species, substrate types, growth rate, oxygen conditions, and cultivation methods. Due to the interest of studying model organism under particular carbon sources, bias of fluxome in the dataset may limit the applicability of machine learning models. This problem can be resolved after more papers on 13C-MFA are published for non-model species.

  16. Rapid Prediction of Bacterial Heterotrophic Fluxomics Using Machine Learning and Constraint Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen Gang; Wang, Yuxuan; Jiang, Wu; Oyetunde, Tolutola; Yao, Ruilian; Zhang, Xuehong; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Tang, Yinjie J; Bao, Forrest Sheng

    2016-04-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) has been widely used to measure in vivo enzyme reaction rates (i.e., metabolic flux) in microorganisms. Mining the relationship between environmental and genetic factors and metabolic fluxes hidden in existing fluxomic data will lead to predictive models that can significantly accelerate flux quantification. In this paper, we present a web-based platform MFlux (http://mflux.org) that predicts the bacterial central metabolism via machine learning, leveraging data from approximately 100 13C-MFA papers on heterotrophic bacterial metabolisms. Three machine learning methods, namely Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN), and Decision Tree, were employed to study the sophisticated relationship between influential factors and metabolic fluxes. We performed a grid search of the best parameter set for each algorithm and verified their performance through 10-fold cross validations. SVM yields the highest accuracy among all three algorithms. Further, we employed quadratic programming to adjust flux profiles to satisfy stoichiometric constraints. Multiple case studies have shown that MFlux can reasonably predict fluxomes as a function of bacterial species, substrate types, growth rate, oxygen conditions, and cultivation methods. Due to the interest of studying model organism under particular carbon sources, bias of fluxome in the dataset may limit the applicability of machine learning models. This problem can be resolved after more papers on 13C-MFA are published for non-model species.

  17. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  18. Unique organizational and functional features of the cytochrome c maturation system in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Jin

    Full Text Available Shewanella are renowned for their ability to respire on a wide range of electron acceptors, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. In the model species S. oneidensis MR-1, at least 41 genes encode c-type cytochromes that are predicted to be intact, thereby likely functional. Previously, in-frame deletion mutants for 36 of these genes were obtained and characterized. In this study, first we completed the construction of an entire set of c-type cytochrome mutants utilizing a newly developed att-based mutagenesis approach, which is more effective and efficient than the approach used previously by circumventing the conventional cloning. Second, we investigated the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm system in S. oneidensis. There are two loci predicted to encode components of the Ccm system, SO0259-SO0269 and SO0476-SO0478. The former is proven essential for cytochrome c maturation whereas the latter is dispensable. Unlike the single operon organization observed in other γ-proteobacteria, genes at the SO0259-SO0269 locus are uniquely organized into four operons, ccmABCDE, scyA, SO0265, and ccmFGH-SO0269. Functional analysis revealed that the SO0265 gene rather than the scyA and SO0269 genes are relevant to cytochrome c maturation.

  19. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  20. From metabolomics to fluxomics: a computational procedure to translate metabolite profiles into metabolic fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortassa, Sonia; Caceres, Viviane; Bell, Lauren N; O'Rourke, Brian; Paolocci, Nazareno; Aon, Miguel A

    2015-01-06

    We describe a believed-novel procedure for translating metabolite profiles (metabolome) into the set of metabolic fluxes (fluxome) from which they originated. Methodologically, computational modeling is integrated with an analytical platform comprising linear optimization, continuation and dynamic analyses, and metabolic control. The procedure was tested with metabolite profiles obtained from ex vivo mice Langendorff-heart preparations perfused with glucose. The metabolic profiles were analyzed using a detailed kinetic model of the glucose catabolic pathways including glycolysis, pentose phosphate (PP), glycogenolysis, and polyols to translate the glucose metabolome of the heart into the fluxome. After optimization, the ability of the model to simulate the initial metabolite profile was confirmed, and metabolic fluxes as well as the structure of control and regulation of the glucose catabolic network could be calculated. We show that the step catalyzed by phosphofructokinase together with ATP demand and glycogenolysis exert the highest control on the glycolytic flux. The negative flux control exerted by phosphofructokinase on the PP and polyol pathways revealed that the extent of glycolytic flux directly affects flux redirection through these pathways, i.e., the higher the glycolytic flux the lower the PP and polyols. This believed-novel methodological approach represents a step forward that may help in designing therapeutic strategies targeted to diagnose, prevent, and treat metabolic diseases.

  1. c-Type cytochrome-dependent formation of U(IV nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Marshall

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, are essential for the reduction of U(VI and formation of extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM decaheme cytochrome MtrC (metal reduction, previously implicated in Mn(IV and Fe(III reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI. Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI reduction rate relative to wild-type MR-1. Similar to the wild-type, the mutants accumulated UO(2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. In wild-type cells, this UO(2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties and contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme-containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA (outer membrane cytochrome. This is the first study to our knowledge to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO(2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO(2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O(2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  2. Comparison of quantitative metabolite imaging tools and carbon-13 techniques for fluxomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niittylae, Totte; Chaudhuri, Bhavna; Sauer, Uwe; Frommer, Wolf B

    2009-01-01

    The recent development of analytic technologies allows fast analysis of metabolism in real time. Fluxomics aims to define the genes involved in regulation of flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway. Flux through a metabolic or signaling pathway is determined by the activity of its individual components; regulation can occur at many levels, including transcriptional, posttranslational, and allosteric levels. Currently two technologies are used to monitor fluxes. The first is pulse labeling of the organism with a tracer such as C13, followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the partitioning of label into different compounds. The second approach is based on the use of flux sensors, proteins that respond with a conformational change to ligand binding. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) detects the conformational change and serves as a proxy for ligand concentration. Both methods provide high time resolution. In contrast to mass spectrometry assays, FRET nanosensors monitor only a single compound, but the advantage of FRET nanosensors is that they yield data with cellular and subcellular resolution.

  3. Molecular Dynamics of the Shewanella oneidensis Response toChromate Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.D.; Thompson, M.R.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Chourey, K.; Shah, M.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Hettich, R.L.; Thompson, D.K.

    2007-09-21

    Temporal genomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyseswere performed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of themetal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to an acute chromateshock. The complex dynamics of cellular processes demand the integrationof methodologies that describe biological systems at the levels ofregulation, gene and protein expression, and metabolite production.Genomic microarray analysis of the transcriptome dynamics ofmidexponential phase cells subjected to 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4)at exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min revealed 910 genesthat were differentially expressed at one or more time points. Stronglyinduced genes included those encoding components of a TonB1 irontransport system (tonB1-exbB1-exbD1), hemin ATP-binding cassettetransporters (hmuTUV), TonB-dependent receptors as well as sulfatetransporters (cysP, cysW-2, and cysA-2), and enzymes involved inassimilative sulfur metabolism (cysC, cysN, cysD, cysH, cysI, and cysJ).Transcript levels for genes with annotated functions in DNA repair (lexA,recX, recA, recN, dinP, and umuD), cellular detoxification (so1756,so3585, and so3586), and two-component signal transduction systems(so2426) were also significantly up-regulated (p<0.05) inCr(VI)-exposed cells relative to untreated cells. By contrast, genes withfunctions linked to energy metabolism, particularly electron transport(e.g. so0902-03-04, mtrA, omcA, and omcB), showed dramatic temporalalterations in expression with the majority exhibiting repression.Differential proteomics based on multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS was used tocomplement the transcriptome data, resulting in comparable induction andrepression patterns for a subset of corresponding proteins. In total,expression of 2,370 proteins were confidently verified with 624 (26percent) of these annotated as hypothetical or conserved hypotheticalproteins. The initial response of S. oneidensis to chromate shock appearsto require a combination of

  4. Single-Molecule Methods for the Large-Scale Characterization of Expression Levels and Protein-Protein Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2008-10-01

    This project has demonstrated a new approach to localize binding sites of proteins regulating gene expression (also known as transcription factors) on the genome of bacteria. Knowledge of the precise binding site(s) of a specific transcription factor helps determining its role in the cell cycle and by extension provides further understanding of the mechanisms at play in the organism. The approach entails labeling transcription factors (or any other DNA-binding protein of interest) with quantum dots, a new class of very bright fluorescent probes, which allow detection of individual molecules with a simple microscope. Detection is then followed with very accurate localization of the probe (with nanometer resolution) with respect to specific parts of the DNA or other proteins bound to the DNA. We have confirmed the precision of our measurement using another technique based on atomic force microscopy, which provides a nanometer-resolution topographic picture of a sample. Quantum dots and DNA are readily observable (and distinguishable) in the atomic force microscope, and can be simultaneously observed by fluorescence microscopy, allowing a direct comparison of the two methods. Precise nanometer-localization of protein binding sites using fluorescent quantum dots is thus a direct and visual method for physical mapping of transcription factor binding sites on whole genomes.

  5. In Situ Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MR1 Biofilms by SALVI and ToF-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komorek, Rachel; Wei, Wenchao; Yu, Xiaofei; Hill, Eric; Yao, Juan; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are surface-associated communities that are vastly studied to understand their self-produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their roles in environmental microbiology. This study outlines a method to cultivate biofilm attachment to the System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI) and achieve in situ chemical mapping of a living biofilm by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). This is done through the culturing of bacteria both outside and within the SALVI channel with our specialized setup, as well as through optical imaging techniques to detect the biofilm presence and thickness before ToF-SIMS analysis. Our results show the characteristic peaks of the Shewanella biofilm in its natural hydrated state, highlighting upon its localized water cluster environment, as well as EPS fragments, which are drastically different from the same biofilm’s dehydrated state. These results demonstrate the breakthrough capability of SALVI that allows for in situ biofilm imaging with a vacuum-based chemical imaging instrument.

  6. MHC class I-related molecule, MR1, and mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Salou, Marion; Legoux, Francois; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yue; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The MHC-related 1, MR1, molecule presents a new class of microbial antigens (derivatives of the riboflavin [Vitamin B2] biosynthesis pathway) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. This raises many questions regarding antigens loading and intracellular trafficking of the MR1/ligand complexes. The MR1/MAIT field is also important because MAIT cells are very abundant in humans and their frequency is modified in many infectious and non-infectious diseases. Both MR1 and the invariant TCRα chain expressed by MAIT cells are strikingly conserved among species, indicating important functions. Riboflavin is synthesized by plants and most bacteria and yeasts but not animals, and its precursor derivatives activating MAIT cells are short-lived unless bound to MR1. The recognition of MR1 loaded with these compounds is therefore an exquisite manner to detect invasive bacteria. Herein, we provide an historical perspective of the field before describing the main characteristics of MR1, its ligands, and the few available data regarding its cellular biology. We then summarize the current knowledge of MAIT cell differentiation and discuss the definition of MAIT cells in comparison to related subsets. Finally, we describe the phenotype and effector activities of MAIT cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Synthesis and Structure-Activity Correlation Studies of Metal Complexes of α-N-heterocyclic Carboxaldehyde Thiosemicarbazones in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintell Tillison

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This investigation involved the synthesis of metal complexes to test the hypothesis that structural changes and metal coordination in pyridine thiosemicarbazones affect cell growth and cell proliferation in vitro. Thiosemicarbazones are well known to possess antitumor, antiviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, and other activities. Extensive research has been carried out on aliphatic, aromatic, heterocyclic and other types of thiosemicarbazones and their metal complexes. Due to the pronounced reactivity exhibited by metal complexes of heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones, synthesis and structural characterization of di-2-pyridylketone 4N-phenyl thiosemicarbazone and diphenyl tin (Sn and platinum (Pt complexes were undertaken. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a metal ion-reducing bacterium, was used as a model organism to explore the biological activity under aerobic conditions. A comparision of the cytotoxic potential of selected ligand and metal-complex thiosemicarbazones on cell growth in wild type MR-1 and mutant DSP-010 Shewanella oneidensis strains at various concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 25 ppm was performed. The wild type (MR-1 grown in the presence of increasing concentrations of Sn- thiosemicarbazone complexes was comparatively more sensitive (mean cell number = 4.8 X 108 + 4.3 X 107 SD than the DSP-010, a spontaneous rifampicillin derivative of the parent strain (mean cell number = 5.6 x 108 + 6.4 X 107 SD under comparable aerobic conditions (p=0.0004. No differences were observed in the sensitivity of the wild and mutant types when exposed to various concentrations of diphenyl Pt- thiosemicarbazone complex (p= 0.425 or the thiosemicarbazone ligand (p=0.313. Growth of MR-1 in the presence of diphenyl Sn- thiosemicarbazone was significantly different among treatment groups (p=0.012. MR-1 cell numbers were significantly higher at 5ppm than at 10 to 20ppm (p = 0.05. The mean number of DSP-010 variant strain cells also differed among diphenyl Sn

  8. Investigation of the structure and function of a Shewanella oneidensis arsenical-resistance family transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaobing; Postis, Vincent L G; Rahman, Moazur; Wright, Gareth S A; Roach, Peter C J; Deacon, Sarah E; Ingram, Jean C; Henderson, Peter J F; Findlay, John B C; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2008-12-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is an abundant element and most organisms possess transport systems involved in its detoxification. One such family of arsenite transporters, the ACR3 family, is widespread in fungi and bacteria. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of arsenic transport, we report here the expression and characterization of a family member, So_ACR3, from the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Surprisingly, expression of this transporter in the arsenic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain AW3110 conferred resistance to arsenate, but not to arsenite. Purification of a C-terminally His-tagged form of the protein allowed the binding of putative permeants to be directly tested: arsenate but not arsenite quenched its intrinsic fluorescence in a concentration-dependent fashion. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the purified protein was predominantly alpha-helical. A mutant bearing a single cysteine residue at position 3 retained the ability to confer arsenate resistance, and was accessible to membrane impermeant thiol reagents in intact cells. In conjunction with successful C-terminal tagging with oligohistidine, this finding is consistent with the experimentally-determined topology of the homologous human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, namely 7 transmembrane helices and a periplasmic N-terminus, although the presence of additional transmembrane segments cannot be excluded. Mutation to alanine of the conserved residue proline 190, in the fourth putative transmembrane region, abrogated the ability of the transporter to confer arsenic resistance, but did not prevent arsenate binding. An apparently increased thermal stability is consistent with the mutant being unable to undergo the conformational transitions required for permeant translocation.

  9. Silencing MR-1 attenuates inflammatory damage in mice heart induced by AngII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wenjian [Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Key Lab of Antibiotic Biotechnology, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100050 (China); Hunan Environment-Biological Polytechnic College, Hengyang Hunan 421005 (China); Chen, Haiyang [Hunan Environment-Biological Polytechnic College, Hengyang Hunan 421005 (China); Jiang, Jiandong [Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Key Lab of Antibiotic Biotechnology, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100050 (China); Kong, Weijia, E-mail: wjkong894@sohu.com [Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Key Lab of Antibiotic Biotechnology, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100050 (China); Wang, Yiguang, E-mail: wangyh456@yahoo.com.cn [Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Key Lab of Antibiotic Biotechnology, Ministry of Health, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1(MR-1) can aggravate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin(Ang) II in mice through activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway, and nuclear transcription factor (NF)-{kappa}B and activator protein-1(AP-1) regulate inflammatory and immune responses by increasing the expression of specific inflammatory genes in various tissues including heart. Whether inhibition of MR-1 expression will attenuate AngII-induced inflammatory injury in mice heart has not been explored. Herein, we monitored the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, together with expression of pro-inflammatory of interleukin(IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-{alpha}, vascular-cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), and inflammatory cell infiltration in heart of mice which are induced firstly by AngII (PBS),then received MR-1-siRNA or control-siRNA injecting. We found that the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 was inhibited significantly, together with the decreased expression of IL-6, TNF-{alpha}, VCAM-1, and PECAM in AngII-induced mice myocardium in MR-1-siRNA injection groups compared with control-siRNA injecting groups. However, the expression level of MR-1 was not an apparent change in PBS-infused groups than in unoperation groups, and MR-1-siRNA do not affect the expression of MR-1 in PBS-infused mice. Our findings suggest that silencing MR-1 protected mice myocardium against inflammatory injury induced by AngII by suppression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 signaling pathway.

  10. Substrates and oxygen dependent citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica: insights through transcriptome and fluxome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Wael; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Maheshwari, Garima; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Zeng, An-Ping

    2017-05-08

    Unlike the well-studied backer yeast where catabolite repression represents a burden for mixed substrate fermentation, Yarrowia lipolytica, an oleaginous yeast, is recognized for its potential to produce single cell oils and citric acid from different feedstocks. These versatilities of Y. lipolytica with regards to substrate utilization make it an attractive host for biorefinery application. However, to develop a commercial process for the production of citric acid by Y. lipolytica, it is necessary to better understand the primary metabolism and its regulation, especially for growth on mixed substrate. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration (pO2) in Y. lipolytica cultures enhanced citric acid production significantly in cultures grown on glucose in mono- or dual substrate fermentations, whereas with glycerol as mono-substrate no significant effect of pO2 was found on citrate production. Growth on mixed substrate with glucose and glycerol revealed a relative preference of glycerol utilization by Y. lipolytica. Under optimized conditions with pO2 control, the citric acid titer on glucose in mono- or in dual substrate cultures was 55 and 50 g/L (with productivity of 0.6 g/L*h in both cultures), respectively, compared to a maximum of 18 g/L (0.2 g/L*h) with glycerol in monosubstrate culture. Additionally, in dual substrate fermentation, glycerol limitation was found to trigger citrate consumption despite the presence of enough glucose in pO2-limited culture. The metabolic behavior of this yeast on different substrates was investigated at transcriptomic and (13)C-based fluxomics levels. Upregulation of most of the genes of the pentose phosphate pathway was found in cultures with highest citrate production with glucose in mono- or in dual substrate fermentation with pO2 control. The activation of the glyoxylate cycle in the oxygen limited cultures and the imbalance caused by glycerol limitation might be the reason for the re-consumption of citrate in dual

  11. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-07-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1-2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1-2(+) MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8(+) T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8(+) subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8(+)  TRAV1-2(+) cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161(hi) was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161(dim) . Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1-2, and CD26(hi) in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis.

  12. Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for human ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is overexpressed in human cancer cells and plays an essential role in cancer cell growth. However, the significance of MR-1 in human ovarian cancer has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to examine whether MR-1 is a predictor of ovarian cancer and its value as a therapeutic target in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect MR-1 mRNA levels in tissue samples from 26 ovarian cancer patients and 25 controls with benign ovarian disease. Anti-MR-1 polyclonal antibodies were prepared, tested by ELISA and western blotting, and then used for immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples. Adhesion and invasion of 292T cells was also examined after transfection of a pMX-MR-1 plasmid. Knockdown of MR-1 expression was achieved after stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a short hairpin DNA pGPU6/GFP/Neo plasmid against the MR-1 gene. In addition, SKOV3 cells were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin, and a potential role for MR-1 as a therapeutic target was evaluated. Results MR-1 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues and SKOV3 cells. 293T cells overexpressed MR-1, and cellular spread and invasion were enhanced after transfection of the pMX-MR-1 plasmid, suggesting that MR-1 is critical for ovarian cancer cell growth. Knockdown of MR-1 expression inhibited cell adhesion and invasion, and treatment with anti-cancer drugs decreased its expression in cancer cells. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MR-1 might serve as a novel biological marker and potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Conclusions MR-1 may be a biomarker for diagnosis of ovarian cancer. It may also be useful for monitoring of the effects of anti-cancer therapies. Further studies are needed to clarify whether MR-1 is an early

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1, a Methylarsenate-Reducing Bacterial Isolate from Florida Golf Course Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawitwar, Shashank S.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yoshinaga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the environmental organoarsenical biocycle, we isolated a soil organism, Burkholderia sp. MR1, which reduces relatively nontoxic pentavalent methylarsenate to the more toxic trivalent methylarsenite, with the goal of identifying the gene for the reductase. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1. PMID:26044439

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1, a Methylarsenate-Reducing Bacterial Isolate from Florida Golf Course Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Pawitwar, Shashank S.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the environmental organoarsenical biocycle, we isolated a soil organism, Burkholderia sp. MR1, which reduces relatively nontoxic pentavalent methylarsenate to the more toxic trivalent methylarsenite, with the goal of identifying the gene for the reductase. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1.

  15. Biochemical and Physiological Characterization: Development & Apply Optical Methods for Charaterizing Biochemical Protein-Protein Interactions in MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Shimon

    2006-08-30

    The objectives of this report are to: Develop novel site-specific protein labeling chemistries for assaying protein-protein interactions in MR-1; and development of a novel optical acquisition and data analysis method for characterizing protein-protein interactions in MR-1 model systems. Our work on analyzing protein-protein interactions in MR-1 is divided in four areas: (1) expression and labeling of MR-1 proteins; (2) general scheme for site-specific fluorescent labeling of expressed proteins; (3) methodology development for monitoring protein-protein interactions; and (4) study of protein-protein interactions in MR-1. In this final report, we give an account for our advances in all areas.

  16. Characterization of MR-1, a Novel Myofibrillogenesis Regulator in Human Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Bo LI; Xiu-Hua LIU; Shuang FENG; Yang HU; Wei-Xi YANG; Yue HAN; Yi-Guang WANG; Li-Min GONG

    2004-01-01

    The actin-myosin contractile apparatus consists of several thick filament and thin filament proteins.Specific regulatory mechanisms are involved in this highly ordered process.In this paper,we reported the identification and characterization of a novel myofibrillogenesis regulator,MR-l.The MR-lgene was cloned from human skeletal muscle cDNA library by using a strategy that involves EST data base searching,PCR and RACE.The MR-l gene is located on human chromosome 2q35 and encodes a 142 aa protein.Northern blot revealed that the mRNA level of MR-1 was highest in the skeletal muscle and certain level of MR-1 expression was also observed in heart,liver and kidney.Immunohistochemical assay confirmed that the MR-l protein existed in human myocardial myofibrils.It was found by yeast two-hybrid screening and confirmed by in vitro binding assay that MR-1 could interact with sarcomeric proteins,such as myosin regulatory light chain,myomesin 1 and β-enolase.These studies suggested that MR-I might play a regulatory role in the muscle cell and it was worth investigating further.

  17. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  18. 零价铁对奥奈达希瓦氏菌还原U(Ⅵ)的影响及机制%Effect and mechanism of zero-valent iron on reducing U(Ⅵ) byS. oneidensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金香; 谢水波; 马华龙; 王永华; 陈华柏; 李标

    2015-01-01

    采用现代分析方法探讨零价铁(ZVI)与奥奈达希瓦氏菌(S. oneidensis)MR-1还原U(Ⅵ)的效果与机制.结果表明:ZVI与S. oneidensis均能够还原U(Ⅵ);在厌氧条件下,ZVI与S. oneidensis还原U(Ⅵ)存在协同作用.当pH为7、温度为30℃、U(Ⅵ)的初始浓度为20 mg/L、ZVI的投加量为1.0 g/L时,24 h S. oneidensis对U(Ⅵ)还原率达到96.9%;在0.5~2.0 g/L范围内,U(Ⅵ)的还原率随ZVI投量的增加而上升;在U(Ⅵ)初始浓度5.0~50.0 mg/L内,U(Ⅵ)的还原率与其浓度正相关.ZVI、Fe 3 O 4和Fe 2 O 3均能明显促进U(Ⅵ)的还原,而可溶态的Fe(Ⅲ)对U(Ⅵ)的还原具有明显的抑制作用.其他离子Cu2+、Ca2+、Mn2+和NO 3-对U(Ⅵ)的还原存在抑制作用,以Cu2+的影响最大,Ca2+的影响次之,SO 4 2-对U(Ⅵ)的还原影响较小.XPS分析结果表明,ZVI表面吸附和沉积了U(Ⅵ)和U(Ⅳ)两种价态的U元素,反应后的铀大部分形成了稳定的UO 2.%The effects and mechanism of U(Ⅵ) reduction byShewanella oneidensis(S.oneidensis) MR-1 with zero-valent iron(ZVI) were evaluated. The results show that either ZVI or bacteriacan reduce U(Ⅵ) in the solution, and under anaerobic conditions, a cooperative action of ZVI and the bacteriaS.oneidensis is observed in reducing process of U(Ⅵ). Under condition of pH 7.0, temperature 30℃, the initial concentration of U (Ⅵ) 20 mg/L and ZVI addition 1.0 g/L, the reduction rate of U(Ⅵ) reaches 96.9% byS.oneidensis reduction for 24 h. The reduction rate of U(Ⅵ) is improved with increasing amount of ZVI in the range of 0.5-2.0 g/L, and the reduction rate of U(Ⅵ) is positive correlated with its initial concentration in the range of 5.0-50.0 mg/L. Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and ZVI are effective accelerators for bioreduction of U(Ⅵ), and soluble Fe(Ⅲ) can remarkably inhibit U(Ⅵ) bioreduction. The other coexistence ions, such as Cu2+, Ca2+, Mn2+ and NO3-, show a remarkable negative effect on U(Ⅵ) reduction, and among these ions, the negative

  19. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage...... as a whole, especially for TCRβ chain sequences. Moreover, different pathogen-specific responses were characterized by distinct TCR usage, both between and within individuals, suggesting that MAIT cell adaptation was a direct consequence of exposure to various exogenous MR1-restricted epitopes. In line...

  20. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage...... as a whole, especially for TCRβ chain sequences. Moreover, different pathogen-specific responses were characterized by distinct TCR usage, both between and within individuals, suggesting that MAIT cell adaptation was a direct consequence of exposure to various exogenous MR1-restricted epitopes. In line...

  1. Involvement and specificity of Shewanella oneidensis outer membrane cytochromes in the reduction of soluble and solid-phase terminal electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücking, Clemens; Popp, Felix; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The formation of outer membrane (OM) cytochromes seems to be a key step in the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. They are believed to be the endpoints of an extended respiratory chain to the surface of the cell that establishes the connection to insoluble electron acceptors such as iron or manganese oxides. The gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains the genetic information for five putative OM cytochromes. In this study, the role and specificity of these proteins were investigated. All experiments were conducted using a markerless deletion mutant in all five OM cytochromes that was complemented via the expression of single, plasmid-encoded genes. MtrC and MtrF were shown to be potent reductases of chelated ferric iron, birnessite, and a carbon anode in a microbial fuel cell. OmcA-producing cells were unable to catalyze iron and electrode reduction, although the protein was correctly produced and oriented. However, OmcA production resulted in a higher birnessite reduction rate compared with the mutant. The presence of the decaheme cytochrome SO_2931 as well as the diheme cytochrome SO_1659 did not rescue the phenotype of the deletion mutant.

  2. MR1-restricted mucosal-associated invariant T cells and their activation during infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J. Howson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MR1-restricted MAIT cells recognize vitamin B metabolites, which are generated by a broad range of bacteria, from Escherichia coli to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and BCG. MAIT cells have been described as innate sensors of infection as they accumulate early in infected tissues. MAIT cells maintain an activated phenotype throughout the course of infections, secrete inflammatory cytokines and have the potential to directly kill infected cells, playing an important role in shaping the host response. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms that underline MAIT cells activation in sterile and non-sterile inflammatory conditions.

  3. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; McCue, Lee Ann [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Parsons, Andrea [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Feng, Sheng [Duke University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter spp. MR1, Isolated from Drought Tolerant Plant (Butea monosperma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakhia, Manoj V; Tomar, Rukam S; Malaviya, Bipin J; Dhingani, Rashmin M; Rathod, Visha M; Thakkar, Jalpa R; Golakiya, B A

    2014-03-01

    Enterobacter sp. MR1 an endophytic plant growth promoting bacterium was isolated from the roots of Butea monosperma, a drought tolerant plant. Genome sequencing of Enterobacter spp. MR1 was carried out in Ion Torrent (PGM), Next Generation Sequencer. The data obtained revealed 640 contigs with genome size of 4.58 Mb and G+C content of 52.8 %. This bacterium may contain genes responsible for inducing drought tolerance in plant, including genes for phosphate solubilization, growth hormones and other useful genes for plant growth.

  5. Deletion of degQ gene enhances outer membrane vesicle production of Shewanella oneidensis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Mohanadas, Thivagaran; Kitamura, Kosei; Nunogami, Shota; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2017-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe that can use a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. In this study, S. oneidensis degQ gene, encoding a putative periplasmic serine protease, was cloned and expressed. The activity of purified DegQ was inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a typical serine protease-specific inhibitor, indicating that DegQ is a serine protease. In-frame deletion and subsequent complementation of the degQ were carried out to examine the effect of envelope stress on the production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Analysis of periplasmic proteins from the resulting S. oneidensis strain showed that deletion of degQ induced protein accumulation and resulted in a significant decrease in protease activity within the periplasmic space. OMVs from the wild-type and mutant strains were purified and observed by transmission electron microscopy. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the OMVs showed a prominent band at ~37 kDa. Nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified three outer membrane porins (SO3896, SO1821, and SO3545) as dominant components of the band, suggesting that these proteins could be used as indices for comparing OMV production by S. oneidensis strains. Quantitative evaluation showed that degQ-deficient cells had a fivefold increase in OMV production compared with wild-type cells. Thus, the increased OMV production following the deletion of DegQ in S. oneidensis may be responsible for the increase in envelope stress.

  6. Microbial-enzymatic-hybrid biological fuel cell with optimized growth conditions for Shewanella oneidensis DSP-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jared N; Luckarift, Heather R; Sizemore, Susan R; Farrington, Karen E; Lau, Carolin; Johnson, Glenn R; Atanassov, Plamen

    2013-07-10

    In this work we present a biological fuel cell fabricated by combining a Shewanella oneidensis microbial anode and a laccase-modified air-breathing cathode. This concept is devised as an extension to traditional biochemical methods by incorporating diverse biological catalysts with the aim of powering small devices. In preparing the biological fuel cell anode, novel hierarchical-structured architectures and biofilm configurations were investigated. A method for creating an artificial biofilm based on encapsulating microorganisms in a porous, thin film of silica was compared with S. oneidensis biofilms that were allowed to colonize naturally. Results indicate comparable current and power densities for artificial and natural biofilm formations, based on growth characteristics. As a result, this work describes methods for creating controllable and reproducible bio-anodes and demonstrates the versatility of hybrid biological fuel cells.

  7. Electrochemically Active Soluble Mediators from Shewanella oneidensis: Relevance to Microbial Fuel Cells and Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    preparations revealed that cell density alone could not account for differences between the tests. Because experiments used planktonic S. oneidensis, extra...Charge/Discharge Operation - M. Casas-Cabanas (EMAT), J. Canales-Vazquez (Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB)), J. Rodriguez...Carvajal (Institut Max Von Laue-Paul Langevin (ILL)) and M. Palacin (Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB)) 11:20 190 High-Rate Alkaline

  8. Characterization of the Shewanella oneidensis Fur gene: roles in iron and acid tolerance response

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Liyou; Luo Feng; Harris Daniel P; Yang Yunfeng; Parsons Andrea B; Palumbo Anthony V; Zhou Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Iron homeostasis is a key metabolism for most organisms. In many bacterial species, coordinate regulation of iron homeostasis depends on the protein product of a Fur gene. Fur also plays roles in virulence, acid tolerance, redox-stress responses, flagella chemotaxis and metabolic pathways. Results We conducted physiological and transcriptomic studies to characterize Fur in Shewanella oneidensis, with regard to its roles in iron and acid tolerance response. A S. oneidensisf...

  9. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  10. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage...... is widely thought to indicate limited ligand presentation and discrimination within a pattern-like recognition system. Here, we evaluated the TCR repertoire of MAIT cells responsive to three classes of microbes. Substantial diversity and heterogeneity were apparent across the functional MAIT cell repertoire...... with this interpretation, MAIT cell clones with distinct TCRs responded differentially to a riboflavin metabolite. These results suggest that MAIT cells can discriminate between pathogen-derived ligands in a clonotype-dependent manner, providing a basis for adaptive memory via recruitment of specific repertoires shaped...

  11. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marielle C; McLaren, James E; Reistetter, Joseph A; Smyk-Pearson, Sue; Ladell, Kristin; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn M; Yu, Yik Y L; Hansen, Ted H; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Gerritsen, Bram; Kesmir, Can; Miles, John J; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Price, David A; Lewinsohn, David M

    2014-07-28

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage is widely thought to indicate limited ligand presentation and discrimination within a pattern-like recognition system. Here, we evaluated the TCR repertoire of MAIT cells responsive to three classes of microbes. Substantial diversity and heterogeneity were apparent across the functional MAIT cell repertoire as a whole, especially for TCRβ chain sequences. Moreover, different pathogen-specific responses were characterized by distinct TCR usage, both between and within individuals, suggesting that MAIT cell adaptation was a direct consequence of exposure to various exogenous MR1-restricted epitopes. In line with this interpretation, MAIT cell clones with distinct TCRs responded differentially to a riboflavin metabolite. These results suggest that MAIT cells can discriminate between pathogen-derived ligands in a clonotype-dependent manner, providing a basis for adaptive memory via recruitment of specific repertoires shaped by microbial exposure.

  12. A New Method For Processing Backscatter Imagery Collected By Multibeam Sonars: The HAWAII MR1 Sidescan Sonar Software Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R.; Appelgate, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Hawaii Mapping Research Group of the University of Hawaii has developed and used in-house software to process seafloor acoustic imagery (sidescan sonar) data acquired by its own shallow-towed HAWAII-MR1 phase-difference sidescan bathymetry mapping system, as well as phase-difference sonars operated by other institutions (NAVO SEAMAP-C, LDEO SCAMP, WHOI DSL-120A). During 2003 the HAWAII MR1 software tools were modified to operate on multibeam backscatter data collected by the University of Hawaii research vessel Kilo Moana to test whether the software could improve the quality of the multibeam backscatter and the resulting data products. We found that the MR1 processing tools are effective in eliminating speckle and stripe noise, and cross-track amplitude variability due to angle-varying gain. HMRG software was also used to produce final mosaics of sonar imagery. Once we determined the viability of using the MR1 tools to process Kilo Moana data, we expanded the toolkit to allow operation on data from other multibeam systems as well. HMRG processing software runs on Linux, Unix and Irix platforms. The main processing modules can be run in either graphical or command-line modes. The preferred processing scheme involves using the graphical interface to interactively determine noise filters appropriate for each survey. Once characterized, these filters are then applied in batch processes that run faster than graphical methods allow. Once processing is completed, the HMRG software is used to grid the data and then to assemble individual grids into mosaics. The mosaics can be output as Sun raster files, geotiffs, or Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) grids, which allow the mosaics to be imported into other GIS and charting programs. Here we present results from several recent surveys that used different hull-mounted multibeam systems: 12kHz Sea Beam 2112 data from the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy, 12kHz Simrad EM120 data from deep water surveys aboard the R/V Kilo Moana

  13. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a

  14. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  15. Exoprotein production correlates with morphotype changes of nonmotile Shewanella oneidensis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wu, Lin; Xia, Yu; Chen, Haijiang; Luo, Qixia; Sun, Linlin; Gao, Haichun

    2013-04-01

    We report a previously undescribed mechanism for the rugose morphotype in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for investigating redox transformations of environmental contaminants. Bacteria may form smooth or rugose colonies on agar plates. In general, conversion from the smooth to rugose colony morphotype is attributed to increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). In this work, we discovered that aflagellate S. oneidensis mutants grew into rugose colonies, whereas those with nonfunctional flagellar filaments remained smooth. EPS production was not altered in either case, but mutants with the rugose morphotype showed significantly reduced exoprotein secretion. The idea that exoproteins at a reduced level correlate with rugosity gained support from smooth suppressor strains of an aflagellate rugose fliD (encoding the capping protein) mutant, which restored the exoprotein level to the levels of the wild-type and mutant strains with a smooth morphotype. Further analyses revealed that SO1072 (a putative GlcNAc-binding protein) was one of the highly upregulated exoproteins in these suppressor strains. Most intriguingly, this study identified a compensatory mechanism of SO1072 to flagellins possibly mediated by bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP.

  16. Hsp90 Is Essential under Heat Stress in the Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Ambre Honoré

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hsp90 chaperone is essential in eukaryotes and activates a large array of client proteins. In contrast, its role is still elusive in bacteria, and only a few Hsp90 bacterial clients are known. Here, we found that Hsp90 is essential in the model bacterium Shewanella oneidensis under heat stress. A genetic screen for Hsp90 client proteins identified TilS, an essential protein involved in tRNA maturation. Overexpression of TilS rescued the growth defect of the hsp90 deletion strain under heat stress. In vivo, the activity and the amount of TilS were significantly reduced in the absence of Hsp90 at high temperature. Furthermore, we showed that Hsp90 interacts with TilS, and Hsp90 prevents TilS aggregation in vitro at high temperature. Together, our results indicate that TilS is a client of Hsp90 in S. oneidensis. Therefore, our study links the essentiality of bacterial Hsp90 at high temperature with the identification of a client.

  17. Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome CymA in Anaerobic Electron Transport in Cells of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 with Normal Levels of Menaquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Judith M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 possesses a complex electron transport system which facilitates its ability to use a diverse array of compounds as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. A previous report described a mutant strain (CMTn-1) deficient in CymA, a tetraheme cytochrome c. However, the interpretation of the electron transport role of CymA was complicated by the fact that CMTn-1 was also markedly deficient in menaquinones. This report demonstrates that the depressed menaquinone levels were the result of the rifampin resistance phenotype of the parent of CMTn-1 and not the interruption of the cymA gene. This is the first report of rifampin resistance leading to decreased menaquinone levels, indicating that rifampin-resistant strains should be used with caution when analyzing electron transport processes. A site-directed gene replacement approach was used to isolate a cymA knockout strain (MR1-CYMA) directly from MR-1. While MR1-CYMA retained menaquinone levels comparable to those of MR-1, it lost the ability to reduce iron(III), manganese(IV), and nitrate and to grow by using fumarate as an electron acceptor. All of these functions were restored to wild-type efficacy, and the presence of the cymA transcript and CymA protein was also restored, by complementation of MR1-CYMA with the cymA gene. The requirement for CymA in anaerobic electron transport to iron(III), fumarate, nitrate, and manganese(IV) is therefore not dependent on the levels of menaquinone in these cells. This represents the first successful use of a suicide vector for directed gene replacement in MR-1. PMID:10613864

  18. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to biofilm

  19. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  20. Role for Outer Membrane Cytochromes OmcA and OmcB of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 in Reduction of Manganese Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Judith M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can use a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration, including certain insoluble manganese and iron oxides. To examine whether the outer membrane (OM) cytochromes of MR-1 play a role in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, mutants lacking the OM cytochrome OmcA or OmcB were isolated by gene replacement. Southern blotting and PCR confirmed replacement of the omcA and omcB genes, respectively, and reverse transcription-PCR analysis demonstrated loss of the respective mRNAs, whereas mRNAs for upstream and downstream genes were retained. The omcA mutant (OMCA1) resembled MR-1 in its growth on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), dimethyl sulfoxide, nitrate, fumarate, thiosulfate, and tetrathionate and its reduction of nitrate, nitrite, ferric citrate, FeOOH, and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid. Similarly, the omcB mutant (OMCB1) grew on fumarate, nitrate, TMAO, and thiosulfate and reduced ferric citrate and FeOOH. However, OMCA1 and OMCB1 were 45 and 75% slower than MR-1, respectively, at reducing MnO2. OMCA1 lacked only OmcA. While OMCB1 lacked OmcB, other OM cytochromes were also missing or markedly depressed. The total cytochrome content of the OM of OMCB1 was less than 15% of that of MR-1. Western blots demonstrated that OMCB1 still synthesized OmcA, but most of it was localized in the cytoplasmic membrane and soluble fractions rather than in the OM. OMCB1 had therefore lost the ability to properly localize multiple OM cytochromes to the OM. Together, the results suggest that the OM cytochromes of MR-1 participate in the reduction of Mn(IV) but are not required for the reduction of Fe(III) or other electron acceptors. PMID:11133454

  1. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew (UW); (UC); (BU)

    2012-09-11

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  2. Shewanella oneidensis: a new and efficient System for Expression and Maturation of heterologous [Fe-Fe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybirna Kateryna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, produces H2 under anaerobic conditions, in a reaction catalysed by a [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase HydA1. For further biochemical and biophysical studies a suitable expression system of this enzyme should be found to overcome its weak expression in the host organism. Two heterologous expression systems used up to now have several advantages. However they are not free from some drawbacks. In this work we use bacterium Shewanella oneidensis as a new and efficient system for expression and maturation of HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results Based on codon usage bias and hydrogenase maturation ability, the bacterium S. oneidensis, which possesses putative [Fe-Fe] and [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase operons, was selected as the best potential host for C. reinhardtii [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase expression. Hydrogen formation by S. oneidensis strain AS52 (ΔhydAΔhyaB transformed with a plasmid bearing CrHydA1 and grown in the presence of six different substrates for anaerobic respiration was determined. A significant increase in hydrogen evolution was observed for cells grown in the presence of trimethylamine oxide, dimethylsulfoxide and disodium thiosulfate, showing that the system of S. oneidensis is efficient for heterologous expression of algal [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase. Conclusion In the present work a new efficient system for heterologous expression and maturation of C. reinhardtii hydrogenase has been developed. HydA1 of C. reinhardtii was purified and shown to contain 6 Fe atoms/molecule of protein, as expected. Using DMSO, TMAO or thiosulfate as substrates for anaerobic respiration during the cell growth, 0.4 – 0.5 mg l-1(OD600 = 1 of catalytically active HydA1 was obtained with hydrogen evolution rate of ~700 μmol H2 mg-1 min-1.

  3. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  4. From Position-Specific Labeling to Environmental Fluxomics: Elucidating Biogeochemical Cycles from the Metabolic Perspective (BG Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Michaela; Apostel, Carolin; Dijkstra, Paul; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Understanding soil and sedimentary organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in biogeoscience. To disentangle the fluxes and transformations of C in soils a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors is required. Biogeochemists' view on the C transformation of microorganisms in soil has rarely exceed a strongly simplified concept assuming that C gets either oxidized to CO2 via the microbial catabolism or incorporated into biomass via the microbial anabolism. Biochemists, however, thoroughly identified in the past decades the individual reactions of glycolysis, pentose-phosphate pathway and citric acid cycle underlying the microbial catabolism. At various points within that metabolic network the anabolic fluxes feeding biomass formation branch off. Recent studies on metabolic flux tracing by position-specific isotope labeling allowed tracing these C transformations in soils in situ, an approach which is qunatitatively complemented by metabolic flux modeling. This approach has reached new impact by the cutting-edge combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites which allows 1) tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils and 2) identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups. Thus, the combination of position-specific labeling, compound-specific isotope incorporation in biomarkers and quantitative metabolic flux modelling provide the toolbox for quantitative soil fluxomics. Our studies combining position-specific labeled glucose with amino sugar 13C analysis showed that up to 55% of glucose, incorporated into the glucose derivative glucosamine, first passed glycolysis before allocated back via gluconeogenesis. Similarly, glutamate-derived C is allocated via anaplerotic pathways towards fatty acid synthesis and in parallel to its oxidation in citric acid cycle. Thus

  5. Fluxomics with ratiometric metabolite dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Bhavna; Niittylä, Totte; Hörmann, Friederike; Frommer, Wolf B

    2007-03-01

    Today's major excitement in biology centers on signaling: How can a cell or organism measure the myriad of environmental cues, integrate it, and acclimate to the new conditions? Hormonal signals and second messengers are in the focus of most of these studies, e.g., regulation of glucose transporter GLUT4 cycling by insulin, or regulation of plant growth by auxin or brassinosteroids.1-3 In comparison, we generally assume that we know almost everything about basic metabolism since it has been studied for many decades; for example we know since the early 80s that allosteric regulation by fructose-2,6-bisphophate plays an important role in regulating glycolysis in plants and animals.4 This may be the reason why studies of metabolism appear to be a bit out of fashion. But if we look to other organisms such as E. coli or yeast, we rapidly realize that metabolism is controlled by complex interconnected signaling networks, and that we understand little of these signaling networks in humans and plants.5,6 As it turns out, the cell registers many metabolites, and flux through the pathways is regulated using complex signaling networks that involve calcium as well as hormones.

  6. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  7. Addressing Shewanella oneidensis "cytochromome": the first step towards high-throughput expression of cytochromes c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londer, Yuri Y; Giuliani, Sarah E; Peppler, Terese; Collart, Frank R

    2008-11-01

    Integrated studies that address proteins structure and function in the new era of systems biology and genomics often require the application of high-throughput approaches for parallel production of many different purified proteins from the same organism. Cytochromes c-electron transfer proteins carrying one or more hemes covalently bound to the polypeptide chain-are essential in most organisms. However, they are one of the most recalcitrant classes of proteins with respect to heterologous expression because post-translational incorporation of hemes is required for proper folding and stability. We have addressed this challenge by designing two families of vectors (total of 6 vectors) suitable for ligation-independent cloning and developing a pipeline for expression and solubility analysis of cytochromes c. This system has been validated by expression analysis of thirty genes from Shewanella oneidensis coding for cytochromes c or cytochromes c-type domains predicted to have 1-4 hemes. Out of 30 targets, 26 (87%) were obtained in soluble form in one or more vectors. This work establishes a methodology for high-throughput expression of this class of proteins and provides a clone resource for the microbiological and functional genomics research communities.

  8. Oxidation state of chromium associated with cell surfaces of Shewanella oneidensis during chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Lowe, Kristine; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J

    2002-12-30

    Employing electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we demonstrate that in both aerobic and anaerobic culture Shewanella oneidensis cells are capable of chromate reduction. No Cr(VI) or Cr(V) species were identified at the cell surfaces in Cr 2p{sub 3/}ore photoelectron spectra. More chromium was associated with cell surfaces recovered from anaerobic medium than aerobic. Multiplet-splitting models derived for Cr(III) and Cr(IV) were employed to determine contributions from each ion to Cr 2p{sub 3/2} photopeaks collected from the various cell treatments. Whilst in all cases Cr(III) was the major ion associated with cell surfaces, a significant contribution was identified due to Cr(IV) in anaerobically grown cells. The Cr(IV) contribution was far less when cells were grown aerobically. Moreover, when anaerobically grown cells were exposed to oxygen very little re-oxidation of Cr-precipitates occurred, the precipitates were again identified as a mixture of Cr(III) and Cr(IV). A positive relationship was observed between amounts of chromium and phosphorous associated with cell surfaces resulting from the various treatments, suggesting the precipitates included Cr(III)-phosphate. The fact that Cr(IV) remained associated with precipitates following re-oxidation suggests that under anaerobic conditions the intermediate ion is afforded sufficient stability to be incorporated within the precipitate matrix and thus conferred a degree of protection from oxidation.

  9. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  10. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genfu eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive.

  11. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  12. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  13. In Folio Respiratory Fluxomics Revealed by {sup 13}C Isotopic Labeling and H/D Isotope Effects Highlight the Non-cyclic Nature of the Tricarboxylic Acid 'Cycle' in Illuminated Leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcherkez, G.; Mahe, A.; Gauthier, P.; Hodges, M. [Institut de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Plateforme Metabolisme-Metabolome IFR87, Batiment 630, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Tcherkez, G.; Mauve, C.; Cornic, G. [Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale, Ecologie Systematique Evolution (G.C.), Batiment 630, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Gout, E.; Bligny, R. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2009-07-01

    While the possible importance of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle reactions for leaf photosynthesis operation has been recognized, many uncertainties remain on whether TCA cycle biochemistry is similar in the light compared with the dark. It is widely accepted that leaf day respiration and the metabolic commitment to TCA decarboxylation are down-regulated in illuminated leaves. However, the metabolic basis (i.e. the limiting steps involved in such a down-regulation) is not well known. Here, we investigated the in vivo metabolic fluxes of individual reactions of the TCA cycle by developing two isotopic methods, {sup 13}C tracing and fluxomics and the use of H/D isotope effects, with Xanthium strumarium leaves. We provide evidence that the TCA 'cycle' does not work in the forward direction like a proper cycle but, rather, operates in both the reverse and forward directions to produce fumarate and glutamate, respectively. Such a functional division of the cycle plausibly reflects the compromise between two contrasted forces: (1) the feedback inhibition by NADH and ATP on TCA enzymes in the light, and (2) the need to provide pH-buffering organic acids and carbon skeletons for nitrate absorption and assimilation. (authors)

  14. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  15. Investigation of the substrate specificity of the proton coupled peptide transporter PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Hald, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian proton coupled transporter (POT) hPepT1 has been studied intensively due to its role in nutrient and drug absorption in the small intestine. In the absence of a crystal structure of hPepT1, the available structures of bacterial POTs, among which PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis has...

  16. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the GenusShewanellaand Description ofShewanellaoneidensis sp. nov.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswaran, K.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA--DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  17. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas A; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem 'modules' similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  18. Monodispersed biocompatible Ag2S nanoparticles: Facile extracellular bio-fabrication using the gamma-proteobacterium, S. oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Wang, Wei [ORNL; Moon, Ji Won [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Hensley, Dale K [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size and or shape dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs have become a priority. In the present illustration we report for the first time the efficient generation of extracellular Ag2S nanoparticles by the metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are nearly monodispersed with homogeneous shape distributions and are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85 % theoretical maximum. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical properties, purity, and crystallinity of the as-synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 1-22 nm, with an average size of 9 3 nm and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these silver sulfide nanoparticles on Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacterial systems as well as eukaryotic; mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells showed that the particles were non-inhibitory or non-cytotoxic to both these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag2S nanoparticles which are dispersible and biocompatible; thus providing excellent potential for their uses in optical imaging and electronic devices, and solar cell applications.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of a Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 Electron Transport Regulator etrA Mutant: Reassessment of the Role of EtrA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Tamara M.; Myers, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 has emerged as a good model to study anaerobic respiration and electron transport-linked metal reduction. Its remarkable respiratory plasticity suggests the potential for a complex regulatory system to coordinate electron acceptor use in the absence of O2. It had previously been suggested that EtrA (electron transport regulator A), an analog of Fnr (fumarate nitrate regulator) from Escherichia coli, may regulate gene expression for anaerobic electron transport. An etrA knockout strain (ETRA-153) was isolated from MR-1 using a gene replacement strategy. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of total RNA demonstrated the loss of the etrA mRNA in ETRA-153. ETRA-153 cells retained the ability to grow on all electron acceptors tested, including fumarate, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), thiosulfate, dimethyl sulfoxide, ferric citrate, nitrate, and O2, as well as the ability to reduce ferric citrate, manganese(IV), nitrate, and nitrite. EtrA is therefore not necessary for growth on, or the reduction of, these electron acceptors. However, ETRA-153 had reduced initial growth rates on fumarate and nitrate but not on TMAO. The activities for fumarate and nitrate reductase were lower in ETRA-153, as were the levels of fumarate reductase protein and transcript. ETRA-153 was also deficient in one type of ubiquinone. These results are in contrast to those previously reported for the putative etrA mutant METR-1. Molecular analysis of METR-1 indicated that its etrA gene is not interrupted; its reported phenotype was likely due to the use of inappropriate anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:11466298

  20. Mutation Analysis of MR-1, SLC2A1, and CLCN1 in 28 PRRT2-negative Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Wang; Hong-Fu Li; Gong-Lu Liu; Xiao-Dan Wen; Zhi-Ying Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is the most common subtype of paroxysmal dyskinesias and is caused by mutations in PRRT2 gene.The majority of familial PKD was identified to harbor PRRT2 mutations.However,over two-third of sporadic PKD patients did not carry anyPRRT2 mutation,suggesting an existence of additional genetic mutations or possible misdiagnosis due to clinical overlap.Methods:A cohort of 28 Chinese patients clinically diagnosed with sporadic PKD and excluded PRRT2 mutations were recruited.Clinical features were evaluated,and all subjects were screened for MR-1,SLC2A1,and CLCN1 genes,which are the causative genes of paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD),paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia,and myotonia congenita (MC),respectively.In addition,200 genetically matched healthy individuals were recruited as controls.Results:A total of 16 genetic variants including 4 in MR-1 gene,8 in SLC2A1 gene,and 4 in CLCN1 gene were detected.Among them,SLC2A1 c.363G>A mutation was detected in one case,and CLCN1 c.1205C>T mutation was detected in other two cases.Neither of them was found in 200 controls as well as 1000 Genomes database and ExAC database.Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by SIFT and PolyPhen2.The SLC2A1 c.363G>A mutation was novel.Conclusions:The phenotypic overlap may lead to the difficulty in distinguishing PKD from PNKD and MC.For those PRRT2-negative PKD cases,screening of SLC2A1 and CLCN1 genes are useful in confirming the diagnosis.

  1. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haichun [Zhejiang University; Wang, Xiaohu [Baylor College of Medicine, Huston; Chen, Jingrong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Liang, Yili [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Chen, Haijiang [Zhejiang University; Palzkill, Timothy [Baylor College of Medicine, Huston; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  2. Transcription factors FabR and FadR regulate both aerobic and anaerobic pathways for unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixia eLuo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As genes for type II fatty acid synthesis are essential to the growth of Escherichia coli, its sole (anaerobic pathway has significant potential as a target for novel antibacterial drug, and has been extensively studied. Despite this, we still know surprisingly little about fatty acid synthesis in bacteria because this anaerobic pathway in fact is not widely distributed. In this study, we show a novel model of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA synthesis in Shewanella, emerging human pathogens in addition to well-known metal reducers. We identify both anaerobic and aerobic UFA biosynthesis pathways in the representative species, S. oneidensis. Uniquely, the bacterium also contains two regulators FabR and FadR, whose counterparts in other bacteria control the anaerobic pathway. However, we show that in S. oneidensis these two regulators are involved in regulation of both pathways, in either direct or indirect manner. Overall, our results indicate that the UFA biosynthesis and its regulation are far more complex than previously expected, and S. oneidensis serves as a good research model for further work.

  3. High- and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with p Ka values of 3.3 ± 0.2, 4.8 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.4, and 9.4 ± 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9(±2.6) × 10 -5, 1.3(±0.2) × 10 -4, 5.9(±3.3) × 10 -5, and 1.1(±0.6) × 10 -4 moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low concentration of very high

  4. Photoreduction of Shewanella oneidensis Extracellular Cytochromes by Organic Chromophores and Dye‐Sensitized TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Emma V.; Lockwood, Colin W. J.; White, Gaye F.; Hwang, Ee Taek; Sakai, Tsubasa; Gross, Manuela A.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The transfer of photoenergized electrons from extracellular photosensitizers across a bacterial cell envelope to drive intracellular chemical transformations represents an attractive way to harness nature's catalytic machinery for solar‐assisted chemical synthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis MR‐1 (MR‐1), trans‐outer‐membrane electron transfer is performed by the extracellular cytochromes MtrC and OmcA acting together with the outer‐membrane‐spanning porin⋅cytochrome complex (MtrAB). Here we demonstrate photoreduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and the MtrCAB complex by soluble photosensitizers: namely, eosin Y, fluorescein, proflavine, flavin, and adenine dinucleotide, as well as by riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide, two compounds secreted by MR‐1. We show photoreduction of MtrC and OmcA adsorbed on RuII‐dye‐sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles and that these protein‐coated particles perform photocatalytic reduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and MtrCAB. These findings provide a framework for informed development of strategies for using the outer‐membrane‐associated cytochromes of MR‐1 for solar‐driven microbial synthesis in natural and engineered bacteria. PMID:27685371

  5. High-resolution structure of a type IV pilin from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgel, Manuela; Ulstrup, Jakob; Bøggild, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    . Interestingly, our PilBac1 crystal structure reveals two unusual features compared to other type IVa pilins: an unusual position of the disulfide bridge and a straight α-helical section, which usually exhibits a pronounced kink. This straight helix leads to a distinct packing in a filament model of PilBac1...... based on an EM model of a Neisseria pilus. Conclusions In this study we have described the first structure of a pilin from Shewanella oneidensis. The structure possesses features of the common type IV pilin core, but also exhibits significant variations in the α-helical part and the D-region...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DYAK-04-0013 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DYAK-04-0013 ref|NP_715670.1| potassium uptake protein TrkH [Shewanella oneide...nsis MR-1] gb|AAN53115.1|AE015454_9 potassium uptake protein TrkH [Shewanella oneidensis MR-1] NP_715670.1 0.11 31% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-04-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-04-0016 ref|NP_719131.1| gpr1/fun34/yaaH family protein [Shewanella oneid...ensis MR-1] gb|AAN56575.1|AE015795_9 gpr1/fun34/yaaH family protein [Shewanella oneidensis MR-1] NP_719131.1 0.017 22% ...

  8. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein from CymA to NapA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin K; Barua, Soumitra; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-08-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  9. Suppression of fabB Mutation by fabF1 Is Mediated by Transcription Read-through in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Luo, Qixia; Gao, Haichun

    2016-11-15

    As type II fatty acid synthesis is essential for the growth of Escherichia coli, its many components are regarded as potential targets for novel antibacterial drugs. Among them, β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (KAS) FabB is the exclusive factor for elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP (cis-3-C10-ACP). In our previous study, we presented evidence to suggest that this may not be the case in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging model gammaproteobacterium renowned for its respiratory versatility. Here, we identified FabF1, another KAS, as a functional replacement for FabB in S. oneidensis In fabB(+) or desA(+) (encoding a desaturase) cells, which are capable of making unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), FabF1 is barely produced. However, UFA auxotroph mutants devoid of both fabB and desA genes can be spontaneously converted to suppressor strains, which no longer require exogenous UFAs for growth. Suppression is caused by a TGTTTT deletion in the region upstream of the fabF1 gene, resulting in enhanced FabF1 production. We further demonstrated that the deletion leads to transcription read-through of the terminator for acpP, an acyl carrier protein gene immediately upstream of fabF1 There are multiple tandem repeats in the region covering the terminator, and the TGTTTT deletion, as well as others, compromises the terminator efficacy. In addition, FabF2 also shows an ability to complement the FabB loss, albeit substantially less effectively than FabF1.

  10. Gaseous ligand selectivity of the H-NOX sensor protein from Shewanella oneidensis and comparison to those of other bacterial H-NOXs and soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2017-09-01

    To delineate the commonalities and differences in gaseous ligand discrimination among the heme-based sensors with Heme Nitric oxide/OXygen binding protein (H-NOX) scaffold, the binding kinetic parameters for gaseous ligands NO, CO, and O2, including KD, kon, and koff, of Shewanella oneidensis H-NOX (So H-NOX) were characterized in detail in this study and compared to those of previously characterized H-NOXs from Clostridium botulinum (Cb H-NOX), Nostoc sp. (Ns H-NOX), Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (Tt H-NOX), Vibrio cholera (Vc H-NOX), and human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), an H-NOX analogue. The KD(NO) and KD(CO) of each bacterial H-NOX or sGC follow the "sliding scale rule"; the affinities of the bacterial H-NOXs for NO and CO vary in a small range but stronger than those of sGC by at least two orders of magnitude. On the other hand, each bacterial H-NOX exhibits different characters in the stability of its 6c NO complex, reactivity with secondary NO, stability of oxyferrous heme and autoxidation to ferric heme. A facile access channel for gaseous ligands is also identified, implying that ligand access has only minimal effect on gaseous ligand selectivity of H-NOXs or sGC. This comparative study of the binding parameters of the bacterial H-NOXs and sGC provides a basis to guide future new structural and functional studies of each specific heme sensor with the H-NOX protein fold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Mammalian CD1 and MR1 genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinink, Peter; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    All higher vertebrates share the fundamental components of the adaptive immune system: the B cell receptor, the T cell receptor, and classical MHC proteins. At a more detailed level, their immune systems vary considerably, especially with respect to the non-polymorphic MHC class I-like proteins. In

  12. Structures of KdnB and KdnA from Shewanella oneidensis: Key Enzymes in the Formation of 8-Amino-3,8-Dideoxy-d-Manno-Octulosonic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachman-Brockmeyer, Trevor R; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2016-08-16

    8-Amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo8N) is a unique amino sugar that has thus far only been observed on the lipopolysaccharides of marine bacteria belonging to the genus Shewanella. Although its biological function is still unclear, it is thought that the sugar is important for the integrity of the bacterial cell outer membrane. A three-gene cluster required for the biosynthesis of Kdo8N was first identified in Shewanella oneidensis. Here we describe the three-dimensional structures of two of the enzymes required for Kdo8N biosynthesis in S. oneidensis, namely, KdnB and KdnA. The structure of KdnB was solved to 1.85-Å resolution, and its overall three-dimensional architecture places it into the Group III alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. A previous study suggested that KdnB did not require NAD(P) for activity. Strikingly, although the protein was crystallized in the absence of any cofactors, the electron density map clearly revealed the presence of a tightly bound NAD(H). In addition, a bound metal was observed, which was shown via X-ray fluorescence to be a zinc ion. Unlike other members of the Group III alcohol dehydrogenases, the dinucleotide cofactor in KdnB is tightly bound and cannot be removed without leading to protein precipitation. With respect to KdnA, it is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate or (PLP)-dependent aminotransferase. For this analysis, the structure of KdnA, trapped in the presence of the external aldimine with PLP and glutamate, was determined to 2.15-Å resolution. The model of KdnA represents the first structure of a sugar aminotransferase that functions on an 8-oxo sugar. Taken together the results reported herein provide new molecular insight into the biosynthesis of Kdo8N.

  13. Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Ni; Delorenzo, Drew M.; He, Lian

    2017-01-01

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been widely used as a photo-biorefinery chassis. Based on its genome annotation, this species contains a complete TCA cycle, an Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMPP), an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), and an Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP). To eva......Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been widely used as a photo-biorefinery chassis. Based on its genome annotation, this species contains a complete TCA cycle, an Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMPP), an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), and an Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP...... through the TCA cycle and the malic shunt. Independent knockouts of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (gnd) and malic enzyme (me) corroborated these results, as neither mutant could grow under dark heterotrophic conditions. Our data also indicate that Synechocystis 6803 metabolism relies upon oxidative...... phosphorylation to generate ATP from NADPH under dark or insufficient light conditions. The pool sizes of intermediates in the TCA cycle, particularly acetyl-CoA, were found to be several fold lower in Synechocystis 6803 (compared to E. coli metabolite pool sizes), while its sugar phosphate intermediates were...

  14. Towards a quantitative prediction of the fluxome from the proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossell, Sergio; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2011-01-01

    from changes in enzyme levels. We based our derivation on the hypothesis that, in the determination of steady-state flux changes, the direct proportionality between enzyme concentrations and reaction rates is principal, whereas the complexity of enzyme–metabolite interactions is secondary and can...

  15. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  16. MR-1通过抑制PERK/Nrf2途径减轻缺氧/复氧诱导的心肌细胞凋亡%Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 attenuates hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by inhibiting PERK/Nrf2 pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶天琪; 王晓礽; 徐菲菲; 刘蜜; 李玉珍; 刘秀华

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究肌原纤维形成调节因子1 (MR-1)是否通过抑制蛋白激酶R样内质网激酶(PERK)/核因子E2相关因子2(Nrf2)途径减轻缺氧/复氧(H/R)诱导的心肌细胞凋亡.方法:在原代培养的乳大鼠心肌细胞H/R模型上,采用Annexin V/PI双标法检测心肌细胞的凋亡率;以Western blotting检测葡萄糖调节蛋白78(GRP78)、磷酸化PERK、Nrf2、活化转录因子4(ATF4)、C/EBP同源蛋白(CHOP)、Bcl-2和Bax的蛋白水平,研究过表达或敲低对于H/R致心肌细胞凋亡的影响及其与PERK/Nrf2途径活化的关系.结果:H/R引起心肌细胞凋亡;过表达MR-1减轻H/R引起的细胞凋亡(P<0.01),下调CHOP表达(P<0.05),引起Bcl-2/Bax值升高(P<0.01),并抑制H/R诱导的PERK磷酸化、Nrf2核转位和ATF4表达(P<0.01).敲低MR-1加重H/R引起的细胞凋亡(P<0.01)、CHOP表达上调(P<0.05)和Bcl-2/Bax值下降(P<0.01),并加重H/R诱导的PERK磷酸化(P<0.05)、Nrf2核转位和ATF4表达(P<0.01).结论:MR-1通过抑制PERK/Nrf2途径而减轻缺氧/复氧诱导的心肌细胞凋亡.

  17. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  18. Mechanism(s) of Electricity Production by Shewanella and other Microbes: Understanding and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Zhou. 2009. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein...the activities of microbes acting as catalysts on the cathodes of MFC systems. During this time, we published over *** reviewed papers, presented...Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 73:7003-7012. 8. El

  19. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer ...

  20. Bioremediation of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frank Fanqing; Keasling, Jay D; Tang, Yinjie J

    2013-05-14

    The present invention provides a method comprising the use of microorganisms for nanotoxicity study and bioremediation. In some embodiment, the microorganisms are bacterial organisms such as Gram negative bacteria, which are used as model organisms to study the nanotoxicity of the fullerene compounds: E. coli W3110, a human related enterobacterium and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally important bacterium with versatile metabolism.

  1. Molecular AND logic gate based on bacterial anaerobic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arugula, Mary Anitha; Shroff, Namita; Katz, Evgeny; He, Zhen

    2012-10-21

    Enzyme coding genes that integrate information for anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used as input for constructing an AND logic gate. The absence of one or both genes inhibited electrochemically-controlled anaerobic respiration, while wild type bacteria were capable of accepting electrons from an electrode for DMSO reduction.

  2. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2007-07-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1- and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

  3. Genomic and fluxomic analysis of carbohydrate metabolism in Bifidobacterium spp: human symbiotic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifidobacteria are gram-positive microorganisms widely applied in fermented dairy products due to their health-promoting effects. Bifidobacterium ssp. may also represent up to 91% of microbial gut population in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Fructose-6 phosphate phosphoketolase...

  4. Measurement uncertainty of isotopologue fractions in fluxomics determined via mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrasio, R; Haberhauer-Troyer, C; Steiger, M; Sauer, M; Mattanovich, D; Koellensperger, G; Hann, S

    2013-06-01

    Metabolic flux analysis implies mass isotopomer distribution analysis and determination of mass isotopologue fractions (IFs) of proteinogenic amino acids of cell cultures. In this work, for the first time, this type of analysis is comprehensively investigated in terms of measurement uncertainty by calculating and comparing budgets for different mass spectrometric techniques. The calculations addressed amino acids of Pichia pastoris grown on 10% uniformly (13)C labeled glucose. Typically, such experiments revealed an enrichment of (13)C by at least one order of magnitude in all proteinogenic amino acids. Liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were performed. The samples were diluted to fit the linear dynamic range of the mass spectrometers used (10 μM amino acid concentration). The total combined uncertainties of IFs as well as the major uncertainty contributions affecting the IFs were determined for phenylalanine, which was selected as exemplary model compound. A bottom-up uncertainty propagation was performed according to Quantifying Uncertainty in Analytical Measurement and using the Monte Carlo method by considering all factors leading to an IF, i.e., the process of measurement and the addition of (13)C-glucose. Excellent relative expanded uncertainties (k = 1) of 0.32, 0.75, and 0.96% were obtained for an IF value of 0.7 by LC-MS/MS, GC-MS, and LC-TOFMS, respectively. The major source of uncertainty, with a relative contribution of 20-80% of the total uncertainty, was attributed to the signal intensity (absolute counts) uncertainty calculated according to Poisson counting statistics, regardless which of the mass spectrometry platforms was used. Uncertainty due to measurement repeatability was of importance in LC-MS/MS, showing a relative contribution up to 47% of the total uncertainty, whereas for GC-MS and LC-TOFMS the average contribution was lower (30 and 15%, respectively). Moreover, the IF actually present also depends on the isotopic purity of the carbon sources. Therefore, in the uncertainty calculation a carbon source purity factor was introduced and a minor contribution to the total uncertainty was observed. The results obtained by uncertainty calculation performed according to the Monte Carlo method were in agreement with the uncertainty value of the Kragten approach and showed a Gaussian distribution.

  5. Workflows for fluxomics in the framework of PhenoMeNal project

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the PhenoMeNal project and e-infrastructures (www.phenomenal-h2020.eu/home/), two workflows were prepared using previously developed programs for analysis of intracellular fluxes from isotopologue distributions. Isotopologue distributions will be available on data repositories in MetaboLights (www.ebi.ac.uk/metabolights). With this aim, programs were adapted to the workflows, docker container dockerfiles for each program were uploaded to GitHub repositories, added to Jenki...

  6. Cyanobacterial carbon metabolism: Fluxome plasticity and oxygen dependence: Cyanobacterial Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Ni [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); DeLorenzo, Drew M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); He, Lian [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); You, Le [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Immethun, Cheryl M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Wang, George [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Baidoo, Edward E. K. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hollinshead, Whitney [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Moon, Tae Seok [Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis Missouri 63130; Tang, Yinjie J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-03-30

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been widely used as a photo-biorefinery chassis. Based on its genome annotation, this species contains a complete TCA cycle, an Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMPP), an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), and an Entner–Doudoroff pathway (EDP). To evaluate how Synechocystis 6803 catabolizes glucose under heterotrophic conditions, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis, metabolite pool size analysis, gene knockouts, and heterologous expressions. The results revealed a cyclic mode of flux through the OPPP. Small, but non-zero, fluxes were observed through the TCA cycle and the malic shunt. Independent knockouts of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (gnd) and malic enzyme (me) corroborated these results, as neither mutant could grow under dark heterotrophic conditions. Our data also indicate that Synechocystis 6803 metabolism relies upon oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP from NADPH under dark or insufficient light conditions. The pool sizes of intermediates in the TCA cycle, particularly acetyl-CoA, were found to be several fold lower in Synechocystis 6803 (compared to E. coli metabolite pool sizes), while its sugar phosphate intermediates were several-fold higher. Moreover, negligible flux was detected through the native, or heterologous, EDP in the wild type or Δgnd strains under heterotrophic conditions. Comparing photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions, the Calvin cycle, OPPP, and EMPP in Synechocystis 6803 possess the ability to regulate their fluxes under various growth conditions (plastic), whereas its TCA cycle always maintains at low levels (rigid). This work also demonstrates how genetic profiles do not always reflect actual metabolic flux through native or heterologous pathways. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1593–1602. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Photoheterotrophic Fluxome in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 and Its Implications for Cyanobacterial Bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Le; He, Lian

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated metabolic responses in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to photosynthetic impairment. We used 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU; a photosystem II inhibitor) to block O2 evolution and ATP/NADPH generation by linear electron flow. Based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) and RNA sequencing, we have found that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 employs a unique photoheterotrophic metabolism. First, glucose catabolism forms a cyclic route that includes the oxidative pentose phosphate (OPP) pathway and the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (PGI) reaction. Glucose-6-phosphate is extensively degraded by the OPP pathway for NADPH production and is replenished by the reversed PGI reaction. Second, the Calvin cycle is not fully functional, but RubisCO continues to fix CO2 and synthesize 3-phosphoglycerate. Third, the relative flux through the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and succinate dehydrogenase is small under heterotrophic conditions, indicating that the newly discovered cyanobacterial TCA cycle (via the γ-aminobutyric acid pathway or α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase/succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) plays a minimal role in energy metabolism. Fourth, NAD(P)H oxidation and the cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I are the two main ATP sources, and the CEF accounts for at least 40% of total ATP generation from photoheterotrophic metabolism (without considering maintenance loss). This study not only demonstrates a new topology for carbohydrate oxidation but also provides quantitative insights into metabolic bioenergetics in cyanobacteria. PMID:25535269

  8. Quantitative analysis of relationships between fluxome and metabolome in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taymaz Nikerel, H.

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic models, which predict the behaviour of metabolic reaction networks under different conditions, are indispensible to fully and quantitatively understand the relation between a product pathway and connected central metabolism. In this thesis the focus was to develop tools for future in vivo k

  9. Nitrogen doped carbon nanoparticles enhanced extracellular electron transfer for high-performance microbial fuel cells anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang-Yang; Guo, Chun Xian; Yong, Yang-Chun; Li, Chang Ming; Song, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanoparticles (NDCN) were applied to modify the carbon cloth anodes of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, one of the most well-studied exoelectrogens. Experimental results demonstrated that the use of NDCN increased anodic absorption of flavins (i.e., the soluble electron mediator secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1), facilitating shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer. In addition, we also found that NDCN enabled enhanced contact-based direct electron transfer via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes. Taken together, the performance of MFCs with the NDCN-modified anode was enormously enhanced, delivering a maximum power density 3.5 times' higher than that of the MFCs without the modification of carbon cloth anodes.

  10. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing Peptides Using Non-Activated Immobilized Metal Affinity Cchromatography Resin Enrichment and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Yang, Feng; Qian, Weijun; Brown, Roslyn N.; Wang, Yuexi; Merkley, Eric D.; Park, Jea H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-10-01

    c-type cytochromes play essential roles in many biological activities of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including electron transfer, enzyme catalysis and induction of apoptosis. We report a novel enrichment strategy for identifying c-type heme-containing peptides that uses non-activated IMAC resin. The strategy demonstrated at least seven-fold enrichment for heme-containing peptides digested from a cytochrome c protein standard, and quantitative linear performance was also assessed for heme-containing peptide enrichment. Heme-containing peptides extracted from the periplasmic fraction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were further identified using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated the applicability of this enrichment strategy to identify c-type heme-containing peptides from a highly complex biological sample, and at the same time, confirmed the periplasmic localization of heme-containing proteins during suboxic respiration activities of S. oneidensis MR-1.

  11. New Approaches to Evaluate the Biological Degradation of RDX in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-27

    groundwater samples and groundwater microcosms derived from the same contaminated aquifer. Zhang and Hughes reported that Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824...Wisconsin (9); Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (75), American Type Culture Collection; Desulfovibrio sp. EFX-DES, Dr. Clint Arnett, U.S. Army Corps...RDX. The final three strains, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824,and Clostridium bifermentans HAW-1were selected

  12. Biotic-Abiotic Nanoscale Interactions in Biological Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-28

    oneidensis MR-1 bacterial nanowires are lipid-based extensions of the outer- membrane and periplasmic electron transport proteins, Science Magazine...from a wide array of electron sources (fuels) and transfer them to electron acceptors (oxidants). Prokaryotes can use a wide variety of dissolved...well as direct transfer using multiheme cytochromes associated with the outer membrane (6). Recent reports have also suggested that extracellular

  13. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  14. Lactate Oxidation Coupled to Iron or Electrode Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    KAUST Repository

    Call, D. F.

    2011-10-14

    Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA completely oxidized lactate and reduced iron or an electrode, producing pyruvate and acetate intermediates. Compared to the current produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, G. sulfurreducens PCA produced 10-times-higher current levels in lactate-fed microbial electrolysis cells. The kinetic and comparative analyses reported here suggest a prominent role of G. sulfurreducens strains in metaland electrode-reducing communities supplied with lactate. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and fourier transform-ion cyclotronresonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-07-11

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  16. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  17. Combined fluxomics and transcriptomics analysis of glucose catabolism via a partially cyclic pentose phosphate pathway in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Tanja; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan; Polen, Tino; Bringer, Stephanie; Sahm, Hermann; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bott, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the distribution and regulation of periplasmic and cytoplasmic carbon fluxes in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H with glucose were studied by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) in combination with transcriptomics and enzyme assays. For (13)C-MFA, cells were cultivated with specifically (13)C-labeled glucose, and intracellular metabolites were analyzed for their labeling pattern by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In growth phase I, 90% of the glucose was oxidized periplasmically to gluconate and partially further oxidized to 2-ketogluconate. Of the glucose taken up by the cells, 9% was phosphorylated to glucose 6-phosphate, whereas 91% was oxidized by cytoplasmic glucose dehydrogenase to gluconate. Additional gluconate was taken up into the cells by transport. Of the cytoplasmic gluconate, 70% was oxidized to 5-ketogluconate and 30% was phosphorylated to 6-phosphogluconate. In growth phase II, 87% of gluconate was oxidized to 2-ketogluconate in the periplasm and 13% was taken up by the cells and almost completely converted to 6-phosphogluconate. Since G. oxydans lacks phosphofructokinase, glucose 6-phosphate can be metabolized only via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP). (13)C-MFA showed that 6-phosphogluconate is catabolized primarily via the oxidative PPP in both phases I and II (62% and 93%) and demonstrated a cyclic carbon flux through the oxidative PPP. The transcriptome comparison revealed an increased expression of PPP genes in growth phase II, which was supported by enzyme activity measurements and correlated with the increased PPP flux in phase II. Moreover, genes possibly related to a general stress response displayed increased expression in growth phase II.

  18. A comparative transcriptomic, fluxomic and metabolomic analysis of the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increases in NADPH oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celton Magalie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redox homeostasis is essential to sustain metabolism and growth. We recently reported that yeast cells meet a gradual increase in imposed NADPH demand by progressively increasing flux through the pentose phosphate (PP and acetate pathways and by exchanging NADH for NADPH in the cytosol, via a transhydrogenase-like cycle. Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying this metabolic response, through a combination of gene expression profiling and analyses of extracellular and intracellular metabolites and 13 C-flux analysis. Results NADPH oxidation was increased by reducing acetoin to 2,3-butanediol in a strain overexpressing an engineered NADPH-dependent butanediol dehydrogenase cultured in the presence of acetoin. An increase in NADPH demand to 22 times the anabolic requirement for NADPH was accompanied by the intracellular accumulation of PP pathway metabolites consistent with an increase in flux through this pathway. Increases in NADPH demand were accompanied by the successive induction of several genes of the PP pathway. NADPH-consuming pathways, such as amino-acid biosynthesis, were upregulated as an indirect effect of the decrease in NADPH availability. Metabolomic analysis showed that the most extreme modification of NADPH demand resulted in an energetic problem. Our results also highlight the influence of redox status on aroma production. Conclusions Combined 13 C-flux, intracellular metabolite levels and microarrays analyses revealed that NADPH homeostasis, in response to a progressive increase in NADPH demand, was achieved by the regulation, at several levels, of the PP pathway. This pathway is principally under metabolic control, but regulation of the transcription of PP pathway genes can exert a stronger effect, by redirecting larger amounts of carbon to this pathway to satisfy the demand for NADPH. No coordinated response of genes involved in NADPH metabolism was observed, suggesting that yeast has no system for sensing NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Instead, the induction of NADPH-consuming amino-acid pathways in conditions of NADPH limitation may indirectly trigger the transcription of a set of PP pathway genes.

  19. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  20. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Moon, Tae Seok; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-05-03

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper) were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H), and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP(+) showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes that use energy from sunlight and CO2 as feedstock. Certain cyanobacterial strains are amenable to facile genetic manipulation, thus enabling synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications. Such strains are being developed as a chassis for the sustainable production of food, feed, and fuel. To this end, a holistic knowledge of cyanobacterial physiology and its correlation with gene expression patterns under the diurnal cycle is warranted. In this report, a genomewide transcriptional analysis of Synechocystis PCC 6803, the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, sheds light on the global coordination of cellular processes during diurnal periods. Furthermore, we found that, in addition to light, the redox level of NADP(H) is an important endogenous regulator of diurnal entrainment of Synechocystis PCC 6803. Copyright © 2016 Saha et al.

  1. Structural and functional studies of multiheme cytochromes C involved in extracellular electron transport in bacterial dissimilatory metal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, T V; Popov, V O

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria utilizing insoluble mineral forms of metal oxides as electron acceptors in respiratory processes are widespread in the nature. The electron transfer from a pool of reduced quinones in the cytoplasmic membrane across the periplasm to the bacterial outer membrane and then to an extracellular acceptor is a key step in bacterial dissimilatory metal reduction. Multiheme cytochromes c play a crucial role in the extracellular electron transfer. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used as a model organism to study the mechanism of extracellular electron transport. In this review, we discuss recent data on the composition, structures, and functions of multiheme cytochromes c and their functional complexes responsible for extracellular electron transport in Shewanella oneidensis.

  2. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  3. Biogenic Formation of As-S Nanotubes by Diverse Shewanella Strains▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V.; Fredrickson, James K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S2O32− under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S. putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate. PMID:19717628

  4. Biogenic formation of As-S nanotubes by diverse Shewanella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V; Fredrickson, James K; Sadowsky, Michael J; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-11-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S(2)O(3)(2-) under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S. putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate.

  5. Biogenic formation of As-S nanotubes by diverse Shewanella strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-11-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S2O3 2* under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S.putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate.

  6. Cr isotope fractionation in metal-mineral-microbe interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Porcelli, Don; Thompson, Ian; Amor, Ken; Galer, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Microbes interact with metals and minerals in the environments, altering their physical and chemical state whilst in turn the metals and minerals affect microbial growth, activity and survival. The interactions between Cr, Fe minerals and bacteria were investigated in this study. Cr(VI) reduction experiments by two iron-reducing bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300 and Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, in the presence of two iron oxide minerals, goethite and hematite, were conducted. Both minerals were found to inhibit the Cr(VI) reduction rate by Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300 but accelerated Shewanella oneidensis MR 1. The Cr isotopic fractionation factor generated by both bacteria was mostly independent of the presence of the minerals, except for hematite with Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, where the ɛ was much higher. Aqueous Fe(III) in the solution did not have any detectable impact on either bacterial Cr reduction rates or the isotopic fractionation factors, indicating that the reduction of Cr(VI) occurred prior to that of Fe(III). The presence of aqueous Fe(II) induced a very fast abiotic reduction of Cr, but had little impact on the bacterial Cr reduction rates or its isotope fractionations. The evidence suggests that the different impact that Fe minerals had on the bacteria were related to the way they attached to the minerals and the difference in the reduction mechanism. SEM images confirmed that the attachment of Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300 on the mineral surfaces were much more tightly packed than that of Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, so reducing mineral-metal interactions.

  7. Characterisation of the dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide at the microbe-mineral interface: the application of STXM-XMCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, V S; Byrne, J M; Telling, N D; VAN DER Laan, G; Lloyd, J R; Hitchcock, A P; Wang, J; Pattrick, R A D

    2012-07-01

    A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism was used to spatially resolve the distribution of different carbon and iron species associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 couples the reduction of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides to the oxidation of organic matter in order to conserve energy for growth. Several potential mechanisms may be used by S. oneidensis MR-1 to facilitate Fe(III)-reduction. These include direct contact between the cell and mineral surface, secretion of either exogenous electron shuttles or Fe-chelating agents and the production of conductive 'nanowires'. In this study, the protein/lipid signature of the bacterial cells was associated with areas of magnetite (Fe₃O₄), the product of dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction, which was oversaturated with Fe(II) (compared to stoichiometric magnetite). However, areas of the sample rich in polysaccharides, most likely associated with extracellular polymeric matrix and not in direct contact with the cell surface, were undersaturated with Fe(II), forming maghemite-like (γ-Fe₂O₃) phases compared to stoichiometric magnetite. The reduced form of magnetite will be much more effective in environmental remediation such as the immobilisation of toxic metals. These findings suggest a dominant role for surface contact-mediated electron transfer in this study and also the inhomogeneity of magnetite species on the submicron scale present in microbial reactions. This study also illustrates the applicability of this new synchrotron-based technique for high-resolution characterisation of the microbe-mineral interface, which is pivotal in controlling the chemistry of the Earth's critical zone.

  8. Extracellular electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms formed at indium tin oxide and graphite electrodes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Connolly, J.O.; Woolley, R.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Marsili, E.

    % of its original level (Figure 8). Thus, SRM mediated electron transfer from the biofilm cells to the graphite electrode accounted for the 50 % of the total current. This could be explained by the fact that not all the cells in a multi-layered biofilm (2... and phylogenetically [2], and its metal reduction and biomineralization capabilities have also been reported [6]. When S. loihica PV-4 was grown under controlled laboratory conditions, they produced higher current than S. oneidensis MR-1 [17], thus they are relevant...

  9. Towards Environmental Systems Biology of Shewanella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Auchutung, Jennifer M.; Driscoll, Michael E.; Gardner, Timothy S.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Rodionov, Dmitry; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Saffarini, Daad; Serres, Margrethe H.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Tiedje, James M.

    2008-07-07

    Abstract: Shewanella are known for versatility in their electron accepting capacities, which allow them to couple decomposition of organic matter to reduction of the variety of terminal electron acceptors encountered in the stratified environments they inhabit. Due to their diverse metabolic capabilities, shewanellae play important roles in carbon cycling and have considerable potential for remediation of contaminated environments and use in microbial fuel cells. Systems-level analysis of the model species, S. oneidensis MR-1, and other members of this genus have provided significant insights into the signal transduction proteins, regulators, and metabolic and respiratory subsystems governing the remarkable versatility of the shewanellae.

  10. Modeling of Sustainable Base Production by Microbial Electrolysis Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, Maxime; Sugnaux, Marc; Comninellis, Christos; Nealson, Kenneth; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-07-07

    A predictive model for the microbial/electrochemical base formation from wastewater was established and compared to experimental conditions within a microbial electrolysis cell. A Na2 SO4 /K2 SO4 anolyte showed that model prediction matched experimental results. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a strong base (pH≈13) was generated using applied voltages between 0.3 and 1.1 V. Due to the use of bicarbonate, the pH value in the anolyte remained unchanged, which is required to maintain microbial activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Comparisons of Shewanella strains based on genome annotations, modeling and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Wai Kit; Vu, Trang; Lovendahl, Klaus N.; Llull, Jenna; Serres, Margaret; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella is a genus of facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria that have highly adaptable metabolism which allows them to thrive in diverse environments. This quality makes them attractive target bacteria for research in bioremediation and microbial fuel cell applications. Constraint-based modeling is a useful tool for helping researchers gain insights into the metabolic capabilities of these bacteria. However, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the only strain with a genome-scale metabolic model constructed out of the 22 sequenced Shewanella strains.

  12. Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; McLean, Jeff S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    The solubility of orthophosphate (PO43−) in iron-rich sediments can be exceedingly low, limiting the bioavailability of this essential nutrient to microbial populations that catalyze critical biogeochemical reactions. Here we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of phosphorus, as well as carbon and energy, for metal-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1 all grew with DNA but displayed different growth rates. W3-18-1 exhibited the highest growth rate with DNA. While strain W3-18-1 displayed Ca2+-independent DNA utilization, both CN32 and MR-1 required millimolar concentrations of Ca2+ for growth with DNA. For S. oneidensis MR-1, the utilization of DNA as a sole source of phosphorus is linked to the activities of extracellular phosphatase(s) and a Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s), which are regulated by phosphorus availability. Mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteome of MR-1 identified one putative endonuclease (SO1844), a predicted UshA (bifunctional UDP-sugar hydrolase/5′ nucleotidase), a predicted PhoX (calcium-activated alkaline phosphatase), and a predicted CpdB (bifunctional 2′,3′ cyclic nucleotide 2′ phosphodiesterase/3′ nucleotidase), all of which could play important roles in the extracellular degradation of DNA under phosphorus-limiting conditions. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the ability to use exogenous DNA as the sole source of phosphorus is widespread among the shewanellae, and perhaps among all prokaryotes, and may be especially important for nutrient cycling in metal-reducing environments. PMID:18156329

  13. Aggregation Kinetics of Hematite Particles in the Presence of Outer Membrane Cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Anxu; Liu, Feng; Shi, Liang; Liu, Juan

    2016-10-06

    The aggregation behavior of 9, 36, and 112 nm hematite particles was studied in the presence of OmcA, a bacterial extracellular protein, in aqueous dispersions at pH 5.7 through time-resolved dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and circular dichroism spectra, respectively. At low salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of hematite particles in all sizes first increased, then decreased, and finally remained stable with the increase of OmcA concentration, indicating the dominant interparticle interaction changed along with the increase in the protein-to-particle ratio. Nevertheless, at high salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of all hematite samples gradually decreased with increasing OmcA concentration, which can be attributed to increasing steric force. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of OmcA-hematite conjugates was more correlated to total particle-surface area than primary particle size. It was further established that OmcA could stabilize hematite nanoparticles more efficiently than bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model plasma protein, due to the higher affinity of OmcA to hematite surface. This study highlighted the effects of particle properties, solution conditions, and protein properties on the complicated aggregation behavior of protein-nanoparticle conjugates in aqueous environments.

  14. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia caused by the mutation of MR-1 in a large Polish kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Andrzej; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Domitrz, Izabela; Lee, Hsien-Yang; Ptacek, Louis; Kwiecinski, Hubert

    2009-01-01

    Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a clinical syndrome of sudden involuntary movements, mostly of dystonic type, which may be triggered by alcohol or coffee intake, stress and fatigue. The attacks of PNKD may consist of various combinations of dystonia, chorea, athetosis and balism. They can be partial and unilateral, but mostly the hyperkinetic movements are bilateral and generalized. We present a large Polish family with 7 symptomatic members of the family in 6 generations. In all affected persons, the onset of clinical symptoms was in early childhood. All male cases showed an increase in severity and frequency of the attacks with ageing, while the only living female patient noticed an improvement of PNKD during both her pregnancies and also after menopause. In addition, at the age of 55 years, she developed symptoms of Parkinson's disease with good response to levodopa treatment. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Mtr Extracellular Electron Transfer Pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing Bacteria: A Genomic Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-12-01

    Originally discovered in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), the Mtr (i.e., metal-reducing) pathway exists in all characterized strains of metal-reducing Shewanella. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway of MR-1 include four multi-heme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts), CymA, MtrA, MtrC and OmcA, and a porin-like, outer membrane protein MtrB. They are strategically positioned along the width of the MR-1 cell envelope to mediate electron transfer from the quinone/quinol pool in the inner-membrane to the Fe(III)-containing minerals external to the bacterial cells. A survey of microbial genomes revealed homologues of the Mtr pathway in other dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Ferrimonas balearica and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, and in the Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Dechloromonas aromatica RCB, Gallionella capsiferriformans ES-2 and Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1. The widespread distribution of Mtr pathways in Fe(III)-reducing or Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria emphasizes the importance of this type of extracellular electron transfer pathway in microbial redox transformation of Fe. Their distribution in these two different functional groups of bacteria also emphasizes the bi-directional nature of electron transfer reactions carried out by the Mtr pathways. The characteristics of the Mtr pathways may be shared by other pathways used by microorganisms for exchanging electrons with their extracellular environments.

  16. Defining How a Microbial Cell Senses and Responds to a Redox Active Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth H. Nealson

    2012-06-22

    This grant was for four years, and the work was designed to look at the mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer by the dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and other closely related Shewanella strains and species. During this work, we defined many of the basic physiological and biochemical properties of the Shewanella group, Much of which was summarized in review articles. We also finished and published the genome sequence of strain MR-1, the first of the shewanellae to have its genome sequenced. Control at the transcriptional and translational level was studied in collaboration with colleagues at PNNL and ANL. We utilized synchrotron X-ray radiation to image both the bacteria and the metal oxide particles via a technique called STXM, synchrotron X-ray absorption (ref. No.9), and X-ray microbeam analysis. We purified several of the cytochromes involved with metal reduction, and improved gene annotation of the MR-1 genome. The conductive appendages (nanowires) of MR-1 were described and characterized. Comparative genomics and biochemistry revealed that the pathway for the utilization of N-acetyl glucosamine in the various strains of Shewanella exhibited great variability, and had a number of previously unknown genes.

  17. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  18. Microbial mediated iron redox cycling in Fe (hydr)oxides for nitrite removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongsheng; Xu, Lu; Shu, Weikang; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Yunfeng; Qian, Guangren

    2017-01-01

    Nitrite, at an environmentally relevant concentration, was significantly reduced with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The average nitrite removal rates of 1.28±0.08 and 0.65±0.02(mgL(-1))h(-1) were achieved with ferrihydrite and magnetite, respectively. The results showed that nitrite removal was able to undergo multiple redox cycles with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. During the bioreduction of the following cycles, biogenic Fe(II) was subsequently chemically oxidized to Fe(III), which is associated with nitrite reduction. There was 11.18±1.26mgL(-1) of NH4(+)-N generated in the process of redox cycling of ferrihydrite. Additionally, results obtained by using X-ray diffraction showed that ferrihydrite and magnetite remained mainly stable in the system. This study indicated that redox cycling of Fe in iron (hydr)oxides was a potential process associated with NO2(-)-N removal from solution, and reduced most nitrite abiotically to gaseous nitrogen species.

  19. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  20. Microfabricated microbial fuel cell arrays reveal electrochemically active microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Hou

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are remarkable "green energy" devices that exploit microbes to generate electricity from organic compounds. MFC devices currently being used and studied do not generate sufficient power to support widespread and cost-effective applications. Hence, research has focused on strategies to enhance the power output of the MFC devices, including exploring more electrochemically active microbes to expand the few already known electricigen families. However, most of the MFC devices are not compatible with high throughput screening for finding microbes with higher electricity generation capabilities. Here, we describe the development of a microfabricated MFC array, a compact and user-friendly platform for the identification and characterization of electrochemically active microbes. The MFC array consists of 24 integrated anode and cathode chambers, which function as 24 independent miniature MFCs and support direct and parallel comparisons of microbial electrochemical activities. The electricity generation profiles of spatially distinct MFC chambers on the array loaded with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 differed by less than 8%. A screen of environmental microbes using the array identified an isolate that was related to Shewanella putrefaciens IR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-7, and displayed 2.3-fold higher power output than the S. oneidensis MR-1 reference strain. Therefore, the utility of the MFC array was demonstrated.

  1. Differential arsenic mobilization from As-bearing ferrihydrite by iron-respiring Shewanella strains with different arsenic-reducing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Donghun; Kanaly, Robert A; Kim, Min-Gyu; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    Arsenic immobilization and release in the environment is significantly influenced by bacterial oxidation and reduction of arsenic and arsenic-bearing minerals. In this study, we tested three iron-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella sp. HN-41, and Shewanella putrefaciens 200, which have diverse arsenate-reducing activities with regard to reduction of an As-bearing ferrihydrite slurry. In the cultures of S. oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. HN-41, which are not capable of respiratory reduction of As(V) to As(III), arsenic was maintained predominantly in its pentavalent form, existing in particulate poorly crystalline As-bearing ferrihydrite and formed small quantities of a stable ferrous arsenate [Fe3(AsO4)2] precipitate. However, in the culture of the As(V) reducer, S. putrefaciens 200, As(V) was reduced to As(III) and a small fraction of As-bearing ferrihydrite was transformed into ribbon-shaped siderite that subsequently re-released arsenic into the liquid phase. Our results indicated that release of arsenic and formation of diverse secondary nanoscale Fe-As minerals are specifically closely related to the arsenic-reducing abilities of different bacteria. Therefore, bacterial arsenic reduction appears to significantly influence As mobilization in soils, minerals, and other Fe-rich environments.

  2. In-situ growth of graphene/polyaniline for synergistic improvement of extracellular electron transfer in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, De-Zhen; Yu, Yang-Yang; Xie, Rong-Rong; Zhang, Chun-Lian; Yang, Yuan; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Yang, Guodong; Liu, Lei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2017-01-15

    Graphene composite has been widely used in various bioelectrochemical systems (BES). However, it is suffered from tedious fabrication procedure and ambiguous mechanism for its effect on BES. Here, a one-step and in-situ strategy for simultaneously graphene exfoliation and aniline polymerization was developed for fabrication of graphene/PANI composite electrode (GO/PANIOS). This GO/PANIOS outperformed graphite paper (GP), GP with PANI (GP/PANI) and GP with electrochemical exfoliated graphene (GOH2SO4) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 inoculated BES (improved the power density output, i.e., 24, 3.4 and 5.7 times of GP , GP/PANI and GOH2SO4, respectively). Further analysis revealed a synergistic improvement on both direct and mediated extracellular electron transfer of S. oneidensis MR-1 by GO/PANIOS contributed to its performance enhancement in BES. This work not only provided a simple strategy for graphene composite fabrication, but also unveiled the underlying mechanism for its stimulation on BES, which promises new opportunity of graphene composite application in various biosystems.

  3. Physiological and transcriptional approaches reveal connection between nitrogen and manganese cycles in Shewanella algae C6G3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, Axel; Bonin, Patricia; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Michotey, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    To explain anaerobic nitrite/nitrate production at the expense of ammonium mediated by manganese oxide (Mn(IV)) in sediment, nitrate and manganese respirations were investigated in a strain (Shewanella algae C6G3) presenting these features. In contrast to S. oneidensis MR-1, a biotic transitory nitrite accumulation at the expense of ammonium was observed in S. algae during anaerobic growth with Mn(IV) under condition of limiting electron acceptor, concomitantly, with a higher electron donor stoichiometry than expected. This low and reproducible transitory accumulation is the result of production and consumption since the strain is able to dissimilative reduce nitrate into ammonium. Nitrite production in Mn(IV) condition is strengthened by comparative expression of the nitrate/nitrite reductase genes (napA, nrfA, nrfA-2), and rates of the nitrate/nitrite reductase activities under Mn(IV), nitrate or fumarate conditions. Compared with S. oneidensis MR-1, S. algae contains additional genes that encode nitrate and nitrite reductases (napA-α and nrfA-2) and an Outer Membrane Cytochrome (OMC)(mtrH). Different patterns of expression of the OMC genes (omcA, mtrF, mtrH and mtrC) were observed depending on the electron acceptor and growth phase. Only gene mtrF-2 (SO1659 homolog) was specifically expressed under the Mn(IV) condition. Nitrate and Mn(IV) respirations seem connected at the physiological and transcriptional levels. PMID:28317859

  4. Physiological and transcriptional approaches reveal connection between nitrogen and manganese cycles in Shewanella algae C6G3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, Axel; Bonin, Patricia; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Michotey, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    To explain anaerobic nitrite/nitrate production at the expense of ammonium mediated by manganese oxide (Mn(IV)) in sediment, nitrate and manganese respirations were investigated in a strain (Shewanella algae C6G3) presenting these features. In contrast to S. oneidensis MR-1, a biotic transitory nitrite accumulation at the expense of ammonium was observed in S. algae during anaerobic growth with Mn(IV) under condition of limiting electron acceptor, concomitantly, with a higher electron donor stoichiometry than expected. This low and reproducible transitory accumulation is the result of production and consumption since the strain is able to dissimilative reduce nitrate into ammonium. Nitrite production in Mn(IV) condition is strengthened by comparative expression of the nitrate/nitrite reductase genes (napA, nrfA, nrfA-2), and rates of the nitrate/nitrite reductase activities under Mn(IV), nitrate or fumarate conditions. Compared with S. oneidensis MR-1, S. algae contains additional genes that encode nitrate and nitrite reductases (napA-α and nrfA-2) and an Outer Membrane Cytochrome (OMC)(mtrH). Different patterns of expression of the OMC genes (omcA, mtrF, mtrH and mtrC) were observed depending on the electron acceptor and growth phase. Only gene mtrF-2 (SO1659 homolog) was specifically expressed under the Mn(IV) condition. Nitrate and Mn(IV) respirations seem connected at the physiological and transcriptional levels.

  5. Immobilization of the iron on the surface of non-woven carbon fiber for use in a microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichanan Phansroy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Iron particles were immobilized onto non-woven carbon fiber via electroplating for use in a microbial fuel cell (MFC. Electroplating was performed under an applied voltage at a current of 0.2 A for 5, 10, and 15 min. The scanning electron microscope (SEM observations show that 5 min was not adequate for the particles to be immobilized, whereas 10 and 15 min of electroplating resulted in an adequate number of particles on the surface. To evaluate the strength of the binding of iron via electroplating on the surface of the fiber, the samples were washed with pure water and observed using an SEM. The 10 min electroplated sample has a larger surface area, which is suitable for the MFC anode, than the 15 min electroplated sample. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, the peaks corresponded to those of Fe2O3, and the sample dipped into tannic acid shows the peaks of Fe3O4. The amount of biofilm of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was evaluated using crystal violet staining, and living bacteria were counted as colony forming units. Electroplated Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 were found to be effective for producing biofilm and immobilizing S. oneidensis MR-1.

  6. CeCaFDB: a curated database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of central carbon metabolic flux distributions explored by 13C-fluxomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengdong; Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Wenwei; Zhou, Xiangfei; Shang, Chuanyu; Xin, Chenwei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Gang; Jiang, Jiansi; Li, Chao; Li, Ruiyuan; Han, Mengshu; You, Shanping; Yu, Guojun; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Liu, Zhijie; Xie, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    The Central Carbon Metabolic Flux Database (CeCaFDB, available at http://www.cecafdb.org) is a manually curated, multipurpose and open-access database for the documentation, visualization and comparative analysis of the quantitative flux results of central carbon metabolism among microbes and animal cells. It encompasses records for more than 500 flux distributions among 36 organisms and includes information regarding the genotype, culture medium, growth conditions and other specific information gathered from hundreds of journal articles. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the CeCaFDB supports a common text search function among the data and interactive visualization of the curated flux distributions with compartmentation information based on the Cytoscape Web API, which facilitates data interpretation. The CeCaFDB offers four modules to calculate a similarity score or to perform an alignment between the flux distributions. One of the modules was built using an inter programming algorithm for flux distribution alignment that was specifically designed for this study. Based on these modules, the CeCaFDB also supports an extensive flux distribution comparison function among the curated data. The CeCaFDB is strenuously designed to address the broad demands of biochemists, metabolic engineers, systems biologists and members of the -omics community.

  7. The Influence of Acidity on Microbial Fuel Cells Containing Shewanella Oneidensis (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    steady state ∼5min). Power measurements were performed in triplicate and he average value was used. .5. Electrochemistry in minimal growth media (MM) Four...carbon food source. The use of polycarbonate membranes esulted in negligible change in pH in either the anode or cathode hambers during the course of mini

  8. Bion M1. Peculiarities of life activities of microbes in 30-day spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Morozova, Julia; Voeikova, Tatiana; Tyaglov, Boris; Novikova, Liudmila; Krestyanova, Irina; Emelyanova, Lydia

    The aim of this work was to analyze the influence of space flight factors ( SFF) to microorganism strains , exposed inside unmanned spacecraft Bion M-1 during the 30- day space flight. Objectives of the work - the study of the influence of the SFF exchange chromosomal DNA in crosses microorganisms of the genus Streptomyces; the level of spontaneous phage induction of lysogenic strains fS31 from Streptomyces lividans 66 and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) on the biosynthesis of the antibiotic tylosin strain of Streptomyces fradiae; survival electrogenic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR- 1 is used in the microbial fuel cell As a result of this work it was found that the SFF affect the exchange of chromosomal DNA by crossing strains of Streptomyces. Was detected polarity crossing , expressed in an advantageous contribution chromosome fragment of one of the parent strains in recombinant offspring. This fact may indicate a more prolonged exposure of cells in microgravity and , as a consequence, the transfer of longer fragments of chromosomal DNA This feature is the transfer of genetic material in microgravity could lead to wider dissemination and horizontal transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA of symbiotic microflora astronauts and other strains present in the spacecraft. It was shown no effect on the frequency of recombination PCF and the level of mutation model reversion of auxotrophic markers to prototrophy It was demonstrated that PCF increase the level of induction of cell actinophage fS31 lysogenic strain of S. lividans 66, but did not affect the level of induction of this phage cells S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). It is shown that the lower the level of synthesis PCF antibiotic aktinorodina (actinorhodin) in lysogenic strain S. coelicolor A3 ( 2). 66 Strains of S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3 ( 2 ) can be used as a biosensor for studying the effect on microorganisms PCF It is shown that the effect of the PCF reduces synthesis of tylosin and desmicosyn S. fradiae at

  9. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre Daniel; Beg Qasim

    2012-02-14

    This project was a component of the Shewanella Federation and, as such, contributed to the overall goal of applying the genomic tools to better understand eco-physiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of Shewanella genus. Our role at Boston University was to perform bioreactor and high throughput gene expression microarrays, and combine dynamic flux balance modeling with experimentally obtained transcriptional and gene expression datasets from different growth conditions. In the first part of project, we designed the S. oneidensis microarray probes for Affymetrix Inc. (based in California), then we identified the pathways of carbon utilization in the metal-reducing marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, using our newly designed high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarray on Shewanella cells grown with various carbon sources. Next, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches, we built algorithm and methods to integrate the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks of S. oneidensis. Specifically, we combined mRNA microarray and metabolite measurements with statistical inference and dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) to study the transcriptional response of S. oneidensis MR-1 as it passes through exponential, stationary, and transition phases. By measuring time-dependent mRNA expression levels during batch growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 under two radically different nutrient compositions (minimal lactate and nutritionally rich LB medium), we obtain detailed snapshots of the regulatory strategies used by this bacterium to cope with gradually changing nutrient availability. In addition to traditional clustering, which provides a first indication of major regulatory trends and transcription factors activities, we developed and implemented a new computational approach for Dynamic Detection of Transcriptional Triggers (D2T2). This new method allows us to infer a putative topology of transcriptional dependencies

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Bacterial Attachment to Fe(III)-Oxide Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Andrew

    2006-06-01

    To date, our studies have concentrated upon two aspects of the chemistry and architecture of the Shewanella outer membrane surface: the influence of terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration, and the role that protein secretion systems play in determining the presence and chemistry of exopolymers. Using Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and S. putrefaciens strain 200R as model organisms we have developed a microelectrophoresis approach to estimating cell mobility in solution over a range of ionic strengths. From this data, and applying Ohshima's soft particle theory, we have successfully estimated the net electrostatic charge and relative thickness of any capsular material of the two model strains under various terminal electron acceptor availabilities. Additionally, by employing state-of-the-art cryo-electron microscopy techniques we have been able to not only confirm presence or absence of capsular material but also visualize the outer cell surface architecture in a completely hydrated state.

  11. Nontronite (NAu-1) Structure Associated with Microbial Fe(III) Reduction in Various Redox Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, T.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires the structural Fe(III) of smectite and promotes illite formation in O2-free environment (Kostka et al., 1996, Kim et al., 2004). Since S. oneidensis is a facultative iron reducing bacterium, it is crucial to understand the structural changes induced by bio-reduction of structural Fe(III) in various redox conditions. Furthermore, the changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bio-reduced nontronite upon the modification of mineral structure has not been extensively studied in terms of Fe-cycling. In this present study, we reported the evolution of nontronite structure at various time points in various redox conditions and corresponding CEC upon reduction and re-oxidation. S. oneidensis MR-1 was incubated in M1 medium with Na-lactate as the electron donor and Fe in nontronite (NAu-1) as the sole electron acceptor at pH 7 in anaerobic chamber for 3 hrs, 12 hrs, 1 day, 2 days, 4 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days. O2 gas bubbling was then applied to the sample at each time point for 24 hours for re-oxidation. The triplet samples at each time point for both reduction and re-oxidation experiments were prepared. The extent of Fe(III) reduction measured by 1,10-phenanthroline method (Stucki and Anderson, 1981) indicated that the structural Fe(III) was reduced up to 8.8% of total Fe(III) within 21 days. XRD data with various treatments such as air dried, glycolated and lithium-saturated showed that K-nontronite may be formed because no discrete 10-Å illite peak was observed in Li-saturated sample upon glycolation. The CEC increased from 747 meg/kg to 1145 meg/kg during Fe(III) reduction and decreased to 954 meg/kg upon re-oxidation, supporting the possible formation of K-nontronite. The direct observation by electron microscopy verified the structural changes in nontonite in various redox conditions. The long-term experiment for 6 months, is in progress in anaerobic chamber, and results will be discussed. Kim, J. W., Dong, H., Seabaugh

  12. Microbial nanowires: Is the subsurface "hardwired"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Atekwana, Estella A.; Hill, Eric A.; Gorby, Yuri

    2007-09-01

    The Earth's shallow subsurface results from integrated biological, geochemical, and physical processes. Methods are sought to remotely assess these interactive processes, especially those catalysed by micro-organisms. Using saturated sand columns and the metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, we show that electrically conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires are directly associated with electrical potentials. No significant electrical potentials were detectable in columns inoculated with mutant strains that produced non-conductive appendages. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed a network of nanowires linking cells-cells and cells to mineral surfaces, "hardwiring" the entire length of the column. We hypothesize that the nanowires serve as conduits for transfer of electrons from bacteria in the anaerobic part of the column to bacteria at the surface that have access to oxygen, akin to a biogeobattery. These results advance understanding of the mechanisms of electron transport in subsurface environments and of how microorganisms cycle geologic material and share energy.

  13. Identifying metalloproteins through X-ray fluorescence mapping and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimunda, Daniel; Khare, Tripti; Giometti, Carol; Vogt, Stefan; Argüello, José M; Finney, Lydia

    2012-08-01

    Metals are critical and dynamic components of biochemistry. To understand their roles, we greatly need tools to identify the ligands that bind them within the complexity of natural systems. This work describes the development of methods that not only detect and distinguish metals, but also characterize the proteins that bind them. We describe an approach to expose, identify and quantify metalloproteins in complex mixtures by sequential non-denaturing 2D-gel electrophoresis (2D GE)/X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in the same spot of a sample. We first apply the development of 2D GE/XRF to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a well-studied system, and verify our electrophoretic approach. Then, we identified a novel periplasmic zinc protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 through 2D GE/XRF followed by MS/MS. The identity and function of this protein was verified through a gene mutation experiment.

  14. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  15. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Marritt, Sophie J; Kemp, Gemma L; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2013-11-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes.

  16. Fluorescent enhancement of bio-synthesized X-Zn-ferrite-bismuth ferrite (X = Mg, Mn or Ni) membranes: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Liang; Li, Hai-long; Dong, Hai-liang; Dong, Fa-qin; Song, Mian-xin; Wang, Li-sheng; Zhou, Tian-liang; Li, Wei-min; Hou, Wen-ping; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Lu, Xi-rui; Li, Xin-Xi; Xie, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Large areas of high-photostability fluorescent X-Zn-ferrite (XZn)Fe2O4 (X = Mg, Mn or Ni) nanoparticles embedded in a bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) membrane were successfully fabricated via a facile bio-approach using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The results revealed that the perovskite BiFeO3 enhances the fluorescent intensity (at 635 and 795 nm) and surface potential difference (14 meV and -40 meV) of the embedded spinel (XZn)Fe2O4. This mechanism is attributed to the interfacial coupling of the Fesbnd Osbnd Osbnd Bi and Fesbnd Osbnd Fe interfaces. Such a system could open up new ideas in the design of environmentally friendly fluorescent sensors for water environments.

  17. 77 FR 68757 - Clean River Power MR-1, LLC; Clean River Power MR-2, LLC; Clean River Power MR-3, LLC; Clean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Projects: Beverly Lock and Dam Project, P-13404-002; Devola Lock and Dam Project, P-13405-002; Malta/Mc...-13405 Devola Lock and Washington..... Near the city Dam. of Devola. P-13406 Malta/ Morgan... facilities. The average annual generation would be about 20,760 MWh. The proposed Malta Lock and Dam...

  18. Aggregation Kinetics of Hematite Particles in the Presence of Outer Membrane Cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Anxu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Liu, Feng [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering; Shi, Liang [China Univ. of Geoscience in Wuhan, Hubei (China). Dept. of Biological Sciences and Technology; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Juan [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    2016-09-20

    The aggregation behavior of 9, 36, and 112 nm hematite particles was studied in the presence of OmcA, a bacterial extracellular protein, in aqueous dispersions at pH 5.7 through time-resolved dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, and circular dichroism spectra, respectively. At low salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of hematite particles in all sizes first increased, then decreased, and finally remained stable with the increase of OmcA concentration, indicating the dominant interparticle interaction changed along with the increase in the protein-to-particle ratio. Nevertheless, at high salt concentration, the attachment efficiencies of all hematite samples gradually decreased with increasing OmcA concentration, which can be attributed to increasing steric force. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of OmcA-hematite conjugates was more correlated to total particle-surface area than primary particle size. It was further established that OmcA could stabilize hematite nanoparticles more efficiently than bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model plasma protein, due to the higher affinity of OmcA to hematite surface. This study highlighted the effects of particle properties, solution conditions, and protein properties on the complicated aggregation behavior of protein-nanoparticle conjugates in aqueous environments.

  19. 78 FR 33406 - Clean River Power MR-1, LLC, Clean River Power MR-2, LLC, Clean River Power MR-3, LLC, Clean...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Muskingum River Park Lock 4 and Canal on 3rd Street, Beverly, Ohio 45715 Project: Malta/McConnelsville Lock... of Projects: Beverly Lock and Dam Project, P-13404-002; Devola Lock and Dam Project, P-13405-002; Malta/McConnelsville Lock and Dam Project, P-13406-002; Lowell Lock and Dam Project, P-13407-002;...

  20. Enhancement of survival and electricity production in an engineered bacterium by light-driven proton pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ethan T; Baron, Daniel B; Naranjo, Belén; Bond, Daniel R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms can use complex photosystems or light-dependent proton pumps to generate membrane potential and/or reduce electron carriers to support growth. The discovery that proteorhodopsin is a light-dependent proton pump that can be expressed readily in recombinant bacteria enables development of new strategies to probe microbial physiology and to engineer microbes with new light-driven properties. Here, we describe functional expression of proteorhodopsin and light-induced changes in membrane potential in the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. We report that there were significant increases in electrical current generation during illumination of electrochemical chambers containing S. oneidensis expressing proteorhodopsin. We present evidence that an engineered strain is able to consume lactate at an increased rate when it is illuminated, which is consistent with the hypothesis that proteorhodopsin activity enhances lactate uptake by increasing the proton motive force. Our results demonstrate that there is coupling of a light-driven process to electricity generation in a nonphotosynthetic engineered bacterium. Expression of proteorhodopsin also preserved the viability of the bacterium under nutrient-limited conditions, providing evidence that fulfillment of basic energy needs of organisms may explain the widespread distribution of proteorhodopsin in marine environments.

  1. Bacterial decolorization of textile dyes is an extracellular process requiring a multicomponent electron transfer pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigé, Ann; Motte, Bart; Borloo, Jimmy; Buysschaert, Géraldine; Devreese, Bart; Van Beeumen, Jozef J

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have reported microorganisms as efficient biocatalysts for colour removal of dye-containing industrial wastewaters. We present the first comprehensive study to identify all molecular components involved in decolorization by bacterial cells. Mutants from the model organism Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, generated by random transposon and targeted insertional mutagenesis, were screened for defects in decolorization of an oxazine and diazo dye. We demonstrate that decolorization is an extracellular reduction process requiring a multicomponent electron transfer pathway that consists of cytoplasmic membrane, periplasmic and outer membrane components. The presence of melanin, a redox-active molecule excreted by S. oneidensis, was shown to enhance the dye reduction rates. Menaquinones and the cytochrome CymA are the crucial cytoplasmic membrane components of the pathway, which then branches off via a network of periplasmic cytochromes to three outer membrane cytochromes. The key proteins of this network are MtrA and OmcB in the periplasm and outer membrane respectively. A model of the complete dye reduction pathway is proposed in which the dye molecules are reduced by the outer membrane cytochromes either directly or indirectly via melanin.

  2. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  3. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Schkolnik

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp, thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  4. A miniature microbial fuel cell with conducting nanofibers-based 3D porous biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawei; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Miniature microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has received growing interest due to its potential applications in high-throughput screening of bacteria and mutants to elucidate mechanisms of electricity generation. This paper reports a novel miniature MFC with an improved output power density and short startup time, utilizing electrospun conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanofibers as a 3D porous anode within a 12 μl anolyte chamber. This device results in 423 μW cm-3 power density based on the volume of the anolyte chamber, using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The device also excels in a startup time of only 1hr. The high conductivity of the electrospun nanofibers makes them suitable for efficient electron transfer. The mean pore size of the conducting nanofibers is several micrometers, which is favorable for bacterial penetration and colonization of surfaces of the nanofibers. We demonstrate that S. oneidensis can fully colonize the interior region of this nanofibers-based porous anode. This work represents a new attempt to explore the use of electrospun PEDOT nanofibers as a 3D anode material for MFCs. The presented miniature MFC potentially will provide a high-sensitivity, high-throughput tool to screen suitable bacterial species and mutant strains for use in large-size MFCs.

  5. Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongqiang; Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong

    2008-09-01

    Microbial electrohydrogenesis provides a new approach for hydrogen generation from renewable biomass. Membranes were used in all the reported microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) to separate the anode and cathode chambers. To reduce the potential losses associated with membrane and increase the energy recovery of this process, single-chamber membrane-free MECs were designed and used to investigate hydrogen production by one mixed culture and one pure culture: Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. At an applied voltage of 0.6 V, this system with a mixed culture achieved a hydrogen production rate of 0.53 m(3)/day/m(3) (0.11 m(3)/day/m(2)) with a current density of 9.3A/m(2) at pH 7 and 0.69 m(3)/day/m(3) (0.15m(3)/day/m(2)) with a current density of 14 A/m(2) at pH 5.8. Stable hydrogen production from lactic acid by S. oneidensis was also observed. Methane was detected during the hydrogen production process with the mixed culture and negatively affected hydrogen production rate. However, by employing suitable approaches, such as exposure of cathodes to air, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens can be suppressed. The current density and volumetric hydrogen production rate of this system have potential to increase significantly by further reducing the electrode spacing and increasing the ratio of electrode surface area/cell volume.

  6. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    . oneidensis MR-1. Analysis of correlations in gene expression patterns helps to interpret the reconstructed regulatory network. The inferred regulatory interactions will provide an additional regulatory constrains for an integrated model of metabolism and regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  7. The interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfeld, Florian [Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL), The Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States)

    2007-10-10

    This review discusses different examples for the interaction of bacteria and metal surfaces based on work reported previously by various authors and work performed by the author with colleagues at other institutions and with his graduate students at CEEL. Traditionally it has been assumed that the interaction of bacteria with metal surfaces always causes increased corrosion rates ('microbiologically influenced corrosion' (MIC)). However, more recently it has been observed that many bacteria can reduce corrosion rates of different metals and alloys in many corrosive environments. For example, it has been found that certain strains of Shewanella can prevent pitting of Al 2024 in artificial seawater, tarnishing of brass and rusting of mild steel. It has been observed that corrosion started again when the biofilm was killed by adding antibiotics. The mechanism of corrosion protection seems to be different for different bacteria since it has been found that the corrosion potential E{sub corr} became more negative in the presence of Shewanella ana and algae, but more positive in the presence of Bacillus subtilis. These findings have been used in an initial study of the bacterial battery in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was added to a cell containing Al 2024 and Cu in a growth medium. It was found that the power output of this cell continuously increased with time. In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) bacteria oxidize the fuel and transfer electrons directly to the anode. In initial studies EIS has been used to characterize the anode, cathode and membrane properties for different operating conditions of a MFC that contained Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Cell voltage (V) - current density (i) curves were obtained using potentiodynamic sweeps. The current output of a MFC has been monitored for different experimental conditions. (author)

  8. Combined genomics and experimental analyses of respiratory characteristics of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dongru; Wei, Hehong; Tu, Qichao; Yang, Yunfeng; Xie, Ming; Chen, Jingrong; Pinkerton, Mark H; Liang, Yili; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-09-01

    It has previously been shown that the Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 strain produces remarkably high current in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and can form magnetite at 0°C. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we developed a genetic manipulation method by deleting the restriction-modification system genes of the SGI1 (Salmonella genome island 1)-like prophage and analyzed the key genes involved in bacterial respiration. W3-18-1 has less respiratory flexibility than the well-characterized S. oneidensis MR-1 strain, as it possesses fewer cytochrome c genes and lacks the ability to oxidize sulfite or reduce dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and timethylamine oxide (TMAO). W3-18-1 lacks the hydrogen-producing Fe-only hydrogenase, and the hydrogen-oxidizing Ni-Fe hydrogenase genes were split into two separate clusters. Two periplasmic nitrate reductases (NapDAGHB and NapDABC) were functionally redundant in anaerobic growth of W3-18-1 with nitrate as the electron acceptor, though napDABC was not regulated by Crp. Moreover, nitrate respiration started earlier in W3-18-1 than in MR-1 (with NapDAGHB only) under microoxic conditions. These results indicate that Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 is well adapted to habitats with higher oxygen levels. Taken together, the results of this study provide valuable insights into bacterial genome evolution.

  9. Roles of UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 in iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Chen, Jingrong; Qiu, Dongru; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-11-25

    The completion of genome sequencing in a number of Shewanella species, which are most renowned for their metal reduction capacity, offers a basis for comparative studies. Previous work in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has indicated that some genes within a cluster (mtrBAC-omcA-mtrFED) were involved in iron reduction. To explore new features of iron reduction pathways, we experimentally analyzed Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 since its gene cluster is considerably different from that of MR-1 in that the gene cluster encodes only four ORFs. Among the gene cluster, two genes (mtrC and undA) were shown to encode c-type cytochromes. The ΔmtrC deletion mutant revealed significant deficiencies in reducing metals of Fe2O3, α-FeO(OH), β-FeO(OH), ferric citrate, Mn(IV) and Co(III), but not organic compounds. In contrast, no deficiency of metal reduction was observed in the ΔundA deletion mutant. Nonetheless, undA deletion resulted in progressively slower iron reduction in the absence of mtrC and fitness loss under the iron-using condition, which was indicative of a functional role of UndA in iron reduction. These results provide physiological and biochemical evidences that UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 are involved in iron reduction.

  10. Heterogeneity of the electron exchange capacity of kitchen waste compost-derived humic acids based on fluorescence components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Tan, Wen-Bing; He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Gao, Ru-Tai; Zhang, Hui; Dang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Composting is widely used for recycling of kitchen waste to improve soil properties, which is mainly attributed to the nutrient and structural functions of compost-derived humic acids (HAs). However, the redox properties of compost-derived HAs are not fully explored. Here, a unique framework is employed to investigate the electron exchange capacity (EEC) of HAs during kitchen waste composting. Most components of compost-derived HAs hold EEC, but nearly two-thirds of them are found to be easily destroyed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and thus result in an EEC lower than the electron - donating capacity in compost-derived HAs. Fortunately, a refractory component also existed within compost-derived HAs and could serve as a stable and effective electron shuttle to promote the MR-1 involved in Fe(III) reduction, and its EEC was significantly correlated with the aromaticity and the amount of quinones. Nevertheless, with the increase of composting time, the EEC of the refractory component did not show an increasing trend. These results implied that there was an optimal composting time to maximize the production of HAs with more refractory and redox molecules. Recognition of the heterogeneity of EEC of the compost-derived HAs enables an efficient utilization of the composts for a variety of environmental applications. Graphical abstract Microbial reduction of compost-derived HAs.

  11. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing evidence for the presence of a large number of microbes in the oceanic subsurface. Such a habitat has a very low energy input because it is deprived of light. A few meters below the sediment surface, conditions are already anoxic in most cases, sulfate reduction and/or methanogenesis becoming thus the primary respiratory reactions of organic matter. Neither the fate of methanogenesis, nor the fate of Dissimilatory Metal-Reduction (DMR) has been investigated so far as a function of pressure. For this reason, we measured experimentally the pressure limits of microbial anaerobic energetic metabolism. In practice, we measured in situ the kinetics of selenite respiration by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) between 0 and 150 MPa at 30°C. MR-1 stationary-phase cells were used in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium amended with lactate as an additional electron donor and sodium selenite as an electron acceptor. In situ measurements were performed by X- ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy in both a diamond-anvil cell and an autoclave. A red precipitate of amorphous Se(0) was virtually observed at any pressure to 150 MPa. A progressive reduction of selenite Se(IV) into selenium Se(0) was also observed in the evolution of XANES spectra with time. All kinetics between 0.1 and 150 MPa can be adjusted to a first order kinetic law. MR-1 respires all available selenite up to 60 MPa. Above 60 MPa, the respiration yield decreases linearly as a function of pressure and reaches 0 at 155 ±5 MPa. This indicates that selenite respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 stops at about 155 MPa, whereas its growth is arrested at 50 MPa. Hence, the present results show that the respiration of selenium by the strain MR-1 occurs efficiently up to 60 MPa and 30°C, i.e. from the surface of a continental sediment to an equivalent depth of about 2 km, or beneath a 5-km water column and

  12. Towards electrosynthesis in shewanella: energetics of reversing the mtr pathway for reductive metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Ross

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems rely on microorganisms to link complex oxidation/reduction reactions to electrodes. For example, in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, an electron transfer conduit consisting of cytochromes and structural proteins, known as the Mtr respiratory pathway, catalyzes electron flow from cytoplasmic oxidative reactions to electrodes. Reversing this electron flow to drive microbial reductive metabolism offers a possible route for electrosynthesis of high value fuels and chemicals. We examined electron flow from electrodes into Shewanella to determine the feasibility of this process, the molecular components of reductive electron flow, and what driving forces were required. Addition of fumarate to a film of S. oneidensis adhering to a graphite electrode poised at -0.36 V versus standard hydrogen electrode (SHE immediately led to electron uptake, while a mutant lacking the periplasmic fumarate reductase FccA was unable to utilize electrodes for fumarate reduction. Deletion of the gene encoding the outer membrane cytochrome-anchoring protein MtrB eliminated 88% of fumarate reduction. A mutant lacking the periplasmic cytochrome MtrA demonstrated more severe defects. Surprisingly, disruption of menC, which prevents menaquinone biosynthesis, eliminated 85% of electron flux. Deletion of the gene encoding the quinone-linked cytochrome CymA had a similar negative effect, which showed that electrons primarily flowed from outer membrane cytochromes into the quinone pool, and back to periplasmic FccA. Soluble redox mediators only partially restored electron transfer in mutants, suggesting that soluble shuttles could not replace periplasmic protein-protein interactions. This work demonstrates that the Mtr pathway can power reductive reactions, shows this conduit is functionally reversible, and provides new evidence for distinct CymA:MtrA and CymA:FccA respiratory units.

  13. The effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the precipitation of U, Pb and Ca phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah; Rui, Xue; Bunker, Bruce; Menguy, Nicolas; Hellmann, Roland; Fein, Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we test the potential for passive cell wall biomineralization by determining the effects of non-metabolizing bacteria on the precipitation of uranyl, lead, and calcium phosphates from a range of over-saturated conditions. Experiments were performed using Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. After equilibration, the aqueous phases were sampled and the remaining metal and P concentrations were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES); the solid phases were collected and analyzed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). At the lower degrees of over-saturation studied, bacterial cells exerted no discernable effect on the mode of precipitation of the metal phosphates, with homogeneous precipitation occurring exclusively. However, at higher saturation states in the U system, we observed heterogeneous mineralization and extensive nucleation of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) mineralization throughout the fabric of the bacterial cell walls. This mineral nucleation effect was observed in both B. subtilis and S. oneidensis cells. In both cases, the biogenic mineral precipitates formed under the higher saturation state conditions were significantly smaller than those that formed in the abiotic controls. The cell wall nucleation effects that occurred in some of the U systems were not observed under any of the saturation state conditions studied in the Pb or Ca systems. The presence of B. subtilis significantly decreased the extent of precipitation in the U system, but had little effect in the Pb and Ca systems. At least part of this effect is due to higher solubility of the nanoscale HUP precipitate relative to macroscopic HUP. This study documents several effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the nature and extent of metal phosphate precipitation. Each of these effects likely contributes to higher

  14. Biological Recovery of Platinum Complexes from Diluted Aqueous Streams by Axenic Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; De Smet, Rebecca; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of platinum in high-tech and catalytic applications has led to the production of diverse Pt loaded wastewaters. Effective recovery strategies are needed for the treatment of low concentrated waste streams to prevent pollution and to stimulate recovery of this precious resource. The biological recovery of five common environmental Pt-complexes was studied under acidic conditions; the chloro-complexes PtCl42- and PtCl62-, the amine-complex Pt(NH3)4Cl2 and the pharmaceutical complexes cisplatin and carboplatin. Five bacterial species were screened on their platinum recovery potential; the Gram-negative species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, Geobacter metallireducens, and Pseudomonas stutzeri, and the Gram-positive species Bacillus toyonensis. Overall, PtCl42- and PtCl62- were completely recovered by all bacterial species while only S. oneidensis and C. metallidurans were able to recover cisplatin quantitatively (99%), all in the presence of H2 as electron donor at pH 2. Carboplatin was only partly recovered (max. 25% at pH 7), whereas no recovery was observed in the case of the Pt-tetraamine complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the presence of both intra- and extracellular platinum particles. Flow cytometry based microbial viability assessment demonstrated the decrease in number of intact bacterial cells during platinum reduction and indicated C. metallidurans to be the most resistant species. This study showed the effective and complete biological recovery of three common Pt-complexes, and estimated the fate and transport of the Pt-complexes in wastewater treatment plants and the natural environment. PMID:28046131

  15. Integrated Investigation on the Production and Fate of Organo-Cr(III) Complexes from Microbial Reduction of Chromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xun, Luying

    2005-06-01

    Our objective is to investigate the complexity of chromium biogeocycling. Our results clearly support more complexity. In short, the chromium cycle is not as simple as the conversion between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in inorganic forms. We have obtained more evidence to prove the formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes from microbial reduction of Cr(VI). The complexes are relatively stable due to the slow ligand exchange of Cr(III). However, some microorganisms can consume the organic ligands and release Cr(III), which then precipitates. Efforts are being made to characterize the organo-Cr(III) complexes and investigate their behavior in soil. Progress and efforts are summarized for each task. Task 1. Production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by selected microorganisms A total of eight organisms were screened for production of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes by culturing in both growth and non growth media containing 4 mg/L of Cr(VI); three were Gram positive and five were Gram negative. The Gram-positive bacteria were Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Rhodococcus sp., and Leafsonia sp., while Shewanella oneidensis MR 1, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, Pseudomonas putida MK 1 and Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1 were Gram negative. Purifications of the soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes produced by Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1, Rhodococcus sp., and D. vulgaris Hildenborough were carried out. The culture supernatants were lyophilized and extracted first with methanol followed by water. The extracts were then analyzed for soluble Cr. The majority of the Cr(III) was present in the water-soluble fraction for all of the bacteria tested (data not shown), revealing a general phenomenon of soluble Cr(III) production. Cellulomonas sp. ES6 produced the highest amount of soluble Cr(III) (364 ppm) and D. vulgaris Hildenborough produced the least (143 ppm). Seventy eight percent of the soluble Cr(III) produced by Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1 was

  16. Genome-Facilitated Analyses of Geomicrobial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth H. Nealson

    2012-05-02

    This project had the goal(s) of understanding the mechanism(s) of extracellular electron transport (EET) in the microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and a number of other strains and species in the genus Shewanella. The major accomplishments included sequencing, annotation, and analysis of more than 20 Shewanella genomes. The comparative genomics enabled the beginning of a systems biology approach to this genus. Another major contribution involved the study of gene regulation, primarily in the model organism, MR-1. As part of this work, we took advantage of special facilities at the DOE: e.g., the synchrotron radiation facility at ANL, where we successfully used this system for elemental characterization of single cells in different metabolic states (1). We began work with purified enzymes, and identification of partially purified enzymes, leading to initial characterization of several of the 42 c-type cytochromes from MR-1 (2). As the genome became annotated, we began experiments on transcriptome analysis under different conditions of growth, the first step towards systems biology (3,4). Conductive appendages of Shewanella, called bacterial nanowires were identified and characterized during this work (5, 11, 20,21). For the first time, it was possible to measure the electron transfer rate between single cells and a solid substrate (20), a rate that has been confirmed by several other laboratories. We also showed that MR-1 cells preferentially attach to cells at a given charge, and are not attracted, or even repelled by other charges. The interaction with the charged surfaces begins with a stimulation of motility (called electrokinesis), and eventually leads to attachment and growth. One of the things that genomics allows is the comparative analysis of the various Shewanella strains, which led to several important insights. First, while the genomes predicted that none of the strains looked like they should be able to degrade N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG), the monomer

  17. Identification and Characterization of MtoA: a Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome of the Neutrophilic Fe(II-oxidizing Bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eLiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1 (ES-1 grows on FeCO3 or FeS at oxic-anoxic interfaces at circumneutral pH, and the ES-1-mediated Fe(II oxidation occurs extracellularly. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ES-1’s ability to oxidize Fe(II remain unknown. Survey of the ES-1 genome for candidate genes for microbial extracellular Fe(II oxidation revealed that it contained a three-gene cluster encoding homologues of MtrA, MtrB and CymA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1 that are involved in extracellular Fe(III reduction. Homologues of MtrA and MtrB were also involved in extracellular Fe(II oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. To distinguish them from those found in MR-1, the identified homologues were named MtoAB and CymAES-1. Cloned mtoA partially complemented an MR-1 mutant without MtrA with regards to ferrihydrite reduction. Characterization of purified MtoA showed that it was a decaheme c-type cytochrome and oxidized soluble Fe(II. Oxidation of Fe(II by MtoA was pH- and Fe(II-complexing ligand-dependent. Under conditions tested, MtoA oxidized Fe(II from pH 7-9 with the optimal rate at pH 9. MtoA oxidized Fe(II complexed with different ligands at different rates. The reaction rates followed the order Fe(IICl2 > Fe(II-citrate > Fe(II-NTA > Fe(II-EDTA with the second-order rate constants ranging from 6.3 × 10-3 μM-1s-1 for oxidation of Fe(IICl2 to 1.0 × 10-3 μM-1s-1 for oxidation of Fe(II-EDTA. Thermodynamic modeling shows that redox reaction rates for the different Fe(II-complexes correlated with their respective estimated reaction-free energies. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MtoA is a functional Fe(II-oxidizing protein and, by working in concert with MtoB and CymAES 1, may oxidize Fe(II at the bacterial surface and transfer released electrons across the bacterial cell envelope to the quinone pool in the inner membrane during extracellular Fe(II oxidation by ES-1.

  18. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  19. 材料表面性质对微生物附着行为的影响%Influence of different material surfaces on microbial adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏艳; 段继周; 段东霞; 蔺存国; 张杰; 侯保荣; 杨东方

    2012-01-01

    Biofouling has great impact on marine vessels and engineering facilities, resulting in huge losses to the development of marine economy. It is very important to study the regular pattern of biofouling and develop new antifouling materials for controlling biofouling. Here we studied the initial attachment behavior of bacteria on 4 different materials surface with fluorescence microscopy. The results show that: (1) The attachment ability of bacteria on different kinds of materials is different with an order: 316L stainless steel > PVC > Glass. It is worth mentioning that the bacteria attachment ability on silicone material (Dow CorningT2) varied widely. (2) Different kinds of bacteria also show different attachment ability on the same material surface. It is easier for S.Oneidensis MR-1 and P.aeruginosa PAO1 strain to adhere on materials than E.lico JM09 strain. In this paper, the different attachment ability of bacteria and the influence factors were discussed.%利用荧光显微镜计数法,研究了微生物在4种不同材料表面的初始附着行为,对微生物附着进行了定量描述,初步获得以下结果:(1)不同材料表面,细菌的附着量呈现如下差异:316L不锈钢>PVC>玻璃,在有机硅材料(道康宁T2)表面的附着变动性很大;(2)同种材料表面,不同细菌的附着量也不同,表现为:Shewanella oneidensis MR-1菌株和Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1菌株均大于Escherichia coli JM 109菌株.并由此对其附着差异和影响因素进行了讨论.

  20. Identification and characterization of a highly variable region in mitochondrial genomes of fusarium species and analysis of power generation from microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Haider Mousa

    In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) project, power generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was analyzed looking for a novel system for both energy generation and sustainability. The results suggest the possibility of generating electricity from different organic substances, which include agricultural and industrial by-products. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates usable electrons at 30°C using both submerged and solid state cultures. In the MFC biocathode experiment, most of the CO2 generated at the anodic chamber was converted into bicarbonate due the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) of the Gluconobacter sp.33 strain. These findings demonstrate the possibility of generation of electricity while at the same time allowing the biomimetic sequestration of CO2 using bacterial CA. In the mitochondrial genomes project, the filamentous fungal species Fusarium oxysporum was used as a model. This species causes wilt of several important agricultural crops. A previous study revealed that a highly variable region (HVR) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of three species of Fusarium contained a large, variable unidentified open reading frame (LV-uORF). Using specific primers for two regions of the LV-uORF, six strains were found to contain the ORF by PCR and database searches identified 18 other strains outside of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. The LV-uORF was also identified in three isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex. Interestingly, several F. oxysporum isolates lack the LV-uORF and instead contain 13 ORFs in the HVR, nine of which are unidentified. The high GC content and codon usage of the LV-uORF indicate that it did not co-evolve with other mt genes and was horizontally acquired and was introduced to the Fusarium lineage prior to speciation. The nonsynonymous/synonymous (dN/dS) ratio of the LV-uORFs (0.43) suggests it is under purifying selection and the putative polypeptide is predicted to be located in the mitochondrial membrane. Growth assays

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations and Molecular Conductance Measurements of the Bacterial Decaheme Cytochrome MtrF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, H. S.; Pirbadian, S.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Shi, Liang; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-09-05

    Microorganisms overcome the considerable hurdle of respiring extracellular solid substrates by deploying large multiheme cytochrome complexes that form 20 nanometer conduits to traffic electrons through the periplasm and across the cellular outer membrane. Here we report the first kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and single-molecule scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer membrane decaheme cytochrome MtrF, which can perform the final electron transfer step from cells to minerals and microbial fuel cell anodes. We find that the calculated electron transport rate through MtrF is consistent with previously reported in vitro measurements of the Shewanella Mtr complex, as well as in vivo respiration rates on electrode surfaces assuming a reasonable (experimentally verified) coverage of cytochromes on the cell surface. The simulations also reveal a rich phase diagram in the overall electron occupation density of the hemes as a function of electron injection and ejection rates. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy confirms MtrF's ability to mediate electron transport between an STM tip and an underlying Au(111) surface, but at rates higher than expected from previously calculated heme-heme electron transfer rates for solvated molecules.

  2. Modulation of the reactivity of multiheme cytochromes by site-directed mutagenesis: moving towards the optimization of microbial electrochemical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alexandra S; Costa, Nazua L; Tien, Ming; Louro, Ricardo O; Paquete, Catarina M

    2017-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria perform extracellular electron transfer, a metabolic trait that is at the core of a wide range of biotechnological applications. To better understand how these microorganisms transfer electrons from their metabolism to an extracellular electron acceptor, it is necessary to characterize in detail the key players in this process, the multiheme c-type cytochromes. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model organism for studying extracellular electron transfer, where the heme protein referred to as small tetraheme cytochrome is one of the most abundant multiheme cytochromes found in the periplasmic space of this bacterium. The small tetraheme cytochrome is responsible for the delivery of electrons to the porin-cytochrome supercomplexes that permeate the outer-membrane and reduce metallic minerals or electrodes. In this work, well-established thermodynamic and kinetic models that discriminate the electron transfer activity of the four individual hemes were employed to characterize a set of single amino-acid mutants of the small tetraheme cytochrome and their interaction with small inorganic electron donors and acceptors. The results show that electrostatics play an important role in the reactivity of the small tetraheme cytochrome with small inorganic electron partners, in particularly in the kinetics of the electron transfer processes. This thorough exploration using site-directed mutants provides key mechanistic insights to guide the rational manipulation of the proteins that are key players in extracellular electron transfer processes, towards the improvement of microbial electrochemical applications using dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria.

  3. Microbial mass-dependent fractionation of chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, E.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Bullen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    Mass-dependent fractionation of Cr isotopes occurs during dissimilatory Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Cells suspended in a simple buffer solution, with various concentrations of lactate or formate added as electron donor, reduced 5 or 10 ??M Cr(VI) to Cr(III) over days to weeks. In all nine batch experiments, 53Cr/52Cr ratios of the unreacted Cr(VI) increased as reduction proceeded. In eight experiments covering a range of added donor concentrations up to 100 ??M, isotopic fractionation factors were nearly invariant, ranging from 1.0040 to 1.0045, with a mean value somewhat larger than that previously reported for abiotic Cr(VI) reduction (1.0034). One experiment containing much greater donor concentration (10 mM lactate) reduced Cr(VI) much faster and exhibited a lesser fractionation factor (1.0018). These results indicate that 53Cr/52Cr measurements should be effective as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction, either bacterial or abiotic. However, variability in the fractionation factor is poorly constrained and should be studied for a variety of microbial and abiotic reduction pathways. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. In vitro evolution of a peptide with a hematite binding motif that may constitute a natural metal-oxide binding archetype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Lins, Roberto D; Oestreicher, Zachery; Straatsma, Tjerk P; Hochella, Michael F; Shi, Liang; Lower, Steven K

    2008-05-15

    Phage-display technology was used to evolve peptides that selectively bind to the metal-oxide hematite (Fe2O3) from a library of approximately 3 billion different polypeptides. The sequences of these peptides contained the highly conserved amino acid motif, Ser/Thr-hydrophobic/aromatic-Ser/Thr-Pro-Ser/Thr. To better understand the nature of the peptide-metal oxide binding demonstrated by these experiments, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for Ser-Pro-Ser at a hematite surface. These simulations show that hydrogen bonding occurs between the two serine amino acids and the hydroxylated hematite surface and that the presence of proline between the hydroxide residues restricts the peptide flexibility, thereby inducing a structural-binding motif. A search of published sequence data revealed that the binding motif (Ser/Thr-Pro-Ser/Thr) is adjacent to the terminal heme-binding domain of both OmcA and MtrC, which are outer membrane cytochromes from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The entire five amino acid consensus sequence (Ser/Thr-hydrophobic/ aromatic-Ser/Thr-Pro-Ser/Thr) was also found as multiple copies in the primary sequences of metal-oxide binding proteins Sil1 and Sil2 from Thalassiosira pseudonana. We suggest that this motif constitutes a natural metal-oxide binding archetype that could be exploited in enzyme-based biofuel cell design and approaches to synthesize tailored metal-oxide nanostructures.

  5. Efficacy of a 3rd generation high-throughput sequencing platform for analyses of 16S rRNA genes from environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Jennifer J; Bernberg, Erin L; Shevchenko, Olga; Kan, Jinjun; Kaplan, Louis A

    2013-11-01

    Longer sequences of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could provide greater phylogenetic and taxonomic resolutions and advance knowledge of population dynamics within complex natural communities. We assessed the accuracy of a Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single molecule, real time (SMRT) sequencing based on DNA polymerization, a promising 3rd generation high-throughput technique, and compared this to the 2nd generation Roche 454 pyrosequencing platform. Amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene from a known isolate, Shewanella oneidensis MR1, and environmental samples from two streambed habitats, rocks and sediments, and a riparian zone soil, were analyzed. On the PacBio we analyzed ~500 bp amplicons that covered the V1-V3 regions and the full 1500 bp amplicons of the V1-V9 regions. On the Roche 454 we analyzed the ~500 bp amplicons. Error rates associated with the isolate were lowest with the Roche 454 method (2%), increased by more than 2-fold for the 500 bp amplicons with the PacBio SMRT chip (4-5%), and by more than 8-fold for the full gene with the PacBio SMRT chip (17-18%). Higher error rates with the PacBio SMRT chip artificially inflated estimates of richness and lowered estimates of coverage for environmental samples. The 3rd generation sequencing technology we evaluated does not provide greater phylogenetic and taxonomic resolutions for studies of microbial ecology. © 2013.

  6. Outer membrane cytochromes/flavin interactions in Shewanella spp.-A molecular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Cornejo, Jose; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth; Atanassov, Plamen

    2017-05-31

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is intrinsically associated with the core phenomena of energy harvesting/energy conversion in natural ecosystems and biotechnology applications. However, the mechanisms associated with EET are complex and involve molecular interactions that take place at the "bionano interface" where biotic/abiotic interactions are usually explored. This work provides molecular perspective on the electron transfer mechanism(s) employed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Molecular docking simulations were used to explain the interfacial relationships between two outer-membrane cytochromes (OMC) OmcA and MtrC and riboflavin (RF) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), respectively. OMC-flavin interactions were analyzed by studying the electrostatic potential, the hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties, and the van der Waals surface of the OMC proteins. As a result, it was proposed that the interactions between flavins and OMCs are based on geometrical recognition event. The possible docking positions of RF and FMN to OmcA and MtrC were also shown.

  7. Empirical Evaluation of a New Method for Calculating Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) for Microarray Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-03-06

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called signal to both standard deviations ratio (SSDR) was developed, and evaluated along with other two methods, signal to standard deviation ratio (SSR), and signal to background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60 and 0.80 with oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon as target templates, and 2.0, 1.60 and 0.70 with genomic DNA as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained at the high stringency condition. The thresholds of SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types), and the presence of background DNA, and a decrease in the composition of targets, while SBR remained unchanged under all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives (FP) and false negatives (FN) was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t-test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  8. Microbial mass-dependent fractionation of chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Eric R.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Bullen, Thomas D.

    2008-08-01

    Mass-dependent fractionation of Cr isotopes occurs during dissimilatory Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Cells suspended in a simple buffer solution, with various concentrations of lactate or formate added as electron donor, reduced 5 or 10 μM Cr(VI) to Cr(III) over days to weeks. In all nine batch experiments, 53Cr/ 52Cr ratios of the unreacted Cr(VI) increased as reduction proceeded. In eight experiments covering a range of added donor concentrations up to 100 μM, isotopic fractionation factors were nearly invariant, ranging from 1.0040 to 1.0045, with a mean value somewhat larger than that previously reported for abiotic Cr(VI) reduction (1.0034). One experiment containing much greater donor concentration (10 mM lactate) reduced Cr(VI) much faster and exhibited a lesser fractionation factor (1.0018). These results indicate that 53Cr/ 52Cr measurements should be effective as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction, either bacterial or abiotic. However, variability in the fractionation factor is poorly constrained and should be studied for a variety of microbial and abiotic reduction pathways.

  9. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  10. Impact of iron-reducing bacteria on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Marta K; Schlegel, Michel L; Libert, Marie; Bildstein, Olivier

    2015-06-16

    The current projects for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste rely on underground burial and confinement by metallic envelopes that are susceptible to corrosion processes. The impact of microbial activity must be fully clarified in order to provide biological parameters for predictive reactive transport models. This study investigates the impact of hydrogenotrophic iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions by using a geochemical approach. It was found that corrosion damage changes mostly according to the experimental solution (i.e., chemical composition). Magnetite and vivianite were identified as the main corrosion products. In the presence of bacteria, the corrosion rate increased by a factor of 1.3 (according to weight loss analysis) to 1.8 (according to H2 measurements), and the detected amount of magnetite diminished. The mechanism likely to enhance corrosion is the destabilization and dissolution of the passivating magnetite layer by reduction of structural Fe(III) coupled to H2 oxidation.

  11. Flavin redox bifurcation as a mechanism for controlling the direction of electron flow during extracellular electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-10-06

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has a dual directional electronic conduit involving 40 heme redox centers in flavin-binding outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts). While the mechanism for electron export from the OM c-Cyts to an anode is well understood, how the redox centers in OM c-Cyts take electrons from a cathode has not been elucidated at the molecular level. Electrochemical analysis of live cells during switching from anodic to cathodic conditions showed that altering the direction of electron flow does not require gene expression or protein synthesis, but simply redox potential shift about 300 mV for a flavin cofactor interacting with the OM c-Cyts. That is, the redox bifurcation of the riboflavin cofactor in OM c-Cyts switches the direction of electron conduction in the biological conduit at the cell-electrode interface to drive bacterial metabolism as either anode or cathode catalysts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Intermittent energy harvesting improves the performance of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Alim; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2009-06-15

    In this study, we compare the efficiencies of harvesting energy from microbial fuel cells (MFC) using two modes of operation: (1) continuous-passing the current through an electrical load-and (2) intermittent-first accumulating the energy in a capacitor and then discharging it through the load. Each of these two modes of operation has advantages and disadvantages: the first mode of operation allows the continuous powering of low-power-consuming devices, and the second mode of operation allows the intermittent powering of high-power-consuming devices. We used a two-compartment MFC: in the anodic compartment, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown using lactate as an electron donor, whereas in the cathodic compartment we used an electrode made of manganese-based catalyzed carbon bonded to a current-collecting screen made of platinum mesh and oxygen as the electron acceptor. The maximum power generated by harvesting energy intermittently was 152 microW, which is 111% higher than the 72 microW generated by harvesting the energy continuously. We conclude that in the operation of MFCs it is beneficial to harvest the energy intermittently. This not only allows the powering of external devices of high power consumption but also allows generating power with greater energy efficiency than does harvesting the energy continuously.

  13. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Moore, Ronald J; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2010-05-07

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope (18)O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level (16)O and (18)O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in Delta gspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with a previous report that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system.

  14. The use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the evaluation of the electrochemical properties of a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Aswin K; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth H; Mansfeld, Florian

    2008-04-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to determine several electrochemical properties of the anode and cathode of a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) under different operational conditions. These operational conditions included a system with and without the bacterial catalyst and EIS measurements at the open-circuit potential of the anode and the cathode or at an applied cell voltage. In all cases the impedance spectra followed a simple one-time-constant model (OTCM) in which the solution resistance is in series with a parallel combination of the polarization resistance and the electrode capacitance. Analysis of the impedance spectra showed that addition of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to a solution of buffer and lactate greatly increased the rate of the lactate oxidation at the anode under open-circuit conditions. The large decrease of open-circuit potential of the anode increased the cell voltage of the MFC and its power output. Measurements of impedance spectra for the MFC at different cell voltages resulted in determining the internal resistance (R(int)) of the MFC and it was found that R(int) is a function of cell voltage. Additionally, R(int) was equal to R(ext) at the cell voltage corresponding to maximum power, where R(ext) is the external resistance that must be applied across the circuit to obtain the maximum power output.

  15. Cometabolic degradation of chloramphenicol via a meta-cleavage pathway in a microbial fuel cell and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Daping

    2017-04-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) in terms of degradation of chloramphenicol (CAP) was investigated. Approximately 84% of 50mg/L CAP was degraded within 12h in the MFC. A significant interaction of pH, temperature, and initial CAP concentration was found on removal of CAP, and a maximum degradation rate of 96.53% could theoretically be achieved at 31.48°C, a pH of 7.12, and an initial CAP concentration of 106.37mg/L. Moreover, CAP was further degraded through a ring-cleavage pathway. The antibacterial activity of CAP towards Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was largely eliminated by MFC treatment. High-throughput sequencing analysis indicated that Azonexus, Comamonas, Nitrososphaera, Chryseobacterium, Azoarcus, Rhodococcus, and Dysgonomonas were the predominant genera in the MFC anode biofilm. In conclusion, the MFC shows potential for the treatment of antibiotic residue-containing wastewater due to its high rates of CAP removal and energy recovery.

  16. Biochar-Facilitated Reduction of Crystalline Fe(III) in Hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Yang, Y.; Roden, E. E.; Tang, Y.; Huang, R.; Adhikari, D.

    2015-12-01

    Pyrogenic organic matter is a significant component of soil organic matter, the transformation of which may play a crucial role in the coupled redox cycles of carbon and iron. However, scant information is available for the role of pyrogenic carbon in the redox cycle of iron. Herein, we studied the influences of wheat straw-derived biochar on the microbial reduction of hematite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the presence of 10 mg/L biochar, microbial reduction of hematite was substantially accelerated by 41% to 142%. Reduction of hematite was enhanced to similar degrees by aqueous biochar with the concentration of 1-3 mg C/L. Importance of the aqueous biochar was also supported by the response of enhancement of Fe reduction to the dose of biochar particles, closely linked to the change in aqueous biochar concentration rather than the amount of total biochar particles. Microbiologically pre-reduced biochar reduced hematite abiotically, demonstrating the electron shuttling capacity of aqueous biochar for hematite reduction. On the other side, biochar particles sorbed Fe(II) and consequently decreased the accumulation of Fe(II) in solution to facilitate the reduction of hematite further. We reported for the first time the biochar-facilitated microbial reduction of crystalline Fe(III), through electron shuttling processes mediated by aqueous biochar and complexation of Fe(II) by biochar particles. Such impacted redox cycles of Fe would be important for the soil environment with relatively high content of indigenous pyrogenic carbon or substantial application of biochar.

  17. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions using Shewanella sp. RCRI7, isolated from Qurugoel Lake in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdehvand, Adib Zaheri; Keshtkar, Alireza; Fatemi, Faezeh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School; Tarhiz, Vahideh; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid [Tabriz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Molecular Medicine Research Center

    2017-04-01

    Isolation, genotypic and phenotypic characterization of an aqueous bacterium, Shewanella sp RCRI7, from Qurugoel Lake in Iran and uranium removal from aqueous solutions using the isolate is described. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree, strain RCRI7{sup T} falls into genus Shewanella. Closely related type strains include Shewanella xiamenensis S4{sup T} KJ542801, Shewanella profunda DSM15900{sup T} FR733713, Shewanella putrefaciens LMG 26268{sup T} X81623 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1{sup T} AE014299. Anaerobic incubation of the bacteria in the presence of U(VI) led to uranium removal from the solution and formation of a black precipitate. Analysis of the precipitate using UV-vis confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The effects of pH, temperature, U(VI) concentration and cell density on uranium removal were elucidated. The maximum uranium removal was 97%. As a conclusion, the findings revealed the ability of the local strain RCRI7 for U(VI) bioreduction as an effective bacterium for uranium immobilization.

  18. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spormann, Alfred

    2011-07-12

    We have constructed in-frame deletions of 7 of the 10 PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We are currently in the process of characterizing the deletion mutants under a wide range of growth conditions. In addition to characterizing growth, we will also examine the biofilm formation of the deletion mutants. In addition to the genetic analyses of the mutants, we are also interested in comparing the activities of the various PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins. Proteins containing PAS, GGDEF and EAL amino acid sequence motifs may play an important role in regulating c-di-GMP signaling in response to environmental conditions. A genetic and biochemical analysis into the roles of these proteins is underway. PDE activity was observed for several PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins. One of these proteins, SO0427, also demonstrates possible DGC activity in vitro. Currently, we are studying the growth, motility and biofilm formation characteristics of deletion mutants, as well as the activity of the purified proteins.

  19. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-05-03

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and environmental electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 79% membrane proteins among all proteins identified from the enriched sample. To illustrate the quantification of membrane proteome changes, enriched membrane protein samples from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) were further labeled with 16O and 18O at the peptide level prior to LC-MS analysis. A chemical-probe-labeled pure protein has also been used as an internal standard for normalization purpose. The quantitative data revealed reduced abundances of many outer membrane proteins such as OmcA and MtrC in ΔgspD mutant cells, which agreed well with previously published studies.

  20. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  1. Microbial synthesis of bimetallic PdPt nanoparticles for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Ya; Liu, Guangfei; Dong, Bin; Yu, Huali; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei

    2017-02-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are generally believed to have improved catalytic activity and stability due to geometric and electronic changes. In this work, biogenic-Pd (bio-Pd), biogenic-Pt (bio-Pt), and biogenic-PdPt (bio-PdPt) nanoparticles were synthesized by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the absence or presence of quinone. Compared with direct microbial reduction process, the addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) could promote the reduction efficiency of Pd(II) or/and Pt(IV) and result in decrease of particles size. All kinds of nanoparticles could catalyze 4-nitrophenol reduction by NaBH4 and their catalytic activities took the following order: bio-PdPt (AQDS) ∼ bio-PdPt > bio-Pd (AQDS) > bio-Pd > bio-Pt (AQDS) ∼ bio-Pt. Moreover, the bio-PdPt (AQDS) nanoparticles could be reused for 6 cycles. We believe that this simple and efficient biosynthesis approach for synthesizing bimetallic bio-PdPt nanocatalysts is important for preparing active and stable catalysts.

  2. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianshu; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nanqi; Tong, Qingyue; Zhang, Luyan

    2016-12-20

    In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH) from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER) under the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m(-3)·day(-1) to 110 g·m(-3)·day(-1). BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell) was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up.

  3. mRNA-targeted Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization (FISH) of Gram-negative Bacteria Without Template Amplification or Tyramide Signal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, James R.; Culley, David E.; Chrisler, William B.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2007-12-01

    Technologies are needed to study gene expression at the level of individual cells within a population or microbial community. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) supplies high-resolution spatial information and has been widely applied to study microbial communities at the rRNA level. While mRNA-targeted FISH has been popular for studying gene expression in eukaryotic cells, very little success has been achieved with prokaryotes. At present, detection of specific mRNAs in individual prokaryotic cells requires the use of in situ-RT-PCR or tyramide signal amplification (TSA). In this study we used DNA oligonucleotide probes labeled with a single near-infrared dye in FISH assays to detect multicopy plasmid-based and endogenous mRNA molecules in Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We took advantage of the fact there is much less background signal produced by biological materials and support matrices in the near-infrared spectrum and thus long camera exposure times could be used. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of probes targeting both rRNA and mRNA could be successfully employed within the same FISH assay. These results, as well as ongoing R&D improvements in NIR and infrared dyes, indicate the FISH approach we demonstrated could be applied in certain environmental settings to monitor gene expression in mixed populations.

  4. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER under the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m−3·day−1 to 110 g·m−3·day−1. BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up.

  5. Performance Enhancement Of Mems-Based Microbial Fuel Cells (μMFC) For Microscale Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen Doğan, Begüm; Afşar Erkal, Nilüfer; Özgür, Ebru; Zorlu, Özge; Külah, Haluk

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a microliter scale Microbial Fuel Cell (μMFC) based on silicon MEMS fabrication technology. μMFC systems are operated under different loads or open circuit to compare the effect of different acclimatization conditions on start-up time. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is preferred to be the biocatalyst. The internal resistance is calculated as 20 kΩ under these conditions. Acclimatization of μMFC under a finite load resulted in shorter start-up time (30 hours) when compared to the open load case. Power and current densities normalized to anode area are 2 μW/cm2 and 12 μA/cm2 respectively. When the load resistance value is closer to the internal resistance of the μMFC, higher power and current densities are achieved as expected, and it resulted in a shorter start-up time. Further studies focusing on the different acclimatization techniques for μMFC could pave the way to use μMFCs as fast and efficient portable power sources.

  6. Rapid degradation of sulphamethoxazole and the further transformation of 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Liu, Yulei; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Sulphamethoxazole (SMX) is extensively used in humans and livestock, but its appearance in natural water raises environmental concerns. This study demonstrated that SMX and its degradation product, 3-amino-5-methylisoxazole (3A5MI), could be effectively degraded in microbial fuel cell (MFC) reactors. Approximately 85% of 20 ppm SMX was degraded within 12 h, and this was a more rapid biodegradation rate than has been previously shown in the literature. In addition, 3A5MI, a toxic chemical that forms in the SMX degradation process, can be further mineralized. The degradation products of SMX were detected by mass spectrometry, and three speculated by-products were confirmed with chemical standards. It was observed that nitrogen atoms of SMX were progressively eliminated during the degradation process, which may relate with the degradation of SMX and 3A5MI. An antibacterial activity test showed that the biotoxicity of SMX towards Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli DH5α was greatly reduced after MFC treatment. Moreover, the ATP level of the MFC microbe was nearly threefold higher than that in open-circuit controls, which may be related to the rapid degradation of SMX in MFCs. This study can facilitate further investigations about the biodegradation of SMX.

  7. Characterization of lead nanoparticles formed by Shewanella sp. KR-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Liang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial strain KR-12 was isolated from river sediment in northeast Taiwan. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that it belongs to the genus Shewanella. The strain can accumulate lead (Pb) and form Pb nanoparticles (PbNPs) on exposure to Pb(NO3)2 and sodium formate in HEPES buffer. On transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the KR-12-formed PbNPs were spherical in shape and ranged from 3 to 8 nm. The PbNPs formed a line or curved pattern on bacteria. In addition, one or more pilus-like structures elongated from the bacteria. In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and other bacteria could not form PbNPs pattern or pilus-like structure under the same conditions. High-resolution TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that these PbNPs primarily contained Pb and had an amorphous structure. This is the first report of the biosynthesis of PbNPs by a Shewanella species.

  8. Characterization of lead nanoparticles formed by Shewanella sp. KR-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chien-Liang; Yen, Jui-Hung, E-mail: sonny@ntu.edu.tw [National Taiwan University, Department of Agricultural Chemistry (China)

    2016-01-15

    The bacterial strain KR-12 was isolated from river sediment in northeast Taiwan. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that it belongs to the genus Shewanella. The strain can accumulate lead (Pb) and form Pb nanoparticles (PbNPs) on exposure to Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and sodium formate in HEPES buffer. On transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the KR-12-formed PbNPs were spherical in shape and ranged from 3 to 8 nm. The PbNPs formed a line or curved pattern on bacteria. In addition, one or more pilus-like structures elongated from the bacteria. In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and other bacteria could not form PbNPs pattern or pilus-like structure under the same conditions. High-resolution TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that these PbNPs primarily contained Pb and had an amorphous structure. This is the first report of the biosynthesis of PbNPs by a Shewanella species.

  9. Bacteria-Affinity 3D Macroporous Graphene/MWCNTs/Fe3O4 Foams for High-Performance Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rong-Bin; Zhao, Cui-E; Jiang, Li-Ping; Abdel-Halim, Essam Sayed; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-06-29

    Promoting the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) relies heavily on the structure design and composition tailoring of electrode materials. In this work, three-dimensional (3D) macroporous graphene foams incorporated with intercalated spacer of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and bacterial anchor of Fe3O4 nanospheres (named as G/MWCNTs/Fe3O4 foams) were first synthesized and used as anodes for Shewanella-inoculated microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thanks to the macroporous structure of 3D graphene foams, the expanded electrode surface by MWCNTs spacing, as well as the high affinity of Fe3O4 nanospheres toward Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, the anode exhibited high bacterial loading capability. In addition to spacing graphene nanosheets for accommodating bacterial cells, MWCNTs paved a smoother way for electron transport in the electrode substrate of MFCs. Meanwhile, the embedded bioaffinity Fe3O4 nanospheres capable of preserving the bacterial metabolic activity provided guarantee for the long-term durability of the MFCs. With these merits, the constructed MFC possessed significantly higher power output and stronger stability than that with conventional graphite rod anode.

  10. Microbial fuel cells using Cellulomonas spp. with cellulose as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuya; Khawdas, Wichean; Aso, Yuji; Ohara, Hitomi

    2017-03-01

    Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas biazotea, and Cellulomonas flavigena are cellulose-degrading microorganisms chosen to compare the degradation of cellulose. C. fimi degraded 2.5 g/L of cellulose within 4 days, which was the highest quantity among the three microorganisms. The electric current generation by the microbial fuel cell (MFC) using the cellulose-containing medium with C. fimi was measured over 7 days. The medium in the MFC was sampled every 24 h to quantify the degradation of cellulose, and the results showed that the electric current increased with the degradation of cellulose. The maximum electric power generated by the MFC was 38.7 mW/m(2), and this numeric value was 63% of the electric power generated by an MFC with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a well-known current-generating microorganism. Our results showed that C. fimi was an excellent candidate to produce the electric current from cellulose via MFCs.

  11. High Performance Heteroatoms Quaternary-doped Carbon Catalysts Derived from Shewanella Bacteria for Oxygen Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaoyan; Ren, Guangyuan; Jiang, Congcong; Lu, Xianyong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Dai, Liming

    2015-11-01

    A novel heteroatoms (N, P, S and Fe) quaternary-doped carbon (HQDC-X, X refers to the pyrolysis temperature) can be fabricated by directly pyrolyzing a gram-negative bacteria, S. oneidensis MR-1 as precursors at 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C under argon atmosphere. These HQDC-X catalysts maintain the cylindrical shape of bacteria after pyrolysis under high temperatures, while heteroatoms including N, P, S and Fe distribute homogeneously on the carbon frameworks. As a result, HQDC-X catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for ORR via a dominant four-electron oxygen reduction pathway in alkaline medium, which is comparable with that of commercial Pt/C. More importantly, HQDC-X catalysts show better tolerance for methanol crossover and CO poisoning effects, long-term durability than commercial Pt/C, which could be promising alternatives to costly Pt-based electrocatalysts for ORR. The method may provide a promising avenue to develop cheap ORR catalysts from inexpensive, scalable and biological recursors.

  12. The Detoxification and Degradation of Benzothiazole from the Wastewater in Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianshu; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nanqi; Tong, Qingyue; Zhang, Luyan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the high-production-volume chemical benzothiazole (BTH) from synthetic water was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates of simple organic acids using an up-flow internal circulation microbial electrolysis reactor (UICMER) under the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. The bioelectrochemical system was operated at 25 ± 2 °C and continuous-flow mode. The BTH loading rate varied during experiments from 20 g·m−3·day−1 to 110 g·m−3·day−1. BTH and soluble COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal efficiency reached 80% to 90% under all BTH loading rates. Bioluminescence based Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that toxicity was largely decreased compared to the BTH wastewater influent and effluent of two control experiments. The results indicated that MEC (Microbial Electrolysis Cell) was useful and reliable for improving BTH wastewater treatment efficiency, enabling the microbiological reactor to more easily respond to the requirements of higher loading rate, which is meaningful for economic and efficient operation in future scale-up. PMID:27999421

  13. A general system for studying protein-protein interactions in gram-negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A.; Hurst, G. B.; Foote, Linda J.; Lankford, Patricia K.; McKeown, Cathy K.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Shah, Manesh B.; Hervey IV, W. J.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Hooker, Brian S.; Cannon, William R.; Daly, Don S.; Gilmore, Jason M.; Wiley, H. S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Wang, Yisong; Larimer, Frank; Kennel, S. J.; Doktycz, M. J.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Owens, Elizabeth T.; Buchanan, M. V.

    2008-08-01

    One of the most promising of the emerging methods for large-scale studies of interactions among proteins is co-isolation of an affinity-tagged protein and its interaction partners, followed by mass spectrometric identification of the co-purifying proteins. We describe a methodology for systematically identifying the proteins that interact with affinity-tagged “bait” proteins expressed from a medium copy plasmid, which are based on a broad host range (pBBR1MCS5) vector backbone that has been modified to incorporate the Gateway DEST plasmid multiple cloning region. This construct was designed to facilitate expression of fusion proteins bearing an affinity tag, across a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts. We demonstrate the performance of this methodology by characterizing interactions among subunits of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex in two metabolically versatile Gram negative microbial species of environmental interest, Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results from the RNA polymerase complex from these two species compared favorably with those for both plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded affinity-tagged fusion proteins expressed in a model organism, E. coli.

  14. A General System for Studying Protein-Protein Interactions in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Auberry, Deanna L [ORNL; Buchanan, Michelle V [ORNL; Cannon, Bill [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Foote, Linda J [ORNL; Hervey, IV, William Judson [ORNL; Hooker, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Kennel, Steve J [ORNL; Lankford, Patricia K [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Owens, Elizabeth T [ORNL; Schmoyer, Denise D [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Wiley, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Gilmore, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2008-01-01

    Abstract One of the most promising methods for large-scale studies of protein interactions is isolation of an affinity-tagged protein with its in vivo interaction partners, followed by mass spectrometric identification of the copurified proteins. Previous studies have generated affinity-tagged proteins using genetic tools or cloning systems that are specific to a particular organism. To enable protein-protein interaction studies across a wider range of Gram-negative bacteria, we have developed a methodology based on expression of affinity-tagged bait proteins from a medium copy-number plasmid. This construct is based on a broad-host-range vector backbone (pBBR1MCS5). The vector has been modified to incorporate the Gateway DEST vector recombination region, to facilitate cloning and expression of fusion proteins bearing a variety of affinity, fluorescent, or other tags. We demonstrate this methodology by characterizing interactions among subunits of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex in two metabolically versatile Gram-negative microbial species of environmental interest, Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results compared favorably with those for both plasmid and chromosomally encoded affinity-tagged fusion proteins expressed in a model organism, Escherichia coli.

  15. An electrochemical evaluation of new materials and methods for corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Esra

    An electrochemical evaluation of various electrode/electrolyte systems was performed by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and other techniques. Each chapter in this thesis presents an individual project with a specific objective which serves an ultimate goal of finding better materials and methods of corrosion protection. An overview of new environmentally friendly and cost effective materials and corrosion protection methods is given in Chapter 1. The protective properties of non-toxic, environmentally friendly polymer coatings, which were developed in the purpose of minimizing biofouling and providing corrosion protection on steel, were investigated and discussed in Chapter 2. The corrosion resistance of steel panels coated with crosslinked siloxanes was evaluated using EIS. Differences in protective properties of the coatings were observed due to differences in the degree of fluorination, the way the films were cured and also the degree of crosslinking. In Chapter 3, a comparison of the corrosion behavior of nanocrystalline (NC) Al 5083 with that of the conventional alloy was made in order to determine what differences if any could be attributed to the NC microstructure. Pit growth rates decreased with time for both materials based on the analysis of the impedance spectra as a function of time. NC samples were resistant to intergranular corrosion whereas conventional Al 5083 was not. The concept of the bacterial battery is presented in Chapter 4. A galvanic cell with Cu and Al 2024 and an electrolyte containing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a growth medium was prepared. A control cell, which did not contain the bacteria, was also tested. For the cell with MR-1 the maximum power values increased continuously with time, whereas in the control cell the maximum power output was obtained in the first day of exposure. The objective of the study presented in Chapter 5 was to examine the interaction of MR-1 with different metal surfaces in order to

  16. Production of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Shewanella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Saad M.; White, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several species of the bacterial genus Shewanella are well-known dissimilatory reducers of manganese under anaerobic conditions. In fact, Shewanella oneidensis is one of the most well studied of all metal-reducing bacteria. In the current study, a number of Shewanella strains were tested for manganese-oxidizing capacity under aerobic conditions. All were able to oxidize Mn(II) and to produce solid dark brown manganese oxides. Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 was the strongest oxidizer, producing oxides at a rate of 20.3 mg/liter/day and oxidizing Mn(II) concentrations of up to 9 mM. In contrast, S. oneidensis MR-1 was the weakest oxidizer tested, producing oxides at 4.4 mg/liter/day and oxidizing up to 4 mM Mn(II). Analysis of products from the strongest oxidizers, i.e., S. loihica PV-4 and Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, revealed finely grained, nanosize, poorly crystalline oxide particles with identical Mn oxidation states of 3.86. The biogenic manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced within 2 days by all of the Shewanella strains when culture conditions were made anoxic and an appropriate nutrient (lactate) was added. While Shewanella species were detected previously as part of manganese-oxidizing consortia in natural environments, the current study has clearly shown manganese-reducing Shewanella species bacteria that are able to oxidize manganese in aerobic cultures. IMPORTANCE Members of the genus Shewanella are well known as dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacteria. This study shows that a number of species from Shewanella are also capable of manganese oxidation under aerobic conditions. Characterization of the products of the two most efficient oxidizers, S. loihica and S. putrefaciens, revealed finely grained, nanosize oxide particles. With a change in culture conditions, the manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced by the same bacteria. The ability of Shewanella species both to oxidize and to reduce manganese indicates

  17. An investigation of the sensitivity of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance to microbial growth and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Keating, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbes and microbial processes play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in applications ranging from microbially enhanced oil recovery to soil and groundwater contaminant remediation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface; however, due to the complexity of subsurface systems,it is difficult to monitor the growth of microbes and microbial activity in porous media. The focus of this research is to determine if low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a method used in well logging to characterize fluids in hydrocarbon reservoirs or water in aquifers, can be used to directly detect the presence and the growth of microbes in geologic media. In this laboratory study, low-field NMR (2 MHz) relaxation measurements were collected on microbial suspensions with measured densities (i.e. biomasses), microbial pellets (live and dead), and inoculated silica. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the NMR signals in the absence of biomineralization. Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1), a facultative metal reducer known to play an important role in subsurface environments, were used as a model organism and were inoculated under aerobic condition. Data were collected using a CPMG pulse sequence, which was to determine the T2-distribution, and using a gradient spin-echo (PGSE) plus CPMG pulse sequence, which was used to encode diffusion properties and determine the effective diffusion-spin-spin relaxation correlation (D-T2) plot. Our data show no obvious change in the T2-distribution as S. oneidensis density varied in suspension, but show a clear distinction in the T2-distribution and D-T2 plots between live and dead cell pellets. A decrease in the T2-distribution is observed in the inoculated sand column. These results will provide a basis for understanding the effect of microbes within geologic media on low-field NMR measurements. This

  18. Understanding the Development and Stabilization of Mn(III) Intermediates during Microbial Manganese Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. E.; Savalia, P.; Kocar, B. D.; Webb, S. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fischer, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant products of Mn(II) oxidation are manganese(IV)-oxide phases, which act as important environmental oxidants and sorbents in soils, freshwater, and marine sediments. Mn(IV) oxides also provide favorable electron acceptors for metal-reducing microbes, but the intermediates and final products formed are highly dependent on environmental conditions, and challenging to predict thermodynamically. We engineered a flow-through reactor system to study the Mn phases during microbial Mn(IV) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in real time, using synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to monitor redox and mineralogical changes. These 10-20 hour experiments capture Mn XAS spectra every 20 minutes and thus we can observe both transient phases and stable products under different experimental conditions. We also record the pH, collect solution and filtered solid samples throughout the experiments for later solute measurements, and confirm mineral identifications with synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements. With excess organic carbon and high (mM) phosphate (like in a soil), Mn(IV) oxides are reduced to Mn(II) and immediately form Mn(II) phosphate in a clearly binary system. This experiment demonstrates that while there may be two successive single-electron transfer reactions from outer membrane cytochromes (Lin et al, 2012), the microbial reduction of Mn(IV) oxides is effectively a two-electron process. However, with minimal phosphate, a transient Mn(III) oxyhydroxide forms before all manganese is reduced to Mn(II) in solution and precipitates a final Mn(II)-carbonate product. We propose this Mn(III) intermediate phase forms due to reaction of Mn2+ in solution with Mn(IV)-oxide surfaces to form Mn(III)OOH, similar to experimental results from this abiotic comproportionation reaction (Elzinga, 2011). Recently, we stabilized this Mn(III) intermediate by limiting the organic carbon available to S. oneidensis, producing Mn(III)OOH and Mn(II) phases

  19. Manganese reduction and its stabilization in the rock record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. E.; Savalia, P.; Kocar, B. D.; Webb, S. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese oxides are abundant and highly reactive electron acceptors present within many environments. Their occurance is intimately tied to the availability of oxygen, as only O2 and oxygen-derived species such as superoxide and peroxide can oxidize reduced Mn(II). Because Mn2+ is soluble and Mn3+ and Mn4+ readily undergo hydrolysis to form insoluble precipitates, the record of manganese in sedimentary deposits can yield interesting insights into the history of atmospheric oxygen--the largest manganese deposits in Earth history (approximately 2.2 billion years ago) are associated with the rise of oxygen. From studying modern environments, we understand that manganese is concentrated in sediments by the oxidation and deposition of Mn(IV) minerals; however, our observations of the geologic record show diagenetic stabilization of only Mn(II) carbonate or mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) oxide minerals--all Mn(IV)-oxide phases in ancient samples are associated with modern weathering and oxidation processes. Reduction is a key element within the manganese cycle, yet the (bio)geochemical processes responsible for the formation of mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) minerals have not been fully elucidated. To better understand how manganese is converted from insoluble Mn(IV) oxide to these Mn(II/III)-bearing phases, we investigated secondary mineral precipitates which form during and after Mn(IV)-oxide reduction using a well-studied metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. To examine changes in Mn mineralogy and oxidation state during the progression of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution/transformation by S. oneidensis, we utilized a flow through reactor system allowing for in-situ and real time x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. We also confirmed mineral phases using XRD and FTIR spectrometry. Our experiments reveal that when solution phosphate concentrations are high, a Mn(II) phosphate phase quickly forms as a secondary precipitate during complete reduction of Mn(IV) oxides

  20. High power density microbial fuel cell with flexible 3D graphene-nickel foam as anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanyu; Wang, Gongming; Ling, Yichuan; Qian, Fang; Song, Yang; Lu, Xihong; Chen, Shaowei; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-10-01

    The structure and electrical conductivity of anode play a significant role in the power generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) reduced graphene oxide-nickel (denoted as rGO-Ni) foam as an anode for MFC through controlled deposition of rGO sheets onto the nickel foam substrate. The loading amount of rGO sheets and electrode surface area can be controlled by the number of rGO loading cycles. 3D rGO-Ni foam anode provides not only a large accessible surface area for microbial colonization and electron mediators, but also a uniform macro-porous scaffold for effective mass diffusion of the culture medium. Significantly, at a steady state of the power generation, the MFC device with flexible rGO-Ni electrodes produced an optimal volumetric power density of 661 W m-3 calculated based on the volume of anode material, or 27 W m-3 based on the volume of the anode chamber. These values are substantially higher than that of plain nickel foam, and other conventional carbon based electrodes (e.g., carbon cloth, carbon felt, and carbon paper) measured in the same conditions. To our knowledge, this is the highest volumetric power density reported for mL-scale MFC device with a pure strain of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We also demonstrated that the MFC device can be operated effectively in a batch-mode at least for a week. These new 3D rGO-Ni electrodes show great promise for improving the power generation of MFC devices.The structure and electrical conductivity of anode play a significant role in the power generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) reduced graphene oxide-nickel (denoted as rGO-Ni) foam as an anode for MFC through controlled deposition of rGO sheets onto the nickel foam substrate. The loading amount of rGO sheets and electrode surface area can be controlled by the number of rGO loading cycles. 3D rGO-Ni foam anode provides not only a large accessible

  1. Bacterial Community Analysis, New Exoelectrogen Isolation and Enhanced Performance of Microbial Electrochemical Systems Using Nano-Decorated Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoutao

    . Citrobacter strain SX-1 is capable of generating electricity from a wide range of substrates in MFCs. This finding increases the known diversity of power generating exoelectrogens and provids a new strain to explore the mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer from bacteria to electrode. The wide range of substrate utilization by SX-1 increases the application potential of MFCs in renewable energy generation and waste treatment. Anode properties are critical for the performance of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Inexpensive Fe nanoparticle modified graphite disks were used as anodes to preliminarily investigate the effects of nanoparticles on the performance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in MECs. Results demonstrated that average current densities produced with Fe nanoparticle decorated anodes were up to 5.9-fold higher than plain graphite anodes. Whole genome microarray analysis of the gene expression showed that genes encoding biofilm formation were significantly up-regulated as a response to nanoparticle decorated anodes. Increased expression of genes related to nanowires, flavins and c-type cytochromes indicate that enhanced mechanisms of electron transfer to the anode may also have contributed to the observed increases in current density. The majority of the remaining differentially expressed genes were associated with electron transport and anaerobic metabolism demonstrating a systemic response to increased power loads. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is another form of nano materials. Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified graphite disks were used as anodes to investigate the effects of nanostructures on the performance S. oneidensis MR-1 in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The current densities produced with CNT decorated anodes were up to 5.6-fold higher than plain graphite anodes. Global transcriptome analysis showed that cytochrome c genes associated with extracellular electron transfer are up-expressed by CNT decorated anodes, which is the leading factor to

  2. Mineralogy and Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, E. U.; Gilbert, K.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    When CO2 is sequestered in deep saline aquifers, a region of high dissolved CO2 surrounds the supercritical CO2 plume. While microbial life will doubtless be perturbed as a result of the CO2 injection, survival may be possible in the region of high dissolved CO2. Mineralogy of the aquifer may influence which microorganisms survive by providing substrates for lithotrophic microbes and determining the competitiveness of microbes in the subsurface. Iron-rich minerals like hematite, for example, provide a terminal electron acceptor for dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) that is essential for their respiration. Mineral dissolution may also provide toxicity for microbes providing increased concentration of toxic elements like Al in groundwater as a result of feldspar or clay dissolution. We investigated, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model DIRB, grown in the presence of representative minerals found in deep saline aquifers including carbonate minerals, silicate minerals, and clays. Cultures were subjected to 20 to 25 atm of CO2 at 30° C for 2 to 8 hours in modified Parr reactors. Cultures were plated to determine viability after CO2 stress and imaged using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Preliminary results show that MR-1 grown in the presence of dolomite and subjected to 20 atm of CO2 for 2 hours results in decreased viability in comparison to cells grown with hematite or no minerals present. This suggests there is selective toxicity with dolomite, possibly due to an increase in dissolved Mg. Additionally, ESEM imaging revealed a change in cell morphology from plump rods to thin, pointy cells after incubating in CO2 for 8 hours at 25 atm. This change in cell morphology may be the result of cell damage due to CO2 stress. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic

  3. Dependence of microbial magnetite formation on humic substance and ferrihydrite concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Dippon, Urs; Porsch, Katharina; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Iron mineral (trans)formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction is of environmental relevance as it can influence the fate of pollutants such as toxic metal ions or hydrocarbons. Magnetite is an important biomineralization product of microbial iron reduction and influences soil magnetic properties that are used for paleoclimate reconstruction and were suggested to assist in the localization of organic and inorganic pollutants. However, it is not well understood how different concentrations of Fe(III) minerals and humic substances (HS) affect magnetite formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction. We therefore used wet-chemical extractions, magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses to determine systematically how (i) different initial ferrihydrite (FH) concentrations and (ii) different concentrations of HS (i.e. the presence of either only adsorbed HS or adsorbed and dissolved HS) affect magnetite formation during FH reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In our experiments magnetite formation did not occur at FH concentrations lower than 5 mM, even though rapid iron reduction took place. At higher FH concentrations a minimum fraction of Fe(II) of 25-30% of the total iron present was necessary to initiate magnetite formation. The Fe(II) fraction at which magnetite formation started decreased with increasing FH concentration, which might be due to aggregation of the FH particles reducing the FH surface area at higher FH concentrations. HS concentrations of 215-393 mg HS/g FH slowed down (at partial FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) or even completely inhibited (at complete FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) magnetite formation due to blocking of surface sites by adsorbed HS. These results indicate the requirement of Fe(II) adsorption to, and subsequent interaction with, the FH surface for the transformation of FH into magnetite. Additionally, we found that the microbially formed magnetite was further reduced by strain MR-1 leading to

  4. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  5. In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-06-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are model subsurface organisms for studying genes involving in situ radionuclide transformation and sediment survival. Our research objective for this project has been to develop a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) procedure and use it to identify mutants in genes of these subsurface bacteria involved in sediment survival and radionuclide reduction. The mutant genes identified in these studies allow us for the first time to describe at the genetic level microbial processes that are actually being used by environmental bacteria while growing in their natural ecosystems. Identification of these genes revealed facets of microbial physiology and ecology that are not accessible through laboratory studies. Ultimately, this information may be used to optimize bioremediation or other engineered microbial processes. Furthermore, the identification of a mutant in a gene conferring multidrug resistance in strain MR-1 shows that this widespread mechanism of antibiotic resistance, likely has its origins as a mechanism of bacterial defense against naturally occurring toxins. Studies with D. desulfuricans G20: The STM procedure first involved generating a library of 5760 G20 mutants and screening for potential non-survivors in subsurface sediment microcosms. After two rounds of screening, a total of 117 mutants were confirmed to be true non-survivors. 97 transposon insertion regions have been sequenced to date. Upon further analysis of these mutants, we classified the sediment survival genes into COG functional categories. STM mutant insertions were located in genes encoding proteins related to metabolism (33%), cellular processes (42%), and information storage and processing (17%). We also noted 8% of STM mutants identified had insertions in genes for hypothetical proteins or unknown functions. Interestingly, at least 64 of these genes encode cytoplasmic proteins, 46 encode inner membrane proteins, and only 7 encode

  6. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Benjamin J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, 920 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); El-Naggar, Mohamed Y., E-mail: mnaggar@usc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, 920 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Molecular and Computational Biology Section, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  7. Characterization of the Structure of Cation-DopedBacteriogenic Uranium Oxides using X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlman, Jonathan M.; /Carnegie Mellon U. /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    Remediation of uranium contamination in subsurface groundwater has become imperative as previous research and manufacturing involving radionuclides has led to contamination of groundwater sources. A possible in situ solution for sequestration of uranium is a bacterial process in which Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces the soluble (and thus mobile) U(VI) oxidation state into the less mobile UO{sub 2} crystalline phase. However, the long term stability of the UO2 compound must be studied as oxidative conditions could return it back into the U(VI) state. Incorporation of other cations into the structure during manufacture of the UO{sub 2} could alter the dissolution behavior. A wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiment was performed to determine whether or not calcium, manganese, and magnesium are incorporated into this structure. If so, the substituted atoms would cause a contraction or expansion in the lattice because of their differing size, causing the lattice constant to be altered. After several stages of data reduction, the WAXS diffraction peaks were fit using the Le Bail fit method in order to determine the lattice constant. Initial results suggest that there may be incorporation of manganese into the UO{sub 2} structure due to a .03 Angstrom decrease in lattice constant, but more data is needed to confirm this. The calcium and magnesium doped samples showed little to no change in the lattice constant, indicating no significant incorporation into the structure. Most importantly, this experiment revealed an artifact of the cleaning process used to remove the bacteria from the sample. It appears the NaOH used to clean the samples is contracting the lattice also by {approx} .03 Angstroms, but no physical explanation is offered as of yet.

  8. Iron Isotope Fractionation Reveals Structural Change upon Microbial and Chemical Reduction of Nontronite NAu-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Wu, L.; Shi, B.; Smeaton, C. M.; Li, W.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.; Roden, E. E.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) isotope fractionations were determined during reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-1 biologically by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and chemically by dithionite. ~10% reduction was achieved in biological reactors, with similar reduction extents obtained by dithionite. We hypothesize that two stages occurred in our reactors. Firstly, reduction started from edge sites of clays and the produced Fe(II) partially remained in situ and partially was released into solution. Next aqueous Fe(II) adsorbed onto basal planes. The basal sorbed Fe(II) then undergoes electron transfer and atom exchange (ETAE) with octahedral Fe(III) in clays, with the most negative fractionation factor Δ56Febasal Fe(II)-structural Fe(III)of -1.7‰ when basal sorption reached a threshold value. Secondly, when the most reactive Fe(III) was exhausted, bioreduction significantly slowed down and chemical reduction was able to achieve 24% due to diffusion of small size dithionite. Importantly, no ETAE occurred between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) due to blockage of pathways by collapsed clay layers. This two-stage process in our reduction experiments is distinctive from abiotic exchange experiments by mixing aqueous Fe(II) and NAu-1, where no structural change of clay would block ETAE between basal Fe(II) and structural Fe(III). The separation of reduction sites (clay edges) and sorption sites (basal planes) is unique to clay minerals with layered structure. In contrast, reduction and sorption occur on the same sites on the surfaces of Fe oxyhydroxides, where reduction does not induce structure change. Thus, the Fe isotope fractionations are the same for reduction and abiotic exchange experiments for Fe oxides. Our study reveals important changes in electron transfer and atom exchange pathways upon reduction of clay minerals by dissimilatory Fe reducing bacteria, which is prevalent in anoxic soils and sediments.

  9. The product of microbial uranium reduction includes multiple species with U(IV)-phosphate coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Daniel S.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Janousch, Markus; Bargar, John R.; Persson, Per; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-04-01

    Until recently, the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) during bioremediation was assumed to produce solely the sparingly soluble mineral uraninite, UO2(s). However, results from several laboratories reveal other species of U(IV) characterized by the absence of an EXAFS U-U pair correlation (referred to here as noncrystalline U(IV)). Because it lacks the crystalline structure of uraninite, this species is likely to be more labile and susceptible to reoxidation. In the case of single species cultures, analyses of U extended X-ray fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have previously suggested U(IV) coordination to carboxyl, phosphoryl or carbonate groups. In spite of this evidence, little is understood about the species that make up noncrystalline U(IV), their structural chemistry and the nature of the U(IV)-ligand interactions. Here, we use infrared spectroscopy (IR), uranium LIII-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and phosphorus K-edge XAS analyses to constrain the binding environments of phosphate and uranium associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacterial cells. Systems tested as a function of pH included: cells under metal-reducing conditions without uranium, cells under reducing conditions that produced primarily uraninite, and cells under reducing conditions that produced primarily biomass-associated noncrystalline U(IV). P X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) results provided clear and direct evidence of U(IV) coordination to phosphate. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy revealed a pronounced perturbation of phosphate functional groups in the presence of uranium. Analysis of these data provides evidence that U(IV) is coordinated to a range of phosphate species, including monomers and polymerized networks. U EXAFS analyses and a chemical extraction measurements support these conclusions. The results of this study provide new insights into the binding mechanisms of biomass-associated U(IV) species which in turn sheds light on the mechanisms of biological U

  10. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  11. The effects of the biogeochemical properties of clay minerals on the Pb sorption and desorption in various redox condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, T. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The fate and transportation of hazardous trace metal in soil environment can be controlled by various factors including temperature, geological location, properties of bed rock or sediment, human behavior, and biogeochemical reactions. The sorption and desorption process is one of the major process for control the transportation of trace metal in soil-water system. Nonetheless, few studies were focused on the biological controlling parameters, particularly redox reaction of structural metal of clay minerals. Thus, the objective of the present study is to investigate the correlation between the sorption and desorption reaction of Pb and biogeochemical properties of clay minerals. The effects of redox state of structural Fe and layer charge of the minerals on the migration/speciation of Pb at the various geochemical environment will be elucidated. The Fe-rich smectite, nontronite (NAu-1), and bulk soil samples which were collected from abandoned mine areas were reduced by microbial respiration by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 and/or Na-dithionite to various oxidation state of structural Fe. Then the Pb-stock solution made with common lead and nitric acid were spiked into the mineral/soil slurry with various Pb concentration to test the sorption and desorption reaction upto 7 days. The reaction was stopped at each time point by freezing the pellet and supernatant separately after centrifugation. Then the concentration and stable isotope ratio of Pb in the supernatant were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and Multicollector (MC)-ICP-MS. The structural as well as chemical modification on nontronite and bulk soil sample were measured using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wet chemistry analysis. The changes in Pb species in supernatant by sorption and desorption and its consequences on the clay structural/biogeochemical properties will be discussed.

  12. The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Myneni, Satish; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the ability of non-metabolizing Bacillus subtilis, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Geobacter sulfurreducens bacterial species to adsorb mercury in the absence and presence of Suwanee River fulvic acid (FA). Bulk adsorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were conducted at three pH conditions, and the results indicate that the presence of FA decreases the extent of Hg adsorption to biomass under all of the pH conditions studied. Hg XAS results show that the presence of FA does not alter the binding environment of Hg adsorbed onto the biomass regardless of pH or FA concentration, indicating that ternary bacteria-Hg-FA complexes do not form to an appreciable extent under the experimental conditions, and that Hg binding on the bacteria is dominated by sulfhydryl binding. We used the experimental results to calculate apparent partition coefficients, Kd, for Hg under each experimental condition. The calculations yield similar coefficients for Hg onto each of the bacterial species studies, suggesting there is no significant difference in Hg partitioning between the three bacterial species. The calculations also indicate similar coefficients for Hg-bacteria and Hg-FA complexes. S XAS measurements confirm the presence of sulfhydryl sites on both the FA and bacterial cells, and demonstrate the presence of a wide range of S moieties on the FA in contrast to the bacterial biomass, whose S sites are dominated by thiols. Our results suggest that although FA can compete with bacterial binding sites for aqueous Hg, because of the relatively similar partition coefficients for the types of sorbents, the competition is not dominated by either bacteria or FA unless the concentration of one type of site greatly exceeds that of the other.

  13. Evolution of Mudstone Porosity, Permeability, and Microstructure in the Presence of Microorganisms During Vertical Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, T.; Reece, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Here we investigate the influence of microbial activity on the mechanical and transport properties of mudstones during early diagenesis. Despite the proven presence of microbial communities in marine sediments to depths of >500 meters below sea floor (mbsf), little is known about the interactions between microorganisms and sediments, especially during the early stages of burial and compression. To characterize and quantify the impact of microbial activity on mudstone properties, we compare natural mudstone samples treated with iron reducing bacteria Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 and those without bacteria. Two bulk mudstones are experimentally prepared using sediments from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Sites U1319 and U1324 in the Gulf of Mexico. The sediments originated from 4-13 mbsf in the Brazos-Trinity Basin and from three depth intervals (3-14 mbsf, 23-32 mbsf, and 493-502 mbsf) in the Ursa Basin. The sediments are dried and ground to clay- and silt-sized particles and homogenized into two natural mudstone powders. These powders are then used to make reproducible mudstone samples through a process called resedimentation, which replicates natural deposition and burial. Changes in microstructure, porosity, compressibility, and permeability are measured while the biotic (with bacteria) and abiotic (without bacteria) mudstones are being uniaxially compressed over several weeks to a maximum stress of 100 kPa. We anticipate that biofilm growth in pore spaces will decrease porosity, compressibility, and permeability, and the resultant microstructural changes created by microorganisms will be evident in high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. Recognition of the micro-scale processes that take place during the early stages of mudstone diagenesis, especially those mediated by microbial activity, and their long-term effects on mudstone properties can lead to better identification and more effective production of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  14. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Benjamin J; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2015-06-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  15. Evidence for microbial liberation of structurally-coordinated iron in clay minerals as a nutrient source in the world ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, K. S.; Gaines, R. R.; Trang, J.; Scott, S.; Crane, E. J.; Lackey, J.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Berelson, W.

    2012-12-01

    Clay minerals are the most abundant materials found at the surface of earth and they are the primary constituents of marine sediments. Iron, a limiting nutrient in many marine settings, is a common constituent of clay minerals. Recent in vitro experimental evidence has shown that lab cultures of Fe-reducing bacteria are able to utilize structurally-bound Fe from the crystal lattice of nontronite, an uncommon and particularly Fe-rich (> 12 wt.%) smectitie. Reduction of structurally-coordinated Fe results in both the liberation of Fe(II) to solution, where it is available for other biotic processes, as well as the transformation of smectite to illite. However, it remains unclear: 1. whether Fe-reducers are able to access structurally coordinated Fe found at low wt.% in common clay minerals; and 2. if naturally occuring populations of Fe-reducers are able to reduce structurally coordinated Fe as are some lab strains. In order to address these questions, we conducted in vitro experiments using a suite of sixteen clay minerals with low (0.8 wt.%) to high (13.9 wt.%) Fe concentrations. Clays were treated with Na-dithionite solution to remove surface-bound Fe, isolating for study Fe sourced from within the clay crystal lattice. Experimental evidence clearly indicates that, under in vitro conditions, Fe(III) bound in common clay minerals is available for reduction by the lab strain Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as well as by naturally-occuring consortia of Fe-reducers cultured from the San Pedro and Santa Monica Basins. Our findings suggest that common clay minerals may represent a large and previously unrecognized pool of bioavailable Fe in the world ocean that contributes significantly to biogeochemical cycling of Fe and C.

  16. Inferring Protein Associations Using Protein Pulldown Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, Julia L.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Borkowski, John J.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-02-01

    Background: One method to infer protein-protein associations is through a “bait-prey pulldown” assay using a protein affinity agent and an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry)-based protein identification method. False positive and negative protein identifications are not uncommon, however, leading to incorrect inferences. Methods: A pulldown experiment generates a protein association matrix wherein each column represents a sample from one bait protein, each row represents one prey protein and each cell contains a presence/absence association indicator. Our method evaluates the presence/absence pattern across a prey protein (row) with a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), computing its p-value with simulated LRT test statistic distributions after a check with simulated binomial random variates disqualified the large sample 2 test. A pulldown experiment often involves hundreds of tests so we apply the false discovery rate method to control the false positive rate. Based on the p-value, each prey protein is assigned a category (specific association, non-specific association, or not associated) and appraised with respect to the pulldown experiment’s goal and design. The method is illustrated using a pulldown experiment investigating the protein complexes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Results: The Monte Carlo simulated LRT p-values objectively reveal specific and ubiquitous prey, as well as potential systematic errors. The example analysis shows the results to be biologically sensible and more realistic than the ad hoc screening methods previously utilized. Conclusions: The method presented appears to be informative for screening for protein-protein associations.

  17. A combined electrochemical and optical trapping platform for measuring single cell respiration rates at electrode interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Benjamin J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2015-06-01

    Metal-reducing bacteria gain energy by extracellular electron transfer to external solids, such as naturally abundant minerals, which substitute for oxygen or the other common soluble electron acceptors of respiration. This process is one of the earliest forms of respiration on earth and has significant environmental and technological implications. By performing electron transfer to electrodes instead of minerals, these microbes can be used as biocatalysts for conversion of diverse chemical fuels to electricity. Understanding such a complex biotic-abiotic interaction necessitates the development of tools capable of probing extracellular electron transfer down to the level of single cells. Here, we describe an experimental platform for single cell respiration measurements. The design integrates an infrared optical trap, perfusion chamber, and lithographically fabricated electrochemical chips containing potentiostatically controlled transparent indium tin oxide microelectrodes. Individual bacteria are manipulated using the optical trap and placed on the microelectrodes, which are biased at a suitable oxidizing potential in the absence of any chemical electron acceptor. The potentiostat is used to detect the respiration current correlated with cell-electrode contact. We demonstrate the system with single cell measurements of the dissimilatory-metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, which resulted in respiration currents ranging from 15 fA to 100 fA per cell under our measurement conditions. Mutants lacking the outer-membrane cytochromes necessary for extracellular respiration did not result in any measurable current output upon contact. In addition to the application for extracellular electron transfer studies, the ability to electronically measure cell-specific respiration rates may provide answers for a variety of fundamental microbial physiology questions.

  18. Biomolecular Aspects of Mercury Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Miller, S. M.; Summers, A. O.; Liang, L.

    2008-12-01

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  19. Comment on "Stress induction in the bacteria Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans in response to below-background ionizing radiation", Castillo, et al. Int. J. Rad. Biol., 2015; Early Online DOI:10.3109/09553002.2015.1062571

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    Castillo, et al. report hormesis by background levels of radiation, at which there is $< 10^{-3}$ ionization per bacterium in a replication time. This suggests radiation products accumulate in the growth medium over much longer times. Experiments are proposed to test this hypothesis.

  20. The application of magnetic source imaging in epileptic with MR1 negative nodular gray natter heterotopia%磁源性影像在MRI阴性的结节状灰质异位伴癫痫发作患者中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴杰; 孙吉林; 吴晶; 贾秀川

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨磁源性影像(MSI)在MRI阴性的结节状灰质异位伴癫痫发作患者中的应用价值.方法:对6例病理证实为结节状灰质异位的MRI阴性的患者行MSI检查,进行发作间期神经元癫痫样放电的定位.结果:患者中5例癫痫灶位于颞叶,此5例行前颞叶及海马切除;1例癫痫灶位于右侧额顶中央区,行右额顶癫痫灶切除.所有6例患者均为结节状灰质异位,其中4例伴有局灶性脑发育不良或微发育不良.4例伴有海马硬化.随访结果中依据南京军区总医院评估标准,疗效满意者5例(5/6).显著改善者1例(1/6).结论:MSI可提示灰质异位伴发癫痫患者的癫痫灶定位,是术前无创伤性定位的有效手段,通过手术治疗可取得良好的效果.%Objective:To evaluate the value of magnetic source imaging (MSI) in epileptic with MRI negative nodular gray matter heterotopial. Methods: 6 epileptic patients with MRI negative nodular gray matter heterotopia had MSI examination for localizing the epileptic focus. Results:The epileptic foci were localized at temporal lobe in 5 cases, che anterior temporal lobe and hippocampus were resected. The epileptic focus was localized at central zone of right frontoparietal lobe and resected in 1 case. All of the 6 patients were nodular gray matter heterotopia pathologically, together with focal cortical dyspla-sia or microdysplasia in 4 cases, hippocampal sclerosis in 4 cases. According to the assessing standard of Nanjing general military hospital, the result of follow up were satisfied in 5 cases and marked improved in 1 case. Conclusion: MSI can prompt the epileptic focus in patients with gray matter heterotopia. It is an effective location method preoperatively and the patients can achieve good outcome by surgery.

  1. A universal fixation method based on quaternary ammonium salts (RNAlater) for omics-technologies: Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eijsden, Rudy G. E. van; Stassen, Catherine; Daenen, Luk

    2013-01-01

    Genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and fluxomics are powerful omics-technologies that play a major role in today’s research. For each of these techniques good sample quality is crucial. Major factors contributing to the quality of a sample is the actual sampling procedure itself and the way th...

  2. Mineral Influence on Microbial Survival During Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, E. U.; Shanahan, T. M.; Wolfe, W. W.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 sequestered in a deep saline aquifer will perturb subsurface biogeochemistry by acidifying the groundwater and accelerating mineral diagenesis. Subsurface microbial communities heavily influence geochemistry through their metabolic processes, such as with dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB). However, CO2 also acts as a sterilant and will perturb these communities. We investigated the role of mineralogy and its effect on the survival of microbes at high PCO2 conditions using the model DIRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Batch cultures of Shewanella were grown to stationary phase and exposed to high PCO2 using modified Parr reactors. Cell viability was then determined by plating cultures after exposure. Results indicate that at low PCO2 (2 bar), growth and iron reduction are decreased and cell death occurs within 1 hour when exposed to CO2 pressures of 10 bar or greater. Further, fatty acid analysis indicates microbial lipid degradation with C18 fatty acids being the slowest lipids to degrade. When cultures were grown in the presence of rocks or minerals representative of the deep subsurface such as carbonates and silicates and exposed to 25 bar CO2, survival lasted beyond 2 hours. The most effective protecting substratum was quartz sandstone, with cultures surviving beyond 8 hours of CO2 exposure. Scanning electron microscope images reveal biofilm formation on the mineral surfaces with copious amounts of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present. EPS from these biofilms acts as a reactive barrier to the CO2, slowing the penetration of CO2 into cells and resulting in increased survival. When biofilm cultures were grown with Al and As to simulate the release of toxic metals from minerals such as feldspars and clays, survival time decreased, indicating mineralogy may also enhance microbial death. Biofilms were then grown on iron-coated quartz sand to determine conversely what influence biofilms may have on mineral dissolution during CO2 perturbation

  3. Comparative dissolution kinetics of biogenic and chemogenic uraninite under oxidizing conditions in the presence of carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Ilton, Eugene S.; Veeramani, Harish; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Bargar, John R.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2009-10-01

    The long-term stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidative dissolution is pivotal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for the subsurface remediation of uranium legacies. Batch and flow-through dissolution experiments were conducted along with spectroscopic analyses to compare biogenic uraninite nanoparticles obtained from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and chemogenic UO 2.00 with respect to their equilibrium solubility, dissolution mechanisms, and dissolution kinetics in water of varied oxygen and carbonate concentrations. Both materials exhibited a similar intrinsic solubility of ˜10 -8 M under reducing conditions. The two materials had comparable dissolution rates under anoxic as well as oxidizing conditions, consistent with structural bulk homology of biogenic and stoichiometric uraninite. Carbonate reversibly promoted uraninite dissolution under both moderately oxidizing and reducing conditions, and the biogenic material yielded higher surface area-normalized dissolution rates than the chemogenic. This difference is in accordance with the higher proportion of U(V) detected on the biogenic uraninite surface by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reasonable sources of a stable U(V)-bearing intermediate phase are discussed. The observed increase of the dissolution rates can be explained by carbonate complexation of U(V) facilitating the detachment of U(V) from the uraninite surface. The fraction of surface-associated U(VI) increased with dissolved oxygen concentration. Simultaneously, X-ray absorption spectra showed conversion of the bulk from UO 2.0 to UO 2+x. In equilibrium with air, combined spectroscopic results support the formation of a near-surface layer of approximate composition UO 2.25 (U 4O 9) coated by an outer layer of U(VI). This result is in accordance with flow-through dissolution experiments that indicate control of the dissolution rate of surface-oxidized uraninite by the solubility of metaschoepite under the tested

  4. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  5. Application Of Bacterial Iron Reduction For The Removal Of Iron Impurities From Industrial Silica Sand And Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A.; Yahaya, S.; Fialips, C. I.; White, M.; Manning, D. A.; Gray, N.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical evidence exists to support the potential importance of crystalline or amorphous Fe minerals as electron acceptor for Fe reducing bacteria in soils and subsurface sediments. This microbial metabolic activity can be exploited as alternative method in different industrial applications. For instance, the removal of ferric iron impurities from minerals for the glass and paper industries currently rely on physical and chemical treatments having substantial economical and environmental disadvantages. The ability to remove iron by other means, such as bacterial iron reduction, may reduce costs, allow lower grade material to be mined, and improve the efficiency of mineral processing. Kaolin clay and silica sand are used in a wide range of industrial applications, particularly in paper, ceramics and glass manufacturing. Depending on the geological conditions of deposition, they are often associated with iron (hydr)oxides that are either adsorbed to the mineral surfaces or admixed as separate iron bearing minerals. In this study, we have examined the Fe(III) removal efficiency from kaolin and silica sand by a series of iron- reducing bacteria from the Shewanella species (S. alga BrY, S. oneidensis MR-1, S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. putrefaciens ATCC 8071) in the presence of anthraquinone 2,6 disulfonate (AQDS). We have also investigated the effectiveness of a natural organic matter, extracted with the silica sand, as a substitute to AQDS for enhancing Fe(III) reduction kinetics. The microbial reduction of Fe(III) was achieved using batch cultures under non-growth conditions. The rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction was monitored as a function of the initial Fe(III) content, Shewanella species and temperature. The bacterially- treated minerals were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to observe any textural and mineralogical transformation. The whiteness and ISO brightness of the kaolin was also measured by

  6. The cymA Gene, Encoding a Tetraheme c-Type Cytochrome, Is Required for Arsenate Respiration in Shewanella Species▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Julie N.; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2007-01-01

    In Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, utilization of arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor is conferred by a two-gene operon, arrAB, which lacks a gene encoding a membrane-anchoring subunit for the soluble ArrAB protein complex. Analysis of the genome sequence of Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 showed that it also contained the same arrAB operon with 100% nucleotide identity. Here, we report that CN-32 respires arsenate and that this metabolism is dependent on arrA and an additional gene encoding a membrane-associated tetraheme c-type cytochrome, cymA. Deletion of cymA in ANA-3 also eliminated growth on and reduction of arsenate. The ΔcymA strains of CN-32 and ANA-3 negatively affected the reduction of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) but not growth on nitrate. Unlike the CN-32 ΔcymA strain, growth on fumarate was absent in the ΔcymA strain of ANA-3. Both homologous and heterologous complementation of cymA in trans restored growth on arsenate in ΔcymA strains of both CN-32 and ANA-3. Transcription patterns of cymA showed that it was induced under anaerobic conditions in the presence of fumarate and arsenate. Nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest level of cymA expression in both wild-type strains. Lastly, site-directed mutagenesis of the first Cys to Ser in each of the four CXXCH c-heme binding motifs of the CN-32 CymA nearly eliminated growth on and reduction of arsenate. Together, these results indicate that the biochemical mechanism of arsenate respiration and reduction requires the interactions of ArrAB with a membrane-associated tetraheme cytochrome, which in the non-arsenate-respiring Shewanella species Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, has pleiotropic effects on Fe(III), Mn(IV), dimethyl sulfoxide, nitrate, nitrite, and fumarate respiration. PMID:17209025

  7. Microbes under pressure: A comparison of CO2 stress responses on three model organisms and their implications for geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, E. U.; Franks, M. A.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2011-12-01

    When carbon dioxide is captured and stored in deep saline aquifers, many biogeochemical changes will occur in these reservoirs. High concentrations of aqueous CO2 itself can be toxic to microorganisms as the gas easily enters cell membranes and alters intracellular cell functions. Because of this, we expect CO2 to be a perturbation that will alter microbial community composition. Microbes that are capable of withstanding CO2 stress will be selected for and their subsequent growth and metabolism will further affect brine chemistry. For this study, we examined three organisms representing metabolic functions and cellular structures potentially found in deep saline aquifers: the Gram-negative dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, the aerobic Gram-positive hydrocarbon degrading Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and the methanogenic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus. Organisms were grown in batch cultures and subsequently exposed to high PCO2 ranging from 25 atm to 60 atm for 2 to 24 hours. Cultures were then plated for viability or tested for metabolic activity such as methane production. Following CO2 stress, organisms were also examined for membrane changes through phospholipid fatty acid analysis and for morphological changes by transmission electron microscopy. After only 2 hours of incubation in 30 atm of CO2, no viable cells were found in planktonic cultures of Shewanella. In contrast, cultures of Geobacillus remained viable (less than a log 2 reduction from initial counts) even after exposure to double the CO2 pressure and for 17 hours. However, when grown in the presence of quartz sandstone, biofilm formation on the rock surface occurred in Shewanella cultures, resulting in survival times greater than 8 hours. Our results suggest that biofilm formation and cell wall thickness may be two very important factors in resisting CO2 toxicity as they create a reactive barrier that slows the diffusion of CO2 into

  8. Understanding the influence of the electrode material on microbial fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, David V. P.

    In this thesis, I deploy sets of electrodes into microbial fuel cells (MFC), characterize their performance, and evaluate the influence of both platinum catalysts and carbon-based electrodes on current production. The platinum work centers on improving current production by optimizing the use of the catalyst using nano-fabrication techniques. The carbon-electrode work seeks to determine the influence of the bare electrode on biofilm-anode current production. The development of electrodes for MFCs has boomed over the past decade, however, experiments aimed at identifying how catalyst deposition methods and electrode properties influence current production have been limited. The research conducted here is an attempt to expand this knowledge base for platinum catalysts and carbon electrodes. In the initial chapters (4 and 5), I discuss our attempt to decrease catalyst loadings while increasing current production through the use of platinum nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that incorporating platinum nanoparticles throughout the anode and cathode is an efficient means of increasing MFC current production relative to surface deposition because it increases catalyst surface area. The later chapters (chapters 6 and 7) develop an understanding of the importance of electrode properties (i.e. surface area, activation resistance, conductivity, surface morphology) by electrochemically evaluating well-studied anode-respiring pure cultures on different carbon electrode architectures. Two different architectures are produced by using tubular and platelet shaped constituent materials (i.e. carbon fibers and graphene nanoplatelets) and the morphologies of the electrodes are varied by altering the size of the constituent material. The electrodes are characterized and evaluated in MFCs using either Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 or Geobacter sulfurreducens as the innoculant because their bioelectrochemical physiologies are the most documented in the literature. Using the

  9. A Genome-Scale Model of Shewanella piezotolerans Simulates Mechanisms of Metabolic Diversity and Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault-Thompson, Keith; Jian, Huahua; Cheng, Ruixue; Li, Jiefu; Wang, Fengping; Zhang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella piezotolerans strain WP3 belongs to the group 1 branch of the Shewanella genus and is a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant species isolated from the deep sea. In this study, a genome-scale model was constructed for WP3 using a combination of genome annotation, ortholog mapping, and physiological verification. The metabolic reconstruction contained 806 genes, 653 metabolites, and 922 reactions, including central metabolic functions that represented nonhomologous replacements between the group 1 and group 2 Shewanella species. Metabolic simulations with the WP3 model demonstrated consistency with existing knowledge about the physiology of the organism. A comparison of model simulations with experimental measurements verified the predicted growth profiles under increasing concentrations of carbon sources. The WP3 model was applied to study mechanisms of anaerobic respiration through investigating energy conservation, redox balancing, and the generation of proton motive force. Despite being an obligate respiratory organism, WP3 was predicted to use substrate-level phosphorylation as the primary source of energy conservation under anaerobic conditions, a trait previously identified in other Shewanella species. Further investigation of the ATP synthase activity revealed a positive correlation between the availability of reducing equivalents in the cell and the directionality of the ATP synthase reaction flux. Comparison of the WP3 model with an existing model of a group 2 species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, revealed that the WP3 model demonstrated greater flexibility in ATP production under the anaerobic conditions. Such flexibility could be advantageous to WP3 for its adaptation to fluctuating availability of organic carbon sources in the deep sea. IMPORTANCE The well-studied nature of the metabolic diversity of Shewanella bacteria makes species from this genus a promising platform for investigating the evolution of carbon metabolism and energy conservation

  10. Electrical Signatures Associated with Abiotic and In Vitro Dissimilatory Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regberg, A. B.; Brantley, S. L.; Singha, K.; Tien, M.

    2007-05-01

    Several researchers have described anomalous electrical signatures associated with bacterial activity in anoxic zones in aquifers containing organic contaminants. It is thought that these signals can be attributed to (bio)geochemical changes caused by the oxidation of organic contaminants and the reduction of associated species like iron oxides. We report laboratory observations of changes in electrical conductivity (EC) that can be attributed to specific (bio)geochemical reactions involving reductive dissolution of iron oxides enzymatically and nonenzymatically. Abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite by ascorbic acid in batch experiments causes a cumulative 20- 40% increase in measured conductivity, (EC increases by ~300 μ S/cm). This change can be attributed to a decrease in conductivity (Δ EC) from increasing proton activity (Δ pH = 3.25 --> 5.07, Δ EC = -200 μ S/cm) and an increase in dissolved Fe(II) (Δ [Fe] = 2.2 - 3.3 mM, Δ EC = 400 -700 μ S/cm). Conductivity is presumably unaffected by Fe(II) sorbed to the ferrihydrite. Rates calculated from this method are comparable to literature rates for similar experiments. In a similar in vitro system, total membrane fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used to reduce ferrihydrite in the presence of formate and HEPES buffer. A 10 - 15% increase in conductivity was observed in the batch experiment (Δ EC = ~280 μ S/cm). This Δ EC is attributed to an increase in the concentration of de-protonated HEPES as well as carbonate ion as formate is oxidized. Fe(II) released in this system is quickly sorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface and is not thought to change conductivity. Despite the sorption of iron in these in vitro experiments, conductivity changes measurably and documents the rate of the reaction. Accessory changes like buffer de- protonation play an important role in interpreting the electrical signals caused by dissimilatory iron reduction. In order to accurately interpret field data it is necessary

  11. Influence of sulfhydryl sites on metal binding by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Ryan M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2017-02-01

    The role of sulfhydryl sites within bacterial cell envelopes is still unknown, but the sites may control the fate and bioavailability of metals. Organic sulfhydryl compounds are important complexing ligands in aqueous systems and they can influence metal speciation in natural waters. Though representing only approximately 5-10% of the total available binding sites on bacterial surfaces, sulfhydryl sites exhibit high binding affinities for some metals. Due to the potential importance of bacterial sulfhydryl sites in natural systems, metal-bacterial sulfhydryl site binding constants must be determined in order to construct accurate models of the fate and distribution of metals in these systems. To date, only Cd-sulfhydryl binding has been quantified. In this study, the thermodynamic stabilities of Mn-, Co-, Ni-, Zn-, Sr- and Pb-sulfhydryl bacterial cell envelope complexes were determined for the bacterial species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Metal adsorption experiments were conducted as a function of both pH, ranging from 5.0 to 7.0, and metal loading, from 0.5 to 40.0 μmol/g (wet weight) bacteria, in batch experiments in order to determine if metal-sulfhydryl binding occurs. Initially, the data were used to calculate the value of the stability constants for the important metal-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes for each metal-loading condition studied, assuming a single binding reaction for the dominant metal-binding site type under the pH conditions of the experiments. For most of the metals that we studied, these calculated stability constant values increased significantly with decreasing metal loading, strongly suggesting that our initial assumption was not valid and that more than one type of binding occurs at the assumed binding site. We then modeled each dataset with two distinct site types with identical acidity constants: one site with a high metal-site stability constant value, which we take to represent metal-sulfhydryl binding and which dominates under low

  12. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  13. Interpolated finite impulse response sequence in observation of the shunt and course of hepatic portal vein from splenic vein and superior mesenteric vein with 1.5T MR%1.5T磁共振插入有限脉冲响应技术观察脾静脉与肠系膜上静脉在门静脉内的分流及走行

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢金子; 刘爱连; 王艺; 董越; 宁殿秀; 宋清伟

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of interpolated finite impulse response (IFIR) sequence in observation of the shunt and course of splenic vein (SV) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) in portal vein (PV) with 1.5T MR. Methods Totally 36 subjects underwent MRI of coronal IFIR sequence 3 times. Three types of presaturation band were used.MIP reconstruction was made on ADW 4.4 workstation to observe and evaluate the shunt and course of SV and SMV in PV. Results Type 1: Both SV and SMV supplied blood to PV, but the shunt and course could not be clearly showed in all 36 subjects. Type 2: The shunt and course of PV and SMV from SV were clearly showed in 20 (20/36, 55. 56%) subjects, faintly showed in 8 (8/36, 22.22%) subjects, but unrecognized in 8 (8/36, 22.22%) subjects. In the identifiable 28 subjects, blood flow from SV of 12 subjects flowed in central of PV, 3 in peripheral, 10 in superior and 3 in inferior part of PV. Type 3: The shunt definition was similar to that of type 2. In the identifiable 28 subjects, blood flow from SMV of 3 subjects flowed in central, 12 in peripheral, 10 in superior and 3 in inferior part of PV. Conclusion It is feasible to show shunt and course of PV from SV and SMV on 1.5T MR system using IFIR sequence without contrast media.%目的 探讨1.5T MR插入有限脉冲响应(IFIR)序列评估脾静脉(SV)与肠系膜上静脉(SMV)在门静脉(PV)内的分流及走行的可行性.方法 通过3种不同的饱和带预加方式对36位受试者进行3次冠状位IFIR序列扫描.在ADW 4.4工作站上行MIP重建,观察SV及SMV在PV中的分流、走行情况,并对其进行分流清晰度及走行分型的评估.结果方式1:36位受试者均示SV与SMV共同供血PV,不能分辨SV与SMV血流的分流及走行.方式2:36位受试者中20人(20/36,55.56%)清晰分辨,8人(8/36,22.22%)隐约可辨,8人(8/36,22.22%)无法分辨出SV在PV中的分流与走行;28位可分辨者中,12人SV走行于PV中央,3人走行于PV周边,10人走行于PV上半部,3人走行于PV下半部.方式3:36位受试者分流清晰度与预饱和方式2相同;28人可分辨者中,3人SMV血流走行于PV中央,12人走行于PV周边,10人走行于PV下半部,3人走行于PV上半部.结论 1.5T MR IFIR序列无需造影增强即可清晰观察SV与SMV在PV中的分流及走行.

  14. Final Report Construction of Whole Genome Microarrays, and Expression Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells in Metal-Reducing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.W. Fields; J.D. Wall; J. Keasling; J. Zhou

    2008-05-15

    experimental results, a set of criteria were suggested for the design of gene-specific and group-specific oligonucleotide probes, and these criteria should provide valuable information for the development of new software and algorithms for microarray-based studies. Secondly, in order to empirically determine the effect of probe length on signal intensities, microarrays with oligonucleotides of different lengths were used to monitor gene expression at a whole genome level. To determine what length of oligonucleotide is a better alternative to PCR-generated probes, the performance of oligonucleotide probes was systematically compared to that of their PCR-generated counterparts for 96 genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in terms of overall signal intensity, numbers of detected genes, specificity, sensitivity and differential gene expression under experimental conditions. Hybridizations conducted at 42 C, 45 C, 50 C, and 60 C indicated that good sensitivities were obtained at 45 C for oligonucleotide probes in the presence of 50% formamide, under which conditions specific signals were detected by both PCR and oligonucleotide probes. Signal intensities increased as the length of oligonucleotide probes increased, and the 70mer oligonucleotide probes produced similar signal intensities and detected a similar number of ORFs compared to the PCR probes. cDNA, 70mer, 60mer and 50mer arrays had detection sensitivities at 5.0, 25, 100 and 100 ng of genomic DNA, or an approximately equivalent of 1.9 x 10{sup 6}, 9.2 x 10{sup 6}, 3.7 x 10{sup 7} and 3.7 x 10{sup 7} copies, respectively when the array was hybridized with genomic DNA. To evaluate differential gene expression under experimental conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 cells were exposed to low or high pH conditions for 30 and 60 min, and the transcriptional profiling detected by oligonucleotide probes (50mer, 60mer, and 70mer) was closely correlated with that detected by the PCR probes. The results demonstrated that 70mer

  15. Functional heterogeneity and anti-mycobacterial effects of mouse mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells specific for riboflavin metabolites1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakala, Isaac G.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Wang, Xiaoli; Blazevic, Azra; Liu, Ligong; Fairlie, David P.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Fremont, Daved H.; Hansen, Ted H.; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells have a semi-invariant TCR Vα chain, and their optimal development is dependent upon commensal flora and expression of the non-polymorphic MHC class I-like molecule MR1. MAIT cells are activated in an MR1-restricted manner by diverse strains of bacteria and yeast suggesting a widely shared Ag. Recently, human and mouse MR1 were found to bind bacterial riboflavin metabolites (ribityllumazines, RL Ag) capable of activating MAIT cells. Here we use MR1/RL tetramers to study MR1-dependency, subset heterogeneity and protective effector functions important for tuberculosis (TB) immunity. Although tetramer+ cells were detected in both MR1+/+ and MR1−/− TCR Vα19i transgenic (Tg) mice, MR1 expression resulted in significantly increased tetramer+ cells co-expressing TCR Vβ6/8, NK1.1, CD44 and CD69, that displayed more robust in vitro responses to IL-12+IL-18 and RL Ag, indicating that MR1 is necessary for the optimal development of the classic murine MAIT cell memory/effector subset. In addition, tetramer+ MAIT cells expressing CD4, CD8 or neither developing in MR1+/+ Vα19i Tg mice had disparate cytokine profiles in response to RL Ag. Therefore, murine MAIT cells are considerably more heterogeneous than previously thought. Most notably, after mycobacterial pulmonary infection heterogeneous subsets of tetramer+ Vα19i Tg MAIT cells expressing CXCR3 and α4β1 were recruited into the lungs and afforded early protection. In addition, Vα19iCα−/−MR+/+ mice were significantly better protected than Vα19iCα−/−MR1−/−, wild type and MR1−/− non-transgenic mice. Overall, we demonstrate considerable functional diversity of MAIT cell responses, and also that MR1-restricted MAIT cells are important for TB protective immunity. PMID:26063000

  16. A molecular basis underpinning the T cell receptor heterogeneity of mucosal-associated invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckle, Sidonia B G; Birkinshaw, Richard W; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Corbett, Alexandra J; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Reantragoon, Rangsima; Chen, Zhenjun; Gherardin, Nicholas A; Beddoe, Travis; Liu, Ligong; Patel, Onisha; Meehan, Bronwyn; Fairlie, David P; Villadangos, Jose A; Godfrey, Dale I; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2014-07-28

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express an invariant T cell receptor (TCR) α-chain (TRAV1-2 joined to TRAJ33, TRAJ20, or TRAJ12 in humans), which pairs with an array of TCR β-chains. MAIT TCRs can bind folate- and riboflavin-based metabolites restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-related class I-like molecule, MR1. However, the impact of MAIT TCR and MR1-ligand heterogeneity on MAIT cell biology is unclear. We show how a previously uncharacterized MR1 ligand, acetyl-6-formylpterin (Ac-6-FP), markedly stabilized MR1, potently up-regulated MR1 cell surface expression, and inhibited MAIT cell activation. These enhanced properties of Ac-6-FP were attributable to structural alterations in MR1 that subsequently affected MAIT TCR recognition via conformational changes within the complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3β loop. Analysis of seven TRBV6-1(+) MAIT TCRs demonstrated how CDR3β hypervariability impacted on MAIT TCR recognition by altering TCR flexibility and contacts with MR1 and the Ag itself. Ternary structures of TRBV6-1, TRBV6-4, and TRBV20(+) MAIT TCRs in complex with MR1 bound to a potent riboflavin-based antigen (Ag) showed how variations in TRBV gene usage exclusively impacted on MR1 contacts within a consensus MAIT TCR-MR1 footprint. Moreover, differential TRAJ gene usage was readily accommodated within a conserved MAIT TCR-MR1-Ag docking mode. Collectively, MAIT TCR heterogeneity can fine-tune MR1 recognition in an Ag-dependent manner, thereby modulating MAIT cell recognition.

  17. Synergistic microbial consortium for bioenergy generation from complex natural energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chua, Song-Lin; Zhang, Qichun; Cao, Bin; Chye, Joachim Loo Say; Yang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1:9 (v:v) significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  18. Synergistic Microbial Consortium for Bioenergy Generation from Complex Natural Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Bochuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1 : 9 (v : v significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  19. Microbial Oxidation of Hg(0) - Its Effect on Hg Stable Isotope Fractionation and Methylmercury Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Nathan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Barkay, Tamar [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Reinfelder, John [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Mercury (Hg) associated with mixed waste generated by nuclear weapons manufacturing has contaminated vast areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) has been formed from the inorganic Hg wastes discharged into headwaters of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). Thus, understanding the processes and mechanisms that lead to Hg methylation along the flow path of EFPC is critical to predicting the impacts of the contamination and the design of remedial action at the ORR. In part I of our project, we investigated Hg(0) oxidation and methylation by anaerobic bacteria. We discovered that the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can oxidize elemental mercury [Hg(0)]. When provided with dissolved elemental mercury, D. desulfuricans ND132 converts Hg(0) to Hg(II) and neurotoxic methylmercury [MeHg]. We also demonstrated that diverse species of subsurface bacteria oxidizes dissolved elemental mercury under anoxic conditions. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Geothrix fermentans H5, and the facultative anaerobic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Cupriavidus metallidurans AE104 can oxidize Hg(0) to Hg(II) under anaerobic conditions. In part II of our project, we established anaerobic enrichment cultures and obtained new bacterial strains from the DOE Oak Ridge site. We isolated three new bacterial strains from subsurface sediments collected from Oak Ridge. These isolates are Bradyrhizobium sp. strain FRC01, Clostridium sp. strain FGH, and a novel Negativicutes strain RU4. Strain RU4 is a completely new genus and species of bacteria. We also demonstrated that syntrophic interactions between fermentative bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in Oak Ridge saprolite mediate iron reduction via multiple mechanisms. Finally, we tested the impact of Hg on denitrification in nitrate reducing enrichment cultures derived from subsurface sediments from the Oak Ridge site, where nitrate is a major contaminant. We showed that there is an inverse

  20. Microbial Oxidation of Hg(0) - Its Effect on Hg Stable Isotope Fractionation and Methylmercury Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Nathan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Barkay, Tamar [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Reinfelder, John [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Mercury (Hg) associated with mixed waste generated by nuclear weapons manufacturing has contaminated vast areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) has been formed from the inorganic Hg wastes discharged into headwaters of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). Thus, understanding the processes and mechanisms that lead to Hg methylation along the flow path of EFPC is critical to predicting the impacts of the contamination and the design of remedial action at the ORR. In part I of our project, we investigated Hg(0) oxidation and methylation by anaerobic bacteria. We discovered that the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can oxidize elemental mercury [Hg(0)]. When provided with dissolved elemental mercury, D. desulfuricans ND132 converts Hg(0) to Hg(II) and neurotoxic methylmercury [MeHg]. We also demonstrated that diverse species of subsurface bacteria oxidizes dissolved elemental mercury under anoxic conditions. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Geothrix fermentans H5, and the facultative anaerobic bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Cupriavidus metallidurans AE104 can oxidize Hg(0) to Hg(II) under anaerobic conditions. In part II of our project, we established anaerobic enrichment cultures and obtained new bacterial strains from the DOE Oak Ridge site. We isolated three new bacterial strains from subsurface sediments collected from Oak Ridge. These isolates are Bradyrhizobium sp. strain FRC01, Clostridium sp. strain FGH, and a novel Negativicutes strain RU4. Strain RU4 is a completely new genus and species of bacteria. We also demonstrated that syntrophic interactions between fermentative bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria in Oak Ridge saprolite mediate iron reduction via multiple mechanisms. Finally, we tested the impact of Hg on denitrification in nitrate reducing enrichment cultures derived from subsurface sediments from the Oak Ridge site, where nitrate is a major contaminant. We showed that there is an inverse

  1. X-ray Microprobe Investigations of Elemental Distributions and Concentrations at Mineral-Microbe Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; Kelly, S. D.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Cai, Z.; Londer, Y.; Schiffer, M.; Nealson, K.

    2003-12-01

    in Pseudomonas fluorescens cells in both planktonic and surface-adhered states. We have used x-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy to investigate the chemical speciation and distribution of Cr that was introduced to these cells as Cr(VI). Additionally, we have used these techniques to identify the distribution of an over expressed cytochrome c7 in individual E. coli. Finally, we have used x-ray fluorescence microscopy to investigate Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells adhered to iron oxyhydroxide thin films. The zone plate used in these microscopy experiments produced a focused beam with a cross section (and hence spatial resolution) of 100-300 nanometers. Results from x-ray fluorescence imaging experiments indicate that the distribution of P, S, Cl, Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn can define the location of the microbe. Additionally, quantitative elemental analysis of individual microbes identified significant changes in concentration of 3d transition elements depending on the age of the culture and the type of electron acceptor presented to the microbes. These results and a discussion of the use of this technique for identifying metabolic states of individual microbes within communities and the chemical speciation of metal contaminants at the mineral-microbe interface will be presented.

  2. Using Stable Isotopes to Trace Microbial Hydrogen Production Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Hill, E.; Bartholomew, R.; Yang, H.; Shi, L.; Ostrom, N. E.; Gandhi, H.; Hegg, E.; Kreuzer, H.

    2010-12-01

    Biological H2 production by hydrogenase enzymes (H2ases) plays an important role in anaerobic microbial metabolism and community structure. Despite considerable progress in elucidating H2 metabolism, the regulation of and flux through key H2 production pathways remain largely undefined. Our goal is to improve understanding of biological H2 production by using H isotope ratios to dissect proton fluxes through different H2ase enzymes and from different substrates. We hypothesized that the isotope ratio of H2 produced by various hydrogenases (H2ase) would differ, and that the H isotope ratios would allow us to define the contribution of different enzymes when more than one is present in vivo. We chose Shewanella oneidensis (S.o.) MR-1, a facultative anaerobe capable of transferring electrons to a variety of terminal acceptors, including protons, as a model system for in vivo studies. S. o. encodes one [FeFe]- and one [NiFe]-H2ase. We purified three [FeFe]-H2ases (S.o., Clostridium pasteurianum, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and two [NiFe]-H2ases (S. o. and Desulfovibrio fructosovorans) to test the isotope fractionation associated with activity by each enzyme in vitro. For in vivo analysis we used wild-type S.o. as well as electron transfer-deficient and H2ase-deficient strains. We employed batch cultures using lactate as an electron donor and O2 as an initial electron acceptor (with H2 production after O2 consumption). The five H2ases we tested all had a unique isotope fractionation. Measurements of H2 produced in vivo showed distinct periods of H2 production having isotope signatures consistent with in vitro results. Isotope data as well as studies of H2 production by mutants in the genes encoding either the [NiFe]-H2ase or the [FeFe]-H2ase, respectively, show that the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]- H2ases became active at different times. The [NiFe]-H2ase both produces and consumes H2 before the [FeFe]-H2ase becomes active. RNA analysis is consistent with up regulation of

  3. Avaliação por Doppler colorido do carcinoma da mama: correlação com dados clínicos e histopatológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Borges,João Bosco Ramos; Soriano,Paula Gemignani; Barros,Nestor de; Souza,Aurélio Zecchi de; Barros,Alfredo Carlos Dornelles; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Pinotti,José Aristodemo

    2004-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar a capacidade da ultra-sonografia com Doppler colorido em caracterizar a vascularização de carcinomas sólidos da mama e em correlacionar padrões de vascularização com o tamanho, estádio e grau histológico destes tumores. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Sessenta e seis carcinomas da mama foram estudados com Doppler colorido. As características morfológicas e fluxométricas foram avaliadas antes da biópsia e correlações com aspectos clínicos, histopatólogicos e estadiamento tumoral foram a...

  4. Systems Biology of Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2017-06-20

    Metabolism is highly complex and involves thousands of different connected reactions; it is therefore necessary to use mathematical models for holistic studies. The use of mathematical models in biology is referred to as systems biology. In this review, the principles of systems biology are described, and two different types of mathematical models used for studying metabolism are discussed: kinetic models and genome-scale metabolic models. The use of different omics technologies, including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and fluxomics, for studying metabolism is presented. Finally, the application of systems biology for analyzing global regulatory structures, engineering the metabolism of cell factories, and analyzing human diseases is discussed.

  5. Stationary versus non-stationary (13)C-MFA: a comparison using a consistent dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Stephan; Nöh, Katharina; Moch, Matthias; Oldiges, Marco; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2011-07-10

    Besides the well-established (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) which characterizes a cell's fluxome in a metabolic and isotopic stationary state a current area of research is isotopically non-stationary MFA. Non-stationary (13)C-MFA uses short-time isotopic transient data instead of long-time isotopic equilibrium data and thus is capable to resolve fluxes within much shorter labeling experiments. However, a comparison of both methods with data from one single experiment has not been made so far. In order to create a consistent database for directly comparing both methods a (13)C-labeling experiment in a fed-batch cultivation with a Corynebacterium glutamicum lysine producer was carried out. During the experiment the substrate glucose was switched from unlabeled to a specifically labeled glucose mixture which was immediately traced by fast sampling and metabolite quenching. The time course of labeling enrichments in intracellular metabolites until isotopic stationarity was monitored by LC-MS/MS. The resulting dataset was evaluated using the classical as well as the isotopic non-stationary MFA approach. The results show that not only the obtained relative data, i.e. intracellular flux distributions, but also the more informative quantitative fluxome data significantly depend on the combination of the measurements and the underlying modeling approach used for data integration. Taking further criteria on the experimental and computational part into consideration, the current limitations of both methods are demonstrated and possible pitfalls are concluded.

  6. Reconstruction of the Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway of Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 Based on Genomic and Bibliomic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Kawasaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 is extremophile Gram-positive bacteria able to survive in cold environments. A key factor to understanding cold adaptation processes is related to the modification of fatty acids composing the cell membranes of psychrotrophic bacteria. In our study we show the in silico reconstruction of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of E. antarcticum B7. To build the stoichiometric model, a semiautomatic procedure was applied, which integrates genome information using KEGG and RAST/SEED. Constraint-based methods, namely, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA and elementary modes (EM, were applied. FBA was implemented in the sense of hexadecenoic acid production maximization. To evaluate the influence of the gene expression in the fluxome analysis, FBA was also calculated using the log2⁡FC values obtained in the transcriptome analysis at 0°C and 37°C. The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway showed a total of 13 elementary flux modes, four of which showed routes for the production of hexadecenoic acid. The reconstructed pathway demonstrated the capacity of E. antarcticum B7 to de novo produce fatty acid molecules. Under the influence of the transcriptome, the fluxome was altered, promoting the production of short-chain fatty acids. The calculated models contribute to better understanding of the bacterial adaptation at cold environments.

  7. Analysis of culture media screening data by projection to latent pathways: The case of Pichia pastoris X-33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidro, Inês A; Ferreira, Ana R; Clemente, João J; Cunha, António E; Oliveira, Rui

    2016-01-10

    Cell culture media formulations contain hundreds of individual components in water solutions which have complex interactions with metabolic pathways. The currently used statistical design methods are empirical and very limited to explore such a large design space. In a previous work we developed a computational method called projection to latent pathways (PLP), which was conceived to maximize covariance between envirome and fluxome data under the constraint of metabolic network elementary flux modes (EFM). More specifically, PLP identifies a minimal set of EFMs (i.e., pathways) with the highest possible correlation with envirome and fluxome measurements. In this paper we extend the concept for the analysis of culture media screening data to investigate how culture medium components up-regulate or down-regulate key metabolic pathways. A Pichia pastoris X-33 strain was cultivated in 26 shake flask experiments with variations in trace elements concentrations and basal medium dilution, based on the standard BSM+PTM1 medium. PLP identified 3 EFMs (growth, maintenance and by-product formation) describing 98.8% of the variance in observed fluxes. Furthermore, PLP presented an overall predictive power comparable to that of PLS regression. Our results show iron and manganese at concentrations close to the PTM1 standard inhibit overall metabolic activity, while the main salts concentration (BSM) affected mainly energy expenditures for cellular maintenance.

  8. Teamwork in microbial fuels cells: symbiotic conversion of sugars into electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  9. Synergetic effects of microbial binary cultures on microbial fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    A binary culture of Lactococcus lactis and Shewanella oneidensis was studied for an efficient conversion of glucose into electricity in a continuously-operated chemostatic electrochemical reactor. The homolactic fermentation bacterium L. lactis fermented glucose almost exclusively to lactate – the ...

  10. Effect of lead, mercury and cadmium on a sulphate-reducing bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Sathe, V.; Chandramohan, D.

    Pollution 67 (1990) 361-374 Effect of Lead, Mercury and Cadmium on a Sulphate-Reducing Bacterium P. A. Loka Bharathi, V. Sathe & D. Chandramohan National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403004, India (Received 9 March 1990; revised version... oftoxicity to growth of these metal salts in a lactate-based medium at 50 J1g mr 1 concentrations was Cd> Pb> Hg and to respiration Pb> Cd> Hg. Inhibitory concentrations (viz. 100 J1g mr 1 ofHgCl z and200 J1g mr 1 ofPb(N0 3 )z) hada stimulatory effect when...

  11. Bacterial Electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Xiao, Yong; Wu, Ranran

    in the electron transport (ET) processes. However, the oxidization of metal compounds was barely described. Here we report electrocatalysis of K4[Fe(CN)6] oxidation by MR-1. K4[Fe(CN)6] is a redox inorganic compound and shows a reversible redox process on bare glassy carbon (GCE). This is reflected by a pair...... of the electrocatalysis. Moreover, Selectivity of MR-1 is another interesting issue: MR-1 does not catalyze other redox compounds such as Ru[(NH3)6]Cl3 and Resorufin. In our recent work, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) showed redox properties and electron hopping through EPS. Here we notice that neither...

  12. Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Guo; Bin Dong; Jia-Fu Ji; Ai-Wen Wu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the expression of myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 (MR-1) in relation to clinicopathological parameters and postoperative survival in a group of Chinese patients with gastric cancer.METHODS:In our previous study of human wholegenome gene expression profiling,the differentially expressed genes were detected in the gastric cancer and its adjacent noncancerous mucosa.We found that MR-1 was associated with the location and differentiation of tumors.In this study,MR-1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in specimens of primary cancer and the adjacent noncancerous tissues from gastric cancer patients.A set of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays based on the Universal ProbeLibrary-a collection of 165 presynthesized,fluorescence-labeled locked nucleic acid hydrolysis probes-was designed specifically to detect the expression of MR-1 mRNA.The correlation was analyzed between the expression of MR-1 and other tumor characteristics which may influence the prognosis of gastric cancer patients.A retrospective cohort study on the prognosis was carried out and clinical data were collected from medical records.RESULTS:MR-1 mRNA and protein could be detected in gastric cancer tissues as well as in matched noncancerous tissues.MR-1 was up-regulated at both mRNA (5.459 ± 0.639 vs 1.233 ± 0.238,P < 0.001) and protein levels (34.2% vs 13.2%,P =0.003) in gastric cancer tissues.Correlation analysis demonstrated that high expression of MR-1 in gastric cancer was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P =0.034).Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the postoperative survival of the MR-1 positive group tended to be poorer than that of the MR-1 negative group,and the difference was statistically significant (P =0.002).Among all the patients with stage Ⅰ-Ⅳ carcinoma,the 5-year survival rates of MR-1 positive and negative groups were 50.40% and 12.70%,respectively,with respective median survival times of 64.27 mo (95

  13. A Quantitative System-Scale Characterization of the Metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Minyeong; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaelle; Croux, Christian; Riviere, Antoine; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe

    2015-11-24

    Engineering industrial microorganisms for ambitious applications, for example, the production of second-generation biofuels such as butanol, is impeded by a lack of knowledge of primary metabolism and its regulation. A quantitative system-scale analysis was applied to the biofuel-producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum, a microorganism used for the industrial production of solvent. An improved genome-scale model, iCac967, was first developed based on thorough biochemical characterizations of 15 key metabolic enzymes and on extensive literature analysis to acquire accurate fluxomic data. In parallel, quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to assess the number of mRNA molecules per cell for all genes under acidogenic, solventogenic, and alcohologenic steady-state conditions as well as the number of cytosolic protein molecules per cell for approximately 700 genes under at least one of the three steady-state conditions. A complete fluxomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis applied to different metabolic states allowed us to better understand the regulation of primary metabolism. Moreover, this analysis enabled the functional characterization of numerous enzymes involved in primary metabolism, including (i) the enzymes involved in the two different butanol pathways and their cofactor specificities, (ii) the primary hydrogenase and its redox partner, (iii) the major butyryl coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) dehydrogenase, and (iv) the major glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. This study provides important information for further metabolic engineering of C. acetobutylicum to develop a commercial process for the production of n-butanol. Currently, there is a resurgence of interest in Clostridium acetobutylicum, the biocatalyst of the historical Weizmann process, to produce n-butanol for use both as a bulk chemical and as a renewable alternative transportation fuel. To develop a commercial process for the production of n-butanol via a

  14. Flux-Enabled Exploration of the Role of Sip1 in Galactose Yeast Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Shymansky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C MFA is an important systems biology technique that has been used to investigate microbial metabolism for decades. The heterotrimer Snf1 kinase complex plays a key role in the preference Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits for glucose over galactose, a phenomenon known as glucose repression or carbon catabolite repression. The SIP1 gene, encoding a part of this complex, has received little attention, presumably, because its knockout lacks a growth phenotype. We present a fluxomic investigation of the relative effects of the presence of galactose in classically glucose-repressing media and/or knockout of SIP1 using a multi-scale variant of 13C MFA known as 2-Scale 13C metabolic flux analysis (2S-13C MFA. In this study, all strains have the galactose metabolism deactivated (gal1Δ background so as to be able to separate the metabolic effects purely related to glucose repression from those arising from galactose metabolism. The resulting flux profiles reveal that the presence of galactose in classically glucose-repressing conditions, for a CEN.PK113-7D gal1Δ background, results in a substantial decrease in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP flux and increased flow from cytosolic pyruvate and malate through the mitochondria toward cytosolic branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. These fluxomic redistributions are accompanied by a higher maximum specific growth rate, both seemingly in violation of glucose repression. Deletion of SIP1 in the CEN.PK113-7D gal1Δ cells grown in mixed glucose/galactose medium results in a further increase. Knockout of this gene in cells grown in glucose-only medium results in no change in growth rate and a corresponding decrease in glucose and ethanol exchange fluxes and flux through pathways involved in aspartate/threonine biosynthesis. Glucose repression appears to be violated at a 1/10 ratio of galactose-to-glucose. Based on the scientific literature, we may have conducted our experiments

  15. Phenotypic characterization of glucose repression mutants of Saccharomyce cerevisiae usinge experiments with C-13-labelled glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghevendran; Gombert, A.K.; Christensen, B.

    2004-01-01

    glucose. Through GC-MS analysis of the C-13 incorporated into the amino acids of cellular proteins, it was possible to obtain quantitative information on the function of the central carbon metabolism in the different mutants. Traditionally, such labelling data have been used to quantify metabolic fluxes...... through the use of a suitable mathematical model, but here we show that the raw labelling data may also be used directly for phenotypic characterization of different mutant strains. Different glucose derepressed strains investigated employed are the disruption mutants reg1, hxk2, grr1, mig1 and mig1mig2...... and the reference strain CEN.PK113-7D. Principal components analysis of the summed fractional labelling data show that deleting the genes HXK2 and GRR1 results in similar phenotype at the fluxome level, with a partial alleviation of glucose repression on the respiratory metabolism. Furthermore, deletion...

  16. A novel analytical method for in vivo phosphate tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong; Lalonde, Sylvie; Okumoto, Sakiko; Looger, Loren L; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne Marie; Grossman, Arthur R; Kossmann, Jens; Jakobsen, Iver; Frommer, Wolf B

    2006-10-30

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors for phosphate (P(i)) (FLIPPi) were engineered by fusing a predicted Synechococcus phosphate-binding protein (PiBP) to eCFP and Venus. Purified fluorescent indicator protein for inorganic phosphate (FLIPPi), in which the fluorophores are attached to the same PiBP lobe, shows P(i)-dependent increases in FRET efficiency. FLIPPi affinity mutants cover P(i) changes over eight orders of magnitude. COS-7 cells co-expressing a low-affinity FLIPPi and a Na(+)/P(i) co-transporter exhibited FRET changes when perfused with 100 microM P(i), demonstrating concentrative P(i) uptake by PiT2. FLIPPi sensors are suitable for real-time monitoring of P(i) metabolism in living cells, providing a new tool for fluxomics, analysis of pathophysiology or changes of P(i) during cell migration.

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli knockouts: lessons from the Keio collection and future outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2014-08-01

    Cellular metabolic and regulatory systems are of fundamental interest to biologists and engineers. Incomplete understanding of these complex systems remains an obstacle to progress in biotechnology and metabolic engineering. An established method for obtaining new information on network structure, regulation and dynamics is to study the cellular system following a perturbation such as a genetic knockout. The Keio collection of all viable Escherichia coli single-gene knockouts is facilitating a systematic investigation of the regulation and metabolism of E. coli. Of all omics measurements available, the metabolic flux profile (the fluxome) provides the most direct and relevant representation of the cellular phenotype. Recent advances in (13)C-metabolic flux analysis are now permitting highly precise and accurate flux measurements for investigating cellular systems and guiding metabolic engineering efforts.

  18. Development of thermodynamic optimum searching (TOS) to improve the prediction accuracy of flux balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Song, Jiangning; Xu, Zixiang; Sun, Jibin; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-03-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) has been widely used in calculating steady-state flux distributions that provide important information for metabolic engineering. Several thermodynamics-based methods, for example, quantitative assignment of reaction directionality and energy balance analysis have been developed to improve the prediction accuracy of FBA. However, these methods can only generate a thermodynamically feasible range, rather than the most thermodynamically favorable solution. We therefore developed a novel optimization method termed as thermodynamic optimum searching (TOS) to calculate the thermodynamically optimal solution, based on the second law of thermodynamics, the minimum magnitude of the Gibbs free energy change and the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP). Then, TOS was applied to five physiological conditions of Escherichia coli to evaluate its effectiveness. The resulting prediction accuracy was found significantly improved (10.7-48.5%) by comparing with the (13)C-fluxome data, indicating that TOS can be considered an advanced calculation and prediction tool in metabolic engineering.

  19. Multi-omic data integration enables discovery of hidden biological regularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebrahim, Ali; Brunk, Elizabeth; Tan, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in size and complexity of biological data sets has led to the 'Big Data to Knowledge' challenge. We develop advanced data integration methods for multi- level analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, ribosomal profiling, proteomic and fluxomic data. First, we show that pairwise integration...... of primary omics data reveals regularities that tie cellular processes together in Escherichia coli: the number of protein molecules made per mRNA transcript and the number of ribosomes required per translated protein molecule. Second, we show that genome- scale models, based on genomic and bibliomic data......, enable quantitative synchronization of disparate data types. Integrating omics data with models enabled the discovery of two novel regularities: condition invariant in vivo turnover rates of enzymes and the correlation of protein structural motifs and translational pausing. These regularities can...

  20. Pathway elucidation and metabolic engineering of specialized plant metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Bo

    , these projects have increased revenues on fermentative production of several biochemicals. The use of systems biology is, however, not limited to microorganisms. Recent advances in biotechnology methods have provided a wealth of data within functional genomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, proteomics...... and fluxomics for a considerable number of organisms. Unfortunately, transferring the wealth of data to valuable information for metabolic engineering purposes is a non-obvious task. This PhD thesis describes a palate of tools used in generation of cell factories for production of specialized plant metabolites......, namely the plant defense compounds camalexin and glucosinolates. The thesis shows methodologies for elucidation of biosynthesis pathways and describes how to transfer obtained knowledge of metabolic pathways to other organisms through establishment of a synthetic biology platform. Through pathway...

  1. Complete genome sequence of Shewanella putrefaciens. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberg, John F.

    2001-04-01

    Seventy percent of the costs for genome sequencing Shewanella putrefaciens (oneidensis) were requested. These funds were expected to allow completion of the low-pass (5-fold) random sequencing and complete closure and annotation of the 200 kbp plasmid. Because of cost reduction that occurred during the period of this grant, these goals have been far exceeded. Currently, the S. putrefaciens genome is very nearly completely closed, even though the genome was significantly larger than expected and extremely repetitive. The entire genome sequence has been made BLAST searchable on the TIGR web page, and an extensive effort has been made to make data and analyses available to all researchers working on S. putrefaciens (oneidensis).

  2. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  3. A stable synergistic microbial consortium for simultaneous azo dye removal and bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Chua, Song-Lin; Cai, Zhao; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Zhang, Qichun; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Cao, Bin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Microbial species coexist in natural or engineered settings, where they encounter extensive competition and cooperation. Interactions occurring through metabolite exchange or direct contact might be important in establishment of functional biodegradation consortium. Understanding these interactions can facilitate manipulation of selected communities and exploitation of their capacity for specific industrial applications. Here, a simple dual-species consortium (Pseudomonas putida and Shewanella oneidensis) was established for examining simultaneous Congo red bioremediation in planktonic culture and power generation in anode biofilms. Compared to mono-species cultures, co-cultures generated higher current densities and could concurrently degrade Congo red over 72h. Disabling the large secreted adhesion protein, LapA, of P. putida greatly enhanced S. oneidensis biofilm formation on the anode, which increased power generation in co-cultures. This demonstrates simultaneous control of specific planktonic and biofilm communities could be effective in manipulating microbial communities for targeted applications.

  4. Unbalanced fermentation of glycerol in Escherichia coli via heterologous production of an electron transport chain and electrode interaction in microbial electrochemical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm-Richter, Katrin; Golitsch, Frederik; Sturm, Gunnar; Kipf, Elena; Dittrich, André; Beblawy, Sebastian; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells are an emerging technology for achieving unbalanced fermentations. However, organisms that can serve as potential biocatalysts for this application are limited by their narrow substrate spectrum. This study describes the reprogramming of Escherichia coli for the efficient use of anodes as electron acceptors. Electron transfer into the periplasm was accelerated by 183% via heterologous expression of the c-type cytochromes CymA, MtrA and STC from Shewanella oneidensis. STC was identified as a target for heterologous expression via a two-stage screening approach. First, mass spectroscopic analysis revealed natively expressed cytochromes in S. oneidensis. Thereafter, the corresponding genes were cloned and expressed in E. coli to quantify periplasmic electron transfer activity using methylene blue. This redox dye was further used to expand electron transfer to carbon electrode surfaces. The results demonstrate that E. coli can be reprogrammed from glycerol fermentation to respiration upon production of the new electron transport chain.

  5. Improved Evidence-Based Genome-scale Metabolic Models for Maize Leaf, Embryo, and Endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaver, Samuel M.D.; Frelin, Oceane; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-03-10

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  6. Improved Evidence-Based Genome-scale Metabolic Models for Maize Leaf, Embryo, and Endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eSeaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  7. Hybrid metabolic flux analysis: combining stoichiometric and statistical constraints to model the formation of complex recombinant products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Paula M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stoichiometric models constitute the basic framework for fluxome quantification in the realm of metabolic engineering. A recurrent bottleneck, however, is the establishment of consistent stoichiometric models for the synthesis of recombinant proteins or viruses. Although optimization algorithms for in silico metabolic redesign have been developed in the context of genome-scale stoichiometric models for small molecule production, still rudimentary knowledge of how different cellular levels are regulated and phenotypically expressed prevents their full applicability for complex product optimization. Results A hybrid framework is presented combining classical metabolic flux analysis with projection to latent structures to further link estimated metabolic fluxes with measured productivities. We first explore the functional metabolic decomposition of a baculovirus-producing insect cell line from experimental data, highlighting the TCA cycle and mitochondrial respiration as pathways strongly associated with viral replication. To reduce uncertainty in metabolic target identification, a Monte Carlo sampling method was used to select meaningful associations with the target, from which 66% of the estimated fluxome had to be screened out due to weak correlations and/or high estimation errors. The proposed hybrid model was then validated using a subset of preliminary experiments to pinpoint the same determinant pathways, while predicting the productivity of independent cultures. Conclusions Overall, the results indicate our hybrid metabolic flux analysis framework is an advantageous tool for metabolic identification and quantification in incomplete or ill-defined metabolic networks. As experimental and computational solutions for constructing comprehensive global cellular models are in development, the contribution of hybrid metabolic flux analysis should constitute a valuable complement to current computational platforms in bridging the

  8. Development of a Proteoliposome Model to Probe Transmembrane Electron-Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Gaye F. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Shi, Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dohnalkova, Alice [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fredrickson, Jim K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Butt, Julea N. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Richardson, David J. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Clarke, Thomas [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system has been developed that contains methyl viologen (MV) as an internalised electron acceptor and valinomycin (V) as a membrane associated cation exchanger. These proteoliposomes can be used as a model system to investigate MtrCAB function.

  9. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-23

    Progress is briefly summarized in these areas: ionizing radiation resistance in bacteria; a hypothesis regarding ionizing radiation resistance emerging for bacterial cells; transcriptome analysis of irradiated D. radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis; the role of metal reduction in Mn-dependnet Deinococcal species; and engineered Deinococcus strains as models for bioremediation. Key findings are also reported regarding protein oxidation as a possible key to bacterial desiccation resistance, and the whole-genome sequence of the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis.

  10. Application of pressurized solvents for ultra fast trypsin hydrolysis in proteomics: Proteomics on the fly

    OpenAIRE

    López-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Hixson, Kim K.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Moore, Ronald J; Belov, Mikhail E.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    A new method for rapid proteolytic digestion of proteins under high pressure that uses pressure cycling technology in the range of 5 to 35 kpsi was demonstrated for proteomic analysis. Successful in-solution digestions of single proteins and complex protein mixtures were achieved in 60 s and then analyzed by reversed phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap-mass spectrometry. Method performance in terms of the number of Shewanella oneidensis peptides and proteins identifie...

  11. Final Report for Award #0006731. Modeling, Patterning and Evolving Syntrophic Communities that Link Fermentation to Metal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, Christopher J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-07-17

    This project has developed and combined mathematical models, multi-species consortia, and spatially structured environments as an approach for studying metabolic exchange in communities like the ones between fermenters and metal reducers. We have developed novel, broadly-applicable tools for following community dynamics, come to a better understanding of both sugar and lactate-utilization in S. oneidensis, the interactions between carbon and mineral availability, and have a methodology for cell printing to match with spatiotemporal models of consortia metabolism.

  12. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  13. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  14. Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 attenuated hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the PERK/Nrf2 pathway in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tian-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Reng; Liu, Mi; Xu, Fei-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 (MR-1) in cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R), through protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. To address this aim, an H/R model of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes was used. MR-1 was overexpressed using an adenoviral vector system and knocked down using MR-1 specific siRNA. Apoptosis was assessed by using Annexin V/PI double staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling assay, and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Western blotting was used to detect the protein levels of MR-1, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), total and phosphorylated PERK, Nrf2, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), Bcl-2 and Bax. Immunofluorescence staining was used to assess the subcellular location of Nrf2. We found that H/R induced significant apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. MR-1 overexpression attenuated H/R-induced apoptosis, decreased GRP78 (P apoptosis, increased expression of GRP78 and CHOP (P apoptosis through inhibition of the PERK/Nrf2 pathway.

  15. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  16. 高比例植物蛋白的代乳粉对断奶犊牛消化道酶活性的影响%Effects of High Vegetable Protein Content in Calf Milk Replaces Feed on the Digestive Enzyme of Weaning Calves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军田; 费水英; 李玉; 龚月生

    2009-01-01

    20 Holstein male calves were selected to determine the influence of the different plant protein contents of milk-replacer on the digestive enzyme of weaning calves between 7~60 days. Calves were divided in four groups; group MR1 ,MR2 and MR3 feeding milk-replacers containing 60%,70% and 80% of crude protein as vegetable protein respectively, group CK feeding whole milk as control group. At the age of 8 weeks, intestinal digesta was determined the activities of some important enzymes. Result: The activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin in group MR1,MR2,MR3 was lower than those of group CK(P<0. 05),and in group MR1,MR2 and MR3, those of group MR1 was highest, those of group MR3 was lowest. The activities of lipase in group MR1, MR2, MR3 was lower than those of group CK(P<0. 05),and those of group MR1 was significantly higher than other groups(P< 0. 01) ,and those of group MR2 was lowest. It is concluded that milk-replacer with increase of vegetable protein had the negative effects for pre-weaning calves,as for decreased the activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin and lipase.%选取20头7日龄左右的荷斯坦奶公犊牛分配于试验组MR1、MR2、MR3和对照组CK,每组共5头.试验组MR1、MR2、MR3分别饲喂60%、70%、80%3种不同植物蛋白含量的代乳粉,对照组CK饲喂鲜奶,研究不同植物蛋白含量的代乳粉对断奶犊牛消化道主要消化酶活性的影响.犊牛8周龄时测定其小肠各段食糜中胰蛋白酶、糜蛋白酶和脂肪酶活性.结果表明,试验组MR1、MR2、MR3的小肠各段食糜中胰蛋白酶、糜蛋白酶活性均显著低于对照组CK(P<0.05=,且试验组中MR1的活性最高,MR3的活性最低.试验组MR1、MR2、MR3的小肠各段食糜中脂肪酶活性均显著低于对照组CK(P<0.05=,且试验组中MR1的活性极显著高于MR2、MR3(P<0.01=,MR2的活性最低.由试验结果得出,断奶犊牛消化酶的活性随着代乳粉中植物蛋白含量的升高呈下降趋势,其中植物

  17. A new molecular rectifier device and some research in its processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Bijian; Liu Chunming; Yin Xiang; Zhang Hua; Xu Wei; Hua Zhongyi

    2006-01-01

    Organic materials of D-π-A type MR-X (MR-1:p-dimethylaminophenylethenetrica-rbonitrile and MR-2:p-diphenylaminophenylethene tricarbonitrile) were designed and synthesized.The device with a sandwich structure shows good rectificative phenomena.The highest rectification ratio 10000 was achieved in device Cu/MR-1/Ag,and about 100 in other device M/MR-X/M (M:Cu,Ag).It has been found that rectificative phenomena exist only in the atmosphere-liquid interface region by means of liquid adsorption,and electric field could help form the oriented molecular film.

  18. Cochlear implant patients underwent successful MRI examination after local bandaging:a case report%电子耳蜗植入术患者局部包扎后行MRI检查成功1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    保国华; 曹克利

    2012-01-01

    Summary A female patient, now 6 years old. received cochlear implant in the right ear at the age of 2(February .2006). In August 16. 2010. a cervical spine MR1 examination was required due to the cervical spine injury in order to confirm the diagnosis. Considering the cochlea coil may interfere with the MKI examination results, a local bandaging around the ear was given to isolate cochlear magnetic field. The results of cervical spine MR1 ex aminations showed no obvious disturbance, which suggests that we could further explore this method clinically.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF NICOTINAMIDE MONONUCLEOTIDE DEAMIDASE OF THE BACTERIAL PYRIDINE NUCLEOTIDE CYCLE REVEALS A NOVEL BROADLY CONSERVED AMIDOHYDROLASE FAMILY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paolo; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Samantha B.; Osterman, Andrei; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-09-27

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle (PNC) is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial PNC was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in E. coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and non functional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase.

  20. Identification of Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Deamidase of the Bacterial Pyridine Nucleotide Cycle Reveals a Novel Broadly Conserved Amidohydrolase Family*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paola; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret; Reed, Samantha; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle, was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds of bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in Escherichia coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three-dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and nonfunctional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in the bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase. PMID:21953451

  1. Identification of nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle reveals a novel broadly conserved amidohydrolase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paola; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret; Reed, Samantha; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-11-18

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle, was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds of bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in Escherichia coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three-dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and nonfunctional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in the bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase.

  2. Bioenergetic Limitations on Slow Microbial Growth in the Subsurface: What is the Burden of Maintenance on the Overall Energy Budget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, C. M.; Bajracharya, B. M.; Ridenour, C.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-12-01

    In low energy environments such as the subsurface, the minimum energy required to maintain cellular integrity and function (maintenance energy) may represent a significant fraction of the total energy available to microbial communities. However, traditional kinetic and thermodynamic models incorporating key microbial processes are often developed using data collected in nutrient rich growth media. In this study, slow microbial growth in the subsurface was simulated using a flow through bioreactor system in experiments designed to determine the maintenance energy requirement of the model subsurface bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. An existing bioreactor system (Applikon EZ-control®, 2.4 L) was modified to include a biomass retention filtration unit (retentostat) resulting in biomass accumulation over time. An artificial low-nutrient groundwater medium was optimized for slow S. oneidensis growth and was supplied and removed from the reactor at flow rates on the order of 1 mL min-1 with a dilution rate of 0.025 h-1. The retentostat was run under electron donor limited conditions with nitrate, a common groundwater contaminant, supplied at 0.025 mM h-1 and lactate supplied in excess at 0.125 mM h-1. Respiratory ammonification of nitrate by S. oneidensis and cell growth was monitored over time (40 days) and compared to parallel incubations in batch reactors. Initial rates of ammonification were similar in the bioreactor and batch reactors, however, optical density and ATP measurements showed slow yet increasing microbial growth over time (generation time = 17 days) in the retentostat. In contrast, cells in the batch reactors did not grow significantly and died within 2 weeks of inoculation. A maintenance energy demand was estimated (2.5 kJ C-mol biomass h-1) by fitting the biomass production rates to the van Verseveld equation. The low maintenance energy demand of S. oneidensis as compared to typical maintenance energies reported in the literature (>10 kJ C-mol biomass

  3. In situ nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging of live biofilms in a microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Tucker, Abigail E.; Chrisler, William B.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microimaging and spectroscopy was used to interrogate fluids of biological importance (e.g., water, buffer, medium solution) and live biofilms in a microchannel compatible for analyses at ambient pressure and under vacuum. Studies using buffer, growth medium, and actively growing Shewanella oneidensis biofilms were used to demonstrate in situ NMR microimaging measurement capabilities including velocity mapping, diffusion coefficient mapping, relaxometry, localized spectroscopy, and 2D and 3D imaging within a microchannel suitable for different analytical platforms. This technique is promising for diverse applications of correlative imaging using a portable microfluidic platform.

  4. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    the facultative anaerobic, radio- resistant bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum [1,22] accumulates 20–25 mM Mn(II) [23]. For an irradiated cell...in dH2O at 0 8C and pre-conditioned to be anaerobic, H2O2 was released by D. radiodurans (;23 105 M) and L. plantarum (;6 3 105 M), in which the...non-irradiated D. radiodurans or L. plantarum control samples, nor by irradiated S. oneidensis (Figure 5A), which accumulates substantially more Fe

  5. The chemical-in-plug bacterial chemotaxis assay is prone to false positive responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Mandy J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical-in-plug assays are commonly used to study bacterial chemotaxis, sometimes in the absence of stringent controls. Results We report that non-chemotactic and non-motile mutants in two distinct bacterial species (Shewanella oneidensis and Helicobacter pylori show apparent zones of accumulation or clearing around test plugs containing potential attractants or repellents, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that the chemical-in-plug assay should be used with caution, that non-motile or non-chemotactic mutants should be employed as controls, and that results should be confirmed with other types of assays.

  6. In vitro antimicrobial effects of two antihalitosis mouth rinses on oral pathogens and human tongue microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raangs, G. C.; Winkel, E. G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of a mouth rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride (MR1) with a stannous fluoride-based mouth rinse (MR2) in vitro. Materials and methods: Samples of the tongues from 10 subjects with and 10 subjects witho

  7. Development of a Model Job Performance Test for a Combat Occupational Specialty. Volume I. Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    from a national guard armory In western New Mexico . The unit runs approxlmently 200 men armed with the latest aggressor weapons. They have been...Agcy, Bathasda, ATTN: MOCA -MR 1 USA Concept Anel Agcy, Bethesda, ATTN: MOCA -JF 1 USA Artie Test Ctr, APO Seattle, ATTN: STEAC-MOASL 1 USA Artie

  8. Occidental vertical modified in situ process for the recovery of oil from oil shale. Phase II. Quarterly progress report, September 1-November 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, William F.

    1979-12-01

    The major activities at OOSI's Logan Wash site during the quarter were: driving the access drifts towards the underground locations for Retorts 7 and 8; manway raise boring; constructing the change house; rubbling the first lift of Mini-Retort (MR)1; preparing the Mini-Retorts for tracer testing; coring of Retort 3E; and beginning the DOE instrumentation program.

  9. In vitro antimicrobial effects of two antihalitosis mouth rinses on oral pathogens and human tongue microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raangs, G. C.; Winkel, E. G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of a mouth rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride (MR1) with a stannous fluoride-based mouth rinse (MR2) in vitro. Materials and methods: Samples of the tongues from 10 subjects with and 10 subjects witho

  10. mrle, a conotoxin from Conus marmoreus with a novel disulfide pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfang Wang; Xiaoxia Shao; Min Li; Sumin Wang; Chengwu Chi; Chunguang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Conotoxins are well known for their highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the identification of a novel conotoxin named mrle from Conus marmoreus.mr1e is composed of 11 amino acid residues cross-linked by two disulfide bonds (CCHSSWCKHLC). The spacing of intercysteine loops in mrle is exactly the same as that in α4/3 conotoxins. However, the native mr1e peptide coeluted on reverse-phase HPLC with the regioselectively synthesized ribbon disulfide linkage isomer (C1=C4, C2-C3)but not the globular linkage isomer (C1-C3, C2-C4). Although this peptide has the same disulfide connectivity as the X-conotoxins, their sequences do not share significant homology. Thus, mrle could be defined as a novel conotoxin family. By intracranial injection into mice, mr1e showed an excitatory effect. The characterization of mr1e certainly enriches our understanding of conotoxins, and also opens an avenue for further structural and functional investigation.

  11. Discrimination of different forms of the murine urokinase plasminogen activator receptor on the cell surface using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, M.G.; Pass, J.; Illemann, M.

    2008-01-01

    of saturation with the amino-terminal fragment of uPA, ATF. However, the signal intensity obtained using another uPAR domain I specific mAb, mR1, was significantly reduced upon ATF saturation. Furthermore, when adding ATF, mR4 selectively stained the cleaved receptor. Applying these newly generated mAbs, we...

  12. The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Barbara Moscicki

    Full Text Available To compare oral health parameters in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected youth (PHEU.In a cross-sectional substudy within the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, participants were examined for number of decayed teeth (DT, Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT, oral mucosal disease, and periodontal disease (PD. Covariates for oral health parameters were examined using zero-inflated negative binomial regression and ordinal logistic regression models.Eleven sites enrolled 209 PHIV and 126 PHEU. Higher DT scores were observed in participants who were PHIV [Adjusted Mean Ratio (aMR = 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.5], female [aMR = 1.4 (1.0-1.9], had no source of regular dental care [aMR = 2.3 (1.5-3.4], and had a high frequency of meals/snacks [≥5 /day vs 0-3, aMR = 1.9 (1.1-3.1] and juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0-3, aMR = 1.6 (1.1-2.4]. Higher DMFT scores were observed in participants who were older [≥19, aMR = 1.9 (1.2-2.9], had biological parent as caregiver [aMR = 1.2 (1.0-1.3], had a high frequency of juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0-3, aMR = 1.4 (1.1-1.7] and a low saliva flow rate [mL/min, aMR = 0.8 per unit higher (0.6-1.0]. Eighty percent had PD; no differences were seen by HIV status using the patient-based classifications of health, gingivitis or mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. No associations were observed of CD4 count and viral load with oral health outcomes after adjustment.Oral health was poor in PHIV and PHEU youth. This was dismaying since most HIV infected children in the U.S. are carefully followed at medical health care clinics. This data underscore the need for regular dental care. As PHIV youth were at higher risk for cavities, it will be important to better understand this relationship in order to develop targeted interventions.

  13. Restricting nonclassical MHC genes coevolve with TRAV genes used by innate-like T cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinot, Pierre; Mondot, Stanislas; Jouneau, Luc; Teyton, Luc; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Lantz, Olivier

    2016-05-24

    Whereas major histocompatibility class-1 (MH1) proteins present peptides to T cells displaying a large T-cell receptor (TR) repertoire, MH1Like proteins, such as CD1D and MR1, present glycolipids and microbial riboflavin precursor derivatives, respectively, to T cells expressing invariant TR-α (iTRA) chains. The groove of such MH1Like, as well as iTRA chains used by mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) and natural killer T (NKT) cells, respectively, may result from a coevolution under particular selection pressures. Herein, we investigated the evolutionary patterns of the iTRA of MAIT and NKT cells and restricting MH1Like proteins: MR1 appeared 170 Mya and is highly conserved across mammals, evolving more slowly than other MH1Like. It has been pseudogenized or independently lost three times in carnivores, the armadillo, and lagomorphs. The corresponding TRAV1 gene also evolved slowly and harbors highly conserved complementarity determining regions 1 and 2. TRAV1 is absent exclusively from species in which MR1 is lacking, suggesting that its loss released the purifying selection on MR1. In the rabbit, which has very few NKT and no MAIT cells, a previously unrecognized iTRA was identified by sequencing leukocyte RNA. This iTRA uses TRAV41, which is highly conserved across several groups of mammals. A rabbit MH1Like gene was found that appeared with mammals and is highly conserved. It was independently lost in a few groups in which MR1 is present, like primates and Muridae, illustrating compensatory emergences of new MH1Like/Invariant T-cell combinations during evolution. Deciphering their role is warranted to search similar effector functions in humans.

  14. Insertion of core CpG island element into human CMV promoter for enhancing recombinant protein expression stability in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariati; Yeo, Jessna H M; Koh, Esther Y C; Ho, Steven C L; Yang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus promoter (hCMV) is susceptible to gene silencing in CHO cells, most likely due to epigenetic events, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. The core CpG island element (IE) from the hamster adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene has been shown to prevent DNA methylation. A set of modified hCMV promoters was developed by inserting one or two copies of IE in either forward or reverse orientations either upstream of the hCMV enhancer, between the enhancer and core promoter (CP), or downstream of the CP. The modified hCMV with one copy of IE inserted between the enhancer and core promoter in reverse orientation (MR1) was most effective at enhancing expression stability without compromising expression level when compared with the wild-type (WT) hCMV. A third of 18 EGFP expressing clones generated using MR1 retained 70% of their starting expression level after 8 weeks of culture in the absence of selection pressure, while none of 18 WT hCMV generated clones had expression above 50%. MR1 also improved antibody expression stability of methotrexate (MTX) amplified CHO cell lines. Stably transfected pools generated using MR1 maintained 62% of their original monoclonal antibody titer after 8 weeks of culture in the absence of MTX, compared to only 37% for WT hCMV pools. Low levels of CpG methylation within both WT hCMV and MR1 were observed in all the analyzed cell lines and the methylation levels did not correlate to the expression stability, suggesting IE enhances expression stability by other mechanisms other than preventing methylation. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le You

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1 properly designed tracer experiments; (2 stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3 efficient metabolite separations; (4 high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5 data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio. This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates. The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research.

  16. Determination of Multimodal Isotopic Distributions: The Case of a (15)N Labeled Protein Produced into Hairy Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillard, Romain; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Tognetti, Vincent; Guilhaudis, Laure; Plasson, Carole; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Coquet, Laurent; Guerineau, François; Hardouin, Julie; Ele Ekouna, Jean-Pierre; Cosette, Pascal; Lerouge, Patrice; Boitel-Conti, Michèle; Afonso, Carlos; Ségalas-Milazzo, Isabelle

    2015-06-16

    Isotopic labeling is widely used in various fields like proteomics, metabolomics, fluxomics, as well as in NMR structural studies, but it requires an efficient determination of the isotopic enrichment. Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for such analysis. However, when complex expression systems like hairy roots are used for production, multiple populations of labeled proteins may be obtained. If the isotopic incorporation determination is actually well-known for unimodal distributions, the multimodal distributions have scarcely been investigated. Actually, only a few approaches allow the determination of the different labeled population proportions from multimodal distributions. Furthermore, they cannot be used when the number of the populations and their respective isotope ratios are unknown. The present study implements a new strategy to measure the (15)N labeled populations inside a multimodal distribution knowing only the peptide sequence and peak intensities from mass spectrometry analyses. Noteworthy, it could be applied to other elements, like carbon and hydrogen, and extended to a larger range of biomolecules.

  17. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  18. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  19. A multi-omics analysis of recombinant protein production in Hek293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Dietmair

    Full Text Available Hek293 cells are the predominant hosts for transient expression of recombinant proteins and are used for stable expression of proteins where post-translational modifications performed by CHO cells are inadequate. Nevertheless, there is little information available on the key cellular features underpinning recombinant protein production in Hek293 cells. To improve our understanding of recombinant protein production in Hek293 cells and identify targets for the engineering of an improved host cell line, we have compared a stable, recombinant protein producing Hek293 cell line and its parental cell line using a combination of transcriptomics, metabolomics and fluxomics. Producer cultures consumed less glucose than non-producer cultures while achieving the same growth rate, despite the additional burden of recombinant protein production. Surprisingly, there was no indication that producer cultures compensated for the reduction in glycolytic energy by increasing the efficiency of glucose utilization or increasing glutamine consumption. In contrast, glutamine consumption was lower and the majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation were downregulated in producer cultures. We observed an overall downregulation of a large number of genes associated with broad cellular functions (e.g., cell growth and proliferation in producer cultures, and therefore speculate that a broad adaptation of the cellular network freed up resources for recombinant protein production while maintaining the same growth rate. Increased abundance of genes associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress indicated a possible bottleneck at the point of protein folding and assembly.

  20. A Multi-Omics Analysis of Recombinant Protein Production in Hek293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietmair, Stefanie; Hodson, Mark P.; Quek, Lake-Ee; Timmins, Nicholas E.; Gray, Peter; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    Hek293 cells are the predominant hosts for transient expression of recombinant proteins and are used for stable expression of proteins where post-translational modifications performed by CHO cells are inadequate. Nevertheless, there is little information available on the key cellular features underpinning recombinant protein production in Hek293 cells. To improve our understanding of recombinant protein production in Hek293 cells and identify targets for the engineering of an improved host cell line, we have compared a stable, recombinant protein producing Hek293 cell line and its parental cell line using a combination of transcriptomics, metabolomics and fluxomics. Producer cultures consumed less glucose than non-producer cultures while achieving the same growth rate, despite the additional burden of recombinant protein production. Surprisingly, there was no indication that producer cultures compensated for the reduction in glycolytic energy by increasing the efficiency of glucose utilization or increasing glutamine consumption. In contrast, glutamine consumption was lower and the majority of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation were downregulated in producer cultures. We observed an overall downregulation of a large number of genes associated with broad cellular functions (e.g., cell growth and proliferation) in producer cultures, and therefore speculate that a broad adaptation of the cellular network freed up resources for recombinant protein production while maintaining the same growth rate. Increased abundance of genes associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress indicated a possible bottleneck at the point of protein folding and assembly. PMID:22937046

  1. Escher: A Web Application for Building, Sharing, and Embedding Data-Rich Visualizations of Biological Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Zachary A; Dräger, Andreas; Ebrahim, Ali; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Lewis, Nathan E; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-08-01

    Escher is a web application for visualizing data on biological pathways. Three key features make Escher a uniquely effective tool for pathway visualization. First, users can rapidly design new pathway maps. Escher provides pathway suggestions based on user data and genome-scale models, so users can draw pathways in a semi-automated way. Second, users can visualize data related to genes or proteins on the associated reactions and pathways, using rules that define which enzymes catalyze each reaction. Thus, users can identify trends in common genomic data types (e.g. RNA-Seq, proteomics, ChIP)--in conjunction with metabolite- and reaction-oriented data types (e.g. metabolomics, fluxomics). Third, Escher harnesses the strengths of web technologies (SVG, D3, developer tools) so that visualizations can be rapidly adapted, extended, shared, and embedded. This paper provides examples of each of these features and explains how the development approach used for Escher can be used to guide the development of future visualization tools.

  2. Escher: A Web Application for Building, Sharing, and Embedding Data-Rich Visualizations of Biological Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A King

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Escher is a web application for visualizing data on biological pathways. Three key features make Escher a uniquely effective tool for pathway visualization. First, users can rapidly design new pathway maps. Escher provides pathway suggestions based on user data and genome-scale models, so users can draw pathways in a semi-automated way. Second, users can visualize data related to genes or proteins on the associated reactions and pathways, using rules that define which enzymes catalyze each reaction. Thus, users can identify trends in common genomic data types (e.g. RNA-Seq, proteomics, ChIP--in conjunction with metabolite- and reaction-oriented data types (e.g. metabolomics, fluxomics. Third, Escher harnesses the strengths of web technologies (SVG, D3, developer tools so that visualizations can be rapidly adapted, extended, shared, and embedded. This paper provides examples of each of these features and explains how the development approach used for Escher can be used to guide the development of future visualization tools.

  3. Industrial systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, José Manuel; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-02-15

    The chemical industry is currently undergoing a dramatic change driven by demand for developing more sustainable processes for the production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. In biotechnological processes different microorganisms can be exploited, and the large diversity of metabolic reactions represents a rich repository for the design of chemical conversion processes that lead to efficient production of desirable products. However, often microorganisms that produce a desirable product, either naturally or because they have been engineered through insertion of heterologous pathways, have low yields and productivities, and in order to establish an economically viable process it is necessary to improve the performance of the microorganism. Here metabolic engineering is the enabling technology. Through metabolic engineering the metabolic landscape of the microorganism is engineered such that there is an efficient conversion of the raw material, typically glucose, to the product of interest. This process may involve both insertion of new enzymes activities, deletion of existing enzyme activities, but often also deregulation of existing regulatory structures operating in the cell. In order to rapidly identify the optimal metabolic engineering strategy the industry is to an increasing extent looking into the use of tools from systems biology. This involves both x-ome technologies such as transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome analysis, and advanced mathematical modeling tools such as genome-scale metabolic modeling. Here we look into the history of these different techniques and review how they find application in industrial biotechnology, which will lead to what we here define as industrial systems biology.

  4. Integrated stoichiometric, thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of steady state metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I; Provan, G; Nasheuer, H P

    2010-06-07

    The quantitative analysis of biochemical reactions and metabolites is at frontier of biological sciences. The recent availability of high-throughput technology data sets in biology has paved the way for new modelling approaches at various levels of complexity including the metabolome of a cell or an organism. Understanding the metabolism of a single cell and multi-cell organism will provide the knowledge for the rational design of growth conditions to produce commercially valuable reagents in biotechnology. Here, we demonstrate how equations representing steady state mass conservation, energy conservation, the second law of thermodynamics, and reversible enzyme kinetics can be formulated as a single system of linear equalities and inequalities, in addition to linear equalities on exponential variables. Even though the feasible set is non-convex, the reformulation is exact and amenable to large-scale numerical analysis, a prerequisite for computationally feasible genome scale modelling. Integrating flux, concentration and kinetic variables in a unified constraint-based formulation is aimed at increasing the quantitative predictive capacity of flux balance analysis. Incorporation of experimental and theoretical bounds on thermodynamic and kinetic variables ensures that the predicted steady state fluxes are both thermodynamically and biochemically feasible. The resulting in silico predictions are tested against fluxomic data for central metabolism in Escherichia coli and compare favourably with in silico prediction by flux balance analysis.

  5. Know-how and know-why in biochemical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stockar, U; Valentinotti, S; Marison, I; Cannizzaro, C; Herwig, C

    2003-08-01

    This contribution analyzes the position of biochemical engineering in general and bioprocess engineering particularly in the force fields between fundamental science and applications, and between academia and industry. By using culture technology as an example, it can be shown that bioprocess engineering has moved slowly but steadily from an empirical art concerned with mainly know-how to a science elucidating the know-why of culture behavior. Highly powerful monitoring tools enable biochemical engineers to understand and explain quantitatively the activity of cellular culture on a metabolic basis. Among these monitoring tools are not just semi-online analyses of culture broth by HPLC, GC and FIA, but, increasingly, also noninvasive methods such as midrange IR, Raman and capacitance spectroscopy, as well as online calorimetry. The detailed and quantitative insight into the metabolome and the fluxome that bioprocess engineers are establishing offers an unprecedented opportunity for building bridges between molecular biology and engineering biosciences. Thus, one of the major tasks of biochemical engineering sciences is not developing new know-how for industrial applications, but elucidating the know-why in biochemical engineering by conducting research on the underlying scientific fundamentals.

  6. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Le; Zhang, Baichen; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1) properly designed tracer experiments; (2) stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3) efficient metabolite separations; (4) high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5) data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio). This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates). The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research. PMID:24957020

  7. Cancer metabolism meets systems biology: Pyruvate kinase isoform PKM2 is a metabolic master regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian V Filipp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase activity is controlled by a tightly woven regulatory network. The oncofetal isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2 is a master regulator of cancer metabolism. PKM2 engages in parallel, feed-forward, positive and negative feedback control contributing to cancer progression. Besides its metabolic role, non-metabolic functions of PKM2 as protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator for c-MYC and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha are essential for epidermal growth factor receptor activation-induced tumorigenesis. These biochemical activities are controlled by a shift in the oligomeric state of PKM2 that includes acetylation, oxidation, phosphorylation, prolyl hydroxylation and sumoylation. Metabolically active PKM2 tetramer is allosterically regulated and responds to nutritional and stress signals. Metabolically inactive PKM2 dimer is imported into the nucleus and can function as protein kinase stimulating transcription. A systems biology approach to PKM2 at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome level reveals how differences in biomolecular structure translate into a global rewiring of cancer metabolism. Cancer systems biology takes us beyond the Warburg effect, opening unprecedented therapeutic opportunities.

  8. Mini review: Recombinant production of tailored bio-pharmaceuticals in different Bacillus strains and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowitz, Antonia; Godard, Thibault; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Krull, Rainer

    2017-06-09

    Bio-pharmaceuticals like antibodies, hormones and growth factors represent about one-fifth of commercial pharmaceuticals. Host candidates of growing interest for recombinant production of these proteins are strains of the genus Bacillus, long being established for biotechnological production of homologous and heterologous proteins. Bacillus strains benefit from development of efficient expression systems in the last decades and emerge as major industrial workhorses for recombinant proteins due to easy cultivation, non-pathogenicity and their ability to secrete recombinant proteins directly into extracellular medium allowing cost-effective downstream processing. Their broad product portfolio of pharmaceutically relevant recombinant proteins described in research include antibody fragments, growth factors, interferons and interleukins, insulin, penicillin G acylase, streptavidin and different kinases produced in various cultivation systems like microtiter plates, shake flasks and bioreactor systems in batch, fed-batch and continuous mode. To further improve production and secretion performance of Bacillus, bottlenecks and limiting factors concerning proteases, chaperones, secretion machinery or feedback mechanisms can be identified on different cell levels from genomics and transcriptomics via proteomics to metabolomics and fluxomics. For systematical identification of recurring patterns characteristic of given regulatory systems and key genetic targets, systems biology and omics-technology provide suitable and promising approaches, pushing Bacillus further towards industrial application for recombinant pharmaceutical protein production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. FRET-based genetically-encoded sensors for quantitative monitoring of metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Mohd; Ahmad, Altaf; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states of dynamic activities. After genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, fluxomics is now equally important for generating accurate quantitative information on the cellular and sub-cellular dynamics of ions and metabolite, which is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Various spectrometry techniques are used for monitoring ions and metabolites, although their temporal and spatial resolutions are limited. Discovery of the fluorescent proteins and their variants has revolutionized cell biology. Therefore, novel tools and methods targeting sub-cellular compartments need to be deployed in specific cells and targeted to sub-cellular compartments in order to quantify the target-molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure cellular activities and protein dynamics with sub-cellular resolution. Biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are genetically encoded and hence can specifically target sub-cellular organelles by fusion to proteins or targetted sequences. Since last decade, FRET-based genetically encoded sensors for molecules involved in energy production, reactive oxygen species and secondary messengers have helped to unravel key aspects of cellular physiology. This review, describing the design and principles of sensors, presents a database of sensors for different analytes/processes, and illustrate examples of application in quantitative live cell imaging.

  10. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  11. Carbon metabolic pathways in phototrophic bacteria and their broader evolutionary implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiang eTang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. It is the only major natural solar energy storage mechanism on Earth. To satisfy the increased demand for sustainable energy sources and identify the mechanism of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, which is one of the bottlenecks in photosynthesis, it is essential to understand the process of solar energy storage and associated carbon metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. Researchers have employed physiological studies, microbiological chemistry, enzyme assays, genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and 13C-based metabolomics/fluxomics to investigate central carbon metabolism and enzymes that operate in phototrophs. In this report, we review diverse CO2 assimilation pathways, acetate assimilation, carbohydrate catabolism, the TCA cycle and some key and/or unconventional enzymes in central carbon metabolism of phototrophic microorganisms. We also discuss the reducing equivalent flow during photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth, evolutionary links in the central carbon metabolic network, and correlations between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. Considering the metabolic versatility in these fascinating and diverse photosynthetic bacteria, many essential questions in their central carbon metabolism still remain to be addressed.

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  13. Microbial reduction of chromium from the hexavalent to divalent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Blom, Douglas A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate that Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacteria species with cytoplasmic-membrane-bound reductases and remarkably diverse respiratory capabilities, reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(II) in anaerobic cultures where chromate was the sole terminal electron acceptor. Individual cell microanalysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) demonstrates Cr(II) concentrated near the cytoplasmic membrane, suggesting the terminal reduction pathway is intracellularly localized. Further, estimated cellular Cr(II) concentrations are relatively high at upwards of 0.03-0.09 g Cr/g bacterium. Accumulation of Cr(II) is observed in S. oneidensis cells prior to the formation of submicron-sized precipitates of insoluble Cr(III) on their surfaces. Furthermore, under anaerobic conditions, Cr(III) precipitates that encrust cells are shown to contain Cr(II) that is likely bound in the net negatively charged extracellular biopolymers which can permeate the surfaces of the precipitates. In otherwise nearly identical incubations, Cr(III) precipitate formation was observed in cultures maintained anaerobic with bubbled nitrogen but not in three replicate cultures in an anaerobic chamber.

  14. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  15. Nile red detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones in a high-throughput format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Aukema, Kelly G; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2011-01-01

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones.

  16. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  17. An SAO-DS9-Based Widget Interface for Compressed Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaud, René D.; Popoff, Fabien S.; Starck, Jean-Luc

    Astronomical images can be efficiently compressed by the multi-resolution package MR1. We describe here a user interface for the images compressed by the software package MR/1 which comes as a plug-in for the popular astronomical image viewer SAO-DS9. This interface allows the user to load a compressed file and to choose not only the scale, but also the size and the portion of image to be displayed, resulting in reduced memory and processing requirements. Astrometry and all SAO-DS9 functionalities are still available. The Tcl/Tk source code of the interface, and the binary code for the decompression (for Unix and Windows) will be made available to the astronomical community.

  18. Macroscopic Neural Theories of Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    complexity of the brain stresses any possible explanation of its function to its limits for a relatively simple practical reason—there are too many...areas (18 and 19) of the cat . Journal of Neurophysiology, 28(2), 229- 289. Ihnen, S. K., Church, J. A., Petersen, S. E., & Schlaggar, B. L. (2009...potentials, and fMR1 in human auditory cortex. Science, 309, 951-954. Murphy, F. C., Nimmo-Smith, I., & Lawrence, A. D. (2003). Functional

  19. Erosion Effects on TVC Vane Heat Transfer Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    desired, by use of, B2LSZ/DBqLSF. The reference is CALL B2LSF (FCO, H, X, XGUESS, IBTYPE, L, oBM, ILCAU, FSCAL =, ZPARAM, AR H, X, FVEC, FJAC, LDFJAC, WK...103. S. I FSCAL . a IPAXAN, kPFA*N. 1. FMlC. YJAC. ,LPJA,. C Priat regalts CALL UMACl (2. !Mr) 1AUTE (M0 00.0gff) 1. FMvg. IPAin(3). tPA*UN(4) C 09Wf

  20. Conventional Radiographs and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Analysis of Trochlear Dysplasia: The Influence of Selected Levels on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholl, Philippe Matthias; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Fucentese, Sandro F

    2017-04-01

    Trochlear dysplasia is one of the most important risk factors for recurrent patellar instability. It is defined on true lateral conventional radiographs (CR) and axial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The type of trochlear dysplasia is decisive for surgical treatment; however, low agreement between CR and MRI has been reported. To compare the Dejour classification of trochlear dysplasia on CR and axial MRI using differing levels defined in the literature. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. The 4-type classification of trochlear dysplasia by Dejour was used to analyze 228 knees with recurrent patellar dislocations on true lateral CR and axial MRI. The 2-type modification of the Dejour classification was also similarly analyzed. Measurements on axial MRI were performed at 3 different levels: MR1, the most proximal level where the intercondylar notch forms a "Roman arch"; MR2, 3 cm above the joint line; and MR3, the midpatellar height. MR1 was measured at a mean distance of 29 ± 3.5 mm and MR3 at a mean of 38 ± 5.8 mm above the joint line. MR1 and MR2 were always measured on the cartilaginous trochlea, whereas 52% of MR3 was found more proximally. Overall agreement was fair between CR and MR1/MR2 (31.1%/25.4%, respectively) and highest for MR3 (45.2%; P fair agreement, especially when the supratrochlear region of the distal femur is not analyzed on axial MRI. MRI analysis that considers the cartilaginous trochlea only tends to underestimate the severity of dysplasia according to Dejour. For a more precise evaluation of trochlear dysplasia, the entire distal femur should be analyzed on axial MRI.

  1. Ideatification and characteristic of Melatonin receptor in human hypothalamus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zho Ying; Shao Fuyuan; Shanghai

    2000-01-01

    To vertify whether there exists melatonin 125reeptor (MR) and MRmRNA in human embryonic hypothalamus. Binding assays: [125Jiodomelatonin binding sites in membrane preparation of human embryonic hypothalamus were studied using radioligand binding assay. Molecular assays: MRmRNA were studied using RT-PCR. Results show saturation studies: the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) was 1.15±4.32 fmol/mg protein and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was 36±8 pmol/L. Kinetic studies: K1=1.3±0.2×107mol·L-1min-1,K1=6.3±A×10-3/min, Kd=48.5±2.1pmol/L. Which is in close agreement with the Kd determined by the saturation studies, Subcellular distribution of specific binding of MR was 0.68, 0.57, 0.31 and 0.07 fmol/mg protein in nucleas, mitochondria, microsme and cytosol respectively. The effect of GTPγ S on specific binding of MR showed that GTPγ S dose-dependently inhibited the binding. Molecular studied showed there exerts MR1a mRNA and MR1b mRNA in human embryonic hypothalamus, but MR1a mRNA is more than MR1b mRNA. The results demonstrated the presence of MR and MRmRNA in human embryonic hypothalamus. GTPγ S inhibits the binding indicating that putative melatonin receptor is coupled to G-proteia. It indicate that hypothalamus is a target organ of melatonin action and direct action of melatonin on the hypothalamus.

  2. Costimulatory signal blockade in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub, M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Stadlbauer, T H;

    1999-01-01

    Blockade of the CD28-B7 or CD40L-CD40 T cell costimulatory signals prevents induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the effect of simultaneous blockade of these signals in EAE is unknown. We show that administration of either MR1 (to block CD40L) or CTLA4Ig (to block...... cells in the periphery. Selective B7-1 blockade did not protect from EAE. These observations have implications for therapy of autoimmune diseases....

  3. Anti-CD154 mAb and rapamycin induce T regulatory cell mediated tolerance in rat-to-mouse islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick D Muller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-CD154 (MR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb and rapamycin (RAPA treatment both improve survival of rat-to-mouse islet xenograft. The present study investigated the effect of combined RAPA/MR1 treatment on rat-to-mouse islet xenograft survival and analyzed the role of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells (Treg in the induction and maintenance of the ensuing tolerance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57BL/6 mice were treated with MR1/RAPA and received additional monoclonal anti-IL2 mAb or anti CD25 mAb either early (0-28 d or late (100-128 d post-transplantation. Treg were characterised in the blood, spleen, draining lymph nodes and within the graft of tolerant and rejecting mice by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Fourteen days of RAPA/MR1 combination therapy allowed indefinite islet graft survival in >80% of the mice. Additional administration of anti-IL-2 mAb or depleting anti-CD25 mAb at the time of transplantation resulted in rejection (100% and 89% respectively, whereas administration at 100 days post transplantation lead to lower rejection rates (25% and 40% respectively. Tolerant mice showed an increase of Treg within the graft and in draining lymph nodes early post transplantation, whereas 100 days post transplantation no significant increase of Treg was observed. Rejecting mice showed a transient increase of Treg in the xenograft and secondary lymphoid organs, which disappeared within 7 days after rejection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: These results suggest a critical role for Treg in the induction phase of tolerance early after islet xenotransplantation. These encouraging data support the need of developing further Treg therapy for overcoming the species barrier in xenotransplantation.

  4. Binding of Shewanella FadR to the fabA fatty acid biosynthetic gene: implications for contraction of the fad regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, Rongsui; Feng, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR protein product, a paradigm/prototypical FadR regulator, positively regulates fabA and fabB, the two critical genes for unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis. However the scenario in the other Ɣ-proteobacteria, such as Shewanella with the marine origin, is unusual in that Rodionov and coworkers predicted that only fabA (not fabB) has a binding site for FadR protein. It raised the possibility of fad regulon contraction. Here we report that this is the case. Sequence alignment of the FadR homologs revealed that the N-terminal DNA-binding domain exhibited remarkable similarity, whereas the ligand-accepting motif at C-terminus is relatively-less conserved. The FadR homologue of S. oneidensis (referred to FadR_she) was over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Integrative evidence obtained by FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) and chemical cross-linking analyses elucidated that FadR_she protein can dimerize in solution, whose identity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. In vitro data from electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that FadR_she is almost functionally-exchangeable/equivalent to E. coli FadR (FadR_ec) in the ability of binding the E. coli fabA (and fabB) promoters. In an agreement with that of E. coli fabA, S. oneidensis fabA promoter bound both FadR_she and FadR_ec, and was disassociated specifically with the FadR regulatory protein upon the addition of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. To monitor in vivo effect exerted by FadR on Shewanella fabA expression, the native promoter of S. oneidensis fabA was fused to a LacZ reporter gene to engineer a chromosome fabA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in E. coli. As anticipated, the removal of fadR gene gave about 2-fold decrement of Shewanella fabA expression by β-gal activity, which is almost identical to the inhibitory level by the addition of oleate. Therefore, we concluded that fabA is contracted to be the only one member of fad regulon in the context of fatty acid

  5. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of the alternate form of S-methylcoenzyme M reductase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (strain delta H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, M C; Ma, L; Johnson, M K; Scott, R A

    1992-04-08

    Two forms (MR1 and MR2) of S-methylcoenzyme M reductase were purified from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (strain delta H) as recently described (Rospert, S., Linder, D., Ellerman, J. and Thauer, R.K. (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 194, 871-877). MR2 was at least 50-fold more active than MR1, independent of assay conditions. The two forms are spectroscopically similar, but not identical, by UV-visible, magnetic circular dichroism and resonance Raman spectroscopies. MR2 exhibited an EPR signal corresponding to 20% of the enzyme-bound nickel. Strong EPR signals similar to those previously assigned to Ni(I)F430 bound to methylreductase in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (strain Marburg) (Albracht, S.P.J., Ankel-Fuchs, D., Bocher, R., Ellerman, J., Moll, J., Van der Zwann, J.W. and Thauer, R.K. (1988) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 955, 86-102) were observed in MR2-rich, log-phase, as well as in MR1-rich, slow-growing bacteria. Log-phase cells had dramatically different EPR spectra depending on whether they were removed from the fermenter (under gas flow) before or after cooling to 10 degrees C. EPR spectra of slow-growing cells were insensitive to harvesting conditions. The possible biological significance of the alternate form of methylreductase is discussed.

  7. Switching to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor improves the response and outcome of frontline imatinib-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 10% of BCR-ABL/ABL ratio at 3 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Luis-Felipe; García-Gutiérrez, José-Valentín; Massagué, Isabel; Giraldo, Pilar; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; de Paz, Raquel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Bautista, Guiomar; Osorio, Santiago; Requena, María-José; Palomera, Luis; Peñarrubia, María-Jesús; Calle, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, José-Ángel; Burgaleta, Carmen; Maestro, Begoña; García-Ormeña, Nuria; Steegmann, Juan-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia patients display heterogeneous responses to imatinib. Survival depends on baseline clinical characteristics (including prognostic scoring systems) and on early response (such as >10% BCR-ABL/ABL ratio at 3 months of therapy). The results of switching to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (2GTKIs) may contain a bias since, in the majority of these studies, patients who switch treatment due to intolerance or failure are censored or excluded. We analyzed the Spanish Registry data on switching in an intention-to-treat analysis of patients in standard clinical practice. Switching to 2GTKIs improves responses from 45% to 75% of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and from 15% to 45% of major molecular response (MMR) in the group without molecular response 1 (MR1) at 3 months and from 70% to 87% in CCyR and from 52% to 87% in MMR in the group with MR1. The final response rate is poorer in the group with no MR1 at 3 months. Nevertheless, the differences in the rates of response were not translated into differences in major events (transformations or deaths), and the final progression-free survival and overall survival were similar. PMID:25756742

  8. Fluxometria da artéria torácica interna esquerda na revascularização da artéria descendente anterior com e sem circulação extracorpórea Flowmetry of left internal thoracic artery graft to left anterior descending artery: comparison between on-pump and off-pump surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filinto Marques de Cerqueira Neto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A cirurgia de revascularização do miocárdio (RM sem circulação extracorpórea (CEC é uma técnica amplamente utilizada. A fluxometria coronariana é a técnica mais usada para avaliação dos enxertos, porém, poucos estudos comparam os dados fluxométricos na RM com e sem CEC. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar as variáveis fluxométricas dos enxertos de artéria torácica interna esquerda para a artéria descendente anterior em pacientes submetidos à RM com e sem CEC. MÉTODOS: Entre março e setembro de 2010, foram analisados retrospectivamente 35 pacientes consecutivos, não randomizados, submetidos à RM. Foram alocados 10 pacientes no grupo A (com CEC e 25 no grupo B (sem CEC. O fluxo médio do enxerto (FME, o índice pulsátil (PI e a porcentagem de enchimento diastólico (ED foram obtidos por meio da fluxometria por tempo de trânsito. Foi utilizado o teste exato de Fisher e Mann-Whitney, sendo considerado estatisticamente significante PBACKGROUND: Off-pump coronary bypass grafting (OPCAB has become a widely used technique. Coronary flowmetry is the most common method employed to assess graft patency, nevertheless, few studies compare flow patterns between ONCAB and OPCAB surgery. The objective of this study was to compare flowmetry data in left internal mammary artery grafts bypasses to the left anterior descendent artery. METHODS: From March to September of 2010, thirtyfive consecutive, non-randomized patients underwent CABG and were retrospectively evaluated. Ten patients were located on group A (On Pump, and twenty-five on group B (Off Pump. The mean graft flow (MGF, pulsatile index (PI and diastolic filling (DF were obtained using Transit Time Flowmetry (TTFM. The Fisher exact test, and Mann Whitney test were used, and a P value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS: There were no deaths, AMI, re-interventions or PTCA in a 30-day period. The number of bypasses performed per

  9. Probing the putative active site of YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne Mørch; Ismat, Fouzia; Szakonyi, Gerda;

    2012-01-01

    YjdL from E. coli is an unusual proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT). Unlike prototypical POTs, dipeptides are preferred over tripeptides, in particular dipeptides with a positively charged C-terminal residue. To further understand this difference in peptide specificity, the sequences...... of YjdL and YdgR, a prototypical E. coli POT, were compared in light of the crystal structure of a POT from Shewanella oneidensis. Several residues found in the putative active site were mutated and the activities of the mutated variants were assessed in terms of substrate uptake assays, and changes...... pocket that opens towards the extracellular space. The C-terminal side chain faces in the opposite direction into a sub pocket that faces the cytoplasm. These data indicated a stabilizing effect on a bulky N-terminal residue by an Ala281Phe variant and on the dipeptide backbone by Trp278...

  10. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  11. Investigating the role of CheA-3 in Dusulfovibrio Vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jayashee; Keller, Kimberley; Krierim, Bernhard; Auer, Manfred; Keasling, Jay; Wall, Judy; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-22

    Multiple sets of chemotaxis genes including three cheA homologs were identified in the genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Each CheA is a histidine kinase (HK) and part of a two component signal transduction system. Knock out mutants in the three cheA genes were created using single cross-over homologous recombination insertion. We studied the phenotypes of the cheA mutants in detail and discovered that ?cheA-3 has a non swarming/swimming phenotype both in the soft agar plates and Palleroni chamber assays. CheA-3 shows similarity to the Shewanella oneidensis CheA-3 and the Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 that are responsible for chemotaxis in the respective organisms. We did not find any morphological or structural differences between the three Delta cheA mutants and the wild type cells in electron microscopy. Our results from these studies are presented.

  12. Bacterial-fungal interactions enhance power generation in microbial fuel cells and drive dye decolourisation by an ex situ and in situ electro-Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Dios, María Ángeles; del Campo, Araceli González; Fernández, Francisco Jesús; Rodrigo, Manuel; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, María Ángeles

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the potential for sustainable energy production from wastes has been exploited using a combination fungus-bacterium in microbial fuel cell (MFC) and electro-Fenton technology. The fungus Trametes versicolor was grown with Shewanella oneidensis so that the bacterium would use the networks of the fungus to transport the electrons to the anode. This system generated stable electricity that was enhanced when the electro-Fenton reactions occurred in the cathode chamber. This configuration reached a stable voltage of approximately 1000 mV. Thus, the dual benefits of the in situ-designed MFC electro-Fenton, the simultaneous dye decolourisation and the electricity generation, were demonstrated. Moreover, the generated power was effectively used to drive an ex situ electro-Fenton process in batch and continuous mode. This newly developed MFC fungus-bacterium with an in situ electro-Fenton system can ensure a high power output and a continuous degradation of organic pollutants.

  13. Characterization of microbial current production as a function of microbe-electrode-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Kerstin; Danzer, Joana; Kabbeck, Tobias; Bierer, Benedikt; Erben, Johannes; Förster, Andreas H; Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2014-04-01

    Microbe-electrode-interactions are keys for microbial fuel cell technology. Nevertheless, standard measurement routines to analyze the interplay of microbial physiology and material characteristics have not been introduced yet. In this study, graphite anodes with varying surface properties were evaluated using pure cultures of Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens, as well as defined and undefined mixed cultures. The evaluation routine consisted of a galvanostatic period, a current sweep and an evaluation of population density. The results show that surface area correlates only to a certain extent with population density and anode performance. Furthermore, the study highlights a strain-specific microbe-electrode-interaction, which is affected by the introduction of another microorganism. Moreover, evidence is provided for the possibility of translating results from pure culture to undefined mixed species experiments. This is the first study on microbe-electrode-interaction that systematically integrates and compares electrochemical and biological data.

  14. Stepwise development of MAIT cells in mouse and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells display two evolutionarily conserved features: an invariant T cell receptor (TCRalpha (iTCRalpha chain and restriction by the nonpolymorphic class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule, MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1. MR1 expression on thymus epithelial cells is not necessary for MAIT cell development but their accumulation in the gut requires MR1 expressing B cells and commensal flora. MAIT cell development is poorly known, as these cells have not been found in the thymus so far. Herein, complementary human and mouse experiments using an anti-humanValpha7.2 antibody and MAIT cell-specific iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic mice in different genetic backgrounds show that MAIT cell development is a stepwise process, with an intra-thymic selection followed by peripheral expansion. Mouse MAIT cells are selected in an MR1-dependent manner both in fetal thymic organ culture and in double iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic RAG knockout mice. In the latter mice, MAIT cells do not expand in the periphery unless B cells are added back by adoptive transfer, showing that B cells are not required for the initial thymic selection step but for the peripheral accumulation. In humans, contrary to natural killer T (NKT cells, MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype in the thymus as well as in cord blood where they are in low numbers. After birth, MAIT cells acquire a memory phenotype and expand dramatically, up to 1%-4% of blood T cells. Finally, in contrast with NKT cells, human MAIT cell development is independent of the molecular adaptor SAP. Interestingly, mouse MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype and do not express the ZBTB16 transcription factor, which, in contrast, is expressed by NKT cells and the memory human MAIT cells found in the periphery after birth. In conclusion, MAIT cells are selected by MR1 in the thymus on a non-B non-T hematopoietic cell, and acquire a memory phenotype and expand in the

  15. Fueling industrial biotechnology growth with bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, José Manuel; Panagiotou, Gianni; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology is the conversion of biomass via biocatalysis, microbial fermentation, or cell culture to produce chemicals, materials, and/or energy. Industrial biotechnology processes aim to be cost-competitive, environmentally favorable, and self-sustaining compared to their petrochemical equivalents. Common to all processes for the production of energy, commodity, added value, or fine chemicals is that raw materials comprise the most significant cost fraction, particularly as operating efficiencies increase through practice and improving technologies. Today, crude petroleum represents the dominant raw material for the energy and chemical sectors worldwide. Within the last 5 years petroleum prices, stability, and supply have increased, decreased, and been threatened, respectively, driving a renewed interest across academic, government, and corporate centers to utilize biomass as an alternative raw material. Specifically, bio-based ethanol as an alternative biofuel has emerged as the single largest biotechnology commodity, with close to 46 billion L produced worldwide in 2005. Bioethanol is a leading example of how systems biology tools have significantly enhanced metabolic engineering, inverse metabolic engineering, and protein and enzyme engineering strategies. This enhancement stems from method development for measurement, analysis, and data integration of functional genomics, including the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome. This review will show that future industrial biotechnology process development will benefit tremendously from the precedent set by bioethanol - that enabling technologies (e.g., systems biology tools) coupled with favorable economic and socio-political driving forces do yield profitable, sustainable, and environmentally responsible processes. Biofuel will continue to be the keystone of any industrial biotechnology-based economy whereby biorefineries leverage common raw materials and unit operations to integrate

  16. FiD: a software for ab initio structural identification of product ions from tandem mass spectrometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Markus; Rantanen, Ari; Mielikäinen, Taneli; Kokkonen, Juha; Kiuru, Jari; Ketola, Raimo A; Rousu, Juho

    2008-10-01

    We present FiD (Fragment iDentificator), a software tool for the structural identification of product ions produced with tandem mass spectrometric measurement of low molecular weight organic compounds. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has proven to be an indispensable tool in modern, cell-wide metabolomics and fluxomics studies. In such studies, the structural information of the MS(n) product ions is usually needed in the downstream analysis of the measurement data. The manual identification of the structures of MS(n) product ions is, however, a nontrivial task requiring expertise, and calls for computer assistance. Commercial software tools, such as Mass Frontier and ACD/MS Fragmenter, rely on fragmentation rule databases for the identification of MS(n) product ions. FiD, on the other hand, conducts a combinatorial search over all possible fragmentation paths and outputs a ranked list of alternative structures. This gives the user an advantage in situations where the MS/MS data of compounds with less well-known fragmentation mechanisms are processed. FiD software implements two fragmentation models, the single-step model that ignores intermediate fragmentation states and the multi-step model, which allows for complex fragmentation pathways. The software works for MS/MS data produced both in positive- and negative-ion modes. The software has an easy-to-use graphical interface with built-in visualization capabilities for structures of product ions and fragmentation pathways. In our experiments involving amino acids and sugar-phosphates, often found, e.g., in the central carbon metabolism of yeasts, FiD software correctly predicted the structures of product ions on average in 85% of the cases. The FiD software is free for academic use and is available for download from www.cs.helsinki.fi/group/sysfys/software/fragid.