WorldWideScience

Sample records for oncology cooperative research

  1. Conducting Cancer Control and Survivorship Research via Cooperative Groups: A Report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra

    2011-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if in...

  2. Conducting cancer control and survivorship research via cooperative groups: a report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-05-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if interventions are well standardized. Some protocols are better suited to cooperative groups than are others, and there are advantages and disadvantages to conducting survivorship research within the cooperative group setting. Behavioral researchers currently involved in cooperative groups, as well as program staff within the NCI, can serve as sources of information for those wishing to pursue symptom management and survivorship studies within the clinical trial setting. The structure of the cooperative groups is currently changing, but going forward, survivorship is bound to be a topic of interest and one that perhaps may be more easily addressed using the proposed more centralized structure. ©2011 AACR.

  3. Future Research in Psycho-Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerling, Ute; Mehnert, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s psycho-oncology and psycho-oncological research have been systematically developed in many industrialized countries and have produced nationally and internationally accepted guidelines. In this article developments and challenges are presented and discussed. From the perspective of various oncological treatment options, different needs for further psycho-oncological research are considered.

  4. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  5. Impact of radiation research on clinical trials in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Van Ess, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present an outline review of the history of the formation of the cooperative group called International Clinical Trials in Radiation Oncology (ICTRO), and the following areas are briefly discussed together with some projections for the direction of clinical trials in radiation oncology into the 1990s:- radiosensitizers, radioprotectors, and their combination, drug-radiation interactions, dose/time/fractionation, hyperthermia, biological response modifiers and radiolabelled antibodies, high LET, particularly neutron therapy, large field irradiation and interoperative irradiation, research studies on specific sites. (U.K.)

  6. Physiologic and psychobehavioral research in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, W H; Silberfarb, P M; Andersen, B L; Andrykowski, M A; Bovbjerg, D H; Burish, T G; Carpenter, P J; Cleeland, C; Dolgin, M; Levy, S M

    1991-02-01

    A major thrust in research in psychosocial oncology is the study of the interaction of psychologic and physiologic variables. This discussion reviews the current status and future directions of such research. Areas addressed include pain, nausea and vomiting with chemotherapy, sexuality, effects of cancer on psychologic and neuropsychologic function, impact of psychologic factors on cancer and its treatment, and psychoneuroimmunology. In addition, specific recommendations for strategies to facilitate research in these areas of psychosocial oncology are proposed.

  7. Precompetitive cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in the current worldwide technology environment, it is essential for the U.S. microelectronics industry, and especially for the integrated circuit portion of that industry, that precompetitive cooperative research alliances be formed and funded at a level that enables them to be effective in rapidly advancing technology. It is important to realize that technology advances with or without our direct participation. If we do not aggressively participate we are quickly left behind. Increasing complexity and miniaturization have been the themes in semiconductor technology. Many are aware that what began in the early 60's with a few masking steps and minimum dimensions measured in mils, has now evolved to a level of sophistication requiring a 100 MIP workstation for IC design and the investment of nearly $400 million dollars in fab cost to produce today's microchips. The leading nations of the world have come to realize that their future well- being is closely tied to their ability to compete in this hi- tech environment. Industry coalitions have been formed to exploit the early ramifications of emerging technologies. Improvements in overseas manufacturing have been made and continue unabated with new products, new processes, and new services being introduced at an increasing rate. Many foreign governments are now actively involved in formulating and conducting industrial and technology policies to aid their hi-tech industry. To meet these challenges, U.S. firms, with U.S. government cooperation, must respond

  8. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  9. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Burt, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Gimotty, Phyllis A. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric, E-mail: eric.ojerholm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  10. Cooperation between medicine and sociology in head and neck oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Emmanuel; Grandazzi, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-first-century medicine is facing many challenges--knowledge and command of technical advances, research development, team management, knowledge transmission, and adaptation to economic constraints--without neglecting "human" aspects, via transformed carer-patient relationships, social change, and so on. The "modern" physicians know that simply treating disease is no longer enough. One of their essential missions lies in offering the individual patient overall care, which implies acknowledging the latter as an individual within a family, social, and professional environment. Indeed, medical practice requires pluridimensional knowledge of the patients' experience of their disease. Yet the contribution sociology can offer to health care remains largely unknown to many physicians, and medical training includes only limited instruction in the human sciences. On the basis of a few observations taken from sociological research, we would like to demonstrate how, in head and neck oncology, interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine and sociology can prove propitious to improving patient care and attention to their close relations.

  11. Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This paper collects some scientific research works on nuclear medicine developed in Ecuador. The main topics are: Brain metastases, computed tomography assessment; Therapeutic challenge in brain metastases, chemotherapy, surgery or radiotherapy; Neurocysticercosis and oncogenesis; Neurologic complications of radiation and chemotherapy; Cerebral perfusion gammagraphy in neurology and neurosurgery; Neuro- oncologic surgical patient anesthesic management; Pain management in neuro- oncology; Treatment of metastatic lesions of the spine, surgically decompression vs radiation therapy alone; Neuroimagining in spinal metastases

  12. View and review on viral oncology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolin Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, almost one and a half million cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in the US and nearly 560,000 Americans are expected to die of cancer in the current year, more than 1,500 people a day (data from the American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org/. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, roughly 20% of all cancers worldwide results from chronic infections; in particular, up to 15% of human cancers is characterized by a viral aetiology with higher incidence in Developing Countries. The link between viruses and cancer was one of the pivotal discoveries in cancer research during the past Century. Indeed, the infectious nature of specific tumors has important implications in terms of their prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. In the 21st Century, the research on viral oncology field continues to be vigorous, with new significant and original studies on viral oncogenesis and translational research from basic virology to treatment of cancer. This review will cover different viral oncology aspects, starting from the history of viral oncology and moving to the peculiar features of oncogenic RNA and DNA viruses, with a special focus on human pathogens.

  13. Clinical outcomes research in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Alexander; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro; Schorge, John O

    2017-09-01

    Clinical outcomes research seeks to understand the real-world manifestations of clinical care. In particular, outcomes research seeks to reveal the effects of pharmaceutical, procedural, and structural aspects of healthcare on patient outcomes, including mortality, disease control, toxicity, cost, and quality of life. Although outcomes research can utilize interventional study designs, insightful use of observational data is a defining feature of this field. Many questions in gynecologic oncology are not amenable to investigation in randomized clinical trials due to cost, feasibility, or ethical concerns. When a randomized trial is not practical or has not yet been conducted, well-designed observational studies have the potential to provide the best available evidence about the effects of clinical care. Such studies may use surveys, medical records, disease registries, and a variety of administrative data sources. Even when a randomized trial has been conducted, observational studies can be used to estimate the real-world effect of an intervention, which may differ from the results obtained in the controlled setting of a clinical trial. This article reviews the goals, methodologies, data sources, and limitations of clinical outcomes research, with a focus on gynecologic oncology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: behavioral science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Robert B; Patel, Sunita K; Embry, Leanne; Hardy, Kristina K; Pelletier, Wendy; Annett, Robert D; Patenaude, Andrea; Lown, E Anne; Sands, Stephen A; Barakat, Lamia P

    2013-06-01

    Behavioral science has long played a central role in pediatric oncology clinical service and research. Early work focused on symptom relief related to side effects of chemotherapy and pain management related to invasive medical procedures. As survival rates improved, the focused has shifted to examination of the psychosocial impact, during and after treatment, of pediatric cancer and its treatment on children and their families. The success of the clinical trials networks related to survivorship highlights an even more critical role in numerous domains of psychosocial research and care. Within the cooperative group setting, the field of behavioral science includes psychologists, social workers, physicians, nurses, and parent advisors. The research agenda of this group of experts needs to focus on utilization of psychometrically robust measures to evaluate the impact of treatment on children with cancer and their families during and after treatment ends. Over the next 5 years, the field of behavioral science will need to develop and implement initiatives to expand use of standardized neurocognitive and behavior batteries; increase assessment of neurocognition using technology; early identification of at-risk children/families; establish standards for evidence-based psychosocial care; and leverage linkages with the broader behavioral health pediatric oncology community to translate empirically supported research clinical trials care to practice. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fostering Cooperation in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thursday, June 25, 2015 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between US National Cancer Institute and three agencies of the Indian government - the Department of Biotechnology, the Indian Council of Medical Research, and the Indian National Cancer Institute, a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences to foster cooperation in cancer research.

  16. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The role of radiation therapy in pediatric oncology as assessed by cooperative clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angio, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances have been made in pediatric oncology, and many are due to the advent of the cooperative clinical trial. This important research tool was originally developed for the testing of various therapeutic strategies for the management of children with acute leukemia. Such trials were eminently successful, as the consistently better long-term survival rates for children with this hitherto uniformly lethal disease can attest. The method soon found favor for the investigation of patients with so-called solid tumors. These trails were originally concerned with the elucidation of the value of various chemotherapeutic agents. Radiation therapists soon became involved, however, and this discipline became more heavily represented in study design and data analyses. Much radiation therapy information has been gained, some through prospective, randomized clinical investigations and some through retrospective reviews of roentgen therapy as it was employed in protocols accenting other aspects of care. Voluminous, important radiation therapy data have been deduced through the latter retrospective kinds of analyses, but this review will be confined largely to the published results of prospective, randomized cooperative clinical trials where radiation therapy was a governing variable. Certain investigations of historical interest will also be cited together with other results that established important principles even though not so rigorous in design

  18. Pediatric Oncology Branch - training- resident electives | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resident Electives Select pediatric residents may be approved for a 4-week elective rotation at the Pediatric Oncology Branch. This rotation emphasizes the important connection between research and patient care in pediatric oncology. The resident is supervised directly by the Branch’s attending physician and clinical fellows. Residents attend daily in-patient and out-patient

  19. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gena Kanas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Gena Kanas1, Libby Morimoto1, Fionna Mowat1, Cynthia O’Malley2, Jon Fryzek3, Robert Nordyke21Exponent, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA; 2Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 3MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry, clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes, and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.Keywords: medical informatics, health care, policy, outcomes

  20. Cooperation in research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanna, R.

    1977-01-01

    In planning scientific programs for rapid and extensive peaceful applications of atomic energy in any developing country, it is not fully realized that one of the most important inputs is a strong research and development (R and D) base with a well-oriented training program. The paper discusses the various ways in which R and D is required to assist in both indigenous and turnkey projects. The R and D organization should be broad based; i.e., it should have physicists, chemists (particularly specialists in water chemistry), health physicists, and engineers (particularly metallurgists for materials development, study of corrosion problems, etc.). The role of electronic engineers is also very significant from the viewpoint of designing reactor control systems. Another important advantage of having an R and D program is its general technological fallout, which aids the entire industrial structure of the country. The concept of regional cooperation is very important, particularly for atomic energy programs in developing countries that have similar conditions and levels of technological skills. This cooperation can be bilateral or multilateral under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Scientists from several countries have been trained in our Center, and we also had a very successful India-Philippines-Agency Project in which scientists from many countries in the region participated in cooperative research programs

  1. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  2. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute’s Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  3. 45 CFR 46.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.114 Cooperative research. Cooperative... conduct of cooperative research projects, each institution is responsible for safeguarding the rights and...

  4. Cooperative Learning: Developments in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from kindergarten through to college level and across different subject areas. Cooperative learning involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks. Interest in cooperative learning has…

  5. Successful Integration of Cooperative Groups: The Origin of the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaman, Gregory H

    2012-01-01

    In March 2000, the four legacy pediatric cooperative groups officially merged to become the Children's Oncology Group (COG). This was accomplished by the ratification of a new constitution by the respective executive committees and voting membership of the four legacy groups. The actual merger was preceded by a 12 to 18 month period of planning, negotiation, and transition, overseen by a Transition Committee of select executive leadership under the direction of the four current chairs of the existing pediatric groups. Despite the constant threat of budget reductions and questions related to the judicious use of National Cancer Institute (NCI) funds to support four pediatric groups when "children constitute only 3% of the US cancer problem," the decision to unify was initiated and driven internally. The merger was envisioned as an opportunity to create efficiency by reducing duplicative systems and processes, which was becoming increasingly apparent as more planned clinical trials required intergroup collaboration. It was also recognized that such intergroup efforts would become more of a reality as clinical trial paradigms were built on risk-adjusted approaches. Clinically, biologically, and molecularly defined homogeneous subgroups of patients were of insufficient sample size within each group to design and conduct studies within a reasonable time frame. In essence, this merger was motivated by an overwhelming sense of necessity to preserve our mission of defining and delivering compassionate and state-of-the-art care through scientific discovery. The merger process itself was challenging, time consuming, not supported by any supplemental funding, and at times painful. What has emerged as a result is the largest pediatric cancer research organization in the world. Accomplishments in epidemiology, biology, translational science, and improved clinical outcomes for some pediatric cancers would have never been achieved without the merger. The very fact that outcome

  6. 21 CFR 56.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cooperative research. 56.114 Section 56.114 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARDS IRB Functions and Operations § 56.114 Cooperative research. In complying with these...

  7. 40 CFR 26.1114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperative research. 26.1114 Section 26.1114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN... Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1114 Cooperative research. In complying with this subpart...

  8. Infusing culture into oncology research on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashing-Giwa, Kimlin; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    To review the literature relevant to understanding culturally informed oncology research, particularly as it relates to health-related quality of life. Published articles and books. A cultural perspective to the prevailing theory and research methods used in oncology research with respect to quality of life is imperative. A multidimensional and practical framework can be applied to increase cultural competence in research by addressing the purpose of the research, theoretical framework, and methodologic approaches. Culturally competent, multicultural research will help the scientific community better comprehend disparities that exist in health-related quality of life so that benefits can be experienced by all patients. Nursing practice and research must continue its leadership role to infuse cultural competence and reduce disparities in the healthcare system.

  9. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Support Services | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Support Services As part of the comprehensive care provided at the NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, we provide a wide range of services to address the social, psychological, emotional, and practical facets of pediatric cancer and to support patients and families while they are enrolled in clinical research protocols.

  10. The impact of qualitative research on gynaecologic oncology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Jeffrey Andrew; Abitbol, Jeremie; Lau, Susie; Gotlieb, Walter Henri; Abenhaim, Haim Arie

    2015-02-01

    Inherent in the care provided to patients with cancer is an important psychosocial element which has been explored scientifically through qualitative research. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the availability of qualitative research in gynaecologic oncology and to measure its integration in gynaecologic oncology practice guidelines. We searched Medline, CINHAL, Scopus, and Web of Science databases to identify the availability of qualitative research conducted in the past 20 years on the three most prevalent gynaecologic cancers: endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer. National and international practice guidelines on management of gynaecologic cancers were selected using the National Guideline Clearinghouse website, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada website, and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence directory of cancer guidelines. Bibliometric analysis was used to determine the frequency of qualitative references cited in these guidelines. One hundred thirteen qualitative research papers on gynaecologic cancers were identified focusing on psychological impacts, social dynamics, and doctor-patient interactions during cancer treatment and recovery. Among the 15 national and international clinical practice guidelines identified on management of gynaecologic cancer, there were a total of 2272 references, and of these only three references citing qualitative research were identified (0.1%) in only one of the 15 practice guidelines. Although qualitative research is being carried out in gynaecologic oncology, its integration into clinical practice guidelines is essentially absent. Efforts to narrow the gap between qualitative research and clinical practice are essential in ensuring a comprehensive approach to the treatment of patients with gynaecologic cancer.

  11. Nordic cooperation within natural gas research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edna, O.-J.

    1993-01-01

    Nordic cooperation within natural gas research is discussed. A reorganization of this cooperation has recently taken place. It is explained that common Nordic resources are now to be concentrated within 7 areas, one of which is the area of energy/industrial policies, regional policies and agriculture and forestry, all under the common heading of ''Economy''. The plan of activities within this area includes international cooperation within the European Communities, the European Energy Charter, the International Energy Agency and will involve the energy policy situation in eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, the electric power and natural gas markets in the northern countries, energy related environmental questions and Nordic energy research cooperation. Nordic research activities constitute 2% of research resources within the OECD. The basis for Nordic research cooperation (for example a common cultural background) is described, and suggestions are made as to how it should be administrated. The Nordic energy research programme for 1991-1994 embodies bioenergy and the environment, fuel cells, energy and the society, solid fuels, district heating and petroleum technology. The status report for the nordic gas market, which represents the Nordic gas companies' evaluation of the Nordic gas market, is summarized, and Nordic research activities related to gas utilization are shortly commented upon. (AB)

  12. The actual citation impact of European oncological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Illescas, Carmen; de Moya-Anegón, Félix; Moed, Henk F

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the research performance of major European countries in the field Oncology, the most important journals in which they published their research articles, and the most important academic institutions publishing them. The analysis was based on Thomson Scientific's Web of Science (WoS) and calculated bibliometric indicators of publication activity and actual citation impact. Studying the time period 2000-2006, it gives an update of earlier studies, but at the same time it expands their methodologies, using a broader definition of the field, calculating indicators of actual citation impact, and analysing new and policy relevant aspects. Findings suggest that the emergence of Asian countries in the field Oncology has displaced European articles more strongly than articles from the USA; that oncologists who have published their articles in important, more general journals or in journals covering other specialties, rather than in their own specialist journals, have generated a relatively high actual citation impact; and that universities from Germany, and--to a lesser extent--those from Italy, the Netherlands, UK, and Sweden, dominate a ranking of European universities based on number of articles in oncology. The outcomes illustrate that different bibliometric methodologies may lead to different outcomes, and that outcomes should be interpreted with care.

  13. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A. (eds.)

    1991-05-28

    Significant progress was made in the May 1990--May 1991 contract period in three primary coal liquefaction research areas: catalysis, structure-reactivity studies, and novel liquefaction processes. A brief summary of the accomplishments in the past year in each of these areas is given.

  14. Information Infrastructure for Cooperative Research in Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Durka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a framework for efficient sharing of knowledge between research groups, which have been working for several years without flaws. The obstacles in cooperation are connected primarily with the lack of platforms for effective exchange of experimental data, models, and algorithms. The solution to these problems is proposed by construction of the platform (EEG.pl with the semantic aware search scheme between portals. The above approach implanted in the international cooperative projects like NEUROMATH may bring the significant progress in designing efficient methods for neuroscience research.

  15. Collaborative action research: implementation of cooperative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Stoner, Marilyn; Molle, Mary E

    2010-06-01

    Nurse educators must continually improve their teaching skills through innovation. However, research about the process used by faculty members to transform their teaching methods is limited. This collaborative study uses classroom action research to describe, analyze, and address problems encountered in implementing cooperative learning in two undergraduate nursing courses. After four rounds of action and reflection, the following themes emerged: students did not understand the need for structured cooperative learning; classroom structure and seating arrangement influenced the effectiveness of activities; highly structured activities engaged the students; and short, targeted activities that involved novel content were most effective. These findings indicate that designing specific activities to prepare students for class is critical to cooperative learning. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. 34 CFR 97.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.114 Cooperative... safeguarding the rights and welfare of human subjects and for complying with this policy. With the approval of...

  17. Cooperative behavior, competition and operations research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Estevez Fernandez, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Game theory is the mathematical tool to study cooperation and competition. Since the beginnings of operations research and game theory both fields have been closely related. This thesis further investigates this relationship. Costs or rewards sharing problems arising from scheduling problems,

  18. Regulating hematology/oncology research involving human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2002-12-01

    The conduct of hematology/oncology research, particularly clinical trials involving human participants, is an extensively regulated enterprise. Professionals in the specialty of hematology/oncology have important stakes in the success of biomedical research endeavors. Knowledge about and compliance strategies regarding the pertinent regulatory parameters are essential for avoiding negative legal repercussions for involved professionals. At the same time, there is a need to be aware of and actively resist the danger that strong [legal] protectionism might inadvertently result in undermining physician investigators' sense of personal moral responsibility in the conduct of human experiments. For all the limitations of that virtue in the protection of human subjects, it is surely not one that we would want medical scientists to be without [47]. Members of the potential participant pool, financial sponsors, and the general public must be convinced that everyone involved in the research enterprise is committed to operating within acceptable legal and ethical boundaries if the atmosphere of confidence and trust that is indispensable to the continued process and progress of investigation aimed at extending and improving quality of life for all of us in the future is to continue and flourish [48].

  19. Developing an organizing framework to guide nursing research in the Children’s Oncology Group (COG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Katherine Patterson; Hooke, Mary C.; Ruccione, Kathleen; Landier, Wendy; Haase, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the development and application of an organizing research framework to guide COG Nursing research. Data Sources Research articles, reports and meeting minutes Conclusion An organizing research framework helps to outline research focus and articulate the scientific knowledge being produced by nurses in the pediatric cooperative group. Implication for Nursing Practice The use of an organizing framework for COG nursing research can facilitate clinical nurses’ understanding of how children and families sustain or regain optimal health when faced with a pediatric cancer diagnosis through interventions designed to promote individual and family resilience. The Children’s Oncology Group (COG) is the sole National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported cooperative pediatric oncology clinical trials group and the largest organization in the world devoted exclusively to pediatric cancer research. It was founded in 2000 following the merger of the four legacy NCI-supported pediatric clinical trials groups (Children’s Cancer Group [CCG], Pediatric Oncology Group [POG], National Wilms Tumor Study Group, and Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group). The COG currently has over 200 member institutions across North America, Australia, New Zealand and Europe and a multidisciplinary membership of over 8,000 pediatric, radiation, and surgical oncologists, nurses, clinical research associates, pharmacists, behavioral scientists, pathologists, laboratory scientists, patient/parent advocates and other pediatric cancer specialists. The COG Nursing Discipline was formed from the merger of the legacy CCG and POG Nursing Committees, and current membership exceeds 2000 registered nurses. The discipline has a well-developed infrastructure that promotes nursing involvement throughout all levels of the organization, including representation on disease, protocol, scientific, executive and other administrative committees (e.g., nominating committee, data safety monitoring

  20. 77 FR 26583 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... Production Act of 1993--Cooperative Research Group on Evaluation of Distributed Leak Detection Systems... Institute-- Cooperative Research Group on Evaluation of Distributed Leak Detection Systems--Performance... detection systems for offshore pipelines. Laboratory testing of distributed temperature and distributed...

  1. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Research and innovation in the development of everolimus for oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, David; Thomas, George; Lane, Heidi A; O'Reilly, Terence; Escudier, Bernard; Yao, James C; Pavel, Marianne; Franz, David; Berg, William; Baladi, Jean-Francois; Stewart, Jubilee; Motzer, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    The critical role of increased activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the pathophysiology of multiple diseases is well established. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway may block disease progression and improve patient outcomes. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, began in clinical development as part of a regimen (Certican, Zortress) for prevention of organ transplant rejection and is now an approved oncology agent. The objective of this review is to discuss the history of key findings and innovative cancer research undertaken to successfully develop everolimus as an oncology therapy (Afinitor) now approved for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) associated with tuberous sclerosis. In addition, data for the use of everolimus in the treatment of other cancers and rare diseases are also discussed. A PubMed search of English articles without time restrictions was conducted using the search terms 'everolimus or rapamycin' and 'cancer'. Bibliographies of retrieved articles were manually searched for additional relevant articles. Major cancer congresses were also searched. The clinical efficacy of everolimus alone and in combination with other agents has been observed in recently completed Phase II-III studies in a wide spectrum of tumors, including RCC, neuroendocrine tumors, tuberous sclerosis complex, SEGAs and angiomyolipomas, lymphoma and gastric, breast and hepatocellular cancers. These findings emphasize the importance of mTOR in diverse cancers and rare diseases and underscore the potential role for everolimus as an effective agent in multiple indications.

  3. Developments in cooperative learning: review of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn M. Gillies

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative learning, where students work in small groups to accomplish shared goals, is widely recognized as a teaching strategy that promotes learning and socialization among students from kindergarten through college and across different subject domains. It has been used successfully to promote reading and writing achievements, understanding and conceptual development in science classes, problem-solving in mathematics, and higher-order thinking and learning to name just a few. It has been shown to enhance students' willingness to work cooperatively and productively with others with diverse learning and adjustment needs and to enhance intergroup relations with those from culturally and ethnically different backgrounds. It has also been used as a teaching strategy to assist students to manage conflict and to help students identified as bullies learn appropriate interpersonal skills. In fact, it has been argued that cooperative learning experiences are crucial to preventing and alleviating many of the social problems related to children, adolescents, and young adults. There is no doubt that the benefits attributed to cooperative learning are widespread and numerous and it is the apparent success of this approach to learning that has led to it being acclaimed as one of the greatest educational innovations of recent times. The purpose of this paper is not only to review developments in research on cooperative learning but also to examine the factors that mediate and moderate its success. In particular, the review focuses on the types of student and teacher interactions generated and the key role talk plays in developing student thinking and learning, albeit through the expression of contrasting opinions or constructed shared meaning. The intention is to provide additional insights on how teachers can effectively utilize this pedagogical approach to teaching and learning in their classrooms.

  4. Radiotherapy in cooperative clinical trials: Northern California Oncology Group (NCOG) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, E.A.; Meurk, M.L.; Ray, G.; Phillips, T.L.; Carter, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The inclusion of radiation therapy in multimodality clinical research has demonstrated the need for consultion and standardization of terminology and practice between participating centers. A set of guidelines has been developed to ensure that the radiotherapy section of a cooperative study is comprehensive and unambiguous, and that the techniques, fractionation and dosage used are sufficiently uniform to provide a homogeneous group of patients for comparative purposes. An outline is given for the preparation of radiotherapy protocols including the necessary details of physical factors, localization and simulation, portal and treatment volume definition, dosimetry requirements, specification of dose, and treatment documentation

  5. Analysis of oncology research from 2001 to 2010: a scientometric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hongfang; Yu, Qi; Bo, Xiaoming; Duan, Zhiguang

    2013-04-01

    Over the past half-century, the incidence of tumours has increased, resulting in cancer becoming one of the most lethal diseases in humans. In the present study, we elucidated the status of oncology research from 2001 to 2010. Studies published in 30 representative oncology journals were retrieved from the Web of Science (2001-2010) to compose our dataset. Knowledge domain visualisation, co-citation analysis and social network analysis methods were used. By mapping the oncology research performed from 2001 to 2010, we identified the primary research centres, including the top 20 institutions and countries and the 4 major oncology research fronts: i) the mechanism of abnormal oncogene expression; ii) tumour metastasis and angiogenesis; iii) the relationship between cancer cells and apoptosis; and iv) tumour vaccines. We also identified the 36 most collaborative academic communities, and multiple myeloma, angiogenesis and acute lymphocytic leukaemia were found to be the focuses of collaborative research in oncology from 2001 to 2010. Over the past 10 years, America has led oncology research, while China is the sole developing country to be ranked in the top 10. Analyses of the main research centres and forefronts may assist researchers in addressing these forefronts and ascertaining the developing trends in oncology. Analysis of the academic communities performing oncology research may provide scientific evidence and suggestions for policymakers to select the most prolific academic groups and leaders and to effectively manage and finance future oncology research. These selected groups and individuals will carry out additional joint undertakings and solve complex problems encountered in oncology research.

  6. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, J.P.; Lucier, A.A.; Haines, L.W.

    1993-01-01

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs

  7. [Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network (RECAVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dorado, David; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Díez, Javier; Gabriel, Rafael; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R; Ortiz de Landázuri, Manuel; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Today, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of death and hospitalization in Spain, and accounts for an annual healthcare budget of more than 4000 million euros. Consequently, early diagnosis, effective prevention, and the optimum treatment of cardiovascular disease present a significant social and healthcare challenge for the country. In this context, combining all available resources to increase the efficacy and healthcare benefits of scientific research is a priority. This rationale prompted the establishment of the Spanish Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network, or RECAVA (Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Enfermedades Cardiovasculares), 5 years ago. Since its foundation, RECAVA's activities have focused on achieving four objectives: a) to facilitate contacts between basic, clinical and epidemiological researchers; b) to promote the shared use of advanced technological facilities; c) to apply research results to clinical practice, and d) to train a new generation of translational cardiovascular researchers in Spain. At present, RECAVA consists of 41 research groups and seven shared technological facilities. RECAVA's research strategy is based on a scientific design matrix centered on the most important cardiovascular processes. The level of RECAVA's research activity is reflected in the fact that 28 co-authored articles were published in international journals during the first six months of 2007, with each involving contributions from at least two groups in the network. Finally, RECAVA also participates in the work of the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research, or CNIC (Centro Nacional de Investigación Cardiovascular), and some established Biomedical Research Network Centers, or CIBER (Centros de Investigación Biomédica en RED), with the aim of consolidating the development of a dynamic multidisciplinary research framework that is capable of meeting the growing challenge that cardiovascular disease will present

  8. Pediatric Oncology Branch - training- medical student rotations | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medical Student Rotations Select 4th-year medical students may be approved for a 4-week elective rotation at the Pediatric Oncology Branch. This rotation emphasizes the important connection between research and patient care in pediatric oncology. The student is supervised directly by the Branch’s attending physician and clinical fellows. Students attend daily in-patient and

  9. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamis, Alan S; Alonzo, Todd A; Perentesis, John P; Meshinchi, Soheil

    2013-06-01

    For the 365 children diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia in the US annually, 5-year survival for patients on COG trials with low, intermediate, and high risk disease is 83%, 62%, and 23%, respectively. Recent advances include improved therapeutic stratification, improved survival with dose intensification, and further elucidation of the heterogeneity specific to childhood AML. These discoveries now guide current strategy incorporating targeted agents to pathways specific to childhood AML as well as evaluating methods to increase the sensitivity of the leukemic stem cell, first in Phase II feasibility trials followed by Phase III efficacy trials of the most promising agents. Acute myeloid leukemia in children, though with similar subgroups to adults, remains uniquely different based upon quite different prevalence of subtypes as well as overall response to therapy. The Children's Oncology Group's research agenda builds upon earlier efforts to better elucidate the leukemogenic steps distinct to childhood AML in order to more scientifically develop and test novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment and ultimate cure for children with this disorder. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013; 60: 964-971. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. International solar energy research co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P.; Peippo, K.; Konttinen, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    Finland has participated in several IEA activities during 1996-97. HUT coordinates the activities, but practical participation in collaborative actions take place both in industrial companies and research organisations. Neste Ltd has directly participated in several tasks and information of results has been disseminated more widely to Finnish industries and organisations. Co-operation projects covered here are: (1) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 1 `Information dissemination`, (2) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 3 `Use of Photovoltaic systems in Stand Alone and Island Applications`, (3) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 7 `Photovoltaics in built environment`, (4) IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program Task 16 `Photovoltaics in buildings` and (5) IEA Working Group `Materials in Solar Thermal Collectors`

  11. Citation analysis of Canadian psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Thomas F; Crooks, Dauna; Plohman, James; Kepron, Emma

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a historical review of psycho-oncology and supportive care research in Canada using citation analysis and to review the clinical impact of the research conducted by the most highly cited researchers. The lifetime journal publication records of 109 psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers in Canada were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database, based on citations since 1996 of articles deemed relevant to psychosocial oncology and supportive care, excluding self-citations. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: the number of citations for each journal publication, a summative citation count of all published articles, and the Scopus h-index. The top 20 psycho-oncology/supportive care researchers for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of citations for all publications; the number of citations for first-authored publications; the most highly cited first-authored publications; the Scopus h-index for all publications; and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. The three most highly cited Canadian psycho-oncology researchers are Dr. Kerry Courneya (University of Alberta), Dr. Lesley Degner, (University of Manitoba), and Dr. Harvey Chochinov (University of Manitoba). Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers and identifying leaders among them.

  12. 76 FR 39901 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Production Act of 1993--Cooperative Research Group on Development of a Predictive Model for Corrosion-Fatigue...(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the... applicability and robustness, it will be (1) Based on scientific principles, (2) informed by fundamental...

  13. A framework for prescription in exercise-oncology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, John P; Eves, Neil D; Christensen, Jesper F

    2015-01-01

    The field of exercise-oncology has increased dramatically over the past two decades, with close to 100 published studies investigating the efficacy of structured exercise training interventions in patients with cancer. Of interest, despite considerable differences in study population and primary ...

  14. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Peter B.; Sopka, Dennis M.; Kathpal, Madeera; Haynes, Jeffrey C.; Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published ≥1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented ≥1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  15. Influence of a sampling review process for radiation oncology quality assurance in cooperative group clinical trials -- results of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Linda A.; Krall, John M.; Curran, Walter J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Cox, James D.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) designed a random sampling process and observed its influence upon radiotherapy review mechanisms in cooperative group clinical trials. The method of sampling cases for review was modeled from sampling techniques commonly used in pharmaceutical quality assurance programs, and applied to the initial (on-study) review of protocol cases. 'In control' (IC) status is defined for a given facility as the ability to meet minimum compliance standards. Upon achieving IC status, activation of the sampling process was linked to the rate of continued patient accrual for each participating institution in a given protocol. The sampling design specified that ≥ 30% cases not in compliance would be detected with 80% power. A total of 458 cases was analyzed for initial review findings in four RTOG Phase III protocols. Initial review findings were compared with retrospective (final) review results. Of the 458 cases analyzed, 370 underwent initial review at on-study, while 88 did not require review as they were enrolled from institutions that had demonstrated protocol compliance. In the group that had both initial and final review, (345(370)) (93%) were found to have followed the protocol or had a minor variation. Of the exempted cases, (79(88)) (90%) were found to be per protocol or a minor variant. The sampling process proved itself to be cost-effective and resulted in a noticeable reduction in the workload, thus providing an improved approach to resource allocation for the group. Continued evaluation of the sampling mechanism is appropriate as study designs and participants vary over time, and as more data become available to study. Further investigation of individual protocol compliance is appropriate to identify problems specific to new trial investigations

  16. Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: Improving Access to National Cooperative Pediatric Oncology Group (AIEOP) Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Andrea; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Mascarin, Maurizio; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mosso, Maria Luisa; Maule, Milena; Barisone, Elena; Bertolotti, Marina; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Fagioli, Franca; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This analysis compared the numbers of patients treated at Italian pediatric oncology group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica [AIEOP]) centers with the numbers of cases predicted according to the population-based registry. It considered 32,431 patients registered in the AIEOP database (1989-2012). The ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases was 0.79 for children (0-14 years old) and 0.15 for adolescents (15-19 years old). The proportion of adolescents increased significantly over the years, however, from 0.05 in the earliest period to 0.10, 0.18, and then 0.28 in the latest period of observation, suggesting a greater efficacy of local/national programs dedicated to adolescents. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Balancing research interests and patient interests: a qualitative study into the intertwinement of care and research in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; van der Graaf, Rieke; Kars, Marijke C; Beishuizen, Auke; de Vries, Martine C; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, in ethical guidelines and in research ethics literature, care and research are clearly separated based on their different objectives. In contrast, in paediatric oncology, research and care are closely combined. Currently, it is unknown how relevant actors in paediatric oncology perceive this combination of research and care. We conducted a qualitative study into the experiences of those involved in Dutch paediatric oncology with the intertwinement of research and care and the dual role of paediatric oncologists as researchers and treating physicians. A qualitative study approach, using two focus groups and 19 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with paediatric oncologists, research coordinators, parents of children with cancer, and adolescents with cancer. Four themes characterize how actors experience the intertwinement of research and care in paediatric oncology. First, research is considered of major importance, and paediatric oncology professionals convey this message to patients and their parents. Second, there is ambiguity about categorization of studies into cancer therapy as either research or treatment. Third, role conflicts appear within the work of the paediatric oncologists. Finally, the various benefits of combining treatment with research are emphasized. Research is regarded as a fundamental and indispensable characteristic of paediatric oncology practice. Paediatric oncology professionals, parents, and patients have a very positive outlook on combining research and care, but they may not be sufficiently critical with respect to potential conflicts. Increased reflection on how to optimally combine research and care could serve as an important protection of the interests of children with cancer and their parents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cooperative Learning: Review of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from pre-school through to tertiary level and across different subject domains. It involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks--goals and tasks that they would be unable to complete by…

  19. Southern Ocean - South African cooperative research programme.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SANCOR

    1979-05-01

    Full Text Available and elsewhere- and to ensure the most efficient possible utilization of limited manpower and facilities, a national programme had to be formulated to achieve the required coordination and cooperation. Such a programme is presented in this report, compiled...

  20. Recommendations for the Return of Research Results to Study Participants and Guardians: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Conrad V.; Ruccione, Kathleen; Wells, Robert J.; Long, Jay B.; Pelletier, Wendy; Hooke, Mary C.; Pentz, Rebecca D.; Noll, Robert B.; Baker, Justin N.; O'Leary, Maura; Reaman, Gregory; Adamson, Peter C.; Joffe, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Children's Oncology Group (COG) strongly supports the widely recognized principle that research participants should be offered a summary of study results. The mechanism by which to do so in a cooperative research group setting has not been previously described. Methods On the basis of a review of the available empirical and theoretic literature and on iterative, multidisciplinary discussion, a COG Return of Results Task Force (RRTF) offered detailed recommendations for the return of results to research study participants. Results The RRTF established guidelines for the notification of research participants and/or their parents/guardians about the availability of research results, a mechanism for and timing of sharing results via registration on the COG public Web site, the scope of the research to be shared, the target audience, and a process for creating and vetting lay summaries of study results. The RRTF recognized the challenges in adequately conveying complex scientific results to audiences with varying levels of health literacy and recommended that particularly sensitive or complex results be returned using direct personal contact. The RRTF also recommended evaluation of the cost, effectiveness, and impact of sharing results. Conclusion These recommendations provide a framework for the offering and returning of results to participants. They can be used by individual investigators, multi-investigator research collaboratives, and large cooperative groups. PMID:23109703

  1. Researchers and mine managers cooperate for better technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    How cooperation between mine managers and research organizations can result in practical technology and better work methods is discussed. Specific cases of how this close cooperation has helped in the U.K., Swedish blasting experiments, linear array scanners for Australian geologic evaluation, coal preparation in Canada, and deep mine problems in South Africa are given

  2. Report of China's innovation increase and research growth in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Qin, Qin; Bian, Kangqi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Jia; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the research status of radiation oncology in China through survey of literature in international radiation oncology journals and retrospectively compare the outputs of radiation oncology articles of the three major regions of China-Mainland (ML), Taiwan (TW) and Hong Kong (HK). Radiation oncology journals were selected from "oncology" and "radiology, nuclear & medical image" category from Science Citation Index Expand (SCIE). Articles from the ML, TW and HK were retrieved from MEDLINE. The number of total articles, clinical trials, case reports, impact factors (IF), institutions and articles published in each journals were conducted for quantity and quality comparisons. A total 818 articles from 13 radiation oncology journals were searched, of which 427 are from ML, 259 from TW, and 132 from HK. Ninety-seven clinical trials and 5 case reports are reported in China. Accumulated IF of articles from ML (1,417.11) was much higher than that of TW (1,003.093) and HK (544.711), while the average IF of articles from ML is the lowest. The total number of articles from China especially ML increased significantly in the last decade. The number of articles published from the ML has exceeded those from TW and HK. However, the quality of articles from TW and HK is better than that from ML.

  3. International human cooperation in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Kaieda, Keisuke; Makuuchi, Keizo; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1997-01-01

    Rearing of talented persons in the area of nuclear energy is one of the important works in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this report, the present situations and future schedules of international human cooperation in this area wsere summarized. First, the recent activities of International Nuclear Technology Center were outlined in respect of international human cooperation. A study and training course which was started in cooperation with JICA and IAEA from the middle of eighties and the international nuclear safety seminar aiming at advancing the nuclear safety level of the world are now being put into practice. In addition, a study and training for rearing talented persons was started from 1996 to improve the nuclear safety level of the neighbouring countries. The activities of the nuclear research interchange system by Science and Technology Agency established in 1985 and Bilateral Co-operation Agreement from 1984 were explained and also various difficulties in the international cooperation were pointed out. (M.N.)

  4. Considerations for Observational Research Using Large Data Sets in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Aileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tina Shih, Ya-Chen [Department of Medicine, Section of Hospital Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, and Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, James B. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  5. Considerations for Observational Research Using Large Data Sets in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Chen, Aileen; Chen, Ronald C.; Hoffman, Karen; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen; Smith, Benjamin D.; Yu, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The radiation oncology community has witnessed growing interest in observational research conducted using large-scale data sources such as registries and claims-based data sets. With the growing emphasis on observational analyses in health care, the radiation oncology community must possess a sophisticated understanding of the methodological considerations of such studies in order to evaluate evidence appropriately to guide practice and policy. Because observational research has unique features that distinguish it from clinical trials and other forms of traditional radiation oncology research, the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics assembled a panel of experts in health services research to provide a concise and well-referenced review, intended to be informative for the lay reader, as well as for scholars who wish to embark on such research without prior experience. This review begins by discussing the types of research questions relevant to radiation oncology that large-scale databases may help illuminate. It then describes major potential data sources for such endeavors, including information regarding access and insights regarding the strengths and limitations of each. Finally, it provides guidance regarding the analytical challenges that observational studies must confront, along with discussion of the techniques that have been developed to help minimize the impact of certain common analytical issues in observational analysis. Features characterizing a well-designed observational study include clearly defined research questions, careful selection of an appropriate data source, consultation with investigators with relevant methodological expertise, inclusion of sensitivity analyses, caution not to overinterpret small but significant differences, and recognition of limitations when trying to evaluate causality. This review concludes that carefully designed and executed studies using observational data that possess these qualities hold

  6. [Using Twitter in oncology. Research, continuing education, and advocacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiore, Luciano; Ascierto, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Traditional mass media coverage has been enhanced by Twitter, an interactive, real-time media, useful in health care, and particularly in oncology. Social media such as Twitter are gaining increasing acceptance as tools for instantaneous scientific dialogue. Professional medical societies such as ASCO and ESMO are using microblogging to expand the reach of scientific communications at and around their scientific meetings. To widen the message and maximize the potential for word-of-mouth marketing using Twitter, organizations (such as AIOM, ASCO or ESMO) and industries need a strategic communications plan to ensure on-going social media conversations. Twitter is a very powerful tool indeed that amplifies the results of scientific meetings, and conference organisers should put in place strategies to capitalise on this. This review demonstrates that cancer patients also share information more and more via Twitter about their disease, including diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments. This information could prove useful to health care providers.

  7. Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program partners with a subset of commercial fishermen to collect high quality, high resolution, haul by haul...

  8. Cooperative Training Partnership in Aquatic Toxicology and Ecosystem Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-ORD seeks applications to enter into a cooperative agreement with EPA that will provide training opportunities for undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral trainees on-site at ORD’s Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED) research

  9. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National

  10. Analysis of Trends in Cooperative Network Patterns for KAERI Researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Young Choon; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    There has been a trend toward faster results of research and accelerating inter-disciplinary convergence, under constraints in available resources. Under such reality, national and international cooperation with inter-sectoral research on science-technology-industry is becoming inevitable as a strategic approach for enhancing competitive edge on global dimension. This study gives an analysis on the cooperative network in nuclear research which bears multi-disciplinary technical feature. The study aims to visualize the cooperative network of KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) researchers, as the hub of the network, including academics and industry, with a view to provide insight on strengthening the cooperative network in nuclear research. This study accounted for the paper entries in SCI(E) in 2013 (538 papers) and 2015 (551 papers) with a view to identify cooperative research activities centered for KAERI. On international cooperation, the analysis showed a trend toward, first of all, diversification of partner countries. There were 118 entries of co-authorship with 22 countries in 2013 (41 with USA, 12 with Japan, 9 with India), which evolved to 121 entries in 2015 (34 for USA, 11 with China, 10 each with Japan and India). Secondly, there was a trend toward more number of countries evenly spread in 2015 compared to 2013, except a few major countries like USA, Japan, and India

  11. Analysis of Trends in Cooperative Network Patterns for KAERI Researchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Young Choon; Lee, Hyun Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    There has been a trend toward faster results of research and accelerating inter-disciplinary convergence, under constraints in available resources. Under such reality, national and international cooperation with inter-sectoral research on science-technology-industry is becoming inevitable as a strategic approach for enhancing competitive edge on global dimension. This study gives an analysis on the cooperative network in nuclear research which bears multi-disciplinary technical feature. The study aims to visualize the cooperative network of KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) researchers, as the hub of the network, including academics and industry, with a view to provide insight on strengthening the cooperative network in nuclear research. This study accounted for the paper entries in SCI(E) in 2013 (538 papers) and 2015 (551 papers) with a view to identify cooperative research activities centered for KAERI. On international cooperation, the analysis showed a trend toward, first of all, diversification of partner countries. There were 118 entries of co-authorship with 22 countries in 2013 (41 with USA, 12 with Japan, 9 with India), which evolved to 121 entries in 2015 (34 for USA, 11 with China, 10 each with Japan and India). Secondly, there was a trend toward more number of countries evenly spread in 2015 compared to 2013, except a few major countries like USA, Japan, and India.

  12. Use of partnership strategies to build radiation oncology disparities research programs in five Western Pennsylvania communities: an organizational case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenlander, Keith H; Heron, Dwight E; Schenken, Larry L

    2009-01-01

    Many cancer treatment and prevention trials as well as surveillance programs suffer from a disproportionately low rate of accrual and a high rate of noncompliance or dropouts of racial minorities and the poor. One suggested strategy to help remediate this trend is to directly involve those targeted populations within the development, implementation, and evaluation of these services. The Radiation Oncology Community Outreach Group (ROCOG) and Neighborhood Cancer Care Cooperative (NCCC) are designed based upon this type of highly collaborative organizational structure, consistent with the general principles of community-based participatory research. Funded by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Disparities Research Partnership program, ROCOG/NCCC provide oncology-focused, community hospital-based initiatives intended to help close the cancer disparities gap. This article presents a descriptive case study of the organizational and political process that preceded our grant proposal submission, the potential benefits and difficulties associated with our extensive collaborative model, and an example of how highly competitive health care organizations can become partners in narrowly focused initiatives aimed at a greater social good.

  13. Barriers and facilitators experienced in collaborative prospective research in orthopaedic oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendon, J S; Swinton, M; Bernthal, N

    2017-01-01

    by orthopaedic oncological surgeons involved or interested in prospective multicentre collaboration. METHODS: All surgeons who were involved, or had expressed an interest, in the ongoing Prophylactic Antibiotic Regimens in Tumour Surgery (PARITY) trial were invited to participate in a focus group to discuss......: The 13 surgeons who participated in the discussion represented orthopaedic oncology practices from seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Spain, Denmark, United States and Canada). Four categories and associated themes emerged from the discussion: the need for collaboration in the field...... of orthopaedic oncology due to the rarity of the tumours and the need for high level evidence to guide treatment; motivational factors for participating in collaborative research including establishing proof of principle, learning opportunity, answering a relevant research question and being part...

  14. Balancing research interests and patient interests: A qualitative study into the intertwinement of care and research in paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekking, Sara; van der Graaf, R; Kars, Marijke C.; Beishuizen, A.; de Vries, Martine; van Delden, J. (Hans) J.M.

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, in ethical guidelines and in research ethics literature, care and research are clearly separated based on their different objectives. In contrast, in paediatric oncology, research and care are closely combined. Currently, it is unknown how relevant actors in paediatric

  15. Research in organizational participation and cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Hans Jeppe; Jønsson, Thomas; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses some different perspectives on organizational participation and presents conducted and ongoing research projects by the research unit SPARK at Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus.......This article discusses some different perspectives on organizational participation and presents conducted and ongoing research projects by the research unit SPARK at Department of Psychology, University of Aarhus....

  16. Informatics in clinical research in oncology: current state, challenges, and a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Amar P S

    2011-01-01

    The informatics landscape of clinical trials in oncology has changed significantly in the last 10 years. The current state of the infrastructure for clinical trial management, execution, and data management is reviewed. The systems, their functionality, the users, and the standards available to researchers are discussed from the perspective of the oncologist-researcher. Challenges in complexity and in the processing of information are outlined. These challenges include the lack of communication and information-interchange between systems, the lack of simplified standards, and the lack of implementation and adherence to the standards that are available. The clinical toxicology criteria from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) are cited as a successful standard in oncology, and HTTP on the Internet is referenced for its simplicity. Differences in the management of information standards between industries are discussed. Possible future advances in oncology clinical research informatics are addressed. These advances include strategic policy review of standards and the implementation of actions to make standards free, ubiquitous, simple, and easily interpretable; the need to change from a local data-capture- or transaction-driven model to a large-scale data-interpretation model that provides higher value to the oncologist and the patient; and the need for information technology investment in a readily available digital educational model for clinical research in oncology that is customizable for individual studies. These new approaches, with changes in information delivery to mobile platforms, will set the stage for the next decade in clinical research informatics.

  17. Quality of life research in neuro-oncology: a quantitative comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Elizabeth; Altshuler, David; Hallock, Abhirami; Szerlip, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the biology of neuro-oncologic disease has improved vastly over time, however overall patient survival remains relatively poor. Our goal as clinicians, therefore, should be to ensure that the quality of life (QOL) in that survival time is optimized. Here we review neuro-oncology QOL abstracts presented at major oncology conferences and the published literature to make a quantitative comparison to other common cancer subtypes. First, all abstracts presented at major oncology meetings from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed and filtered to find those related to QOL in CNS, breast, lung, and prostate cancer. Next, a Medline search was performed to identify all QOL papers published from 2003 to 2012 for the same cancer subtypes. The results were compared as absolute values and percentages. The average percentage of CNS QOL-related abstracts presented at ASCO and ASTRO over the last 5 years was 4.9 %, compared to 6.4 % for breast, 4.4 % for lung, and 6.1 % for prostate. There is a significant difference in total percentage of QOL abstracts over the time period when comparing CNS to breast and prostate, but not lung (p neuro-oncology research. We need to improve this by standardizing QOL measures and including them in every outcome study.

  18. Benefits and organization of cooperative research for fisheries management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, T.R.; Densen, van W.L.T.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on research in the northeastern USA and northwestern Europe, a description is given of how cooperative research is organized and a statement made of how involving fishers in research can contribute to better fisheries management. The focus is on improving stock assessments through the

  19. Transnational Research Co-operation: Opportunities and Challenges for transnational research co-operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the NGOs have a lot of international experience (mainly in Denmark and Germany) as partners in different co-operation projects. Almost all the NGOs have recognized the important role of the scientific information in their activity. NGOs also feel the need for an easy access to required information...... for transnational co-operation like: an investigation/project concerning the driving forces behind urban development,or a co-operation in the field of wastewater reuse and minimization of wastewater loads and discharge, or a service page (internet) to search for potential partners. The governmental institutions...... in order to improve transnational cooperation are identified to be: • Search for national/international project partners • Access to existent co-operation projects or networks • Develop in common project proposals on themes requested by community groups • Exchange information/good operational practices...

  20. Psycho-oncology in Australia: a descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butow, P; Dhillon, H; Shaw, J; Price, M

    2017-01-01

    Australia has a thriving Psycho-Oncology research and clinical community. In this article, the Australian health system in which Psycho-Oncology is embedded is described. Clinical Psycho-Oncology services are outlined, in terms of their composition, processes and reach. The development of the internationally ground-breaking Australian Psychosocial guidelines for the care of adults with cancer is described. Two large Psycho-Oncology organisations which are strongly linked to mainstream Oncology organisations are discussed: the Australian Psycho-Oncology Society (OzPos, a primarily clinician-led and focused organisation) and the Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG, a national cancer clinical trial group). OzPos is a special interest group within the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, while PoCoG is one of 14 cancer clinical trial groups funded by the national government. It is these strong connections with major multidisciplinary cancer organisations, and a culture of collaboration and co-operation, that have made Psycho-Oncology grow and thrive in Australia. Examples of large collaborative programs of Psycho-Oncology research are provided, as well as the mechanisms used to achieve these outcomes.

  1. International cooperation in heavy-ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The rapidly growing research applications of heavy ions in basic biology and medicine have stimulated interest in this field in many countries. LBL, with its unique facilities and its scientific programs, is the focal point of interest. Plans are underway in several countries, including France, Japan, West Germany, and Canada, to build heavy-ion facilities, and to collaborate with our staff at LBL in heavy-ion research in physics, biology, and medicine

  2. 76 FR 39901 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cooperative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    .... Moreover, the methodology incorporated into FlawPRO TM Version 4 will be validated by comparing software... Production Act of 1993--Cooperative Research Group on Development and Validation of FlawPRO for Assessing... Development and Validation of FlawPRO for Assessing Defect Tolerance of Welded Pipes Under Generalized High...

  3. 40 CFR 26.114 - Cooperative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.114... responsible for safeguarding the rights and welfare of human subjects and for complying with this policy. With...

  4. The Need for Cooperation in Cereal Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.W. van der

    2004-01-01

    The trends and needs in cereal research as discussed in 2003 AACC annual meeting are presented. The seminar identified the need of feeding a growing world population with less arable land and under more adverse agronomic conditions. An urgent need of eliminating mycotoxins and coeliac diseases to

  5. Clustering, cooperation, and research in social networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vega-Redondo, F.; Slanina, František; Marsili, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2-3 (2005), s. 628-638 ISSN 1542-4766 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04OCP10.001 Grant - others:MEC(ES) SEJ2004-02170; EU(XE) HPRN-CT-2002-00319 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : sociophysics * random graphs * networks Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  6. Partnering with patients in translational oncology research: ethical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamzer, Marie-France; Duchange, Nathalie; Darquy, Sylviane; Marvanne, Patrice; Rambaud, Claude; Marsico, Giovanna; Cerisey, Catherine; Scotté, Florian; Burgun, Anita; Badoual, Cécile; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Hervé, Christian

    2017-04-08

    The research program CARPEM (cancer research and personalized medicine) brings together the expertise of researchers and hospital-based oncologists to develop translational research in the context of personalized or "precision" medicine for cancer. There is recognition that patient involvement can help to take into account their needs and priorities in the development of this emerging practice but there is currently no consensus about how this can be achieved. In this study, we developed an empirical ethical research action aiming to improve patient representatives' involvement in the development of the translational research program together with health professionals. The aim is to promote common understanding and sharing of knowledge between all parties and to establish a long-term partnership integrating patient's expectations. Two distinct committees were settled in CARPEM: an "Expert Committee", gathering healthcare and research professionals, and a "Patient Committee", gathering patients and patient representatives. A multidisciplinary team trained in medical ethics research ensured communication between the two committees as well as analysis of discussions, minutes and outputs from all stakeholders. The results highlight the efficiency of the transfer of knowledge between interested parties. Patient representatives and professionals were able to identify new ethical challenges and co-elaborate new procedures to gather information and consent forms for adapting to practices and recommendations developed during the process. Moreover, included patient representatives became full partners and participated in the transfer of knowledge to the public via conferences and publications. Empirical ethical research based on a patient-centered approach could help in establishing a fair model for coordination and support actions during cancer research, striking a balance between the regulatory framework, researcher needs and patient expectations. Our approach addresses

  7. Progress report on JAERI-ORNL cooperative neutron scattering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1985-08-01

    One year activities done under the JAERI-DOE(ORNL) cooperative neutron scattering program are summarized. This period just followed the completion of the wide-angle neutron diffractometer dedicated to the cooperative research. The report contains results of the performance test of the instrument and early research activities. The latter part includes the time-resolved measurements of the transition kinetics in tin and Ni-Mn alloy as well as the single-crystal diffraction by the flat-cone method. (author)

  8. Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S; Lee, Sandra J; Yip, Waiki; Rao, Uma N; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Cohen, Gary I; Reintgen, Douglas S; Evans, Terry L; Brell, Joanna M; Albertini, Mark R; Atkins, Michael B; Dakhil, Shaker R; Conry, Robert M; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Flaherty, Lawrence E; Sondak, Vernon K; Carson, William E; Smylie, Michael G; Pappo, Alberto S; Kefford, Richard F; Kirkwood, John M

    2017-03-10

    Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m 2 /d IV for 5 days (Monday to Friday) every week for 4 weeks (IFN) or OBS. Stratification factors were pathologic lymph node status, lymph node staging procedure, Breslow depth, ulceration of the primary lesion, and disease stage. The primary end point was relapse-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival, toxicity, and quality of life. Results A total of 1,150 patients were randomly assigned. At a median follow-up of 7 years, the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for OBS and 0.70, (95% CI, 0.66 to 0.74) for IFN ( P = .964). The 5-year overall survival rate was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.86) for OBS and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.86) for IFN ( P = .558). Treatment-related grade 3 and higher toxicity was 4.6% versus 57.9% for OBS and IFN, respectively ( P weeks of IV induction as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group high-dose IFN regimen is not better than OBS alone for patients with intermediate-risk melanoma as defined in this trial.

  9. At the United Nation Foundation's Social Good Summit, Vice President Biden Announces New Cancer Moonshot International Cooperation and Investments | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This week, Vice President Joe Biden announced progress on his global vision for the Cancer Moonshot.  Announced were 10 new Memoranda of Understanding or Memoranda of Cooperation for international cancer research and care, as well as new efforts in the emerging scientific areas of precision oncology, the funding of collaborative research centers to address cancer disparities in low- and middle- income (LMIC) countries, and a strengthening of existing U.S. bilateral science and technology engagements around cancer.  

  10. Secondary data sources for health services research in urologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Alexander P; Friedlander, David F; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2018-04-01

    Though secondary data analyses of large datasets may reduce logistical and financial barriers required to perform significant and innovative work, such research requires specialized skills in data handling and statistical techniques as well as thorough and detailed knowledge of the data sources being used. To provide an overview of several common types of secondary data, focusing on strengths, weaknesses and examples of how these data may be used for health services research. Secondary data comprise a broad and heterogeneous category. This review covers several large categories of such data with examples of their use and discussions about their strengths and weaknesses. Sources include administrative data, claims-based datasets, electronic health records health surveys, patient or disease or both registries, quality improvement initiatives, as well as data from existing trials. Linkages of different types of data may expand the scope of questions answerable using secondary data analysis. Specific strengths and weaknesses of each type of dataset are discussed along with examples from the recent urologic literature. Choice of the appropriate data source should be tailored to the specific research question as well as the research resources and expertise available. Appropriate decisions about which data to use are the foundation for valid, high-impact research using secondary data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Swedish-Estonian energy forest research cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.; Kirt, E.; Koppel, A.; Kull, K.; Noormets, A.; Roostalu, H.; Ross, V.; Ross, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Organization of Estonian energetic economy is aimed at cutting the usage of oil, gas and coal and increasing the local resources firewood, oil-shale and peat for fuel. The resources of low-valued firewood-brushwood, fallen deadwood etc. are available during the following 10-15 years, but in the future the cultivation of energy forest (willow) plantations will be actual. During the last 20 years the Swedish scientists have been extensively studying the willow forest selection, cultivation and use in energetics and waste water purification systems. A Swedish-Estonian energy forest research project was started in 1993 between the Swedish Agricultural University on one hand and Toravere Observatory, Institute of Zoology and Botany, Estonian Academy of Sciences and Estonian Potato Processing Association on the other hand. In spring 5 willow plantations were established with the help of Swedish colleagues and obtained from Sweden 36000 willow cuttings. The aim of the project: a) To study experimentally and by means of mathematical modelling the biogeophysical aspects of growth and productivity of willow plantations in Sweden and Estonian climatological conditions. b) To study the possibility of using the willow plantations in waste waters purification. c) To study the economical efficiency of energy forest as an energy resource under the economic and environmental conditions of Estonia. d) To study the economic efficiency of willow plantations as a raw material for the basket industry in Estonia. e) To select the most productive and least vulnerable willow clones for practical application in energy plantations. During 1993 in all five plantations detailed analysis of soil properties has been carried out. In the plantation at Toravere Observatory phytometrical measurements were carried out - the growth of plant biomass leaf and stem area, vertical distribution of dry matter content, biomass and phyto area separately for leaves and stems has been performed. Some

  12. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN C1 CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2001-04-30

    Faculty and students from five universities (Kentucky, West Virginia, Utah, Pittsburgh and Auburn) are collaborating on a basic research program to develop novel C1 chemistry processes for the production of clean, high quality transportation fuel. An Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) with members from Chevron, Eastman Chemical, Energy International, Teir Associates, and the Department of Defense has been formed to provide practical guidance to the program. The program has two principal objectives. (1) Develop technology for conversion of C1 source materials (natural gas, synthesis gas, carbon dioxide and monoxide, and methanol) into clean, high efficiency transportation fuel. (2) Develop novel processes for producing hydrogen from natural gas and other hydrocarbons. Some of the principal accomplishments of the program in its first two years are: (1) The addition of acetylenic compounds in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is found to produce significant amounts of oxygenated products in FT diesel fuels. Such oxygenated products should decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. (2) Nanoscale, binary, Fe-based catalysts supported on alumina have been shown to have significant activity for the decomposition of methane into pure hydrogen and potentially valuable multi-walled carbon nanotubes. (3) Catalytic synthesis processes have been developed for synthesis of diethyl carbonate, higher ethers, and higher alcohols from C1 source materials. Testing of the effect of adding these oxygenates to diesel fuel on PM emissions has begun using a well-equipped small diesel engine test facility. (4) Supercritical fluid (SCF) FT synthesis has been conducted under SCF hexane using both Fe and Co catalysts. There is a marked effect on the hydrocarbon product distribution, with a shift to higher carbon number products. These and other results are summarized.

  13. Innovative designs for radiation oncology research in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Keys, H.; Salazar, O.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of the research mission are clear: (1) to explore in a logical, systematic, organized, and coordinated fashion those potential therapeutic advances that show promise; (2) to identify, in the laboratory, those models that predict successful combinations of treatment modes; (3) to search for ultimate treatment of programs that improve the therapeutic ratio. The modalities, innovations in treatment, and logic exist; it now rests with meticulous science to show carefully the directions that clinical research should follow in pursuit of the ultimate objective of improving cancer cure rates with less toxicity

  14. Establishment of International Cooperative Network and Cooperative Research Strategy Between Korea and USA on Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, Chul Hwa; Jeong, Jae Jun; Choi, Ki Yong; Kang, Kyoung Ho

    2004-07-01

    1. Scope and Objectives of the Project - Successful holding of the NURETH-10 - Analysis of the international trends in technology development and applications for nuclear thermal-hydraulics - Establishment of the international cooperative network and cooperative research strategy between Korea and USA on nuclear thermal-hydraulics 2. Research Results - Successful holding of the NURETH-10 - Analysis of the international trends in technology development and applications for nuclear thermal-hydraulics: - Establishment of international cooperative network and cooperative research strategy focused between Korea and USA on nuclear thermal-hydraulics: 3. Application Plan of the Research Results - Utilization as the basic data/information in establishing the domestic R and D directions and the international cooperative research strategy, - Application of the relevant experiences and data bases of NURETH-10 for holding future international conferences, - Promote more effective and productive research cooperation between Korea and USA

  15. Clinical and Outcome Research in oncology The need for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolone Giovanni

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is one of the main healthcare problems in Europe. Although significant progress has recently been made, long-term survival is still disappointing for most common solid tumours. The explosion of information has strengthened the need to create and sustain coordinated interaction between technology, biology, clinical research, clinical practice and health policy. A simple process based on automatic and passive translation from bench to clinical research and eventually to the bed side is usually assumed but cannot be taken for granted. A critical role might be played by Outcome Research (OR, defined as the discipline that describes, interprets, and predicts the impact of various influences, especially interventions, on final endpoints (from survival to satisfaction with care that matter to decision makers (from patients to society at large, with special emphasis on the use of patient-reported outcomes (PRO. Recently, under pressure from several parts of society, the FDA, recognizing the need for faster drug approval, has modified existing regulations and created new rules to allow anti-cancer drugs to be approved more quickly and, in certain but quite common circumstances, single arm trials and surrogate endpoints to be used as measures of clinical benefit. In this context, the faster approval process may lead to drugs being marketed without there being a complete picture of how effective or safe they are. The FDA move to speed up drug approval, together with the use of not fully validated surrogate endpoints, give OR the unique opportunity to help understand the value of drugs that have received accelerated approval. Despite this opportunity, OR has yet to demonstrate its role in this specific setting and provide proof of the validity, reliability and added value of its primary endpoint measures when evaluated in a broader context. The implementation of lines of OR in the development and evaluation of anti-cancer drugs hinges upon

  16. International cooperation for promotion of nuclear science and engineering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Kazusuke; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Katoh, Toshio; Kimura, Itsuro.

    1993-01-01

    For promotion of nuclear science and engineering research, examinations were made on the possibilities and necessary measures to extend joint research at international level. The present article is a summary of the reports of investigations performed during FY 1986 through 1991 by the Special Committee of the AESJ for Feasibility Study on International Cooperation for Promotion of Nuclear Science and Engineering Research, under contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan. Background information was collected on the present status of scientific research facilities in US, European and Asian countries on one hand, and on the expectations and prospects of Japanese scientists on the other hand. Based on the analysis of these data, some measures necessary to expand the international cooperation were proposed. It was emphasized that international joint research on a reciprocal basis would be effective in order to strengthen the technological basis of peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Problems to be solved for the new development were also discussed. (author)

  17. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Requirements Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurawski, Jason, W; Mace, Kathryn, P

    2016-08-11

    In August 2016 The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Colorado State University (CSU) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) located on the campus of Colorado State University. Several key findings highlighting the results from the review were discovered, with benefits to improve the overall scientific process for CIRA and CSU.

  18. A Qualitative Study into Dependent Relationships and Voluntary Informed Consent for Research in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; van der Graaf, Rieke; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y N; Kars, Marijke C; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-04-01

    In pediatric oncology, many oncologists invite their own patients to participate in research. Inclusion within a dependent relationship is considered to potentially compromise voluntariness of consent. Currently, it is unknown to what extent those involved in pediatric oncology experience the dependent relationship as a threat to voluntary informed consent, and what they see as safeguards to protect voluntary informed consent within a dependent relationship. We performed a qualitative study among key actors in pediatric oncology to explore their experiences with the dependent relationship and voluntary informed consent. We conducted three focus groups and 25 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with pediatric oncologists, research coordinators, Research Ethics Committee members, parents of children with cancer, and adolescents with cancer. Professionals regarded the dependent relationship both as a potential threat to and as a positive influence on voluntary decision making. Parents and adolescents did not feel as though dependency upon the oncologist influenced their decisions. They valued the involvement of their own physician in the informed consent process. The professionals suggested three strategies to protect voluntariness: emphasizing voluntariness; empowering families; involvement of an independent person. Although the dependent relationship between pediatric oncologists, patients and parents may be problematic for voluntary informed consent, this is not necessarily the case. Moreover, the involvement of treating physicians may even have a positive impact on the informed consent process. Although we studied pediatric oncology, our results may also apply to many other fields of pediatric medicine where research and care are combined, for example, pediatric rheumatology, neurology and nephrology. Clinical trials in these fields are inevitably often designed, initiated and conducted by medical specialists closely involved in patient care.

  19. Translational research in oncology: Implications for palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunangshu Ghoshal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The label “translational research” (TR has become ever more popular in the biomedical domain in recent years. It is usually presented as an attempt to bridge a supposed gap between knowledge produced at the laboratory bench and its use at the clinical bedside. This is claimed to help society harvest the benefits of its investments in scientific research. The past decade has witnessed a remarkable acceleration in the pace of translational cancer medicine – genome sequencing of various human cancers has been broadly deployed in drug discovery programs, diagnostic tests have been developed to predict molecularly targeted anticancer agents, advent of cancer immunotherapies, an enhanced appreciation of the complex interactions that exist between tumor cells and their microenvironment have revolutionized the management of cancers. Treatment for cancer and palliative care (PC go hand in hand and the role of TR in PC can no longer be ignored. This paper discusses about the scientific discourse of TR in cancer care and its implications for the practice of PC. It starts with a brief reconstruction of the history of the concept and subsequently unravels how the label is used in clinical/research practice. In conclusion, TR seems to be driven by a changed relationship between science and society. “Translation” has become important because society is thought to deserve a tangible return in terms of health and quality of life on its investment in basic biomedical science.

  20. Present state and future planning on research cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsushi

    1997-01-01

    NUCEF is a comprehensive large scale research facility to conduct from critical safety study to study on nuclear fuel cycle back end, and aims to be a kerneled research place by intending its effective application through common application due to colaboration and others. Therefore, NUCEF hopes to promote active research cooperation with various research institutes in or out of Japan and wide development. NUCEF held the 1st International Symposium NUCEF'95 in 1995, to discuss the engineering safety of nuclear fuel recycle facility. Subsequently, NUCEF'98 will hold next year, to intend to promote studies relating to nuclear fuel recycle from an international view. And also, it will intend to promote positively cooperation in response to needs with relating institutes, and private companies as well as to expect some innovative studies to create new techniques through colaboration with universities. (G.K.)

  1. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bütof, Rebecca; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  2. Multi-Vehicle Cooperative Control Research at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, 2000-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    A brief introductory overview of multi-vehicle cooperative control research conducted at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center from 2000 - 2014. Both flight research projects and paper studies are included. Since 2000, AFRC has been almost continuously pursuing research in the areas of formation flight for drag reduction and automated cooperative trajectories. An overview of results is given, including flight experiments done on the FA-18 and with the C-17. Other multi-vehicle cooperative research is discussed, including small UAV swarming projects and automated aerial refueling.

  3. Cooperative research and knowledge flow in the marine commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa R. Johnson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Integration of fishers’ knowledge into scientific-based fisheries management is difficult due to a history of distrust between fishers and scientists and institutional constraints that limit management to only the best scientific information available. A recent response to the Northeast U.S. fisheries crisis has been to include fishers in scientific research. Cooperative research, where fishers and scientists collaborate to produce knowledge for fisheries management, aims improve the knowledge base of fisheries management and integrate fishers and their knowledge into the science policy process, which together is expected to generate broader acceptance of scientific-based management. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in the Northeast U.S., this paper discusses the value of cooperative research as a tool for managing the commons. Specifically, it focuses on the flow of knowledge and expertise between fishers and scientists. The flow of knowledge from fishers to science involves a process of translation, where fishers’ knowledge is transformed (proven, verified, etc. into scientific knowledge. This process enables the flow of fishers’ knowledge into the science policy process. Knowledge and expertise also flow from scientists to fishers, where fishers gain understandings of the scientific research process. With this new expertise, fishers develop a greater capacity to participate in science and management discussions. The paper argues that 2-way knowledge flow between fishers and scientists, in particular flow that results in capacity building, can improve commons management through communication, translation, and conflict resolution. Finally, boundary spanners are identified as being critical to success in cooperative research.

  4. Pediatric oncology in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, B; Anzic, J

    1996-01-01

    Slovenia, a new country and formerly a part of Yugoslavia, has had its Childrens Hospital in Ljubljana since 1865. This became a part of the University Hospital in 1945, and in the early 1960s the Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology was established. The Oncological Institute of Slovenia was established in 1938 and has developed into a modern facility for comprehensive cancer care, research, and teaching. In close cooperation, established in the 1960s, a team from these two institutions takes care of the approximately 60 children per year who develop cancer in Slovenia. Consisting of pediatricians, radiation oncologists, pathologists, cytologists, surgeons, and other ad hoc specialists, the team meets at least twice weekly to plan treatment, follow the patients, discuss the results, and teach. All patients are subject to regular follow-up indefinitely. A separate team has been formed to study the late effects of cancer treatment on survivors, who by now are mostly adults.

  5. Toward Transdisciplinary Research by Means of Cooperative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aureliano Betancourt Bethencourt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the observation that fifth year Medicine students do not have enough skills in statistics, IT, or information management to adequately prepare and implement research projects. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the experiences obtained by using the cooperative learning method and to present the results obtained by students in their research projects.  In order to meet the proposed objectives the cooperative learning method was applied to several topics of the Public Health course in the Medical Program.  Consequently, students were divided into five groups to interact with health care specialists and workers, workers from other sectors, and the general public. They identified the most urgent health problems in a participative manner and conducted a research project. The students’ acceptance of the method was evaluated using an exploratory statistical technique.  As a result, students analyzed data, drew conclusions, and participated in debates having the professor as the facilitator and coordinator. All groups successfully presented the results of their research projects, which included 2 projects on the control of Dengue and the Aedes aegypti mosquito and 3 on potential maternal mortality risks. Surveys reflected acceptance of the method.  The experiences obtained by using the cooperative learning technique and the results obtained by students in their projects are described; this experience should be systematized.

  6. Strategic Plans to Promote Head and Neck Cancer Translational Research Within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group: A Report From the Translational Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine H.; Wong, Stuart; Ang, K. Kian; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Dicker, Adam P.; Harari, Paul M.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2007-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, with an overall survival rate of approximately 40-50%. In an effort to improve patient outcomes, research efforts designed to maximize benefit and reduce toxicities of therapy are in progress. Basic research in cancer biology has accelerated this endeavor and provided preclinical data and technology to support clinically relevant advances in early detection, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Recent completion of the Human Genome Project has promoted the rapid development of novel 'omics' technologies that allow more broad based study from a systems biology perspective. However, clinically relevant application of resultant gene signatures to clinical trials within cooperative groups has advanced slowly. In light of the large numbers of variables intrinsic to biomarker studies, validation of preliminary data for clinical implementation presents a significant challenge and may only be realized with large trials that involve significant patient numbers. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Head and Neck Cancer Translational Research Program recognizes this problem and brings together three unique features to facilitate this research: (1) availability of large numbers of clinical specimens from homogeneously treated patients through multi-institutional clinical trials; (2) a team of physicians, scientists, and staff focused on patient-oriented head-and-neck cancer research with the common goal of improving cancer care; and (3) a funding mechanism through the RTOG Seed Grant Program. In this position paper we outline strategic plans to further promote translational research within the framework of the RTOG

  7. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Current status of international cooperation on nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragi, Satoru

    1984-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), as a representative organization in Japan, has been participating in many international cooperations on nuclear safety research. This report reviews the recent achievement and evolution of the international cooperative safety studies. Twelve projects that are based on the agreements between JAERI and foreign organizations are reviewed. As the fuel irradiation studies, the recent achievement of the OECD Halden Reactor Project and the agreement between Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Battelle Memorial Institute, and JAERI are explained. As for the study of reactivity accident, the cooperation of the NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) project in Japan with PBF, PNS and PHEBUS projects in the U.S., West Germany and France, respectively, are now in progress. The fuel performance in abnormal transient and the experiment and analysis of severe fuel damage are the new areas of international interest. The OECD/LOFT project and ROSA-4 projects are also explained in connection with the FP source term problem and the analysis codes such as RELAP-5 and TRAC. As the safety studies associated with the downstream of the nuclear fuel cycle, the BEFAST project of IAEA and the ISIRS project of OECD/NEA are shortly reviewed. (Aoki, K.)

  9. Engaging Future Clinical Oncology Researchers: An Initiative to Integrate Teaching of Biostatistics and Research Methodology into Specialty Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S; Sundaresan, P; Mann, K; Pryor, D; Gebski, V; Shaw, T

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the learner's perspectives on a novel workshop programme designed to improve skills in biostatistics, research methodology and critical appraisal in oncology. Trainees were surveyed anonymously at the completion of each annual workshop from 2012 to 2015. In total, 103 trainees in years 2-4 of training in radiation oncology responded, giving a 94% survey response rate. A 1 day workshop, designed by biostatisticians and radiation oncologist facilitators, is the central component of a programme teaching skills in biostatistics, research methods and critical appraisal. This links short didactic lectures about statistical concepts to interactive trainee discussions around discipline-related publications. The workshop was run in conjunction with the major radiation oncology clinical trials group meeting with alternating programmes (A and B). Most of the participants (44-47/47 for A and 48-55/56 for B), reported that their understanding of one or more individual topics improved as a result of teaching. Refinement of the workshop over time led to a more favourable perception of the 'optimal' balance between didactic/interactive teaching: nine of 27 (33%) 'optimal' responses seen in 2013 compared with 23 of 29 (79%) in 2015 (P research to illuminate key statistical concepts. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient engagement in the design and execution of urologic oncology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel J; Avulova, Svetlana; Conwill, Ralph; Barocas, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    There have been significant effort and financial support to engage patients in the design and execution of medical research. However, little is known about the relative benefits or potential impact of involving patients in research, most efficient practices and systems to enhance their involvement, and potential barriers and challenges that are involved with engaging patients. In this review, we will discuss the value of patient centered research, review the challenges that many of these studies faced, and highlight potential future opportunities to enhance patient involvement in urologic research. An English-language literature search was performed in the electronic databases of Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, the Cochrane Library, and on the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) website. Search items included "patient-centered research," "patient-reported outcomes" and "patient engagement" in various combinations. Although PCORI has funded almost 600 projects with $1.6 billion to improve patient centered research, the search revealed 3 studies of patient engagement in the development, management, and execution of urologic oncology research. Patient engagement in the design and execution of medical research can help align research topics to match patient priorities, improve survey and data collection tools, increase patient recruitment and participation in studies, and improve accessibility and dissemination of clinically relevant results from medical research. However, engagement patients in research requires significant investment of time, financial support, and energy from the patients, stakeholders, and researchers to provide mutual benefit. In the three studies in urologic oncology that involved patients, the patients provided a significant impact on the structure of the studies and helped improve the ability of patients to apply the results from the research studies. The benefits to involving patients in research to

  11. Research group librarian – a cooperating partner in research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Kristin Olsen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Academic libraries encounter many challenges when providing services for researchers and it is evident that use of the library in information searches has reduced significantly over time and continues to decrease.However, a study in Norway in 2007, at Vestfold University College (VUC, demonstrated that there is great potential to increase faculty staff’s use of the library’s digital resources with the right form of engagement. The findings led VUC’s library to focus on its services for this particular user group.In 2009, VUC library initiated a study to investigate the possible effects of a librarian participating as a ‘Research Group Librarian’.The research project, in which this new role was tried out, was called ‘Kindergarten space, materiality, learning and meaning-making’. This was a three year project, funded by the Research Council of Norway. There were eight part time researchers involved in this project, two senior researchers and the research group librarian.The study adopted an ethnographic approach. The research group librarian was a fully participating member of the research team throughout the project.The empirical sources for the study included:semi-structured interviews with the project leader and the participating researchers: short individual interviews at the beginning of the project with each of the research group participants; several group interviews with the majority of the research team midway in the project;observation and field notesThe results are presented under the following categories:implications for the researcher; emphasising behaviour in relation to information search and reference management skills;communication and information within, and evolving from, the project;collaboration in writing a review article;implications for the library – internal, and at VUC in general;the librarian’s role – a ‘boundary worker’?The study demonstrated that as a member of a research group a librarian can

  12. Skoda Concern's cooperation with State Machinery Design Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valchar, J.; Kuhn, L.

    1988-01-01

    The main areas are presented of cooperation between the Skoda Plzen Concern and the State Machinery Design Research Institute in Prague-Bechovice. This is mainly the development of steam turbines, from 50 MW turbines to the present 1000 MW saturated steam turbines designed for nuclear power plants. Main attention is centred on conditions of the boiling crisis in the steam turbine circuit, and its consequences. This study is served by the experimental equipment of the institute and its computer. The cooperation of the two institutions in the field of testing and diagnostic equipment is centred on measuring natural oscillations of turbine blades, the diagnostics of vibrations of steam turbines, the measurement of the humidity of saturated steam, optical measurements of the parameters of saturated steam, ultrasound diagnostics and the measurement of turbine blade deformation caused by hydraulic effects. (Z.M.). 8 figs

  13. The Challenge of Researching Trust in Intercultural Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Schwegler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical element to the successful globalization of business requires the ability to cooperate across cultural borders. Thus, people of different cultural backgrounds are increasingly faced with the challenge of managing unfamiliar situations with unfamiliar people. Exactly this situation is where the ability to establish trusting relationships becomes a critical factor. Despite of the importance of the topic, little research exists on developing trust in intercultural settings. This article analyses the specific conditions of researching trusting relationships across cultures. Etic and emic research designs will be compared and discussed with respect to the specific conditions in cross-cultural and intercultural situations. A discussion is directed at to which extent different research approaches support our understanding of trust as a dynamic concept. The analyses will be used to identify implications relevant for further empirical research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901486

  14. Cooperative research with CHECIR (CHErnobyl Center for International Research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, T.; Saito, K.; Sakamoto, R.; Tsutsumi, M.; Moriuchi, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Chernobyl Center for International Research (CHECIR) has been established under an agreement among IAEA. Russia, Byelorussia and Ukraine in order to implement various studies on the reactor facilities and on the environment near and around the reactor. JAERI started discussions with a view to join the idea on the research project of study on assessment and analysis of environmental consequences in contaminated area. On June, 1992, JAERI and CHECIR concluded an agreement on the Implementation of Research at the CHECIR. Under the agreement, JAERI has started 'Study on Assessment and Analysis of Environmental Radiological Consequences and Verification of an Assessment System'. This project is scheduled to last until 1996. This study consists of following two subjects. Subject-1: Study on Measurements and Evaluation of Environmental External Exposure after Nuclear Accident. Subject-2: Study on the Validation of Assessment Models in an Environmental Consequence Assessment Methodology for Nuclear Accidents. Subject-3: Study on Migration of Radionuclides Released into Rivers adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (planned to start from FY1994). In this workshop, research activity will be introduced with actually measured data. (J.P.N.)

  15. Bioluminescent imaging: a critical tool in pre-clinical oncology research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Karen

    2010-02-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a non-invasive imaging modality widely used in the field of pre-clinical oncology research. Imaging of small animal tumour models using BLI involves the generation of light by luciferase-expressing cells in the animal following administration of substrate. This light may be imaged using an external detector. The technique allows a variety of tumour-associated properties to be visualized dynamically in living models. The increasing use of BLI as a small-animal imaging modality has led to advances in the development of xenogeneic, orthotopic, and genetically engineered animal models expressing luciferase genes. This review aims to provide insight into the principles of BLI and its applications in cancer research. Many studies to assess tumour growth and development, as well as efficacy of candidate therapeutics, have been performed using BLI. More recently, advances have also been made using bioluminescent imaging in studies of protein-protein interactions, genetic screening, cell-cycle regulators, and spontaneous cancer development. Such novel studies highlight the versatility and potential of bioluminescent imaging in future oncological research.

  16. Recruitment of oncology nurses for Internet research: issues and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik; Lim, Hyun Ju; Bender, Melinda; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Yang, Soon-Ok; Lee, Hungsa

    2006-11-03

    To provide future directions for Internet research based on issues raised during the recruitment process of an Internet survey of oncology nurses. Throughout the research process, the research staff recorded issues as they arose and wrote memos regarding recruitment issues and possible reasons for the issues. Weekly group discussions were conducted, and written records of the discussions were kept. The written memos and records were reviewed, and the content was analyzed. The recruitment issues included flexibility required, mutual trust, changing Internet dynamics, and potential selection bias. As the issues indicated, recruiting nurses for the study only through the Internet did not work well. For future Internet research, the authors suggest using multiple Internet and real settings for recruitment, a variety of strategies, the quota sampling method, and creative motivation strategies.

  17. Research on Strategic Cooperation Between China Post and Telecoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Zhen-lin; ZHANG Jing; LIANG Xiong-jian

    2005-01-01

    Firstly several aspects of the strategic cooperation between China Post and Telecoms are described in succession, which includes the necessity, the probability, the significance and the detailed contents of the strategic cooperation. With that the way to select strategic partners and the frame of the cooperated business are proposed. Lastly the obstacles of the cooperation and accordingly the solution of them are discussed.

  18. Cooperation in research in the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marka, Philippe.

    1977-01-01

    This work studies the legal instruments for cooperative research granted to Euratom under the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, and the conditions whereby concrete use was made of these instruments. This assessment of Euratom's efforts to launch a community nuclear industry is accompanied by an analysis of the respective roles of the bodies of the Community, the Council and the Commission, as well as of the circumstances which, according to the author, have led to a paralysis of this institution. (NEA) [fr

  19. Researches on Agricultural Cooperative Economic Organization Promoting Agricultural Insurance Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The advantages of cooperative economic organization being the effective carrier of agricultural insurance development are analyzed. Firstly, cooperative economic organization promotes scale management and solves the problem of decentralized operation of small households. Secondly, cooperative economic organization can settle the problem of peasants’ low systematization. Thirdly, cooperative economic organization can largely reduce the costs of agricultural insurance operation. Fourthly, cooperative organization decreases moral risks as well as adverse selection to some extent. Lastly, cooperative organization, to a certain degree, reduces the risks of agricultural production and increases the insurability of agricultural risks. Meanwhile, limitations of agricultural cooperative economic organization being the carrier of agricultural insurance operation are pointed out. Firstly, cooperative economic organization has limited coverage and small size of organization, which is harmful to the diversification of agricultural risks. Secondly, cooperative economic organization lacks capital funds and its development is not standard, which is not perfect for the function exertion as a carrier. Lastly, members of professional cooperative organization have low cultural qualities, which restrict the implementation of agricultural insurance. The modes of farmers’ cooperative economic organization promoting agricultural insurance development are proposed, including mode of agricultural insurance cooperative ( mutual corporation), mode of "leading enterprises (companies) + professional cooperative organization (planting majors) + insurance" and mode of professional cooperatives serving as agricultural insurance agent. Last of all, the promoting role of agricultural insurance in agricultural cooperative economic organization is briefly illustrated.

  20. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  1. Precompetitive cooperative research: the culture of the '90s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, William C.

    1991-03-01

    In the current worldwide technology environment, it is essential for the U.S. microelectronics industry. and especially for the integrated circuit portion of that industry, that precompeutive cooperative research alliances be formed and funded at a level that emables them to be effective in rapidly advancing technology. It is important to realize that technology advances with or without our direct participation. If we do not aggressively participate we are quickly left behind. Increasing complexity and miniaturization have been the themes in semiconductor technology. Many are aware that what began in the early 60's with a few masking steps and minimum dimensions measured in mils. has now evolved to a level of sophistication requiring a 100 MW workstation for IC design and the investment of nearly S400 million dollars in fab cost to produce today's microchips. The leading nations of the world have come to realize that their future well-being is closely tied to their ability to compete in this hi-tech environment. Industry coalitions have been formed to exploit the early ramifications of emeging technologies. Improvements in overseas manufacturing have been made and continue unabated with new producLs, new processes, and new services being introduced at an increasing rate. Many foreign governments are now actively involved in formulating and conducting industrial and technology policies to aid their hi-tech industry. To meet these challenges, U.S. firms, with U. S. government cooperation, must respond.

  2. Rationality, emotional expression and control: psychometric characteristics of a questionnaire for research in psycho-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiker, E M; van der Ploeg, H M; Hendriks, J H; Leer, J W; Kleijn, W C

    1993-12-01

    In some studies rationality, anti-emotionality and the control of (negative) emotions were found to be psychological risk factors for cancer. In the present study instruments were developed in order to cross-validate the role of the 'rationality/anti-emotionality (RAE)'-concept and the 'emotional expression and control (EEC)'-concept. The psychometric characteristics of a RAE-scale and EEC-scales were investigated in 4302 healthy women attending a breast cancer screening programme in The Netherlands. Principal components analysis revealed three factors for the RAE-scale: (1) Rationality; (2) Emotionality; and (3) Understanding. The EEC-scales consist of three factors that indicate: (1) expression of emotions to oneself; (2) expression of emotions towards others; and (3) control of emotions. These RAE and EEC scales can be of importance in psycho-oncological research, especially when: (1) the more refined subscales are used; and (2) age of the subjects is taken into account.

  3. [The French health care funding system for research and innovation in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiernik, Harvey; Katz, Gregory; Coulonjou, Hélène; Salagnac, André; Kletz, Frédéric; Thariat, Juliette

    2018-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the French health system with respect to allocation of public resources to hospitals, to encourage research and innovation, particularly in the field of oncology. It is explained in a historical, economic and scientific perspective. Important structural and conceptual reforms (T2A, HPST law, etc.) have been carried out. These have significantly impacted the way public funding is allocated. Funding of innovation and research has been modified into a more incentive logic, aimed at strengthening competitiveness between all health care actors. The funding allocation system has evolved towards a more ubiquitous redistribution, including non-academic and private institutions. The baseline endowment includes indicators relating to scientific publications (60% of the endowment), teaching (25%) and clinical trials (15%). Research funding is then redistributed by regional health agencies, and used in health care institutions at the discretion of the directorates. Other funding sources such as calls for grants, funding for mobile research centers and teams, tumor banks and temporary user licenses are also part of the funding by the French Ministry of health. Changes in the health research funding system have an incentive purpose. They have significantly modified the global healthcare landscape. Feedback on these changes will be necessary to assess the success of the reinforcement of the dynamics of research and innovation. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms.

  5. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms

  6. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Schumacher

    Full Text Available Informed consent forms (ICFs for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies.We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics.Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials were significantly longer (P < .0001 and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003 than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11. At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011. The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12 or trial sponsor (P = .38.Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient's education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511.

  7. The role of medical physicists in developing a generic research framework for the assessment of new radiation oncology technology and treatments in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, M.M.; Amin, R.; Cornes, D.A.; Duchesne, G.; Haworth, A.; Kron, T.; Burmeister, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: TROG Cancer Research has secured funding from the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing to develop and pilot an evaluation framework for new radiation oncology technologies and treatments. Four site specific projects will be undertaken to test the framework including IMRT for nasopharynx, anal canal and post-prostatectomy and IGRT for prostate fiducial markers. Multidisciplinary Expert Groups that include medical physicists, have been appointed for each site specific project. Each project will collect data from at least ten treatment centres who have been credentialed. The Framework will have the capacity to gather information to substantiate the clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of new technologies and treatments in radiation oncology. The framework will be tested by gathering data to evaluate the superiority of IMRT and lGRT over other treatments and economic analysis will examine the potential trade-off between efficiency and the clinical gains to a patient. It is anticipated that the outcome of this research will inform future funding decisions. The involvement of medical physicists has been central to development of the framework, protocol development and the credentialing process. (author)

  8. Male Oncology Research and Education program for men at high risk for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentz, J; Liu, S K; Vesprini, D

    2018-04-01

    Three groups of men are at high risk of developing prostate cancer: men with a strong family history of prostate cancer, men of West African or Caribbean ancestry, and men with a germline pathogenic variant in a prostate cancer-associated gene. Despite the fact that those men constitute a significant portion of the male population in North America, few recommendations for prostate cancer screening specific to them have been developed. For men at general population risk for prostate cancer, screening based on prostate-specific antigen (psa) has remained controversial despite the abundance of literature on the topic. As a result, recommendations made by major screening authorities are inconsistent (ranging from no psa screening to baseline psa screening at age 45), allowing physicians to pick and choose how to screen their patients. The Male Oncology Research and Education (more) program is an observational research program that serves as an academic platform for multiple research foci. For its participants, serum and dna are biobanked, medical information is collected, and contact for relevant research-related opportunities is maintained. This research program is paired with a specialized clinic called the more clinic, where men at high risk are regularly screened for prostate cancer in a standard approach that includes physical examination and serum psa measurement. In this article, we describe the goals, participant accrual to date, and projects specific to this unique program.

  9. Theory of Regression Apple Professional Cooperation Organization Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang Bin

    2013-01-01

    In view of the enterprise ecological apple manor a variety of problems of existence, put forward to the enterprise management transformation, achieve enterprise, collective, individual integrated operation management and the use of regression mathematical model on apple professional cooperation organization analysis. Through the example, Apple professional economic cooperation organization innovation model of the input output ratio than the rural economic cooperation organization is much high...

  10. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of real world data comparative effectiveness research of systemic therapies in lung oncology: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Bas J.M.; Janssen, Vivi E.M.T.; Schramel, Franz M.; van de Garde, Ewoudt M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The growing interest in comparative effectiveness research (CER) based on data from routine clinical practice also extends towards lung oncology. Although CER studies using real world data (RWD) have the potential to assist clinical decision-making, concerns about the quality and

  11. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  12. Capacity for Cancer Care Delivery Research in National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Community Practices: Availability of Radiology and Primary Care Research Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Ruth C; Sicks, JoRean D; Chang, George J; Lyss, Alan P; Stewart, Teresa L; Sung, Lillian; Weaver, Kathryn E

    2017-12-01

    Cancer care spans the spectrum from screening and diagnosis through therapy and into survivorship. Delivering appropriate care requires patient transitions across multiple specialties, such as primary care, radiology, and oncology. From the program's inception, the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites were tasked with conducting cancer care delivery research (CCDR) that evaluates structural, organizational, and social factors, including care transitions that determine patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the capacity of the NCORP to conduct multidisciplinary CCDR that includes radiology and primary care practices. The NCORP includes 34 community and 12 minority and underserved community sites. The Landscape Capacity Assessment was conducted in 2015 across these 46 sites, composed of the 401 components and subcomponents designated to conduct CCDR. Each respondent had the opportunity to designate an operational practice group, defined as a group of components and subcomponents with common care practices and resources. The primary outcomes were the proportion of adult oncology practice groups with affiliated radiology and primary care practices. The secondary outcomes were the proportion of those affiliated radiology and primary care groups that participate in research. Eighty-seven percent of components and subcomponents responded to at least some portion of the assessment, representing 230 practice groups. Analyzing the 201 adult oncology practice groups, 85% had affiliated radiologists, 69% of whom participate in research. Seventy-nine percent had affiliated primary care practitioners, 31% of whom participate in research. Institutional size, multidisciplinary group practice, and ownership by large regional or multistate health systems was associated with research participation by affiliated radiology and primary care groups. Research participation by these affiliated specialists was not significantly

  13. An overview of the Cooperative IASCC Research (CIR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathania, R.; Gott, K.; Scott, P.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) has affected reactor core internal structures fabricated from austenitic stainless steels in both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The Cooperative IASCC Research (CIR) Program is an international research effort designed to address irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in light water reactor (LWR) components. The objectives of the CIR program are to develop a mechanistic understanding of IASCC initiation and crack growth, to derive a predictive model of IASCC, if possible based on a mechanistic understanding, and thus to identify possible countermeasures to IASCC. It complements other more applied programs by concentrating on the underlying physical causes of IASCC. This paper provides an overview of the current status and achievements of the CIR program, which has been running since 1995. Two phases of the program have been completed and a final extension program is in progress which is scheduled to finish in 2008. The extent to which the CIR program has met its objectives, or will meet them with its current plans extending into 2008, is assessed. (author)

  14. SU-F-T-237: The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Cooperatives Activities Supporting the NCI’s National Clinical Trial Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Michalski, J [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Rosen, M [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); FitzGerald, T [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Knopp, M [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Cooperative has been active for the past two years supporting the National Clinical Trial Network and the details of that support are reported. Methods: There are six QA centers (Houston, Ohio, Philadelphia-RT, Philadelphia-DI, Rhode Island, St. Louis) providing an integrated RT and DI quality control program in support of the NCI’s clinical trials. The QA Center’s efforts are focused on assuring high quality data for clinical trials designed to improve the clinical outcomes for cancer patients worldwide. This program is administered through five core services: site qualification, trial design support, credentialing, data management, and case review. Results: IROC currently provides core support for 172 NCTN trials with RT, DI and RT/DI components. Many of these trials were legacy trial from the previous cooperative group program. IROC monitors nearly 1800 RT photon and 20 proton institutions. Over 28,000 beams outputs were monitored with 8% of the sites requiring repeat audits due to beam out of criteria. As part of credentialing, 950 QA phantoms have been irradiated, 515 imaging modalities evaluated and almost 4000 credentialing letters have been issued. In just year 2, 5290 RT and 4934 DI patient datasets were received (many using TRIAD) by IROC QA Centers to be prepared for review. During the past 2 years, a total of 6300 RT cases and 19,000 DI image sets were reviewed by IROC technical staff. To date, IROC has published 36 manuscripts. Conclusion: The QA services provided by IROC are numerous and are continually being evaluated for effectiveness, harmonized across all NCTN Groups and administered in an efficient and timely manner to enhance accurate and per protocol trial data submission. These efforts increase each NCTN Group’s ability to derive meaningful outcomes from their clinical trials. This work was supported by DHHS NIH grant 5U24CA180803.

  15. Canine as a biomedical research model: immunological, hematological, and oncological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifrine, M.; Wilson, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The canine has been used as a biomedical research model in radiation studies by a number of laboratories supported primarily by the US Department of Energy and its predecessors. These studies were unique in that they covered the life spans of the canines and permitted the collection of data from birth to death under controlled conditions. Since these were multiparametric studies, an extensive data base has been established, not the least of which are normative values covering all biologic systems, including immunohematology. The canine model has also been extensively used by other groups, such as transplantation biologists. The virtues of the canine as a model in these and many other endeavors are becoming increasingly more apparent with the passing of time. One of the primary goals of this volume was to compile the knowledge and experience of researchers using the canine model and to focus their expertise on furthering the use of the canine for studies in immunology, hematology, and oncology. We have attempted to present some of the contemporary, diverse uses of the canine in biomedical research, emphasizing immunologic endpoints, and also to present in detail some of the latest technology used in such studies

  16. Health Services Research and Health Economy - Quality Care Training in Gynaecology, with Focus On Gynaecological Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, M P; Fasching, P A; Loehberg, C R; Jud, S M; Schrauder, M G; Bani, M R; Thiel, F C; Hack, C C; Hildebrandt, T; Beckmann, M W

    2011-12-01

    In the era of cost increases and reduced resources in the German healthcare system, the value of health services research and health economics is increasing more and more. Health services research attempts to develop concepts for the most effective ways to organise, manage, finance and deliver high-quality care and evaluates the implementation of these concepts with regard to daily routine conditions. Goals are the assessment of benefits and the economic advantages and disadvantages of new and established diagnostic methods, drugs and vaccines. Regarding these goals, it is clear that health services research goes hand in hand with health economics, which evaluates the benefits of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in relation to the costs. Both scientific fields have focus principally on gynaecology and particularly on gynaecological oncology in Germany, as can be seen by numerous publications. These present several advantages compared with clinical trials - they uncover gaps in health care, question the material, staffing and consequently the financial resources required and they allow the estimation of value and the comparison of different innovations to identify the best options for our patients.

  17. The CRC Contribution to Research Training: Report of a Scoping Study for the Cooperative Research Centres Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    This report summarises findings from a scoping study conducted for the Cooperative Research Centres Association (CRCA) by the Centre for the Study of Higher Education. The purpose of the scoping study is to inform the research training activities of Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs). While previous studies have focussed on the outcomes supported…

  18. [Overview of research projects funding in traditional Chinese medicine oncology field supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dong-Xin; Chen, Lian-Yu; Guo, Shu-Zhen; Han, Li-Wei; Zhang, Feng-Zhu

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the funding situation of traditional Chinese medicine oncology research projects supported by National Natural Science Fund from 1986-2016 was reviewed. The characteristics of funded projects were summarized from funding amount, funding expenses, funding category, and the main research contents of projects, etc. At the same time, the main problems in the projects were analyzed in this paper, in order to provide reference for the relevant fund applicants. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. The challenges of psycho-oncology research in developing countries: A non-equivalent process of growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Castellano-Tejedor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In summary, most psycho-oncology research comes from resource-rich settings and, therefore, some results might be very different in developing countries if we acknowledge that they have specific and unique features. Consequently, research from developing countries is highly necessary and needs to be supported to advance this knowledge and to favour a better understanding of the specific realities of cancer patients and their families in those countries.

  20. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  1. Implementation of comparative effectiveness research in personalized medicine applications in oncology: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IJzerman MJ

    2015-11-01

    medicine, precision medicine, comparative effectiveness research, health technology assessment, oncology, genomics 

  2. An analysis of the most-cited research papers on oncology: which journals have they been published in?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Faruk

    2014-05-01

    The most-cited papers (MCPs) are likely those that impressed researchers and had profound influence on clinical practice or future developments in the related scientific field. This study was conducted to explore a bibliometric approach to assess where the oncology-related MCPs have been published in. The source of the data presented in this study was provided by using the InCitesTM, Web of Science, Thomson Reuters Database (2013). It contained any journal indexed by ISI between 1979 and 2013. The term MCPs arbitrarily defined as equal or more than 100 citations. A total of 565 publications were cited equal or more than 100 times. They were published in 79 different journals (64 oncology, 12 medicine, and 3 science), led by the Journal of Clinical Oncology (n = 76; 13.5%) and Cancer Research (n = 66; 11.7%) followed by Oncogene (n = 46; 8.1%), Nature Reviews Cancer (n = 41; 7.3%), and Cancer (n = 37; 6.5%). Moreover, the journal categories with the MCPs were the Oncology with 495 articles (87.6%), followed by the Medicine with 60 (10.6%) articles. However, the numbers of journals related to Science (n = 10; 1.8%) were the least. The MCPs were cited a total of 118,531 times. The citations ranged from 100 to 1,790, and the median number was 149. The total numbers of MCPs were the most prominent for the journals, the New England Journal of Medicine (median 398), Lancet (median 213), and Nature Reviews Cancer (median 210). In other side, the counts of MCPs were the highest for the Science and Medicine-categorized journals (median 212.5 and 192.5 citations, respectively). The MCPs categorized as Oncology were the least cited (median 145). The median number of MCPs per year was 18.7 with range 4.1-858.5. The annual most valuable MCPs were also published in the journal Nature Reviews Cancer (median 42) and the New England Journal of Medicine (median 38.7). Likewise, the numbers of MCPs were the highest for the Science-categorized journals (median

  3. Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration Handbook: National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Cooperative Research Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrero, E.; McClelland, R.

    2002-07-01

    This report is a guide for rural electric cooperatives engaged in field testing of equipment and in assessing related application and market issues. Dispersed generation and its companion fuel cell technology have attracted increased interest by rural electric cooperatives and their customers. In addition, fuel cells are a particularly interesting source because their power quality, efficiency, and environmental benefits have now been coupled with major manufacturer development efforts. The overall effort is structured to measure the performance, durability, reliability, and maintainability of these systems, to identify promising types of applications and modes of operation, and to assess the related prospect for future use. In addition, technical successes and shortcomings will be identified by demonstration participants and manufacturers using real-world experience garnered under typical operating environments.

  4. The feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using synchronous webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events in clinical trials: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerson, Dawn; Dino, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research professionals are faced with decreased funding and increased workloads; innovative methods of professional development programs are necessary to accommodate these factors. This study evaluated the feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events commonly experienced in pediatric oncology clinical trials. The setting incorporated synchronous web-based educational technology. Constructivist learning provides the theoretical framework for this study. Participants evaluated the professional development program at 2 time points: (a) at the conclusion and (b) 4 to 6 weeks afterward, using survey method. Synchronous webinars were both economical and effective in educating clinical research professionals across institutional sites. Participants reported exceptionally high levels of satisfaction with the accessibility, scope, quality, and interactivity of the professional development program. The vast majority of participants reported that the education would assist with reporting adverse events in pediatric oncology clinical trials and this perception persisted into clinical practice. Although the results of this study were intended to guide future educational efforts of the Children's Oncology Group, they may also apply to other cooperative groups.

  5. The first Studsvik AB - JAEA meeting for cooperation in nuclear energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Yanagihara, Satoshi; Karlsson, Mikael; Stenmark, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Based on the implemental agreement between the Studsvik AB and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for cooperation in nuclear energy research and development, the first annual meeting was held at Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this meeting, information exchange on two cooperation areas, 'Radioactive waste treatment technology including recycling of materials' and 'Technical developments for the neutron irradiation experiments in materials testing reactors', was carried out, and future plan in cooperation was discussed. This report describes contents of information exchange and discussions in two cooperation areas. (author)

  6. International cooperative research with Japan for the establishment of cooperation structure and technology for dynamic neutron radiography using HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, I. C.; Sim, C. M.; Lee, B. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Baek, W. P.; Cha, J. E.; Yoon, B. J.; Chu, I. C.

    2007-07-01

    DNR is the technique to obtain radiography image continuously using a imaging system and Japan is the leading country in this field. Considering that no research has been performed to obtain quantitative parameters using DNR in Korea, it was necessary to establish a cooperative structure with Japanese experts and to develop the DNR technique throughout this project. The objectives of the project were to conduct 4 cooperative experiments using the HANARO BNCT facility and to establish a relationship with Japanese experts which makes it possible to maintain continuous communication. 4 experiments such as the void fraction and flow pattern measurement in a channel simulating HANARO fuel channel, observation of flow field in Pb/Bi field and the observation of cavity in a diesel engine nozzle were successfully completed. Also, the continuos communication and cooperation between the experts of two countries will be made. In this sense, this project is believed as a model project to use the mega research facility such as HANARO for the international cooperation

  7. Electron beam flue gas treatment. Research cooperation among JAERI, IAEA and INCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The research co-operation is conducted among Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Poland (INCT) on Electron Beam Flue Gas Treatment from January 1993 to March 1997. The first phase of the cooperation was carried out for 3 years from January 1993 to March 1995. This cooperation was performed through information exchange meetings (Coordination Meetings), held in Takasaki and Warsaw, and experiments and discussions by exchange scientists. Many useful results were obtained on electron beam treatment of flue gas from coal-combustion heat generation plant in Kaweczyn within the frame work of the research co-operation. This report includes the main results of the tripartite research cooperation. (author)

  8. Report of cooperative research programs in the field of ion-beam breeding between Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Bilateral cooperative research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Zaiton; Oono, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes Bilateral Cooperative Research between Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (a representative of the Government of Malaysia) implemented from 2002 to 2012 under 'THE IMPLEMENTING ARRANGEMENT BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF MALAYSIA AND THE JAPAN ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY ON THE RESEARCH COOPERATION IN THE FIELD OF RADIATION PROCESSING'. The research activities in two Cooperative Research Programs, 'Mutation Induction of Orchid Plants by Ion Beams' and 'Generating New Ornamental Plant Varieties Using Ion Beams' performed 2002-2007 and 2007-2012, respectively, are contained. The lists of steering committee meetings, irradiation experiments, and publications/presentations of each program are also attached in the Appendixes. (author)

  9. Research on international cooperation for nuclear and radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jianxiu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the importance and related requirements of international cooperation on nuclear and radiation safety, analyzes the current status, situation and challenges faced, as well as the existing weakness and needs for improvement, and gives some proposals for reference. (author)

  10. INTERINSTITUTIONAL COOPERATION: RESULTS INDICATORS OF INTERACTIONS OF VISITING RESEARCHERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Baron Mussi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to define a proposition for a characterization of indicators applicable to evaluate joint research results. In order to do that, literature on interinstitutional cooperation, exchange programs and indicators was assessed, and its guidelines, adopted. Ten cases were selected for evaluation, and the following procedures undertaken: visits to receptor institutions in several cities; visits to workplace where the subjected projects were being developed; interviews with project managers and visiting researchers; interviews with other personnel; review of the approved projects' official documentation collected during the previous steps; and a new contact with the respondents to clarify eventual doubts. Theoretically, this research contributes to the development of a proposal of a set of indicators to characterize and evaluate interdisciplinary cooperation between researchers from universities and distinct research institutes. Practical contributions to be mentioned are the information gathered that can help promotion agencies to improve their supporting edicts offered to scientific and technological development, as well as upgrading their evaluation systems regarding such actions.

  11. Cooperation of international Research Infrastructures to address environmental global challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet García, Francisco J.; Suárez-Muñoz, María; Conchubhair, Diarmuid O.; Dohna, Tina; Lo Bue, Nadia

    2017-04-01

    Human impact on the planet is causing a set of global environmental problems that threaten the wellbeing of current and future generations. Examples of these environmental problems include climate change, decline of biodiversity, alteration of biogeochemical cycles, ocean acidification, etc. These environmental Global Challenges (GCs) are transnational and complex, combining elements of both natural and social factors. Providing solutions for these challenges can be significantly enhanced through the collaboration of various related institutions, governments and stakeholders. A deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of GCs, as well as the processes which control them is required. Environmental Research Infrastructures (DANUBIUS-RI) are key players in this learning process. Covering many fields of research, it is through RIs collaboration that GCs can be more fully addressed. However, the collaboration among environmental RIs is still limited nationally as well as internationally. Although contact is encouraged and interactions are common practice, there are few cases where RI managers initiate and foster transnational collaborations in order to address specific problems. The COOP+ project aims to explore and strengthen cooperation among global RIs by bringing various RIs together and working on the identification of requirements, strengths, knowledge gaps and other relevant items in regard to the selected GCs. For this purpose, 13 GCs have been selected: coral bleaching, marine debris, noise impact on marine fauna, Arctic sea ice melting, pollinators decline, threatened species, agriculture pollutants, nitrogen cycle, carbon and GHG, geohazards and extreme events, estuaries, global urbanization process, and ozone depletion. These GCs are being analysed and described by multidisciplinary teams of experts composed of scientists, RIs operators and other stakeholders. This assessment will derive a list of tasks and requirements to be fulfilled by the

  12. International health research monitoring: exploring a scientific and a cooperative approach using participatory action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Tracey; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Miiro, George; Hantrakum, Viriya; Nanvubya, Annet; Ayuo, Elizabeth; Kivaya, Esther; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Parker, Michael; Njuguna, Patricia; Ashley, Elizabeth; Guerin, Philippe J; Lang, Trudie

    2014-02-17

    To evaluate and determine the value of monitoring models developed by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit and the East African Consortium for Clinical Research, consider how this can be measured and explore monitors' and investigators' experiences of and views about the nature, purpose and practice of monitoring. A case study approach was used within the context of participatory action research because one of the aims was to guide and improve practice. 34 interviews, five focus groups and observations of monitoring practice were conducted. Fieldwork occurred in the places where the monitoring models are coordinated and applied in Thailand, Cambodia, Uganda and Kenya. Participants included those coordinating the monitoring schemes, monitors, senior investigators and research staff. Transcribed textual data from field notes, interviews and focus groups was imported into a qualitative data software program (NVIVO V. 10) and analysed inductively and thematically by a qualitative researcher. The initial coding framework was reviewed internally and two main categories emerged from the subsequent interrogation of the data. The categories that were identified related to the conceptual framing and nature of monitoring, and the practice of monitoring, including relational factors. Particular emphasis was given to the value of a scientific and cooperative style of monitoring as a means of enhancing data quality, trust and transparency. In terms of practice the primary purpose of monitoring was defined as improving the conduct of health research and increasing the capacity of researchers and trial sites. The models studied utilise internal and network wide expertise to improve the ethics and quality of clinical research. They demonstrate how monitoring can be a scientific and constructive exercise rather than a threatening process. The value of cooperative relations needs to be given more emphasis in monitoring activities, which seek to ensure that research protects

  13. EPA-WERF Cooperative Agreement: Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a brief slide presentation that will provide an overview of several projects that are being conducted in EPA-WERF Cooperative Agreement, Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century. The cooperative agreement objectives are to produce, evaluate, &...

  14. Developing as Teachers and as Researchers: Emerging Professionals' Experiences with Cooperative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Cruz, Maria; Albaladejo, Cristina; Johnson, Arlette; Homa, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article details the second cycle of cooperative inquiry undertaken by emerging educators who self-identify as "other" because of gender, language, ethnicity, and/or sexual orientation. The current cycle focuses on the impact participation in cooperative inquiry had on researchers' teaching practices. Data sources include transcripts…

  15. Romanian - Swiss cooperative research programme "Environmental Science and Technology in Romania" (ESTROM)

    OpenAIRE

    PANIN, Nicolae; GIGER, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The Romanian Ministry for Education, Research and Youth (MECT), the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and the Swiss National Science Foundation had launched in 2004 the Romanian-Swiss research programme known as “Environmental Science and Technology in Romania” (ESTROM). ESTROM was established as a pilot programme of scientific co-operation between Swiss Research and Education Units with similar ones from Romania in the framework of SCOPES – a Swiss national programme for sup...

  16. Sludge pasteurization and upgrading by radiation. Bilateral research cooperation between OAEP and JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The research cooperation between office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand (OAEP) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) on 'Sludge Pasteurization and Upgrading by Radiation' was carried out for 4 years starting from March 1990. This cooperation was performed through information exchange meetings (Steering Committee Meeting), held in Takasaki and Bangkok, and experiments and discussions by scientist exchange, Many useful results were obtained on radiation inactivation effect of pathogen and parasites, upgrading of irradiated sludges to fertilizer, animal feeds and biological pesticides. This report includes the main results of the research cooperation reported at the First to Fifth Steering Committee Meetings as the progress reports. (author)

  17. Report on the fiscal 1996 research cooperation promotion project, `the research cooperation diagnosis survey`; 1996 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo `kenkyu kyoryoku shindan chosa` hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    A diagnosis survey was conducted for Japan to cooperate in researching subjects on technical development in developing countries. In fiscal 1996, surveys were made on the following: (1) establishment of the industrial base (Vietnam), (2) preservation of biological diversification and the continuous utilization (Brazil), (3) fostering of the industry of automobile parts (Thailand), (4) finding out of items on environment related fields (India), (5) environmental response type system for effective use of water resource (the Philippines), (6) small size geothermal exploration in remote islands (Indonesia). (1) is research cooperation for welding technology, powder metallurgy technology, hypoid gear manufacturing technology, and iron making technology by the direct reduction method. In (2), research/development are conducted in cooperation with research institutes in Brazil on survey/identification/utilization of bioactive substances from biological resources in Brazil. In (4), an examination was made of the seeds for research cooperation in technical fields such as environment and energy. Having a strong relation with the industrial circle, SCIR is carrying out researches on aerospace, petrochemical, biology, electronics, medicines/drug, etc., which indicated fulfillment of intellectual infrastructure in India. 52 figs.

  18. Collaborations in gynecologic oncology education and research in low- and middle- income countries: Current status, barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, L; Berek, J; Randall, T; McCormack, M; Schmeler, K; Manchanda, R; Rebbeck, T; Jeng, C J; Pyle, D; Quinn, M; Trimble, E; Naik, R; Lai, C H; Ochiai, K; Denny, L; Bhatla, N

    2018-08-01

    Eighty-five percent of the incidents and deaths from cervical cancer occur in low and middle income countries. In many of these countries, this is the most common cancer in women. The survivals of the women with gynecologic cancers are hampered by the paucity of prevention, screening, treatment facilities and gynecologic oncology providers. Increasing efforts dedicated to improving education and research in these countries have been provided by international organizations. We describe here the existing educational and research programs that are offered by major international organizations, the barriers and opportunities provided by these collaborations and hope to improve the outcomes of cervical cancer through these efforts.

  19. Research of possible connection of oncological sickness rate with environment pollution by physical and chemical carcinogens on the population both West-Kazakhstan area and Kokshetau oblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, M.A.; Doskeeva, R.A.; Bityukov, A.I.; Bajmukhamedova, M.Kh.

    2003-01-01

    It was researched a number of the oncological diseases cases (lung and hemic-blastosis) of population within 10 years (1984-1993) for revealing a possible correlation of sickness rate on oncological diseases with oncological inauspicious part of West Kazakhstan region (Atyrau, Oral, Kyzylorda) and Kokshetau. The first three regions have oil-mining and oil refining industries and nuclear tests experience. In Kokshetau gold-mining industry takes place. We can connect to some degree a number of cases of lung cancer and hemic-blastosis with effect of ionizing radiation. It is possibly influence of oil products and gas condensate on malignancy. (author)

  20. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalhatu Muhammed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal, long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node’s cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted.

  1. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Dalhatu; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Zareei, Mahdi; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Khan, Anwar

    2018-02-01

    Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal), long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node's cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted.

  2. Game Theory-Based Cooperation for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Taxonomy, Review, Research Challenges and Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Dalhatu; Anisi, Mohammad Hossein; Vargas-Rosales, Cesar; Khan, Anwar

    2018-01-01

    Exploring and monitoring the underwater world using underwater sensors is drawing a lot of attention these days. In this field cooperation between acoustic sensor nodes has been a critical problem due to the challenging features such as acoustic channel failure (sound signal), long propagation delay of acoustic signal, limited bandwidth and loss of connectivity. There are several proposed methods to improve cooperation between the nodes by incorporating information/game theory in the node’s cooperation. However, there is a need to classify the existing works and demonstrate their performance in addressing the cooperation issue. In this paper, we have conducted a review to investigate various factors affecting cooperation in underwater acoustic sensor networks. We study various cooperation techniques used for underwater acoustic sensor networks from different perspectives, with a concentration on communication reliability, energy consumption, and security and present a taxonomy for underwater cooperation. Moreover, we further review how the game theory can be applied to make the nodes cooperate with each other. We further analyze different cooperative game methods, where their performance on different metrics is compared. Finally, open issues and future research direction in underwater acoustic sensor networks are highlighted. PMID:29389874

  3. Patterns of symptom control and palliative care-focused original research articles in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology *Biology* Physics and the Radiotherapy and Oncology Journal, 2005-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Diana D; DiGiovanni, Julia; Skamene, Sonia; Noveroske Philbrick, Sarah; Wang, Yanbing; Barnes, Elizabeth A; Chow, Edward; Sullivan, Adam; Balboni, Tracy A

    2018-04-01

    A significant portion of radiation treatment (30-40%) is delivered with palliative intent. Given the frequency of palliative care (PC) in radiation oncology, we determined the patterns of research focusing on symptom control and palliative care (SCPC) in two prominent radiation oncology journals from 2005-2014. Original research manuscripts published from 2005-2014 in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology *Biology* Physics (Red Journal) and the Radiotherapy and Oncology Journal (Green Journal) were reviewed to categorize articles as PC and/or SCPC. Articles were categorized as PC if it pertained to any aspect of treatment of metastatic cancer, and as SCPC if symptom control in the metastatic cancer setting was the goal of the research inquiry and/or any domain of palliative clinical practice guidelines was the goal of research inquiry. From 2005-2014, 4.9% (312/6,386) of original research articles published in the Red Journal and 3.5% (84/2,406) published in the Green Journal pertained to metastatic cancer, and were categorized as PC. In the Red Journal, 1.3% (84/6,386) of original research articles were categorized as SCPC; 1.3% (32/2,406) of articles in the Green Journal were categorized as SCPC. There was no trend observed in the proportion of SCPC articles published over time in the Red Journal (P=0.76), the Green Journal (P=0.48), or both journals in aggregate (P=0.38). Despite the fact that palliative radiotherapy is a critical part of radiation oncology practice, PC and SCPC-focused original research is poorly represented in the Red Journal and the Green Journal.

  4. CGH U.S.-China Program for Biomedical Research Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Bilateral Programs for Collaborative Scientific Research seeks to enhance the global activities of NCI’s intramural researchers and grantees through co-funded support for collaborative research between NIH and international scientific research agencies.

  5. Research on public logistics centre as tool for cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jaržemskis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on logistics centre concept and benefits for users. Intermodal benefit, forwarders impact, IT solutions, new transport flows due to synergy, better supply chain management, additional services, cost sharing, economies of scale, quality of the services, know-how, joint marketing impact, and benefit for growth of third-party logistics services are presented. The main bottlenecks such as duration of planning logistics centres process, pressure to land use for other purposes and problems caused by legislation are described. Results of pilot study of benefits from business cooperation are presented and concluded as well.

  6. Oncologic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis

  7. New Virginia Cooperative Extension website connects citizens with research-based knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphin, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Cooperative Extension has revamped its online presence with a new and improved website that connects citizens with the research-based knowledge at Virginia's land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University.

  8. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 year in review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2018-02-08

    The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program was involved in a number of notable events during 2017, many concerning our personnel. Dr. Barry Grand left his position as Leader of the Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit to become the Cooperative Units Program Supervisor for the South, replacing Dr. Kevin Whalen who took over as Supervisor for the West. We welcomed Dr. Sarah Converse who left the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to become Leader of the Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Dr. Amanda Rosenberger joined the Tennessee Cooperative Fishery Research Unit as Assistant Leader, transferring from the Missouri Cooperative Unit. Dr. Scott Carleton left his position as Assistant Unit Leader in New Mexico to become Chief of the Region 2 Migratory Bird Program of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.We said farewell to many colleagues who retired. Their departure is bittersweet as we wish them health, happiness, and wellness in retirement. We will miss their companionship and the extraordinary contributions they have made to the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program and conservation.The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program has a record high number of vacant scientist positions due to a combination of retirements and base funding short-falls. These issues are affecting our ability to meet cooperator needs. Yet, we remain highly productive. For example, this year we released a report (https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1427) containing abstracts of nearly 600 of our research projects, covering thematic areas ranging from advanced technologies to wildlife diseases. We provided highly competent, trained scientists and natural resource managers for our cooperators’ workforce. We delivered technical training and guidance to professional practitioners. We provided critical information to cooperators for decisions on species status assessments and management of species of greatest conservation need

  9. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Khalid, Najma; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B.; Devlin, Phillip M.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    -based planning with use of DVH to evaluate normal tissue doses. Most patients completed adjuvant RT in the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were not routinely incorporated into clinical practice during the 2005-2007 period. These data will be a benchmark for future Quality Research in Radiation Oncology GC surveys.

  10. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Khalid, Najma [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Minsky, Bruce D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B. [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Devlin, Phillip M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2013-02-01

    -based planning with use of DVH to evaluate normal tissue doses. Most patients completed adjuvant RT in the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were not routinely incorporated into clinical practice during the 2005-2007 period. These data will be a benchmark for future Quality Research in Radiation Oncology GC surveys.

  11. Bergen Campus Biomedical Research Cooperation Analysis using a CERIF-CRIS

    OpenAIRE

    Aksnes, Dag W.; Asserson, Anne; Thorstensen, Reidar; Økland, Bernt Olav

    2012-01-01

    Presented at the CRIS2012 Conference in Prague.-- 10 pages.-- Full conference programme available at: http://www.cris2012.org/findByFilter.do?categoryId=1158 In this study we have analysed research cooperation between a Norwegian university and its affiliated university hospital using contextual metadata based on the CERIF (Common European Research Information Format) model on co-authored publications. The purpose is to analyse the extent and nature of cooperation between the institutio...

  12. Research Use by Cooperative Extension Educators in New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; Chen, Emily K.; Pillemer, Karl; Meador, Rhoda H.

    2013-01-01

    A Web-based survey of 388 off-campus Cornell Extension educators in New York State examined their attitudes toward research, sources of research-based information, knowledge and beliefs about evidence-based programs, and involvement in research activities. Strong consensus emerged that research is central and that educators are capable of reading…

  13. Aquaculture in South Africa: A cooperative research programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Safriel, O

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available the industry on a sound footing. An Aquaculture Working Group was appointed by the CSIR in 1981, which developed a research strategy, identified needs and suggested priorities for research on major problem areas in aquaculture....

  14. 77 FR 38709 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP) AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... Research Program (STEP). The FHWA anticipates that the STEP or a similar program to provide resources for... stakeholders that can leverage limited research funding in the STEP with other stakeholders and partners in...

  15. 75 FR 38605 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP) AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... Research Program (STEP). The FHWA anticipates that the STEP or a similar program to provide resources for... limited research funding in the STEP with other stakeholders and partners in order to increase the total...

  16. 76 FR 50312 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP) AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION... Research Program (STEP). The FHWA anticipates that the STEP or a similar program to provide resources for... limited research funding in the STEP with other stakeholders and partners in order to increase the total...

  17. 34 CFR 350.33 - What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center— (a) Shall... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What cooperation requirements must a Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center meet? 350.33 Section 350.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  18. 78 FR 70102 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies; Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and... Development Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the...

  19. 78 FR 41198 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and.... The Committee advises the Chief Research and Development Officer through the Director of the Clinical...

  20. 77 FR 72438 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and... through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and...

  1. 78 FR 53015 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and... Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and feasibility of proposed projects and...

  2. 76 FR 9812 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Halon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Production Act of 1993--Halon Alternatives Research Corporation, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on January 18, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Halon Alternatives Research Corporation, Inc. (``HARC'') has...

  3. 77 FR 28405 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on April 17, 2012... seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written notifications...

  4. 77 FR 61786 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on September 10....C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written...

  5. 77 FR 54612 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on July 5, 2012... seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written notifications...

  6. 77 FR 26583 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Project No. 2011-01, Ultra Low Nutrient...''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) Project No. 2011-01, Ultra Low Nutrient Control in Wastewater...

  7. 77 FR 14046 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on January 31....C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written...

  8. 76 FR 78044 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on November 1....C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written...

  9. 75 FR 45156 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on June 2, 2010... seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written notifications...

  10. 77 FR 40086 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Petroleum Environmental Research Forum Notice is hereby given that, on June 8, 2012... seq. (``the Act''), Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (``PERF'') has filed written notifications...

  11. Highly cited German research contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics. Focus on collaboration and diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Medicine; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-10-15

    Background and purpose: Tight budgets and increasing competition for research funding pose challenges for highly specialized medical disciplines such as radiation oncology. Therefore, a systematic review was performed of successfully completed research that had a high impact on clinical practice. These data might be helpful when preparing new projects. Methods: Different measures of impact, visibility, and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this study, the article citation rate was chosen (minimum 15 citations per year on average). Highly cited German contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics (published between 1990 and 2010) were identified from the Scopus database. Results: Between 1990 and 2010, 106 articles published in 44 scientific journals met the citation requirement. The median average of yearly citations was 21 (maximum 167, minimum 15). All articles with {>=} 40 citations per year were published between 2003 and 2009, consistent with the assumption that the citation rate gradually increases for up to 2 years after publication. Most citations per year were recorded for meta-analyses and randomized phase III trials, which typically were performed by collaborative groups. Conclusion: A large variety of clinical radiotherapy, biology, and physics topics achieved high numbers of citations. However, areas such as quality of life and side effects, palliative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy for nonmalignant disorders were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted. (orig.)

  12. Highly cited German research contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics. Focus on collaboration and diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, C.; Tromsoe Univ.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tight budgets and increasing competition for research funding pose challenges for highly specialized medical disciplines such as radiation oncology. Therefore, a systematic review was performed of successfully completed research that had a high impact on clinical practice. These data might be helpful when preparing new projects. Methods: Different measures of impact, visibility, and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this study, the article citation rate was chosen (minimum 15 citations per year on average). Highly cited German contributions to the fields of radiation oncology, biology, and physics (published between 1990 and 2010) were identified from the Scopus database. Results: Between 1990 and 2010, 106 articles published in 44 scientific journals met the citation requirement. The median average of yearly citations was 21 (maximum 167, minimum 15). All articles with ≥ 40 citations per year were published between 2003 and 2009, consistent with the assumption that the citation rate gradually increases for up to 2 years after publication. Most citations per year were recorded for meta-analyses and randomized phase III trials, which typically were performed by collaborative groups. Conclusion: A large variety of clinical radiotherapy, biology, and physics topics achieved high numbers of citations. However, areas such as quality of life and side effects, palliative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy for nonmalignant disorders were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted. (orig.)

  13. An integrative review of the influence of job strain and coping on nurses' work performance: Understanding the gaps in oncology nursing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhuha Youssef Wazqar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nursing is known to be a stressful profession that can lead to physical and psychological health issues and behavioural problems. In oncology, workload among nurses is believed to be increasing in conjunction with rapidly increasing numbers of patients with cancer and staff shortages worldwide, therefore it is essential to sustain a quality oncology nurse workforce. Numerous studies have presented evidence on job strain, effects of coping strategies, and nurses' work performance within healthcare settings, but few have focused on oncology settings and none of these on nurses working in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of this review was to summarize empirical and theoretical evidence concerning job-related stressors in nurses, particularly oncology nurses, and the interrelationships among job strain, coping strategies, and work performance in this population. Search strategies identified studies published on studies in peer-reviewed journals from 2004 to 2016. Twenty-five nursing studies were found examining the relationships among the concepts of interest. Common job-related stressors among oncology nurses were high job demands, dealing with death/dying, lack of job control, and interpersonal conflicts at work. Job strain was found to be significantly linked to coping strategies, and negatively associated with work performance among nurses in general. There is no existing empirical evidence to support the relationship between coping strategies and work performance among oncology nurses. The present evidence is limited, and a considerable amount of research is required in the future to expand the oncology nursing literature. Research is needed to investigate job-related stressors and their effects on oncology nurses. Keywords: Coping, Job strain, Nurses, Review, Work performance

  14. Nuclear weapons research in Sweden. The co-operation between civilian and military research, 1947 - 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonter, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear weapons research began as early as 1945, shortly after the first atomic bombs fell over Japan. The assignment to look into the new weapon of mass destruction went to the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). Admittedly, the main aim of the research initiated at that time was to find out how Sweden could best protect itself against a nuclear weapon attack. However, from the outset FOA was interested in investigating the possibilities of manufacturing what was then called an atomic bomb. A co-operation between FOA and AB Atomenergi (AE), which was created in 1947 in order to be responsible for the industrial development of civilian nuclear energy, was initiated. AE made several technical investigations within this co-operation regarding choice of reactors and preconditions for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. The first purpose of this report is therefore to investigate how this co-operation emerged and what consequences it had for the project to produce basic information for the Swedish manufacture of nuclear weapons. In general terms, the finding of this report is that FOA was responsible for the overall nuclear weapons research. For this reason, FOA was in charge of the construction of the nuclear device and the studies of its effects. Additionally, AE should deliver basic information of a possible production of weapons-grade plutonium and investigate the possibilities of a production or a procurement of inspection-free heavy water (i.e. without inspections by the supplying country). AE should also build a reprocessing plant and manufacture fuel elements to be used in the reactors for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise that both FOA and AE conducted plutonium research. The reason why FOA conducted this research was that the plutonium had to be in metallic form in order to be used in a nuclear weapons device. Therefore, FOA carried out research with the purpose of producing

  15. Nuclear weapons research in Sweden. The co-operation between civilian and military research, 1947 - 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonter, Thomas [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History

    2002-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear weapons research began as early as 1945, shortly after the first atomic bombs fell over Japan. The assignment to look into the new weapon of mass destruction went to the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). Admittedly, the main aim of the research initiated at that time was to find out how Sweden could best protect itself against a nuclear weapon attack. However, from the outset FOA was interested in investigating the possibilities of manufacturing what was then called an atomic bomb. A co-operation between FOA and AB Atomenergi (AE), which was created in 1947 in order to be responsible for the industrial development of civilian nuclear energy, was initiated. AE made several technical investigations within this co-operation regarding choice of reactors and preconditions for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. The first purpose of this report is therefore to investigate how this co-operation emerged and what consequences it had for the project to produce basic information for the Swedish manufacture of nuclear weapons. In general terms, the finding of this report is that FOA was responsible for the overall nuclear weapons research. For this reason, FOA was in charge of the construction of the nuclear device and the studies of its effects. Additionally, AE should deliver basic information of a possible production of weapons-grade plutonium and investigate the possibilities of a production or a procurement of inspection-free heavy water (i.e. without inspections by the supplying country). AE should also build a reprocessing plant and manufacture fuel elements to be used in the reactors for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise that both FOA and AE conducted plutonium research. The reason why FOA conducted this research was that the plutonium had to be in metallic form in order to be used in a nuclear weapons device. Therefore, FOA carried out research with the purpose of producing

  16. The role of international cooperation regarding safety assessment development in the SKB research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.; Ahlstrom, P.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperation and exchange of information with organizations in foreign countries regarding nuclear waste management constitutes an important part of the overall research and development activities of SKB. In the safety assessment of a repository for spent nuclear fuel natural phenomena have to be described with different kinds of models based on both general and site specific data. The international cooperation efforts to achieve models and methods for this type of descriptions, and where SKB are largely part, is summarized in this paper

  17. Brief report of the JNC Cooperative Research (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2004 was the tenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JNC's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JNC as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JNC. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2004 on 42 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; seventeen of which ended in 2004. Of these, eight were related to fast breeder reactors, eight to the nuclear fuel cycle, and one to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  18. Cooperative research in space geodesy and crustal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This research grant, which covered the period of July 1991 to August 1994, was concerned with a variety of topics within the geodesy and crustal dynamics fields. The specific topics of this grant included satellite tracking and gravity field determinations and crustal dynamics (this concentrated of space geodetic site stability for VLBI sites). Summaries of the specific research projects are included along with a list of publications and presentations supported by this research grant.

  19. The integration of psychology in pediatric oncology research and practice: collaboration to improve care and outcomes for children and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, Anne E; Noll, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancers are life-threatening diseases that are universally distressing and potentially traumatic for children and their families at diagnosis, during treatment, and beyond. Dramatic improvements in survival have occurred as a result of increasingly aggressive multimodal therapies delivered in the context of clinical research trials. Nonetheless, cancers remain a leading cause of death in children, and their treatments have short- and long-term impacts on health and well-being. For over 35 years, pediatric psychologists have partnered with pediatric oncology teams to make many contributions to our understanding of the impact of cancer and its treatment on children and families and have played prominent roles in providing an understanding of treatment-related late effects and in improving quality of life. After discussing the incidence of cancer in children, its causes, and the treatment approaches to it in pediatric oncology, we present seven key contributions of psychologists to collaborative and integrated care in pediatric cancer: managing procedural pain, nausea, and other symptoms; understanding and reducing neuropsychological effects; treating children in the context of their families and other systems (social ecology); applying a developmental perspective; identifying competence and vulnerability; integrating psychological knowledge into decision making and other clinical care issues; and facilitating the transition to palliative care and bereavement. We conclude with a discussion of the current status of integrating knowledge from psychological research into practice in pediatric cancer. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Semiconductor Research Corporation: A Case Study in Cooperative Innovation Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Nathaniel; Anadon, Laura Diaz; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    In the study of innovation institutions, it is important to consider how different institutional models can affect a research organization in conducting or funding successful work. As an industry collaborative, Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) provides an example of a privately funded institution that leverages the inputs of several member…

  1. Extensible Open-Source Zero-Footprint Web Viewer for Oncologic Imaging Research | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tumor Imaging Metrics Core (TIMC), a CCSG Shared-Resource of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, has developed software for managing the workflow and image measurements for oncology clinical trials. This system currently is in use across the five Harvard hospitals to manage over 600 active clinical trials, with 800 users, and has been licensed and implemented at several other Cancer Centers, including Yale, Utah/Huntsman Cancer Institute, and UW/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

  2. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 year in review postcard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2018-02-08

    This postcard provides details about the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 Year in Review, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1438, now available at https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1438. In this report, you will find details about the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units (CRU) Program relating to its background, fish and wildlife science, students, staffing, vacancies, research funding, outreach and training, science themes, accolades, and professional services. You will see snapshots of CRU projects with information on how results have been or are being applied by cooperators. This is the essence of what we do: science that matters.Throughout the year, keep up with CRU research projects at http://www.coopunits.org.

  3. Research and development at ORNL/CESAR towards cooperating robotic systems for hazardous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.C.; Fujimura, K.; Unseren, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the frontiers in intelligent machine research is the understanding of how constructive cooperation among multiple autonomous agents can be effected. The effort at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR)at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) focuses on two problem areas: (1) cooperation by multiple mobile robots in dynamic, incompletely known environments; and (2) cooperating robotic manipulators. Particular emphasis is placed on experimental evaluation of research and developments using the CESAR robot system testbeds, including three mobile robots, and a seven-axis, kinematically redundant mobile manipulator. This paper summarizes initial results of research addressing the decoupling of position and force control for two manipulators holding a common object, and the path planning for multiple robots in a common workspace. 15 refs., 3 figs

  4. Vascular surgery research in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jawas

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The quality and quantity of vascular surgery research in the GCC countries should be improved to answer important local questions related to vascular diseases. This needs better strategic planning and more collaboration between various institutions.

  5. International cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter international cooperation of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. is presented. Very important is cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. This cooperation has various forms - national and regional projects of technical cooperation, coordinated research activities, participation of our experts in preparation of the IAEA documentation etc.

  6. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, S; Jaffray, D; Chetty, I; Benedict, S

    2014-01-01

    efficacy, and provided a glimpse into the future. Learning Objectives: To understand the impact of technology on the field of radiation therapy To learn about the trends of technology development for the field of radiation oncology To understand the opportunities for in innovative technology research

  7. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, S [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    efficacy, and provided a glimpse into the future. Learning Objectives: To understand the impact of technology on the field of radiation therapy To learn about the trends of technology development for the field of radiation oncology To understand the opportunities for in innovative technology research.

  8. 77 FR 31072 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... Development Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  9. 76 FR 19189 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  10. 75 FR 79446 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative... Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  11. 76 FR 65781 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and feasibility of proposed projects and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  12. 76 FR 73781 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative... Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  13. 75 FR 28686 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative... through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  14. Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century: Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through this $10 million cooperative agreement, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) will increase its recognition as an active leader and supporter of research that seeks innovative solutions to problems posed by aging water i...

  15. SARNET: An European cooperative effort on LWR severe accident research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, Jean-Claude; Van Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Chaumont, Bernard; Adroguer, Bernard; Haste, Tim; Bonnet, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Leonhard; Beraha, David; Trambauer, Klaus; Annunziato, Alessandro; Sehgal, Raj

    2006-01-01

    49 organisations network in SARNET (Severe Accident Research and management NETwork) their capacities of research in order to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues for enhancing, in regard of Severe Accidents (SA), the safety of existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). This project has been defined bearing in mind the necessity to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups. SARNET tackles the fragmentation that exists between the different R and D national programmes, notably in defining common research programmes and developing common computer tools and methodologies for safety assessment. SARNET comprises most of the actors involved in SA research in Europe. To reach these objectives, all the organizations networked in SARNET contribute to a so-called Joint Programme of Activities (JPA), which can be broken in several elements: - Implementing an advanced communication tool for fostering exchange of information; - Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining commonly new ones; - Analysing commonly the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of concerned phenomena; - Developing ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA), which capitalizes in terms of physical models the knowledge produced within SARNET; - Developing Scientific Databases, in which all the results of research programmes are stored; - Developing a common methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of NNPs; - Developing educational courses and text (source) books; - Promoting personnel mobility between the various European organisations. A few organizations are covering a wide range of competences though not complete, whereas others are specialized in very specific areas and thus complementarities are developing. The critical mass of competence for performing experiments needed in the

  16. European Research Reloaded : Cooperation and Integration Among Europeanized States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ron; Haverland, Markus

    2006-01-01

    European integration has had an ever deepening impact on the member states. The first wave of research concerned the process of institution building and policy developments at the European Union (EU) level. The second wave, on Europeanization used the resulting integration as an explanatory factor

  17. Building a platform for scientific-research cooperation under circumstances of realized asymmetry of potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiśniowski Witold

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing complexity of the environment arising both from the processes of globalization in world economy and from the development processes in Poland has become a strategic challenge for the Institute of Aviation. Significant disproportions of the potential of Poland, compared to Germany, United States, or China (especially in terms of the economic dimension and the adopted model for financing scientific research, as well as distant position of Polish universities on the scientific map of the world lead to the necessity to create a model for managing the Institute of Aviation based on internationalization of research and cooperation with leading scientific and (Ohio State University – OSU technological centres (General Electric – GE. The experiences of the Institute of Aviation show that what should be the basis of international competitiveness of research institutes is well educated scientific personnel, modern research infrastructure and competences of cooperation. A proof of this is 16-year-long strategic alliance (private-public partnership of the Institute and GE, cooperation with OSU and activities in European research consortia. The innovative dimension of scientific cooperation with OSU (2+2 formula, research internships, commission for predicting new directions of scientific research and other foreign partners allows the Institute of Aviation to achieve success in competition of international character.

  18. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.C. de; Houtlosser, M.; Wit, J.M.; Engberts, D.P.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Leeuwen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences

  19. Need for global partnership in cancer care: perceptions of cancer care researchers attending the 2010 australia and Asia pacific clinical oncology research development workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, H Kim; Abernethy, Amy P; Stockler, Martin R; Koczwara, Bogda; Aziz, Zeba; Nair, Reena; Seymour, Lesley

    2011-09-01

    To understand the diversity of issues and the breadth of growing clinical care, professional education, and clinical research needs of developing countries, not typically represented in Western or European surveys of cancer care and research. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the attendees at the 2010 Australia and Asia Pacific Clinical Oncology Research Development workshop (Queensland, Australia) about the most important health care questions facing the participant's home countries, especially concerning cancer. Early-career oncologists and advanced oncology trainees from a region of the world containing significant low- and middle-income countries reported that cancer is an emerging health priority as a result of aging of the population, the impact of diet and lifestyle, and environmental pollution. There was concern about the capacity of health care workers and treatment facilities to provide cancer care and access to the latest cancer therapies and technologies. Although improving health care delivery was seen as a critical local agenda priority, focusing on improved cancer research activities in this select population was seen as the best way that others outside the country could improve outcomes for all. The burden of cancer will increase dramatically over the next 20 years, particularly in countries with developing and middle-income economies. Cancer research globally faces significant barriers, many of which are magnified in the developing country setting. Overcoming these barriers will require partnerships sensitive and responsive to both local and global needs.

  20. Maya phytomedicine in Guatemala - Can cooperative research change ethnopharmacological paradigms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitziger, Martin; Heinrich, Michael; Edwards, Peter; Pöll, Elfriede; Lopez, Marissa; Krütli, Pius

    2016-06-20

    This paper presents one of the first large-scale collaborative research projects in ethnopharmacology, to bring together indigenous stakeholders and scientists both in project design and execution. This approach has often been recommended but rarely put into practice. The study was carried out in two key indigenous areas of Guatemala, for which very little ethnopharmacological fieldwork has been published. To document and characterize the ethno-pharmacopoeias of the Kaqchikel (highlands) and Q'eqchi' (lowlands) Maya in a transdisciplinary collaboration with the two groups Councils of Elders. The project is embedded in a larger collaboration with five Councils of Elders representing important indigenous groups in Guatemala, two of which participated in this study. These suggested healing experts reputed for their phytotherapeutic knowledge and skills. Ethnobotanical fieldwork was carried out over 20 months, accompanied by a joint steering process and validation workshops. The field data were complemented by literature research and were aggregated using a modified version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and Trotter & Logan's consensus index. Similar numbers of species were collected in the two areas, with a combined total of 530 species. This total does not represent all of the species used for medicinal purposes. Remedies for the digestive system, the central nervous system & behavioral syndromes, and general tissue problems & infections were most frequent in both areas. Furthermore, remedies for the blood, immune & endocrine system are frequent in the Kaqchikel area, and remedies for the reproductive system are frequent in the Q'eqchi' area. Consensus factors are however low. The Kaqchikel, in contrast to the Q'eqchi', report more remedies for non-communicable illnesses. They also rely heavily on introduced species. The transdisciplinary research design facilitated scientifically rigorous and societally relevant large-scale fieldwork, which

  1. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Moretti

    Full Text Available Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs.A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction.Three-hundred and eleven (57% out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72% participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49% declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79% of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%. Overall, 246 residents (79% gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools.The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the access to research opportunity are needed; the

  2. Closing the Gap Between Research and Field Applications for Multi-UAV Cooperative Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    REPORT DATE September 2013 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLOSING THE GAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND FIELD...iii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited CLOSING THE GAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND FIELD APPLICATIONS FOR MULTI-UAV COOPERATIVE...the report is to lay the groundwork for future analysis in multi-UAV analysis to close the gap between existing research and efficient multi-UAV

  3. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  4. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2002 was the eighth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JNC's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JNC as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JNC. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. The report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on 42 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; twelve of which ended in 2002. Of these, five were related to fast breeder reactors, three to the nuclear fuel cycle, one to radiation safety and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  5. Brief report of the JAEA cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the JAEA Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2009 was the fifteenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects in relation to the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle technology through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JAEA's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JAEA as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JAEA screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JAEA. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2009 on 32 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; eleven of which ended in 2009. Of these, six were related to fast breeder reactors, two to the nuclear fuel cycle, and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  6. Brief report of the JAEA cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the JAEA Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as “universities, etc.” below), which means that the fiscal year 2011 was the seventeenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects in relation to the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle technology through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JAEA's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JAEA as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JAEA screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JAEA. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2011 on 27 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; thirteen of which ended in 2011. Of these, seven were related to fast breeder reactors, two to the nuclear fuel cycle, one to radiation safety, and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  7. Brief report of the JAEA cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the JAEA Cooperative Research Scheme (A) of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2007 was the thirteenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects in relation to the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle technology through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JAEA's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JAEA as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JAEA screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JAEA. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2007 on 32 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; twelve of which ended in 2007. Of these, six were related to fast breeder reactors, two to the nuclear fuel cycle, and two to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  8. Brief report of the JAEA cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the JAEA Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2008 was the fourteenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects in relation to the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle technology through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JAEA's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JAEA as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JAEA screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JAEA. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2008 on 32 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; twelve of which ended in 2008. Of these, six were related to fast breeder reactors, one to the nuclear fuel cycle, one to radiation safety, and four to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  9. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2003 was the ninth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JNC's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JNC as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JNC. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2003 on 43 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; fourteen of which ended in 2003. Of these, seven were related to fast breeder reactors, five to the nuclear fuel cycle, one to radiation safety and one to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  10. Brief report of the JAEA cooperative research (A) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the JAEA Cooperative Research Scheme (A) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1995 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2012 was the eighteenth year of the scheme. The purpose of this scheme is to promote the basic and fundamental research that precedes the research and development projects in relation to the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle technology through collaboration with universities, etc. by using mainly JAEA's facilities and equipment. Under the scheme, universities, etc. propose methods and ideas, etc. to lead to the achievement of the goals of research collaboration themes which are set by JAEA as research collaboration subjects. Then a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JAEA screens the research collaboration subjects. Research collaboration is performed by carrying out cooperative research with universities, etc. or by accepting researchers from universities, etc. as Visiting Research Fellows at JAEA. The scheme allows students studying for doctorates at postgraduate schools either to participate in the cooperative research or to be accepted as trainee researchers. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2012 on 20 research collaboration subjects for preceding basic engineering research related to fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; ten of which ended in 2012. Of these, three were related to fast breeder reactors, five to the nuclear fuel cycle, and two to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  11. Achievement in research on ion beam application under the scientific cooperation program with the Gesellschaft fuer schwerionenforschung mbH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Masaru; Maekawa, Yasunari (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Gasellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung mbH (GSI) signed a memorandum of 'Research and Development in the Field of Ion Beam Application' in January, 1991 and started the cooperative research program. The cooperation has been implemented by means of joint research between JAERI and GSI, exchange of scientific and technical experts, and providing mutual exchange of research materials as well as technical information. This report summarizes the cooperative research activities under the cooperative research program in the last 12 years. The list of publications and several articles relating to this cooperative research program are attached as an appendix. All the attached articles are reprinted with permission from the publishers. (author)

  12. 75 FR 57502 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Robotics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Robotics Technology Consortium, Inc. Correction In notice document 2010-22215 beginning on page 54914 in the issue of Thursday, July 9, 2010, make the following corrections: 1. On page...

  13. Five hydrologic studies conducted by or in cooperation with the Center for Forested Wetlands Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra M. Amatya; Carl C. Trettin; R. Wayne Skaggs; T.J. Callahan; Ge Sun; J.E. Nettles; J.E. Parsons; M. Miwa

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Center for Forested Wetlands Research has conducted or cooperated in studies designed to improve understanding of fundamental hydrologic and biogeochemical processes that link aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Five of these studies are discussed here. The first is based on observations made on long-term experimental...

  14. 75 FR 24971 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Intellegere...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... Production Act of 1993--Intellegere Foundation Notice is hereby given that, on April 7, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq...) to facilitate scientific collaboration by addressing challenges of national security; (b) to promote...

  15. Efficacy of the Cooperative Learning Method on Mathematics Achievement and Attitude: A Meta-Analysis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, Gulfer; Tarim, Kamuran

    2015-01-01

    This research compiles experimental studies from 1988 to 2010 that examined the influence of the cooperative learning method, as compared with that of traditional methods, on mathematics achievement and on attitudes towards mathematics. The related field was searched using the following key words in Turkish "matematik ve isbirlikli ögrenme,…

  16. 78 FR 64248 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Heterogeneous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and...; Synopsys Inc., Mountain View, CA; and Kishonti Kft (individual member), Budapest, HUNGARY, have been added... the Act. The Department of Justice published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b...

  17. 78 FR 56939 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Opendaylight...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and.... In addition, Big Switch Networks, Mountain View, CA has withdrawn as a party to this venture. No... notification pursuant to Section 6(a) of the Act. The Department of Justice published a notice in the Federal...

  18. 78 FR 7455 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Heterogeneous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and... Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA; Ceva Inc., Mountain View, CA... the Act. The Department of Justice published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b...

  19. Academic Procrastination and the Performance of Graduate-Level Cooperative Groups in Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which academic procrastination predicted the performance of cooperative groups in graduate-level research methods courses. A total of 28 groups was examined (n = 83 students), ranging in size from 2 to 5 (M = 2.96, SD = 1.10). Multiple regression analyses revealed that neither within-group mean nor within-group…

  20. 78 FR 42532 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of Homeland Security for the Development of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease 3ABC ELISA Diagnostic Kit; Correction AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, Plum Island Animal Disease Center...

  1. 77 FR 25488 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Federally Integrated Communications System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with General Dynamics C4 Systems, Inc. to lab.... The Coast Guard invites public comment on the proposed CRADA, and also invites other potential non... material on the proposed CRADA must either be submitted to our online docket via http://www.regulations.gov...

  2. Psycho-oncology in Korea: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Kwang-Min; Jung, Dooyoung; Shim, Eun-Jung; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Kim, Jong-Heun

    2017-01-01

    to overcome the many barriers and stigmas of cancer and mental illnesses, psycho-oncology is now acknowledged as an essential part of integrated supportive care in cancer. Active research and international cooperation can gradually shape the Korean model of distress management.

  3. [Clinical research activity of the French cancer cooperative network: Overview and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Claire; Morin, Franck; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Seitz, Jean-François; Girault, Cécile; Salles, Gilles; Haioun, Corinne; Deschaseaux, Pascal; Casassus, Philippe; Mathiot, Claire; Pujade-Lauraine, Éric; Votan, Bénédicte; Louvet, Christophe; Delpeut, Christine; Bardet, Étienne; Vintonenko, Nadejda; Hoang Xuan, Khê; Vo, Maryline; Michon, Jean; Milleron, Bernard

    The French Cancer Plan 2014-2019 stresses the importance of strengthening collaboration between all stakeholders involved in the fight against cancer, including cancer cooperative groups and intergroups. This survey aimed to describe the basics characteristics and clinical research activity among the Cancer Cooperative Groups (Groupes coopérateurs en oncologie). The second objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to their research activity. A questionnaire was sent to all the clinicians involved in 2014 as investigators in a clinical trial sponsored by one of the ten members of the Cancer Cooperative Groups network. The questions were related to their profile, research activity and the infrastructure existing within their healthcare center to support clinical research and related compliance activities. In total, 366 investigators responded to our survey. The academic clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Cooperative Groups represented an important part of the research activity of the investigators in France in 2014. These academic groups contributed to the opening of many research sites throughout all regions in France. Factors associated with a higher participation of investigators (more than 10 patients enrolled in a trial over a year) include the existing support of healthcare professionals (more than 2 clinical research associate (CRA) OR=11.16 [3.82-32.6] compared to none) and the practice of their research activity in a University Hospital Center (CHU) rather than a Hospital Center (CH) (OR=2.15 [1.20-3.83]). This study highlighted factors that can strengthen investigator clinical research activities and subsequently improve patient access to evidence-based new cancer therapies in France. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Research on Multirobot Pursuit Task Allocation Algorithm Based on Emotional Cooperation Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baofu Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multirobot task allocation is a hot issue in the field of robot research. A new emotional model is used with the self-interested robot, which gives a new way to measure self-interested robots’ individual cooperative willingness in the problem of multirobot task allocation. Emotional cooperation factor is introduced into self-interested robot; it is updated based on emotional attenuation and external stimuli. Then a multirobot pursuit task allocation algorithm is proposed, which is based on emotional cooperation factor. Combined with the two-step auction algorithm recruiting team leaders and team collaborators, set up pursuit teams, and finally use certain strategies to complete the pursuit task. In order to verify the effectiveness of this algorithm, some comparing experiments have been done with the instantaneous greedy optimal auction algorithm; the results of experiments show that the total pursuit time and total team revenue can be optimized by using this algorithm.

  5. Research on multirobot pursuit task allocation algorithm based on emotional cooperation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Baofu; Chen, Lu; Wang, Hao; Dai, Shuanglu; Zhong, Qiubo

    2014-01-01

    Multirobot task allocation is a hot issue in the field of robot research. A new emotional model is used with the self-interested robot, which gives a new way to measure self-interested robots' individual cooperative willingness in the problem of multirobot task allocation. Emotional cooperation factor is introduced into self-interested robot; it is updated based on emotional attenuation and external stimuli. Then a multirobot pursuit task allocation algorithm is proposed, which is based on emotional cooperation factor. Combined with the two-step auction algorithm recruiting team leaders and team collaborators, set up pursuit teams, and finally use certain strategies to complete the pursuit task. In order to verify the effectiveness of this algorithm, some comparing experiments have been done with the instantaneous greedy optimal auction algorithm; the results of experiments show that the total pursuit time and total team revenue can be optimized by using this algorithm.

  6. The second Studsvik AB - JAEA meeting for cooperation in nuclear energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Yanagihara, Satoshi; Karlsson, Mikael; Stenmark, Anders

    2010-03-01

    The second annual meeting was held at Studsvik AB in Sweden to exchange information on radioactive waste treatment technology including recycling of materials and technical developments for the neutron irradiation experiments in materials testing reactors. The information exchange meeting was held on the basis of the implemental agreement between the Studsvik AB and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for cooperation in nuclear energy research and development. The major items of the information exchange were the present status of waste treatment in both organizations including acceptance criteria of wastes in Studsvik facilities, experience and current status of RI production technology in both organizations as well as the sensor development. The future plan in cooperative program was also discussed. This report describes contents of the information exchange and discussions in two cooperation areas. (author)

  7. Fuel irradiation research of Japan at Halden reactor. Achievement of cooperative researches between JAERI and several organizations in the period from 2000 to 2002 (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    JAERI has performed cooperative researches with several Japanese organizations utilizing the Halden Boiling Heavy Water Reactor(HBWR) which is located at Halden in Norway. These researches are carried out based on the contracts of the cooperative researches, which are revised every three years, in accordance with the renewal of the participation of JAERI to the OECD Halden Reactor Project. This report summarizes the objectives, contents and outlines of the achievements of the cooperative researches during the three years from 2000 January to 2002 December. During the period, seven cooperative researches had been carried out. Two of them had been completed and other five researches have been continued to the next three-year period. Most of them are irradiation test researches of advanced fuel and cladding in order to prepare the higher burnup utilization and introduction of LWR fuel and MOX fuel in LWRs of Japan. As the researches of fuel irradiation usually take long time for preparing test and irradiation, three years are usually not enough to obtain some achievements from the irradiation tests. Therefore, five cooperative researches have been continued to the next three-year period. In this report, the achievements of the researches continued to the next period are not final one but a kind of progress report. (author)

  8. Safe Anesthesia for Radiotherapy in Pediatric Oncology: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience, 2004-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghelescu, Doralina L.; Burgoyne, Laura L.; Liu Wei; Hankins, Gisele M.; Cheng, Cheng; Beckham, Penny A. C.R.N.A.; Shearer, Jack; Norris, Angela L.; Kun, Larry E.; Bikhazi, George B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of anesthesia-related complications in children undergoing radiotherapy and the associated risk factors. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively investigated the incidence and types of anesthesia-related complications and examined their association with age, weight, oncology diagnosis, type of anesthetic (propofol vs. propofol and adjuncts), total propofol dose, anesthetic duration, type of radiotherapy procedure (simulation vs. radiotherapy) and patient position (prone vs. supine). Results: Between July 2004 and June 2006, propofol was used in 3,833 procedures (3,611 radiotherapy sessions and 222 simulations) in 177 patients. Complications occurred during 49 anesthetic sessions (1.3%). On univariate analysis, four factors were significantly associated with the risk of complications: procedure duration (p <0.001), total propofol dose (p <0.001), use of adjunct agents (vs. propofol alone; p = 0.029), and simulation (vs. radiotherapy; p = 0.014). Patient position (prone vs. supine) was not significantly associated with the frequency of complications (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.53; p = 0.38). On multivariate analysis, the procedure duration (p <0.0001) and total propofol dose (p ≤0.03) were the most significant risk factors after adjustment for age, weight, anesthetic type, and procedure type. We found no evidence of the development of tolerance to propofol. Conclusion: The rate of anesthesia-related complications was low (1.3%) in our study. The significant risk factors were procedure duration, total propofol dose, the use of adjunct agents with propofol, and simulation (vs. radiotherapy)

  9. Personal identifiers in medical research networks: evaluation of the personal identifier generator in the Competence Network Paediatric Oncology and Haematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pommerening, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Society for Paediatric Oncology and Haematology (GPOH and the corresponding Competence Network Paediatric Oncology and Haematology conduct various clinical trials. The comprehensive analysis requires reliable identification of the recruited patients. Therefore, a personal identifier (PID generator is used to assign unambiguous, pseudonymous, non-reversible PIDs to participants in those trials. We tested the matching algorithm of the PID generator using a configuration specific to the GPOH. False data was used to verify the correct processing of PID requests (functionality tests, while test data was used to evaluate the matching outcome. We also assigned PIDs to more than 44,000 data records from the German Childhood Cancer Registry (GCCR and assessed the status of the associated patient list which contains the PIDs, partly encrypted data items and information on the PID generation process for each data record. All the functionality tests showed the expected results. Neither 14,915 test data records nor the GCCR data records yielded any homonyms. Six synonyms were found in the test data, due to erroneous birth dates, and 22 synonyms were found when the GCCR data was run against the actual patient list of 2579 records. In the resulting patient list of 45,693 entries, duplicate record submissions were found for about 7% of all listed patients, while more frequent submissions occurred in less than 1% of cases. The synonym error rate depends mainly on the quality of the input data and on the frequency of multiple submissions. Depending on the requirements on maximally tolerable synonym and homonym error rates, additional measures for securing input data quality might be necessary. The results demonstrate that the PID generator is an appropriate tool for reliably identifying trial participants in medical research networks.

  10. Brief of the joint research with universities, etc. for 2002. Except the research by the JNC cooperative research scheme on the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) promote the basic and fundamental research in relation to the research and development projects of JNC through collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below). This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on 15 joint researches with universities, etc. In addition, this report removes the research by the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. (author)

  11. Report on the fiscal 1995 research cooperation promotion project, `the research cooperation diagnosis survey`; 1995 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku suishin jigyo `kenkyu kyoryoku shindan chosa` hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A diagnosis survey was conducted for Japan to cooperate in researching subjects on technical development in developing countries. In fiscal 1995, surveys were made on the following: (1) recycling technology of biomass industrial waste in the tropical region, (2) small size geothermal exploration in remote islands, (3) waste water recycling system using activated carbon, etc., (4) upgrading of proofreading technology of measuring standards, (5) technology to simply set up conditions for forming engineering plastics, (6) assessment of safety of chemical substances. In (1), energy and useful matters are recovered from oil palm of Indonesia by thermal decomposition technology. In (2), a system is constructed which can effectively explore geothermal energy in remote islands in the east Indonesia. As to (3), a survey is conducted in the Philippines. (4) contributes to upgrading of length measuring standards in Thailand. (5) attempts to improve technology of forming engineering plastics. In (6), research cooperation is made for preventing environmental pollution and health damage by chemical substances from happening in Thailand and for technology for assessing safety of chemical substances which contributes to the proper use of the hazardous material law in Thailand. 28 figs.

  12. Profile and scientific production of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) researchers in the field of Hematology/Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Christina Lopes Araujo; Martelli, Daniella Reis; Quirino, Isabel Gomes; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões e; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo de

    2014-01-01

    several studies have examined the academic production of the researchers at the CNPq, in several areas of knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the scientific production of researchers in Hematology/Oncology who hold scientific productivity grants from the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development. the Academic CVs of 28 researchers in Hematology/Oncology with active grants in the three-year period from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: institution, researchers' time after doctorate, tutoring of undergraduate students, masters and PhD degree, scientific production and its impact. from a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 28 (7%) were identified as being in the area of Hematology/Oncology. There was a slight predominance of males (53.6%) and grant holders in category 1. Three Brazilian states are responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (21,75%), Rio de Janeiro (3,11%), and Minas Gerais (2, 7%). During their academic careers, the researchers published 2,655 articles, with a median of 87 articles per researcher (IQR = 52 to 122). 65 and 78% of this total were indexed on the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The researchers received 14,247 citations on the WoS database with a median of 385 citations per researcher. The average number of citations per article was 8.2. in this investigation, it was noted that researchers in the field of Hematology/Oncology have a relevant scientific output from the point of view of quantity and quality compared to other medical specialties.

  13. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation.

  14. Measuring macro-level effects of the global economic recession on university-industry research cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azagra-Caro, J.M.; Tijssen, R.J.W.; Yegros-Yegros, A.

    2016-07-01

    The 2007/2008 financial crisis, and ensuing economic recession, had a direct negative effect on university-industry research cooperation in the OECD countries and other economies – it diminished the number of university-industry co-authored research publications (UICs) during the period 2008-13 by 7%. It also changed the relationship between national business expenditure on R&D and UIC output levels. Before the recession the relationship was negative, but became positive during the years 2008-2013. The few countries where business expenditure on R&D increased during recession saw UIC numbers rise. This moderating effect of the recession applies only to ‘domestic UICs’, where universities cooperated with business companies located in the same country. Micro-level research is needed to assess the contributing effects on large university-industry R&D consortia on both domestic and international collaboration patterns. (Author)

  15. 75 FR 5566 - NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the Pacific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ...-02] NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the Pacific..., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice; extension... Research (OAR) published a notice of availability of funds to establish three new NOAA cooperative...

  16. 75 FR 20003 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Connected Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and..., pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et... to the venture are: MXP4, Paris, FRANCE; Universal Music Group, Inc., Santa Monica, CA; Omediae, LLC...

  17. 75 FR 28294 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-The Applied...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--The Applied Nanotechnology Consortium Notice is hereby given that, on March 26, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et...

  18. 77 FR 40085 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Gap...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--American Gap Association Notice is hereby given that, on June 6, 2012, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq...

  19. 78 FR 55296 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Gap...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--American Gap Association Notice is hereby given that, on August 12, 2013, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq...

  20. Prognostic index for patients with parotid carcinoma - External validation using the nationwide 1985-1994 Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vander Poorten, Vincent L. M.; Hart, Augustinus A. M.; van der Laan, Bernardus F. A. M.; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Manni, Johannes J.; Marres, Henri A. M.; Meeuwis, Cees A.; Lubsen, Herman; Terhaard, Chris H. J.; Balm, Alfonsus J. M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Validation of the prognostic indices for the recurrence-free interval of patients with parotid carcinoma, the development of which was described in a previous report, is needed to be confident of their generalizability and justified prospective use. METHODS. The Dutch Cooperative Group

  1. Basic actinide chemistry and physics research in close cooperation with hot laboratories: ACTILAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K; Konashi, K; Fujii, T; Uehara, A; Nagasaki, S; Ohtori, N; Tokunaga, Y; Kambe, S

    2010-01-01

    Basic research in actinide chemistry and physics is indispensable to maintain sustainable development of innovative nuclear technology. Actinides, especially minor actinides of americium and curium, need to be handled in special facilities with containment and radiation shields. To promote and facilitate actinide research, close cooperation with the facilities and sharing of technical and scientific information must be very important and effective. A three-year-program B asic actinide chemistry and physics research in close cooperation with hot laboratories , ACTILAB, was started to form the basis of sustainable development of innovative nuclear technology. In this program, research on actinide solid-state physics, solution chemistry and solid-liquid interface chemistry is made using four main facilities in Japan in close cooperation with each other, where basic experiments with transuranium elements can be made. The 17 O-NMR measurements were performed on (Pu 0.91 Am 0.09 )O 2 to study the electronic state and the chemical behaviour of Am and Cm ions in electrolyte solutions was studied by distribution experiments.

  2. Fiscal 1999 research cooperation project report. Research cooperation on coal liquefaction technology; 1999 nendo sekitan ekika gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1999 research cooperation project result on coal liquefaction technology. Cooperative FS was made on coal liquefaction technology of Indonesian coal as petroleum substituting energy. To obtain the basic data necessary for the FS, study was made on the applicability of Indonesian natural minerals as catalytic materials. Promising low-cost abundant Soroako Limonite ore showed a high catalytic activity for liquefaction reaction of Banko coal, and an excellent grindability. Improved BCL process including hydrogenation process was promising for production of high-quality coal liquid superior in storage stability with less nitrogen and sulfur contents. Survey was made on the general conditions of Tanjung Enim area including South Banko coal field concerned, and the geological features and coal seam of South Banko coal field which is composed of 3 seams including coal deposits of 6.35 hundred million tons. To study the marketability of coal liquid, survey was made on the current situation of oil, oil product standards, and blendability of coal liquid. Hydrogen for the liquefaction process can be obtained by coal gasification. (NEDO)

  3. Cooperative Research Projects in the Microgravity Combustion Science Programs Sponsored by NASA and NEDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Howard (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the results of a collection of selected cooperative research projects between principal investigators in the microgravity combustion science programs, sponsored by NASA and NEDO. Cooperation involved the use of drop towers in Japan and the United States, and the sharing of subsequent research data and findings. The topical areas include: (1) Interacting droplet arrays, (2) high pressure binary fuel sprays, (3) sooting droplet combustion, (4) flammability limits and dynamics of spherical, premixed gaseous flames and, (5) ignition and transition of flame spread across thin solid fuel samples. All of the investigators view this collaboration as a success. Novel flame behaviors were found and later published in archival journals. In some cases the experiments provided verification of the design and behavior in subsequent experiments performed on the Space Shuttle. In other cases, the experiments provided guidance to experiments that are expected to be performed on the International Space Station.

  4. Facilitating cooperation in interprofessional education using a study activity model- An action research project’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Winther; Hatt, Camusa

    in interprofessional courses and if the model has a potential as mean of pedagogical development and collaboration. Methods The study is based on action research and is a mixed method study. In 2016 the project will gather data in cooperation with lecturers through qualitative methods and a followup on the baseline...... to further explore the potential of the study activity model as a mean of pedagogical development. The qualitative data will be processed by current hermeneutical and phenomenological methods. Outcomes and implications The outcome of the project should provide deeper insight into facilitating IPE and IPC......Title: Facilitating cooperation in interprofessional education using a study activity model- An action research project . Background Metropolitan University College has over the years developed interprofessional courses for students from 12 different professions, and since 2013 worked...

  5. Annual cooperative research report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This is FY 1995 annual report of research results of the Yayoi research group and the high speed neutron science group as well as the cooperative application research results of reactor `Yayoi` application, related to reactor `Yayoi` and of accelerator Linac. The reactor was also operated smoothly in FY 1995, and its application and related research reached to 25 themes. The research using Linac reduced apparently to 7 themes from 14 in FY 1994, which showed apparent reduction because of integration of the cooperative research theme but showed more results in general. in particular, it was a wonderful result to success the formation of sub-pico second pulsed beam in world wide area. The Yayoi research group reported 13 researches which was two more than these in last fiscal year, all of which were the most advanced discussions in the field related to nuclear engineering. The high speed neutron science group started in FY 1993 aiming at construction of new research field on application of the high speed neutron as a quantum beam with excellent nuclear transfer and transmittance, to manifestation and control of new material function and design and creation of intelligent material. In FY 1995, the group began his full scale operation and reported on 8 themes. (G.K.)

  6. Annual cooperative research report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is FY 1995 annual report of research results of the Yayoi research group and the high speed neutron science group as well as the cooperative application research results of reactor 'Yayoi' application, related to reactor 'Yayoi' and of accelerator Linac. The reactor was also operated smoothly in FY 1995, and its application and related research reached to 25 themes. The research using Linac reduced apparently to 7 themes from 14 in FY 1994, which showed apparent reduction because of integration of the cooperative research theme but showed more results in general. in particular, it was a wonderful result to success the formation of sub-pico second pulsed beam in world wide area. The Yayoi research group reported 13 researches which was two more than these in last fiscal year, all of which were the most advanced discussions in the field related to nuclear engineering. The high speed neutron science group started in FY 1993 aiming at construction of new research field on application of the high speed neutron as a quantum beam with excellent nuclear transfer and transmittance, to manifestation and control of new material function and design and creation of intelligent material. In FY 1995, the group began his full scale operation and reported on 8 themes. (G.K.)

  7. The second Symptom Management Research Trial in Oncology (SMaRT Oncology-2): a randomised trial to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adding a complex intervention for major depressive disorder to usual care for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jane; Cassidy, Jim; Sharpe, Michael

    2009-03-30

    Depression Care for People with Cancer is a complex intervention delivered by specially trained cancer nurses, under the supervision of a psychiatrist. It is given as a supplement to the usual care for depression, which patients receive from their general practitioner and cancer service. In a 'proof of concept' trial (Symptom Management Research Trials in Oncology-1) Depression Care for People with Cancer improved depression more than usual care alone. The second Symptom Management Research Trial in Oncology (SMaRT Oncology-2 Trial) will test its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in a 'real world' setting. A two arm parallel group multi-centre randomised controlled trial. TRIAL PROCEDURES: 500 patients will be recruited through established systematic Symptom Monitoring Services, which screen patients for depression. Patients will have: a diagnosis of cancer (of various types); an estimated life expectancy of twelve months or more and a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder. Patients will be randomised to usual care or usual care plus Depression Care for People with Cancer. Randomisation will be carried out by telephoning a secure computerised central randomisation system or by using a secure web interface. The primary outcome measure is 'treatment response' measured at 24 week outcome data collection. 'Treatment response' will be defined as a reduction of 50% or more in the patient's baseline depression score, measured using the 20-item Symptom Checklist (SCL-20D). Secondary outcomes include remission of major depressive disorder, depression severity and patients' self-rated improvement of depression. Current controlled trials ISRCTN40568538 TRIAL HYPOTHESES: (1) Depression Care for People with Cancer as a supplement to usual care will be more effective than usual care alone in achieving a 50% reduction in baseline SCL-20D score at 24 weeks. (2) Depression Care for People with Cancer as a supplement to usual care will cost more than usual care alone but will be

  8. Locational conditions, cooperation, and innovativeness: evidence from research and company spin-offs

    OpenAIRE

    Lejpras, Anna; Stephan, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    This paper has two goals. First, it analyzes the extent to which the innovativeness of spin-offs, either born from a research facility or from another company, is influenced by locational conditions. Second, it provides evidence on how important local cooperation links are in comparison to nonlocal ones. Using a sample of approximately 1,500 East German firms from knowledge-intensive sectors, we estimate a structural equation model applying the partial least squares method. We find that proxi...

  9. Current status and future perspectives of research and development cooperation between utilities, research institutions and universities in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Yasuji [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the research and development activity in the field of electric power production, transmission and distribution in Japan. Organizations participating in the research and development are described with emphasis on theirs roles and cooperation between them. Next described are the R and D subjects and projects carried out by respective organizations. The needs and motivations of respective R and D programs are reviewed briefly together with the financial and human resources put into implementation. The R and D activities in the electric power industry are compared with those in other industrial sectors such as automobile, steel, telecommunication, etc. Mainly in terms of R and D fund. A similar comparison is made with the electric power industry in countries other than Japan. Importance of the international cooperation in stressed for further development of electric power industry and economic progress worldwide. (author) 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Brief report of the JNC Cooperative Research (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2004 was the sixth year of the scheme and ended in 2004. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the result of the research carried out in fiscal year 2004 on four selected themes related the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  11. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (C) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc. 'below'), which means that the fiscal year 2002 was the fourth year of the scheme. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2002 on twenty selected themes related to the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; eight of which ended in 2002. Of these, three were related to fast breeder reactors, two to the nuclear fuel cycle and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  12. Brief report of the JNC cooperative research (C) on the nuclear fuel cycle for 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) started the JNC Cooperative Research Scheme (C) on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle in 1999 in order to promote research collaboration with universities and other research institutes (referred to as 'universities, etc.' below), which means that the fiscal year 2003 was the fifth year of the scheme. This scheme is to invite foresighted and original themes of basic and fundamental research, to be performed using JNC's facilities and equipment, in principle, for the research and development of JNC in the field of the nuclear fuel cycle, from researchers at universities, etc. Those researchers who propose research themes in response to the invitation are expected to lead the research. The purpose of the scheme is to promote the efficiency of basic and fundamental research and development by enhancing the research environment of JNC through collaboration between JNC's own researchers and other researchers, and exchange of information and publication of achievements, etc. Research themes proposed by researchers at universities, etc. are screened by a screening committee consisting mainly of experts independent of JNC. This report includes a summary of the results of the research carried out in fiscal year 2003 on twelve selected themes related to the JNC's collaborative research for fast breeder reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation safety and geological disposal/geoscience; eight of which ended in 2003. Of these, four were related to fast breeder reactors, one to radiation safety and three to geological disposal/geoscience. (author)

  13. Participatory Research Revealing the Work and Occupational Health Hazards of Cooperative Recyclers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. N. Felipone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although informal waste collectors are sometimes organized in cooperatives, their working conditions remain extremely precarious and unsafe. The paper discusses the findings of action oriented, participatory qualitative research with several recycling groups in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. During workshops with the recyclers mapping, acting, and drawing methods helped reveal health hazards from collection, separation and transportation of recyclable materials. Major health problems relate to chemical and biological hazards, musculoskeletal damage, mechanical trauma and poor emotional wellbeing. The recent federal legislation on solid waste management opens new avenues for the inclusion of recycling cooperatives in selective waste collection. Nevertheless, we express the need to consider the distinctive characteristics and vulnerabilities of recycling groups, when developing safer work environments in these social businesses. We also suggest that the workspace be ergonomically organized and that public awareness campaigns about selective waste collection are conducted regularly to increase the quality of source separation. The introduction of electric hand pushed carts can further reduce health strains. This research has produced a better understanding of the work of the recyclers and related health risks. The interactive qualitative research methodology has allowed for the co-creation and mobilization of specific knowledge on health and safety in recycling cooperatives.

  14. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  15. Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  16. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

  17. [Role of multicenter study groups for clinical research in hematology and oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökbuget, N; Hoelzer, D

    2009-04-01

    During the past 25 years a highly effective infrastructure for clinical trials was developed in hematology. Following initial funding by the BMFT (Ministry for Research and Technology) a number of large multicenter study groups for leukemia and lymphoma were developed. Treatment results from these studies often represent the"gold standard". However, since no standard therapy is defined for these diseases, the study groups aim to treat all patients within treatment optimization trials (TOT) to combine research and care. They contribute considerably to quality control in therapy and diagnostics, e.g., by establishing central reference laboratories. The regulatory requirements for clinical trials were extended considerably after the activation of the 12th drug law and TOTs now have to fulfill requirements similar to registration trials in the pharmaceutical industry. Due to the considerable bureaucratic effort and increased costs, only few large multicenter trials could thereafter be initiated and a substantial disadvantage for independent academic research becomes clearly evident.

  18. Recent Cooperative Research Activities of HDD and Flexible Media Transport Technologies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kyosuke

    This paper presents the recent status of industry-university cooperative research activities in Japan on the mechatronics of information storage and input/output equipment. There are three research committees for promoting information exchange on technical problems and research topics of head-disk interface in hard disk drives (HDD), flexible media transport and image printing processes which are supported by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineering (JSME), the Japanese Society of Tribologists (JAST) and the Japan Society of Precision Engineering (JSPE). For hard disk drive technology, the Storage Research Consortium (SRC) is supporting more than 40 research groups in various different universities to perform basic research for future HDD technology. The past and present statuses of these activities are introduced, particularly focusing on HDD and flexible media transport mechanisms.

  19. Cooperative Group Performance in Graduate Research Methodology Courses: The Role of Study Coping and Examination-Taking Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the extent to which cooperative group members' levels of coping strategies (study and examination-taking coping strategies) and the degree that heterogeneity (variability of study coping strategies and examination-taking coping strategies) predict cooperative groups' levels of achievement in research methodology…

  20. When Triple Helix Unravels: A Multi-Case Analysis of Failures in Industry-University Cooperative Research Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Denis; Sundstrom, Eric; Tornatzky, Louis G.; McGowen, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative research centres (CRCs) increasingly foster Triple Helix (industry-university-government) collaboration and represent significant vehicles for cooperation across sectors, the promotion of knowledge and technology transfer and ultimately the acceleration of innovation. A growing social science literature on CRCs focuses on their…

  1. A new model in teaching undergraduate research: A collaborative approach and learning cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Pamela V; McClellan, Lynx Carlton; Jarosinski, Judith M

    2016-05-01

    Forming new, innovative collaborative approaches and cooperative learning methods between universities and hospitals maximize learning for undergraduate nursing students in a research course and provide professional development for nurses on the unit. The purpose of this Collaborative Approach and Learning Cooperatives (CALC) Model is to foster working relations between faculty and hospital administrators, maximize small group learning of undergraduate nursing students, and promote onsite knowledge of evidence based care for unit nurses. A quality improvement study using the CALC Model was implemented in an undergraduate nursing research course at a southern university. Hospital administrators provided a list of clinical concerns based on national performance outcome measures. Undergraduate junior nursing student teams chose a clinical question, gathered evidence from the literature, synthesized results, demonstrated practice application, and developed practice recommendations. The student teams developed posters, which were evaluated by hospital administrators. The administrators selected several posters to display on hospital units for continuing education opportunity. This CALC Model is a systematic, calculated approach and an economically feasible plan to maximize personnel and financial resources to optimize collaboration and cooperative learning. Universities and hospital administrators, nurses, and students benefit from working together and learning from each other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. International cooperative research project between NEDO and NASA on advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes an international cooperative research project between NEDO and NASA on advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity. In June, 1994, NEDO and NASA reached a basic agreement with each other about this cooperative R and D on combustion under microgravity conditions. In fiscal 2000, Japan proposed an experiment using the drop tower facilities and parabolic aircraft at NASA Glen Research Center and at JAMIC (Japan Microgravity Center). In other words, the proposals from Japan included experiments on combustion of droplets composed of diversified fuels under different burning conditions (vaporization), flame propagation in smoldering porous materials and dispersed particles under microgravity conditions, and control of interactive combustion of two droplets by acoustical and electrical perturbations. Additionally proposed were experiments on effect of low external air flow on solid material combustion under microgravity, and sooting and radiation effects on the burning of large droplets under microgravity conditions. This report gives an outline of the results of these five cooperative R and D projects. The experiments were conducted under ordinary normal gravity and microgravity conditions, with the results compared and examined mutually. (NEDO)

  3. The Future of Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Sarah H

    2016-02-01

    To project the future of gero-oncology nursing as a distinct specialty, framed between analysis of current challenges and explication of prospective solutions. Peer-reviewed literature, policy directives, web-based resources, and author expertise. Oncology nursing faces several challenges in meeting the needs of older people living with cancer. Realigning cancer nursing education, practice, and research to match demographic and epidemiological realities mandates redesign. Viewing geriatric oncology as an optional sub-specialty limits oncology nursing, where older people represent the majority of oncology patients and cancer survivors. The future of gero-oncology nursing lies in transforming oncology nursing itself. Specific goals to achieve transformation of oncology nursing into gero-oncology nursing include assuring integrated foundational aging and cancer content across entry-level nursing curricula; assuring a gero-competent oncology nursing workforce with integrated continuing education; developing gero-oncology nurse specialists in advanced practice roles; and cultivating nurse leadership in geriatric oncology program development and administration along with expanding the scope and sophistication of gero-oncology nursing science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cooperative earthquake research between the United States and the People's Republic of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, D.P.; Johnson, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes cooperative research by scientists of the US and the People's Republic of China (PRC) which has resulted in important new findings concerning the fundamental characteristics of earthquakes and new insight into mitigating earthquake hazards. There have been over 35 projects cooperatively sponsored by the Earthquake Studies Protocol in the past 5 years. The projects are organized into seven annexes, including investigations in earthquake prediction, intraplate faults and earthquakes, earthquake engineering and hazards investigation, deep crustal structure, rock mechanics, seismology, and data exchange. Operational earthquake prediction experiments are currently being developed at two primary sites: western Yunnan Province near the town of Xiaguan, where there are several active faults, and the northeast China plain, where the devastating 1976 Tangshan earthquake occurred.

  5. A network to enhance cooperation for research and higher education on radiation protection and nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Gallardo, Sergio . E mail: sergalbe@iqn.upv.es

    2008-01-01

    The educational capacity of many Institutions of Higher Education in Nuclear Engineering decreased under the combined effect of a declining interest among students as well as from academic and political authorities. An increasing cooperation at the international level on educational efforts is necessary. The CHERNE network is an initiative mainly focussed on teaching and learning activities to develop a wide-scope open academic network to enhance cooperation, competence and equipment sharing between its partners. Typical activities organized within the network include workshops, intensive courses, seminars and conferences. The CHERNE network and its main objectives as well as the activities developed since its foundation are presented. Special attention is given to international intensive courses (SPERANSA, JUNCSS, ICARO, etc.) organized for students of the member institutions. The common feature of these courses is a strong practical part in specialized facilities, including in some cases access to large equipment like research reactors and accelerators. (author)

  6. The role of leadership in bridging the cultural divide within university-industry cooperative research centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdad, Maral; Bogers, Marcel; Piccaluga, Andrea

    The purpose of this study is to understand the role of leadership in bridging the cultural gap within university-industry cooperative research centres. Many different aspects of university-industry collaborations have been researched, but the role of leadership in such organizations has not been...... and employees representatives from both the company and the university within eight joint laboratories of Telecom Italia. We find that leadership theories help to shed light on the performance of university-industry collaboration. We specifically identify charismatic leadership at the individual level followed...... provide specific insights that advance the literature in management of university-industry collaborations as well as leadership theories....

  7. South Carolina DOE/EPSCOR Research Implementation Proposal Cooperative Agreement. Final Report for October 15, 2000 - October 15, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zee, John W.

    2003-01-15

    The final report includes resumes of faculty hired under this cooperative agreement to illustrate the increase in infrastructure and the quality of research performed in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at the University of South Carolina and the Department of Chemistry at Clemson University. In addition, this agreement initiated research that has resulted in the nation's first NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Fuel Cells and a summary of this Center is included.

  8. Mental illness research in the Gulf Cooperation Council: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Jason E; Pryjmachuk, Steven; Waterman, Heather

    2016-08-04

    Rapid growth and development in recent decades has seen mental health and mental illness emerge as priority health concerns for the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). As a result, mental health services in the region are being redefined and expanded. However, there is a paucity of local research to guide ongoing service development. Local research is important because service users' experience of mental illness and mental health services are linked to their sociocultural context. In order for service development to be most effective, there is a need for increased understanding of the people who use these services.This article aims to review and synthesize mental health research from the Gulf Cooperation Council. It also seeks to identify gaps in the literature and suggest directions for future research. A scoping framework was used to conduct this review. To identify studies, database searches were undertaken, regional journals were hand-searched, and reference lists of included articles were examined. Empirical studies undertaken in the Gulf Cooperation Council that reported mental health service users' experience of mental illness were included. Framework analysis was used to synthesize results. Fifty-five studies met inclusion criteria and the following themes were identified: service preferences, illness (symptomology, perceived cause, impact), and recovery (traditional healing, family support, religion). Gaps included contradictory findings related to the supportive role of the Arabic extended family and religion, under-representation of women in study samples, and limited attention on illness management outside of the hospital setting.From this review, it is clear that the sociocultural context in the region is linked to service users' experience of mental illness. Future research that aims to fill the identified gaps and develop and test culturally appropriate interventions will aid practice

  9. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2016 year in review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2017-02-22

    SummaryThe Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units (CRU) Program had a productive year in 2016. Despite vacancies in our scientist ranks exceeding 20 percent, our research, training, and teaching portfolio was full and we graduated 93 students and published 398 manuscripts primarily focused on addressing the real conservation challenges of our cooperators. As I’ve stated before, our mission is our legacy: meeting the actionable science needs of our cooperators, providing them technical guidance and assistance in interpreting and applying new advances in science, and developing the future workforce through graduate education and mentoring. Our scientists and the manner in which they approach our mission continue to inspire me. The most rewarding part of my job is meeting and engaging with the students they recruit—the conservation professionals of the future. I cannot help but feel uplifted after discussions with and presentations by these young men and women. Personally, I owe my place in the profession today to the mentoring I received as a CRU student, and today’s CRU scientists have raised the bar. It gives me hope for the future of conservation, and added motivation to see our vacancies filled so that we can expand our portfolio.The National Cooperators’ Coalition has been active and is strategically working to build support on our behalf. Sincere thanks to the American Fisheries Society, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, the Boone and Crockett Club, the National Association of University Fish and Wildlife Programs, the Wildlife Management Institute, and The Wildlife Society for their efforts and those of their affiliated members.We co-sponsored a workshop at the 2016 North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference along with the American Fisheries Society, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, the Wildlife Management Institute, and The Wildlife Society, titled “Barriers and Bridges in Reconnecting Natural Resources

  10. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W; Dancey, Janet E; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Horvath, L Elise; Perez, Edith A; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a longstanding history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the US-based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the United States, and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the United States or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the United States and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to US policies that restrict drug distribution outside the United States. This article serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W.; Dancey, Janet E.; Wickerham, D. Lawrence; Horvath, L. Elise; Perez, Edith A.; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M.; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a long-standing history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the U.S. based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the U.S., and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the U.S. or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the U.S. and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to U.S. policies that restrict drug distribution outside the U.S. This manuscript serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future. PMID:26433551

  12. Big Data and Comparative Effectiveness Research in Radiation Oncology: Synergy and Accelerated Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Several advances in large data set collection and processing have the potential to provide a wave of new insights and improvements in the use of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The era of electronic health records, genomics, and improving information technology resources creates the opportunity to leverage these developments to create a learning healthcare system that can rapidly deliver informative clinical evidence. By merging concepts from comparative effectiveness research with the tools and analytic approaches of “big data,” it is hoped that this union will accelerate discovery, improve evidence for decision making, and increase the availability of highly relevant, personalized information. This combination offers the potential to provide data and analysis that can be leveraged for ultra-personalized medicine and high-quality, cutting-edge radiation therapy. PMID:26697409

  13. [Does co-operation research provide approaches to explain the changes in the German hospital market?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, C; Leidl, R

    2004-11-01

    The German hospital market faces an extensive process of consolidation. In this change hospitals consider cooperation as one possibility to improve competitiveness. To investigate explanations of changes in the German hospital market by theoretical approaches of cooperation research. The aims and mechanism of the theories, their relevance in terms of contents and their potential for empirical tests were used as criteria to assess the approaches, with current and future trends in the German hospital market providing the framework. Based on literature review, six theoretical approaches were investigated: industrial organization, transaction cost theory, game theory, resource dependency, institutional theory, and co-operative investment and finance theory. In addition, the data needed to empirically test the theories were specified. As a general problem, some of the theoretical approaches set a perfect market as a precondition. This precondition is not met by the heavily regulated German hospital market. Given the current regulations and the assessment criteria, industrial organization as well as resource-dependency and institutional theory approaches showed the highest potential to explain various aspects of the changes in the hospital market. So far, none of the approaches investigated provides a comprehensive and empirically tested explanation of the changes in the German hospital market. However, some of the approaches provide a theoretical background for part of the changes. As this dynamic market is economically of high significance, there is a need for further development and empirical testing of relevant theoretical approaches.

  14. Dose Specification and Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 95-17; a Cooperative Group Study of Iridium-192 Breast Implants as Sole Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hanson, W.F.; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Kuske, Robert R.; Arthur, Douglas; Rabinovitch, Rachel; White, Julia; Wilenzick, Raymond M.; Harris, Irene; Tailor, Ramesh C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 95-17 was a Phase I/II trial to evaluate multicatheter brachytherapy as the sole method of adjuvant breast radiotherapy for Stage I/II breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery. Low- or high-dose-rate sources were allowed. Dose prescription and treatment evaluation were based on recommendations in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), Report 58 and included the parameters mean central dose (MCD), average peripheral dose, dose homogeneity index (DHI), and the dimensions of the low- and high-dose regions. Methods and Materials: Three levels of quality assurance were implemented: (1) credentialing of institutions was required before entering patients into the study; (2) rapid review of each treatment plan was conducted before treatment; and (3) retrospective review was performed by the Radiological Physics Center in conjunction with the study chairman and RTOG dosimetry staff. Results: Credentialing focused on the accuracy of dose calculation algorithm and compliance with protocol guidelines. Rapid review was designed to identify and correct deviations from the protocol before treatment. The retrospective review involved recalculation of dosimetry parameters and review of dose distributions to evaluate the treatment. Specifying both central and peripheral doses resulted in uniform dose distributions, with a mean dose homogeneity index of 0.83 ± 0.06. Conclusions: Vigorous quality assurance resulted in a high-quality study with few deviations; only 4 of 100 patients were judged as representing minor variations from protocol, and no patient was judged as representing major deviation. This study should be considered a model for quality assurance of future trials

  15. Learning outcomes through the cooperative learning team assisted individualization on research methodology’ course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpahan, N. F. D. B.

    2018-01-01

    All articles must contain an abstract. The research methodology is a subject in which the materials must be understood by the students who will take the thesis. Implementation of learning should create the conditions for active learning, interactive and effective are called Team Assisted Individualization (TAI) cooperative learning. The purpose of this study: 1) improving student learning outcomes at the course research methodology on TAI cooperative learning. 2) improvement of teaching activities. 3) improvement of learning activities. This study is a classroom action research conducted at the Department of Civil Engineering Universitas Negeri Surabaya. The research subjects were 30 students and lecturer of courses. Student results are complete in the first cycle by 20 students (67%) and did not complete 10 students (33%). In the second cycle students who complete being 26 students (87%) and did not complete 4 students (13%). There is an increase in learning outcomes by 20%. Results of teaching activities in the first cycle obtained the value of 3.15 with the criteria enough well. In the second cycle obtained the value of 4.22 with good criterion. The results of learning activities in the first cycle obtained the value of 3.05 with enough criterion. In the second cycle was obtained 3.95 with good criterion.

  16. Comprehensive research cooperation in environmental technology in fiscal 1995; 1995 nendo kankyo gijutsu sogo kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Cooperative study was conducted on research subjects concerning water pollution preventive technologies in China and Thailand. In China, straw pulp mills were studied which were in the Institute of Light Industry Environmental Protection and the Environmental Engineering Course of Jinghua University. The following studies were jointly conducted: survey of the water quality pollution caused by waste water, investigational study on production technology and waste water treatment technology, extraction of technologies effective to preserve water quality, study/evaluation of economical efficiency of the said technologies, etc. In Thailand, cooperative research was conducted on automatic measuring technology for factory waste water in a model industrial estate of the Thai National Industrial Estate Corporation. Items for the study were a study on measuring technology for water quality environment, an investigation on the status of water quality environment in the model industrial estate, a study on automatic measuring technology for plant waste water, a study on how to use measuring data in the model industrial estate, etc. Every study enabled technical data accumulation at every research institute through field research exchanges. 24 refs., 91 figs., 45 tabs.

  17. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Martine C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians. Methodology An empirical ethical approach, combining (1 a narrative review of (primarily qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology research practice, and (2 comparison of these experiences with existing theoretical ethical concepts about (pediatric research. The use of empirical evidence enriches these concepts by taking into account the peculiarities that ethical challenges pose in practice. Results Analysis of the 22 studies reviewed revealed that the integration of research and care has consequences for the informed consent process, the promotion of the child's best interests, and the role of the physician (doctor vs. scientist. True consent to research is difficult to achieve due to the complexity of research protocols, emotional stress and parents' dependency on their child's physician. Parents' role is to promote their child's best interests, also when they are asked to consider enrolling their child in a trial. Parents are almost never in equipoise on trial participation, which leaves them with the agonizing situation of wanting to do what is best for their child, while being fearful of making the wrong decision. Furthermore, a therapeutic misconception endangers correct assessment of participation, making parents inaccurately attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures. Physicians prefer the perspective of a therapist over a researcher. Consequently they may truly believe that in the research setting they promote the child's best interests, which maintains the

  18. Theoretical rationale for music selection in oncology intervention research: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Debra S

    2012-01-01

    Music-based interventions have helped patients with cancer improve their quality of life, decrease treatment related distress, and manage pain. However, quantitative findings from music intervention studies are inconsistent. The purpose of this review was to explore the theoretical underpinnings for the selection of the music stimuli used to influence targeted outcomes. It was hypothesized that disparate findings were due in part to the atheoretical nature of music selection and the resulting diversity in music stimuli between and within studies. A systematic research synthesis including a comprehensive database and reference list search resulted in 22 studies. Included studies were compiled into two tables cataloging intervention theory, intervention content, and outcomes. A majority of studies did not provide a rationale or intervention theory for the delivery of music or choice of outcomes. Recorded music was the most common delivery method, but the specific music was rarely included within the report. Only two studies that included a theoretical framework reported null results on at least some of the outcomes. Null results are partially explained by an incomplete or mismatch in intervention theory and music selection and delivery. While the inclusion of an intervention theory does not guarantee positive results, including a theoretical rationale for the use of music, particular therapeutic processes or mechanisms, and the specifics of how music is selected and delivered increases scientific rigor and the probability of clinical translation.

  19. Sequential, Multiple Assignment, Randomized Trial Designs in Immuno-oncology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Kelley M; Postow, Michael A; Panageas, Katherine S

    2018-02-15

    Clinical trials investigating immune checkpoint inhibitors have led to the approval of anti-CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4), anti-PD-1 (programmed death-1), and anti-PD-L1 (PD-ligand 1) drugs by the FDA for numerous tumor types. In the treatment of metastatic melanoma, combinations of checkpoint inhibitors are more effective than single-agent inhibitors, but combination immunotherapy is associated with increased frequency and severity of toxicity. There are questions about the use of combination immunotherapy or single-agent anti-PD-1 as initial therapy and the number of doses of either approach required to sustain a response. In this article, we describe a novel use of sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trial (SMART) design to evaluate immune checkpoint inhibitors to find treatment regimens that adapt within an individual based on intermediate response and lead to the longest overall survival. We provide a hypothetical example SMART design for BRAF wild-type metastatic melanoma as a framework for investigating immunotherapy treatment regimens. We compare implementing a SMART design to implementing multiple traditional randomized clinical trials. We illustrate the benefits of a SMART over traditional trial designs and acknowledge the complexity of a SMART. SMART designs may be an optimal way to find treatment strategies that yield durable response, longer survival, and lower toxicity. Clin Cancer Res; 24(4); 730-6. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. 75 FR 14190 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Joint Venture To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Production Act of 1993--Joint Venture To Perform Project Entitled Robotic Rehabilitation of Aging Water... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et sect. (``the Act''), Joint [[Page 14191

  1. Education Program for Doctoral Researchers by Industrial-Government-Academic Cooperation and Interaction between Different Research Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kazuya; Sawaragi, Tetsuo; Hasebe, Shinji; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    New education program to train graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who can be good leaders in a variety of social fields by cooperation of graduate school of engineering and pharmaceutical sciences is conducted as an advanced activity in Kyoto University. This program consists of four sub-programs and the educational effect by the collaboration of industry-government-academic and the interaction between dissimilar research fields is described in this paper. Trainees in this program acquire the ability to understand objectively one’ s research from comprehensive point of view and to debate with researchers in different fields. This program supports them to become ‘Global Leaders’ who play an important role internationally in advanced technology.

  2. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T; Phillips, M; Hendrickson, K; Song, W; Kwok, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  3. SU-E-P-26: Oncospace: A Shared Radiation Oncology Database System Designed for Personalized Medicine, Decision Support, and Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, M; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Wong, J; DeWeese, T; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Phillips, M [Univ Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hendrickson, K [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Song, W; Kwok, P [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, U of T, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Advancement in Radiation Oncology (RO) practice develops through evidence based medicine and clinical trial. Knowledge usable for treatment planning, decision support and research is contained in our clinical data, stored in an Oncospace database. This data store and the tools for populating and analyzing it are compatible with standard RO practice and are shared with collaborating institutions. The question is - what protocol for system development and data sharing within an Oncospace Consortium? We focus our example on the technology and data meaning necessary to share across the Consortium. Methods: Oncospace consists of a database schema, planning and outcome data import and web based analysis tools.1) Database: The Consortium implements a federated data store; each member collects and maintains its own data within an Oncospace schema. For privacy, PHI is contained within a single table, accessible to the database owner.2) Import: Spatial dose data from treatment plans (Pinnacle or DICOM) is imported via Oncolink. Treatment outcomes are imported from an OIS (MOSAIQ).3) Analysis: JHU has built a number of webpages to answer analysis questions. Oncospace data can also be analyzed via MATLAB or SAS queries.These materials are available to Consortium members, who contribute enhancements and improvements. Results: 1) The Oncospace Consortium now consists of RO centers at JHU, UVA, UW and the University of Toronto. These members have successfully installed and populated Oncospace databases with over 1000 patients collectively.2) Members contributing code and getting updates via SVN repository. Errors are reported and tracked via Redmine. Teleconferences include strategizing design and code reviews.3) Successfully remotely queried federated databases to combine multiple institutions’ DVH data for dose-toxicity analysis (see below – data combined from JHU and UW Oncospace). Conclusion: RO data sharing can and has been effected according to the Oncospace

  4. 76 FR 65749 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-TAI and Southwest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... Production Act of 1993--TAI and Southwest Research Institute Notice is hereby given that, on August 24, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et... tools research and development by organizing and implementing joint engineering and scientific research...

  5. Review of Research on Credit Risk Management for Rural Credit Cooperatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of rural micro-credit, whether the qagriculture, rural areas and farmersq problems have been effectively solved, whether the credit risk has been effectively controlled, these have become the focus of our attention to the rural economic environment. The main content of this paper contains four aspects: the classification and characteristics of credit risk, the problems and factors of credit risk, the model and evaluation of credit risk, the countermeasures and suggestions of credit risk. This paper reviews the research of credit risk management for rural credit cooperatives from the above four aspects, and makes a brief summary.

  6. Preservation of nuclear talented experts in Japan by cooperation of industries, research institutes and universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, H.; Miura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Japan has enjoyed decades-long successful development of nuclear power generation and has a nuclear generating capacity of about 46,000,000 kilowatts at present. Construction of a commercial reprocessing plant in Rokkasho is nearing completion. The continuation of Japan's nuclear technology and experience, however, and the challenge of securing technically trained human resources for the future, present serious problems. Recognizing this, the nuclear industry, universities and research institutes have joined in new cooperative efforts to find network-oriented solutions. (author)

  7. International health research monitoring: exploring a scientific and a cooperative approach using participatory action research

    OpenAIRE

    Chantler, Tracey; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Miiro, George; Hantrakum, Viriya; Nanvubya, Annet; Ayuo, Elizabeth; Kivaya, Esther; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Parker, Michael; Njuguna, Patricia; Ashley, Elizabeth; Guerin, Philippe J; Lang, Trudie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and determine the value of monitoring models developed by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit and the East African Consortium for Clinical Research, consider how this can be measured and explore monitors’ and investigators’ experiences of and views about the nature, purpose and practice of monitoring. Research design A case study approach was used within the context of participatory action research because one of the aims was to guide and improve practice. 34 inte...

  8. Collaboration on contentious issues: research partnerships for gender equity in Nicaragua's Fair Trade coffee cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Lori; Terstappen, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the use of collaborative and partnership approaches in health and agricultural research has flourished. Such approaches are frequently adopted to ensure more successful research uptake and to contribute to community empowerment through participatory research practices. At the same time that interest in research partnerships has been growing, publications on methods, models, and guidelines for building these partnerships have proliferated. However, partnership development is not necessarily as straightforward or linear a process as such literature makes it appear, particularly when the research involves divisive or contentious issues. This paper explores prevailing views on research partnerships, and also questions the applicability of partnership models using an emerging research program around gender equity and health in Fair Trade coffee cooperatives in Nicaragua as an example. Moreover, the paper introduces some of the complicated issues facing the authors as they attempt to develop and expand partnerships in this research area. The paper culminates with a series of strategies that the authors plan to use that offer alternative ways of thinking about building research partnerships concerning controversial or complex issues in the field of community health and development.

  9. A proposal for cooperative activities between Japan and Indonesia in the field of nuclear research and nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, Iyos

    2008-01-01

    Development and realization of cooperative activities between Japan and Indonesia in nuclear research and education is indeed very important for scientists and engineers of both countries. This bilateral cooperation can easily be expanded into a regional cooperation benefiting the scholars from Asian region which is expecting a New Nuclear Age in the 21st Century. To develop and realize this cooperative activities, in the first step, we invite the ideas of our partners in the Nuclear Institution and in Universities. They are eager to have and undertake this cooperation effort. For nuclear research activities, they have proposed several topics which include: advanced radioactive waste technology and management in a nuclear power plant, innovative fuel development for LWR's, gas cooled reactor for electricity and hydrogen production and a topic on design and construction of high energy accelerator. Institute of Technology - Bandung (ITB), University of Gajah Mada (UGM) and School of Nuclear Technology (STTN/BATAN) are interested in cooperative works which include: joint development of standard curriculum for M.Sc. level in response to increased activities in nuclear research and nuclear power development, exchange of guest lecturers, and exchange of M.Sc. level students. With this cooperation, we want to put very special emphasis on nuclear human resources development (nuclear - HRD) in anticipation of the upcoming nuclear era. (author)

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2016–2017 Research Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2017-04-20

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has several strategic goals that focus its efforts on serving the American people. The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area has responsibility for the following objectives under the strategic goal of “Science to Manage and Sustain Resources for Thriving Economies and Healthy Ecosystems”:Understand, model, and predict change in natural systemsConserve and protect wildlife and fish species and their habitatsReduce or eliminate the threat of invasive species and wildlife diseaseThis report provides abstracts of the majority of ongoing research investigations of the USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program and is intended to complement the 2016 Cooperative Research Units Program Year in Review Circular 1424 (https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1424). The report is organized by the following major science themes that contribute to the objectives of the USGS:Advanced TechnologiesClimate ScienceDecision ScienceEcological FlowsEcosystem ServicesEndangered Species Conservation, Recovery, and Proactive StrategiesEnergyHuman DimensionsInvasive SpeciesLandscape EcologySpecies of Greatest Conservation NeedSpecies Population, Habitat, and Harvest ManagementWildlife Health and Disease

  11. Status of international cooperation in nuclear technology on testing/research reactors between JAEA and INP-NNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Takemoto, Noriyuki; Kimura, Akihiro; Tanimoto, Masataka; Izumo, Hironobu; Chakrov, Petr; Gizatulin, Shamil; Chakrova, Yelena; Ludmila, Chkushuina; Asset, Shaimerdenov; Nataliya, Romanova

    2012-02-01

    Based on the implementing arrangement between National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan (NNC) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for 'Nuclear Technology on Testing/Research Reactors' in cooperation in Research and Development in Nuclear Energy and Technology, four specific topics of cooperation (STC) have been carried out from June, 2009. Four STCs are as follows; (1) STC No.II-1 : International Standard of Instrumentation. (2) STC No.II-2 : Irradiation Technology of RI Production. (3) STC No.II-3 : Lifetime Expansion of Beryllium Reflector. (4) STC No.II-4 : Irradiation Technology for NTD-Si. The information exchange, personal exchange and cooperation experiments are carried out under these STCs. The status in the field of nuclear technology on testing/research reactors in the implementing arrangement is summarized, and future plans of these specific topics of cooperation are described in this report. (author)

  12. Collaborative translational research leading to multicenter clinical trials in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group (CINRG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolar, Diana M; Henricson, Erik K; Pasquali, Livia; Gorni, Ksenija; Hoffman, Eric P

    2002-10-01

    Progress in the development of rationally based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has been accelerated by encouraging multidisciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration between basic science and clinical investigators in the Cooperative International Research Group. We combined existing research efforts in pathophysiology by a gene expression profiling laboratory with the efforts of animal facilities capable of conducting high-throughput drug screening and toxicity testing to identify safe and effective drug compounds that target different parts of the pathophysiologic cascade in a genome-wide drug discovery approach. Simultaneously, we developed a clinical trial coordinating center and an international network of collaborating physicians and clinics where those drugs could be tested in large-scale clinical trials. We hope that by bringing together investigators at these facilities and providing the infrastructure to support their research, we can rapidly move new bench discoveries through animal model screening and into therapeutic testing in humans in a safe, timely and cost-effective setting.

  13. The Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) programme. Nordic cooperation on nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kasper G. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark). National Lab. for Sustainable Energy; Ekstroem, Karoliina [Fortum Power and Heat, Fortum (Finland); Gwynn, Justin P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Tromsoe (Norway). Fram Centre; Magnusson, Sigurdur M. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Physant, Finn C. [NKS-Sekretariatet, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    The roots of the current Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) programme can be traced back to the recommendation by the Nordic Council in the late 1950s for the establishment of joint Nordic committees on the issues of nuclear research and radiation protection. One of these joint Nordic committees, the 'Kontaktorgan', paved the way over its 33 years of existence for the future of Nordic cooperation in the field of nuclear safety, through the formation of Nordic groups on reactor safety, nuclear waste and environmental effects of nuclear power in the late 1960s and early 1970s. With an increased focus on developing nuclear power in the wake of the energy crisis on the 1970s, the NKS was established by the Nordic Council to further develop the previous strands of Nordic cooperation in nuclear safety. NKS started its first programme in 1977, funding a series of four year programmes over the next 24 years covering the areas of reactor safety, waste management, emergency preparedness and radioecology. Initially funded directly from the Nordic Council, ownership of NKS was transferred from the political level to the national competent authorities at the beginning of the 1990s. This organizational and funding model has continued to the present day with additional financial support from a number of co-sponsors in Finland, Norway and Sweden. (orig.)

  14. [U.S.-Mexico cross-border cooperation in research on diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela-Soler, Jaume; Frontini, María; Cerqueira, Maria Teresa; Ruiz-Holguín, Rosalba; Díaz-Apodaca, Beatriz A

    2010-09-01

    To describe and analyze, utilizing a case study approach, the U.S.- Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project, a health research cooperation initiative incorporating the participation of federal, state, and local institutions of both countries. A model of equal representation, participation, consensus, and shared leadership was used, with the participation of more than 130 institutions. A sample of 4 020 people over 18 years of age was obtained by a random, multistage, stratified, clustered design. A questionnaire about diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and health was applied. The statistical analysis took into account the design effect. The prevalence of diagnosed DM2 was 14.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 12.5-17.6) and the prevalence of diagnosed DM2 adjusted by age was 19.5% (95% CI: 16.8-22.6) on the Mexican side of the border and 16.1% (IC95%: 13.5-19.2) on the U.S. border side. There were differences between the DM2 prevalence and risk factors along the border. The U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project allowed the border zone between the two countries to be considered, for the first time ever, as a unit for epidemiological research. A shared understanding among all participating institutions and entities of sociopolitical structures and procedures is required for effective border health cooperation initiatives.

  15. A national laboratory/private industry cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the history and process of establishing a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories and Magnavox Electronic Systems Company for the design, development, and testing of a 360-degree scanning, imaging, intrusion detection sensor. The subject of the CRADA is the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). It is intended for exterior use at ranges from 50 to 1,500 meters and uses a combination of three sensing technologies (infrared, visible, and radar) and a new data processing method to provide low false-alarm intrusion detection and tracking combined with immediate visual assessment. The establishment of this CRADA represents a new paradigm in the cooperation between the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Laboratories and Private Industry. Although a formal document has now been executed, a CRADA is, nonetheless, primarily an agreement to work with each other to achieve goals that might otherwise be unattainable. For the DoD, a program continues in the face of uncertain funding. For the DOE, a CRADA is in place that meets congressionally mandated guidelines. For Sandia, sponsors are in agreement on requirements and synergistic funding. And for Magnavox, an opportunity is in hand to work with researchers in developing advanced security technology

  16. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  17. Molecular imaging in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  18. Research and development in technology enriched schools: a case for cooperation between teachers and researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, J.J.; Beishuizen, J.J.; Moonen, J.C.M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Technology-enriched schools offer unique opportunities for research into the use of information technology in education. As in every applied educational research project, some concerns should be carefully considered. One of them is teacher involvement. Another issue of concern is finding a proper

  19. Cooperation possibilities and priorities for research and education in Soil Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriels, D.; Ruiz, M E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Decision and agreements for cooperation in the field of Soil Physics, and between the Department of Management and Soil Care Ghent University (UGENT), Belgium; Agrophysics Research Group at the Agrarian University of Havana (UNAH) and the International Centre for Theoretical Physics 'Abdum Salam' in Trieste, Italy (ICTP) . This cooperation is manifested through various projects. UGent and UNAH are already cooperating through a project funded by the Inter-University Council of Flanders (VLIR), Belgium entitled 'Increased cognitive and techniques UNAH (Agrarian University of Havana) and CENHICA capabilities (Center hydrology and water Quality ) in view of a program of soil conservation and water Cuyaguateje River Basin area in Western Cuba'. The Department of Soil Management and Care of UGENT is associated with ICTP Centre and Professor Dr. Donald Gabriels (UGent ) is founder and co-director of the College of Soil Physics that had its beginnings in 1983 and is organized every two years in Trieste , Italy. He is also co - organizer of the ELAFIS (Latin American School of Soil Physics), which was organized by the UNAH in Havana, Cuba under the direction of Dr Maria Elena Ruiz as senior associate at ICTP. The Department of Management and Soil Care (UGENT) directs and coordinates the International Center Eremologia (ICE ) and Prof. Dr. Donald Gabriels was recently named as president of the UNESCO Chair in Eremologia . ICE organized and coordinated by the International Training Center UGENT and the Faculty of Applied, Free University of Brussels (UB) a Master's program in two years entitled 'Physical Land Resources' Science. The UNESCO Chair in Eremologia supports 'Desertification Research priorities' announced in the Declaration of Tunes in 2006. As desertification in arid and land degradation in general under different weather conditions provide for the deterioration of the physical and soil quality, cooperation between the three institutions: UGENT , UNAH

  20. 75 FR 80536 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993 National Warheads...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... Production Act of 1993 National Warheads and Energetics Consortium Notice is hereby given that, on November 30, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993... Mountain Scientific Laboratory, Centennial, CO; Rocky Research, Boulder City, NV; The Research Foundation...

  1. Annual technical meeting of the NRC cooperative severe accident research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1993-01-01

    This brief report summarizes the 1992 annual technical meeting of the NRC Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program (CSARP-92) held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, May 4-8, 1992. The report is taken mainly from coverage of the meeting published in the June 5, 1992, issue of Atomic Energy Clearinghouse. Results of this meeting are formalized at the Water Reactor Safety Information Meetings (WRSIM) that are held annually in October. Nuclear Safety summarizes the annual WRSIM meetings and provides a list of the presentations that were given. Interested readers are encouraged to review listed topics to identify specific topic areas in severe accident research. Sessions were held on in-vessel core melt progression; fuel-coolant interactions; fission-product behavior; direct containment heating; and severe accident code development, assessment, and validation. Summaries of the individual technical sessions and the current state of the art in these areas were given by the chairmen

  2. Applying Science: opportunities to inform disease management policy with cooperative research within a One Health framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason K. Blackburn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the current saiga antelope die off in Kazakhstan each represent very real and difficult to manage public or veterinary health crises. They also illustrate the importance of stable and funded surveillance and sound policy for intervention or disease control. While these two events highlight extreme cases of infectious disease (Ebola or (possible environmental exposure (saiga, diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, tularemia, and plague are all zoonoses that pose risks and present surveillance challenges at the wildlife-livestock-human interfaces. These four diseases are also considered important actors in the threat of biological terror activities and have a long history as legacy biowarfare pathogens. This paper reviews recent studies done cooperatively between American and institutions within nations of the Former Soviet Union (FSU focused on spatiotemporal, epidemiological, and ecological patterns of these four zoonoses. We examine recent studies and discuss the possible ways in which techniques, including ecological niche modeling, disease risk modeling, and spatio-temporal cluster analysis, can inform disease surveillance, control efforts and impact policy. Our focus is to posit ways to apply science to disease management policy and actual management or mitigation practices. Across these examples, we illustrate the value of cooperative studies that bring together modern geospatial and epidemiological analyses to improve our understanding of the distribution of pathogens and diseases in livestock, wildlife, and humans. For example, ecological niche modeling can provide national level maps of pathogen distributions for surveillance planning, while space-time models can identify the timing and location of significant outbreak events for defining active control strategies. We advocate for the need to bring the results and the researchers from cooperative studies into the meeting rooms where policy is

  3. Program of enhancing the Korea-USA cooperation research for the development of proliferation resistant fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Ahn, D. H.; Ko, W. I.

    2007-03-01

    The objective of the Program is to develop the fuel cycle technology of GEN-IV SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) system through the Korea-USA cooperation research in order to improve the efficiency of the technology development and to increase the transparency of the research. Since the pyroprocessing research by using actual spent nuclear fuel can not be performed in Korea at present, the active demonstration research will be performed by using the USA national research facilities under the Korea-USA cooperation. Moreover, the development of safeguards technology and the methodology for the evaluation of the proliferation resistance will also be performed under the cooperation. The current cooperation national laboratories of the safeguards and pyroprocessing technology development are LANL (Los Alamos National Lab.) and INL (Idaho National Lab.), respectively. Practical research experience and technical data for the pyroprocessing technology can be achieved through the demonstration of the inactive research results, which was performed in Korea, by using actual spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the cooperation study encompass the electrolytic reduction of oxide spent fuel, electrorefining, liquid cadmium cathode process, TRU fuel fabrication, fuel performance evaluation and related safeguards technology development

  4. An increasing number of qualitative research papers in oncology and palliative care: does it mean a thorough development of the methodology of research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunelli Cinzia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the second half of the nineties, a scientific debate about the usefulness of qualitative research in medicine began in the main medical journals as well as the amount of "qualitative" papers published on peer reviewed journals has noticeably increased during these last years. Nevertheless the label of qualitative methodology has been assigned to an heterogeneous collection of studies. Some of them show a complete awareness of the specificity of this kind of research, while others are still largely influenced by the quantitative paradigm prevailing in the medical field. The concern with the rigour and credibility of qualitative methods has lead to the development of a number of checklist for assessing qualitative research. The purposes of this review were to describe the quality of the development of qualitative research in the medical field, focusing on oncology and palliative care, and to discuss the applicability of a descriptive checklist. Methods A review was conducted on Medline and PsycINFO databases. On the basis of their abstract, papers found have been classified considering: publication year, kind of journal, paper type, data gathering method, sample size and declared methodological approach. A sub sample of the previous papers was than selected and their methodological characteristics were evaluated based on a descriptive checklist. Results 351 abstracts and 26 full papers were analysed. An increase over time in the number of qualitative studies is evident. While most of the papers before 1999 were published on nursing journals (43%, afterwards also medical journals were largely represented. Psychological journals increased from 7% to 12%. The 22% of studies used a sample size lower than 15 and the 15% did not specify the sample size in the abstract. The methodological approach was also often not specified and the percentage increased in the second time period (from 73% to 80%. Grounded theory was the most

  5. Cooperation between research institutions and journals on research integrity cases: guidance from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Elizabeth; Kleinert, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    Institutions and journals both have important duties relating to research and publication misconduct. Institutions are responsible for the conduct of their researchers and for encouraging a healthy research environment. Journals are responsible for the conduct of their editors, for safeguarding the research record, and for ensuring the reliability of everything they publish. It is therefore important for institutions and journals to communicate and collaborate effectively on cases relating to research integrity. To achieve this, we make the following recommendations. Institutions should: • have a research integrity officer (or office) and publish their contact details prominently; • inform journals about cases of proven misconduct that affect the reliability or attribution of work that they have published; • respond to journals if they request information about issues, such as disputed authorship, misleading reporting, competing interests, or other factors, including honest errors, that could affect the reliability of published work; • initiate inquiries into allegations of research misconduct or unacceptable publication practice raised by journals; • have policies supporting responsible research conduct and systems in place for investigating suspected research misconduct. Journals should: • publish the contact details of their editor-in-chief who should act as the point of contact for questions relating to research and publication integrity; • inform institutions if they suspect misconduct by their researchers, and provide evidence to support these concerns; • cooperate with investigations and respond to institutions' questions about misconduct allegations; • be prepared to issue retractions or corrections (according to the COPE guidelines on retractions) when provided with findings of misconduct arising from investigations; • have policies for responding to institutions and other organizations that investigate cases of research misconduct

  6. Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Final Report for Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Number ORNL93-0237 Adhesive Bonding Technologies for Automotive Structural Composites; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. The research undertaken under this CRADA addresses the following areas of importance: bulk material characterization, structural fracture mechanics, modeling/characterization, process control and nondestructive evaluation (PC/NDE), manufacturing demonstration, and advanced processing. For the bulk material characterization task, the individual material properties of the adherends and adhesives were characterized. This included generating a database of mechanical and physical properties, after identifying and developing standard test methods to obtain properties. The structural fracture mechanics task concentrated on test development to characterize the fracture toughness of adhesively bonded joints subjected to Mode I, Mode II and mixed-mode conditions. Standard test procedures for quantifying an adhesive/adherend system's resistance to crack growth were developed for use by industry. In the modeling/characterization task, fracture mechanics-based design guidelines and predictive methodologies have been developed which will facilitate iteration on design concepts for bonded joints while alleviating the need for extensive testing

  7. Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, J. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Yun, H. C.; Lee, D. G.

    2005-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation, MSO for short, is a robust technology that can effectively treat mixed waste (radioactive waste including hazardous metals or organics). It can safely and economically treat the difficult wastes such as not-easily destroyable toxic organic waste, medical waste, chemical warfare and energetic materials such as propellant and explosives, all of which are not easily treated by an incinerator or other currently existing thermal treatment system. Therefore, molten salt oxidation technology should be developed and utilized to treat a lot of niche waste stored in the nuclear and environmental industries. So, if we put the MSO technology to practical use by Korea-Vietnam joint research, we can reduce R and D fund for MSO technology by ourselves and we can expect an export of the outcome of nuclear R and D in Korea. For Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research concerning molten salt oxidation technology between KOREA and VIETNAM, in this research, We invited two Vietnamese researchers and we introduced our experimental scale molten salt oxidation system in order to let them understand molten salt oxidation technology. We also visited Viet man and we consulted about molten salt oxidation process. We held seminar on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology, discussed on the joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology and finally we wrote MOU for joint research

  8. Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Y. J.; Kim, J. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Yun, H. C.; Lee, D. G

    2005-08-01

    Molten salt oxidation, MSO for short, is a robust technology that can effectively treat mixed waste (radioactive waste including hazardous metals or organics). It can safely and economically treat the difficult wastes such as not-easily destroyable toxic organic waste, medical waste, chemical warfare and energetic materials such as propellant and explosives, all of which are not easily treated by an incinerator or other currently existing thermal treatment system. Therefore, molten salt oxidation technology should be developed and utilized to treat a lot of niche waste stored in the nuclear and environmental industries. So, if we put the MSO technology to practical use by Korea-Vietnam joint research, we can reduce R and D fund for MSO technology by ourselves and we can expect an export of the outcome of nuclear R and D in Korea. For Establishment of cooperation basis of joint research concerning molten salt oxidation technology between KOREA and VIETNAM, in this research, We invited two Vietnamese researchers and we introduced our experimental scale molten salt oxidation system in order to let them understand molten salt oxidation technology. We also visited Viet man and we consulted about molten salt oxidation process. We held seminar on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology, discussed on the joint research on the mixed waste molten salt oxidation technology and finally we wrote MOU for joint research.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies

  10. Auricular acupuncture and biomedical research--A promising Sino-Austrian research cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Pei-Jing; Zhao, Jing-Jun; Li, Yu-Qing; Litscher, Daniela; Li, Shao-yuan; Gaischek, Ingrid; Zhai, Xu; Wang, Lu; Luo, Man; Litscher, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Treatment by auricular acupuncture has a long history. Ear-acupoint research has been advancing step by step in China and also in Europe. Auricles are rich in nerves, therefore a close relationship with different functions of the human body has been proved by the research teams of the two main authors of this article from China and Austria. In recent years, great progress has been made in the research of regulating human body functions through electroacupuncture at the auricular branch of the vagus nerve, which is part of auricular acupuncture therapy. It is well known that the auricular branch of the vagus nerve is the only peripheral pathway to the cerebral cortex. Studies of the Chinese team on hypertension, diabetes, epilepsy and depression have shown that the mechanism of auricular vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may be comparable with cervical VNS in terms of pathways. Auricular VNS has a broad clinical application prospect.

  11. NULIFE - Implementing Strategic Research of LTO and Facing Generation II and III Challenges Through Cooperative Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Aho-Mantila, I.; Prunier, V.

    2011-01-01

    The European network of excellence NULIFE (Nuclear plant life prediction) has been launched under the Euratom Framework Programme with a clear focus on integrating safety-oriented research on materials, structures and systems and exploiting the results of this integration through the production of harmonised lifetime assessment methods. NULIFE will help provide a better common understanding of the factors affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help facilitate safe and economic long term operation of existing nuclear power plants. In addition, NULIFE will help in the development of design criteria for future generations of nuclear power plant. NULIFE was kicked-off in October 2006 and will work over a 5-year period to create a single organization structure, capable of providing harmonised research and development (R and D) at European level to the nuclear power industry and the related safety authorities. Led by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland), the project has a total budget in excess of 8 million euros, with over 40 partners drawn from leading research institutions, technical support organisations, power companies and manufacturers throughout Europe. NULIFE also involves many industrial organizations and, in addition to their R and D contributions, these take part in a dedicated End User Group. The importance of the long term operation of the plants has been recognized at European level, in the strategic research agenda of SNE TP (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform). In NULIFE, the joint EU-wide coordinated research strategy for plant life integrity management and long term operation has been defined. Based on NULIFE business plan, the discussion of long-term business plan, operational model and statutes of the future NULIFE institute has been started. NULIFE maintains the sustainability of nuclear power by focusing on the continued, 60+ years of safe operation of nuclear power

  12. NULIFE - Implementing Strategic Research of LTO and Facing Gen II / III Challenges through Cooperative Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Aho-Mantila, I.; Prunier, V.

    2011-01-01

    The European network of excellence NULIFE (Nuclear plant life prediction) has been launched under the Euratom Framework Programme with a clear focus on integrating safety-oriented research on materials, structures and systems and exploiting the results of this integration through the production of harmonised lifetime assessment methods. NULIFE will help provide a better common understanding of the factors affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help facilitate safe and economic long term operation of existing nuclear power plants. In addition, NULIFE will help in the development of design criteria for future generations of nuclear power plant. NULIFE was kicked-off in October 2006 and will work over a 5-year period to create a single organization structure, capable of providing harmonised research and development (R and D) at European level to the nuclear power industry and the related safety authorities. Led by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland), the project has a total budget in excess of 8 million euros, with over 40 partners drawn from leading research institutions, technical support organisations, power companies and manufacturers throughout Europe. NULIFE also involves many industrial organizations and, in addition to their R and D contributions, these take part in a dedicated End User Group. The importance of the long term operation of the plants has been recognized at European level, in the strategic research agenda of SNE TP (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform). In NULIFE, the joint EU-wide coordinated research strategy for plant life integrity management and long term operation has been defined. Based on NULIFE business plan, the discussion of long-term business plan, operational model and statutes of the future NULIFE institute has been started. NULIFE maintains the sustainability of nuclear power by focusing on the continued, 60+ years of safe operation of nuclear power

  13. Interpretive Study of Research and Development Relative to Educational Cooperatives. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Larry W.; And Others

    This document analyzes some of the aspects of the trend toward educational regionalism and cooperation. Educational cooperatives are designed to provide the flexibility and service associated with large districts while allowing for local control and school district autonomy. Types of educational cooperatives discussed include intermediate…

  14. Topics in clinical oncology. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, P.

    1987-12-01

    The monograph comprising primarily papers on topical subjects of oncology and cancer research, contains also a selection of papers presented at the 2. Congress of the Czechoslovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene. Seven papers were selected on behalf of their subject related to clinical oncology. All of them were iputted in INIS; five of them deal with the scintiscanning of the skeleton of cancer patients, one with radioimmunodetection of tumors, and one with radionuclide lymphography. (A.K.)

  15. An Integrated Strategy for Promoting Geoscience Education and Research in Developing Countries through International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    2007-12-01

    Geoscience education and research in Developing countries should aim at achieving food, water and environmental security, and disaster preparedness, based on the synergetic application of earth (including atmospheric and oceanic realms), space and information sciences through economically-viable, ecologically- sustainable and people-participatory management of natural resources. The proposed strategy involves the integration of the following three principal elements: (i) What needs to be taught: Geoscience needs to be taught as earth system science incorporating geophysical, geochemical and geobiological approaches, with focus (say, 80 % of time) on surficial processes (e.g. dynamics of water, wind and waves, surface and groundwater, soil moisture, geomorphology, landuse, crops), and surficial materials (e.g. soils, water, industrial minerals, sediments, biota). Subjects such as the origin, structure and evolution of the earth, and deep-seated processes (e.g. dynamics of the crust-mantle interaction, plate tectonics) could be taught by way of background knowledge (say, 20 % of the time), (ii) How jobs are to be created: Jobs are to be created by merging geoscience knowledge with economic instruments (say, micro enterprises), and management structures at different levels (Policy level, Technology Transfer level and Implementation level), customized to the local biophysical and socioeconomic situations, and (iii) International cooperation: Web-based instruction (e.g. education portals, virtual laboratories) through South - South and North - South cooperation, customized to the local biophysical and socioeconomic situations, with the help of (say) UNDP, UNESCO, World Bank, etc.

  16. Activities and cooperation opportunities at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.

    2004-01-01

    Turkey's familiarization with nuclear energy began in July 1955, when it signed a bilateral agreement with the USA to cooperate in the 'peaceful uses of nuclear energy'. In 1956, the Turkish Atomic Energy Commission (TAEK) was created. Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center (CNAEM) was formally established in 1962. Turkey's first research reactor, a pool-type 1 MW reactor at CNAEM site, known as TR-1, went critical in 1962 and was shut down in September 1977. Strong collaborations with national and international organizations have been achieved for the promotion of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and its applications in Turkey. Meanwhile the TR-2 reactor (5 MW) was commissioned in 1984 in order to meet the increasing demand of radioisotopes.CNAEM as a subsidiary of TAEK is charged to perform R and D activities on whole area of nuclear science and technology, such as research reactor, nuclear safety, nuclear fuel technology and fuel analysis codes, nuclear materials, NDT, nuclear electronics, accelerator, radiobiology, cytogenetics (bio dosimetry), radioecology, marine radioactivity, radiation safety, dosimetry, radioactive waste management, calibration of nuclear instruments, environmental monitoring. Possible cooperation fields between CNAEM and other institutions are as follows: measurements of radioactivity in the environment, radioecological studies of radioactivity levels in environmental samples, indoor radon measurements, development and production of radiopharmaceuticals, radiation cytogenetics (bio dosimetry), training in NDT, certification of industrial workers who use non-destructive testing devices, production of UO 2 and (U,Th)O 2 based fuel material, development and construction of radiation measurement instrument, analysis of all kind of uranium and thorium, training on processing and storage of low level radioactive waste

  17. Activities and cooperation opportunities at Cekmece nuclear research and training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Turkey's familiarization with nuclear energy began in July 1955, when it signed a bilateral agreement with the USA to cooperate in the p eaceful uses of nuclear energy . In 1956, the Turkish Atomic Energy Commission (TAEK) was created. Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center (CNAEM) was formally established in 1962. Turkey's first research reactor, a pool-type 1 MW reactor at CNAEM site, known as TR-1, went critical in 1962 and was shut down in September 1977. Strong collaborations with national and international organizations have been achieved for the promotion of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and its applications in Turkey. Meanwhile the TR-2 reactor (5 MW) was commissioned in 1984 in order to meet the increasing demand of radioisotopes.CNAEM as a subsidiary of TAEK is charged to perform R and D activities on whole area of nuclear science and technology, such as research reactor, nuclear safety, nuclear fuel technology and fuel analysis codes, nuclear materials, NDT, nuclear electronics, accelerator, radiobiology, cytogenetics (bio dosimetry), radioecology, marine radioactivity, radiation safety, dosimetry, radioactive waste management, calibration of nuclear instruments, environmental monitoring. Possible cooperation fields between CNAEM and other institutions are as follows: measurements of radioactivity in the environment, radioecological studies of radioactivity levels in environmental samples, indoor radon measurements, development and production of radiopharmaceuticals, radiation cytogenetics (bio dosimetry), training in NDT, certification of industrial workers who use non-destructive testing devices, production of UO 2 and (U,Th)O 2 based fuel material, development and construction of radiation measurement instrument, analysis of all kind of uranium and thorium, training on processing and storage of low level radioactive waste

  18. Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, James M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Dunnick, N. Reed; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring 'Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology.' Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia.

  19. Prognostic implications of c-Ki-ras2 mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil and interferon: a study of the eastern cooperative oncology group (EST 2292)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadler, S; Bajaj, R; Neuberg, D; Agarwal, V; Haynes, H; Benson, A B

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in c-Ki-ras2 (ras) occur in about 40% of patients with colorectal cancers and occur early in the pathogenesis of this disease. To evaluate the prognostic value of mutations in ras, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) conducted a retrospective study (EST 2292) to determine the frequency of mutations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, and to determine whether ras mutations were associated with altered response to therapy and survival. Patients were enrolled from four studies: P-Z289, an ECOG phase II trial of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and interferon (IFN) in patients with advanced colorectal cancer; P-Z991, an ECOG phase I trial of 5-FU and IFN in patients with advanced malignancies; and two trials from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in patients with advanced colorectal cancer treated with 5-FU and either IFN-alpha or IFN-beta. All patients had advanced colorectal carcinoma and had sufficient histologic material available for analysis for the presence and type of ras, using polymerase chain reaction and dot-blot analysis with sets of probes sufficient to detect all the common mutations of ras at codons 12, 13, and 61. Seventy-two patients were enrolled in this trial. Mutations in ras were detected in 25 (35%), including 17 (23%) in codon 12, four (6%) in codon 13, and four (6%) in codon 61. There was no correlation between the presence of a ras mutation and age, sex, Dukes' stage, histology, or tumor markers. Thirty-one of 72 patients (43%) responded to therapy with 5-FU and IFN, and 10 of 31 responders (32%) and 15 of 41 nonresponders (37%) had mutations in ras. There was no difference in response rates or overall survival between the groups with and without ras mutations. It is unlikely that ras mutations will have significant prognostic value for either response to therapy or survival in patients with colorectal carcinomas treated with 5-FU and IFN.

  20. Oncology in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Cooperation and competition in business on example of Internet research of opto-electronic companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2006-10-01

    Based on findings from earlier studies which showed that links to academic web sites contain important information, the following study examines the practicability of using co-link data to describe cooperation and competition in optoelec-tronic business. The analysis was based on 32 companies and organizations which were found in an issue of a specialist magazine. For the purpose of the research three search engines - Google, Yahoo! and MSN Search were used. Assuming that a number of co-links to a pair of Web sites is a measure of the similarity between the two companies, the study aims at search for the sets of companies that would be similar to one another. The method applied is the MDS - multidimensional scaling that allows to present results of the analysis on a 2D map.

  2. WVU cooperative agreement, decontamination systems information and research program, deployment support leading to implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    This program at West Virginia University is a Cooperative Agreement that focuses on R ampersand D associated with hazardous waste remediation problems existing at DOE, Corps of Engineers, and private sector sites. The Agreement builds on a unique combination of resources coupling university researchers with DOE sponsored small businesses, leading toward field tests and large scale technology demonstrations of environmental technologies. Most of the Agreement's projects are categorized in the Technology Maturity Levels under Gates 3-Advanced Development, Gate 4-Engineering Development, and Gate 5-Demonstration. The program includes a diversity of projects: subsurface contaminants; mixed wastes; mixed wastes/efficient separations; mixed wastes/characterization, monitoring, and sensor technologies; and decontamination and decommissioning/efficient separations

  3. 12th Quadrennial Congress of the International Association for Radiation Research incorporating the 50th Annual Meeting of Radiation Research Society, RANZCR Radiation Oncology Annual Scientific Meeting and AINSE Radiation Science Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 12th International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR2003), for the first time held in the Southern Hemisphere under the auspices of the International Association of Radiation Research (IARR). The Australian affiliate of IARR is the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE). As with recent Congresses, the annual scientific meeting of the Radiation Research Society will be incorporated into the program. The Congress will be further enhanced by the integration of the annual scientific meeting of the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the AINSE Radiation Science Conference. An exciting programme was presented with the main threads being radiation oncology, radiation biology, radiation chemistry/physics, radiation protection and the environment. Items in INIS scope have been separately indexed

  4. VVER operational safety improvements: lessons learnt from European co-operation and future research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazdera, F.; Vasa, I.; Zd'arek, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper summarises involvement of Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) in the areas which are directly related to Reactor Operational Safety and Plant Life Management, it also gives an idea how results of the research projects can be used to enhance safety of VVER reactors. These issues are for many years subject of a wide international co-operation effort, covered by such programmes as PHARE, OECD/NEA TACIS, 5th Framework Programme. Nuclear Research Institute participated in the majority of these programmes and projects, which allowed us to evaluate benefits (especially for VVER reactors) of the projects already finalised or running, as well as to formulate so-called 'future research needs', which possibly may be pursued within 6th Framework Programme. The paper highlights the main features of some projects our Institute was and is involved in, emphasising the most important results, expectations and future needs. It also very briefly, deals with some general and particular lessons learnt within these projects and their application to VVER reactors, especially as to their safety improvement. The paper also mentions VVER-focused projects and activities, co-ordinated by the OECD, which should enable to extend multilateral contacts already existing between organisations of the EU countries to include organisations from Russia, USA, Japan and possibly some other countries

  5. Quality in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-01-01

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years

  6. Mezhdunarodnoe nauchnoe sotrudnichestvo v Baltijskom regione: naukometricheskij analiz [International research cooperation in the Baltic region: a scientometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the processes of international research cooperation in the Baltic Sea region. It focuses on research works published in the leading periodicals in 1993—2012. The empirical material is collected from the world’s largest abstract and citation database, SciVerse Scopus, which makes it possible to evaluate macroindicators at the national and global levels as well as the contribution of scholars to the global progress. The article also offers an assessment of the efficiency of research activities in the Baltic Sea region countries. It is based on a number of scientometric indicators that reflect the performance of universities in terms of research journal publications and the development of research cooperation in the field of Baltic studies. The authors consider the dynamics of research contribution and academic cooperation in the Baltic Sea countries in four leading fields — i. e. agricultural and biological sciences, Earth sciences, ecology and social sciences presented in the SciVerse Scopus scientometric database. The article provides a map of research cooperation in the Baltic Sea region.

  7. Research on the Mode of University-Enterprise Cooperation to Promote Engineering Students' Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Yan; Lihua, Sun

    2018-06-01

    The employment of university students has become a hot issue of concern to the whole society. Promoting the employment of university students is a top priority for higher education institutions. University-enterprise cooperation is an important trend in the development of modern higher education. It is also an important channel for promoting the employment of university students, especially for engineering students. Through an in-depth analysis of the status quo of employment of university graduates, this paper proposes four modes of university-enterprise cooperation to promote university graduates' employment: The post-employment cooperation model, the professional internship cooperation model, the second classroom expansion cooperation model and the enterprise-oriented recruitment model, and further proposed the countermeasures to strengthen the cooperation between university and enterprise in order to promote the employment of university students.

  8. Plan and progress of a cooperative research program on field migration test between CIRP and JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shushen; Wang Zhiming; Li Zhentang

    1999-01-01

    As the main parts of a cooperative research project on safety assessment method for shallow land disposal of low level radioactive wastes between the China Institute for radiation Protection (CIRP) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), field migration tests investigating the migration of radionuclides 90 Sr, 237 Np and 238 Pu and stable elements Sr, Ce, and Nd in both aerated zone and aquifer are carried out. 3 H and Br are used as tracers to obtain the water flow velocity in the aquifer and the movement of moisture water in the aerated zone for radioactive and non-radioactive tests, respectively. The aerated zone migration tests are carried out with media including soil, bentonite, cement block and mortar in both natural rainfall condition and artificial rainfall condition. The aquifer migration tests are carried out with assemblies (Type I), experimental frame (Type II) and injection tube (Type III), respectively, in and Underground Research Facility (URF). The aerated zone migration tests were started in May, 1997, while the aquifer migration tests started in August 1997. (author)

  9. The characteristics of oncology social work in Australia: Implications for workforce planning in integrated cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockett, Rosalie; Peate, Michelle; Hobbs, Kim; Dzidowska, Monika; L Bell, Melanie; Baylock, Brandi; Epstein, Irwin

    2016-12-01

    To describe the demographics, professional characteristics, self-reported professional development needs and research involvement of oncology social workers in Australia and to describe perceived barriers to provision of quality psychosocial care. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to social workers working in the oncology field who were contacted through three professional organizations; the Australian Association of Social Workers, Oncology Social Work Australia and the Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group, the University of Sydney. A snowball recruitment method was adopted to maximize the sample size. Two thirds of respondents had over 10 years professional practice experience but with lesser experience in oncology settings. Twenty-eight percent had post-graduate qualifications. Professional development needs were reported as moderate or high by 68% of respondents. No association between professional needs and work setting was found. Years of experience in oncology practice and living in an urban area increased the likelihood of involvement in research. Barriers to psychosocial care included poor understandings of the social work role, time constraints and an inadequate number of social work positions. In this first Australian study of the social work oncology workforce, the results demonstrated active, well-qualified and experienced social workers providing frontline services to people with cancer and their caregivers in geographically diverse locations across Australia. Inadequate resources and a lack of integrated psychosocial care were identified as barriers to comprehensive cancer care. The need for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander social workers was identified as an urgent workforce priority. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Recurrent or Oligometastatic Uterine Cervix Cancer: A Cooperative Study of the Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG 14-11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Jin; Chang, Ah Ram; Seo, Youngseok; Cho, Chul Koo; Jang, Won-Il; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Chulwon

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate local control and patient survival for recurrent or oligometastatic uterine cervical cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using CyberKnife, and to demonstrate the safety of SBRT. Between 2002 and 2013, 100 recurrent or oligometastatic lesions in 85 patients were treated with SBRT at three Institutions. SBRT sites were within the previous RT field in 59 and partially overlapped in nine. SBRT sites included three local recurrences, 89 lymph node metastases, and eight distant metastases. Patients were treated with a median dose of 39 Gy in three fractions, which was equivalent to a biologically effective dose (BED) of 90 Gy. The median follow-up period was 20.4 months. Local failure occurred in 17 out of 100 SBRT-treated sites. The 2-year and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.5% and 78.8%, respectively. Eleven local failures occurred within the previous RT field. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.5% and 32.9%, respectively. BED >90 Gy (p=0.072) and >69 Gy (p=0.059) and longer disease-free interval (p=0.065) predicted marginally superior local control. Re-irradiation appeared to be related to inferior local control (p<0.001), but the SBRT BED in this group was much lower than the dose in the other group (median BED, 79 Gy vs. 90 Gy). Chronic toxicities of grade 3 or more occurred in five cases. SBRT for recurrent or oligometastatic cervical cancer resulted in excellent local control, especially with a long disease-free interval and high BED treatment, with acceptable toxicities. Therefore, SBRT can be considered a therapeutic option for these patients. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Prospective randomized phase II study of FOLFIRI versus FOLFOX7 in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a Chinese Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Wen, Feng; Zhou, Chengya; Qiu, Meng; Liu, Jiyan; Chen, Jing; Yi, Cheng; Li, Zhiping; Luo, Deyun; Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaohong; Bi, Feng

    2017-11-17

    Until now, no standard chemotherapy has been widely accepted for advanced gastric cancer (GC). The current research aimed to compare folinic acid, fluorouracil with irinotecan (mFOLFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX7) as first-line treatments in patients with locally advanced GC in an open, randomized, phase II study. Previously untreated metastatic or recurrent GC patients with measurable disease received mFOLFIRI (arm A) or mFOLFOX7 (arm B) every 2 weeks. The defined second-line treatment was mFOLFOX7 for arm A and mFOLFIRI for arm B. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control rate (DCR) and toxicity. The evaluable population consisted of 128 patients (54 in arm A; 74 in arm B). Median PFS of arm A was 2.9 months (m) (95% confidence interval, CI , 1.9 to 4.1 m) versus 4.1 m (95% CI , 3.2 to 4.8 m) for arm B ( p = 0.109). Median OS was 9.9 months (95% CI , 6.0 to 13.5 m) for arm A versus 12.0 m for arm B (95% CI , 10.3 to 13.7m; p = 0.431). DCRs for arm A and arm B were 59.3% and 66.3%, respectively ( p = 0.850). In subgroup analysis of the patients who completed both treatment lines per protocol, the median first-line PFS was 2.1 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7arm versus 8.0 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI arm ( p = 0.053), and the median second-line PFS values were 1.2 m versus 5.1 m ( p = 0.287). Total PFS and OS were 8.1m and 11.0 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7 group compared with 12.2m and 20.2 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI group ( p = 0.008, p = 0.030). Both regimens were well-tolerated with acceptable and manageable toxicities. Hence, there was no significant difference in the PFS or DCR. However, mFOLFOX7 followed by mFOLFIRI might have a better OS.

  12. FY 2000 report on the research cooperation project on the research cooperative follow-up for development of the manufacturing technology supported by advanced and integrated information system through cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The manufacturing technology supported by advanced and integrated information system through cooperation (MATIC), that is, a project supporting the production technology including the international information system and CAD/CAM system, etc. was carried out from FY 1994 to FY 1998. From FY 1999, the follow-up project is being implemented for the spread of the MATIC results, support for the independent R and D and the technical guidance. China, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore participated in this project, by which the support and technical guidance were given in three fields: automobiles/the parts; household electric appliances/the parts; fiber/apparel. At present, each country is continuing its own activity for using the system developed in the MATIC project in its country. In this fiscal year, researchers were sent to each country for supporting the activities. Further, the MATIC follow-up committee was established to conduct the drawing-up of a business plan, grasp of the state of the spread/R and D, discussion about problems/subjects, comprehensive evaluation of the MATIC project, etc. (NEDO)

  13. A Cooperative Industry - Government Woodland Caribou Research Program in Northeastern Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Rippin

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of large scale logging and increasingly intensive petroleum exploration and development in northeastern Alberta prompted the establishment of a cooperative research program to investigate various aspects of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou biology. The ultimate goal of the program is to develop an effective plan that will ensure the long term survival of caribou while allowing for renewable and non-renewable resource development. There are three parts to the program. Part I began early in 1991 and makes use of conventional radio telemetry as a means of recording various parameters of general caribou biology. The study area encompasses approximately 4000 km2 of low relief, boreal mixedwood forest. Preliminary results from 2500 radio locations (involving 50 individuals indicate that woodland caribou inhabiting the study area are non-migratory and are strongly associated with some of the more scarce peatland forest types present in the area. Investigations to document the basic biology and ecology will continue for another two years. Part II began in early 1993 as a part of a two-year investigation into the disturbance effects of petroleum exploration and development on caribou movements and behaviour. One objective of this study is to develop a predictive model useful in determining the cumulative effects of varying intensities of disturbance on caribou. Part III began in early 1994 with a proposed three-year investigation to determine the mechanism of spatial and temporal separation of caribou and moose in the study area. These relationships may indicate the means by which caribou minimize the impact of wolf predation on their populations in northeastern Alberta. Results will be applied to industrial land use and specifically to large scale forest harvesting planned for the area. The research program is supported through cooperative funding contributed by 24 petroleum companies, 1 forest company, 2 peat companies and

  14. Thermal-Hydraulic Research Review and Cooperation Outcome for Light Water Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Lee, Chan; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chi Young [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The fuel assembly for pressurized water reactor (PWR) consists of fuel rod bundle, spacer grid and bottom/top end fittings. The cooling water in high pressure and temperature is introduced in lower plenum of reactor core and directed to upper plenum through the subchannel which is formed between the fuel rods. The main thermalhydraulic performance parameters for the PWR fuel are pressure drop and critical heat flux in normal operating condition, and quenching time in accident condition. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an advanced PWR fuel, dual-cooled annular fuel and accident tolerant fuel for the enhancement of fuel performance and the localization. For the key thermal-hydraulic technology development of PWR fuel, the KAERI LWR fuel team has conducted the experiments for pressure drop, turbulent flow mixing and heat transfer, critical heat flux(CHF) and quenching. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was also performed to predict flow and heat transfer in fuel assembly including the spent fuel assembly in dry cask for interim repository. In addition, the research cooperation with university and nuclear fuel company was also carried out to develop a basic thermalhydraulic technology and the commercialization.

  15. International cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1995, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) ensured foreign cooperation particularly in the frame of the Slovak Republic is membership in the IAEA, as well as cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD NEA), cooperation with European Union in the frame of PHARE programmes, and intergovernmental cooperation and cooperation among nuclear regulatory authorities. With respect to an international importance, prestige and a wide-scope possibilities of a technical assistance , either a direct one (expert assessments, technology supplies, work placement, scientific trips, training courses) or indirect one (participation at various conferences, seminars, technical committees, etc), the most important cooperation with the IAEA in Vienna. In 1994, the Slovak Republic, was elected to the Board Governors, the represent the group of Eastern European countries. The Slovak Government entrusted the NRA SR's Chairman with representing the Slovak Republic in the Board of Governors. Owing to a good name of Slovakia was elected to the one of two Vice-Chairmen of the Board of Governors at the 882-nd session on the Board. IAEA approved and developed 8 national projects for Slovakia in 1995. Generally, IAEA is contracting scientific contracts with research institutes, nuclear power plants and other organizations. Slovak organizations used these contracts as complementary funding of their tasks. In 1995, there were 12 scientific contracts in progress, or approved respectively. Other international activities of the NRA SR, international co-operations as well as foreign affairs are reported

  16. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  17. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  18. Urological oncology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammon, J.; Karstens, J.H.; Rathert, P.

    1981-01-01

    The cooperation between urologists and radiologists has brought about new ideas for the therapy of malignant tumours of the urogenital tract. This and the development of new techniques of diagnosis and therapy has brought about a need for revision of present diagnostic and therapeutical conceptions. With the introduction of the TNM classification system for nearly all tumours of the urogenital system, it has become obligatory to have a list of indications for the various techniques to determine the T-, N-, or M-nature of a tumour. Except for tumours of the female genitals, also diagnosis and therapy are based on the new classification system. The use of computerized tomography will have to be re-evaluated. To say the least, it is a decisive aid in physical and technical irradiation planning. The fundamentals of systematic diagnosis and therapy are listed in a table. Cytostatic treatment and combined radio-/chemotherapy must be considered. Side-effects of radiotherapy and their treatment are of practical importance. Post-therapeutical treatment receives special attention. The documented cooperation between radiophysics, radiobiology, radiology, and urology has yielded new knowledge in the sense of a comprehensive conception of urological oncology. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research (CIDER): Contributions to Education (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research (http://www.deep-earth.org) began its activities in 2003 and has so far held four summer programs of duration ranging from 3 to 7 weeks, funded by the NSF/CSEDI program, with support from and at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara. CIDER's goals are twofold: (1) as a "synthesis center", to provide an environment for transformative studies of Earth's internal dynamics, requiring a concerted multi-disciplinary effort of leading researchers, and (2) to educate a new generation of Earth scientists with a breadth of competence across the disciplines required to understand the dynamic earth: mineral physics, geodynamics, geochemistry and geomagnetism. CIDER summer programs, so far, have focused on themes related to the Deep Earth: "Reconciling seismic and geochemical heterogeneity in the Earth", "The Earth's transition zone", "Boundary layers in the Earth" and "Fluids and volatiles in the Earth's mantle and core". These programs typically include three weeks of unstructured program designed for senior (assistant professor level and higher) researchers, and a 3-4 weeks "tutorial and workshop" part geared towards advanced graduate students and post-docs, but open also to more senior participants. The first two weeks of the tutorial part include lectures and practical exercises in the different disciplines aimed at providing participants with a basic understanding of the fundamentals and current challenges in disciplines other than their own. During the second week, topics related to the summer program's theme are proposed for further study in a workshop mode by multi-disciplinary groups formed on the fly, continued through the last week or two of the program. These activities often lead to the development of new collaborations and research proposals to the CSEDI program. In 2011, CIDER will hold a summer program at UC Berkeley on the theme "Mountain Building", expanding the scope of the Institute

  20. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecological oncology in the nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B

    2011-01-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries we developed an online questionnaire in cooperation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian...... (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecological oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange...

  1. Prognostic value of biologic subtype and the 21-gene recurrence score relative to local recurrence after breast conservation treatment with radiation for early stage breast carcinoma: results from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E2197 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solin, Lawrence J; Gray, Robert; Goldstein, Lori J; Recht, Abram; Baehner, Frederick L; Shak, Steven; Badve, Sunil; Perez, Edith A; Shulman, Lawrence N; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Sledge, George W; Sparano, Joseph A

    2012-07-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the significance of biologic subtype and 21-gene recurrence score relative to local recurrence and local-regional recurrence after breast conservation treatment with radiation. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E2197 was a prospective randomized clinical trial that compared two adjuvant systemic chemotherapy regimens for patients with operable breast carcinoma with 1-3 positive lymph nodes or negative lymph nodes with tumor size >1.0 cm. The study population was a subset of 388 patients with known 21-gene recurrence score and treated with breast conservation surgery, systemic chemotherapy, and definitive radiation treatment. Median follow-up was 9.7 years (range = 3.7-11.6 years). The 10-year rates of local recurrence and local-regional recurrence were 5.4 % and 6.6 %, respectively. Neither biologic subtype nor 21-gene Recurrence Score was associated with local recurrence or local-regional recurrence on univariate or multivariate analyses (all P ≥ 0.12). The 10-year rates of local recurrence were 4.9 % for hormone receptor positive, HER2-negative tumors, 6.0 % for triple negative tumors, and 6.4 % for HER2-positive tumors (P = 0.76), and the 10-year rates of local-regional recurrence were 6.3, 6.9, and 7.2 %, respectively (P = 0.79). For hormone receptor-positive tumors, the 10-year rates of local recurrence were 3.2, 2.9, and 10.1 % for low, intermediate, and high 21-gene recurrence score, respectively (P = 0.17), and the 10-year rates of local-regional recurrence were 3.8, 5.1, and 12.0 %, respectively (P = 0.12). For hormone receptor-positive tumors, the 21-gene recurrence score evaluated as a continuous variable was significant for local-regional recurrence (hazard ratio 2.66; P = 0.03). The 10-year rates of local recurrence and local-regional recurrence were reasonably low in all subsets of patients. Neither biologic subtype nor 21-gene recurrence score should preclude breast conservation treatment with radiation.

  2. 78 FR 9939 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-U.S. Photovoltaic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on..., 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, Inc. (``USPVMC...

  3. 78 FR 58559 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-U.S. Photovoltaic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on..., 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, Inc. (``USPVMC...

  4. 75 FR 79024 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ODVA, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Production Act of 1993--ODVA, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on November 15, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act..., Ontario, Canada; Hokuyo Automatic Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan; Omron Scientific Technologies, Inc. (formerly...

  5. 75 FR 25294 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Joint Venture To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Production Act of 1993--Joint Venture To Perform Project Entitled Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Joint Venture to..., Trilion Quality Systems, Plymouth Meeting, PA, has been added as a party to this venture. Also, Witten...

  6. 78 FR 67401 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Advanced Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Production Act of 1993--Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on September 24, 2013, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993..., AudioVisual Preservation Solutions, New York, NY; Chellomedia Direct Programming, B.V., Amsterdam...

  7. 76 FR 77250 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ODVA, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and... Prairie, MN, have been added as parties to this venture. Also, Actel Corporation, Mountain View, CA... Department of Justice published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on...

  8. 78 FR 58559 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cable Television...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on August 26, 2013... seq. (``the Act''), Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. (``CableLabs'') has filed written...

  9. 77 FR 74877 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; Cable Television...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on November 13, 2012... seq. (``the Act''), Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. (``CableLabs'') has filed written...

  10. 78 FR 49770 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cable Television...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on July 9, 2013... seq. (``the Act''), Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. (``CableLabs'') has filed written...

  11. 78 FR 54277 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cable Television...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on August 1, 2013... seq. (``the Act''), Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. (``CableLabs'') has filed written...

  12. 75 FR 79025 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cable Television...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on November 4, 2010... seq. (``the Act''), Cable Television Laboratories, Inc. (``CableLabs'') has filed written...

  13. The regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.

    1978-01-01

    The history of the Agreement, known as the RCA, is given and the operation of the Agreement, its achievements and current projects are described. The Agreement entered into force in 1972 for a period of five years and has been extended for an additional five years. Any IAEA Member State in the area of South Asia, South East Asia, the Pacific and the Far East may become a party to the Agreement. The purpose of the Agreement is to promote and co-ordinate research, development and training projects in nuclear science and technology through co-operation between the appropriate national institutions and with the assistance of the IAEA. The current RCA co-operative projects cover a broad spectrum of technologies and interests, among which are: food and agriculture, medicine, environmental research, industrial applications, training, research reactor use including radioisotope production, and physical research such as nuclear data programs

  14. Research for the innovation of the agri-food system in international cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bocchi

    2012-08-01

    and implementation of sound agro-ecological policies through an appropriate set of advanced tools. Particularly, a key aspect to empower all the stakeholders involved in the research, development, dissemination and application of new methods and technologies is the identification of information and communication systems that farmers and policy makers need in order to cope with fast-changing conditions in a complex system. University and research centers can act as institutional facilitators of dialogue and development policies among different stakeholders, catalyzing participation and promoting participatory problem-solving strategies for agricultural development and cooperation.

  15. FY 1999 research cooperation project - the research cooperation on the protection of biodiversity and sustainable use, etc. Follow-up; 1999 nendo seibutsu tayosei hozen to jizokuteki riyo nado ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku. Follow up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The follow-up for the research cooperation for Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand was conducted to make it possible that developing countries themselves protect biological resources in the tropical area, etc. and make the sustainable use of biological resources using bio-technology. In Indonesia, the follow-up was to be made for proceeding with the joint study for 'The study on the plant utilization technology - search for useful plant ingredients' reported by Professor Koshimizu, Kinki University. In Malaysia, considering that equipment is enough installed there and research leaders are very excellent, it is considered that the country is suitable for the partner of future joint research on microorganisms with Japan. Moreover, the merit in joint study is the cooperation in study of information system and culture collection. In Thailand, Japan told them that the study theme has to be made smaller toward the culture collection rich in content and the search for useful plants/bacteria. (NEDO)

  16. FY 1999 research cooperation project - the research cooperation on the protection of biodiversity and sustainable use, etc. Follow-up; 1999 nendo seibutsu tayosei hozen to jizokuteki riyo nado ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku. Follow up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The follow-up for the research cooperation for Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand was conducted to make it possible that developing countries themselves protect biological resources in the tropical area, etc. and make the sustainable use of biological resources using bio-technology. In Indonesia, the follow-up was to be made for proceeding with the joint study for 'The study on the plant utilization technology - search for useful plant ingredients' reported by Professor Koshimizu, Kinki University. In Malaysia, considering that equipment is enough installed there and research leaders are very excellent, it is considered that the country is suitable for the partner of future joint research on microorganisms with Japan. Moreover, the merit in joint study is the cooperation in study of information system and culture collection. In Thailand, Japan told them that the study theme has to be made smaller toward the culture collection rich in content and the search for useful plants/bacteria. (NEDO)

  17. Information technologies for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, George T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Electronic exchange of information is profoundly altering the ways in which we share clinical information on patients, our research mission, and the ways we teach. The three panelists each describe their experiences in information exchange. Dr. Michael Vannier is Professor of Radiology at the Mallinkrodt Institute of Radiology, and directs the image processing laboratory. He will provide insights into how radiologists have used the Internet in their specialty. Dr. Joel Goldwein, Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania, will describe his experiences in using the World Wide Web in the practice of academic radiation oncology and the award winning Oncolink Web Site. Dr. Timothy Fox Assistant, Professor of Radiation Oncology at Emory University will discuss wide area networking of multi-site departments, to coordinate center wide clinical, research and teaching activities

  18. Cooperative research and development for artificial intelligence based reactor diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Abboud, R.G.; Chasensky, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques in the form of knowledge-based Expert Systems (ESs) have been proposed to provide on-line decision-making support for plant operators during both normal and emergency conditions. However, in spite of the great interest in these advanced techniques, their application in the diagnosis of large-scale processes has not yet reached its full potential because of limitations of the knowledge base. These limitations include problems with knowledge acquisition and the use of an event-oriented approach for process diagnosis. To investigate the capabilities of this two-level hierarchical knowledge structure, Commonwealth Research Corporation (CRC) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)are collaborating on a DOE-sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project to perform feasibility studies on the proposed diagnostic system. Investigations are being performed in the construction of a physics-based plant level process diagnostic ES and the characterization of component-level fault project is to develop a computer-based system using this Al approach to assist process plant operators during off-normal plant conditions. The proposed computer-based system will use T-H signals complemented by other non-T-H signals available in the data stream to provide the process operator with the component which most likely caused the observed process disturbance. To demonstrate the scale-up feasibility of the proposed diagnostic system it is being developed for use with the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) of a nuclear power plant. This is an ongoing multi-year project and the remainder of this paper presents a mid-term status report

  19. Cooperation Relationships in Community Prevention Committees—Neglected by Qualitative Social Research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning van den Brink

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available There are very few qualitative studies about the different models of cooperation founded in the last years in the field of community crime prevention in Germany. Qualitative methods are helpful in identifying and in analyzing the conflicts in interest and the negotiation process that takes place among the local institutes. The conflict in interest makes it difficult to work together and in the worst case it can completely block cooperation. With the help of qualitative methods, the soft skills and structural requirements for successful cooperation can be identified and discussed. The aim of this article is to show that it is necessary to examine the "inner life" of cooperation especially in crime prevention committees by using qualitative methods and with more rigor than in the past. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0503202

  20. Report on field research of the Spanish Antarctic Campaign 2014/15: a cooperative international research project with the 56th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakae Kudoh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the limnological and ecological characteristics of maritime Antarctic lakes on Byers Peninsula, Livingstone Island, South Shetland Islands, West Antarctica, was conducted by the Spanish Antarctic Research Campaign during the 2014/15 season, in cooperation with the research program of the 56th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition. Limnological surveys of three hillside lakes and three lagoons near beaches were conducted under conditions of heavy snow cover. Soils and biological samples in the catchment areas of the lakes and lagoons were also collected and analyzed. The hillside lakes were covered by thick ice and snow, which maintained winter water conditions in the lakes, such as irreversible stratification, oxygen depletion of bottom water, very weak underwater light conditions, etc., even in mid-January, although swimming zooplankton were abundant. Water samples were also collected in coastal lagoons and streams, an environment in which birds and marine mammals transport materials through the aquatic system.

  1. Cooperative research with Russia for the development of VDU based simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, In Seok; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang

    2004-02-01

    From this project, we established the cooperative relations for the promotion of cooperation in the simulator development area and the instrumentation and control area with Russia. We also prepared a technical specification for the VVER-type VDU-based simulator. Thus, we provided a momentum to make inroads into the Eastern Europe and Russia. We also reviewed the strategy of exportation of simulator to Eastern Europe. The technical specification from the study is utilized the proposal for the bidding of IAEA project

  2. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-02-01

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include e-cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or formers smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the public's health; however, definitive data are lacking. AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the FDA and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Neuro-Oncology Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BTTC are experts in their respective fields. Neuro-Oncology Clinical Fellowship This is a joint program with ... can increase survival rates. Learn more... The Neuro-Oncology Branch welcomes Dr. Mark Gilbert as new Branch ...

  4. FY 2000 research cooperation project on the research cooperation for the preservation, sustainable utilization, etc. of the biological diversification. Follow-up; 2000 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo. Seibutsu tayosei hozen to zizokuteki riyo to ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku (Follow up)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of contributing to developing countries' preserving biological resources in the tropical region, etc. and making the sustainable utilization of biological resources using biotechnology, etc. possible, research cooperation for strengthening the base of international research cooperation was given, and the FY 2000 results were outlined. In this fiscal year, visits were paid to research institutes in Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia for survey of the present situation. In Indonesia, conducted were the study of information system and culture collection, study of plant utilization technology, study of utilization technology of bacteria, etc., and improvement in personnel, facilities and maintenance management power of research cooperation institutes was confirmed. In Thailand and Malaysia, conducted were the study of information system and culture collection, study of rule making of the access profit distribution to genetic resource, and management of the biological resource sampled and study of the route to the industrial utilization. Taking advantage of this project, the contract for the genetic resource search for commercial purpose was agreed between a Japanese company and a Malaysian institute. (NEDO)

  5. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative: Multidisciplinary data management from the ground up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, L. M.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    As more journals and funding organizations require data to be made available, more and more scientists are being exposed to the world of data science, metadata development, and data standards so they can ensure future funding and publishing success. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is the vehicle by which the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GOMRI) is making all data collected in this program publically available. This varied group of researchers all have different levels of experience with data management standards and protocols, thus GRIIDC has evolved to embrace the cooperative nature of our work and develop a number of tools and training materials to help ensure data managers and researchers in the GoMRI program are submitting high quality data and metadata that will be useful for years to come. GRIIDC began with a group of 8 data managers many of which had only ever managed their own data, who were then expected to manage the data of a large group of geographically distant researchers. As the program continued to evolve these data managers worked with the GRIIDC team to help identify and develop much needed resources for training and communication for themselves and the scientists they represented. This essential cooperation has developed a team of highly motivated scientists, computer programmers and data scientists who are working to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem and beyond.

  6. Nonparametric estimation for censored mixture data with application to the Cooperative Huntington's Observational Research Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanjia; Garcia, Tanya P; Ma, Yanyuan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents methods for estimating genotype-specific distributions from genetic epidemiology studies where the event times are subject to right censoring, the genotypes are not directly observed, and the data arise from a mixture of scientifically meaningful subpopulations. Examples of such studies include kin-cohort studies and quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies. Current methods for analyzing censored mixture data include two types of nonparametric maximum likelihood estimators (NPMLEs) which do not make parametric assumptions on the genotype-specific density functions. Although both NPMLEs are commonly used, we show that one is inefficient and the other inconsistent. To overcome these deficiencies, we propose three classes of consistent nonparametric estimators which do not assume parametric density models and are easy to implement. They are based on the inverse probability weighting (IPW), augmented IPW (AIPW), and nonparametric imputation (IMP). The AIPW achieves the efficiency bound without additional modeling assumptions. Extensive simulation experiments demonstrate satisfactory performance of these estimators even when the data are heavily censored. We apply these estimators to the Cooperative Huntington's Observational Research Trial (COHORT), and provide age-specific estimates of the effect of mutation in the Huntington gene on mortality using a sample of family members. The close approximation of the estimated non-carrier survival rates to that of the U.S. population indicates small ascertainment bias in the COHORT family sample. Our analyses underscore an elevated risk of death in Huntington gene mutation carriers compared to non-carriers for a wide age range, and suggest that the mutation equally affects survival rates in both genders. The estimated survival rates are useful in genetic counseling for providing guidelines on interpreting the risk of death associated with a positive genetic testing, and in facilitating future subjects at risk

  7. The Business Case for Provider Participation in Clinical Trials Research: An Application to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H.; Reiter, Kristin L.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    Background Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. Purpose This study explores whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. Methodology/Approach We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program, a longstanding federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. Findings We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis, and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. Practice Implications As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally-funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research. PMID:23044836

  8. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  9. Climate change in the Carpathian-Balkan Area. Advancing research and cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel MINDRESCU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Carpathian Mountains are considered to be one of Europe’s last “wilderness” areas, but are nevertheless under heavy pressure from human activities. Examples range from large-scale activities (e.g. metal and coal mining and ecological disasters (e.g. tailing dam failures in the Toroiaga and Baia Mare areas to cross-border pollution (e.g. Chernobyl nuclear accident. The current political thrust for economic development is accelerating the pace of industrial activities, exploitation of natural resources and tourism. Romania has just recently been integrated into the European Union and many community-based projects were initiated to evaluate problems related to climatic and anthropogenic impacts.The diversity of landforms that characterize the Carpathian region encompassing mountain ranges and large spans of adjacent lowlands and the dynamic interplay between North Atlantic, continental, and Mediterranean atmospheric circulation patterns in southeastern Europe, have resulted in extremely fragmented habitats and exceptional biodiversity (Veres and Mindrescu, 2013. However, the Carpathian Mountains remain the least studied mountain environment in Europe, as reflected for example by the low number of well-dated and high-resolution paleorecords (e.g. Buczkó et al. 2009. Rose et al. (2009 published a pollution history study from a lake in the Retezat Mountains at the western extremity of the Southern Carpathians, but no paleoenvironmental studies exist for the rest of the mountain range, despite the abundance of suitable sites (Akinyemi et al., 2013.An interdisciplinary approach to geoscience is particularly important in this vast research field (geosciences, as innovative science is increasingly stimulated by studies that cross disciplinary boundaries and thus benefit from multiple research methods and viewpoints. Grasping this concept has led us to encourage interdisciplinary cooperation by creating “meeting places” where geoscience

  10. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the current and potential uses of positron emission tomography in clinical medicine and research related to oncology. Assessment will be possible of metabolism and physiology of tumors and their effects on adjacent tissues. Specific probes are likely to be developed for target sites on tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and specific growth factors that recognize tumors. To date, most oncological applications of positron emission tomography tracers have been qualitative; in the future, quantitative metabolic measurements should aid in the evaluation of tumor biology and response to treatment

  11. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  12. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzGerald, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial.

  13. A proposed new mechanism for research and development co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Scientists in developing countries sometimes lack knowledge of recent developments, co-operation with advanced countries, and government appreciation of the importance and quality of their work. The present IAEA mechanisms like CRPs and TC projects are very helpful but do not fully meet R and D co-operation needs of these scientists. A new complementary mechanism of co-operation among the Member States is proposed that would utilize IAEA services through a suitable agreement. The IAEA could help to evaluate joint R and D proposals, to provide an example legal agreement, to monitor progress, to disseminate the results, and, in some cases, to administer joint funds. This new mechanism would be similar to ITER, but on a smaller scale, and applicable to all fields of nuclear R and D. (author)

  14. Environmental monitoring data around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant used in the cooperative research project between JAERI and CHESCIR (Ukraine). Cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Takashi; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Amano, Hikaru

    2003-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the shared data derived from the environmental monitoring by RADEK (The state Enterprise for Region Monitoring of Environment and Dosimetric Control of Ukraine) and the record of environmental characteristics derived from field observations during a research project (1992-1999) between JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and CHESCIR (Chernobyl Science and Technology Centre for International Research). The compiled data in this report are especially related to one particular research subject (Subject-3) of the project on the migration of radionuclides released into the terrestrial and aquatic environments after a nuclear accident. The present report shows the basis of published works concerning Subject-3. (author)

  15. Integration of oncology and palliative care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Kim, Yu Jung; Park, Ji Chan; Zhang, Yi; Strasser, Florian; Cherny, Nathan; Kaasa, Stein; Davis, Mellar P; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Both the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society for Medical Oncology strongly endorse integrating oncology and palliative care (PC); however, a global consensus on what constitutes integration is currently lacking. To better understand what integration entails, we conducted a systematic review to identify articles addressing the clinical, educational, research, and administrative indicators of integration. We searched Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBase between 1948 and 2013. Two researchers independently reviewed each citation for inclusion and extracted the indicators related to integration. The inter-rater agreement was high (κ = 0.96, p oncology journals (59%) and in or after 2010 (64%, p oncology and PC. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Using model fish to study the biological mechanisms of cooperative behaviour: A future for translational research concerning social anxiety disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta C; Cardoso, Sónia C; Carvalho, Tamires Dos Santos; Maximino, Caio

    2018-03-02

    Human societies demand of its composing members the development of a wide array of social tools and strategies. A notable example is human outstanding ability to cooperate with others, in all its complex forms, depicting the reality of a highly demanding social framework in which humans need to be integrated as to attain physical and mental benefits. Considering the importance of social engagement, it's not entirely unexpected that most psychiatric disorders involve some disruption of normal social behaviour, ranging from an abnormal absence to a significant increase of social functioning. It is however surprising that knowledge on these social anxiety disorders still remains so limited. Here we review the literature focusing on the social and cooperative toolbox of 3 fish model species (cleaner fishes, guppies and zebrafish) which are amenable systems to test for social disorders. We build on current knowledge based on ethological information, arising from studies on cooperative behaviour in cleanerfishes and guppies, while profiting from the advantages of the intense use of zebrafish, to create novel paradigms aiming at the major socio-cognitive modules/dimensions in fish species. This focus may enable the discovery of putative conserved endpoints which are relevant for research into social disorders. We suggest that cross-species, cross-domain, functional and genetic approaches could provide a wider array of information on the neurobiological bases of social and cooperative behaviour, crucial to understanding the neural bases of social disorders and key to finding novel avenues towards treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pilot test of cooperative learning format for training mental health researchers and black community leaders in partnership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, Danielle J; Brannock, Kristen; Breland-Noble, Alfiee; Parrish, Theodore

    2007-12-01

    To support reduction of racial disparities in mental health diagnosis and treatment, mental health researchers and black community-based organization (CBO) leaders need training on how to engage in collaborative research partnerships. In this study, we pilot tested a series of partnership skills training modules for researchers and CBO leaders in a collaborative learning format. Two different sets of three modules, designed for separate training of researchers and CBO leaders, covered considering, establishing and managing mental health research partnerships and included instructions for self-directed activities and discussions. Eight CBO leaders participated in 10 sessions, and six researchers participated in eight sessions. The effectiveness of the training content and format was evaluated through standardized observations, focus group discussions, participant evaluation forms and retrospective pre-/posttests to measure perceived gains in knowledge. Participants generally were satisfied with the training experience and gained new partnership knowledge and skills. Although the CBO leaders were more engaged in the cooperative learning process, this training format appealed to both audiences. Pilot testing demonstrated that: 1) our modules can equip researchers and CBO leaders with new partnership knowledge and skills and 2) the cooperative learning format is a well-received and suitable option for mental health research partnership training.

  18. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  19. 75 FR 36695 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement: Meetings of the Institutional Corrections Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... under this cooperative agreement will organize and coordinate all logistical details for all four... in arranging travel and lodging and in reimbursing costs in conformity with Federal guidelines. With...), an outline explaining projected costs, and the following forms: OMB Standard Form 424, Application...

  20. University Students' Perceptions of a Holistic Care Course through Cooperative Learning: Implications for Instructors and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Peter Jen Der; Pan, Gloria Huey-Ming; Lee, Ching-Yieh; Chang, Shona Shih Hua

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of cooperative learning have been advocated in a wide range of educational contexts in higher education. There is, however, rare information on the contributions of holistic education courses on college students. Using grounded theory methods, this preliminary study was to explore participants' perceptions of a holistic care course…

  1. Thoughts on the International Cooperation and Exchanges of Chinese Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiang-bin

    2009-01-01

    More prominent in the 21st century than ever are the internationalization of the competition for talents, the globalization of their mobility, and the diversity of the demand for them. This article analyzes the major features and content of the international cooperation and exchanges, and further discusses their tactics and measures in the process…

  2. African American Women Scholars and International Research: Dr. Anna Julia Cooper's Legacy of Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephanie Y.

    2009-01-01

    EIn this article, the author presents a little-known but detailed history of Black women's tradition of study abroad. Specifically, she situates Dr. Anna Julia Cooper within the landscape of historic African American students who studied in Japan, Germany, Jamaica, England, Italy, Haiti, India, West Africa, and Thailand, in addition to France. The…

  3. Research on Cooperation Strategy of Enterprises’ Quality and Safety in Food Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jining Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent and control risk factors which harm the quality and safety of the food supply chain effectively and reduce the probability of food safety incidents, this paper investigated on some problems of the upstream and downstream enterprises of the food supply chain under the three different forms of cooperation based on the neoclassic economics and game theory method. These problems include the effectiveness of the quality and safety efforts, the profits, the effect of the losses that the food safety incidents caused on the quality efforts’ efficacy, and the social welfare comparison. Meanwhile, we constructed evolutionary game model to analyze the macro and micro factors that influenced the cooperation strategy and demonstrated the effect of diversity of decision-making parameters on evolution results based on numerical simulation. By the theoretical and simulation analysis, we found that (1 the quality efforts’ efficacy, the profits, the sensitivity coefficient of the quality efforts efficiency to the losses, and the social welfare without thinking about the externality all met their maximum under the full cooperation situation; (2 strengthening supervision over the source of the food supply chain can reduce the probability of food safety incidents; (3 macro and micro environment will be the important basis for companies’ decision-making on cooperation strategy in the food supply chain.

  4. 75 FR 20003 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Wireless...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... circumstances. Specifically, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Austin, TX; and Cooper Industries, Houston, TX have... published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to section 6(b) of the Act on September 18, 2008 (73 FR 54170). The last notification was filed with the Department on December 2, 2008. A notice was published...

  5. Research priorities in cancer cachexia: The University of Rochester Cancer Center NCI Community Oncology Research Program Research Base Symposium on Cancer Cachexia and Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Richard F; Mustian, Karen M; Garcia, Jose M; Dale, William; Hayward, Reid; Roussel, Breton; Buschmann, Mary M; Caan, Bette J; Cole, Calvin L; Fleming, Fergal J; Chakkalakal, Joe V; Linehan, David C; Hezel, Aram F; Mohile, Supriya G

    2017-12-01

    Cancer cachexia remains understudied and there are no standard treatments available despite the publication of an international consensus definition and the completion of several large phase III intervention trials in the past 6 years. In September 2015, The University of Rochester Cancer Center NCORP Research Base led a Symposium on Cancer Cachexia and Sarcopenia with goals of reviewing the state of the science, identifying knowledge gaps, and formulating research priorities in cancer cachexia through active discussion and consensus. Research priorities that emerged from the discussion included the implementation of morphometrics into clinical decision making, establishing specific diagnostic criteria for the stages of cachexia, expanding patient selection in intervention trials, identifying clinically meaningful trial endpoints, and the investigation of exercise as an intervention for cancer cachexia. Standardizing how we define and measure cancer cachexia, targeting its complex biologic mechanisms, enrolling patients early in their disease course, and evaluating exercise, either alone or in combination, were proposed as initiatives that may ultimately result in the improved design of cancer cachexia therapeutic trials.

  6. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  7. Mathematical oncology 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Gandolfi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    With chapters on free boundaries, constitutive equations, stochastic dynamics, nonlinear diffusion–consumption, structured populations, and applications of optimal control theory, this volume presents the most significant recent results in the field of mathematical oncology. It highlights the work of world-class research teams, and explores how different researchers approach the same problem in various ways. Tumors are complex entities that present numerous challenges to the mathematical modeler. First and foremost, they grow. Thus their spatial mean field description involves a free boundary problem. Second, their interiors should be modeled as nontrivial porous media using constitutive equations. Third, at the end of anti-cancer therapy, a small number of malignant cells remain, making the post-treatment dynamics inherently stochastic. Fourth, the growth parameters of macroscopic tumors are non-constant, as are the parameters of anti-tumor therapies. Changes in these parameters may induce phenomena that a...

  8. Biodiesel Performance with Modern Engines. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-153

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-29

    NREL and the National Biodiesel Board (NBB) will work cooperatively to assess the effects of biodiesel blends on the performance of modern diesel engines and emissions control systems meeting increasingly strict emissions standards. This work will include research to understand the impact of biodiesel blends on the operation and durability of particle filters and NOx control sorbents/catalysts, to quantify the effect on emission control systems performance, and to understand effects on engine component durability. Work to assess the impact of biodiesel blends on real world fleet operations will be performed. Also, research to develop appropriate ASTM standards for biodiesel quality and stability will be conducted. The cooperative project will involve engine testing and fleet evaluation studies at NREL using biodiesel from a variety of sources. In addition, NREL will work with NBB to set up an Industrial Steering Committee to design the scope for the various projects and to provide technical oversight to these projects. NREL and NBB will cooperatively communicate the study results to as broad an audience as possible.

  9. Regulator and industry Co-operation on safety research: challenges and opportunities. Final report and answers to questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    A Group has been set up by the CSNI to identify and review the issues which hinder closer co-operation on research between regulators and industry, and to propose possible ways for resolving such issues while maintaining regulatory independence in decision-making. The Group has analyzed the potential advantages and disadvantages of regulator-industry collaboration in safety research and has also provided indications on how to overcome possible difficulties that can arise from such collaboration. The Group focused in particular on the issue of regulator independence, on means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry

  10. Winning together: research cooperation with China's solar industry; Gemeinsam gewinnen. Forschungskooperation mit Chinas Solarbranche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Thomas

    2012-03-15

    The German solar industry is grappling with existential problems, while in China the branch is bounding ahead with vast growth rates. This shows that it is time for a change of perspective and the abandonment of old prejudices. Chinese corporations are investing large sums in research and have an interest of their own in patent protection. In the long term price dumping would put profits at risk, which are above the global industry average among Chinese producers. Especially for German component manufacturers this is not so much a threat than it is an opportunity given the ongoing market growth. After all, research cooperation is one way of securing future business.

  11. [Research on collaborative innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China based on patent cooperation network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Chen, Xiang-dong

    2015-03-01

    In the situation of global completion, collaborative innovation is becoming increasingly important because its advantage in risk avoiding and innovation efficiency. In order to explore the model of collaborative innovation and its evolution in traditional Chinese medicine of China, the cooperation in traditional Chinese medicine patents of China from 1985 to 2013 has been analyzed by using the method of scientometrics and social network analysis. It is proved that, though the number of grated cooperative patents has increased sharply during the last thirty years, the degree of cooperation innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China is still not high. Moreover, in spite of the individual subject' s leading role in the past domestic collaborative innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China, the institutions have been more and more powerful and achieved great improvement. At last, core institutions, represented by universities have played an important role in the collaborative innovation of domestic institutions, because they are key links between many institutions and promote the transferring and diffusion of knowledge.

  12. Development of co-operation between a research institute and enterprises in the context of marketing communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Niemczyk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the article is presentation of results of recent research on the effectiveness of practical solutions used in marketing communication of the Institute of Logistics and Warehousing, leading to development of cooperation with enterprises. Thanks to the management, the appropriate information reaches definite groups of clients through multiple channels. E-marketing of scientific and research organizations is carried out mainly through web sites, web portals, social media. The analytical and research instruments in the marketing of scientific and research organisations used for measuring the effectiveness and efficacy of marketing communication include: Google Analytics, Seo Stat, Salesmanago, Advertising Value Equivalency and a range of reports. Product line and product managers are employees who are highly qualified and often possess unique competences. Ongoing research coupled with direct contact with companies results in a constant improvement in the services rendered and generation of innovative products.

  13. Barriers to communication and cooperation in addressing community impacts of radioactive releases from research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, R J; Peterson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Two instances of research facilities responding to public scrutiny will be discussed. The first concerns emissions from a tritium labeling facility operated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); the second deals with releases of plutonium from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). There are many parallels between these two cases, both of which are still ongoing. In both, the national laboratory is the acknowledged source of low-level (by regulatory standards) radioactive contamination in the community. A major purpose of both investigations is to determine the degree of the contamination and the threat it poses to public health and the environment. The examining panel or committee is similarly constituted in the two cases, including representatives from all four categories of stakeholders: decision makers; scientists and other professionals doing the analysis/assessment; environmental activist or public interest groups; and ordinary citizens (nearly everyone else not in one or more of the first three camps). Both involved community participation from the beginning. The levels of outrage over the events triggering the assessment are comparable; though discovered or appreciated only a few years ago, the release of radiation in both cases occurred or began occurring more than a decade ago. The meetings have been conducted in a similar manner, with comparable frequency, often utilizing the services of professional facilitators. In both cases, the sharply contrasting perceptions of risk commonly seen between scientists and activists were present from the beginning, though the contrast was sharper and more problematical in the Berkeley case. Yet, the Livermore case seems to be progressing towards a satisfactory resolution, while the Berkeley case remains mired in ill-will, with few tangible results after two years of effort. We perceive a wide gap in negotiation skills (at the very least), and a considerable difference in willingness to compromise

  14. Guidelines on oncologic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present issue of European Journal of Radiology is devoted to guidelines on oncologic imaging. 9 experts on imaging in suspected or evident oncologic disease have compiled a broad survey on strategies as well as techniques on oncologic imaging. The group gives advice for detecting tumours at specific tumour sites and use modern literature to emphasize their recommendations. All recommendations are short, comprehensive and authoritative. (orig./MG)

  15. [The Seintinelles: an innovative approach to promoting Community-Based Research and sustaining health democracy in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauquier, Charlotte; Pannard, Myriam; Préau, Marie

    2017-10-02

    Community-based research drives innovation in major fields of public health, HIV/AIDS being the most emblematic example (Demange, Henry & Préau, 2012), and hepatitis. However, this type of research appears to be more difficult to develop in certain specific diseases, such as cancer (Shankand, Saïas & Friboulet, 2009). This article proposes various approaches concerning current citizen mobilization in relation to cancer research, including potential new levers to the development of participative and community-based research based on the recent creation of the Seintinelles platform, designed to federate researchers and citizens concerned by the problem of cancer. This reflection will be supported by more global issues concerning health democracy.

  16. Career opportunities in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, L

    Oncology nursing offers nurses a wide range of opportunities. Nurses need a wide range of skills in order to care for patients who may have acute oncological illnesses or require palliative care. The nature of the nurse/patient relationship can be intense. Nurses generally find this enhances job satisfaction. The pressures exerted on nurses working in oncology can be immense. Oncology nursing is rewarding but very demanding and therefore the nurse has to be resourceful. Early career planning is advisable to take advantage of the opportunities that are currently available.

  17. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  18. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: DNOR has...... advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. CONCLUSION: The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality...

  19. Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program of the USNRC and its foreign partners: Program content and principal results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Eltawila, F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its associated foreign partners have been engaged in an extensive Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program. In addition to the NRC, the partners currently include Belgium, the Czech Republic, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the Community of European Countries. The purpose of this research is to provide a technical basis for decisions involved in potential severe accidents in light water reactor (LWR) power plants. The research includes relatively large-scale integral tests and smaller scale separate-effects experiments on the dominant phenomena regarding severe accident behavior in LWR power plants, the development of phenomenological models of the key phenomena involved, and the development and validation of large computer codes for use in the analysis of core behavior and of a LWR systems behavior under severe accident conditions. The research results are also used in probabilistic risk assessment for LWRS

  20. Research on Cooperative Combat for Integrated Reconnaissance-Attack-BDA of Group LAVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available LAVs (loitering air vehicles are advanced weapon systems that can loiter autonomously over a target area, detect and acquire the targets, and then attack them. In this paper, by the theory of Itô stochastic differential, a group system was analyzed. The uniqueness and continuity of the solution of the system was discussed. Afterwards the model of the system based on the state transition was established with the finite state machine automatically. At last, a search algorithm was proposed for obtaining good feasible solutions for problems. And simulation results show that model and method are effective for dealing with cooperative combat of group LAVs.

  1. FY 2000 research cooperation project on the comprehensive research cooperation for environmental technology. Research cooperation for technology for prevention of the water pollution caused by plant waste water in Vietnam; 2000 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo. Kankyo gijutsu sogo kenkyu kyoryoku (Betonamu koku kojo haisui ni yoru suishitsu osen boshi taisaku gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu hokoku)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of increasing the research capability of the Center for Consultancy, Training and Technology Transfer in Vietnam, research cooperation for prevention of water pollution was given for plants of the local industry located in the suburbs of Hanoi city. In the survey of the actual state of the water pollution in the industrial area in the suburbs of Hanoi city, the following was found out: In the area, approximately 110 companies of the production industry such as livestock feed, papermaking, dyeing, brewing, construction materials, etc. are in operation and are discharging the untreated waste water into rivers and waterways because waste water treatment facilities are not prepared yet. In this research cooperation, the following were carried out: detailed survey of specified plants and proposal for improvement, training of Vietnamese researchers/engineers in charge of water pollution prevention technology, invitation to/training at Japan of Vietnamese managers/researchers, seminar to be held on the site, equipment to be given that is needed to measure water quality. The equipment to be given is a portable multi-item water quality meter and analytical equipment such as spectrometer, atomic absorption spectrophotometer and gas chromatograph. (NEDO)

  2. The text of an African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The document reproduces the text of an African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology among African Member States that was endorsed by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1990

  3. The Text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Norway, Poland and Yugoslavia concerning Co-operative Research in Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-05-14

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Norway, Poland and Yugoslavia concerning Co-operative Research in Reactor Physics (the 'NPY Agreement') is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members.

  4. The Text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Norway, Poland and Yugoslavia concerning Co-operative Research in Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Norway, Poland and Yugoslavia concerning Co-operative Research in Reactor Physics (the 'NPY Agreement') is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members

  5. АВ0-INCOMPATIBILITY IN ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION: 15-YEARS EXPERIENCE OF R.M. GORBACHEVA MEMORIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN ONCOLOGY, HEMATOLOGY AND TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kucher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. AB0-incompatibility in different types of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT may be an additional aggravating factor for the development of immunological complications and decrease treatment efficacy.Materials and methods. From May 1999 to December 2015 in R.M. Gorbacheva Memorial Research Institute for Children Oncology, Hematology and Transplantation 1131 patients with malignancies and hereditary diseases were included to the study, which were performed 1428 allogeneic HSCT: allogeneic unrelated – 814 (57.0 %, allogeneic related – 344 (24.1 %, haploidentical – 267 (18.7 %, umbilical cord blood in 3 patients (0.2 %. Age was 0–76 years, median – 25 years.Results. In 54.6 % of cases (n = 780 АВ0-incompatibility was determined: major – 37.8 % (n = 295; minor – 45.4 % (n = 354; combined – 16.8 % (n = 131. АВ0-incompatibility in allogeneic HSCT did not influence overall survival (p = 0.56, frequency of acute graftversus-host disease (GVHD (p = 0.2. There was an increased frequency of acute GVHD in combination with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and АВ0-incompatibility (30.8 % compared with myeloablative regimens (15.3 %; p = 0.002.Conclusion. The presence of АВ0-incompatibility is not a limiting factor to perform allogeneic HSCT, however, it demands high quality prophylaxis and sophisticated transfusion therapy to prevent immune complications.

  6. Multidisciplinary quality assurance and control in oncological trials: Perspectives from European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Quality assurance (QA) programmes are one of the mainstays of clinical research and constitute the pillars on which European Organisation for Research Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) delivers multidisciplinary therapeutic progress. Changing practice treatments require solid evidence-based data, which can only be achieved if integral QA is part of the infrastructure sustaining research projects. Cancer treatment is a multimodality approach, which is often applied either in sequence and/or in combination. Each modality plays a key role in cancer control. The modalities by which QA is applied varies substantially within and across the disciplines. In addition, translational and diagnostic disciplines take an increasing role in the era of precision medicine. Building on the structuring effect of clinical research with fully integrated multidisciplinary QA programmes associated with the solutions addressing the chain of custody for biological material and data integrity as well as compliance ensure at the same time validity of clinical research output but also have a training effect on health care providers, who are more likely to apply such principles as routine. The principles of QA are therefore critical to be embedded in multidisciplinary infrastructure to guarantee therapeutic progress. These principles also provide the basis for the functioning of multidisciplinary tumour board. However, technical, operational and economic challenges which go with the implementation of such programmes require optimal know-how and the coordination of the multiple expertise and such efforts are best achieved through centralised infrastructure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Stewart M; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, Web-based materials, and professional organizations' resources. Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gero-oncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and health care systems remain under-prepared to provide high-quality care for older adults with cancer. Nurses must take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Text of an African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As of 1 September 1994, notifications of acceptance of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (see INFCIRC/377), in accordance with Article XIII thereof, had been received by the Director General from the Governments of: Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Nigeria, Madagascar, Libya, Morocco, Kenya, Sudan, Ghana, Tanzania, Mauritius, Cameroon, South Africa, Zaire, Ethiopia, Zambia, Niger. The Agreement entered into force on 4 April 1990, the date of receipt of the third notification of acceptance

  9. Physical sciences and engineering advances in life sciences and oncology a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Daniel; Gerecht, Sharon; Levine, Ross; Mallick, Parag; McCarty, Owen; Munn, Lance; Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION) by a panel of experts. It covers the status and trends of applying physical sciences and engineering principles to oncology research in leading laboratories and organizations in Europe and Asia. The book elaborates on the six topics identified by the panel that have the greatest potential to advance understanding and treatment of cancer, each covered by a chapter in the book. The study was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institute of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the NIH in the US under a cooperative agreement with the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC).

  10. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: From Regulatory T Cells to Checkpoint Monoclonal Antibodies--Immuno-oncology Advances Clinical Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dominik; Wolf, Anna Maria

    2015-06-15

    Immune escape is a hallmark of cancer development and metastasis. Regulatory T cells (Treg) are potent inhibitors of cancer immune surveillance but also prevent inflammation-driven tumorigenesis. The study by Wolf and colleagues, which was published in the February 2003 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, showed the expansion of Treg in solid cancer patients, providing a deeper understanding of cancer immune escape mechanisms that later set the stage for the development of scientific breakthroughs in cancer immunotherapy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Fiscal 2000 research cooperation project on the research cooperation on practical application of wastewater treatment technologies for global warming prevention; 2000 nendo chikyu ondanka boshi haisui shori gijutsu no jitsuyoka ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A verification plant operation study is conducted in cooperation with Thailand over wastewater treatment technologies for effectively decomposing and removing organic matters contained in foods plant wastewater and for recovering methane gas therefrom. The effort aims to transfer to Thailand anaerobic wastewater treatment technologies for recovering methane gas. For the 3-year research that began in fiscal 1998, a verification plant was installed at Cho Heng Rice Vermicell Factory Co., Ltd., located 30 kilometers west of Bangkok City. In the first half of verification plant related operation studies for fiscal 2000, the plant was kept in operation for the determination of the optimum operating conditions, and operation/maintenance technologies were transferred to Thailand. In the second half, plant operation was studied for by-passing the ultimate sedimentation tank of the factory. The results of activities are summarized into seven chapters of (1) outline of research cooperation project implementation, (2) outline of project implementation in fiscal 2000, (3) verification plant operation study, (4) automatic monitoring system construction, (5) technology disseminating activities, (6) study of support in Japan, and (7) subjects for future discussion. (NEDO)

  12. Heterogeneous Optimization Framework: Reproducible Preprocessing of Multi-Spectral Clinical MRI for Neuro-Oncology Imaging Research

    OpenAIRE

    Milchenko, Mikhail; Snyder, Abraham Z.; LaMontagne, Pamela; Shimony, Joshua S; Benzinger, Tammie L.; Fouke, Sarah Jost; Marcus, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research often relies on clinically acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets that can originate from multiple institutions. Such datasets are characterized by high heterogeneity of modalities and variability of sequence parameters. This heterogeneity complicates the automation of image processing tasks such as spatial co-registration and physiological or functional image analysis.

  13. To cooperate or not to cooperate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Josepha Ivanka

    To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results of a research project to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels, so called "qanats", in Syria. Communities all over the world are using traditional technologies to extract drinkingwater, irrigate their lands and feed...... their livestock. But these often sustainable and ancient ways to make use of groundwater are in rapid decline worldwide. A research project started in 1999 to study the rehabilitation of 1500-year old water tunnels called "qanats"in Syria. To Cooperate or not to Cooperate...? discusses results and outcomes...

  14. Basic radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyzadeoglu, M. M.; Ebruli, C.

    2008-01-01

    Basic Radiation Oncology is an all-in-one book. It is an up-to-date bedside oriented book integrating the radiation physics, radiobiology and clinical radiation oncology. It includes the essentials of all aspects of radiation oncology with more than 300 practical illustrations, black and white and color figures. The layout and presentation is very practical and enriched with many pearl boxes. Key studies particularly randomized ones are also included at the end of each clinical chapter. Basic knowledge of all high-tech radiation teletherapy units such as tomotherapy, cyberknife, and proton therapy are also given. The first 2 sections review concepts that are crucial in radiation physics and radiobiology. The remaining 11 chapters describe treatment regimens for main cancer sites and tumor types. Basic Radiation Oncology will greatly help meeting the needs for a practical and bedside oriented oncology book for residents, fellows, and clinicians of Radiation, Medical and Surgical Oncology as well as medical students, physicians and medical physicists interested in Clinical Oncology. English Edition of the book Temel Radyasyon Onkolojisi is being published by Springer Heidelberg this year with updated 2009 AJCC Staging as Basic Radiation Oncology

  15. Cooperative games and network structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musegaas, Marieke

    2017-01-01

    This thesis covers various research topics involving cooperative game theory, a mathematical tool to analyze the cooperative behavior within a group of players. The focus is mainly on interrelations between operations research and cooperative game theory by analyzing specific types of cooperative

  16. Maximizing industry benefit through cooperation between federal, state and private-sector floricultural research efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    he USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group was established to provide a federally funded research emphasis on greenhouse crop production. It has focused on broad production issues (nutrition, water management, and energy conservation) by coordinating research between in-house researchers, Uni...

  17. What, why, and when we image: considerations for diagnostic imaging and clinical research in the Children's Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaman, Gregory H.

    2009-01-01

    Success in improving treatment outcomes in childhood cancer has been achieved almost exclusively through multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical and applied research over several decades. While biologically rational as well as empirical approaches have led to combination chemotherapy and multimodality approaches to therapy, which have given rise to evidence-based practice standards, similar scientific rigor has not always been as evidently applied to modalities utilized to assess initial disease burden and, more important, response to investigational approaches to therapy. As the empirical approach to therapeutic advances has likely maximized its benefit, future progress will require translation of biologic discovery most notably from the areas of genomics and proteomics. Hence, attempts to improve efficacy of therapy will require a parallel effort to minimize collateral damage of future therapeutic approaches, and such a parallel approach will mandate the continued dependence on advances in diagnostic imaging for improvements in staging methodologies to best define risk groups for risk-adjusted therapy. In addition, anatomic and functional assessment of response and surveillance for disease recurrence will require improved understanding of the biology as well as natural history of individual diseases, which one hopes will better inform investigators in designing trials. Clinical and research expertise is urgently needed in the selection of specific imaging studies and frequencies that best assess a response as well as to define disease-free intervals. Despite limited resources to develop sufficient infrastructure, emphasis on enabling early assessment of new technology to minimize risks associated with treatment advances and with those critical diagnostic and staging procedures must continue to be a focus of pediatric cancer clinical research. (orig.)

  18. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported significantly higher concerns about diet (44.3 vs. 25.4 %,) and exercise (40.4 vs. 19.7 %,) during the course of treatment. Compared to whites, blacks also had significantly higher concern about treatment-related issues (white vs. black mean, 25.52 vs. 31.78), self-image issues (7.03 vs. 8.60), family-related issues (10.44 vs. 12.84), and financial concerns (6.42 vs. 8.90, all p < 0.05). Blacks, compared to whites, also had significantly greater post-treatment information needs regarding follow-up tests (8.17 vs. 9.44), stress management (4.12 vs. 4.89), and handling stigma after cancer treatment (4.21 vs. 4.89) [all p < 0.05]. Pre-treatment concerns and post-treatment information needs differed by race, with black patients reporting greater information needs and concerns. In clinical practice, tailored approaches may work particularly well in addressing the needs and concerns of black patients.

  19. Building visual identity of scientific and research units and the role of visualization in cooperation with business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfreda Kamińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for commercialization of scientific research leads to the necessity of changing the orientation of scientific-research units to marketing orientation, which is characterized by, among others, conducting research aimed at learning the clients’ needs and building better communication with the recipients. What is an important element of a unit’s marketing communication is its visual identity system, which the recipients use to build their opinion and their picture of the unit. The goal of this article is an attempt to define the key rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions, as well as presenting the role of visualization in their cooperation with business. In the article the notions of image, identity, corporate identity and visual identity are subject to analysis. The article also presents the significance of visualization in the functioning of research and scientific units, elements of visual identity system and the rules of designing visual identity of scientific and research institutions. An analysis of chosen research-scientific units was carried out with regard to visualization.

  20. Report for fiscal 1995 on simple operation type CAD/CAM system development through international cooperation. Cooperation for joint researches; 1995 nendo 'kan'i sosagata denshi sekkei seisan shien system no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku' ni kansuru hokokusho. Kyodo kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Reported herein are the joint research results of the project (manufacturing technology supported by advanced and integrated information system through international cooperation (MATIC)), implemented in China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand by Center of International Cooperation for Computerization, commissioned by NEDO. Japan invited researchers from each country to explain the research themes, and discussed construction of the systems in each country. Japanese experts visited the research institutes and cooperative works in these countries, to discuss the research cooperation themes, and survey the conditions and technical levels of these research institutes, and information infrastructures. The oversea researchers were invited to Japan for the MATIC international seminar, discussions for research cooperation themes, and MATIC cooperation promotion committee. Textile and apparel researchers were also invited from China. Japanese experts visited China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand for the on-the-spot surveys for each working group. (NEDO)

  1. Report for fiscal 1995 on simple operation type CAD/CAM system development through international cooperation. Cooperation for joint researches; 1995 nendo 'kan'i sosagata denshi sekkei seisan shien system no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku' ni kansuru hokokusho. Kyodo kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Reported herein are the joint research results of the project (manufacturing technology supported by advanced and integrated information system through international cooperation (MATIC)), implemented in China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand by Center of International Cooperation for Computerization, commissioned by NEDO. Japan invited researchers from each country to explain the research themes, and discussed construction of the systems in each country. Japanese experts visited the research institutes and cooperative works in these countries, to discuss the research cooperation themes, and survey the conditions and technical levels of these research institutes, and information infrastructures. The oversea researchers were invited to Japan for the MATIC international seminar, discussions for research cooperation themes, and MATIC cooperation promotion committee. Textile and apparel researchers were also invited from China. Japanese experts visited China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand for the on-the-spot surveys for each working group. (NEDO)

  2. Setting and meeting priorities in Indigenous health research in Australia and its application in the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Johanna M; Rowley, Kevin G; Anderson, Ian Ps

    2009-11-20

    Priority setting is about making decisions. Key issues faced during priority setting processes include identifying who makes these decisions, who sets the criteria, and who benefits. The paper reviews the literature and history around priority setting in research, particularly in Aboriginal health research. We explore these issues through a case study of the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health (CRCAH)'s experience in setting and meeting priorities.Historically, researchers have made decisions about what research gets done. Pressures of growing competition for research funds and an increased public interest in research have led to demands that appropriate consultation with stakeholders is conducted and that research is of benefit to the wider society. Within Australian Aboriginal communities, these demands extend to Aboriginal control of research to ensure that Aboriginal priorities are met.In response to these demands, research priorities are usually agreed in consultation with stakeholders at an institutional level and researchers are asked to develop relevant proposals at a project level. The CRCAH's experience in funding rounds was that scientific merit was given more weight than stakeholders' priorities and did not necessarily result in research that met these priorities. After reviewing these processes in 2004, the CRCAH identified a new facilitated development approach. In this revised approach, the setting of institutional priorities is integrated with the development of projects in a way that ensures the research reflects stakeholder priorities.This process puts emphasis on identifying projects that reflect priorities prior to developing the quality of the research, rather than assessing the relevance to priorities and quality concurrently. Part of the CRCAH approach is the employment of Program Managers who ensure that stakeholder priorities are met in the development of research projects. This has enabled researchers and stakeholders to come

  3. Setting and meeting priorities in Indigenous health research in Australia and its application in the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Ian PS

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Priority setting is about making decisions. Key issues faced during priority setting processes include identifying who makes these decisions, who sets the criteria, and who benefits. The paper reviews the literature and history around priority setting in research, particularly in Aboriginal health research. We explore these issues through a case study of the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health (CRCAH's experience in setting and meeting priorities. Historically, researchers have made decisions about what research gets done. Pressures of growing competition for research funds and an increased public interest in research have led to demands that appropriate consultation with stakeholders is conducted and that research is of benefit to the wider society. Within Australian Aboriginal communities, these demands extend to Aboriginal control of research to ensure that Aboriginal priorities are met. In response to these demands, research priorities are usually agreed in consultation with stakeholders at an institutional level and researchers are asked to develop relevant proposals at a project level. The CRCAH's experience in funding rounds was that scientific merit was given more weight than stakeholders' priorities and did not necessarily result in research that met these priorities. After reviewing these processes in 2004, the CRCAH identified a new facilitated development approach. In this revised approach, the setting of institutional priorities is integrated with the development of projects in a way that ensures the research reflects stakeholder priorities. This process puts emphasis on identifying projects that reflect priorities prior to developing the quality of the research, rather than assessing the relevance to priorities and quality concurrently. Part of the CRCAH approach is the employment of Program Managers who ensure that stakeholder priorities are met in the development of research projects. This has enabled

  4. Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Burnout and exhaustion is a frequent problem in oncology nursing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the aspects of oncology nurses about their profession in order to enhance the standards of oncology nursing. Materials and Methods: This survey was conducted with 70 oncology nurses working at ...

  5. 78 FR 35323 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Gender-Informed Research (Women): Enhanced Approaches to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ...--Gender-Informed Research (Women): Enhanced Approaches to Project Development AGENCY: National Institute... deliverables from this solicitation will be based on research and theory and are meant to provide a medium to...- Informed Research (Women): Enhanced Approaches to Project Development.'' The package must include: a cover...

  6. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  7. Co-Operative Advances in Behavioral Health and Performance Research and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderArk, Stephen T.; Leveton, Lauren B.

    2011-01-01

    In organizations that engage in both operations and applied research, with operational needs guiding research questions and research informing improved operations, the ideal goal is a synergy of ideas and information. In reality, this ideal synergy is often lacking. Real-time operational needs driving day-to-day decisions, lack of communication, lag time in getting research advances plugged into operations can cause both areas to suffer from this gap between operations and research. At Johnson Space Center, the Behavior Health and Performance group (BHP) strives to bridge this gap by following a Human Research Program framework: Expectations of future operational needs identify the knowledge gaps; the gaps in turn guide research leading to a product that is transitioned into operations. Thus, the direction those of us in research take is in direct response to current and future needs of operations. Likewise, those of us in operations actively seek knowledge that is supported by evidence-based research. We make an ongoing effort to communicate across the research and operations gap by working closely with each other and making a conscious effort to keep each other informed. The objective of the proposed panel discussion is to demonstrate through the following presentations the results of a successful collaboration between research and operations and to provide ASMA members with more practical knowledge and strategies for building these bridges to serve our field of practice well. The panel will consist of six presenters from BHP operations, internal BHP research, and external research instigated by BHP who together represent the entire BHP Research Transition to Operations Framework

  8. Report on Japan/Republic of Kazakhstan cooperative research project (March, 1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Development was agreed of highly efficient mineral resources extraction and treatment technology as a cooperative R and D project between Japan and Kazakhstan in March, 1995. This paper explains the 1996 results. Kazakhstan is a mineral resources country and has a number of base metal mines. However, as the result of production/treatment processes, a lot of by-products are produced consisting of low grade ores and tailings. These by-products contain a variety of metals. If a process is developed for extracting metals from the by-products, it will contribute to the prevention of environmental pollution caused by mining activities as well as increasing metal production in Kazakhstan. The development begun in 1995 will continue until fiscal 2000. The report describes a sampling method for test specimens, and chemical/mineralogical analysis. Concerning leaching tests for low grade ore, methods are explained covering Cu maximum, column, and flotation froth leaching tests. Also described are leaching tests for tailings. A flotation test and bacteria leaching test are mentioned in addition. The report further refers to the basic study of solvent extraction and treatment of waste water. (NEDO)

  9. Research on Multiaircraft Cooperative Suppression Interference Array Based on an Improved Multiobjective Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of multiaircraft cooperative suppression interference array (MACSIA against the enemy air defense radar network in electronic warfare mission planning, firstly, the concept of route planning security zone is proposed and the solution to get the minimum width of security zone based on mathematical morphology is put forward. Secondly, the minimum width of security zone and the sum of the distance between each jamming aircraft and the center of radar network are regarded as objective function, and the multiobjective optimization model of MACSIA is built, and then an improved multiobjective particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to solve the model. The decomposition mechanism is adopted and the proportional distribution is used to maintain diversity of the new found nondominated solutions. Finally, the Pareto optimal solutions are analyzed by simulation, and the optimal MACSIA schemes of each jamming aircraft suppression against the enemy air defense radar network are obtained and verify that the built multiobjective optimization model is corrected. It also shows that the improved multiobjective particle swarm optimization algorithm for solving the problem of MACSIA is feasible and effective.

  10. The Continuing Growth of Global Cooperation Networks in Research: A Conundrum for National Governments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Wagner

    Full Text Available Global collaboration continues to grow as a share of all scientific cooperation, measured as coauthorships of peer-reviewed, published papers. The percent of all scientific papers that are internationally coauthored has more than doubled in 20 years, and they account for all the growth in output among the scientifically advanced countries. Emerging countries, particularly China, have increased their participation in global science, in part by doubling their spending on R&D; they are increasingly likely to appear as partners on internationally coauthored scientific papers. Given the growth of connections at the international level, it is helpful to examine the phenomenon as a communications network and to consider the network as a new organization on the world stage that adds to and complements national systems. When examined as interconnections across the globe over two decades, a global network has grown denser but not more clustered, meaning there are many more connections but they are not grouping into exclusive 'cliques'. This suggests that power relationships are not reproducing those of the political system. The network has features an open system, attracting productive scientists to participate in international projects. National governments could gain efficiencies and influence by developing policies and strategies designed to maximize network benefits-a model different from those designed for national systems.

  11. Radiation processing of silk protein (Bilateral research cooperation OAEP and JAERI. December 1998 - December 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Thailand's production of silk, about 1,200 ton per year, also gives about 10% of silk waste which is expected to be recycled into new material (non-textile application) and to avoid environmental pollution. For this purpose, cooperative program 'radiation processing of silk protein' was conducted between OAEP (Thailand) and JAERI. Among the results already obtained are: radiation degradation of silk protein (fibroin) with gamma rays at 160 kGy, production of fine silk milled powder (<90 microns) by electron beam irradiation at 250-1000 kGy (dry method) using electron accelerator (1 MeV, 1 mA), use of antioxidant effect of silk protein on lipid peroxidation and antibacterial activity of irradiated silk protein powder, and wound dressing hydrogel mixed with silk protein and use of antibacterial activity of cross-linked silk protein/PVA hydrogel. Other topics of interest are gamma irradiation of anionic natural polymer solution for use as latex protein scavenger and gamma radiation degradation of chitosan for use as plant growth promoter and fungicide. (S. Ohno)

  12. Neuro-oncology: a selected review of ASCO 2016 abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-10-01

    ASCO 2016, 29 May-2 June 2016, Chicago, IL, USA The largest annual clinical oncology conference the American Society of Clinical Oncology is held in the USA and gives researchers and other key opinion leaders the opportunity to present new cancer clinical trials and research data. The CNS tumors section of the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2016 covered various aspects of neuro-oncology including metastatic CNS diseases and primary brain tumors, presented via posters, oral talks and over 100 abstracts. This brief review selectively highlights presentations from this meeting in an organizational manner that reflects clinically relevant aspects of a large and multifaceted meeting.

  13. The Delta Cooperative Model: a Dynamic and Innovative Team-Work Activity to Develop Research Skills in Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rios-Velazquez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i student’s perception of the workshops’ effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student’s knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83%and 75%respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology.

  14. The Delta Cooperative Model: a Dynamic and Innovative Team-Work Activity to Develop Research Skills in Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Baez-Santos

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i student’s perception of the workshops’ effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student’s knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83%and 75%respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology.

  15. Research Progress in Oncology. Highlighting and Exploiting the Roles of Several Strategic Proteins in Understanding Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odiba Arome S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although almost all biological processes are mediated by a variety of proteins, it is important to bring to spotlight recent experimental and clinical research advances that had their focus on highlighting and taking advantage of the roles of several strategic proteins in order to gain more understanding of cancer biology. Proteins have a major stake in the initiation, progression, sustenance and completion of cellular processes, and have also demonstrated their vital roles in cancer processes. The characteristic functions of proteins and modified proteins have been utilized in the understanding and treatment of cancer. Recent insights in such roles and applications include linker histone H1.2 in the compaction of chromatin and gene silencing via the recognition of H3K27me3; c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos in the promotion of aggressive tumour phenotypes in tongue cancer; the use of sodium channelinhibiting agents targeting the transmembrane protein in breast, colon and prostate cancer; SET-mediated activities; protein interaction networks in glioma; Gpnmb significance as a biomarker; β-carbolines inhibition on Wnt/β-catenin signaling; p53 mutants co-opt chromatin pathways; Bone morphogenetic protein 4 as regulator of the behaviors of cancer cell; Brain-Expressed X-linked (BEX proteins in human cancers; targeting CDK4/6 including protein kinases to make a reversal of multidrug resistance in sarcoma. In-depth knowledge of Proteomics will go a long way in helping us uncover a lot more strategies that will help us in the long fight against cancer.

  16. Efficacy of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy at Tabriz Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Iran in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shabanlui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy is an important treatment for cancer, yet some of its side effects are serious and painful. Many patients with cancer suffer from psychiatric disorders that most likely result from therapeutic drugs or mental strategies to cope with their illness. Progressive muscle relaxation is one of the cost effective, self-help methods that promotes mental health in healthy participants. Thisstudy aims to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.Methods: This was a randomized, clinical study that enrolled 60 patients who received inpatient chemotherapy in the Tabriz Hematology and Oncology Research Center in 2010. We divided patients into two groups, intervention and control. All participants signed written formal consents and completed the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale questionnaires. Intervention group participants were trained inprogressive muscle relaxation in groups of 3-6 to enable participants to perform this technique when they were alone in the hospital and after discharge, two to three times each day. After one and three months, questionnaires were completed again by both groups and the results compared. 17th version of SPSS software was used fordata analysis.Results: After data analysis, most participants were satisfied with learning and experiencing this technique. There was no significant difference between scales in the case and control groups after one month (P>0.05. However after three months, anxiety and depression considerably improved in patients who underwent progressive muscle relaxation training (P<0.05.Conclusion: Progressive muscle relaxation training can improve anxietyand depression in cancer patients.

  17. Development of reconstitution technique of irradiated specimens. 3. Report for FY 1995 and FY 1996 on JAERI-IHI cooperated research program (joint research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yutaka; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Onizawa, Kunio; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakamura, Terumi; Kaihara, Shoichiro; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sato, Akira

    1998-10-01

    The cooperated research between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. on the development of reconstitution technique of irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance specimens has been performed from FY 1993. In FY 1993-1994, the method of surface activated joining (SAJ) was applied to reconstitution of Charpy impact specimens. Some verification tests using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel plate materials have shown that SAJ is feasible for a reconstitution technique, in particular, owing to low joining temperature. The present paper reports the results of the cooperated research performed in FY 1995-1996. To improve the quality of the SAJ, the configuration of the end tab surface to be joined with the insert material was modified. The torque measured during joining was also introduced in joining parameters. A nondestructive inspection, temperature measurements in the specimens during joining were performed. The effect of joining on Charpy impact properties was discussed. For practical application of the technique to irradiated specimens, we confirmed that the impact specimens with joining interface gave rise to no failure at the joining position during impact test after neutron irradiation. (author)

  18. Conference Report: Project Journal of Discourse Research and the Prospects of Disciplinary, Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Matzner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A symposium was held to mark the first anniversary of Journal of Discourse Research (ZfD, at which the status of German discourse research was discussed. Since its inception, German-language discourse research has been characterized by connections, challenges and limitations of interdisciplinarity in terms of both practical research and methodology. In four lectures and two panel discussions, participants explored specific issues of interdisciplinarity. Taking into account the difficult process of institutionalization of discourse research in the 1990s, it can be determined that a diverse and highly productive research environment has been created that marks a specific style of interdisciplinary thinking. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs140390

  19. Psychosocial Issues in Pediatric Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology, a relatively new discipline, is a multidisciplinary application of the behavioral and social sciences, and pediatric psychosocial oncology is an emerging subspecialty within the domain of psychosocial oncology. This review presents a brief overview of some of the major clinical issues surrounding pediatric psychosocial oncology. PMID:23049457

  20. Metabolic complications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, a lot of space and time is devoted to the therapy of oncologic diseases itself. To reach the good therapy results, complex care of the oncologic patient is needed. Management of complications linked with the disease itself and management of complications emerged after administration of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or targeted therapy, plays a significant role. In addition to infectious, hematological, neurological, cardiac or other complications, metabolic complications are relatively extensive and serious. One of the most frequent metabolic complications in oncology is tumor lysis syndrome, hyperuricemia, hypercalcaemia and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. (author)

  1. Generalized report on the research cooperation promoting project. Research cooperation related to the mine waste water treatment technology utilizing biotechnology; Kenkyu kyoryoku suishin jigyo sokatsu hokokusho. Bio riyo ni yoru kohaisui shori gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper is a generalized report in relation with the mine waste water treatment technology utilizing biotechnology, from among the promotion projects for research cooperation with China. Ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}), which precipitates at low pH, is produced by utilizing bacteria which derives energy from oxidizing ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) in the waste water, and the iron is precipitated and removed by using low-cost calcium carbonate as a neutralizing agent. Joint researches and developments have been carried out on selection of optimal kinds of bacteria, cultivation of bacteria oxidizing iron at high efficiency, optimal removal system of heavy metals in mine waste water, and recovery of useful resources. Japanese engineers were sent to sites in China, Chinese researchers were received in Japan, and pilot plants were operated and studied. For the purpose of proliferating and enlightening the result of the project, a seminar was held in Beijing in February 1998. In order for the achievements derived up to fiscal 1998 to be used in diverse fields, fiscal 1999 will carry out follow-ups, including assistance, for the voluntary researches performed by China. The follow-ups will also include confirmation on the state of testing the iron oxidizing bacteria technology, technical guidance, and analyses and discussions on the data. (NEDO)

  2. Research cooperation project in fiscal 1999. Research cooperation on a technology to treat well waste water by utilizing biomass (follow-up); 1999 nendo bio riyo ni yoru kohaisui shori gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku (follow up)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The research cooperation project on a technology to treat well waste water by utilizing biomass has used as the object the well waste water from the north mine in the Wu Shan mine in Jiangxi Province. The research included surveys on properties of the well waste water from the subject mine by means of the site survey, discussions on treatment conditions based on studies in Japan, and discussions on factors for designing a full size facility as a result of pilot plant operation research. The Japanese side has transported to Beijing the bench-scale testing equipment used for the studies in Japan (an oxidation and neutralization testing equipment and a copper recovery testing equipment). In the present follow-up project, supports were provided to the research and development activities performed voluntarily by the Chinese side by using the above bench-scale testing equipment through guiding the tests at the site and supplying consumables. Certain bacteria have capability to oxidize ferrous ions in the mine well waste water into ferric ions. Utilizing these bacteria results in sedimentation of iron oxides in lower pH zones than in the conventional method, making removal of heavy metals from the well waste water possible. As a result, such effects may be expected as reduction in chemical cost, and reduction of quantity of the produced sediments. (NEDO)

  3. Tumor Slice Culture: A New Avatar in Personalized Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0149 TITLE: Tumor Slice Culture: A New Avatar in Personalized Oncology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Raymond Yeung...CONTRACT NUMBER Tumor Slice Culture: A New Avatar in Personalized Oncology 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...10 Annual Report 2017: Tumor Slice Culture: A new avatar for personalized oncology 1. INTRODUCTION: The goal of this research is to advance our

  4. 76 FR 6497 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Industrial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ..., 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Industrial Nacromolecular Crystallography Association (``INCA... activity of the group research project. Membership in this group research project remains open, and INCA..., INCA filed its original notification pursuant to Section 6(a) of the Act. The Department of Justice...

  5. Cooperative strategies European perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Killing, J Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cooperative Strategies: European Perspectives is one of three geographically targeted volumes in which the contributors present the most current research on topics such as advances in theories of cooperative strategies, the formation of cooperative alliances, the dynamics of partner relationships, and the role of information and knowledge in cooperative alliances. Blending conceptual insights with empirical analyses, the contributors highlight commonalities and differences across national, cultural, and trade zones. The chapters in this volume are anchored in a wide set of theoretical approaches, conceptual frameworks, and models, illustrating how rich the area of cooperative strategies is for scholarly inquiry.

  6. 78 FR 15953 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Regulatory Research Related to Food and Drug Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... enacted in 1992, has provided FDA with the resources and process enhancements to enable a transformation... performance goals and procedures outlined within PDUFA V will require a high degree of leadership, research...

  7. The International Stripa Project: Technology transfer from cooperation in scientific and technological research on nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levich, R.A.; Ferrigan, P.M.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency of the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA) sponsors the International Stripa Project. The objectives of the Stripa Project are to develop techniques for characterizing sites located deep in rock formations that are potentially suitable for the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and to evaluate particular engineering design considerations that could enhance the long-term safety of a high-level radioactive waste repository in a geologic medium. The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize the research conducted at Stripa and discuss the ways in which the technology developed for the Stripa Project has been and will be transfered to the United States Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program's Yucca Mountain Project. 3 refs., 2 figs

  8. Research and development of methods/utilities and rules for managing cooperation for performance improvement in government offices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, H.A.

    1993-03-01

    Purpose is to help managers approach their responsibilities proactively, so that they can anticipate problems and take actions to alleviate or eliminate those problems. Continuous performance improvement, the philosophy behind total quality management, requires working cooperatively to do a little better each day. The most effective tools are working through a closed set of 9 methods: setting expectations, charting, defining indicators and standards, collecting and logging data, converting data to information, organizing and presenting information, reviewing status and progress, self-management, and appraising. In addition, there are 8 rules: focus on what you can do, supply physical evidence of progress, pay attention to detail, inspect (don't expect), review progress routinely and frequently, face ''success/fail'' squarely, communicate crisply, and conduct honest, open appraisals. Scope and plans of the draft research plan (study areas) are described.

  9. Report of Research Cooperation Sub-Committee 46 on research and development of methods for inelastic (EPICC: Elastic-PlastIC-Creep) structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshiaki

    1977-05-01

    This report succeeds the preceding one on ''Verification and Qualification of Nonlinear Structural Analysis Computer Program''. PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) decided to sponsor an extended research project on inelastic structural analysis for a period spanning September, 1976 to May, 1978. Responding to PNC proposal, RC Sub-Committee 46 was formed in Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and plunged into the cooperative work from October, 1976. Besides the verification and/or qualification of available general purpose computer programs which were the major objectives of previous contract, the Committee executed the research on the topics categorized into the following three fields of interests: 1. Material data for use in elastic analysis, 2. Inelastic analysis procedure and computer program verification, 3. Design code and processing of computer solutions. This report summarizes the efforts during the first year of the Sub-Committee and consists of three parts each corresponding to the research topics stated above. Part I. Inelastic constitutive equations for materials under high temperature service conditions Part II. EPICC standard benchmark test problem and solutions Part III. Examination of postprocessors and development Although the research is still in the intermediate stage, the features of research being actively under way are 1. Evaluative review and nationwide collection of material data, recommendation of tentative constitutive equations for elastic-plastic and creep analyses of benchmark test problem, 2. Revision and augmentation of EPICC standard benchmark test problem and competitive and/or cooperative execution of solutions, 3. Review of existing prototypical post processors, and development of a processor for piping design. (author)

  10. Report on the research cooperation promoting project in fiscal 1998. Research cooperation related to the mine waste water treatment technology utilizing biomass; 1998 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku suishin jigyo hokokusho. Bio riyo ni yoru kohaisui shori gijutsu ni kansuru kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes the achievement in relation with the mine waste water treatment technology utilizing biomass, from among the promotion projects for research cooperation with China. Waste water is converted into ferric iron (Fe{sup 3+}), which precipitates at low pH, by utilizing iron oxidizing bacteria which use ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}) in the waste water as the energy source, and is precipitated and removed by using low-cost calcium carbonate as a neutralizing agent. Fiscal 1998 has performed eight site surveys with 47 persons in total. The main survey items are the study and guidance of pilot plant operation and the survey on measures to prevent occurrence of contamination by heavy metals in Wushan Mine. Additional site surveys were made at Dexing Mine and Yinshan Lead/Zinc Mine. Continued from fiscal 1997, consumables required for the pilot plant were purchased, and items of the bench-scale testing equipment used by Japan for domestic researches (an oxidation and neutralization testing equipment and a copper recovering and testing equipment) were transported to China. The operation research data of the pilot plant were put in order and analyzed. This paper summarizes the concept design of the shaft waste water treatment facilities for the north mine in Wushan Mine, and the surveys on measures for heavy metal contamination sources. (NEDO)

  11. Nordic co-operation in the field of nuclear safety research, thoughts on the future NKS program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, Jukka

    1998-01-01

    Some general objectives for the Nordic co-operation stay for the foreseeable future. Maybe the most important of the objectives is building and maintaining a strong Nordic network between experts who work in this area. This network must be extended to the working level and to the young generation. Younger people must have similar opportunities to the co-operation as the older generation which is now in leading positions, and which to day has many other mutual contacts besides the Nordic frame. Another important objective is to build common Nordic views and to promote together our ideas in wider circles such as EU. Together we would be more influential than separately. In some fields, especially in the radioecology and emergency planning, joining the forces and sharing the common work in a co-ordinated manner could increase productivity and help to avoid overlapping work. The emphasis should be in production, communication, and systematic presentation of the research results, rather than making joint policy or common recommendations. Although the Nordic technology and the Nordic culture have similarities as compared with the rest of the world, there are differences which do not permit easy adoption of common rules and regulations. For instance, the relations between nuclear industry and nuclear regulators are not similar in Sweden and in Finland, and the entire regulatory approach is based on different philosophies. The regulatory organisations of each Nordic country are arranged and attached to the national government structure in a different way. Attempts towards harmonisation should be continued, but it is not the task of the research community and certainly not the objective of the NKS. (EG)

  12. International research co-operation in the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This 26th report by the Swiss Federal Office for Education and Science presents a review of work done in Swiss institutes in 2003 as part of international research into thermonuclear fusion. A broad outline of the project and of its significance within the wider field of thermonuclear fusion research is given. This is followed by a review of the significant events in the world of fusion research, with emphasis placed on ITER and on the EURATOM fusion programme. A further chapter summarises events in Switzerland in 2003 and the report closes with a list of contacts for more information. Three annexes provide information on the current situation in fusion research, as well as scientific and technical highlights of the work performed in 2003 at the Plasma Physics Research Centre CRPP at the Federal Institute of Technology EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. Annex 3 reports on results obtained at the Physics Institute of the University of Basle. The annexes are for the benefit of the technically and scientifically versed reader, and brief summaries of them are given in the main body of the report

  13. International research co-operation in the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conscience, J.-F.

    2003-01-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Education and Science presents a review of activities carried out in 2002 within the framework of the International Experimental Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) project that involves contributions from Canada, Japan, the Russian Federation and the European Union. Further agreements on the development of a fusion reactor with other countries, including Switzerland, the USA and China, are mentioned. The first chapter describes the current state of research on electricity production using nuclear fusion and discusses feasibility, safety, environmental, fuel supply and economic aspects. A second chapter reviews global efforts in the fusion area, including ITER and EURATOM projects and the activities running under the European Fusion Development Agreement EFDA and the JET Implementing Agreement. Finally, a third chapter deals with fusion research activities in Switzerland and the contributions made to international research by Swiss universities and institutes

  14. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1990-- April 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1992-02-15

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Liquefaction Science (CFFLS) is currently engaged in a three year contract with the US Department of Energy investigating a range of research topics dealing with direct coal liquefaction. This report summarizes the results of this program in its second year, from May 1, 1990 to April 30, 1991. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction, exploratory research on coal conversion, novel coal liquefaction concepts, and novel catalysts for coal liquefaction.

  15. Exploring the Eastern United States Continental Shelf with the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickson, D.; Pomponi, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology (CIOERT) serves NOAA priorities in three theme areas: exploring the eastern U.S. continental shelf, improving the understanding of coral and sponge ecosystems, and developing advanced underwater technologies. CIOERT focuses on the exploration and research of ecosystems and habitats along frontier regions of the eastern U.S. continental shelf that are of economic, scientific, or cultural importance or of natural hazards concern. One particular focus is supporting ocean exploration and research through the use of advanced underwater technologies and techniques in order to improve the understanding of vulnerable deep and shallow coral and sponge ecosystems. CIOERT expands the scope and efficiency of exploration and research by developing, testing, and applying new and/or innovative uses of existing technologies to ocean exploration and research activities. In addition, CIOERT is dedicated to expanding ocean literacy and building NOAA's technical and scientific workforce through hands-on, at-sea experiences. A recent CIOERT cruise characterized Gulf of Mexico mesophotic and deepwater reef ecosystems off the west Florida shelf, targeting northern Pulley Ridge. This project created and ground-truthed new sonar maps made with an autonomous underwater vehicle; conducted video and photographic transects of benthic habitat and fish using a remotely operated vehicle; and examined the connectivity of fauna from shallow to deep reef ecosystems. CIOERT was established in 2009 by FAU-Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, with University of North Carolina, Wilmington, SRI International, and the University of Miami. The primary NOAA partner is the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

  16. Factors Influencing Industry Uptake of Marketing & Supply Chain Innovations within the Australian Seafood Cooperative Research Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentoni, D.; English, F.

    2012-01-01

    This study identifies factors influencing the Australian seafood industry’s adoption of marketing and supply chain innovations created from public-private funded research and development (R&D). A grounded theory approach was followed by comparing and contrasting the evidence from 35 projects

  17. 78 FR 50424 - NIH Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Program: Invitation To Solicit Nonclinical and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... permit the transfer of funds from the NIH to a collaborator but does permit the collaborator to provide... areas of mutual interest. NIH investigators' proposals responsive to a solicitation will be reviewed by... research to be conducted and establishes benchmarks to chronicle its progress. The CRADA will include a...

  18. 7 CFR 2.66 - Administrator, Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... extension program through grants to regional rural development centers and competitive grants to land-grant... Small Business Innovation Development Act of 1982 for USDA (15 U.S.C. 638(e)-(k)). (51) Administer a..., and Extension Service. (1) Administer research and technology development grants related to the...

  19. FY 2001 report on the integrated evaluation of the research cooperation project. Research cooperation program on the development of environmental measurement use laser radar/research cooperation project on the mining waste water treatment technology using biology; 2001 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo sogo hyoka hokokusho. Kankyo kesokuyo reza reda no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku - Baio riyo ni yoru kohaisui shori gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    By research groups having been sent, the integrated evaluation was made of the projects on the research cooperation with Indonesia in the development of environmental measurement use laser radar and the research cooperation with China in the mining waste water treatment technology using biology. As to the research cooperation with Indonesia, the purpose/target proposed were almost achieved, and all were favorably carried out. Especially, after finishing the project, the design/manufacture of an on-vehicle type Mie-scattering laser radar were made using the acquired laser technology. And, it was reported that an observation study of the state of air pollution in Bandung city was made using the laser radar. It can be said that generally the research cooperation with China was smoothly proceeded with. However, the Wushan mine is small in scale of management, and therefore, there might have been some points to be reviewed in selection of the mine for research. The pilot plant installed at the Wushan mine is not now operated. If the mine has strong management force, the effective use of the pilot plant after finishing the project might have been studied. (NEDO)

  20. Geosciences research: cooperation with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    PNC has been participating in the research program of the Construction Phase in Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory project (HRL project), an underground research laboratory project initiated by Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB), since 1991. The main purpose of participating in the HRL project is to apply site characterization, prediction and validation methodology of geological environment in the project to R and D program on geological disposal in Japan. The outcome from investigations for the 0-700 m section in the access tunnel has been evaluated to compare with predictions on geological-structure. This report gives the summary of R and D program on the HRL project and preliminary results on evaluation of geological-structural predictions for the 0-700 m section in the access tunnel. (author)

  1. Acquisition of Cooperative Small Unmanned Aerial Systems for Advancing Man Machine Interface Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Airborne Cross Runway Departure/Landing Scenario Figure 7 Illustration of a participant looking at the 10Hz or 15Hz flickering visual stimulus in a...Figure 5 An illustration using a formation of UAVs for Direction of Arrival (DOA) mitigation of spoofing signals Spoofer Antenna array based on a...this project is to research and develop robust and jamming-resistant receivers including advanced interference mitigation algorithms and network

  2. Fiscal 1999 research cooperation project. Research cooperation on community-oriented practical photovoltaic power systems (Practical methane gas fermentation fuel cell power systems); 1999 nendo metan hakko gas nenryo denchi hatsuden system no jitsuyoka ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the research cooperation with developing countries on practical methane gas fermentation fuel cell power systems in 1999-2002. This research aims to construct the methane gas fermentation fuel cell power facility using livestock excreta which can supply power to the facility and peripheral areas. The facility controls various substance concentrations in waste water within environmental standards, and uses waste as compost. This project is very promising in use of environment-friendly energy, effective use of unused energy and power supply to unelectrified areas for China under serious conditions such as rapid increase in energy demand and various environment problems. There are such various issues to achieve this target as securing livestock (pig breeders) and excreta, and fermentation and recovery of suitable methane gas necessary for fuel cell power systems from excreta. This report is composed of 2 parts, (1) Current use of energy resources and use of unused energy in Guangdong province, and (2) Technical requirements for practical methane gas fermentation fuel cell power systems. (NEDO)

  3. Fiscal 1998 research cooperation project. Research cooperation on diversity preservation and sustainable use for living organisms; 1998 nendo seibutsu tayosei hozen to jizokuteki riyo nado ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report describes the titled research cooperation. Joint R and D with Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia was made on collection and preservation of bio-resources such as tropical rain forest, and sustainable use of them by developing countries themselves. The project includes the simple identification and preservation technology of biospecies such as microorganism, assessment and monitoring technology of ecosystem, search of useful functions of biospecies, and construction of a bio-resource information network. This project promotes conversion of excessive hunting into resource conservation in agriculture, forestry and fisheries industries, and establishment of the basis of new product development in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. This project also contributes to preparation of the basic scheme of developed countries including Japan to countries holding bio-resources in addition to industrial basis preparation of every country. Until 1997, basis establishment has been made such as training of researchers, preparation of equipment and technical guidance, and in the final 1998, various results such as extraction of promising samples from microorganisms were obtained. (NEDO)

  4. Research cooperation in the development of laser radar for environmental measurements. Environmental network; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku. Kankyo network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Among the research cooperation in the development of laser radar for environmental measurements with Indonesia between FY 1993 and FY 1996, results of the research and development of the environmental network are summarized. For the environmental information network, the Tokyo NOC is linked as an Internet connection point in Japan with the Jakarta NOC using an international dedicated line with a capacity of 64 Kbps. The Tokyo NOC is linked with domestic environmental information researchers using Internet. Thus, data stored in the data processing system of laser radar can be exchanged, information in both countries can be exchanged using E-mail, and data can be accumulated. For the research cooperation with Indonesia, research of path control and information relay server, research of effective transmission of data on the network, and research of multimedia communication have been conducted. The multimedia communication, distributed processing, and extension of dedicated line network using PPTP have been also conducted. 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Penetration of Recommended Procedures for Lung Cancer Staging and Management in the United States Over 10 Years: A Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khalid, Najma [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Owen, Jean B.; Crozier, Cheryl L. [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wilson, J. Frank [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wei, Xiong [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To document the penetration of clinical trial results, practice guidelines, and appropriateness criteria into national practice, we compared the use of components of staging and treatment for lung cancer among patients treated in 2006-2007 with those used in patients treated in 1998-1999. Methods and Materials: Patient, staging work-up, and treatment characteristics were extracted from the process survey database of the Quality Research in Radiation Oncology (QRRO), consisting of records of 340 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) at 44 institutions and of 144 patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) at 39 institutions. Data were compared for patients treated in 2006-2007 versus those for patients treated in 1998-1999. Results: Use of all recommended procedures for staging and treatment was more common in 2006-2007. Specifically, disease was staged with brain imaging (magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography) and whole-body imaging (positron emission tomography or bone scanning) in 66% of patients with LA-NSCLC in 2006-2007 (vs 42% in 1998-1999, P=.0001) and in 84% of patients with LS-SCLC in 2006-2007 (vs 58.3% in 1998-1999, P=.0011). Concurrent chemoradiation was used for 77% of LA-NSCLC patients (vs 45% in 1998-1999, P<.0001) and for 90% of LS-SCLC patients (vs 62.5% in 1998-1999, P<.0001). Use of the recommended radiation dose (59-74 Gy for NSCLC and 60-70 Gy as once-daily therapy for SCLC) did not change appreciably, being 88% for NSCLC in both periods and 51% (2006-2007) versus 43% (1998-1999) for SCLC. Twice-daily radiation for SCLC was used for 21% of patients in 2006-2007 versus 8% in 1998-1999. Finally, 49% of patients with LS-SCLC received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in 2006-2007 (vs 21% in 1998-1999). Conclusions: Although adherence to all quality indicators improved over time, brain imaging and recommended radiation doses for stage III NSCLC were used in <90% of cases. Use

  6. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ...] Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. General... adult oncology indication, or in late stage development in pediatric patients with cancer. The...

  7. EUROSUNMED. Euro-Mediterranean cooperation on research and training in sun based renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaoui, Abdelilah

    2013-01-01

    Here we present the different aspects of the EUROSUNMED project. The scientific targets of EUROSUNMED are the development of new technologies in three energy field areas, namely photovoltaics (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP) and grid integration (GI), in strong collaboration with research institutes, universities and SMSs from Europe in the north side of the Mediterranean sea and from Morocco and Egypt from the south of the sea. the focus in PV will be on thin film (Si, CZTS) based solar cells and modules while the goal in CSP field is to design and test new heliostats as well as novel solutions for energy storage compatible with these technologies. The project aims at producing components that will be tested under specific conditions of MPC (hot climate, absence of water, etc.). Such investigations are complemented with studies on grid integration of energy sources from PV and CSP in Morocco and Egypt context. Additionally, the consortium envisages training PhD students and post-docs in these interdisciplinary fields (chemistry, physics, materials science) in a close and fruitful collaboration between academic institutions and industry from EU and MPCs. The consortium is well placed around leading academic groups in materials science and engineering devices and equipments for the development of PV and CSP, and also in the promotion of the renewable energies in general. Moreover, technology transfer and research infrastructure development in the targeted areas will be provided. Disseminating the results of the projects will be done through the organization of summer schools and stakeholders involved in the 3 selected energy area and beyond. Another outreach of the project will be the proposal for a roadmap on the technological aspects (research, industry, implementation) of the PV, CSP and grid area as well as on the best practice for the continuation of strong collaboration between the EU and MPCS partners and beyond for mutual interest. (author)

  8. The Road to Grow, Enrich and Strength Cooperation Between Undergrad and Research Institutions in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Domínguez, M. Á.; Perez-Campos, X.; García Vertiz, D.; Martínez, L.; Torres Sánchez, E.

    2017-12-01

    Earth sciences undergrad programs have rapidly increased in the past years in Mexico. To form the future generation of geoscientist it is important to involve young undergrad students into research activities so they can develop the interest in science. Several inter-institutional programs are already attending this matter within the Mexican geoscientific community. Two of them, "Verano de la Investigación Científica 2017 (Summer of Scientific Research 2017)" and "Programa Delfín, Interinstitucional para el fortalecimiento de la investigación y el posgrado del Pacífico (Dolphin Program)", applied by the Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, gave the opportunity to three Geophysics Engineering students to carry out management, processing and analysis of seismic data to study the rate of seismicity over the north and south of Mexico and its relationship with the oil production industry; as well as study the seismic structure beneath a city located within a volcanic arc, in which case the study resolved a two layer model corresponding to the midcrust and the Mohorövičić discontinuities. These programs not only allowed the students to enrich and strengthen their knowledge in seismology, it also gave them an insight of the general geoscientific research activities. Furthermore, it provided the opportunity for a Ph.D. student, to take the role of a young advisor, which has helped train the student on skills needed for a future academic path, such as mentoring, assistance, encouragement and leadership.

  9. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  10. Ten years of IAEA cooperation with the Russian research reactor fuel return programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, S.; Adelfang, P.; Bradley, E. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Programme was launched in 2001. Over the duration, the programme successfully completed 43 safe shipments of 1.6 tons of fresh and spent HEU fuel from different countries using Russian fuelled research reactors to the country of origin. The IAEA has been a very active supporter of the RRRFR Programme since its inception. Under the auspices of the RRRFR Programme, the Agency has been ensuring a broad range of technical advisory and organizational support to the HEU fuel repatriation, as well as training and advisory assistance for supporting RR conversion from HEU to LEU. The presentation gives an overview of the RRRFR programme achievements with special consideration of the IAEA contribution. These include an overview of the shipments' history in terms of fresh and spent fuel, as well as a summary of experiences gained during the shipments' preparation and termination. The presentation focuses on technical advisory support given by the IAEA during the programme implementation, captures the consolidated knowledge of the unique international programme and shares the most important lessons learned. (orig.)

  11. ASCO 2007: “Translating Research into Practice”. Report from the 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This year, for the 34th time in its history, the mastodontic machinery of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO once again welcomed thousand of members and participants from all over the world to the Society’s annual meeting, which, this year, took place in the ample and well-appointed, McCormick’s Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois...

  12. The experiential world of the oncology nurse | Van Rooyen | Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In her1 experiential world, the oncology nurse experiences unique, challenging and rewarding relationships in a multidimensional, dynamic way. The aim of this study was to describe, from her viewpoint and perspective, how she experiences and reacts to this world. Through this study the researcher wants the oncology ...

  13. Global Oncology; Harvard Global Health Catalyst summit lecture notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Nguyen, Paul

    2017-08-01

    The material presented in this book is at the cutting-edge of global oncology and provides highly illuminating examples, addresses frequently asked questions, and provides information and a reference for future work in global oncology care, research, education, and outreach.

  14. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1994-10-01

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  15. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P. [ed.

    1996-03-01

    Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

  16. The Evolution of Gero-Oncology Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Stewart M.; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Puts, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article summarizes the evolution of gero-oncology nursing and highlights key educational initiatives, clinical practice issues, and research areas to enhance care of older adults with cancer. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, position statements, clinical practice guidelines, web-based materials, and professional organizations’ resources. Conclusion Globally, the older adult cancer population is rapidly growing. The care of older adults with cancer requires an understanding of their diverse needs and the intersection of cancer and aging. Despite efforts to enhance competence in gerooncology and to develop a body of evidence, nurses and healthcare systems remain under-prepared to provide high quality care for older adults with cancer. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses need to take a leadership role in integrating gerontological principles into oncology settings. Working closely with interdisciplinary team members, nurses should utilize available resources and continue to build evidence through gero-oncology nursing research. PMID:26830263

  17. Innovations in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withers, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    The series 'Medical Radiology - Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology' is the successor to the well known 'Encyclopedia of Medical Radiology/Handbuch der medizinischen Radiologie'. 'Medical Radiology' brings the state of the art on special topics in a timely fashion. This volume 'Innovation in Radiation Oncology', edited by H.R. Withers and L.J. Peters, presents data on the development of new therapeutic strategies in different oncologic diseases. 57 authors wrote 32 chapters covering a braod range of topics. The contributors have written their chapters with the practicing radiation oncologist in mind. The first chapter sets the stage by reviewing the quality of radiation oncology as it is practiced in the majority of radiation oncology centers in the United States. The second chapter examines how we may better predict the possible causes of failure of conventional radiotherapy in order that the most appropriate of a variety of therapeutic options may eventually be offered to patients on an individual basis. The third chapter discussed how our therapeutic endeavors affect the quality of life, a problem created by our ability to be successful. Following these three introductory chapters there are 29 chapters by highly qualified specialists discussing the newest ideas in subjects of concern to the practicing radiation oncologist. With 111 figs

  18. The carbon fiber development for uranium centrifuges: a Brazilian cooperative research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Paulo Cesar Beltrao de; Zouain, Desiree Moraes

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes both the carbon fiber-based development for uranium centrifuges and the research project that supports its development effort over time. The carbon fiber-based engineering properties make it a valuable supply for high technologic products. Nevertheless, its fabrication occurs only in few developed countries and there is no production in Brazil. In addition, the carbon fiber-based products have dual applications: they can be used by the civilian and military industry. Therefore, there are international restrictions related to its use and applications that justify the internal development. Moreover, the Brazilian Navy centrifuges for uranium enrichment were developed using carbon-fiber which contains polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as an imported raw material. The PAN properties of low weight, high tensile strength increase the isotopic separation efficiency. The Brazilian financial scenario surrounded by the international uncertain economy shows that combined creative project solutions are more effective. Therefore, the Navy's Technological Center in Sao Paulo (CTMSP), the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), the University of Sao Paulo (USP), the RADICIFIBRAS Company, and the Brazilian FINEP agency, which is responsible for the project financial support, established a partnership aiming the development of a domestic PAN-based carbon fiber industry. The innovative project solutions adopted and the results of this partnership are presented here. (author)

  19. Report on the cooperative research project for fiscal 1998. Japan and Republic of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Metal Mining Agency of Japan and VNIITSVETMET have agreed on March 15, 1995 on the joint research plan to use environment preserving technologies in extracting valuable metals from low-grade ores and tailings. The present study developed methods that use leaching, solvent extraction and electrolytic extraction. Flotation mineral processing tests were performed by using sulfurous acid, sodium sulfite and hot water bubbles. In the test using the bacteria leaching method, observations were performed on effects due to bacteria culturing conditions, conditions affecting the leaching, effects due to pH adjustment, effects due to impalpable powder activated carbon, effects due to coarse powder activated carbon, electrochemical properties of activated carbon, and bacteria observation using a scanning electron microscope. The chemical leaching, solvent extraction and electrolytic extraction tests were carried out on chemical leaching of bulk-separation flotation froth of Zhezkent tailing, solvent extraction using a small mixer settler, a stripping test, and electrolytic extraction efficiency. For waste water treatment, tests were executed using iron oxidizing bacteria. (NEDO)

  20. Research and development of a control system for multi axis cooperative motion based on PMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-xiao; Dong, Deng-feng; Zhou, Wei-hu

    2017-10-01

    Based on Programmable Multi-axes Controller (PMAC), a design of a multi axis motion control system for the simulator of spatial targets' dynamic optical properties is proposed. According to analysis the properties of spatial targets' simulator motion control system, using IPC as the main control layer, TurboPMAC2 as the control layer to meet coordinated motion control, data acquisition and analog output. A simulator using 5 servomotors which is connected with speed reducers to drive the output axis was implemented to simulate the motion of both the sun and the space target. Based on PMAC using PID and a notch filter algorithm, negative feedback, the speed and acceleration feed forward algorithm to satisfy the axis' requirements of the good stability and high precision at low speeds. In the actual system, it shows that the velocity precision is higher than 0.04 s ° and the precision of repetitive positioning is better than 0.006° when each axis is at a low-speed. Besides, the system achieves the control function of multi axis coordinated motion. The design provides an important technical support for detecting spatial targets, also promoting the theoretical research.