WorldWideScience

Sample records for oncogenic viruses identified

  1. Oncogenic viruses and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxiang; George; Luo; Jing-hsiung; James; Ou

    2015-01-01

    <正>This special issue of the journal is dedicated to the important topic of oncogenic viruses and cancer.It contains seven review articles covering all known oncogenic viruses except for human T-lymphotropic virus type1(HTLV-1).These review articles are contributed by experts on specific viruses and their associated human cancers.Viruses account for about 20%of total human cancer cases.Although many viruses can cause various tumors in animals,only seven of them

  2. Multiple oncogenic viruses identified in Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisson Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is a rare cancer that has increased in incidence with the HIV pandemic in Africa. The underlying cause of this cancer in HIV-infected patients from Botswana is not well defined. Results Tissues were obtained from 28 OSSN and 8 pterygia patients. The tissues analyzed from OSSN patients were 83% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 70% were KSHV positive, 75% were HSV-1/2 positive, and 61% were CMV positive by PCR. Tissues from pterygium patients were 88% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 50% were KSHV positive, and 60% were CMV positive. None of the patients were JC or BK positive. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analyses further identified HPV, EBV, and KSHV in a subset of the tissue samples. Conclusion We identified the known oncogenic viruses HPV, KSHV, and EBV in OSSN and pterygia tissues. The presence of these tumor viruses in OSSN suggests that they may contribute to the development of this malignancy in the HIV population. Further studies are necessary to characterize the molecular mechanisms associated with viral antigens and their potential role in the development of OSSN.

  3. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  4. Oncogenic viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ari, Ziv; Weitzman, Ella; Safran, Michal

    2015-05-01

    About 80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections especially in the setting of established cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis, making HCC prevention a major goal of antiviral therapy. HCC tumors are highly complex and heterogeneous resulting from the aberrant function of multiple molecular pathways. The roles of HCV or HBV in promoting HCC development are still either directly or indirectly are still speculative, but the evidence for both effects is compelling. In patients with chronic hepatitis viral infection, cirrhosis is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis.

  5. Polyoma BK Virus: An Oncogenic Virus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 65-year-old gentleman with a history of end stage renal disease who underwent a successful cadaveric donor kidney transplant four years ago. He subsequently developed BK virus nephropathy related to chronic immunosuppressant therapy. Three years later, misfortune struck again, and he developed adenocarcinoma of the bladder.

  6. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  7. Synonymous codon changes in the oncogenes of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus lead to increased oncogenicity and immunogenicity of the virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Hu, Jiafen; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses use rare codons with respect to the host. The reasons for this are incompletely understood but among the hypotheses is the concept that rare codons result in low protein production and this allows the virus to escape immune surveillance. We changed rare codons in the oncogenes E6 and E7 of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus to make them more mammalian-like and tested the mutant genomes in our in vivo animal model. While the amino acid sequences of the proteins remained unchanged, the oncogenic potential of some of the altered genomes increased dramatically. In addition, increased immunogenicity, as measured by spontaneous regression, was observed as the numbers of codon changes increased. This work suggests that codon usage may modify protein production in ways that influence disease outcome and that evaluation of synonymous codons should be included in the analysis of genetic variants of infectious agents and their association with disease. PMID:23433866

  8. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  9. DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankgopo Magdeline Kgatle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Unrepaired DNA damage is the most common and overlapping feature of these DNA oncogenic viruses and a source of genomic instability and tumour development. Sustained DNA damage results from unceasing production of reactive oxygen species and activation of inflammasome cascades that trigger genomic changes and increased propensity of epigenetic alterations. Accumulation of epigenetic alterations may interfere with genome-wide cellular signalling machineries and promote malignant transformation leading to cancer development. Untangling and understanding the underlying mechanisms that promote these detrimental effects remain the major objectives for ongoing research and hope for effective virus-induced cancer therapy. Here, we review current literature with an emphasis on how DNA damage influences HPV, HVB, and EBV replication and epigenetic alterations that are associated with carcinogenesis.

  10. Comparative sequence analysis of a highly oncogenic but horizontal spread-defective clone of Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Stephen J; Zhao, Yuguang; Petherbridge, Lawrence; Smith, Lorraine P; Baigent, Susan J; Nair, Venugopal

    2007-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a cell-associated alphaherpesvirus that induces rapid-onset T-cell lymphomas in poultry. MDV isolates vary greatly in pathogenicity. While some of the strains such as CVI988 are non-pathogenic and are used as vaccines, others such as RB-1B are highly oncogenic. Molecular determinants associated with differences in pathogenicity are not completely understood. Comparison of the genome sequences of phenotypically different strains could help to identify molecular determinants of pathogenicity. We have previously reported the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones of RB-1B from which fully infectious viruses could be reconstituted upon DNA transfection into chicken cells. MDV reconstituted from one of these clones (pRB-1B-5) showed similar in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics and oncogenicity as the parental virus. However, unlike the parental RB-1B virus, the BAC-derived virus showed inability to spread between birds. In order to identify the unique determinants for oncogenicity and the ''non-spreading phenotype'' of MDV derived from this clone, we determined the full-length sequence of pRB-1B-5. Comparative sequence analysis with the published sequences of strains such as Md5, Md11, and CVI988 identified frameshift mutations in RLORF1, protein kinase (UL13), and glycoproteins C (UL44) and D (US6). Comparison of the sequences of these genes with the parental virus indicated that the RLORF1, UL44, and US6 mutations were also present in the parental RB-1B stock of the virus. However with regard to UL13 mutation, the parental RB-1B stock appeared to be a mixture of wild type and mutant viruses, indicating that the BAC cloning has selected a mutant clone. Although further studies are needed to evaluate the role of these genes in the horizontal-spreading defective phenotype, our data clearly indicate that mutations in these genes do not affect the oncogenicity of MDV.

  11. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ming Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1, KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs.

  12. A screen identifies the oncogenic micro-RNA miR-378a-5p as a negative regulator of oncogene-induced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Marije Kooistra

    Full Text Available Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS can occur in response to hyperactive oncogenic signals and is believed to be a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis. To identify new factors involved in OIS, we performed a screen for microRNAs that can overcome or inhibit OIS in human diploid fibroblasts. This screen led to the identification of miR-378a-5p and in addition several other miRNAs that have previously been shown to play a role in senescence. We show that ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p reduces the expression of several senescence markers, including p16(INK4A and senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Moreover, cells with ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p retain proliferative capacity even in the presence of an activated Braf oncogene. Finally, we identified several miR-378a-5p targets in diploid fibroblasts that might explain the mechanism by which the microRNA can delay OIS. We speculate that miR-378a-5p might positively influence tumor formation by delaying OIS, which is consistent with a known pro-oncogenic function of this microRNA.

  13. Identification of ALV-J associated acutely transforming virus Fu-J carrying complete v-fps oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Fang, Lichun; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    Transduction of oncogenes by ALVs and generation of acute transforming viruses is common in natural viral infections. In order to understand the molecular basis for the rapid oncogenicity of Fu-J, an acutely transforming avian leukosis virus isolated from fibrosarcomas in crossbreed broilers infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in China, complete genomic structure of Fu-J virus was determined by PCR amplification and compared with those of Fu-J1, Fu-J2, Fu-J3, Fu-J4, and Fu-J5 reported previously. The results showed that the genome of Fu-J was defective, with parts of gag gene replaced by the complete v-fps oncogene and encoded a 137 kDa Gag-fps fusion protein. Sequence analysis revealed that Fu-J and Fu-J1 to Fu-J5 were related quasi-species variants carrying different lengths of v-fps oncogenes generated from recombination between helper virus and c-fps gene. Comparison of virus carrying v-fps oncogene also gave us a glimpse of the molecular characterization and evolution process of the acutely transforming ALV.

  14. Genomic profiling identifies GATA6 as a candidate oncogene amplified in pancreatobiliary cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Kwei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatobiliary cancers have among the highest mortality rates of any cancer type. Discovering the full spectrum of molecular genetic alterations may suggest new avenues for therapy. To catalogue genomic alterations, we carried out array-based genomic profiling of 31 exocrine pancreatic cancers and 6 distal bile duct cancers, expanded as xenografts to enrich the tumor cell fraction. We identified numerous focal DNA amplifications and deletions, including in 19% of pancreatobiliary cases gain at cytoband 18q11.2, a locus uncommonly amplified in other tumor types. The smallest shared amplification at 18q11.2 included GATA6, a transcriptional regulator previously linked to normal pancreas development. When amplified, GATA6 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels, and strong immunostaining was observed in 25 of 54 (46% primary pancreatic cancers compared to 0 of 33 normal pancreas specimens surveyed. GATA6 expression in xenografts was associated with specific microarray gene-expression patterns, enriched for GATA binding sites and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity. siRNA mediated knockdown of GATA6 in pancreatic cancer cell lines with amplification led to reduced cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and colony formation. Our findings indicate that GATA6 amplification and overexpression contribute to the oncogenic phenotypes of pancreatic cancer cells, and identify GATA6 as a candidate lineage-specific oncogene in pancreatobiliary cancer, with implications for novel treatment strategies.

  15. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  16. Systematic analysis of human oncogenic viruses in colon cancer revealed EBV latency in lymphoid infiltrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, Loretta; Ricotti, Mattia; Vanoli, Alessandro; Luinetti, Ombretta; Dallera, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Paolucci, Stefania; Brugnatelli, Silvia; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Baldanti, Fausto; Perfetti, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors may play a role in colon cancer. In this view, several studies investigated tumor samples for the presence of various viral DNA with conflicting results. We undertook a systematic DNA analysis of 44 consecutive, prospectively collected primary tumor samples by real time and qualitative PCR for viruses of known or potential oncogenic role in humans, including polyomavirus (JCV, BKV, Merkel cell polyomavirus), HPV, HTLV, HHV-8 and EBV. Negative controls consisted of surgical resection margins. No evidence of genomic DNA fragments from tested virus were detected, except for EBV, which was found in a significant portion of tumors (23/44, 52%). Real-time PCR showed that EBV DNA was present at a highly variable content (median 258 copies in 10(5) cells, range 15-4837). Presence of EBV DNA had a trend to be associated with high lymphocyte infiltration (p = 0.06, χ2 test), and in situ hybridization with EBER1-2 probes revealed latency in a fraction of these lymphoid cells, with just a few scattered plasma cells positive for BZLF-1, an immediate early protein expressed during lytic replication. LMP-1 expression was undetectable by immunohistochemistry. These results argue against a significant involvement of the tested oncogenic viruses in established colon cancer.

  17. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK, and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in TCGA datasets.

  18. A Screen Identifies the Oncogenic Micro-RNA miR-378a-5p as a Negative Regulator of Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne Marije; Rudkjær, Lise Christine; Lees, Michael James;

    2014-01-01

    fibroblasts. This screen led to the identification of miR-378a-5p and in addition several other miRNAs that have previously been shown to play a role in senescence. We show that ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p reduces the expression of several senescence markers, including p16INK4A and senescence......-associated β-galactosidase. Moreover, cells with ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p retain proliferative capacity even in the presence of an activated Braf oncogene. Finally, we identified several miR-378a-5p targets in diploid fibroblasts that might explain the mechanism by which the microRNA can delay OIS. We...... speculate that miR-378a-5p might positively influence tumor formation by delaying OIS, which is consistent with a known pro-oncogenic function of this microRNA....

  19. A Screen Identifies the Oncogenic Micro-RNA miR-378a-5p as a Negative Regulator of Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne Marije; Rudkjær, Lise Christine; Lees, Michael James

    2014-01-01

    fibroblasts. This screen led to the identification of miR-378a-5p and in addition several other miRNAs that have previously been shown to play a role in senescence. We show that ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p reduces the expression of several senescence markers, including p16INK4A and senescence......Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) can occur in response to hyperactive oncogenic signals and is believed to be a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis. To identify new factors involved in OIS, we performed a screen for microRNAs that can overcome or inhibit OIS in human diploid......-associated β-galactosidase. Moreover, cells with ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p retain proliferative capacity even in the presence of an activated Braf oncogene. Finally, we identified several miR-378a-5p targets in diploid fibroblasts that might explain the mechanism by which the microRNA can delay OIS. We...

  20. Reverse engineering of TLX oncogenic transcriptional networks identifies RUNX1 as tumor suppressor in T-ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gatta, Giusy; Palomero, Teresa; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Bansal, Mukesh; Carpenter, Zachary W; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Sole, Xavier; Xu, Luyao; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H; Rowe, Jacob M; Meijerink, Jules P; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2012-02-26

    The TLX1 and TLX3 transcription factor oncogenes have a key role in the pathogenesis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we used reverse engineering of global transcriptional networks to decipher the oncogenic regulatory circuit controlled by TLX1 and TLX3. This systems biology analysis defined T cell leukemia homeobox 1 (TLX1) and TLX3 as master regulators of an oncogenic transcriptional circuit governing T-ALL. Notably, a network structure analysis of this hierarchical network identified RUNX1 as a key mediator of the T-ALL induced by TLX1 and TLX3 and predicted a tumor-suppressor role for RUNX1 in T cell transformation. Consistent with these results, we identified recurrent somatic loss-of-function mutations in RUNX1 in human T-ALL. Overall, these results place TLX1 and TLX3 at the top of an oncogenic transcriptional network controlling leukemia development, show the power of network analyses to identify key elements in the regulatory circuits governing human cancer and identify RUNX1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in T-ALL.

  1. Molecular Interactions of High Energy Fuels and Jet Fuels with Oncogenic Viruses and Endogenous Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    furam failed to abrogate the inhibitory effect of MAMA , the ultimate carcinogen of SDMH. Detailed methodology required to ascertain effect of chemicals...and 25 S. Duesberg (4) has also reported on the melting behavior of certain RNA molecules of such RFNA tumor viruses as Pous sarcoma virus (RSV) arid...mouse mammary tumor virus (.MNMTV). The melted FPA.s all were 19 Lo 1io FTITYN Figure 6 A) ~ V~i4 ~i±7!~’’tii~ ~7rA) Profile occasionally seen A)il of

  2. Marek’s disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotrophic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unimmunized host birds. The causative pathogen, Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres during viral latency an...

  3. [Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1 oncogene variants in cell lines of different origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, L S; Senyuta, N B; Goncharova, E V; Scherback, L N; Smirnova, R V; Pavlish, O A; Gurtsevitch, V E

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a widespread infection in the human population. Typically, infection occurs in early childhood without serious consequences for infected people. At the same time, a secondary infection with an additional EBV strain occurs quite often. During the in vitro cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from persons infected with multiple strains of the virus, only one of these strains with higher transforming potential becomes dominant, while the others are eliminated. Under certain conditions, such a highly transforming EBV strain apparently is able to be the etiologic agent of EBVassociated diseases. To find out the range of highly transforming EBV strains prevalent among Russians, cell lines from patients with EBV-associated and non-associated tumors, as well as healthy individuals, were established. The structural analysis of the latent membrane protein 1 gene (LMP1), a key oncogene of the virus, isolated from established cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes of blood donors was carried out, and data obtained were compared with the respective data for LMP1 isolates, amplified from cell lines established from African and Japanese patients with Burkitt's lymphoma. The data obtained show a genetic relationship between Russian LMP1 isolates regardless the fact whether they come from patients with tumors or healthy individuals and differ significantly from LMP1 isolates from Burkitt's lymphoma patients. Thus, the results of the study suggest that in nonendemic region for EBV-associated pathology, Russia, any strain of EBV with any structure of LMP1 with concomitant effect of additional factors may become an etiologic agent for EBV-associated neoplasia.

  4. Comparative analysis of oncogenic genes revealed unique evolutionary features of field Marek's disease virus prevalent in recent years in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ping

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease (MD is an economically important viral disease of chickens caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic herpesvirus. This disease was well controlled since the widespread use of commercial vaccines, but field MDVs have shown continuous increasing in virulence and acquired the ability to overcome the immune response induced by vaccines. Nowadays, MD continues to be a serious threat to poultry industry, isolation and characterization of MDVs are essential for monitoring changes of viruses and evaluating the effectiveness of existing vaccines. Results Between 2008 and 2010, 18 field MDV strains were isolated from vaccinated chicken flocks in Sichuan province, China. Three oncogenic genes including Meq, pp38 and vIL-8 genes of the 18 isolates were amplified and sequenced. Homology analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequences of these three genes exhibit 95.0-98.8%, 99.3-100% and 97.0-98.5% homology respectively with these of other reference strains published in GenBank. Alignment analysis of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed that four amino acid mutations in Meq gene and two amino acid mutations in vIL-8 gene displayed perfect regularity in MDVs circulating in China, which could be considered as features of field MDVs prevalent in recent years in China. In addition, one amino acid mutation in pp38 gene can be considered as a feature of virulent MDVs from USA, and three amino acid mutations in Meq gene were identified and unique in very virulent plus (vv+ MDVs. Phylogenetic analysis based on Meq and vIL-8 protein sequences revealed that field MDVs in China evolved independently. Virulence studies showed that CVI988 could provide efficient protection against the field MDVs epidemic recently in China. Conclusions This study and other published data in the GenBank have demonstrated the features of Meq, pp38 and vIL-8 genes of MDVs circulating in recent years in Sichuan, China

  5. Ebola Virus Infection Modelling and Identifiability Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van-Kinh eNguyen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV infections have underlined the impact of the virus as a major threat for human health. Due to the high biosafety classification of EBOV (level 4, basic research is very limited. Therefore, the development of new avenues of thinking to advance quantitative comprehension of the virus and its interaction with the host cells is urgently neededto tackle this lethal disease. Mathematical modelling of the EBOV dynamics can be instrumental to interpret Ebola infection kinetics on quantitative grounds. To the best of our knowledge, a mathematical modelling approach to unravel the interaction between EBOV and the host cells isstill missing. In this paper, a mathematical model based on differential equations is used to represent the basic interactions between EBOV and wild-type Vero cells in vitro. Parameter sets that represent infectivity of pathogens are estimated for EBOV infection and compared with influenza virus infection kinetics. The average infecting time of wild-type Vero cells in EBOV is slower than in influenza infection. Simulation results suggest that the slow infecting time of EBOV could be compensated by its efficient replication. This study reveals several identifiability problems and what kind of experiments are necessary to advance the quantification of EBOV infection. A first mathematical approach of EBOV dynamics and the estimation of standard parametersin viral infections kinetics is the key contribution of this work, paving the way for future modelling work on EBOV infection.

  6. Computational drugs repositioning identifies inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K/AKT/P70S6K-dependent pathways among FDA-approved compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrella, Diego; Manni, Isabella; Tumaini, Barbara; Dattilo, Rosanna; Papaccio, Federica; Mutarelli, Margherita; Sirci, Francesco; Amoreo, Carla A.; Mottolese, Marcella; Iezzi, Manuela; Ciolli, Laura; Aria, Valentina; Bosotti, Roberta; Isacchi, Antonella; Loreni, Fabrizio; Bardelli, Alberto; Avvedimento, Vittorio E.; di Bernardo, Diego; Cardone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors for oncogenic signalling pathways remains a key focus in modern oncology, based on personalized and targeted therapeutics. Computational drug repurposing via the analysis of FDA-approved drug network is becoming a very effective approach to identify therapeutic opportunities in cancer and other human diseases. Given that gene expression signatures can be associated with specific oncogenic mutations, we tested whether a “reverse” oncogene-specific signature might assist in the computational repositioning of inhibitors of oncogenic pathways. As a proof of principle, we focused on oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling, a molecular pathway frequently driving cancer progression as well as raising resistance to anticancer-targeted therapies. We show that implementation of “reverse” oncogenic PI3K-dependent transcriptional signatures combined with interrogation of drug networks identified inhibitors of PI3K-dependent signalling among FDA-approved compounds. This led to repositioning of Niclosamide (Niclo) and Pyrvinium Pamoate (PP), two anthelmintic drugs, as inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling. Niclo inhibited phosphorylation of P70S6K, while PP inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and P70S6K, which are downstream targets of PI3K. Anthelmintics inhibited oncogenic PI3K-dependent gene expression and showed a cytostatic effect in vitro and in mouse mammary gland. Lastly, PP inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells harbouring PI3K mutations. Our data indicate that drug repositioning by network analysis of oncogene-specific transcriptional signatures is an efficient strategy for identifying oncogenic pathway inhibitors among FDA-approved compounds. We propose that PP and Niclo should be further investigated as potential therapeutics for the treatment of tumors or diseases carrying the constitutive activation of the PI3K/P70S6K signalling axis. PMID:27542212

  7. 3 Drugs Identified to Potentially Fight Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html 3 Drugs Identified to Potentially Fight Zika Virus But only one is already approved in the ... fetuses protection against the damaging effects of Zika virus, a new multicenter study reports. Researchers identified these ...

  8. Rescue of avian leukosis subgroup-J-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene and analysis of their tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Fang, Lichun; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Cui, Shuai; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-12-01

    In our previous study, six subgroup J strains of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J)-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene, designated as Fu-J and Fu-J1-5, were isolated and characterized from fibrosarcomas in ALV-J-infected chickens. In the present study, the oncogenic potential of Fu-J and Fu-J1-5 was investigated using a reverse genetics technique. Six replication-defective viruses, named rFu-J and rFu-J1-5, were rescued with the replication-competent rescued ALV-J strain rSDAU1005 as a helper virus by co-transfection of chicken embryo fibroblast monolayers with infectious clone plasmids. Experimental bird studies were performed, demonstrating that only the rescued rFu-J virus carrying the complete v-fps oncogene with rSDAU1005 as the helper virus could induce acute fibrosarcoma after inoculation in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. These results provide direct evidence that the replication-defective acutely transforming Fu-J virus, with the complete v-fps oncogene, was associated with acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with ALV-J in the field, as reported previously.

  9. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs. And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL. Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3% than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  10. New variants of E6 and E7 oncogenes of human papillomavirus type 31 identified in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Bárbara S; Batista, Marcus V A; Guimarães, Vilma; Balbino, Valdir Q; Crovella, Sergio; Freitas, Antonio C

    2011-11-01

    We sought to characterize E6 and E7 oncogenes genetic variability of HPV-31 isolated from cervical scraping samples of Northeastern Brazilian women. E6 and E7 were amplified with specific primers, cloned and sequenced. The sequences obtained were aligned with the GenBank reference sequences with the aim of evaluating the possible genetic variants. We identified several genetic variants in E6 and E7 sequences from HPV-31 positive women. Three nucleotide changes in E6 were described for the first time in this study. Some nucleotide changes were non-synonymous substitutions. The knowledge of region/country HPV specific genetic variations is relevant to understand the epidemiology and the development of effective vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential......BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...... leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS...

  12. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  13. BamHI-A rightward frame 1, an Epstein-Barr virus-encoded oncogene and immune modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, Eveline K; Le Large, Tessa Y S; Greijer, Astrid E; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2013-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes several benign and malignant disorders of lymphoid and epithelial origin. EBV-related tumors display distinct patterns of viral latent gene expression, of which the BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is selectively expressed in carcinomas, regulated by cellular differentiation factors including ΔNp63α. BARF1 functions as a viral oncogene, immortalizing and transforming epithelial cells of different origin by acting as a mitogenic growth factor, inducing cyclin-D expression, and up-regulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2, stimulating host cell growth and survival. In addition, secreted hexameric BARF1 has immune evasive properties, functionally corrupting macrophage colony stimulating factor, as supported by recent functional and structural data. Therefore, BARF1, an intracellular and secreted protein, not only has multiple pathogenic functions but also can function as a target for immune responses. Deciphering the role of BARF1 in EBV biology will contribute to novel diagnostic and treatment options for EBV-driven carcinomas. Herein, we discuss recent insights on the regulation of BARF1 expression and aspects of structure-function relating to its oncogenic and immune suppressive properties.

  14. Identifying Hendra virus diversity in pteropid bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Smith

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV causes a zoonotic disease with high mortality that is transmitted to humans from bats of the genus Pteropus (flying foxes via an intermediary equine host. Factors promoting spillover from bats to horses are uncertain at this time, but plausibly encompass host and/or agent and/or environmental factors. There is a lack of HeV sequence information derived from the natural bat host, as previously sequences have only been obtained from horses or humans following spillover events. In order to obtain an insight into possible variants of HeV circulating in flying foxes, collection of urine was undertaken in multiple flying fox roosts in Queensland, Australia. HeV was found to be geographically widespread in flying foxes with a number of HeV variants circulating at the one time at multiple locations, while at times the same variant was found circulating at disparate locations. Sequence diversity within variants allowed differentiation on the basis of nucleotide changes, and hypervariable regions in the genome were identified that could be used to differentiate circulating variants. Further, during the study, HeV was isolated from the urine of flying foxes on four occasions from three different locations. The data indicates that spillover events do not correlate with particular HeV isolates, suggesting that host and/or environmental factors are the primary determinants of bat-horse spillover. Thus future spillover events are likely to occur, and there is an on-going need for effective risk management strategies for both human and animal health.

  15. Acute leukemia viruses E26 and avian myeloblastosis virus have related transformation-specific RNA sequences but different genetic structures, gene products, and oncogenic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bister, Klaus; Nunn, Michael; Moscovici, Carlo; Perbal, Bernard; Baluda, Marcel A.; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1982-01-01

    Replication-defective acute leukemia viruses E26 and myeloblastosis virus (AMV) cause distinct leukemias although they belong to the same subgroup of oncogenic avian tumor viruses based on shared transformation-specific (onc) RNA sequences. E26 causes predominantly erythroblastosis in chicken and in quail, whereas AMV induces a myeloid leukemia. However, upon cultivation in vitro for >1 month, a majority of surviving hemopoietic cells of E26-infected animals bear myeloid markers similar to those of AMV-transformed cells. We have analyzed the genetic structure and gene products of E26 virus for a comparison with those of AMV. An E26/helper virus complex was found to contain two RNA species: a 5.7-kilobase (kb) RNA that hybridizes with cloned AMV-specific proviral DNA and hence is probably the E26 genome; and an 8.5-kb RNA that is unrelated to AMV and represents helper virus RNA. Thus, E26 RNA is smaller than 7.5-kb AMV RNA. Hybridization of size-selected poly(A)-terminating E26 RNA fragments with AMV-specific DNA indicated that the shared specific sequences are located in the 5′ half of the E26 genome as opposed to a 3′ location in AMV RNA. In nonproducer cells transformed in vitro by E26, a gag-related nonstructural 135,000-dalton protein (p135) was found. No gag(Pr76) or gag-pol (Pr180) precursors of essential virion proteins, which are present in AMV nonproducer cells, were observed. p135 was also found in cultured E26 virus producing cells of several leukemic chickens, and its intracellular concentration relative to that of the essential virion proteins encoded by the helper virus correlates with the ratio of E26 to helper RNA in virions released by these cells. p135 is phosphorylated but not glycosylated; antigenically it is not related to the pol or env gene products. It appears to be coded for by a partial gag gene and by E26-specific RNA sequences, presumably including those shared with AMV. Hence, AMV and E26 appear to use different strategies for the

  16. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  17. Global metabolic profiling of infection by an oncogenic virus: KSHV induces and requires lipogenesis for survival of latent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracie Delgado

    Full Text Available Like cancer cells, virally infected cells have dramatically altered metabolic requirements. We analyzed global metabolic changes induced by latent infection with an oncogenic virus, Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS, the most common tumor of AIDS patients. Approximately one-third of the nearly 200 measured metabolites were altered following latent infection of endothelial cells by KSHV, including many metabolites of anabolic pathways common to most cancer cells. KSHV induced pathways that are commonly altered in cancer cells including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, amino acid production and fatty acid synthesis. Interestingly, over half of the detectable long chain fatty acids detected in our screen were significantly increased by latent KSHV infection. KSHV infection leads to the elevation of metabolites involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, not degradation from phospholipids, and leads to increased lipid droplet organelle formation in the infected cells. Fatty acid synthesis is required for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells, as inhibition of key enzymes in this pathway led to apoptosis of infected cells. Addition of palmitic acid to latently infected cells treated with a fatty acid synthesis inhibitor protected the cells from death indicating that the products of this pathway are essential. Our metabolomic analysis of KSHV-infected cells provides insight as to how oncogenic viruses can induce metabolic alterations common to cancer cells. Furthermore, this analysis raises the possibility that metabolic pathways may provide novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of latent KSHV infection and ultimately KS tumors.

  18. A conditional piggyBac transposition system for genetic screening in mice identifies oncogenic networks in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Roland; Rad, Lena; Wang, Wei; Strong, Alexander; Ponstingl, Hannes; Bronner, Iraad F; Mayho, Matthew; Steiger, Katja; Weber, Julia; Hieber, Maren; Veltkamp, Christian; Eser, Stefan; Geumann, Ulf; Öllinger, Rupert; Zukowska, Magdalena; Barenboim, Maxim; Maresch, Roman; Cadiñanos, Juan; Friedrich, Mathias; Varela, Ignacio; Constantino-Casas, Fernando; Sarver, Aaron; Ten Hoeve, Jelle; Prosser, Haydn; Seidler, Barbara; Bauer, Judith; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Krug, Anne; Ehmer, Ursula; Schneider, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Rümmele, Petra; Aust, Daniela; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ning, Zemin; Wessels, Lodewyk; Schmid, Roland M; Quail, Michael A; Vassiliou, George; Esposito, Irene; Liu, Pentao; Saur, Dieter; Bradley, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a conditional piggyBac transposition system in mice and report the discovery of large sets of new cancer genes through a pancreatic insertional mutagenesis screen. We identify Foxp1 as an oncogenic transcription factor that drives pancreatic cancer invasion and spread in a mouse model and correlates with lymph node metastasis in human patients with pancreatic cancer. The propensity of piggyBac for open chromatin also enabled genome-wide screening for cancer-relevant noncoding DNA, which pinpointed a Cdkn2a cis-regulatory region. Histologically, we observed different tumor subentities and discovered associated genetic events, including Fign insertions in hepatoid pancreatic cancer. Our studies demonstrate the power of genetic screening to discover cancer drivers that are difficult to identify by other approaches to cancer genome analysis, such as downstream targets of commonly mutated human cancer genes. These piggyBac resources are universally applicable in any tissue context and provide unique experimental access to the genetic complexity of cancer.

  19. Changing faces in virology: The Dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Belcaid (Zineb); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); V.W. Beusechem (Victor); R.C. Hoeben (Rob)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transform

  20. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations

  1. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction method to detect oncogenic Marek's disease virus from feather tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shiro; Chang, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Sung-Il; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2007-09-01

    For the easy survey of Marek's disease virus (MDV), feather tip-derived DNA from MDV-infected chickens can be used because feather tips are easy to collect and feather follicle epithelium is known to be the only site of productive replication of cell-free MDV. To develop a diagnostic method to differentiate highly virulent strains of MDV from the attenuated MDV vaccine strain, CVI988, which is widely used, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect a segment of the meq gene in feather tip samples of chickens experimentally infected with MDV. In chickens infected with Md5, a strain of oncogenic MDV, the meq gene was consistently detected, whereas the L-meq gene, in which a 180-base pair (180-bp) sequence is inserted into the meq gene, was detected in CVI988-infected chickens. Moreover, the meq gene was mainly detected even in chickens co-infected with both Md5 and CVI988. These results suggest that this method is appropriate for the surveillance of the highly virulent MDV infection in the field.

  3. Molecular cloning of the avian erythroblastosis virus genome and recovery of oncogenic virus by transfection of chicken cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennström, B; Fanshier, L; Moscovici, C; Bishop, J M

    1980-01-01

    Avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) causes erythroblastosis and sarcomas in birds and transforms both erythroblasts and fibroblasts to neoplastic phenotypes in culture. The viral genetic locus required for oncogenesis by AEV is at present poorly defined; moreover, we know very little of the mechanism of tumorigenesis by the virus. To facilitate further analysis of these problems, we used molecular cloning to isolate the genome of AEV as recombinant DNA in a procaryotic vector. The identity of the isolated DNA was verified by mapping with restriction endonucleases and by tests for biological activity. The circular form of unintegrated AEV DNA was purified from synchronously infected quail cells and cloned into the EcoRI site of lambda gtWES x B. A restriction endonuclease cleavage map was established. By hybridization with complementary DNA probes representing specific parts of avian retrovirus genomes, the restriction map of the cloned AEV DNAs was correlated with a genetic map. These data show that nucleotide sequences unique to AEV comprise at least 50% of the genome and are located approximately in the middle of the AEV genome. Our data confirm and extend previous descriptions of the AEV genome obtained by other procedures. We studied in detail two recombinant clones containing AEV DNA: the topography of the viral DNA in the two clones was virtually identical, except that one clone apparently contained two copies of the terminal redundancy that occurs in linear viral DNA isolated from infected cells; the other clone probably contained only one copy of the redundant sequence. To recover infectious virus from the cloned DNA, we developed a procedure for transfection that compensated for the defectiveness of AEV in replication. We accomplished this by ligating cloned AEV DNA to the cloned DNA of a retrovirus (Rous-associated virus type 1) whose genome could complement the deficiencies of AEV. Ligation of the two viral DNAs was facilitated by using a neutral fragment

  4. Genome Sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Oat dwarf virus, Turnip curly top virus, and Wheat dwarf virus Identified in Leafhoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Mehdi; Pouramini, Najmeh; Masumi, Hossain; Farkas, Kata; Kraberger, Simona

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Implementation of a vector-enabled metagenomics approach resulted in the identification of various geminiviruses. We identified the genome sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Turnip curly top viruses, Oat dwarf viruses, the first from Iran, and Wheat dwarf virus from leafhoppers feeding on beet, parsley, pumpkin, and turnip plants. PMID:28232449

  5. Genome-wide screening for genetic alterations in esophageal cancer by aCGH identifies 11q13 amplification oncogenes associated with nodal metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is highly prevalent in China and other Asian countries, as a major cause of cancer-related mortality. ESCC displays complex chromosomal abnormalities, including multiple structural and numerical aberrations. Chromosomal abnormalities, such as recurrent amplifications and homozygous deletions, directly contribute to tumorigenesis through altering the expression of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: To understand the role of genetic alterations in ESCC pathogenesis and identify critical amplification/deletion targets, we performed genome-wide 1-Mb array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH analysis for 10 commonly used ESCC cell lines. Recurrent chromosomal gains were frequently detected on 3q26-27, 5p15-14, 8p12, 8p22-24, 11q13, 13q21-31, 18p11 and 20q11-13, with frequent losses also found on 8p23-22, 11q22, 14q32 and 18q11-23. Gain of 11q13.3-13.4 was the most frequent alteration in ESCC. Within this region, CCND1 oncogene was identified with high level of amplification and overexpression in ESCC, while FGF19 and SHANK2 was also remarkably over-expressed. Moreover, a high concordance (91.5% of gene amplification and protein overexpression of CCND1 was observed in primary ESCC tumors. CCND1 amplification/overexpression was also significantly correlated with the lymph node metastasis of ESCC. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that genomic gain of 11q13 is the major mechanism contributing to the amplification. Novel oncogenes identified within the 11q13 amplicon including FGF19 and SHANK2 may play important roles in ESCC tumorigenesis.

  6. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  7. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Mark A; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Podolsky, Robert H; Arnouk, Hilal; Ferris, Daron G; Dynan, William S; Stöppler, Hubert

    2009-08-23

    Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs) is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19-21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23%) of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2%) were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1); and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27). This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  8. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnouk Hilal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Results Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19–21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23% of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2% were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1; and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27. Conclusion This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  9. RNA-Sequencing Analysis of 5' Capped RNAs Identifies Many New Differentially Expressed Genes in Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret S. E. Heale

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first report of RNA sequencing of 5' capped (Pol II RNAs isolated from acutely hepatitis C virus (HCV infected Huh 7.5 cells that provides a general approach to identifying differentially expressed annotated and unannotated genes that participate in viral-host interactions. We identified 100, 684, and 1,844 significantly differentially expressed annotated genes in acutely infected proliferative Huh 7.5 cells at 6, 48, and 72 hours, respectively (fold change ≥ 1.5 and Bonferroni adjusted p-values < 0.05. Most of the differentially expressed genes (>80% and biological pathways (such as adipocytokine, Notch, Hedgehog and NOD-like receptor signaling were not identified by previous gene array studies. These genes are critical components of host immune, inflammatory and oncogenic pathways and provide new information regarding changes that may benefit the virus or mediate HCV induced pathology. RNAi knockdown studies of newly identified highly upregulated FUT1 and KLHDC7B genes provide evidence that their gene products regulate and facilitate HCV replication in hepatocytes. Our approach also identified novel Pol II unannotated transcripts that were upregulated. Results further identify new pathways that regulate HCV replication in hepatocytes and suggest that our approach will have general applications in studying viral-host interactions in model systems and clinical biospecimens.

  10. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, Hamid H; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C; Edgerton, Susan M; Lucia, M Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D; Porter, Christopher C; Lambert, James R

    2016-03-29

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells.

  11. Oncogenic signaling pathways and origins of tumor-initiating stem-like cells of hepatocellular carcinomas induced by hepatitis C virus, alcohol and/or obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Machida, Keigo

    2014-07-01

    This review article discusses the importance and oncogenic signaling pathways of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in several etiologies of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcohol, obesity and/or chemicals. Stem cells may be present in cancer tissue, and a hierarchy of cells is formed, as is the case for normal tissue. Tumor formation, growth and propagation are maintained by a small proportion of cells with stem cell-like properties. TICs are present in alcohol-fed HCV transgenic mice, diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital-treated mice (chemical carcinogenesis) and Spnb2 +/- mice (defective TGF-β signal). Alcohol/obesity-associated endotoxemia induces the stem cell marker Nanog through TLR4 signaling to generate TICs and liver tumors in several HCC models. The oncogenic pathway (such as the STAT3 and TLR4-NANOG pathway) and mechanism of generation of TICs of HCCs associated with HCV, alcohol and obesity are discussed. Understanding the molecular stemness signaling and cellular hierarchy and defining key TIC-specific genes will accelerate the development of novel biomarkers and treatment strategies. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of liver TICs and discusses unanswered questions about the concept of liver TICs. (This project was supported by NIH grants 1R01AA018857 and P50AA11999).

  12. Involvement of V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 in regulation of transcription activity of MDR1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Xiaoqing Zeng; Tiancheng Luo; Wei Jin; Shiyao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Over-expression of MDR1 confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancers and remains a major cause for the failure of chemotherapy.In the present study,we found that V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2(ETS2) could activate MDR1 transcription and P-glyco-protein (P-gp) expression in SGC7901 cells.Knockdown of ETS2 attenuated MDR1 transcription and P-gp expression,and increased the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs that were transported by P-gp in SGC7901/VCR cells.ETS2 could bind to the ETS2 sites on the MDR1 promoter and activate its transcription.The regulation of MDR1 expression by ETS2 may provide potential ways to overcome MDR in cancer treatment.

  13. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  14. Oncogenes in melanoma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumour with poor prognosis in the metastatic stage. BRAF, NRAS, and KIT are three well-known oncogenes involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Targeting of mutated BRAF kinase has recently been shown to significantly improve overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients, underscoring the particular role of this oncogene in melanoma biology. However, recurrences regularly occur within several months, which supposedly involve further oncogenes. Moreover, oncogenic driver mutations have not been described for up to 30% of all melanomas. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the mutational landscape of melanoma, more recent studies used high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. A number of new oncogene candidates such as MAPK1/2, ERBB4, GRIN2A, GRM3, RAC1, and PREX2 were identified. Their particular role in melanoma biology is currently under investigation. Evidence for the functional relevance of some of these new oncogene candidates has been provided in in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, these findings await further validation in clinical studies. This review provides an overview on well-known melanoma oncogenes and new oncogene candidates, based on recent high-throughput sequencing studies. The list of genes discussed herein is of course not complete but highlights some of the most significant of recent findings in this area. The new candidates may support more individualized treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma patients in the future.

  15. Integrative Functional Genomics Analysis of Sustained Polyploidy Phenotypes in Breast Cancer Cells Identifies an Oncogenic Profile for GINS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha K. Rantala

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy is among the most obvious differences between normal and cancer cells. However, mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of aneuploid cell growth are diverse and incompletely understood. Functional genomics analyses have shown that aneuploidy in cancer cells is correlated with diffuse gene expression signatures and aneuploidy can arise by a variety of mechanisms, including cytokinesis failures, DNA endoreplication, and possibly through polyploid intermediate states. To identify molecular processes contributing to development of aneuploidy, we used a cell spot microarray technique to identify genes inducing polyploidy and/or allowing maintenance of polyploid cell growth in breast cancer cells. Of 5760 human genes screened, 177 were found to induce severe DNA content alterations on prolonged transient silencing. Association with response to DNA damage stimulus and DNA repair was found to be the most enriched cellular processes among the candidate genes. Functional validation analysis of these genes highlighted GINS2 as the highest ranking candidate inducing polyploidy, accumulation of endogenous DNA damage, and impairing cell proliferation on inhibition. The cell growth inhibition and induction of polyploidy by suppression of GINS2 was verified in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Bioinformatic analysis of published gene expression and DNA copy number studies of clinical breast tumors suggested GINS2 to be associated with the aggressive characteristics of a subgroup of breast cancers in vivo. In addition, nuclear GINS2 protein levels distinguished actively proliferating cancer cells suggesting potential use of GINS2 staining as a biomarker of cell proliferation as well as a potential therapeutic target.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY HEPATITIS E VIRUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a waterborne emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Thus far, an HEV outbreak has not been reported in the U.S., although a swine variant of the virus is common in Midwestern hogs. Because viruses isolated from two ...

  17. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. (Hopital Cochin, Paris (France))

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  18. Rubus canadensis virus 1, a novel betaflexivirus identified in blackberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ghanem-Sabanadzovic, Nina; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Sabanadzovic, Sead

    2013-02-01

    Flexuous filaments, resembling flexivirus virions, were observed in partially purified blackberry preparations showing mild virus-like symptoms. Further tests revealed the presence of a novel betaflexivirus that is phylogenetically related to foveaviruses. The putative virus-encoded proteins shared limited similarity with orthologs of known members of the genus, indicating that the virus, provisionally named Rubus canadensis virus 1 (RuCV-1), represents a novel member of the taxon. Results of a survey in several U.S. states suggest that RuCV-1 is not widespread in the blackberry germplasm.

  19. Guidelines for Identifying Homologous Recombination Events in Influenza A Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boni, M.F.; de Jong, M.D.; van Doorn, H.R.; Holmes, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid evolution of influenza viruses occurs both clonally and non-clonally through a variety of genetic mechanisms and selection pressures. The non-clonal evolution of influenza viruses comprises relatively frequent reassortment among gene segments and a more rarely reported process of

  20. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lielian; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lingzhi; Tang, Yunlian; Wu, Hongzhuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Meijuan; Du, Shujuan; Zhao, Lian; Cao, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Lu, Jianhong

    2015-12-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293-1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change of 293 sublineage cells for EBV harboring also got similar result. To seek the underlying reason, the copy number of EBV genome in all the cell lines was detected. The result indicated that 293-EBV contained about 4.5-fold higher EBV copies than 293-1/NL did. Parallel EBV genomes led to relatively stable copies in different 293 sublineages, suggesting the viral genome structure is a factor for the sustainability of EBV's copy number. Moreover, the LMP1 transcription in high copy-containing cells showed abnormally high level. Furthermore, the main LMP1-driven pathway, transcription factor NF-κB, was highly activated in high-copy cells. Here we first manifest by experimental model that the copy number of EBV latent genome correlates with the viral pathogenesis, which depends on the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB. Overall, both the presence and amount of EBV genome are crucial for the viral oncogenicity.

  1. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates the induction of pro-oncogenic and fibrogenic phenotypes in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisi, Anna; Arciello, Mario; Petrini, Stefania; Conti, Beatrice; Missale, Gabriele; Balsano, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiological factors involved in fibrosis development and its progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pivotal role of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) in fibrogenesis is now certainly accepted, while the network of molecular interactions connecting HCV is emerging as a master regulator of several biological processes including proliferation, inflammation, cytoskeleton and ECM remodeling. In this study, the effects of HCV proteins expression on liver cancer cells, both pro-invasive and pro-fibrogenic phenotypes were explored. As a model of HCV infection, we used permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells infected with JFH1-derived ccHCV. Conditioned medium from these cells was used to stimulate LX-2 cells, a line of HSCs. We found that the HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells decreased adhesion, increased migration and caused the delocalization of alpha-actinin from plasma membrane to cytoplasm and increased expression levels of paxillin. The treatment of LX-2 cells, with conditioned medium from HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells, caused an increase in cell proliferation, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, hyaluronic acid release and apoptosis rate measured as cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). These effects were accompanied in Huh7.5.1 cells by an HCV-dependent increasing of FAK activation that physically interacts with phosphorylated paxillin and alpha-actinin, and a rising of tumor necrosis factor alpha production/release. Silencing of FAK by siRNA reverted all effects of HCV infection, both those directed on Huh7.5.1 cells, and those indirect effects on the LX-2 cells. Moreover and interestingly, FAK inhibition enhances apoptosis in HCV-conditioned LX-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HCV, through FAK activation, may promote cytoskeletal reorganization and a pro-oncogenic phenotype in hepatocyte-like cells, and a fibrogenic phenotype in HSCs.

  2. Identification and partial characterization of Taastrup virus: a newly identified member species of the Mononegavirales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bock, J.O.; Lundsgaard, T.; Pedersen, P.A.;

    2004-01-01

    We present a 8904-nt sequence of the central part of the RNA genome of a novel virus with a filovirus-like, nonidentical morphology named Taastrup Virus (TV) detected in the leafhopper Psammotettix alienus. Sequence analysis identified five potential open reading frames (ORFs) and a complex patte...

  3. [Mechanism of the cancerogenesis in cervix paraepidermal epithelium cells with chronic infection of oncogenic types of human papiloma virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzia, Witold; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2007-09-01

    The human papillomavirus family is composed of a large number of different and variably related types, each of which is associated with a characteristic set of epithelial lesions. Each of the many identified types of human papillomavirus have shown considerable specificity of different anatomical sites and different characteristic lesions. HPV 6 and 11 are frequently associated with benign condylomas, while HPV 16 and 18 are associated with malignant progression and cervical cancer. The genome of papillomaviruses is composed of a circular double stranded DNA. Various open reading frames (ORFs) are located on only one DNA strand. The coding strand contains from 8 to 10 translational ORFs. Among them, only 6 to 8 were designated as early and 2 as late. The role of HPVs 16 and 18 in uterine cervix carcinoma has been well-documented, but their contriobution to carcinogenesis of other neoplasias is still questionable.

  4. The Exceptional Oncogenicity of HTLV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Yutaka; Gallo, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) is the first pathogenic human retrovirus identified in 1979 by the Gallo group. HTLV-1 causes fatal T-cell leukemia (adult T cell leukemia) and a progressive myelopahy (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/ tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP) and other disorders. Since the discovery of HTLV-1, several other microorganisms are demonstrated to cause cancer in humans. In this article, we investigated the oncogenic capacity of HTLV-1, in comparison with those of other oncoviruses and one oncobacterium (Helicobacter pylori, H. Pylori) based on published literature. We conclude here that HTLV-1 is one of the most and may be the most carcinogenic among them and arguably one of the most potent of the known human carcinogens. This fact has not been noted before and is particularly important to justify why we need to study HTLV-1 as an important model of human viral oncogenesis.

  5. The role of infections and coinfections with newly identified and emerging respiratory viruses in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debiaggi Maurizia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity in children both in developed and developing countries. A wide range of respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, influenza A and B viruses, parainfluenza viruses (PIVs, adenovirus, rhinovirus (HRV, have repeatedly been detected in acute lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI in children in the past decades. However, in the last ten years thanks to progress in molecular technologies, newly discovered viruses have been identified including human Metapneumovirus (hMPV, coronaviruses NL63 (HcoV-NL63 and HKU1 (HcoV-HKU1, human Bocavirus (HBoV, new enterovirus (HEV, parechovirus (HpeV and rhinovirus (HRV strains, polyomaviruses WU (WUPyV and KI (KIPyV and the pandemic H1N1v influenza A virus. These discoveries have heavily modified previous knowledge on respiratory infections mainly highlighting that pediatric population is exposed to a variety of viruses with similar seasonal patterns. In this context establishing a causal link between a newly identified virus and the disease as well as an association between mixed infections and an increase in disease severity can be challenging. This review will present an overview of newly recognized as well as the main emerging respiratory viruses and seek to focus on the their contribution to infection and co-infection in LRTIs in childhood.

  6. Report of isolations of unusual lyssaviruses (rabies and Mokola virus identified retrospectively from Zimbabwe : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bingham

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Rabies isolates that had been stored between 1983 and 1997 were examined with a panel of anti-lyssavirus nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Out of 56 isolates from cats and various wild carnivore species, 1 isolate of Mokola virus and 5 other non-typical rabies viruses were identified. The Mokola virus isolate was diagnosed as rabies in 1993 from a cat. Genetic analysis of this isolate suggests that it falls in a distinct subgroup of the Mokola virus genotype. The 5 non-typical rabies viruses were isolated from honey badgers (Mellivora capensis, African civets (Civettictis civetta and an unidentified mongoose (Herpestidae. These isolates are representatives of rarely-reported wildlife-associated strains of rabies, probably maintained by the slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea. These findings indicate that both Mokola virus and the mongoose-associated variant may be more common in Zimbabwe than is apparent from routine surveillance.

  7. An optimized polymerase chain reaction assay to identify avian virus vaccine contamination with Chicken anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Haitham M; Elzahed, Hanan M; Elabiare, Elham A; Badawy, Ahmed A; Yousef, Ausama A

    2011-01-01

    The use of embryonating chicken eggs in preparation of avian virus vaccines is the principle cause for contamination with Chicken anemia virus (CAV). Identification of CAV in contaminated vaccines relies on the expensive, tedious, and time-consuming practice of virus isolation in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The experience of the last 2 decades indicates that polymerase chain reaction is extending to replace most of the classic methods for detection of infectious agents. In the present report, a simple, rapid, and accurate polymerase chain reaction method for detection of CAV in poultry vaccines is described. Oligonucleotide primers homologous to highly conserved sequences of the VP1 gene were used to amplify a fragment of 676 bp. The developed assay was specific for detecting CAV from different sources, with no cross reactivity with many avian viruses. No inter- and intra-assay variations were observed. The analytical sensitivity of the test was high enough to detect 5 TCID(50) (50% tissue culture infective dose) of the virus per reaction; however, different factors related to the vaccine matrix showed considerable effects on the detection limit. In conclusion, this method may represent a suitable alternative to virus isolation for identification of CAV contamination of poultry virus vaccines.

  8. Metagenomic analysis of viruses associated with field-grown and retail lettuce identifies human and animal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Tiong Gim; Wengert, Samantha; Rose, Joan B

    2016-04-16

    The emergence of culture- and sequence-independent metagenomic methods has not only provided great insight into the microbial community structure in a wide range of clinical and environmental samples but has also proven to be powerful tools for pathogen detection. Recent studies of the food microbiome have revealed the vast genetic diversity of bacteria associated with fresh produce. However, no work has been done to apply metagenomic methods to tackle viruses associated with fresh produce for addressing food safety. Thus, there is a little knowledge about the presence and diversity of viruses associated with fresh produce from farm-to-fork. To address this knowledge gap, we assessed viruses on commercial romaine and iceberg lettuces in fields and a produce distribution center using a shotgun metagenomic sequencing targeting both RNA and DNA viruses. Commercial lettuce harbors an immense assemblage of viruses that infect a wide range of hosts. As expected, plant pathogenic viruses dominated these communities. Sequences of rotaviruses and picobirnaviruses were also identified in both field-harvest and retail lettuce samples, suggesting an emerging foodborne transmission threat that has yet to be fully recognized. The identification of human and animal viruses in lettuce samples in the field emphasizes the importance of preventing viral contamination on leafy greens starting at the field. Although there are still some inherent experimental and bioinformatics challenges in applying viral metagenomic approaches for food safety testing, this work will facilitate further application of this unprecedented deep sequencing method to food samples.

  9. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  10. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK mediates the induction of pro-oncogenic and fibrogenic phenotypes in hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alisi

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is one of the most common etiological factors involved in fibrosis development and its progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The pivotal role of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs and extracellular matrix (ECM in fibrogenesis is now certainly accepted, while the network of molecular interactions connecting HCV is emerging as a master regulator of several biological processes including proliferation, inflammation, cytoskeleton and ECM remodeling. In this study, the effects of HCV proteins expression on liver cancer cells, both pro-invasive and pro-fibrogenic phenotypes were explored. As a model of HCV infection, we used permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells infected with JFH1-derived ccHCV. Conditioned medium from these cells was used to stimulate LX-2 cells, a line of HSCs. We found that the HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells decreased adhesion, increased migration and caused the delocalization of alpha-actinin from plasma membrane to cytoplasm and increased expression levels of paxillin. The treatment of LX-2 cells, with conditioned medium from HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells, caused an increase in cell proliferation, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, hyaluronic acid release and apoptosis rate measured as cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. These effects were accompanied in Huh7.5.1 cells by an HCV-dependent increasing of FAK activation that physically interacts with phosphorylated paxillin and alpha-actinin, and a rising of tumor necrosis factor alpha production/release. Silencing of FAK by siRNA reverted all effects of HCV infection, both those directed on Huh7.5.1 cells, and those indirect effects on the LX-2 cells. Moreover and interestingly, FAK inhibition enhances apoptosis in HCV-conditioned LX-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HCV, through FAK activation, may promote cytoskeletal reorganization and a pro-oncogenic phenotype in hepatocyte-like cells, and a fibrogenic phenotype in

  11. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC, a subset of cervical cancer (CxC. Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7 includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18 targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1 of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1. Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent

  12. Newly identified RNAs of raspberry leaf blotch virus encoding a related group of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuwen; McGavin, Wendy; Cock, Peter J A; Schnettler, Esther; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Members of the genus Emaravirus, including Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), are enveloped plant viruses with segmented genomes of negative-strand RNA, although the complete genome complement for any of these viruses is not yet clear. Currently, wheat mosaic virus has the largest emaravirus genome comprising eight RNAs. Previously, we identified five genomic RNAs for RLBV; here, we identify a further three RNAs (RNA6-8). RNA6-8 encode proteins that have clear homologies to one another, but not to any other emaravirus proteins. The proteins self-interacted in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments, and the P8 protein interacted with the virus nucleocapsid protein (P3) using BiFC. Expression of two of the proteins (P6 and P7) using potato virus X led to an increase in virus titre and symptom severity, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in RLBV pathogenicity; however, using two different tests, RNA silencing suppression activity was not detected for any of the RLBV proteins encoded by RNA2-8.

  13. A BSL-4 High-Throughput Screen Identifies Sulfonamide Inhibitors of Nipah Virus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-...

  14. Copy Number Analysis of 24 Oncogenes: MDM4 Identified as a Putative Marker for Low Recurrence Risk in Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Salvi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC generally have a high risk of relapsing locally after primary tumor resection. The search for new predictive markers of local recurrence thus represents an important goal for the management of this disease. We studied the copy number variations (CNVs of 24 oncogenes (MDM4, MYCN, ALK, PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, DHFR, EGFR, MET, SMO, FGFR1, MYC, ABL1, RET, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, MDM2, AURKB, ERBB2, TOP2A, AURKA, AR and BRAF using multiplex ligation probe amplification technique to verify their role as predictive markers of recurrence. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 43 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB were used; 23 patients had relapsed and 20 were disease-free after 5 years. Amplification frequencies were analyzed for all genes and MDM4 was the only gene that showed significantly higher amplification in non recurrent patients than in recurrent ones (0.65 vs. 0.3; Fisher’s test p = 0.023. Recurrence-free survival analysis confirmed the predictive role of MDM4 (log-rank test p = 0.041. Our preliminary results indicate a putative role for the MDM4 gene in predicting local recurrence of bladder cancer. Confirmation of this hypothesis is needed in a larger cohort of NMIBC patients.

  15. Senna leaf curl virus: a novel begomovirus identified in Senna occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitesh; Alok, Anshu; Kumar, Jitendra; Tuli, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    Begomoviruses are whitefly-transmitted, single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a variety of cultivated (crop) and non-cultivated (weed) plants. The present study identified a novel begomovirus and satellites (alpha- and betasatellite) in Senna occidentalis (syn. Cassia occidentalis) showing leaf curl symptoms. The begomovirus shared a maximum sequence identity of 88.6 % with french bean leaf curl virus (JQ866297), whereas the alphasatellite and the betasatellite shared identities of 98 % and 90 % with ageratum yellow vein India alphasatellite (LK054802) and papaya leaf curl betasatellite (HM143906), respectively. No other begomovirus or satellites were detected in the suspected plants. We propose to name the virus "senna leaf curl virus" (SenLCuV).

  16. Identifying potential virulence determinants in viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Scott; Collet, Bertrand; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2009-01-01

    We identified viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates classified within Genotype Ib which are genetically similar (>99.4% glycoprotein amino acid identity) yet, based on their isolation history, were suspected to differ in virulence in juvenile rainbow trout. The virulence of an isol......We identified viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates classified within Genotype Ib which are genetically similar (>99.4% glycoprotein amino acid identity) yet, based on their isolation history, were suspected to differ in virulence in juvenile rainbow trout. The virulence...... the same experimental infection routes (...

  17. Transmission dynamics of the recently-identified BYD virus causing duck egg-drop syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen K Vaidya

    Full Text Available Baiyangdian (BYD virus is a recently-identified mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes severe disease in ducks, with extremely rapid transmission, up to 15% mortality within 10 days and 90% reduction in egg production on duck farms within 5 days of infection. Because of the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses, the characterization of BYD virus and its epidemiology are important public health concerns. Here, we develop a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of this novel virus. We validate the model against BYD outbreak data collected from duck farms in Southeast China, as well as experimental data obtained from an animal facility. Based on our model, the basic reproductive number of BYD virus is high (R(0 = 21 indicating that this virus is highly transmissible, consistent with the dramatic epidemiology observed in BYDV-affected duck farms. Our results indicate that younger ducks are more vulnerable to BYD disease and that ducks infected with BYD virus reduce egg production (to about 33% on average for about 3 days post-infection; after 3 days infected ducks are no longer able to produce eggs. Using our model, we predict that control measures which reduce contact between mosquitoes and ducks such as mosquito nets are more effective than insecticides.

  18. Transmission dynamics of the recently-identified BYD virus causing duck egg-drop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Naveen K; Wang, Feng-bin; Zou, Xingfu; Wahl, Lindi M

    2012-01-01

    Baiyangdian (BYD) virus is a recently-identified mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes severe disease in ducks, with extremely rapid transmission, up to 15% mortality within 10 days and 90% reduction in egg production on duck farms within 5 days of infection. Because of the zoonotic nature of flaviviruses, the characterization of BYD virus and its epidemiology are important public health concerns. Here, we develop a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of this novel virus. We validate the model against BYD outbreak data collected from duck farms in Southeast China, as well as experimental data obtained from an animal facility. Based on our model, the basic reproductive number of BYD virus is high (R(0) = 21) indicating that this virus is highly transmissible, consistent with the dramatic epidemiology observed in BYDV-affected duck farms. Our results indicate that younger ducks are more vulnerable to BYD disease and that ducks infected with BYD virus reduce egg production (to about 33% on average) for about 3 days post-infection; after 3 days infected ducks are no longer able to produce eggs. Using our model, we predict that control measures which reduce contact between mosquitoes and ducks such as mosquito nets are more effective than insecticides.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of rubella viruses identified in Uganda, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namuwulya, Prossy; Abernathy, Emily; Bukenya, Henry; Bwogi, Josephine; Tushabe, Phionah; Birungi, Molly; Seguya, Ronald; Kabaliisa, Theopista; Alibu, Vincent P; Kayondo, Jonathan K; Rivailler, Pierre; Icenogle, Joseph; Bakamutumaho, Barnabas

    2014-12-01

    Molecular data on rubella viruses are limited in Uganda despite the importance of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Routine rubella vaccination, while not administered currently in Uganda, is expected to begin by 2015. The World Health Organization recommends that countries without rubella vaccination programs assess the burden of rubella and CRS before starting a routine vaccination program. Uganda is already involved in integrated case-based surveillance, including laboratory testing to confirm measles and rubella, but molecular epidemiologic aspects of rubella circulation have so far not been documented in Uganda. Twenty throat swab or oral fluid samples collected from 12 districts during routine rash and fever surveillance between 2003 and 2012 were identified as rubella virus RNA positive and PCR products encompassing the region used for genotyping were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the 20 sequences identified 19 genotype 1G viruses and 1 genotype 1E virus. Genotype-specific trees showed that the Uganda viruses belonged to specific clusters for both genotypes 1G and 1E and grouped with similar sequences from neighboring countries. Genotype 1G was predominant in Uganda. More epidemiological and molecular epidemiological data are required to determine if genotype 1E is also endemic in Uganda. The information obtained in this study will assist the immunization program in monitoring changes in circulating genotypes.

  20. Construction of recombinant Marek's disease virus (MDV) lacking the meq oncogene and co-expressing AIV-H9N2 HA and NA genes under control of exogenous promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Chen, Wenqing; Ma, Chengtai; Zhao, Peng; Duan, Luntao; Zhang, Fushou; Sun, Aijun; Li, Yanpeng; Su, Hongqin; Li, Sifei; Cui, He; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-07-10

    To develop a recombinant Marek's disease virus (rMDV1) co-expressing the hemagglutinin gene (HA) and neuramidinase gene (NA) from a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H9N2 strain and lacking the meq oncogene that shares homology with the Jun/Fos family of transcriptional factors, a wild strain of MDV GX0101 was used as parental virus, the HA and NA genes co-expression cassette under control of the CMV and SV40 early promoters was inserted at two meq sites of GX0101 to form a new meq knock-out mutant MDV (MZC12HA/NA) through homologous recombination. MZC12HA/NA was reconstituted by transfection of recombinant BAC-MDV DNA into the secondary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. Highly purified MZC12HA/NA was obtained after four rounds of plaque purification and proliferation. In vitro growth properties of recombinant virus were also inspected and concluded that the MZC12HA/NA had the same growth kinetics in CEF cultures as its parental wild type virus GX0101. Southern blot indicated that co-expression cassette was successfully inserted at two copies sites of meq gene, so two meq genes were knocked-out completely. RT-qPCR showed transcription and expression levels of the HA and NA genes were both significantly higher than that of GX0101 own pp38 gene. Indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) test, and Western blot analyses indicated that HA and NA genes were co-expressed simultaneously under control of the different promoters but meq genes were not. These results herald a new and effective recombinant meq-deleted MDV-based AIV-H9N2 vaccine may be useful in protecting chickens from very virulent MDV and H9N2 challenges.

  1. Imaging oncogene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Archana [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: Archana.Mukherjee@jefferson.edu; Wickstrom, Eric [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, 233S, 10th street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu; Thakur, Mathew L. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: Mathew.Thakur@jefferson.edu

    2009-05-15

    This review briefly outlines the importance of molecular imaging, particularly imaging of endogenous gene expression for noninvasive genetic analysis of radiographic masses. The concept of antisense imaging agents and the advantages and challenges in the development of hybridization probes for in vivo imaging are described. An overview of the investigations on oncogene expression imaging is given. Finally, the need for further improvement in antisense-based imaging agents and directions to improve oncogene mRNA targeting is stated.

  2. A BSL-4 high-throughput screen identifies sulfonamide inhibitors of Nipah virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigabu, Bersabeh; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Tower, Nichole; Saeed, Mohammad; Bukreyev, Alexander; Rockx, Barry; LeDuc, James W; Noah, James W

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus is a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen that causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. To identify novel small molecules that target Nipah virus replication as potential therapeutics, Southern Research Institute and Galveston National Laboratory jointly developed an automated high-throughput screening platform that is capable of testing 10,000 compounds per day within BSL-4 biocontainment. Using this platform, we screened a 10,080-compound library using a cell-based, high-throughput screen for compounds that inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect. From this pilot effort, 23 compounds were identified with EC50 values ranging from 3.9 to 20.0 μM and selectivities >10. Three sulfonamide compounds with EC50 values BSL-4 containment changes the paradigm for drug discovery for highly pathogenic agents because this platform can be readily modified to identify prophylactic and postexposure therapeutic candidates against other BSL-4 pathogens, particularly Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

  3. New avian influenza A virus subtype combination H5N7 identified in Danish mallard ducks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    7, was identified. The HA gene showed great. sequence similarity to the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAIV) A/Chicken/ftaly/312/97 (H5N2); however, the cleavage site sequence between HA1 and HA2 had a motif typical for low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV). The full-length NA......During the past years increasing incidences of influenza A zoonosis have made it of uppermost importance to possess methods for rapid and precise identification and characterisation of influenza A Viruses. We present here a convenient one-step RT-PCR method that will amplify full...... sequence was most closely related to the HPAIV A/Chicken/Netheriancts/01/03 (H7N7) that infected chickens and humans in the Netherlands in 2003. Ten persons with direct or indirect contact with the Danish mallard ducks showed signs Of influenza-like illness 2-3 clays following the killing of the ducks...

  4. Data fusion and machine learning to identify threat vectors for the Zika virus and classify vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentle, J. N., Jr.; Kahn, A.; Pierce, S. A.; Wang, S.; Wade, C.; Moran, S.

    2016-12-01

    With the continued spread of the zika virus in the United States in both Florida and Virginia, increased public awareness, prevention and targeted prediction is necessary to effectively mitigate further infection and propagation of the virus throughout the human population. The goal of this project is to utilize publicly accessible data and HPC resources coupled with machine learning algorithms to identify potential threat vectors for the spread of the zika virus in Texas, the United States and globally by correlating available zika case data collected from incident reports in medical databases (e.g., CDC, Florida Department of Health) with known bodies of water in various earth science databases (e.g., USGS NAQWA Data, NASA ASTER Data, TWDB Data) and by using known mosquito population centers as a proxy for trends in population distribution (e.g., WHO, European CDC, Texas Data) while correlating historical trends in the spread of other mosquito borne diseases (e.g., chikungunya, malaria, dengue, yellow fever, west nile, etc.). The resulting analysis should refine the identification of the specific threat vectors for the spread of the virus which will correspondingly increase the effectiveness of the limited resources allocated towards combating the disease through better strategic implementation of defense measures. The minimal outcome of this research is a better understanding of the factors involved in the spread of the zika virus, with the greater potential to save additional lives through more effective resource utilization and public outreach.

  5. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92 oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Kayali

    Full Text Available Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  6. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  7. Analysis of Arbovirus Isolates from Australia Identifies Novel Bunyaviruses Including a Mapputta Group Virus from Western Australia That Links Gan Gan and Maprik Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Thomas; Williams, David T; Kapoor, Vishal; Diviney, Sinead M; Certoma, Andrea; Wang, Jianning; Johansen, Cheryl A; Chowdhary, Rashmi; Mackenzie, John S; Lipkin, W Ian

    2016-01-01

    The Mapputta group comprises antigenically related viruses indigenous to Australia and Papua New Guinea that are included in the family Bunyaviridae but not currently assigned to a specific genus. We determined and analyzed the genome sequences of five Australian viruses isolated from mosquitoes collected during routine arbovirus surveillance in Western Australia (K10441, SW27571, K13190, and K42904) and New South Wales (12005). Based on matching sequences of all three genome segments to prototype MRM3630 of Trubanaman virus (TRUV), NB6057 of Gan Gan virus (GGV), and MK7532 of Maprik virus (MPKV), isolates K13190 and SW27571 were identified as TRUV, 12005 as GGV, and K42904 as a Mapputta group virus from Western Australia linking GGV and MPKV. The results confirmed serum neutralization data that had linked SW27571 to TRUV. The fifth virus, K10441 from Willare, was most closely related to Batai orthobunyavirus, presumably representing an Australian variant of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis also confirmed the close relationship of our TRUV and GGV isolates to two other recently described Australian viruses, Murrumbidgee virus and Salt Ash virus, respectively. Our findings indicate that TRUV has a wide circulation throughout the Australian continent, demonstrating for the first time its presence in Western Australia. Similarly, the presence of a virus related to GGV, which had been linked to human disease and previously known only from the Australian southeast, was demonstrated in Western Australia. Finally, a Batai virus isolate was identified in Western Australia. The expanding availability of genomic sequence for novel Australian bunyavirus variants supports the identification of suitably conserved or diverse primer-binding target regions to establish group-wide as well as virus-specific nucleic acid tests in support of specific diagnostic and surveillance efforts throughout Australasia.

  8. New avian influenza A virus subtype combination H5N7 identified in Danish mallard ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragstad, K; Jørgensen, P H; Handberg, K J; Mellergaard, S; Corbet, S; Fomsgaard, A

    2005-05-01

    During the past years increasing incidences of influenza A zoonosis have made it of uppermost importance to possess methods for rapid and precise identification and characterisation of influenza A viruses. We present here a convenient one-step RT-PCR method that will amplify full-length haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) directly from clinical samples and from all known subtypes of influenza A. We applied the method on samples collected in September 2003 from a Danish flock of mallards with general health problems and by this a previously undescribed influenza A subtype combination, H5N7, was identified. The HA gene showed great sequence similarity to the highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAIV) A/Chicken/Italy/312/97 (H5N2); however, the cleavage site sequence between HA1 and HA2 had a motif typical for low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV). The full-length NA sequence was most closely related to the HPAIV A/Chicken/Netherlands/01/03 (H7N7) that infected chickens and humans in the Netherlands in 2003. Ten persons with direct or indirect contact with the Danish mallard ducks showed signs of influenza-like illness 2-3 days following the killing of the ducks, but no evidence of influence infections was detected. To our knowledge this is the first report of an H5N7 influenza A virus.

  9. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations.

  10. A functional yeast survival screen of tumor-derived cDNA libraries designed to identify anti-apoptotic mammalian oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Eißmann

    Full Text Available Yeast cells can be killed upon expression of pro-apoptotic mammalian proteins. We have established a functional yeast survival screen that was used to isolate novel human anti-apoptotic genes overexpressed in treatment-resistant tumors. The screening of three different cDNA libraries prepared from metastatic melanoma, glioblastomas and leukemic blasts allowed for the identification of many yeast cell death-repressing cDNAs, including 28% of genes that are already known to inhibit apoptosis, 35% of genes upregulated in at least one tumor entity and 16% of genes described as both anti-apoptotic in function and upregulated in tumors. These results confirm the great potential of this screening tool to identify novel anti-apoptotic and tumor-relevant molecules. Three of the isolated candidate genes were further analyzed regarding their anti-apoptotic function in cell culture and their potential as a therapeutic target for molecular therapy. PAICS, an enzyme required for de novo purine biosynthesis, the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 and the MAST2 kinase are overexpressed in certain tumor entities and capable of suppressing apoptosis in human cells. Using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model, we also demonstrated that glioblastoma tumor growth requires MAST2 expression. An additional advantage of the yeast survival screen is its universal applicability. By using various inducible pro-apoptotic killer proteins and screening the appropriate cDNA library prepared from normal or pathologic tissue of interest, the survival screen can be used to identify apoptosis inhibitors in many different systems.

  11. Clinical Genotyping of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancers Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing: Utility of Identifying Rare and Co-mutations in Oncogenic Driver Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Tafe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Detection of somatic mutations in non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs, especially adenocarcinomas, is important for directing patient care when targeted therapy is available. Here, we present our experience with genotyping NSCLC using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM and the AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. We tested 453 NSCLC samples from 407 individual patients using the 50 gene AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 from May 2013 to July 2015. Using 10 ng of DNA, up to 11 samples were simultaneously sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM (316 and 318 chips. We identified variants with the Ion Torrent Variant Caller Plugin, and Golden Helix's SVS software was used for annotation and prediction of the significance of the variants. Three hundred ninety-eight samples were successfully sequenced (12.1% failure rate. In all, 633 variants in 41 genes were detected with a median of 2 (range of 0 to 7 variants per sample. Mutations detected in BRAF, EGFR, ERBB2, KRAS, NRAS, and PIK3CA were considered potentially actionable and were identified in 237 samples, most commonly in KRAS (37.9%, EGFR (11.1%, BRAF (4.8%, and PIK3CA (4.3%. In our patient population, all mutations in EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF were mutually exclusive. The Ion Torrent Ampliseq technology can be utilized on small biopsy and cytology specimens, requires very little input DNA, and can be applied in clinical laboratories for genotyping of NSCLC. This targeted next-generation sequencing approach allows for detection of common and also rare mutations that are clinically actionable in multiple patients simultaneously.

  12. Endogenous Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus Identified in a Rodent (Melomys burtoni subsp.) from Wallacea (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Niccolò; Michaux, Johan; Morand, Serge; Aplin, Ken; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Löber, Ulrike; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Fitriana, Yuli; Semiadi, Gono; Ishida, Yasuko; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) most likely originated from a cross-species transmission of an ancestral retrovirus into koalas and gibbons via one or more intermediate as-yet-unknown hosts. A virus highly similar to GALV has been identified in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni) after extensive screening of Australian wildlife. GALV-like viruses have also been discovered in several Southeast Asian species, although screening has not been extensive and viruses discovered to date are only distantly related to GALV. We therefore screened 26 Southeast Asian rodent species for KoRV- and GALV-like sequences, using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing, in the attempt to identify potential GALV and KoRV hosts. Only the individuals belonging to a newly discovered subspecies of Melomys burtoni from Indonesia were positive, yielding an endogenous provirus very closely related to a strain of GALV. The sequence of the critical receptor domain for GALV infection in the Indonesian M. burtoni subsp. was consistent with the susceptibility of the species to GALV infection. The second record of a GALV in M. burtoni provides further evidence that M. burtoni, and potentially other lineages within the widespread subfamily Murinae, may play a role in the spread of GALV-like viruses. The discovery of a GALV in the most western part of the Australo-Papuan distribution of M. burtoni, specifically in a transitional zone between Asia and Australia (Wallacea), may be relevant to the cross-species transmission to gibbons in Southeast Asia and broadens the known distribution of GALVs in wild rodents. IMPORTANCE Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and the koala retrovirus (KoRV) are very closely related, yet their hosts neither are closely related nor overlap geographically. Direct cross-species infection between koalas and gibbons is unlikely. Therefore, GALV and KoRV may have arisen via a cross-species transfer from an intermediate

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Pichindé virus Infection Identifies Differential Expression of Prothymosin-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The arenaviruses include a number of important pathogens including Lassa virus and Junin virus. Presently, the only treatment is supportive care and the antiviral Ribavirin. In the event of an epidemic, patient triage may be required to more effectively manage resources; the development of prognostic biomarker signatures, correlating with disease severity, would allow rational triage. Using a pair of arenaviruses, which cause mild or severe disease, we analyzed extracts from infected cells using SELDI mass spectrometry to characterize potential biomarker profiles. EDGE analysis was used to analyze longitudinal expression differences. Extracts from infected guinea pigs revealed protein peaks which could discriminate between mild or severe infection and between times post-infection. Tandem mass-spectrometry identified several peaks, including the transcriptional regulator prothymosin-α. Further investigation revealed differences in secretion of this peptide. These data show proof of concept that proteomic profiling of host markers could be used as prognostic markers of infectious disease.

  14. Complete genome sequence of a novel extrachromosomal virus-like element identified in planarian Girardia tigrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Loura L

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are widely used as models for investigation of pattern formation and studies on genetic variation in populations. Despite extensive information on the biology and genetics of planaria, the occurrence and distribution of viruses in these animals remains an unexplored area of research. Results Using a combination of Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH and Mirror Orientation Selection (MOS, we compared the genomes of two strains of freshwater planarian, Girardia tigrina. The novel extrachromosomal DNA-containing virus-like element denoted PEVE (Planarian Extrachromosomal Virus-like Element was identified in one planarian strain. The PEVE genome (about 7.5 kb consists of two unique regions (Ul and Us flanked by inverted repeats. Sequence analyses reveal that PEVE comprises two helicase-like sequences in the genome, of which the first is a homolog of a circoviral replication initiator protein (Rep, and the second is similar to the papillomavirus E1 helicase domain. PEVE genome exists in at least two variant forms with different arrangements of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA stretches that correspond to the Us and Ul regions. Using PCR analysis and whole-mount in situ hybridization, we characterized PEVE distribution and expression in the planarian body. Conclusions PEVE is the first viral element identified in free-living flatworms. This element differs from all known viruses and viral elements, and comprises two potential helicases that are homologous to proteins from distant viral phyla. PEVE is unevenly distributed in the worm body, and is detected in specific parenchyma cells.

  15. Multiple gene mutations identified in patients infected with influenza A (H7N9) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuicui; Wang, Mingbang; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Qu, Jieming; Xi, Xiuhong; Tang, Xinjun; Lao, Xiangda; Seeley, Eric; Li, Tao; Fan, Xiaomei; Du, Chunling; Wang, Qin; Yang, Lin; Hu, Yunwen; Bai, Chunxue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Shuihua; Song, Yuanlin; Zhou, Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A (H7N9) virus induced high mortality since 2013. It is important to elucidate the potential genetic variations that contribute to virus infection susceptibilities. In order to identify genetic mutations that might increase host susceptibility to infection, we performed exon sequencing and validated the SNPS by Sanger sequencing on 18 H7N9 patients. Blood samples were collected from 18 confirmed H7N9 patients. The genomic DNA was captured with the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit, sequenced on the Illumina Hiseq 2000, and the resulting data processed and annotated with Genome analysis Tool. SNPs were verified by independent Sanger sequencing. The DAVID database and the DAPPLE database were used to do bioinformatics analysis. Through exon sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified 21 genes that were highly associated with H7N9 influenza infection. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected (p = 0.004), and DAVID analysis confirmed the defense-related functions of these genes. Gene mutation profiles of survived and non-survived patients were similar, suggesting some of genes identified in this study may be associated with H7N9 influenza susceptibility. Host specific genetic determinants of disease severity identified by this approach may provide new targets for the treatment of H7N9 influenza. PMID:27156515

  16. Oncogene v-jun modulates DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylyk, C; Schneikert, J; Wasylyk, B

    1990-07-01

    Cell transformation leads to alterations in both transcription and DNA replication. Activation of transcription by the expression of a number of transforming oncogenes is mediated by the transcription factor AP1 (Herrlich & Ponta, 1989; Imler & Wasylyk, 1989). AP1 is a composite transcription factor, consisting of members of the jun and fos gene-families. c-jun and c-fos are progenitors of oncogenes, suggestion that an important transcriptional event in cell transformation is altered activity of AP1, which may arise either indirectly by oncogene expression or directly by structural modification of AP1. We report here that the v-jun oncogene and its progenitor c-jun, as fusion proteins with the lex-A-repressor DNA binding domain, can activate DNA replication from the Polyoma virus (Py) origin of replication, linked to the lex-A operator. The transcription-activation region of v-jun is required for activation of replication. When excess v-jun is expressed in the cell, replication is inhibited or 'squelched'. These results suggest that one consequence of deregulated jun activity could be altered DNA replication and that there are similarities in the way v-jun activates replication and transcription.

  17. A phenotypic assay to identify Chikungunya virus inhibitors targeting the nonstructural protein nsP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Lupan, Alexandru; Desprès, Philippe; Thoret, Sylviane; Pamlard, Olivier; Dubois, Joëlle; Guillou, Catherine; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted pathogen responsible for an acute infection of abrupt onset, characterized by high fever, polyarthralgia, myalgia, headaches, chills, and rash. In 2006, CHIKV was responsible for an epidemic outbreak of unprecedented magnitude in the Indian Ocean, stressing the need for therapeutic approaches. Since then, we have acquired a better understanding of CHIKV biology, but we are still missing active molecules against this reemerging pathogen. We recently reported that the nonstructural nsP2 protein of CHIKV induces a transcriptional shutoff that allows the virus to block cellular antiviral response. This was demonstrated using various luciferase-based reporter gene assays, including a trans-reporter system where Gal4 DNA binding domain is fused to Fos transcription factor. Here, we turned this assay into a high-throughput screening system to identify small molecules targeting nsP2-mediated shutoff. Among 3040 molecules tested, we identified one natural compound that partially blocks nsP2 activity and inhibits CHIKV replication in vitro. This proof of concept suggests that similar functional assays could be developed to target other viral proteins mediating a cellular shutoff and identify innovative therapeutic molecules.

  18. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hwa Jang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30% had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70% had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  19. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  20. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293–1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change...

  1. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Landeras-Bueno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection.

  2. V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian)/Trefoil factor 3/high-molecular-weight cytokeratin triple immunostain: a novel tissue-based biomarker in prostate cancer with potential clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca; Mosquera, Juan Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is associated with various cancers and overexpressed in a subset of prostate cancers. Functional studies suggest that v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian) (ERG) down-regulates TFF3 expression in hormone-naïve prostate cancer. To characterize this inverse relationship, we developed a triple immunostain encompassing ERG, TFF3, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin. Triple stain was performed on 96 tumors and 52 benign cases represented in tissue microarrays. Distinct ERG and TFF3 protein was expressed in 45% (43/96) and 36% (35/96) of prostate cancers, respectively. Coexpression was observed in 5% (5/96) of tumor cases, and 24% (23/96) did not express ERG or TFF3. The inverse expression of ERG and TFF3 was significant (P tumors demonstrating TFF3 expression. Sensitivity and specificity of combined ERG and TFF3 expression in detecting prostate cancer were 76% and 96%, respectively. The feasibility of triple immunostain protocol was validated in a set of 76 needle biopsies. The application of this multiplex in situ biomarker for molecular characterization of prostate cancer and as a supplemental diagnostic and prognostic tool in prostate needle biopsies should be further explored.

  3. Heterogeneity and Seroprevalence of a Newly Identified Avian Hepatitis E Virus from Chickens in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, F. F.; Haqshenas, G.; Shivaprasad, H L; Guenette, D. K.; Woolcock, P. R.; Larsen, C. T.; Pierson, F.W.; F Elvinger; Toth, T. E.; Meng, X. J.

    2002-01-01

    We recently identified and characterized a novel virus, designated avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome (HS syndrome) in the United States. Avian HEV is genetically related to but distinct from human and swine HEVs. To determine the extent of genetic variation and the seroprevalence of avian HEV infection in chicken flocks, we genetically identified and characterized 11 additional avian HEV isolates from chickens with HS syndrome and assessed...

  4. Temporal SILAC-based quantitative proteomics identifies host factors involved in chikungunya virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffers, Emmely E; Tas, Ali; Scholte, Florine E M; Van, Myrthe N; Heemskerk, Matthias T; de Ru, Arnoud H; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J; van Veelen, Peter A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne reemerging human pathogen that generally causes a severe persisting arthritis. Since 2005, the virus has infected millions of people during outbreaks in Africa, Indian Ocean Islands, Asia, and South/Central America. Many steps of the replication and expression of CHIKV's 12-kb RNA genome are highly dependent on cellular factors, which thus constitute potential therapeutic targets. SILAC and LC-MS/MS were used to define the temporal dynamics of the cellular response to infection. Using samples harvested at 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, over 4700 proteins were identified and per time point 2800-3500 proteins could be quantified in both biological replicates. At 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, 13, 38, and 106 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed. The majority of these proteins showed decreased abundance. Most subunits of the RNA polymerase II complex were progressively degraded, which likely contributes to the transcriptional host shut-off observed during CHIKV infection. Overexpression of four proteins that were significantly downregulated (Rho family GTPase 3 (Rnd3), DEAD box helicase 56 (DDX56), polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C (UbcH10) reduced susceptibility of cells to CHIKV infection, suggesting that infection-induced downregulation of these proteins is beneficial for CHIKV replication. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001330 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001330).

  5. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J H; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-07-24

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.

  6. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA, for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn. These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  7. Identifying recombinants in human and primate immunodeficiency virus sequence alignments using quartet scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Darren P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombination has a profound impact on the evolution of viruses, but characterizing recombination patterns in molecular sequences remains a challenging endeavor. Despite its importance in molecular evolutionary studies, identifying the sequences that exhibit such patterns has received comparatively less attention in the recombination detection framework. Here, we extend a quartet-mapping based recombination detection method to enable identification of recombinant sequences without prior specifications of either query and reference sequences. Through simulations we evaluate different recombinant identification statistics and significance tests. We compare the quartet approach with triplet-based methods that employ additional heuristic tests to identify parental and recombinant sequences. Results Analysis of phylogenetic simulations reveal that identifying the descendents of relatively old recombination events is a challenging task for all methods available, and that quartet scanning performs relatively well compared to the triplet based methods. The use of quartet scanning is further demonstrated by analyzing both well-established and putative HIV-1 recombinant strains. In agreement with recent findings, we provide evidence that the presumed circulating recombinant CRF02_AG is a 'pure' lineage, whereas the presumed parental lineage subtype G has a recombinant origin. We also demonstrate HIV-1 intrasubtype recombination, confirm the hybrid origin of SIV in chimpanzees and further disentangle the recombinant history of SIV lineages in a primate immunodeficiency virus data set. Conclusion Quartet scanning makes a valuable addition to triplet-based methods for identifying recombinant sequences without prior specifications of either query and reference sequences. The new method is available in the VisRD v.3.0 package http://www.cmp.uea.ac.uk/~vlm/visrd.

  8. Relationship between suppression of E6 and E7 virus oncogenes and expression of apoptosis and cell cycle genes in cervical cancer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, E V; Shkoporov, A N; Volodin, N N; Efimov, B A; Pavlov, K A; Kafarskaia, L I

    2010-07-01

    The effects of short interfering RNA suppressing the expression of E6 and E7 human papilloma virus (type 18) on the expression of apoptosis and cell cycle genes were studied in HeLa cells. Changes in the transcription profiles were evaluated using DNA microarray and real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Cell transfection with anti-E6 and anti-E7 short interfering RNA moderately reduced the expression of mRNA for CDC25C, GRB2, GTSE1, and PLK1 genes and induced expression of CDKN1A (p21(CIP)) gene mRNA. In addition, culture proliferation was inhibited and morphological changes characteristic of differentiation and cell aging developed.

  9. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. GeneChip Resequencing of the Smallpox Virus Genome Can Identify Novel Strains: a Biodefense Application▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 strains of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the hybridization results of 14 smallpox virus strains. Of the 14 smallpox virus strains hybridized, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining strains was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and hybridized with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus strains hybridized. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by hybridization was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus strains characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future. PMID:17182757

  11. New real-time-PCR method to identify single point mutations in hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Belmonte, Irene; Buti, Maria; Nieto, Leonardo; Garcia-Cehic, Damir; Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Ordeig, Laura; Llorens, Meritxell; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Esteban, Rafael; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Quer, Josep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To develop a fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS In patients with HCV infection, resistance-associated amino acid substitutions within the viral quasispecies prior to therapy can confer decreased susceptibility to direct-acting antiviral agents and lead to treatment failure and virological relapse. One such naturally occurring mutation is the Q80K substitution in the HCV-NS3 protease gene, which confers resistance to PI inhibitors, particularly simeprevir. Low-cost, highly sensitive techniques enabling routine detection of these single point mutations would be useful to identify patients at a risk of treatment failure. LightCycler methods, based on real-time PCR with sequence-specific probe hybridization, have been implemented in most diagnostic laboratories. However, this technique cannot identify single point mutations in highly variable genetic environments, such as the HCV genome. To circumvent this problem, we developed a new method to homogenize all nucleotides present in a region except the point mutation of interest. RESULTS Using nucleotide-specific probes Q, K, and R substitutions at position 80 were clearly identified at a sensitivity of 10% (mutations present at a frequency of at least 10% were detected). The technique was successfully applied to identify the Q80K substitution in 240 HCV G1 serum samples, with performance comparable to that of direct Sanger sequencing, the current standard procedure for this purpose. The new method was then validated in a Catalonian population of 202 HCV G1-infected individuals. Q80K was detected in 14.6% of G1a patients and 0% of G1b in our setting. CONCLUSION A fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy based on real-time PCR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe melting curve analysis has been successfully developed to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus. This

  12. A functional selection of viral genetic elements in cultured cells to identify hepatitis C virus RNA translation inhibitors †

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffrelo, Loic; Chabas, Sandrine; Reigadas, Sandrine; Pflieger, Aude; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Rumi, Julie; Ventura, Michel; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Staedel, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    We developed a functional selection system based on randomized genetic elements (GE) to identify potential regulators of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA translation, a process initiated by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). A retroviral HCV GE library was introduced into HepG2 cells, stably expressing the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) under the control of the HCV IRES. Cells that expressed transduced GEs inhibiting HSV-TK were selected via their resistance to ganciclovir. S...

  13. The Epstein-Barr virus oncogene product, latent membrane protein 1, induces the downregulation of E-cadherin gene expression via activation of DNA methyltransferases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-NeuTsai

    2005-01-01

    The latent membrane protein (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is expressed in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which isnotoriously metastatic. Although it Is established that LMP1 represses E-cadherin expression and enhances the invasive ability of carcinoma cells, the mechanism underlying this repression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that LMP1 induces the expression and activity of the DNA methyltransferases 1, 3a, and 3b, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme activity assay. This results in hypermethylation of the E-cadherin promoter and down-regulation of E-cadherin gene expression, as revealed by methylation-specific PCR, real-time reverse transcription-PeR and Western blotting data. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5'-Aza-2'dC, restores E-cadherin promoter activity and protein expression in LMPl-expressing cells, which in turn blocks cell migration ability, as demonstrated by the Transwell cell migration assay. Our findings suggest that LMP1 down-regulates E-cadherin gene expression and induces cell migration activity by using cellular DNA methylation machinery.

  14. Research update: Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory avian tumor viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomics and Immunogenetics Use of genomics to identify QTL, genes, and proteins associated with resistance to Marek’s disease. Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV), continues to be a major disease concern to the p...

  15. RECOVIR: An application package to automatically identify some single stranded RNA viruses using capsid protein residues that uniquely distinguish among these viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox George E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most single stranded RNA (ssRNA viruses mutate rapidly to generate large number of strains having highly divergent capsid sequences. Accurate strain recognition in uncharacterized target capsid sequences is essential for epidemiology, diagnostics, and vaccine development. Strain recognition based on similarity scores between target sequences and sequences of homology matched reference strains is often time consuming and ambiguous. This is especially true if only partial target sequences are available or if different ssRNA virus families are jointly analyzed. In such cases, knowledge of residues that uniquely distinguish among known reference strains is critical for rapid and unambiguous strain identification. Conventional sequence comparisons are unable to identify such capsid residues due to high sequence divergence among the ssRNA virus reference strains. Consequently, automated general methods to reliably identify strains using strain distinguishing residues are not currently available. Results We present here RECOVIR ("recognize viruses", a software tool to automatically detect strains of caliciviruses and picornaviruses by comparing their capsid residues with built-in databases of residues that uniquely distinguish among known reference strains of these viruses. The databases were created by constructing partitioned phylogenetic trees of complete capsid sequences of these viruses. Strains were correctly identified for more than 300 complete and partial target sequences by comparing the database residues with the aligned residues of these sequences. It required about 5 seconds of real time to process each sequence. A Java-based user interface coupled with Perl-coded computational modules ensures high portability of the software. RECOVIR currently runs on Windows XP and Linux platforms. The software generalizes a manual method briefly outlined earlier for human caliciviruses. Conclusion This study shows implementation of

  16. Identifying potential virulence determinants in viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) for rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S; Collet, B; Einer-Jensen, K; Secombes, C J; Snow, M

    2009-11-09

    We identified viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates classified within Genotype Ib which are genetically similar (>99.4% glycoprotein amino acid identity) yet, based on their isolation history, were suspected to differ in virulence in juvenile rainbow trout. The virulence of an isolate recovered in 2000 from a viral haemorrhagic septicaemia disease episode in a marine rainbow trout farm in Sweden (SE-SVA-1033) was evaluated in juvenile rainbow trout via intraperitoneal injection and immersion challenge alongside 3 isolates recovered from wild-caught marine fish (DK-4p37, DK-5e59 and UKMLA98/6HE1) suspected of being of low pathogenicity to trout. Mortality data revealed that isolate SE-SVA-1033 caused VHSV-specific mortality in both intraperitoneal and immersion challenges (75.0 and 15.4%, respectively). The remaining Genotype Ib isolates caused significantly lower mortalities using the same experimental infection routes (<35.0 and <2.0%, respectively). Having identified VHSV isolates with clear differences in their pathogenicity, coding and inter-genic non-coding regions of 2 isolates (SE-SVA-1033 and DK-4p37) were determined and compared in order to identify potential markers responsible for the observed differences in virulence. Only 4 predicted amino acid substitutions were identified across the genome sequenced; these occurred in the N (R46G), G (S113G), NV (L12F) and L (S56A) proteins. These findings form the basis for further studies aimed at determining the biological significance of these mutations and suggest that small changes at the molecular level can cause significant changes in the virulence properties of VHSV isolates.

  17. Oncogenic human papilloma virus infection among women attending the cytology clinic of a tertiary hospital in Lagos, South-West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Adegbesan-Omilabu

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Cumulative high risk HPV infection is high in Lagos, Nigeria. This thus support the need for routine and early screening of all identified high risk sexually active women for HPV infection in Nigeria, as well as emphasising further the importance of sex education for the girl child in schools and increased awareness for parents towards HPV vaccination for their generally healthy adolescent girls. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 625-630

  18. FluShuffle and FluResort: new algorithms to identify reassorted strains of the influenza virus by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Aaron TL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is one of the oldest and deadliest infectious diseases known to man. Reassorted strains of the virus pose the greatest risk to both human and animal health and have been associated with all pandemics of the past century, with the possible exception of the 1918 pandemic, resulting in tens of millions of deaths. We have developed and tested new computer algorithms, FluShuffle and FluResort, which enable reassorted viruses to be identified by the most rapid and direct means possible. These algorithms enable reassorted influenza, and other, viruses to be rapidly identified to allow prevention strategies and treatments to be more efficiently implemented. Results The FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms were tested with both experimental and simulated mass spectra of whole virus digests. FluShuffle considers different combinations of viral protein identities that match the mass spectral data using a Gibbs sampling algorithm employing a mixed protein Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. FluResort utilizes those identities to calculate the weighted distance of each across two or more different phylogenetic trees constructed through viral protein sequence alignments. Each weighted mean distance value is normalized by conversion to a Z-score to establish a reassorted strain. Conclusions The new FluShuffle and FluResort algorithms can correctly identify the origins of influenza viral proteins and the number of reassortment events required to produce the strains from the high resolution mass spectral data of whole virus proteolytic digestions. This has been demonstrated in the case of constructed vaccine strains as well as common human seasonal strains of the virus. The algorithms significantly improve the capability of the proteotyping approach to identify reassorted viruses that pose the greatest pandemic risk.

  19. Subgenotyping of genotype C hepatitis B virus: correcting misclassifications and identifying a novel subgenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than ten subgenotypes of genotype C Hepatitis B virus (HBV have been reported, including C1 to C16 and two C/D recombinant subgenotypes (CD1 and CD2, however, inconsistent designations of these subgenotypes still exist. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a phylogenetic analysis of all full-length genotype C HBV genome sequences to correct the misclassifications of HBV subgenotypes and to study the influence of recombination on HBV subgenotyping. Our results showed that although inclusion of the recombinant sequences changed the topology of the phylogenetic tree, it did not affect the subgenotyping of the non-recombinant sequences, except subgenotype C2. In addition, most of the subgenotypes have been properly designated. However, several misclassifications of HBV subgenotypes have been identified and corrected. For example, C11 proposed by Utsumi and colleagues in 2011 was found to be grouped with C12 proposed by Mulyanto and colleagues. Two sequences, GQ358157 and GU721029, previously designated as C6 have been re-designated as C12 and C7, respectively. Moreover, a quasi-subgenotype C2 was proposed, which included the old C2, several previously unclassified sequences and previously designated C14. In particular, we identified a novel subgenotype, tentative C14, which was well supported by phylogenetic analysis and sequence divergence of >4%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A number of misclassifications in the subgenotyping of genotype C HBV have been identified in this study. After correcting the misclassifications, we proposed a better classification for the subgenotyping of genotype C HBV, in which a novel quasi-subgenotype C2 and a novel subgenotype, tentative C14, were described. Based on this large-scale analysis, we propose that a novel subgenotype should only be reported after a complete comparison of all relevant sequences rather than a few representative sequences only.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Seneca Valley Virus CH-01-2015 Identified in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiwen; Zhao, Xiaoya; Chen, Yanshan; He, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guanqun; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-01-21

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a single-stranded RNA virus that causes porcine vesicular disease in China, has been sequenced and analyzed. This Chinese isolate shares 94.4 to 97.1% sequence identity to another 8 strains from Canada, Brazil, and the United States. This is the first report of SVV infecting swine in China.

  1. Human monoclonal antibodies to West Nile virus identify epitopes on the prM protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Kalantarov, Gavreel F; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Trakht, Ilya; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2011-02-05

    Hybridoma cell lines (2E8, 8G8 and 5G12) producing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) specific for the pre-membrane (prM) protein of West Nile virus (WNV) were prepared using a human fusion partner cell line, MFP-2, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes from a blood donor diagnosed with WNV fever in 2004. Using site-directed mutagenesis of a WNV-like particle (VLP) we identified 4 amino acid residues in the prM protein unique to WNV and important in the binding of these hMAbs to the VLP. Residues V19 and L33 are important epitopes for the binding of all three hMAbs. Mutations at residue, T20 and T24 affected the binding of hMAbs, 8G8 and 5G12 only. These hMAbs did not significantly protect AG129 interferon-deficient mice or Swiss Webster outbred mice from WNV infection.

  2. Integrative functional genomics of hepatitis C virus infection identifies host dependencies in complete viral replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qisheng; Zhang, Yong-Yuan; Chiu, Stephan; Hu, Zongyi; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Cha, Helen; Sodroski, Catherine; Zhang, Fang; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Thomas, Emmanuel; Liang, T Jake

    2014-05-01

    Recent functional genomics studies including genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) exploits an extensive network of host factors for productive infection and propagation. How these co-opted host functions interact with various steps of HCV replication cycle and exert pro- or antiviral effects on HCV infection remains largely undefined. Here we present an unbiased and systematic strategy to functionally interrogate HCV host dependencies uncovered from our previous infectious HCV (HCVcc) siRNA screen. Applying functional genomics approaches and various in vitro HCV model systems, including HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp), single-cycle infectious particles (HCVsc), subgenomic replicons, and HCV cell culture systems (HCVcc), we identified and characterized novel host factors or pathways required for each individual step of the HCV replication cycle. Particularly, we uncovered multiple HCV entry factors, including E-cadherin, choline kinase α, NADPH oxidase CYBA, Rho GTPase RAC1 and SMAD family member 6. We also demonstrated that guanine nucleotide binding protein GNB2L1, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2J1, and 39 other host factors are required for HCV RNA replication, while the deubiquitinating enzyme USP11 and multiple other cellular genes are specifically involved in HCV IRES-mediated translation. Families of antiviral factors that target HCV replication or translation were also identified. In addition, various virologic assays validated that 66 host factors are involved in HCV assembly or secretion. These genes included insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a proviral factor, and N-Myc down regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1), an antiviral factor. Bioinformatics meta-analyses of our results integrated with literature mining of previously published HCV host factors allows the construction of an extensive roadmap of cellular networks and pathways involved in the complete HCV replication cycle. This comprehensive study of HCV host

  3. Integrative functional genomics of hepatitis C virus infection identifies host dependencies in complete viral replication cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qisheng Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent functional genomics studies including genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA screens demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV exploits an extensive network of host factors for productive infection and propagation. How these co-opted host functions interact with various steps of HCV replication cycle and exert pro- or antiviral effects on HCV infection remains largely undefined. Here we present an unbiased and systematic strategy to functionally interrogate HCV host dependencies uncovered from our previous infectious HCV (HCVcc siRNA screen. Applying functional genomics approaches and various in vitro HCV model systems, including HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp, single-cycle infectious particles (HCVsc, subgenomic replicons, and HCV cell culture systems (HCVcc, we identified and characterized novel host factors or pathways required for each individual step of the HCV replication cycle. Particularly, we uncovered multiple HCV entry factors, including E-cadherin, choline kinase α, NADPH oxidase CYBA, Rho GTPase RAC1 and SMAD family member 6. We also demonstrated that guanine nucleotide binding protein GNB2L1, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2J1, and 39 other host factors are required for HCV RNA replication, while the deubiquitinating enzyme USP11 and multiple other cellular genes are specifically involved in HCV IRES-mediated translation. Families of antiviral factors that target HCV replication or translation were also identified. In addition, various virologic assays validated that 66 host factors are involved in HCV assembly or secretion. These genes included insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, a proviral factor, and N-Myc down regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1, an antiviral factor. Bioinformatics meta-analyses of our results integrated with literature mining of previously published HCV host factors allows the construction of an extensive roadmap of cellular networks and pathways involved in the complete HCV replication cycle. This comprehensive study

  4. DNase SISPA-next generation sequencing confirms Schmallenberg virus in Belgian field samples and identifies genetic variation in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toon Rosseel

    Full Text Available In 2011, a novel Orthobunyavirus was identified in cattle and sheep in Germany and The Netherlands. This virus was named Schmallenberg virus (SBV. Later, presence of the virus was confirmed using real time RT-PCR in cases of congenital malformations of bovines and ovines in several European countries, including Belgium. In the absence of specific sequencing protocols for this novel virus we confirmed its presence in RT-qPCR positive field samples using DNase SISPA-next generation sequencing (NGS, a virus discovery method based on random amplification and next generation sequencing. An in vitro transcribed RNA was used to construct a standard curve allowing the quantification of viral RNA in the field samples. Two field samples of aborted lambs containing 7.66 and 7.64 log(10 RNA copies per µL total RNA allowed unambiguous identification of SBV. One sample yielded 192 SBV reads covering about 81% of the L segment, 56% of the M segment and 13% of the S segment. The other sample resulted in 8 reads distributed over the L and M segments. Three weak positive field samples (one from an aborted calf, two from aborted lambs containing virus quantities equivalent to 4.27-4.89 log(10 RNA copies per µL did not allow identification using DNase SISPA-NGS. This partial sequence information was compared to the whole genome sequence of SBV isolated from bovines in Germany, identifying several sequence differences. The applied viral discovery method allowed the confirmation of SBV in RT-qPCR positive brain samples. However, the failure to confirm SBV in weak PCR-positive samples illustrates the importance of the selection of properly targeted and fresh field samples in any virus discovery method. The partial sequences derived from the field samples showed several differences compared to the sequences from bovines in Germany, indicating sequence divergence within the epidemic.

  5. Battle between influenza A virus and a newly identified antiviral activity of the PARP-containing ZAPL protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Zhou, Ligang; Chen, Guifang; Krug, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that ZAPL (PARP-13.1) exerts its antiviral activity via its N-terminal zinc fingers that bind the mRNAs of some viruses, leading to mRNA degradation. Here we identify a different antiviral activity of ZAPL that is directed against influenza A virus. This ZAPL antiviral activity involves its C-terminal PARP domain, which binds the viral PB2 and PA polymerase proteins, leading to their proteasomal degradation. After the PB2 and PA proteins are poly(ADP-ribosylated), they are associated with the region of ZAPL that includes both the PARP domain and the adjacent WWE domain that is known to bind poly(ADP-ribose) chains. These ZAPL-associated PB2 and PA proteins are then ubiquitinated, followed by proteasomal degradation. This antiviral activity is counteracted by the viral PB1 polymerase protein, which binds close to the PARP domain and causes PB2 and PA to dissociate from ZAPL and escape degradation, explaining why ZAPL only moderately inhibits influenza A virus replication. Hence influenza A virus has partially won the battle against this newly identified ZAPL antiviral activity. Eliminating PB1 binding to ZAPL would be expected to substantially increase the inhibition of influenza A virus replication, so that the PB1 interface with ZAPL is a potential target for antiviral development. PMID:26504237

  6. Phylogeny of geminivirus coat protein sequences and digital PCR aid in identifying Spissistilus festinus (Say) as a vector of Grapevine red blotch-associated virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapevine red blotch-associated virus (GRBaV) is a newly identified virus of grapevines, and a putative member of a new genus within the family Geminiviridae. This virus is associated with red blotch disease that was first reported in California in 2008. It affects the profitability of vineyards by ...

  7. The use of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways for analysis and prediction of oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhihao; Chu, Chen; Chen, Lei; Kong, Xiangyin

    2016-11-01

    Oncogenes are a type of genes that have the potential to cause cancer. Most normal cells undergo programmed cell death, namely apoptosis, but activated oncogenes can help cells avoid apoptosis and survive. Thus, studying oncogenes is helpful for obtaining a good understanding of the formation and development of various types of cancers. In this study, we proposed a computational method, called OPM, for investigating oncogenes from the view of Gene Ontology (GO) and biological pathways. All investigated genes, including validated oncogenes retrieved from some public databases and other genes that have not been reported to be oncogenes thus far, were encoded into numeric vectors according to the enrichment theory of GO terms and KEGG pathways. Some popular feature selection methods, minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, and an advanced machine learning algorithm, random forest, were adopted to analyze the numeric vectors to extract key GO terms and KEGG pathways. Along with the oncogenes, GO terms and KEGG pathways were discussed in terms of their relevance in this study. Some important GO terms and KEGG pathways were extracted using feature selection methods and were confirmed to be highly related to oncogenes. Additionally, the importance of these terms and pathways in predicting oncogenes was further demonstrated by finding new putative oncogenes based on them. This study investigated oncogenes based on GO terms and KEGG pathways. Some important GO terms and KEGG pathways were confirmed to be highly related to oncogenes. We hope that these GO terms and KEGG pathways can provide new insight for the study of oncogenes, particularly for building more effective prediction models to identify novel oncogenes. The program is available upon request. We hope that the new findings listed in this study may provide a new insight for the investigation of oncogenes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "System Genetics" Guest Editor

  8. The MicroRNA miR-199a-5p Down-regulation Switches on Wound Angiogenesis by Derepressing the v-ets Erythroblastosis Virus E26 Oncogene Homolog 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuk Cheung; Roy, Sashwati; Huang, Yue; Khanna, Savita; Sen, Chandan K.

    2012-01-01

    miR-199a-5p plays a critical role in controlling cardiomyocyte survival. However, its significance in endothelial cell biology remains ambiguous. Here, we report the first evidence that miR-199a-5p negatively regulates angiogenic responses by directly targeting v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (Ets-1). Induction of miR-199a-5p in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) blocked angiogenic response in Matrigel® culture, whereas miR-199a-5p-deprived cells exhibited enhanced angiogenesis in vitro. Bioinformatics prediction and miR target reporter assay recognized Ets-1 as a novel direct target of miR-199a-5p. Delivery of miR-199a-5p blocked Ets-1 expression in HMECs, whereas knockdown endogenous miR-199a-5p induced Ets-1 expression. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), one of the Ets-1 downstream mediators, was negatively regulated by miR-199a-5p. Overexpression of Ets-1 not only rescued miR-199a-5p-dependent anti-angiogenic effects but also reversed miR-199a-5p-induced loss of MMP-1 expression. Similarly, Ets-1 knockdown blunted angiogenic response and induction of MMP-1 in miR-199a-5p-deprived HMECs. Examination of cutaneous wound dermal tissue revealed a significant down-regulation of miR-199a-5p expression, which was associated with induction of Ets-1 and MMP-1. Mice carrying homozygous deletions in the Ets-1 gene exhibited blunted wound blood flow and reduced abundance of endothelial cells. Impaired wound angiogenesis was associated with compromised wound closure, insufficient granulation tissue formation, and blunted induction of MMP-1. Thus, down-regulation of miR-199a-5p is involved in the induction of wound angiogenesis through derepressing of the Ets-1-MMP1 pathway. PMID:23060436

  9. Viral etiology of bronchiolitis among pediatric inpatients in northern Taiwan with emphasis on newly identified respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Ho, Tai-Hua; Huang, Chung-Guei; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2014-04-01

    Viral etiology of bronchiolitis in children in Taiwan has been fragmentary. We conducted a prospective study to figure out the viral epidemiology of bronchiolitis in Taiwan. From January 2009 to March 2011, a total of 113 children with bronchiolitis, aged bronchiolitis either caused by different single or mixed viral infection. RSV was the most common etiologic agent for children with bronchiolitis in Taiwan. Newly identified viruses, including hMPV and hBoV, were also among the common causative agents. Clinical characteristics were not significantly different among the children with bronchiolitis caused by different viruses. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Odontonema cuspidatum and Psychotria punctata, two new cucumber mosaic virus hosts identified in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wide host range of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been expanded by the identification of Odontonema cuspidatum (firespike) and Psychotria punctata (dotted wild coffee) as CMV hosts in Florida....

  11. Identifying the Environmental Conditions Favouring West Nile Virus Outbreaks in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Marcantonio, Matteo; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Metz, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Marini, Giovanni; Chadwick, Elizabeth Anna; Neteler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a globally important mosquito borne virus, with significant implications for human and animal health. The emergence and spread of new lineages, and increased pathogenicity, is the cause of escalating public health concern. Pinpointing the environmental conditions that favour WNV circulation and transmission to humans is challenging, due both to the complexity of its biological cycle, and the under-diagnosis and reporting of epidemiological data. Here, we used remote s...

  12. Novel quasi-subgenotype D2 of hepatitis B virus identified in Taiwanese aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy; Yu, Ming-Lung; Dai, Chia-Yen; Lin, I-Ling; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Chuang, Wan-Long; Abe, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomes in Taiwanese aborigines, whose ancestors have lived in Taiwan for over 10,000 years, have not been characterized. In order to characterize of HBV in this special population, serum samples were obtained from serologically HBsAg-positive 27 Taiwanese aborigines. The pre-S1/S2 region and the full-length 3.2 kb of the HBV genome were amplified by PCR. Obtained amplicons were sequenced and confirmed the HBV genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. By phylogenetic analysis of the sequence of pre-S1/pre-S2 region, HBV/B2 (21/27: 78 %) was the most prevalent followed by genotype D (6/27: 22 %). Two strains of HBV/B2, each having 3,215 bp genomes, had recombination with genotype C in the pre-C/C gene which is characteristic of subgenotype B2 circulating in Southeast Asia. Interestingly, six strains of genotype D formed a distinct cluster between subgenotypes D1 and D2 suggesting a novel group of HBV. A similar finding could also be confirmed based on the entire 3,182 bp genome from four strains of HBV/D. This new cluster was supported by a branch with 99 % bootstrap value and 3.4-5.8 % nucleotide divergence over the entire genome from other known subgenotypes D1 to D9. Four strains of the new D subgenotype showed serotype ayw2, but had unique amino acid sequences consisting of N115 in the preS/S gene; P41 in the X gene; S239, K/E295, V567, and P708 in the P gene, respectively. From the above results, we provisionally proposed to designate it as novel quasi-subgenotype D2 identified in Taiwanese aborigines.

  13. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  14. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-07-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  15. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  16. Modification of AxSYM Human Immunodeficiency Virus Assay to Identify Recent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Korean Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jin-Sook; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon

    2015-01-01

    To estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence using HIV avidity assays in Korea, we established a serological testing method to differentiate recent HIV infections from long-standing ones...

  17. In Sillico Analysis of Newly Identified Potential Drug Lead Compound against VP40 for the Treatment of Ebola Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *Biswadip Bandyopadhyay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus (EBOV, also referred as Zaire Ebola Virus, member of filoviridae family, is a single stranded, filamentous, enveloped, mononegavirales virus. It causes acute hemorrhagic fever which is naturally resistant to various antibiotics. After the outbreak of Ebola virus, the CADD (Computer Aided Drug Discovery became necessary as classical model of drug discovery takes lots of time to find target protein and potential lead compound. Computational techniques made it much easier. The matrix protein of Ebola VP40 whose virulent activity and functions in pathogenesis affirmed it as a potential drug target. To inhibit Ebola infection, CADD and molecular docking approaches are one of the effective tools to discover new drug leads against these sporadic targets. In this study lead compounds identified that matches the drug likeliness criteria using “Lipinski’s rule of five” for different crystalline structures of target receptor protein. The discovery of such drug lead molecules which inhibits those protein molecules may constitute successful multidrug resistant Ebola virus infection.

  18. HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes identified in dengue viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Zhi-Liang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All four dengue virus (DV serotypes (D1V, D2V, D3V and D4V can cause a series of disorders, ranging from mild dengue fever (DF to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS. Previous studies have revealed that DV serotype-specific CD8+ T cells are involved in controlling DV infection. Serotype cross-reactive CD8+ T-cells may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of DHF/DSS. The aim of the study was to identify HLA-A*0201-binding peptides from four DV serotypes. We then examined their immunogenicity in vivo and cross-reactivity within heterologous peptides. Methods D1V-derived candidate CD8+ T-cell epitopes were synthesized and evaluated for their affinity to the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Variant peptides representing heterologous D2V, D3V, D4V serotypes were synthesized. The immunogenicity of the high-affinity peptides were evaluated in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Results Of the seven D1V-derived candidate epitopes [D1V-NS4a56–64(MLLALIAVL, D1V-C46–54(LVMAFMAFL, D1V-NS4b562–570(LLATSIFKL, D1V-NS2a169–177(AMVLSIVSL, D1V-NS4a140–148(GLLFMILTV, D1V-NS2a144–152(QLWAALLSL and D1V-NS4b183–191(LLMRTTWAL], three peptides [D1V-NS4a140–148, D1V-NS2a144–152 and D1V-NS4b183–191] had a high affinity for HLA-A*0201 molecules. Moreover, their variant peptides for D2V, D3V and D4V [D2V-NS4a140–148(AILTVVAAT, D3V-NS4a140-148(GILTLAAIV, D4V-NS4a140-148(TILTIIGLI, D2V-NS2a144–152(QLAVTIMAI, D3V-NS2a144–152(QLWTALVSL, D4V-NS2a143–151(QVGTLALSL, D2V-NS4b182–190(LMMRTTWAL, D3V-NS4b182–190 (LLMRTSWAL and D4V-NS4b179–187(LLMRTTWAF] also had a high affinity for HLA-A*0201 molecules. Furthermore, CD8+ T cells directed to these twelve peptides were induced in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice following immunization with these peptides. Additionally, cross-reactivity within four peptides (D1V-NS4b183–191, D2V-NS4b182–190, D3V-NS4b182–190 and D4V-NS4b179–187 was observed. Conclusions Two novel serotype

  19. Carcinoma de células escamosas oral - contribuição de vírus oncogênicos e alguns marcadores moleculares no desenvolvimento e prognóstico da lesão: uma revisão Oral squamous cell carcinoma - contribution of oncogenic virus and some molecular markers in the development and prognosis of the lesion: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz da Rocha Miranda Venturi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma de células escamosas oral é um evento de muitas etapas, cuja incidência cresce continuamente, particularmente em jovens, numa amplitude que não pode ser completamente explicada pelo aumento da exposição a fatores de risco, como o tabaco e o álcool. Recentes investigações moleculares sugerem que existem múltiplos eventos genéticos, e vírus oncogênicos que são capazes de alterar as funções normais de oncogenes e genes de supressão tumoral. O objetivo deste artigo foi revisar o conhecimento atual sobre o papel do papilomavírus humano (HPV, Epstein-Barr vírus (EBV, P53 e telomerase no desenvolvimento e prognóstico do carcinoma de células escamosas oral.Oral squamous cell carcinoma is a multistep event that continues to increase in incidence, particularly in the young, and to an extent that cannot be fully explained by increased exposure to known risk factors, as tobacco or alcohol. Recent molecular investigations suggest that there are multiple genetic events, and oncogenic virus that are able to alter the normal functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The aim of the present article was to review the current knowledge on the role of Human papillomavirus (HPV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, P53 and telomerase in the development and prognosis of the oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  20. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) within the European marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, M.; Cunningham, C.O.; Melvin, W.T.; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    A ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay (RPA) has been used to detect nucleotide sequence variation within the nucleoprotein gene of 39 viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates of European marine origin. The classification of VHSV isolates based on RPA cleavage patterns permitted the identification of ten distinct groups of viruses based on differences at the molecular level. The nucleotide sequence of representatives of each of these groupings was determined and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This revealed grouping of the European marine isolates of VHSV into three genotypes circulating within distinct geographic areas. A fourth genotype was identified comprising isolates originating from North America. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that VHSV isolates recovered from wild caught fish around the British Isles were genetically related to isolates responsible for losses in farmed turbot. Furthermore, a relationship between naturally occurring marine isolates and VHSV isolates causing mortality among rainbow trout in continental Europe was demonstrated. Analysis of the nucleoprotein gene identifies distinct lineages of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus within the European marine environment. Virus Res. 63, 35-44. Available from: 

  1. Genome sequence of erythromelalgia-related poxvirus identifies it as an ectromelia virus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge D Mendez-Rios

    Full Text Available Erythromelagia is a condition characterized by attacks of burning pain and inflammation in the extremeties. An epidemic form of this syndrome occurs in secondary students in rural China and a virus referred to as erythromelalgia-associated poxvirus (ERPV was reported to have been recovered from throat swabs in 1987. Studies performed at the time suggested that ERPV belongs to the orthopoxvirus genus and has similarities with ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox. We have determined the complete genome sequence of ERPV and demonstrated that it has 99.8% identity to the Naval strain of ectromelia virus and a slighly lower identity to the Moscow strain. Small DNA deletions in the Naval genome that are absent from ERPV may suggest that the sequenced strain of Naval was not the immediate progenitor of ERPV.

  2. Radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Oncogenes and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltenburg, L. T. C. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology

    2000-12-01

    The success of treatment of cancer patients by radiotherapy largely depends on tumor radiosensitivity. Several molecular factors that determine the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation have been identified during the last couple of years. Some of these factors are known as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the influence of some of these molecular factors on a major determinant of radiosensitivity: i. e. programmed cell death or apoptosis. The crucial molecular step in ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cell's cytosol. The ways the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as the oncogenes ras and raf, c-myc and Bcl-2 can influence this process at different stages are presented. As will be discussed, the result of activation of an oncoprotein on tumor radiosensitivity depends on its mechanism of action and on the presence of other (oncogenic) factors, since complex interactions among many molecular factors determine the delicate balance between cell proliferation and cell death. The ongoing identification and characterization of factors influencing apoptosis will eventually make it possible to predict tumor radiosensitivity and thereby improve cancer treatment.

  3. Transcriptomic Profiling of Diverse Aedes aegypti Strains Reveals Increased Basal-level Immune Activation in Dengue Virus-refractory Populations and Identifies Novel Virus-vector Molecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Shuzhen; Jupatanakul, Natapong; Ramirez, José L.; Kang, Seokyoung; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M.; Mohammed, Hamish; Dimopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation among Aedes aegypti populations can greatly influence their vector competence for human pathogens such as the dengue virus (DENV). While intra-species transcriptome differences remain relatively unstudied when compared to coding sequence polymorphisms, they also affect numerous aspects of mosquito biology. Comparative molecular profiling of mosquito strain transcriptomes can therefore provide valuable insight into the regulation of vector competence. We established a panel of A. aegypti strains with varying levels of susceptibility to DENV, comprising both laboratory-maintained strains and field-derived colonies collected from geographically distinct dengue-endemic regions spanning South America, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia. A comparative genome-wide gene expression microarray-based analysis revealed higher basal levels of numerous immunity-related gene transcripts in DENV-refractory mosquito strains than in susceptible strains, and RNA interference assays further showed different degrees of immune pathway contribution to refractoriness in different strains. By correlating transcript abundance patterns with DENV susceptibility across our panel, we also identified new candidate modulators of DENV infection in the mosquito, and we provide functional evidence for two potential DENV host factors and one potential restriction factor. Our comparative transcriptome dataset thus not only provides valuable information about immune gene regulation and usage in natural refractoriness of mosquito populations to dengue virus but also allows us to identify new molecular interactions between the virus and its mosquito vector. PMID:23861987

  4. Malignant catarrhal fever virus identified in free-ranging musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    To study the epizootiology of malignant catarrhal fever viruses (MCFV), sera and spleen samples collected in 2004-2011 from a free-ranging musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population in Dovrefjell, Norway, were examined. Sera were tested for antibodies against MCFV by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbe...

  5. New Ebola virus in 2014:do identified mutated amino acids in the viral sequences sense?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somsri; Wiwanitkit; Viroj; Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    To the editor,The problem of new Ebola virus outbreak in 2014 is thepresent big consideration of medical society.The new infectionoccurs in West Africa and causes infection in thousands oflocal people,and the trend of the worldwide expansion leads to serious concerns of the medical society. The reason why the

  6. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  7. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Utt, Age; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; Tammela, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2), obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs). The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV), their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate models for anti

  8. Large-scale analysis by SAGE reveals new mechanisms of v-erbA oncogene action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faure Claudine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The v-erbA oncogene, carried by the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus, derives from the c-erbAα proto-oncogene that encodes the nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine (T3R. v-ErbA transforms erythroid progenitors in vitro by blocking their differentiation, supposedly by interference with T3R and RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor. However, v-ErbA target genes involved in its transforming activity still remain to be identified. Results: By using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, we identified 110 genes deregulated by v-ErbA and potentially implicated in the transformation process. Bioinformatic analysis of promoter sequence and transcriptional assays point out a potential role of c-Myb in the v-ErbA effect. Furthermore, grouping of newly identified target genes by function revealed both expected (chromatin/transcription and unexpected (protein metabolism functions potentially deregulated by v-ErbA. We then focused our study on 15 of the new v-ErbA target genes and demonstrated by real time PCR that in majority their expression was activated neither by T3, nor RA, nor during differentiation. This was unexpected based upon the previously known role of v-ErbA. Conclusion: This paper suggests the involvement of a wealth of new unanticipated mechanisms of v-ErbA action.

  9. Novel E6 and E7 oncogenes variants of human papillomavirus type 31 in Brazilian women with abnormal cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Bárbara Simas; Batista, Marcus Vinicius de Aragão; Crovella, Sergio; Gurgel, Ana Pavla Almeida Diniz; Silva Neto, Jacinto da Costa; Serra, Ivi Gonçalves Soares Santos; Amaral, Carolina Maria Medeiros; Balbino, Valdir Queiroz; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Freitas, Antonio Carlos

    2013-06-01

    HPV-31 has been widely described as an important oncogenic type, showing high incidence in worldwide and especially in Northeastern Brazil. We sought to identify the presence of specific mutations in HPV-31 E6 and E7 oncogenes in women with abnormal cervical smear. We enrolled 150 gynecological patients from Sergipe State, Northeastern Brazil. HPV screening was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (MY09/11). E6 and E7 oncogenes were amplified with specific primers and sequenced. The sequences obtained were aligned with the GenBank reference sequences in order to search for genetic variants. We identified genetic variants in E6 and E7 sequences from HPV-31. Two new nucleotide changes in E6 and E7 were described for the first time in this study. A novel mutation in E6 resulted in amino acid change in a site belonging to T-cell epitope with MHC II binding activity. There was no significant difference in the distribution of HPV-31 E6 and E7 variants when compared to all selected clinical/epidemiological characteristics. HPV-31 isolates have been clustered into three main groups called lineages A, B and C. We describe new HPV-31 variants in Brazil, contributing to better understand the genomic diversity of these viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying potential survival strategies of HIV-1 through virus-host protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucher Charles AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has launched the HIV-1 Human Protein Interaction Database in an effort to catalogue all published interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins. In order to systematically investigate these interactions functionally and dynamically, we have constructed an HIV-1 human protein interaction network. This network was analyzed for important proteins and processes that are specific for the HIV life-cycle. In order to expose viral strategies, network motif analysis was carried out showing reoccurring patterns in virus-host dynamics. Results Our analyses show that human proteins interacting with HIV form a densely connected and central sub-network within the total human protein interaction network. The evaluation of this sub-network for connectivity and centrality resulted in a set of proteins essential for the HIV life-cycle. Remarkably, we were able to associate proteins involved in RNA polymerase II transcription with hubs and proteasome formation with bottlenecks. Inferred network motifs show significant over-representation of positive and negative feedback patterns between virus and host. Strikingly, such patterns have never been reported in combined virus-host systems. Conclusions HIV infection results in a reprioritization of cellular processes reflected by an increase in the relative importance of transcriptional machinery and proteasome formation. We conclude that during the evolution of HIV, some patterns of interaction have been selected for resulting in a system where virus proteins preferably interact with central human proteins for direct control and with proteasomal proteins for indirect control over the cellular processes. Finally, the patterns described by network motifs illustrate how virus and host interact with one another.

  11. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L. Koenig

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other

  12. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Kristi L; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED) personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I) tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other arthropod

  13. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  14. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna eRosario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs, which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses.

  15. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  16. Broadly Neutralizing Activity of Zika Virus-Immune Sera Identifies a Single Viral Serotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Dowd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV have been associated with congenital malformation during pregnancy and Guillain-Barré syndrome. There are two ZIKV lineages (African and Asian that share >95% amino acid identity. Little is known regarding the ability of neutralizing antibodies elicited against one lineage to protect against the other. We investigated the breadth of the neutralizing antibody response following ZIKV infection by measuring the sensitivity of six ZIKV strains to neutralization by ZIKV-confirmed convalescent human serum or plasma samples. Contemporary Asian and early African ZIKV strains were similarly sensitive to neutralization regardless of the cellular source of virus. Furthermore, mouse immune serum generated after infection with African or Asian ZIKV strains was capable of neutralizing homologous and heterologous ZIKV strains equivalently. Because our study only defines a single ZIKV serotype, vaccine candidates eliciting robust neutralizing antibody responses should inhibit infection of both ZIKV lineages, including strains circulating in the Americas.

  17. Subgenotyping of Genotype C Hepatitis B Virus: Correcting Misclassifications and Identifying a Novel Subgenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Weifeng Shi; Chaodong Zhu; Weimin Zheng; Wei Zheng; Cheng Ling; Carr, Michael J; Higgins, Desmond G.; Zhong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than ten subgenotypes of genotype C Hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been reported, including C1 to C16 and two C/D recombinant subgenotypes (CD1 and CD2), however, inconsistent designations of these subgenotypes still exist. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a phylogenetic analysis of all full-length genotype C HBV genome sequences to correct the misclassifications of HBV subgenotypes and to study the influence of recombination on HBV subgenotyping. Our results showed...

  18. Integrative Functional Genomics of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Identifies Host Dependencies in Complete Viral Replication Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Qisheng Li; Yong-Yuan Zhang; Stephan Chiu; Zongyi Hu; Keng-Hsin Lan; Helen Cha; Catherine Sodroski; Fang Zhang; Ching-Sheng Hsu; Emmanuel Thomas; T Jake Liang

    2014-01-01

    Recent functional genomics studies including genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) exploits an extensive network of host factors for productive infection and propagation. How these co-opted host functions interact with various steps of HCV replication cycle and exert pro- or antiviral effects on HCV infection remains largely undefined. Here we present an unbiased and systematic strategy to functionally interrogate HCV host dependencies unc...

  19. Antibodies against a synthetic peptide identify the Epstein-Barr virus-determined nuclear antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Five peptides corresponding to amino acid sequences predicted from all three reading frames of the nucleotide sequence of the third internal repeat array (IR3) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome were synthesized chemically. All five peptides elicited antipeptide antibodies in rabbits. The antiserum raised against a 14-residue copolymer of glycine and alanine gave brilliant EBV-specific nuclear staining in the anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) assay, in line with the original defini...

  20. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation. PMID:28165016

  1. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-02-06

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation.

  2. Identifying the environmental conditions favouring West Nile Virus outbreaks in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Marcantonio

    Full Text Available West Nile Virus (WNV is a globally important mosquito borne virus, with significant implications for human and animal health. The emergence and spread of new lineages, and increased pathogenicity, is the cause of escalating public health concern. Pinpointing the environmental conditions that favour WNV circulation and transmission to humans is challenging, due both to the complexity of its biological cycle, and the under-diagnosis and reporting of epidemiological data. Here, we used remote sensing and GIS to enable collation of multiple types of environmental data over a continental spatial scale, in order to model annual West Nile Fever (WNF incidence across Europe and neighbouring countries. Multi-model selection and inference were used to gain a consensus from multiple linear mixed models. Climate and landscape were key predictors of WNF outbreaks (specifically, high precipitation in late winter/early spring, high summer temperatures, summer drought, occurrence of irrigated croplands and highly fragmented forests. Identification of the environmental conditions associated with WNF outbreaks is key to enabling public health bodies to properly focus surveillance and mitigation of West Nile virus impact, but more work needs to be done to enable accurate predictions of WNF risk.

  3. Identifying the environmental conditions favouring West Nile Virus outbreaks in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcantonio, Matteo; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Metz, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Marini, Giovanni; Chadwick, Elizabeth; Neteler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a globally important mosquito borne virus, with significant implications for human and animal health. The emergence and spread of new lineages, and increased pathogenicity, is the cause of escalating public health concern. Pinpointing the environmental conditions that favour WNV circulation and transmission to humans is challenging, due both to the complexity of its biological cycle, and the under-diagnosis and reporting of epidemiological data. Here, we used remote sensing and GIS to enable collation of multiple types of environmental data over a continental spatial scale, in order to model annual West Nile Fever (WNF) incidence across Europe and neighbouring countries. Multi-model selection and inference were used to gain a consensus from multiple linear mixed models. Climate and landscape were key predictors of WNF outbreaks (specifically, high precipitation in late winter/early spring, high summer temperatures, summer drought, occurrence of irrigated croplands and highly fragmented forests). Identification of the environmental conditions associated with WNF outbreaks is key to enabling public health bodies to properly focus surveillance and mitigation of West Nile virus impact, but more work needs to be done to enable accurate predictions of WNF risk.

  4. A Mutation Identified in Neonatal Microcephaly Destabilizes Zika Virus NS1 Assembly in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deping; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Shengnan; Zhou, Han; Yang, Kailin; Zhao, Qi; Ji, Xiaoyun; Chen, Chen; Xie, Wei; Wang, Zefang; Mi, Li-Zhi; Yang, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    An unprecedented epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection had spread to South and Central America. ZIKV infection was recently confirmed by CDC (the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) to cause neonatal microcephaly, which posed a significant public health emergency of international concern. No specific vaccines or drugs are currently available to fight ZIKV infection. ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) plays an essential role in viral replication and immune evasion. We determined the crystal structure of ZIKV NS1172–352, which forms a head-to-head, symmetric dimer with a unique 14-stranded β-ladder conserved among flaviviruses. The assembly of the β-ladder dimer is concentration dependent. Strikingly, one pathogenic mutation T233A (NCBI accession no. KU527068), found in the brain tissue of infected fetus with neonatal microcephaly, is located at the dimer interface. Thr233, a unique residue found in ZIKV but not in other flaviviruses, organizes a central hydrogen bonding network at NS1 dimer interface. Mutation of Thr233 to Ala disrupts this elaborated interaction network, and destabilizes the NS1 dimeric assembly in vitro. In addition, our structural comparison of epitopes for protective antibody 22NS1, targeting West Nile Virus NS1, could potentially be valuable in understanding its anti-virus specificities and in the development of antibodies against ZIKV. PMID:28198446

  5. Identifying protective host gene expression signatures within the spleen during West Nile virus infection in the collaborative cross model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Green

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are hematophagous arthropod-viruses that pose global challenges to human health. Like Zika virus, West Nile Virus (WNV is a flavivirus for which no approved vaccine exists [1]. The role host genetics play in early detection and response to WNV still remains largely unexplained. In order to capture the impact of genetic variation on innate immune responses, we studied gene expression following WNV infection using the collaborative cross (CC. The CC is a mouse genetics resource composed of hundreds of independently bred, octo-parental recombinant inbred mouse lines [2]. To accurately capture the host immune gene expression signatures of West Nile infection, we used the nanostring platform to evaluate expression in spleen tissue isolated from CC mice infected with WNV over a time course of 4, 7, and 12 days' post-infection [3]. Nanostring is a non-amplification based digital method to quantitate gene expression that uses color-coded molecular barcodes to detect hundreds of transcripts in a sample. Using this approach, we identified unique gene signatures in spleen tissue at days 4, 7, and 12 following WNV infection, which delineated distinct differences between asymptomatic and symptomatic CC lines. We also identified novel immune genes. Data was deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE86000.

  6. New Phylogenetic Groups of Torque Teno Virus Identified in Eastern Taiwan Indigenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Liang Hsiao

    Full Text Available Torque teno virus (TTV is a single-stranded DNA virus highly prevalent in the world. It has been detected in eastern Taiwan indigenes with a low prevalence of 11% by using N22 region of which known to underestimate TTV prevalence excessively. In order to clarify their realistic epidemiology, we re-analyzed TTV prevalence with UTR region. One hundred and forty serum samples from eastern Taiwanese indigenous population were collected and TTV DNA was detected in 133 (95% samples. Direct sequencing revealed an extensive mix-infection of different TTV strains within the infected individual. Entire TTV open reading frame 1 was amplified and cloned from a TTV positive individual to distinguish mix-infected strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed eleven isolates were clustered into a monophyletic group that is distinct from all known groups. In addition, another our isolate was clustered with recently described Hebei-1 strain and formed an independent clade. Based on the distribution pattern of pairwise distances, both new clusters were placed at phylogenetic group level, designed as the 6th and 7th phylogenetic group. In present study, we showed a very high prevalence of TTV infection in eastern Taiwan indigenes and indentified new phylogenetic groups from the infected individual. Both intra- and inter-phylogenetic group mix-infections can be found from one healthy person. Our study has further broadened the field of human TTVs and proposed a robust criterion for classification of the major TTV phylogenetic groups.

  7. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialuisa Moccia

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  8. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  9. Coevolution analysis of Hepatitis C virus genome to identify the structural and functional dependency network of viral proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champeimont, Raphaël; Laine, Elodie; Hu, Shuang-Wei; Penin, Francois; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-05-01

    A novel computational approach of coevolution analysis allowed us to reconstruct the protein-protein interaction network of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) at the residue resolution. For the first time, coevolution analysis of an entire viral genome was realized, based on a limited set of protein sequences with high sequence identity within genotypes. The identified coevolving residues constitute highly relevant predictions of protein-protein interactions for further experimental identification of HCV protein complexes. The method can be used to analyse other viral genomes and to predict the associated protein interaction networks.

  10. Can plant oncogenes inhibit programmed cell death? The rolB oncogene reduces apoptosis-like symptoms in transformed plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpenchenko, Tatiana Y; Aminin, Dmitry L; Vereshchagina, Yuliya V; Shkryl, Yuri N; Veremeichik, Galina N; Tchernoded, Galina K; Bulgakov, Victor P

    2012-09-01

    The rolB oncogene was previously identified as an important player in ROS metabolism in transformed plant cells. Numerous reports indicate a crucial role for animal oncogenes in apoptotic cell death. Whether plant oncogenes such as rolB can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in transformed plant cells is of particular importance. In this investigation, we used a single-cell assay based on confocal microscopy and fluorescent dyes capable of discriminating between apoptotic and necrotic cells. Our results indicate that the expression of rolB in plant cells was sufficient to decrease the proportion of apoptotic cells in steady-state conditions and diminish the rate of apoptotic cells during induced PCD. These data suggest that plant oncogenes, like animal oncogenes, may be involved in the processes mediating PCD.

  11. Stable oncogenic transformation induced by microcell-mediated gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕有勇; Donald G.Blair

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenes have been identified using DNA-mediated transfection, but the size of the transferable and unrearranged DNA, gene rearrangement and amplification which occur during the transfection process limit the use of the techniques. We have evaluated microcell-mediated gene transfer techniques for the transfer and analysis of dominant oncogenes. MNNG-HOS, a transformed human cell line which contained the met oncogene mapping to human chromosome 7 was infected with retroviruses carrying drug resistance markers and used to optimize microcell preparation and transfer. Stable and drug-resistant hybrids containing single human chromosomes as well as the foci of the transformed cells containing the activated met oncogene and intact hitman chromosomes were obtained. Hybridization analysis with probes (i.e. collA2, pJ3.11) mapping up to 1 Mb away from met shows that the cells from the individual focr contain different amounts of apparently unrearranged human DNA associated with the oncogene, and the microcell-g

  12. Mapping of Chikungunya virus interactions with host proteins identified nsP2 as a highly connected viral component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouraï, Mehdi; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Gad, Hans Henrik; Drosten, Christian; Jacob, Yves; Tafforeau, Lionel; Cassonnet, Patricia; Jones, Louis M; Judith, Delphine; Couderc, Thérèse; Lecuit, Marc; André, Patrice; Kümmerer, Beate Mareike; Lotteau, Vincent; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2012-03-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that has been responsible for an epidemic outbreak of unprecedented magnitude in recent years. Since then, significant efforts have been made to better understand the biology of this virus, but we still have poor knowledge of CHIKV interactions with host cell components at the molecular level. Here we describe the extensive use of high-throughput yeast two-hybrid (HT-Y2H) assays to characterize interactions between CHIKV and human proteins. A total of 22 high-confidence interactions, which essentially involved the viral nonstructural protein nsP2, were identified and further validated in protein complementation assay (PCA). These results were integrated to a larger network obtained by extensive mining of the literature for reports on alphavirus-host interactions. To investigate the role of cellular proteins interacting with nsP2, gene silencing experiments were performed in cells infected by a recombinant CHIKV expressing Renilla luciferase as a reporter. Collected data showed that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K) and ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4) participate in CHIKV replication in vitro. In addition, we showed that CHIKV nsP2 induces a cellular shutoff, as previously reported for other Old World alphaviruses, and determined that among binding partners identified by yeast two-hybrid methods, the tetratricopeptide repeat protein 7B (TTC7B) plays a significant role in this activity. Altogether, this report provides the first interaction map between CHIKV and human proteins and describes new host cell proteins involved in the replication cycle of this virus.

  13. [Preliminary analysis on respiratory syncytial virus identified in children with acute respiratory infections in Tibet Autonomous Region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Qian, Yuan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Wang, Fang; Wu, Hong; Shan, Min-Na; Deji, Mei-Duo

    2012-03-01

    To understand the role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Tibet Autonomous Region and the contribution of two major groups of RSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected from hospitalized children with ARI in Department of Pediatrics, Tibet People's Hospital in Lasa, Tibet from April to July in 2011 and tested for seven common respiratory viruses and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) by direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA). Total RNAs were extracted from RSV positive samples by DFA and reverse transcripted to cDNA. Nested-PCR was employed to determine the genogroups of RSV, which were confirmed by real time-PCR and sequence analysis for G protein encoding gene. The Characteristics and variations of G genes from RSV in this project were identified by sequence comparison with those G genes in GenBank. Out of 167 samples, 65 were positive for respiratory viruses with a total positive rate of 38.9%, including 45 (69.2%, 45/65)positive samples for RSV. Among 42 samples that were positive for RSV and genotyped, 40 were identified as group A and 2 as group B. Sequence analysis of full-length G genes for 7 RSV of group A indicated that all of these belonged to subgroup GA2. The nucleotide identities between RSVs from Tibet and prototype A2 strain were 90.7%-91.8%, with 86.5%-87.2% identities of amino acid. The mutations of amino acids were mainly located in both ends of a highly conserved region in the ectodomain of the G proteins. The data indicated that RSV was the most important viral etiologic agent of ARI in spring of 2011 in Tibet and group A of RSV was predominant during the study period. High divergence existed in the ectodomain of G proteins of RSVs from Tibet.

  14. In Silico Analysis of Oncogenes for Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim-Hui Tee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational tools and methods play a vital role in handling and analyzing a large volume of genomic data. In cancer research, in silico methods such as computational algorithm and protein databases are indispensable. In this paper, we adopted an in silico approach to analyze oncogenes that cause  renal cancer. Our objective is to identify and analyze the genes which are over expressed in the renal cancer tissues. The identification of oncogenes for renal cancer could provide directions and insights for molecular cancer treatment.

  15. A functional selection of viral genetic elements in cultured cells to identify hepatitis C virus RNA translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrelo, Loic; Chabas, Sandrine; Reigadas, Sandrine; Pflieger, Aude; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Rumi, Julie; Ventura, Michel; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Staedel, Cathy

    2008-09-01

    We developed a functional selection system based on randomized genetic elements (GE) to identify potential regulators of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA translation, a process initiated by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). A retroviral HCV GE library was introduced into HepG2 cells, stably expressing the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) under the control of the HCV IRES. Cells that expressed transduced GEs inhibiting HSV-TK were selected via their resistance to ganciclovir. Six major GEs were rescued by PCR on the selected cell DNA and identified as HCV elements. We validated our strategy by further studying the activity of one of them, GE4, encoding the 5' end of the viral NS5A gene. GE4 inhibited HCV IRES-, but not cap-dependent, reporter translation in human hepatic cell lines and inhibited HCV infection at a post-entry step, decreasing by 85% the number of viral RNA copies. This method can be applied to the identification of gene expression regulators.

  16. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kandeel, Amr M; Talaat, Maha; Afifi, Salma A; El-Sayed, Nasr M; Abdel Fadeel, Moustafa A; Hajjeh, Rana A; Mahoney, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    .... We conducted a case-control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two...

  17. ICP35 Is a TREX-Like Protein Identified in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phairoh, Panapat; Suthibatpong, Thana; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Jongruja, Nujarin; Senapin, Saengchan; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Khunrae, Pongsak

    2016-01-01

    ICP35 is a non-structural protein from White spot syndrome virus believed to be important in viral replication. Since ICP35 was found to localize in the host nucleus, it has been speculated that the function of ICP35 might be involved in the interaction of DNA. In this study, we overexpressed, purified and characterized ICP35. The thioredoxin-fused ICP35 (thio-ICP35) was strongly expressed in E. coli and be able to form itself into dimers. Investigation of the interaction between ICP35 and DNA revealed that ICP35 can perform DNase activity. Structural model of ICP35 was successfully built on TREX1, suggesting that ICP35 might adopt the folding similar to that of TREX1 protein. Several residues important for dimerization in TREX1 are also conserved in ICP35. Residue Asn126 and Asp132, which are seen to be in close proximity to metal ions in the ICP35 model, were shown through site-directed mutagenesis to be critical for DNase activity. PMID:27348862

  18. Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa J. Schwartz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV infection of horses with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. Viral dynamic modeling of antibody protection from EIAV infection in SCID horses may lead to insights into the mechanisms of control of infection by antibody vaccination. In this work, such a model is constructed in conjunction with data from EIAV infection of SCID horses to gain insights into multiple strain competition in the presence of antibody control. Conditions are determined under which wild-type infection is eradicated with the antibody vaccine. In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain. The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters. This work extends the current understanding of competition and antibody control in lentiviral infection, which may provide insights into the development of vaccines that stimulate the immune system to control infection effectively.

  19. Identifying a few foot-and-mouth disease virus signature nucleotide strings for computational genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lizhe

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotypes of the Foot-and-Mouth disease viruses (FMDVs were generally determined by biological experiments. The computational genotyping is not well studied even with the availability of whole viral genomes, due to uneven evolution among genes as well as frequent genetic recombination. Naively using sequence comparison for genotyping is only able to achieve a limited extent of success. Results We used 129 FMDV strains with known serotype as training strains to select as many as 140 most serotype-specific nucleotide strings. We then constructed a linear-kernel Support Vector Machine classifier using these 140 strings. Under the leave-one-out cross validation scheme, this classifier was able to assign correct serotype to 127 of these 129 strains, achieving 98.45% accuracy. It also assigned serotype correctly to an independent test set of 83 other FMDV strains downloaded separately from NCBI GenBank. Conclusion Computational genotyping is much faster and much cheaper than the wet-lab based biological experiments, upon the availability of the detailed molecular sequences. The high accuracy of our proposed method suggests the potential of utilizing a few signature nucleotide strings instead of whole genomes to determine the serotypes of novel FMDV strains.

  20. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies SEC61A and VCP as Conserved Regulators of Sindbis Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Panda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are a large class of insect-borne human pathogens and little is known about the host-factor requirements for infection. To identify such factors, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using model Drosophila cells and validated 94 genes that impacted infection of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototypical alphavirus. We identified a conserved role for SEC61A and valosin-containing protein (VCP in facilitating SINV entry in insects and mammals. SEC61A and VCP selectively regulate trafficking of the entry receptor NRAMP2, and loss or pharmacological inhibition of these proteins leads to altered NRAMP2 trafficking to lysosomal compartments and proteolytic digestion within lysosomes. NRAMP2 is the major iron transporter in cells, and loss of NRAMP2 attenuates intracellular iron transport. Thus, this study reveals genes and pathways involved in both infection and iron homeostasis that may serve as targets for antiviral therapeutics or for iron-imbalance disorders.

  1. Heterogeneity and seroprevalence of a newly identified avian hepatitis e virus from chickens in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F F; Haqshenas, G; Shivaprasad, H L; Guenette, D K; Woolcock, P R; Larsen, C T; Pierson, F W; Elvinger, F; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2002-11-01

    We recently identified and characterized a novel virus, designated avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome (HS syndrome) in the United States. Avian HEV is genetically related to but distinct from human and swine HEVs. To determine the extent of genetic variation and the seroprevalence of avian HEV infection in chicken flocks, we genetically identified and characterized 11 additional avian HEV isolates from chickens with HS syndrome and assessed the prevalence of avian HEV antibodies from a total of 1,276 chickens of different ages and breeds from 76 different flocks in five states (California, Colorado, Connecticut, Virginia, and Wisconsin). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a truncated recombinant avian HEV ORF2 antigen was developed and used to determine avian HEV seroprevalence. About 71% of chicken flocks and 30% of chickens tested in the study were positive for antibodies to avian HEV. About 17% of chickens younger than 18 weeks were seropositive, whereas about 36% of adult chickens were seropositive. By using a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay, we tested 21 bile samples from chickens with HS syndrome in California, Connecticut, New York, and Wisconsin for the presence of avian HEV RNA. Of the 21 bile samples, 12 were positive for 30- to 35-nm HEV-like virus particles by electron microscopy (EM). A total of 11 of the 12 EM-positive bile samples and 6 of the 9 EM-negative bile samples were positive for avian HEV RNA by RT-PCR. The sequences of a 372-bp region within the helicase gene of 11 avian HEV isolates were determined. Sequence analyses revealed that the 11 field isolates of avian HEV had 78 to 100% nucleotide sequence identities to each other, 79 to 88% identities to the prototype avian HEV, 76 to 80% identities to chicken big liver and spleen disease virus, and 56 to 61% identities to other known strains of human and swine HEV. The data from this study indicated that, like swine and human

  2. Identifying SARS-CoV membrane protein amino acid residues linked to virus-like particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Tzu Tseng

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV membrane (M proteins are capable of self-assembly and release in the form of membrane-enveloped vesicles, and of forming virus-like particles (VLPs when coexpressed with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. According to previous deletion analyses, M self-assembly involves multiple M sequence regions. To identify important M amino acid residues for VLP assembly, we coexpressed N with multiple M mutants containing substitution mutations at the amino-terminal ectodomain, carboxyl-terminal endodomain, or transmembrane segments. Our results indicate that a dileucine motif in the endodomain tail (218LL219 is required for efficient N packaging into VLPs. Results from cross-linking VLP analyses suggest that the cysteine residues 63, 85 and 158 are not in close proximity to the M dimer interface. We noted a significant reduction in M secretion due to serine replacement for C158, but not for C63 or C85. Further analysis suggests that C158 is involved in M-N interaction. In addition to mutations of the highly conserved 107-SWWSFNPE-114 motif, substitutions at codons W19, W57, P58, W91, Y94 or F95 all resulted in significantly reduced VLP yields, largely due to defective M secretion. VLP production was not significantly affected by a tryptophan replacement of Y94 or F95 or a phenylalanine replacement of W19, W57 or W91. Combined, these results indicate the involvement of specific M amino acids during SARS-CoV virus assembly, and suggest that aromatic residue retention at specific positions is critical for M function in terms of directing virus assembly.

  3. RNAseq expression analysis of resistant and susceptible mice after influenza A virus infection identifies novel genes associated with virus replication and important for host resistance to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Esther; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Leist, Sarah Rebecca; Hatesuer, Bastian; Preusse, Matthias; Pommerenke, Claudia; Wang, Junxi; Schughart, Klaus

    2015-09-02

    The host response to influenza A infections is strongly influenced by host genetic factors. Animal models of genetically diverse mouse strains are well suited to identify host genes involved in severe pathology, viral replication and immune responses. Here, we have utilized a dual RNAseq approach that allowed us to investigate both viral and host gene expression in the same individual mouse after H1N1 infection. We performed a detailed expression analysis to identify (i) correlations between changes in expression of host and virus genes, (ii) host genes involved in viral replication, and (iii) genes showing differential expression between two mouse strains that strongly differ in resistance to influenza infections. These genes may be key players involved in regulating the differences in pathogenesis and host defense mechanisms after influenza A infections. Expression levels of influenza segments correlated well with the viral load and may thus be used as surrogates for conventional viral load measurements. Furthermore, we investigated the functional role of two genes, Reg3g and Irf7, in knock-out mice and found that deletion of the Irf7 gene renders the host highly susceptible to H1N1 infection. Using RNAseq analysis we identified novel genes important for viral replication or the host defense. This study adds further important knowledge to host-pathogen-interactions and suggests additional candidates that are crucial for host susceptibility or survival during influenza A infections.

  4. Newly identified phosphorylation site in the vesicular stomatitis virus P protein is required for viral RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Arindam; Victor, Ken G; Pudupakam, R S; Lyons, Charles E; Wertz, Gail W

    2014-02-01

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase consists of two viral proteins; the large (L) protein is the main catalytic subunit, and the phosphoprotein (P) is an essential cofactor for polymerase function. The P protein interacts with the L protein and the N-RNA template, thus connecting the polymerase to the template. P protein also binds to free N protein to maintain it in a soluble, encapsidation-competent form. Previously, five sites of phosphorylation were identified on the P protein and these sites were reported to be differentially important for mRNA synthesis or genomic replication. The previous studies were carried out by biochemical analysis of portions of the authentic viral P protein or by analysis of bacterium-expressed, exogenously phosphorylated P protein by mutagenesis. However, there has been no systematic biochemical search for phosphorylation sites on authentic, virus-expressed P protein. In this study, we analyzed the P protein isolated from VSV-infected cells for sites of phosphorylation by mass spectrometry. We report the identification of Tyr14 as a previously unidentified phosphorylation site of VSV P and show that it is essential for viral transcription and replication. However, our mass spectral analysis failed to observe the phosphorylation of previously reported C-terminal residues Ser226 and Ser227 and mutagenic analyses did not demonstrate a role for these sites in RNA synthesis.

  5. A novel protein-coding ORF72.2 gene was identified from Marek's disease virus strain CVI988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ping

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marek's disease is a highly contagious disease of poultry characterized by rapid-on set of T-cell lymphomas, which is caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, but its pathogenic mechanism is still not very clear. Recently, some new progress were achieved in molecular character of MDV. Along with the genomic sequencing of MDV serotype 1, some novel open reading frames (ORFs were predicted, and ORF72.2 was one of them which have no homologues in other MDV serotypes or in other alphaherpesvirus. In the study, ORF72.2 was firstly identified as a protein-coding gene by the method of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay. This study paved the way to conduct further studies to determine whether ORF72.2 plays a role in MDV replication and pathogenicity.

  6. Small molecule inhibitors of the LEDGF site of human immunodeficiency virus integrase identified by fragment screening and structure based design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Peat

    Full Text Available A fragment-based screen against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV integrase led to a number of compounds that bound to the lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF binding site of the integrase catalytic core domain. We determined the crystallographic structures of complexes of the HIV integrase catalytic core domain for 10 of these compounds and quantitated the binding by surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that the compounds inhibit the interaction of LEDGF with HIV integrase in a proximity AlphaScreen assay, an assay for the LEDGF enhancement of HIV integrase strand transfer and in a cell based assay. The compounds identified represent a potential framework for the development of a new series of HIV integrase inhibitors that do not bind to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  7. Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    proto-oncogene (or other gene concerned with cell growth, cycling or .... small proportion of the anti-HCV-positive patients with HCC have not had cirrhosis, ..... Abelson murine leukemia virus encoded protein present in transformed fibroblasts ...

  8. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N. Spurgeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100. The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship.

  9. Validation of case-finding algorithms derived from administrative data for identifying adults living with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Antoniou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to validate a case-finding algorithm for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection using administrative health databases in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: We constructed 48 case-finding algorithms using combinations of physician billing claims, hospital and emergency room separations and prescription drug claims. We determined the test characteristics of each algorithm over various time frames for identifying HIV infection, using data abstracted from the charts of 2,040 randomly selected patients receiving care at two medical practices in Toronto, Ontario as the reference standard. RESULTS: With the exception of algorithms using only a single physician claim, the specificity of all algorithms exceeded 99%. An algorithm consisting of three physician claims over a three year period had a sensitivity and specificity of 96.2% (95% CI 95.2%-97.9% and 99.6% (95% CI 99.1%-99.8%, respectively. Application of the algorithm to the province of Ontario identified 12,179 HIV-infected patients in care for the period spanning April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Case-finding algorithms generated from administrative data can accurately identify adults living with HIV. A relatively simple "3 claims in 3 years" definition can be used for assembling a population-based cohort and facilitating future research examining trends in health service use and outcomes among HIV-infected adults in Ontario.

  10. MISSEL: a method to identify a large number of small species-specific genomic subsequences and its application to viruses classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscon, Giulia; Weitschek, Emanuel; Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciotti, Marco; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Bertolazzi, Paola; Felici, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Continuous improvements in next generation sequencing technologies led to ever-increasing collections of genomic sequences, which have not been easily characterized by biologists, and whose analysis requires huge computational effort. The classification of species emerged as one of the main applications of DNA analysis and has been addressed with several approaches, e.g., multiple alignments-, phylogenetic trees-, statistical- and character-based methods. We propose a supervised method based on a genetic algorithm to identify small genomic subsequences that discriminate among different species. The method identifies multiple subsequences of bounded length with the same information power in a given genomic region. The algorithm has been successfully evaluated through its integration into a rule-based classification framework and applied to three different biological data sets: Influenza, Polyoma, and Rhino virus sequences. We discover a large number of small subsequences that can be used to identify each virus type with high accuracy and low computational time, and moreover help to characterize different genomic regions. Bounding their length to 20, our method found 1164 characterizing subsequences for all the Influenza virus subtypes, 194 for all the Polyoma viruses, and 11 for Rhino viruses. The abundance of small separating subsequences extracted for each genomic region may be an important support for quick and robust virus identification. Finally, useful biological information can be derived by the relative location and abundance of such subsequences along the different regions.

  11. Mumps Virus: Modification of the Identify-Isolate-Inform Tool for Frontline Healthcare Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L. Koenig

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection that became rare in most industrialized countries following the introduction of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccine in 1967. The disease, however, has been re-emerging with several outbreaks over the past decade. Many clinicians have never seen a case of mumps. To assist frontline healthcare providers with detecting potential cases and initiating critical actions, investigators modified the “Identify-Isolate-Inform” tool for mumps infection. The tool is applicable to regions with rare incidences or local outbreaks, especially seen in college students, as well as globally in areas where vaccination is less common. Mumps begins with a prodrome of low-grade fever, myalgias and malaise/anorexia, followed by development of nonsuppurative parotitis, which is the pathognomonic finding associated with acute mumps infection. Orchitis and meningitis are the two most common serious complications, with hearing loss and infertility occurring rarely. Providers should consider mumps in patients with exposure to a known case or international travel to endemic regions who present with consistent signs and symptoms. If mumps is suspected, healthcare providers must immediately implement standard and droplet precautions and notify the local health department and hospital infection control personnel.

  12. Oncogenic HPV among HIV infected female population in West Bengal, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta Sharmila; Bhattacharya Subhasish; Saha Bibhuti; Bal Baishali; Pal Reshmi; Sarkar Kamalesh; Mazumdar Partha; Chakraborti Shekhar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prevalence of both cervical cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are very high in India. Natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is known to be altered in HIV positive women and there is an increased possibility of persistence of HPV infections in this population. Therefore, this study was conducted to understand the epidemiology and circulating genotypes of oncogenic HPV among HIV positive and negative female population in West Bengal, ...

  13. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Novel Oncogenes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread recurrent copy number alterations are observed across the majority of human cancers, yet the specific targets of such amplified or deleted regions remain undefined. Here, the CTD2 Center at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute took a systematic approach using cDNA overexpression screening to identify and validate oncogenes residing in such amplified regions. In representative examples, these experiments have identified the adaptor proteins CRKL, GAB2, FRS2 and the TLOC and SKIL proteins as novel amplified oncogenes.

  14. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  15. Transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts by direct DNA transfection of single oncogenes: comparative analyses of src, erbB, myc, and ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Antczak, M; Kung, H J

    1990-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) have been used extensively to study the transformation parameters of a number of avian sarcoma-leukemia viruses. Previously, oncogene transformation of CEF has been conducted almost exclusively with replicating viruses, because of perceived difficulties with direct DNA transfection. Here, we show that CEF can be efficiently and stably transfected by selection for the neomycin resistance gene (neo). Cotransfection of neo with various oncogenes resulted in CEF t...

  16. The in Silico Approach to Identify a Unique Plant-Derived Inhibitor Against E6 and E7 Oncogenic Proteins of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus 16 and 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Globally, the human papillomavirus (HPV remains the foremost cause of cancer mortality among women. There is a need to identify natural anti-cancerous compounds that can fight against life-threatening infections by HPV. Various kinds of natural plant-originated compounds have been used in the traditional system of medicine for cancer therapy. Different studies have reported the effective inhibition of HPV infection enacted by certain natural compounds. Out of all the different HPV types, HPV-16 and 18 are the ones mainly associated with causing cervical cancer; furthermore, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins of these two high-risk HPV types typically interact with tumor protein 53 (p53 and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (pRb of human host which consequent to cancer formation. Objectives The goal of this study is to identify unique plant-originated compounds to utilize in order to combat the high-risk human papillomavirus oncoproteins using docking measures. Materials and Methods Twelve natural compounds jaceosidin, withaferin A, curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, artemisinin, gingerol, ursolic acid, ferulic acid, berberin, silymarin, resveratrol, and indol-3-carbinol were docked against E6 and E7 oncoproteins of high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 using a protein-ligand docking software called AutoDock4.2. Results Out of these 12 natural compounds, withaferin A was found to inhibit all four oncoproteins with minimum binding energy. Conclusions These in silico findings indicate that withaferin A may be used as a common drug for cervical cancer caused by high-risk HPV types, perhaps by restoring the normal functions of tumor suppressor proteins.

  17. Comparative analysis of the human and feline c-sis proto-oncogenes : Identification of 5' human c-sis coding sequences that are not homologous to the transforming gene of simian sarcoma virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, Ans M.W. van den; Breuer, M.L.; Steenbergh, P.H.; Schalken, Jack A.; Bloemers, H.P.J.; Ven, Wim J.M. Van de

    1985-01-01

    Feline and human genetic sequences, homologous to the v-sis gene of simian sarcoma virus, have been isolated from cosmid gene libraries and characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis. Comparison of the two loci revealed their related structural organization. In both loci, similar unique gene

  18. 40 CFR 798.3300 - Oncogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Species of Experimental Animals for Inhalation Carcinogenicity Studies” Paper presented at Conference on...) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3300 Oncogenicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a long-term oncogenicity study is to observe test animals for a major portion of their life span for...

  19. Identification of a provirally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene in an avian nephroblastoma via a novel procedure: cDNA cloning of a chimaeric viral-host transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, D; Papkoff, J; Moscovici, C; Varmus, H E

    1986-01-01

    Retrovirus without oncogenes often exert their neoplastic potential as insertional mutagens of cellular proto-oncogenes. This may be associated with the production of chimaeric viral-host transcripts; in these cases; activated cellular genes can be identified by obtaining cDNA clones of bipartite RNAs. This approach was used in the analysis of chicken nephroblastomas induced by myeloblastosis-associated virus (MAV). One tumor contained a novel mRNA species initiated within a MAV LTR. cDNA cloning revealed that this mRNA encodes a protein of 189 amino acids, identical to that of normal human Ha-ras-1 at 185 positions, including positions implicated in oncogenic activation of ras proto-oncogenes; there are no differences between the coding sequences of presumably normal Ha-ras cDNA clones from chicken lymphoma RNA and the tumor-derived cDNAs. The chimaeric mRNA in the nephroblastoma is at least 25-fold more abundant than c-Ha-ras mRNA in normal kidney tissue, and a 21-kd ras-related protein is present in relatively large amounts in the tumor. We conclude that a quantitative change in c-Ha-ras gene expression results from an upstream insertion mutation and presumably contributes to tumorigenesis in this single case. Little or no increase in c-Ha-ras RNA or protein was observed in other nephroblastomas. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 10. PMID:3011401

  20. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Birth-cohort testing intervention identified hepatitis c virus infection among patients with few identified risks: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Southern, William N.; Norton, Brianna; Steinman, Meredith; DeLuca, Joseph; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Smith, Bryce D.; Litwin, Alain H.

    2015-01-01

    Background International guidelines and U.S. guidelines prior to 2012 only recommended testing for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among patients at risk, but adherence to guidelines is poor, and the majority of those infected remain undiagnosed. A strategy to perform one-time testing of all patients born during 1945–1965, birth cohort testing, may diagnose HCV infection among patients whose risk remains unknown. We sought to determine if a birth-cohort testing intervention for HCV antibody...

  2. Identifying blueberry germplasm that is slow to get Blueberry shock virus in the Pacific Northwest United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberry shock virus (BlShV) is a serious problem in blueberry production in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of North America. Infection occurs during bloom and the virus moves into other parts of the plant in an uneven but steady manner and may take several years to become fully systemic in mat...

  3. A systematic review of the literature to identify and quantify host and vector competence and abundance of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne arbovirus that causes endemic and epidemic encephalitis in Eastern and Southeastern Asia. Swine and wading birds serve as reservoirs for the virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquitos. Currently, there is no specific treatment availa...

  4. Partial deletion of stem-loop 2 in the 3' untranslated region of foot-and-mouth disease virus identifies a region that is dispensable for virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-08-01

    The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome plays an essential role in virus replication, but the properties of the 3' UTR are not completely defined. In order to determine the role of different regions of the 3' UTR in FMDV replication, we conducted site-directed mutagenesis of the 3' UTR of FMDV serotype O IND R2/1975 using a cDNA clone. Through independent serial deletions in various regions of the 3' UTR, we demonstrated that deletion of nucleotides between the stem-loop (SL) structures and in the beginning and the end regions of the SL2 structure could be lethal for FMDV replication. However, a block deletion of 20 nucleotides (nt 60 to 79) in the middle of SL2 did not affect the viability of FMDV in cultured cells. Characterisation of the deletion mutant virus (O(R2/1975-Δ3'UTR 60-79)) revealed no significant difference in growth kinetics or RNA replication ability compared to the parental virus. However, the mutant virus produced slightly larger plaques when compared to the parental virus. This is the first description of a dispensable 20-nucleotide region in SL2 of the FMDV 3' UTR.

  5. Small RNA profiling of influenza A virus-infected cells identifies miR-449b as a regulator of histone deacetylase 1 and interferon beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Buggele

    Full Text Available The mammalian antiviral response relies on the alteration of cellular gene expression, to induce the production of antiviral effectors and regulate their activities. Recent research has indicated that virus infections can induce the accumulation of cellular microRNA (miRNA species that influence the stability of host mRNAs and their protein products. To determine the potential for miRNA regulation of cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, small RNA profiling was carried out using next generation sequencing. Comparison of miRNA expression profiles in uninfected human A549 cells to cells infected with influenza A virus strains A/Udorn/72 and A/WSN/33, revealed virus-induced changes in miRNA abundance. Gene expression analysis identified mRNA targets for a cohort of highly inducible miRNAs linked to diverse cellular functions. Experiments demonstrate that the histone deacetylase, HDAC1, can be regulated by influenza-inducible miR-449b, resulting in altered mRNA and protein levels. Expression of miR-449b enhances virus and poly(I:C activation of the IFNβ promoter, a process known to be negatively regulated by HDAC1. These findings demonstrate miRNA induction by influenza A virus infection and elucidate an example of miRNA control of antiviral gene expression in human cells, defining a role for miR-449b in regulation of HDAC1 and antiviral cytokine signaling.

  6. Viral metagenomic analysis of bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus in Uganda identifies novel variants of Porcine parvovirus 4 and Torque teno sus virus 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomström Anne-Lie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of rapidly growing human populations, intensification of livestock production and increasing exploitation of wildlife habitats for animal agriculture, the interface between wildlife, livestock and humans is expanding, with potential impacts on both domestic animal and human health. Wild animals serve as reservoirs for many viruses, which may occasionally result in novel infections of domestic animals and/or the human population. Given this background, we used metagenomics to investigate the presence of viral pathogens in sera collected from bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus, a nocturnal species of wild Suid known to move between national parks and farmland, in Uganda. Results Application of 454 pyrosequencing demonstrated the presence of Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV, porcine parvovirus 4 (PPV4, porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV, a GB Hepatitis C–like virus, and a Sclerotinia hypovirulence-associated-like virus in sera from the bushpigs. PCR assays for each specific virus combined with Sanger sequencing revealed two TTSuV-1 variants, one TTSuV-2 variant as well as PPV4 in the serum samples and thereby confirming the findings from the 454 sequencing. Conclusions Using a viral metagenomic approach we have made an initial analysis of viruses present in bushpig sera and demonstrated for the first time the presence of PPV4 in a wild African Suid. In addition we identified novel variants of TTSuV-1 and 2 in bushpigs.

  7. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  8. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  9. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  10. Oncogenic and tumor-promoting Spermatophytes and Pteridophytes and their active principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, N R; Bingel, A S; Fong, H H; Saleh, A A; Christenson, G M; Saufferer, S M

    1976-08-01

    A survey and discussion are presented of plants classified as Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta, extracts of which have been shown to be oncogenic or tumor-promoting in animals. The active oncogenic and tumor-promoting principles, where known, have been identified. They represent tannins; pyrrolizidine, indole, tropolone, quinoline, purine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids; nitroso compounds; triterpene glycosides; lignans; isoflavans; allyl benzenoids; simple (nu-pyrenes; and carbocyclic hydroxy acids. A total of 28 compounds of known structure have been identified as oncogens and several phorbol esters as tumor-promoters. Plants known to contain any of the 28 oncogens (excluding shikimic acid and caffeine) have been tabulated; they represent at least 454 species, 110 genera, and 34 families of Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta.

  11. Aggressive transformation of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia associated with duplication of oncogenic KRAS due to acquired uniparental disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Motohiro; Yasui, Naoko; Seki, Masafumi; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Hanada, Ryoji; Ogawa, Seishi; Manabe, Atsushi; Takita, Junko; Koh, Katsuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    A small fraction of cases of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) develop massive disease activation. Through genomic analysis of JMML, which developed in an individual with mosaicism for oncogenic KRAS mutation with rapid progression, we identified acquired uniparental disomy at 12p. We demonstrated that duplication of oncogenic KRAS is associated with rapid JMML progression.

  12. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2011-01-01

    ) but not to ED43 (4a). The mutations permitting robust virus production in Huh7.5 cells had no apparent effect on viral replication but allowed efficient assembly of intracellular infectious HCV for adapted novel or previously developed recombinants. In conclusion, previously identified mutations permitted...

  13. The putative capsid protein of the newly identified avian hepatitis E virus shares antigenic epitopes with that of swine and human hepatitis E viruses and chicken big liver and spleen disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, G; Huang, F F; Fenaux, M; Guenette, D K; Pierson, F W; Larsen, C T; Shivaprasad, H L; Toth, T E; Meng, X J

    2002-09-01

    We recently identified a novel virus, designated avian hepatitis E virus (avian HEV), from chickens with hepatitis-splenomegaly (HS) syndrome in the USA. We showed that avian HEV is genetically related to swine and human HEVs. Here we report the antigenic cross-reactivity of the putative open reading frame 2 (ORF2) capsid protein of avian HEV with those of swine and human HEVs and the Australian chicken big liver and spleen disease virus (BLSV). The region encoding the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian HEV ORF2 was cloned into expression vector pRSET-C. The truncated ORF2 protein was expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein and purified by affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis revealed that the avian HEV ORF2 protein reacted with antisera against the Sar-55 strain of human HEV and with convalescent antisera against swine HEV and the US2 strain of human HEV, as well as with antiserum against BLSV. Convalescent sera from specific-pathogen-free chickens experimentally infected with avian HEV also reacted with the recombinant capsid proteins of swine HEV and Sar-55 human HEV. Antisera against the US2 human HEV also reacted with recombinant ORF2 proteins of both swine HEV and Sar-55 human HEV. The antigenic cross-reactivity of the avian HEV putative capsid protein with those of swine and human HEVs was further confirmed, for the most part, by ELISA assays. The data indicate that avian HEV shares certain antigenic epitopes in its putative capsid protein with swine and human HEVs, as well as with BLSV. The results have implications for HEV diagnosis and taxonomy.

  14. Novel immune-modulator identified by a rapid, functional screen of the parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of new sequencing technologies and informatic methods for identifying genes has made establishing gene product function a critical rate limiting step in progressing the molecular sciences. We present a method to functionally mine genomes for useful activities in vivo, using an unusual property of a member of the poxvirus family to demonstrate this screening approach. Results The genome of Parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus was sequenced, annotated, and then used to PCR-amplify its open-reading-frames. Employing a cloning-independent protocol, a viral expression-library was rapidly built and arrayed into sub-library pools. These were directly delivered into mice as expressible cassettes and assayed for an immune-modulating activity associated with parapoxvirus infection. The product of the B2L gene, a homolog of vaccinia F13L, was identified as the factor eliciting immune cell accumulation at sites of skin inoculation. Administration of purified B2 protein also elicited immune cell accumulation activity, and additionally was found to serve as an adjuvant for antigen-specific responses. Co-delivery of the B2L gene with an influenza gene-vaccine significantly improved protection in mice. Furthermore, delivery of the B2L expression construct, without antigen, non-specifically reduced tumor growth in murine models of cancer. Conclusion A streamlined, functional approach to genome-wide screening of a biological activity in vivo is presented. Its application to screening in mice for an immune activity elicited by the pathogen genome of Parapoxvirus ovis yielded a novel immunomodulator. In this inverted discovery method, it was possible to identify the adjuvant responsible for a function of interest prior to a mechanistic study of the adjuvant. The non-specific immune activity of this modulator, B2, is similar to that associated with administration of inactivated particles to a host or to a live viral infection. Administration

  15. Generation of transgenic wheat resistant to wheat yel-low mosaic virus and identifi-cation of gene silence induced by virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The plasmid containing the promoter Act1, the coat protein (cp) gene of wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) and the selectable bar gene, was delivered via particle bombardment, directly into immature embryos of a wheat cultivars. PCR and PCR-RFLP were employed to screen the existence of the cp gene in T0 and T1 generations. Seeds from the positive T1 plants were sowed in fields heavily contaminated with WYMV to detect their resistance. In field trial of virus infection, one of the transgenic wheat lines, P8-T2, exhibited highly disease-resistance. Western blot and RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of cp gene in the resistant transgenic line was reduced greatly compared to those susceptible to WYMV infection. This provided evidence to presume that the resistance obtained by the transgenic wheat line was stimulated by the mechanism of the virus induced gene silencing.

  16. Mapping of Chikungunya Virus Interactions with Host Proteins Identified nsP2 as a Higly Connected Viral Component

    OpenAIRE

    Bourai, Mehdi; Lucas-Hourani, M.; Gad, Hans H; Drosten, Christian; Jacob, Y.; Tafforeau, Lionel; Cassonnet, P.; Jones, Louis M.; Judith, Delphine; Couderc, Therese; Lecuit, Marc; André, P.; Kummerer, Beate M; Lotteau, V; Despres, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that has been responsible for an epidemic outbreak of unprecedented magnitude in recent years. Since then, significant efforts have been made to better understand the biology of this virus, but we still have poor knowledge of CHIKV interactions with host cell components at the molecular level. Here we describe the extensive use of high-throughput yeast two-hybrid (HT-Y2H) assays to characterize interactions between CHIKV and human...

  17. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, Jitka; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Cancer initialization can be explained as a result of parasitic virus energy consumption leading to randomized genome chemical bonding. Analysis of experimental data on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) containing about 12,000 cases of healthy humans, cancer patients and patients with precancerous cervical lesions disclosed that the specific cancer and the non-specific lactate dehydrogenase-elevating (LDH) virus antigen elicit similar responses. The specific antigen is effective only in cancer type of its origin but the non-specific antigen in all examined cancers. CMI results of CIN patients display both healthy and cancer state. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the LDH virus parasitizing on energy reduces the ratio of coherent/random oscillations. Decreased effect of coherent cellular electromagnetic field on bonding electrons in biological macromolecules leads to elevating probability of random genome reactions. Overlapping of wave functions in biological macromolecules depends on energy of the cellular electromagnetic field which supplies energy to bonding electrons for selective chemical bonds. CMI responses of cancer and LDH virus antigens in all examined healthy, precancerous and cancer cases point to energy mechanism in cancer initiation. Dependence of the rate of biochemical reactions on biological electromagnetic field explains yet unknown mechanism of genome mutation.

  18. Liver regeneration signature in hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated acute liver failure identified by gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriel Nissim

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The liver has inherent regenerative capacity via mitotic division of mature hepatocytes or, when the hepatic loss is massive or hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, through activation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. The dramatic clinical course of acute liver failure (ALF has posed major limitations to investigating the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration and the role of HSPC in this setting. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration in 4 patients who underwent liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated ALF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiling of 17 liver specimens from the 4 ALF cases and individual specimens from 10 liver donors documented a distinct gene signature for ALF. However, unsupervised multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering identified two clusters of ALF that segregated according to histopathological severity massive hepatic necrosis (MHN; 2 patients and submassive hepatic necrosis (SHN; 2 patients. We found that ALF is characterized by a strong HSPC gene signature, along with ductular reaction, both of which are more prominent in MHN. Interestingly, no evidence of further lineage differentiation was seen in MHN, whereas in SHN we detected cells with hepatocyte-like morphology. Strikingly, ALF was associated with a strong tumorigenesis gene signature. MHN had the greatest upregulation of stem cell genes (EpCAM, CK19, CK7, whereas the most up-regulated genes in SHN were related to cellular growth and proliferation. The extent of liver necrosis correlated with an overriding fibrogenesis gene signature, reflecting the wound-healing process. CONCLUSION: Our data provide evidence for a distinct gene signature in HBV-associated ALF whose intensity is directly correlated with the histopathological severity. HSPC activation and fibrogenesis positively correlated with the extent of liver necrosis. Moreover, we detected a tumorigenesis gene signature

  19. Early T Cell Recognition of B Cells following Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Identifying Potential Targets for Prophylactic Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has strong aetiologic links with several malignancies and has been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Efforts to develop a prophylactic vaccine to prevent or reduce EBV-associated disease have, to date, focused on the induction of neutralising antibody responses. However, such vaccines might be further improved by inducing T cell responses capable of recognising and killing recently-infected B cells. In that context, EBNA2, EBNA-LP and BHRF1 are the first viral antigens expressed during the initial stage of B cell growth transformation, yet have been poorly characterised as CD8+ T cell targets. Here we describe CD8+ T cell responses against each of these three "first wave" proteins, identifying target epitopes and HLA restricting alleles. While EBNA-LP and BHRF1 each contained one strong CD8 epitope, epitopes within EBNA2 induced immunodominant responses through several less common HLA class I alleles (e.g. B*3801 and B*5501, as well as subdominant responses through common class I alleles (e.g. B7 and C*0304. Importantly, such EBNA2-specific CD8+ T cells recognised B cells within the first day post-infection, prior to CD8+ T cells against well-characterised latent target antigens such as EBNA3B or LMP2, and effectively inhibited outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cell lines. We infer that "first wave" antigens of the growth-transforming infection, especially EBNA2, constitute potential CD8+ T cell immunogens for inclusion in prophylactic EBV vaccine design.

  20. Serum lipid alterations identified in chronic hepatitis B, hepatitis B virus-associated cirrhosis and carcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Aihua; Li, Meng; Chen, Tianlu; Panee, Jun; Jia, Wei; Ji, Guang

    2017-01-01

    The incidences of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated cirrhosis and HBV-associated carcinoma are high and increasing. This study was designed to evaluate serum lipid metabolite changes that are associated with the progression from CHB to HBV-associated cirrhosis and ultimately to HBV-associated HCC. A targeted metabolomic assay was performed in fasting sera from 136 CHB patients, 104 HBV-associated cirrhosis, and 95 HBV-associated HCC using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. A total of 140 metabolites were identified. Clear separations between each two groups were obtained using the partial least squares discriminate analysis of 9 lipid metabolites. Progressively lower levels of long-chain lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPC a C18:2, lysoPC a C20:3, lysoPC a C20:4) were observed from CHB to cirrhosis to carcinoma; lower levels of lysoPC a C20:4 were found in patients with higher model for end-stage liver disease in the same disease group; and lysoPC a C20:3 levels were lower in Child-Pugh Class C than in Class A and Class B in HBV-associated cirrhosis and HBV-associated HCC groups. The octadecadienyl carnitine level was higher in HBV-associated cirrhosis group than in other two groups. Serum levels of selected long-chain lysoPCs are promising markers for the progression of HBV-associated liver diseases. PMID:28198443

  1. High-throughput, luciferase-based reverse genetics systems for identifying inhibitors of Marburg and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhoer, Luke S; Albariño, César G; McMullan, Laura K; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Vincent, Joel P; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), members of the family Filoviridae, represent a significant challenge to global public health. Currently, no licensed therapies exist to treat filovirus infections, which cause up to 90% mortality in human cases. To facilitate development of antivirals against these viruses, we established two distinct screening platforms based on MARV and EBOV reverse genetics systems that express secreted Gaussia luciferase (gLuc). The first platform is a mini-genome replicon to screen viral replication inhibitors using gLuc quantification in a BSL-2 setting. The second platform is complementary to the first and expresses gLuc as a reporter gene product encoded in recombinant infectious MARV and EBOV, thereby allowing for rapid quantification of viral growth during treatment with antiviral compounds. We characterized these viruses by comparing luciferase activity to virus production, and validated luciferase activity as an authentic real-time measure of viral growth. As proof of concept, we adapt both mini-genome and infectious virus platforms to high-throughput formats, and demonstrate efficacy of several antiviral compounds. We anticipate that both approaches will prove highly useful in the development of anti-filovirus therapies, as well as in basic research on the filovirus life cycle.

  2. The ETS family of oncogenic transcription factors in solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Gina M; Pitarresi, Jason R; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Findings over the past decade have identified aberrant activation of the ETS transcription factor family throughout all stages of tumorigenesis. Specifically in solid tumours, gene rearrangement and amplification, feed-forward growth factor signalling loops, formation of gain-of-function co-regulatory complexes and novel cis-acting mutations in ETS target gene promoters can result in increased ETS activity. In turn, pro-oncogenic ETS signalling enhances tumorigenesis through a broad mechanistic toolbox that includes lineage specification and self-renewal, DNA damage and genome instability, epigenetics and metabolism. This Review discusses these different mechanisms of ETS activation and subsequent oncogenic implications, as well as the clinical utility of ETS factors.

  3. Amplification of cellular oncogenes in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Bagci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term gene amplification refers to an increase in copy number of a gene. Upregulation of gene expression through amplification is a general mechanism to increase gene dosage. Oncogene amplifications have been shown in solid human cancers and they are often associated with progression of cancer. Defining oncogene amplification is useful since it is used as a prognostic marker in clinical oncology nowadays, especially v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER2 targeted agents are used in breast cancer patients with high level of HER2 overexpression as a therapeutic approach. However, patients without HER2 overexpression do not appear to benefit from these agents. We concluded that determination of oncogene amplification in solid tumors is an important factor in treatment of human cancers with many unknowns. We have referred to PubMed and some databases to prepare this article.

  4. In vitro and in vivo studies identify important features of dengue virus pr-E protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Zheng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses bud into the endoplasmic reticulum and are transported through the secretory pathway, where the mildly acidic environment triggers particle rearrangement and allows furin processing of the prM protein to pr and M. The peripheral pr peptide remains bound to virus at low pH and inhibits virus-membrane interaction. Upon exocytosis, the release of pr at neutral pH completes virus maturation to an infectious particle. Together this evidence suggests that pr may shield the flavivirus fusion protein E from the low pH environment of the exocytic pathway. Here we developed an in vitro system to reconstitute the interaction of dengue virus (DENV pr with soluble truncated E proteins. At low pH recombinant pr bound to both monomeric and dimeric forms of E and blocked their membrane insertion. Exogenous pr interacted with mature infectious DENV and specifically inhibited virus fusion and infection. Alanine substitution of E H244, a highly conserved histidine residue in the pr-E interface, blocked pr-E interaction and reduced release of DENV virus-like particles. Folding, membrane insertion and trimerization of the H244A mutant E protein were preserved, and particle release could be partially rescued by neutralization of the low pH of the secretory pathway. Thus, pr acts to silence flavivirus fusion activity during virus secretion, and this function can be separated from the chaperone activity of prM. The sequence conservation of key residues involved in the flavivirus pr-E interaction suggests that this protein-protein interface may be a useful target for broad-spectrum inhibitors.

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies Identify Important Features of Dengue Virus pr-E Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Aihua; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Kielian, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Flaviviruses bud into the endoplasmic reticulum and are transported through the secretory pathway, where the mildly acidic environment triggers particle rearrangement and allows furin processing of the prM protein to pr and M. The peripheral pr peptide remains bound to virus at low pH and inhibits virus-membrane interaction. Upon exocytosis, the release of pr at neutral pH completes virus maturation to an infectious particle. Together this evidence suggests that pr may shield the flavivirus fusion protein E from the low pH environment of the exocytic pathway. Here we developed an in vitro system to reconstitute the interaction of dengue virus (DENV) pr with soluble truncated E proteins. At low pH recombinant pr bound to both monomeric and dimeric forms of E and blocked their membrane insertion. Exogenous pr interacted with mature infectious DENV and specifically inhibited virus fusion and infection. Alanine substitution of E H244, a highly conserved histidine residue in the pr-E interface, blocked pr-E interaction and reduced release of DENV virus-like particles. Folding, membrane insertion and trimerization of the H244A mutant E protein were preserved, and particle release could be partially rescued by neutralization of the low pH of the secretory pathway. Thus, pr acts to silence flavivirus fusion activity during virus secretion, and this function can be separated from the chaperone activity of prM. The sequence conservation of key residues involved in the flavivirus pr-E interaction suggests that this protein-protein interface may be a useful target for broad-spectrum inhibitors. PMID:20975939

  6. Novel viral genomes identified from six metagenomes reveal wide distribution of archaeal viruses and high viral diversity in terrestrial hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbergsdóttir, Sóley Ruth; Menzel, Peter; Krogh, Anders; Young, Mark; Peng, Xu

    2016-03-01

    Limited by culture-dependent methods the number of viruses identified from thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria is still very small. In this study we retrieved viral sequences from six hot spring metagenomes isolated worldwide, revealing a wide distribution of four archaeal viral families, Ampullaviridae, Bicaudaviridae, Lipothrixviridae and Rudiviridae. Importantly, we identified 10 complete or near complete viral genomes allowing, for the first time, an assessment of genome conservation and evolution of the Ampullaviridae family as well as Sulfolobus Monocaudavirus 1 (SMV1)-related viruses. Among the novel genomes, one belongs to a putative thermophilic virus infecting the bacterium Hydrogenobaculum, for which no virus has been reported in the literature. Moreover, a high viral diversity was observed in the metagenomes, especially among the Lipothrixviridae, as indicated by the large number of unique contigs and the lack of a completely assembled genome for this family. This is further supported by the large number of novel genes in the complete and partial genomes showing no sequence similarities to public databases. CRISPR analysis revealed hundreds of novel CRISPR loci and thousands of novel CRISPR spacers from each metagenome, reinforcing the notion of high viral diversity in the thermal environment.

  7. Monitoring the spread of myxoma virus in rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus populations on the southern tablelands of New South Wales, Australia. III. Release, persistence and rate of spread of an identifiable strain of myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, J C; Kerr, P J; Simms, N G; Hood, G M; Pech, R P; Robinson, A J

    2003-02-01

    An identifiable strain of myxoma virus was introduced into four local populations of wild rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus on the southern tablelands of New South Wales (NSW) and its spread in the presence of other field strains was monitored for 6 months. The main vector in this region was considered to be the European rabbit flea Spilopsyllis cuniculi. Each population of rabbits was of a high density and living in groups of warrens covering areas from 59 to 87 hectares. Rabbits occupying centrally located warrens were inoculated with the virus in late September or early October (spring) and the subsequent appearance of myxomatosis across the sites monitored by trapping, shooting and visual observations. Samples, taken from rabbits with myxomatosis, were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allowed identification of the introduced strain. On all four sites the introduced virus spread from the inoculated rabbits in the centrally located warrens to rabbits in surrounding warrens. On Sites 1 and 3, this spread continued across the entire site persisting for at least 118 and 174 days respectively. On Sites 2 and 4, the virus was detected for 78 and 62 days respectively and the subsequent inability to detect the introduced virus correlated with the appearance of an unrelated field strain. Using three different methods of calculation, rates of spread ranged from 3.7 to 17.8 m d(-1).

  8. The First Identified Citrus tristeza virus Isolate of Turkey Contains a Mixture of Mild and Severe Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Çevik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV has previously been reported in citrus growing regions of Turkey. All serologically and biologically characterized isolates including Iğdır, which was the first identified CTV isolates from Turkey, were considered mild isolates. In this study, molecular characteristics of the Iğdır isolate were determined by different methods. Analysis of the Iğdır isolate by western blot and BD-RT-PCR assays showed the presence of MCA13 epitope, predominantly found in severe isolates, in the Iğdır isolate revealing that it contains a severe component. For further characterization, the coat protein (CP and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp genes representing the 3′ and 5′ half of CTV genome, respectively, were amplified from dsRNA by RT-PCR. Both genes were cloned separately and two clones for each gene were sequenced. Comparisons of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed that while two CP gene sequences were identical, two RdRp clones showed only 90% and 91% sequence identity in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, suggesting a mixed infection with different strains. Phylogenetic analyses of the CP and RdRp genes of Iğdır isolate with previously characterized CTV isolates from different citrus growing regions showed that the CP gene was clustered with NZRB-TH30, a resistance breaking isolate from New Zealand, clearly showing the presence of severe component. Furthermore, two different clones of the RdRp gene were clustered separately with different CTV isolates with a diverse biological activity. While the RdRp-1 was clustered with T30 and T385, two well-characterized mild isolates from Florida and Spain, respectively, the RdRp-2 was most closely related to NZRB-G90 and NZRB-TH30, two well-characterized resistance breaking and stem pitting (SP isolates from New Zealand confirming the mixed infection. These results clearly demonstrated that the Iğdır isolate, which

  9. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  10. Emergence of a new lineage of dengue virus type 2 identified in travelers entering Western Australia from Indonesia, 2010-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV transmission is ubiquitous throughout the tropics. More than 70% of the current global dengue disease burden is borne by people who live in the Asia-Pacific region. We sequenced the E gene of DENV isolated from travellers entering Western Australia between 2010-2012, most of whom visited Indonesia, and identified a diverse array of DENV1-4, including multiple co-circulating viral lineages. Most viruses were closely related to lineages known to have circulated in Indonesia for some time, indicating that this geographic region serves as a major hub for dengue genetic diversity. Most notably, we identified a new lineage of DENV-2 (Cosmopolitan genotype that emerged in Bali in 2011-2012. The spread of this lineage should clearly be monitored. Surveillance of symptomatic returned travellers provides important and timely information on circulating DENV serotypes and genotypes, and can reveal the herald wave of dengue and other emerging infectious diseases.

  11. Avian hepatitis E virus identified in Russian chicken flocks exhibits high genetic divergence based on the ORF2 capsid gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprygin, A V; Nikonova, Z B; Zinyakov, N G

    2012-10-01

    A total of 79 liver samples from clinically sick and asymptomatic chickens were tested for avian hepatitis E virus (aHEV). Samples were received from 19 farms, five of which tested positive with primers targeting the ORF2 capsid gene. The phylogenetic analysis of a 242-base-pair fragment demonstrated that the Russian aHEV isolates share between 78.2 and 96.2% over the fragment sequenced, whereas the nucleotide sequence identities between the Russian isolates and the other representatives from GeneBank varied from 76.3 to 96.2%. The homology between the studied hepatitis E viruses and swine hepatitis E virus varied between 46.9 to 48.1%. The most divergent isolate aHEV16050 showed homology of 82.6% as compared with the strains in the dendrogram. The three positive hepatitis E virus samples (aHEV16279, aHEV16050 and aHEV18196) did not cluster with the European genotype 3 as expected due to the close location of Russia to Europe, nor did they with the other two genotypes, separating to a distinct branch. The aHEV16211 grouped together with European and Chinese isolates, and the aHEV18198 with Canadian ones.

  12. Phage-display for identifying peptides that bind the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and possess diagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  13. Hepatitis virus protein X-Phenylalanine Hydroxylase fusion proteins identified in PKU mice treated with AAV-WPRE vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utilizing the Pahenu2 mouse model for phenylketonuria (PKU), we developed an improved expression vector containing the Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus post-transcriptional regulatory element inserted into a rAAV-mPAH construct (rAAV-mPAH-WPRE) for treatment of PKU. Following portal vein delivery of these ...

  14. Human Papilloma Virus and oral cancer: Narrative review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Fernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is now more common sexually transmitted diseases, with an incidence of 5.5 million worldwide, with 85% of the carrier of this virus adult population. Their oncogenic potential and increased oral lesions associated with oral HPV infection have led us to make a narrative of the literature on the role of HPV in oral cancer, especially types 16 and 18. Here we refer to the possible routes of infection, oncogenic mechanisms, both benign and potentially malignant oral lesions associated with the infection, different methods used for detection, prediction and prevention of infection. We stress the importance of the role of the dentist to identify individuals considered high risk and ease of performing detection in the oral cavity, through a quick and easy method as exfoliative cytology.

  15. Genetic disruption of oncogenic Kras sensitizes lung cancer cells to Fas receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Haiwei; Moore, Jill; Malonia, Sunil K; Li, Yingxiang; Ozata, Deniz M; Hough, Soren; Song, Chun-Qing; Smith, Jordan L; Fischer, Andrew; Weng, Zhiping; Green, Michael R; Xue, Wen

    2017-04-04

    Genetic lesions that activate KRAS account for ∼30% of the 1.6 million annual cases of lung cancer. Despite clinical need, KRAS is still undruggable using traditional small-molecule drugs/inhibitors. When oncogenic Kras is suppressed by RNA interference, tumors initially regress but eventually recur and proliferate despite suppression of Kras Here, we show that tumor cells can survive knockout of oncogenic Kras, indicating the existence of Kras-independent survival pathways. Thus, even if clinical KRAS inhibitors were available, resistance would remain an obstacle to treatment. Kras-independent cancer cells exhibit decreased colony formation in vitro but retain the ability to form tumors in mice. Comparing the transcriptomes of oncogenic Kras cells and Kras knockout cells, we identified 603 genes that were specifically up-regulated in Kras knockout cells, including the Fas gene, which encodes a cell surface death receptor involved in physiological regulation of apoptosis. Antibodies recognizing Fas receptor efficiently induced apoptosis of Kras knockout cells but not oncogenic Kras-expressing cells. Increased Fas expression in Kras knockout cells was attributed to decreased association of repressive epigenetic marks at the Fas promoter. Concordant with this observation, treating oncogenic Kras cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor and Fas-activating antibody efficiently induced apoptosis, thus bypassing the need to inhibit Kras. Our results suggest that activation of Fas could be exploited as an Achilles' heel in tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras.

  16. Human genome: proto-oncogenes and proretroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisselev, L L; Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Berditchevsky, F B; Tret'yakov, L D

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the studies undertaken at the Laboratory for Molecular Bases of Oncogenesis (Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow) till middle of 1984 is presented. The human genome contains multiple dispersed nucleotide sequences related to the proto-oncogene mos and to proretroviral sequences in tight juxtaposition to each other. From sequencing appropriate cloned fragments of human DNA in phage and plasmid vectors it follows that one of these regions, NV-1, is a pseudogene of proto-mos with partial duplications and two Alu elements intervening its coding sequence, and the other, CL-1, seems to be also a mos-related gene with a deletion of the internal part of the structural gene. CL-1 is flanked by a proretroviral-like sequence including tRNAiMet binding site and U5 (part of the long terminal repeat). The proretroviral-like sequences are transcribed in 21-35S poly(A)+RNA abundant in normal and malignant human cells. Two hypotheses are proposed: endogenous retroviruses take part in amplification of at least some proto-oncogenes; proto-oncogenes are inactivated via insertion of movable genetic elements and conversion into pseudogenes. Potential oncogenicity of a normal human genome undergoes two controversial influences: it increases due to proto-oncogene amplification and decreases due to inactivation of some of them.

  17. Alanine scanning of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV 2b protein identifies different positions for cell-to-cell movement and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Nemes

    Full Text Available The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA, and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA, which are not essential for suppressor activity.

  18. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  19. Live Cell Analysis and Mathematical Modeling Identify Determinants of Attenuation of Dengue Virus 2'-O-Methylation Mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Schmid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the most common mosquito-transmitted virus infecting ~390 million people worldwide. In spite of this high medical relevance, neither a vaccine nor antiviral therapy is currently available. DENV elicits a strong interferon (IFN response in infected cells, but at the same time actively counteracts IFN production and signaling. Although the kinetics of activation of this innate antiviral defense and the timing of viral counteraction critically determine the magnitude of infection and thus disease, quantitative and kinetic analyses are lacking and it remains poorly understood how DENV spreads in IFN-competent cell systems. To dissect the dynamics of replication versus antiviral defense at the single cell level, we generated a fully viable reporter DENV and host cells with authentic reporters for IFN-stimulated antiviral genes. We find that IFN controls DENV infection in a kinetically determined manner that at the single cell level is highly heterogeneous and stochastic. Even at high-dose, IFN does not fully protect all cells in the culture and, therefore, viral spread occurs even in the face of antiviral protection of naïve cells by IFN. By contrast, a vaccine candidate DENV mutant, which lacks 2'-O-methylation of viral RNA is profoundly attenuated in IFN-competent cells. Through mathematical modeling of time-resolved data and validation experiments we show that the primary determinant for attenuation is the accelerated kinetics of IFN production. This rapid induction triggered by mutant DENV precedes establishment of IFN-resistance in infected cells, thus causing a massive reduction of virus production rate. In contrast, accelerated protection of naïve cells by paracrine IFN action has negligible impact. In conclusion, these results show that attenuation of the 2'-O-methylation DENV mutant is primarily determined by kinetics of autocrine IFN action on infected cells.

  20. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  1. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  2. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  3. Bioinformatics of non small cell lung cancer and the ras proto-oncogene

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, Amita; Babu M, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is initiated by activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutations in the K-ras proto-oncogene are responsible for 10–30% of adenocarcinomas. Clinical Findings point to a wide variety of other cancers contributing to lung cancer incidence. Such a scenario makes identification of lung cancer difficult and thus identifying its mechanisms can contribute to the society. Identifying unique conserved patterns common to contributing proto-oncogenes may further be a boon to Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoinformatics. This calls for ab initio/de novo drug discovery that in turn will require a comprehensive in silico approach of Sequence, Domain, Phylogenetic and Structural analysis of the receptors, ligand screening and optimization and detailed Docking studies. This brief involves extensive role of the RAS subfamily that includes a set of proteins, which cause an over expression of cancer-causing genes like M-ras and initiate tumour formation in lungs. SNP Studies and Structure based ...

  4. Oncofuse: a computational framework for the prediction of the oncogenic potential of gene fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugay, Mikhail; Ortiz de Mendíbil, Iñigo; Vizmanos, José L; Novo, Francisco J

    2013-10-15

    Gene fusions resulting from chromosomal aberrations are an important cause of cancer. The complexity of genomic changes in certain cancer types has hampered the identification of gene fusions by molecular cytogenetic methods, especially in carcinomas. This is changing with the advent of next-generation sequencing, which is detecting a substantial number of new fusion transcripts in individual cancer genomes. However, this poses the challenge of identifying those fusions with greater oncogenic potential amid a background of 'passenger' fusion sequences. In the present work, we have used some recently identified genomic hallmarks of oncogenic fusion genes to develop a pipeline for the classification of fusion sequences, namely, Oncofuse. The pipeline predicts the oncogenic potential of novel fusion genes, calculating the probability that a fusion sequence behaves as 'driver' of the oncogenic process based on features present in known oncogenic fusions. Cross-validation and extensive validation tests on independent datasets suggest a robust behavior with good precision and recall rates. We believe that Oncofuse could become a useful tool to guide experimental validation studies of novel fusion sequences found during next-generation sequencing analysis of cancer transcriptomes. Oncofuse is a naive Bayes Network Classifier trained and tested using Weka machine learning package. The pipeline is executed by running a Java/Groovy script, available for download at www.unav.es/genetica/oncofuse.html.

  5. Adler hantavirus, a new genetic variant of Tula virus identified in Major's pine voles (Microtus majori) sampled in southern European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Evgeniy A; Witkowski, Peter T; Radosa, Lukas; Dzagurova, Tamara K; Okulova, Nataliya M; Yunicheva, Yulia V; Vasilenko, Ludmila; Morozov, Vyacheslav G; Malkin, Gennadiy A; Krüger, Detlev H; Klempa, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Although at least 30 novel hantaviruses have been recently discovered in novel hosts such as shrews, moles and even bats, hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) are primarily known as rodent-borne human pathogens. Here we report on identification of a novel hantavirus variant associated with a rodent host, Major's pine vole (Microtus majori). Altogether 36 hantavirus PCR-positive Major's pine voles were identified in the Krasnodar region of southern European Russia within the years 2008-2011. Initial partial L-segment sequence analysis revealed novel hantavirus sequences. Moreover, we found a single common vole (Microtusarvalis) infected with Tula virus (TULV). Complete S- and M-segment coding sequences were determined from 11 Major's pine voles originating from 8 trapping sites and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The data obtained show that Major's pine vole is a newly recognized hantavirus reservoir host. The newfound virus, provisionally called Adler hantavirus (ADLV), is closely related to TULV. Based on amino acid differences to TULV (5.6-8.2% for nucleocapsid protein, 9.4-9.5% for glycoprotein precursor) we propose to consider ADLV as a genotype of TULV. Occurrence of ADLV and TULV in the same region suggests that ADLV is not only a geographical variant of TULV but a host-specific genotype. High intra-cluster nucleotide sequence variability (up to 18%) and geographic clustering indicate long-term presence of the virus in this region.

  6. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  7. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  8. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is dependent on oncogenic Kras in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith A Collins

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies, and its prognosis has not improved over the past 40 years. Mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mimic the progression of the human disease are emerging as a new tool to investigate the basic biology of this disease and identify potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe a new model of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma based on pancreas-specific, inducible and reversible expression of an oncogenic form of Kras, together with pancreas-specific expression of a mutant form of the tumor suppressor p53. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to follow individual animals in longitudinal studies, we show that both primary and metastatic lesions depend on continuous Kras activity for their maintenance. However, re-activation of Kras* following prolonged inactivation leads to rapid tumor relapse, raising the concern that Kras*-resistance might eventually be acquired. Thus, our data identifies Kras* as a key oncogene in pancreatic cancer maintenance, but raises the possibility of acquired resistance should Kras inhibitors become available for use in pancreatic cancer.

  9. An siRNA Screen Identifies the U2 snRNP Spliceosome as a Host Restriction Factor for Recombinant Adeno-associated Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Claire A; Sakuma, Toshie; Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Holditch, Sara J; Hickey, Raymond D; Bressin, Robert K; Basu, Upamanyu; Koide, Kazunori; Asokan, Aravind; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have evolved to exploit the dynamic reorganization of host cell machinery during co-infection by adenoviruses and other helper viruses. In the absence of helper viruses, host factors such as the proteasome and DNA damage response machinery have been shown to effectively inhibit AAV transduction by restricting processes ranging from nuclear entry to second-strand DNA synthesis. To identify host factors that might affect other key steps in AAV infection, we screened an siRNA library that revealed several candidate genes including the PHD finger-like domain protein 5A (PHF5A), a U2 snRNP-associated protein. Disruption of PHF5A expression selectively enhanced transgene expression from AAV by increasing transcript levels and appears to influence a step after second-strand synthesis in a serotype and cell type-independent manner. Genetic disruption of U2 snRNP and associated proteins, such as SF3B1 and U2AF1, also increased expression from AAV vector, suggesting the critical role of U2 snRNP spliceosome complex in this host-mediated restriction. Notably, adenoviral co-infection and U2 snRNP inhibition appeared to target a common pathway in increasing expression from AAV vectors. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of U2 snRNP by meayamycin B, a potent SF3B1 inhibitor, substantially enhanced AAV vector transduction of clinically relevant cell types. Further analysis suggested that U2 snRNP proteins suppress AAV vector transgene expression through direct recognition of intact AAV capsids. In summary, we identify U2 snRNP and associated splicing factors, which are known to be affected during adenoviral infection, as novel host restriction factors that effectively limit AAV transgene expression. Concurrently, we postulate that pharmacological/genetic manipulation of components of the spliceosomal machinery might enable more effective gene transfer modalities with recombinant AAV vectors.

  10. An siRNA Screen Identifies the U2 snRNP Spliceosome as a Host Restriction Factor for Recombinant Adeno-associated Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire A Schreiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated viruses (AAV have evolved to exploit the dynamic reorganization of host cell machinery during co-infection by adenoviruses and other helper viruses. In the absence of helper viruses, host factors such as the proteasome and DNA damage response machinery have been shown to effectively inhibit AAV transduction by restricting processes ranging from nuclear entry to second-strand DNA synthesis. To identify host factors that might affect other key steps in AAV infection, we screened an siRNA library that revealed several candidate genes including the PHD finger-like domain protein 5A (PHF5A, a U2 snRNP-associated protein. Disruption of PHF5A expression selectively enhanced transgene expression from AAV by increasing transcript levels and appears to influence a step after second-strand synthesis in a serotype and cell type-independent manner. Genetic disruption of U2 snRNP and associated proteins, such as SF3B1 and U2AF1, also increased expression from AAV vector, suggesting the critical role of U2 snRNP spliceosome complex in this host-mediated restriction. Notably, adenoviral co-infection and U2 snRNP inhibition appeared to target a common pathway in increasing expression from AAV vectors. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of U2 snRNP by meayamycin B, a potent SF3B1 inhibitor, substantially enhanced AAV vector transduction of clinically relevant cell types. Further analysis suggested that U2 snRNP proteins suppress AAV vector transgene expression through direct recognition of intact AAV capsids. In summary, we identify U2 snRNP and associated splicing factors, which are known to be affected during adenoviral infection, as novel host restriction factors that effectively limit AAV transgene expression. Concurrently, we postulate that pharmacological/genetic manipulation of components of the spliceosomal machinery might enable more effective gene transfer modalities with recombinant AAV vectors.

  11. LEO1 is regulated by PRL-3 and mediates its oncogenic properties in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Phyllis S Y; Zhou, Jianbiao; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Qian, Jingru; Guo, Tiannan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-06-01

    PRL-3, an oncogenic dual-specificity phosphatase, is overexpressed in 50% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and associated with poor survival. We found that stable expression of PRL-3 confers cytokine independence and growth advantage of AML cells. However, how PRL-3 mediates these functions in AML is not known. To comprehensively screen for PRL3-regulated proteins in AML, we performed SILAC-based quantitative proteomics analysis and discovered 398 significantly perturbed proteins after PRL-3 overexpression. We show that Leo1, a component of RNA polymerase II-associated factor (PAF) complex, is a novel and important mediator of PRL-3 oncogenic activities in AML. We described a novel mechanism where elevated PRL-3 protein increases JMJD2C histone demethylase occupancy on Leo1 promoter, thereby reducing the H3K9me3 repressive signals and promoting Leo1 gene expression. Furthermore, PRL-3 and Leo1 levels were positively associated in AML patient samples (N=24; PPRL-3 oncogenic phenotypes in AML. Loss of Leo1 leads to destabilization of the PAF complex and downregulation of SOX2 and SOX4, potent oncogenes in myeloid transformation. In conclusion, we identify an important and novel mechanism by which PRL-3 mediates its oncogenic function in AML.

  12. Regulation of autophagy and chloroquine sensitivity by oncogenic RAS in vitro is context-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michael J; Gamez, Graciela; Menke, Christina; Hernandez, Ariel; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Gidan, Freddi; Staskiewicz, Leah; Morgan, Shellie; Cummings, Christopher; Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial drug and late-stage inhibitor of autophagy currently FDA-approved for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Based primarily on its ability to inhibit autophagy, CQ and its derivative, hydroxychloroquine, are currently being investigated as primary or adjuvant therapy in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment. Oncogenic RAS has previously been shown to regulate autophagic flux, and cancers with high incidence of RAS mutations, such as pancreatic cancer, have been described in the literature as being particularly susceptible to CQ treatment, leading to the hypothesis that oncogenic RAS makes cancer cells dependent on autophagy. This autophagy "addiction" suggests that the mutation status of RAS in tumors could identify patients who would be more likely to benefit from CQ therapy. Here we show that RAS mutation status itself is unlikely to be beneficial in such a patient selection because oncogenic RAS does not always promote autophagy addiction. Moreover, oncogenic RAS can have opposite effects on both autophagic flux and CQ sensitivity in different cells. Finally, for any given cell type, the positive or negative effect of oncogenic RAS on autophagy does not necessarily predict whether RAS will promote or inhibit CQ-mediated toxicity. Thus, although our results confirm that different tumor cell lines display marked differences in how they respond to autophagy inhibition, these differences can occur irrespective of RAS mutation status and, in different contexts, can either promote or reduce chloroquine sensitivity of tumor cells.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA binding sites of oncogenes: implications in cancer and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer, a complex genetic disease involving uncontrolled cell proliferation, is caused by inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. A vast majority of these cancer causing genes are known targets of microRNAs (miRNAs) that bind to complementary sequences in 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of messenger RNAs and repress them from translation. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring naturally in such miRNA binding regions can alter the miRNA:mRNA interaction and can significantly affect gene expression. We hypothesized that 3'UTR SNPs in miRNA binding sites of proto-oncogenes could abrogate their post-transcriptional regulation, resulting in overexpression of oncogenic proteins, tumor initiation, progression, and modulation of drug response in cancer patients. Therefore, we developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases, followed stringent selection criteria and identified a panel of 30 high-confidence SNPs that may impair miRNA target sites in the 3' UTR of 54 mRNA transcripts of 24 proto-oncogenes. Further, 8 SNPs amidst them had the potential to determine therapeutic outcome in cancer patients. Functional annotation suggested that altogether these SNPs occur in proto-oncogenes enriched for kinase activities. We provide detailed in silico evidence for the functional effect of these candidate SNPs in various types of cancer.

  14. DJ-1, an oncogene and causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease, is essential for SV40 transformation in mouse fibroblasts through up-regulation of c-Myc

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yun Chul; Kitaura, Hirotake; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a tumor virus and its early gene product large T-antigen (LT) is responsible for the transforming activity of SV40. Parkinson's disease causative gene DJ-1 is also a ras-dependent oncogene, but the mechanism of its oncogene function is still not known. In this study, we found that there were no transformed foci when fibroblasts from DJ-1-knockout mice were transfected with LT. We also found that DJ-1 directly bound to LT and that the expression level of c-Myc in tran...

  15. Identifying Candidate Targets of Immune Responses in Zika Virus Based on Homology to Epitopes in Other Flavivirus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Vaughan, Kerrie; Weiskopf, Daniela; Grifoni, Alba; Diamond, Michael S; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-11-15

    The current outbreak of Zika virus has resulted in a massive effort to accelerate the development of ZIKV-specific diagnostics and vaccines. These efforts would benefit greatly from the definition of the specific epitope targets of immune responses in ZIKV, but given the relatively recent emergence of ZIKV as a pandemic threat, few such data are available. We used a large body of epitope data for other Flaviviruses that was available from the IEDB for a comparative analysis against the ZIKV proteome in order to project targets of immune responses in ZIKV. We found a significant level of overlap between known antigenic sites from other Flavivirus proteins with residues on the ZIKV polyprotein. The E and NS1 proteins shared functional antibody epitope sites, whereas regions of T cell reactivity were conserved within NS3 and NS5 for ZIKV.  Discussion: Our epitope based analysis provides guidance for which regions of the ZIKV polyprotein are most likely unique targets of ZIKV-specific antibodies, and which targets in ZIKV are most likely to be cross-reactive with other Flavivirus species. These data may therefore provide insights for the development of antibody- and T cell-based ZIKV-specific diagnostics, therapeutics and prophylaxis.

  16. Retroviruses hijack chromatin loops to drive oncogene expression and highlight the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian M Pattison

    Full Text Available The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene.

  17. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  18. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  19. Comparison of viral Env proteins from acute and chronic infections with subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 identifies differences in glycosylation and CCR5 utilization and suggests a new strategy for immunogen design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Li-Hua; Joseph, Sarah B; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Kincer, Laura P; Treurnicht, Florette K; Arney, Leslie; Ojeda, Suany; Zhang, Ming; Keys, Jessica; Potter, E Lake; Chu, Haitao; Moore, Penny; Salazar, Maria G; Iyer, Shilpa; Jabara, Cassandra; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Mapanje, Clement; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Seoighe, Cathal; Hoffman, Irving; Gao, Feng; Tang, Yuyang; Labranche, Celia; Lee, Benhur; Saville, Andrew; Vermeulen, Marion; Fiscus, Susan; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim Abdool; Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Korber, Bette T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Cohen, Myron S; Montefiori, David; Williamson, Carolyn; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Understanding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is central to developing effective prevention strategies, including a vaccine. We compared phenotypic and genetic variation in HIV-1 env genes from subjects in acute/early infection and subjects with chronic infections in the context of subtype C heterosexual transmission. We found that the transmitted viruses all used CCR5 and required high levels of CD4 to infect target cells, suggesting selection for replication in T cells and not macrophages after transmission. In addition, the transmitted viruses were more likely to use a maraviroc-sensitive conformation of CCR5, perhaps identifying a feature of the target T cell. We confirmed an earlier observation that the transmitted viruses were, on average, modestly underglycosylated relative to the viruses from chronically infected subjects. This difference was most pronounced in comparing the viruses in acutely infected men to those in chronically infected women. These features of the transmitted virus point to selective pressures during the transmission event. We did not observe a consistent difference either in heterologous neutralization sensitivity or in sensitivity to soluble CD4 between the two groups, suggesting similar conformations between viruses from acute and chronic infection. However, the presence or absence of glycosylation sites had differential effects on neutralization sensitivity for different antibodies. We suggest that the occasional absence of glycosylation sites encoded in the conserved regions of env, further reduced in transmitted viruses, could expose specific surface structures on the protein as antibody targets.

  20. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides.

  1. A novel putative tyrosine kinase receptor with oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J W; Schulz, A S; Steenvoorden, A C; Schmidberger, M; Strehl, S; Ambros, P F; Bartram, C R

    1991-11-01

    We have detected transforming activity by a tumorigenicity assay using NIH3T3 cells transfected with DNA from a chronic myeloproliferative disorder patient. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of the corresponding oncogene, designated UFO, in allusion to the as yet unidentified function of its protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 3116bp cDNA clone revealed a 2682-bp-long open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 894 amino acid polypeptide. The predicted UFO protein exhibits characteristic features of a transmembrane receptor with associated tyrosine kinase activity. The UFO proto-oncogene maps to human chromosome 19q13.1 and is transcribed into two 5.0 kb and 3.2 kb mRNAs in human bone marrow and human tumor cell lines. The UFO locus is evolutionarily conserved between vertebrate species. A 4.0 kb mRNA of the murine UFO homolog is expressed in a variety of different mouse tissues. We thus have identified a novel element of the complex signaling network involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  2. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm.

  3. Oncogenic HPV among HIV infected female population in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Sharmila

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of both cervical cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection are very high in India. Natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is known to be altered in HIV positive women and there is an increased possibility of persistence of HPV infections in this population. Therefore, this study was conducted to understand the epidemiology and circulating genotypes of oncogenic HPV among HIV positive and negative female population in West Bengal, India. Methods In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, 93 known HIV positive females attending a pre-ART registration clinic and 1106 HIV negative females attending a Reproductive and Child Health Care Clinic were subjected to study. Cervical cell samples collected from the study population were tested for the presence of HPV 16, 18 using specific primers. Roche PCR assay was used to detect other specific HPV genotypes in the cervical cells specimens of HIV positive cases only. Results Prevalence of HPV 16, 18 among HIV positive females (32.2%; n = 30 was higher than HIV negative females (9.1%; n = 101. About 53% (23/43 of cases with oncogenic HPV were infected with genotypes other than 16, 18 either as single/multiple infections. HPV 18 and HPV 16 were the predominant genotypes among HIV positive and HIV negative subjects respectively. Oncogenic HPV was not found to be associated with age and duration of sexual exposure. But the presence of HIV was found to a statistically significant predictor oncogenic HPV. Conclusion The currently available HPV vaccines offer protection only against HPV 16 and 18 and some cross- protection to few associated genotypes. These vaccines are therefore less likely to offer protection against cervical cancer in HIV positive women a high percentage of who were infected with non-16 and non-18 oncogenic HPV genotypes. Additionally, there is a lack of sufficient evidence of immunogenicity in HIV infected individuals. Therefore

  4. Optimization of a Plaque Neutralization Test (PNT) to identify the exposure history of Pacific Herring to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lucas; Mackenzie, Ashley; Purcell, Maureen; Thompson, Rachel L.; Hershberger, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Methods for a plaque neutralization test (PNT) were optimized for the detection and quantification of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) neutralizing activity in the plasma of Pacific Herring Clupea pallasii. The PNT was complement dependent, as neutralizing activity was attenuated by heat inactivation; further, neutralizing activity was mostly restored by the addition of exogenous complement from specific-pathogen-free Pacific Herring. Optimal methods included the overnight incubation of VHSV aliquots in serial dilutions (starting at 1:16) of whole test plasma containing endogenous complement. The resulting viral titers were then enumerated using a viral plaque assay in 96-well microplates. Serum neutralizing activity was virus-specific as plasma from viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) survivors demonstrated only negligible reactivity to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, a closely related rhabdovirus. Among Pacific Herring that survived VHSV exposure, neutralizing activity was detected in the plasma as early as 37 d postexposure and peaked at approximately 64 d postexposure. The onset of neutralizing activity was slightly delayed in fish reared at 7.4°C relative to those in warmer temperatures (9.9°C and 13.1°C); however, neutralizing activity persisted for at least 345 d postexposure in all temperature treatments. It is anticipated that this novel ability to assess VHSV neutralizing activity in Pacific Herring will enable retrospective comparisons between prior VHS infections and year-class recruitment failures. Additionally, the optimized PNT could be employed as a forecasting tool capable of identifying the potential for future VHS epizootics in wild Pacific Herring populations.

  5. Attempts on producing lymphoid cell line from Penaeus monodon by induction with SV40-T and 12S EIA oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Prabhakaran, Priyaja; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt of in vitro transformation, transfection mediated expression of Simian virus-40 (T) antigen (SV40-T) and transduction mediated expression of Adenovirus type 12 early region 1A (12S E1A) oncogene were performed in Penaeus monodon lymphoid cells. pSV3-neo vector encoding SV40-T oncogene and a recombinant baculovirus BacP2-12S E1A-GFP encoding 12S E1A oncogene under the control of hybrid promoters were used. Electroporation and lipofection mediated transformation of SV40-T in lymphoid cells confirmed the transgene expression by phenotypic variation and the expression of GFP in co-transfection experiment. The cells transfected by lipofection (≥ 5%) survived for 14 days with lower toxicity (30%), whilst on electroporation, most of the cells succumbed to death (60%) and survived cells lived up to 7 days. Transduction efficiency in primary lymphoid cells was more than 80% within 14 days of post-transduction, however, an incubation period of 7 days post-transduction was observed without detectable expression of 12S E1A. High level of oncogenic 12S E1A expression were observed after 14 day post-transduction and the proliferating cells survived for more than 90 days with GFP expression, however, without in vitro transformation and immortalization. The study put forth the requirement of transduction mediated 'specific' oncogene expression along with telomerase activation and epigenetic induction for the immortalization and establishment of shrimp cell line.

  6. Two oncogenes, v-fos and v-ras, cooperate to convert normal keratinocytes to squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D.A.; Welty, D.J.; Player, A.; Yuspa, S.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have been implicated the ras{sup Ha} oncogene in the initiation of skin carcinogenesis and the fos oncogene in malignant progression of premalignant skin cell lines. To determine if these two oncogenes are sufficient to convert normal keratinocytes to cancer cells, freshly isolated mouse keratinocytes were coinfected with replication-defective ({psi}-2) v-ras{sup Ha} and v-fos viruses in culture. When tested in nude mice within several days of infection, v-fos/v-ras{sup Ha}-coinfected keratinocytes produced squamous cell carcinomas. Introduction of v-fos alone resulted in normal or hyperplastic skin, whereas v-ras{sup Ha} alone produced squamous papillomas. These results indicate that two oncogenes are sufficient to produce the malignant phenotype in epidermal cells. Furthermore, they clearly link the fos oncogene with malignant conversion. Since fos acts as a transcriptional regulator of other genes, malignant conversion may be an indirect consequence of the overexpression of the fos-encoded protein leading to a change in the expression of fos-controlled cellular genes.

  7. Redox proteomics of the inflammatory secretome identifies a common set of redoxins and other glutathionylated proteins released in inflammation, influenza virus infection and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Checconi

    Full Text Available Protein cysteines can form transient disulfides with glutathione (GSH, resulting in the production of glutathionylated proteins, and this process is regarded as a mechanism by which the redox state of the cell can regulate protein function. Most studies on redox regulation of immunity have focused on intracellular proteins. In this study we have used redox proteomics to identify those proteins released in glutathionylated form by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS after pre-loading the cells with biotinylated GSH. Of the several proteins identified in the redox secretome, we have selected a number for validation. Proteomic analysis indicated that LPS stimulated the release of peroxiredoxin (PRDX 1, PRDX2, vimentin (VIM, profilin1 (PFN1 and thioredoxin 1 (TXN1. For PRDX1 and TXN1, we were able to confirm that the released protein is glutathionylated. PRDX1, PRDX2 and TXN1 were also released by the human pulmonary epithelial cell line, A549, infected with influenza virus. The release of the proteins identified was inhibited by the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX, which also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α release, and by thiol antioxidants (N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, which did not affect TNF-α production. The proteins identified could be useful as biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with inflammation, and further studies will be required to investigate if the extracellular forms of these proteins has immunoregulatory functions.

  8. Novel biomarkers of nasopharyngeal carcinoma metastasis risk identified by reverse phase protein array based tumor profiling with consideration of plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Su, Bojin; Huang, Peiyu; Wei, Weihong; Deng, Yanming; Sehgal, Vasudha; Wang, Donghui; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Guoyi; Li, Anfei; Yang, Huiling; Claret, Francois X

    2017-05-01

    In patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), intertumor heterogeneity causes interpatient heterogeneity in the risk of distant metastasis. We aimed to identify novel biomarkers of metastasis risk using reverse phase protein array (RPPA) profiling of NPC patients at risk for metastasis and considering plasma EBV DNA load. A total of 98 patients with NPC with and without metastasis after treatment, matched with respect to clinical parameters, are enrolled. Total protein expression is measured by RPPA, and protein functions are analyzed by pathway bioinformatics. The RPPA analysis revealed a profile of 70 proteins that are differentially expressed in metastatic and nonmetastatic tumors. Plasma EBV DNA load after treatment correlated with protein expression level better than plasma EBV DNA load before treatment did. The biomarkers of NPC metastasis identified by proteomics regulate signaling pathways involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The authors identified 26 biomarkers associated with 5-year distant failure-free survival in univariate analysis; five biomarkers remained significant in multivariate analysis. A comprehensive RPPA profiling study is warranted to identify novel metastasis-related biomarkers and further examine the activation state of signaling proteins to improve estimation of metastasis risk for patients with EBV-associated NPC. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Characterization of TRPS1 and ERAS as oncogenes implicated in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Gonzalez, L.

    2015-07-01

    New high throughput technologies have made possible to identify putative oncogenes in breast cancer. In this project we aim to relate and characterise two novel putative oncogenes, ERAS and TRPS1, in their role in human breast cancer. TRPS1, an atypical GATA factor, modulates cell proliferation and controls cell cycle progression through repression of GATA-regulated genes, therefore acting as a tumour suppressor gene. Conversely, TRPS1 expression has been shown to be significantly elevated in luminal and in a lesser extent in basal breast cancer cells, presenting roles both as an oncogene and as a tumour suppressor gene in breast cancer development. The aim of this project is therefore to determine the characteristics of TRPS1 either as a putative novel human oncogene or as a tumour suppressor gene in breast cancer cells. To this aim, we have cloned a novel isoform of TRPS1 and introduced it into several breast cancer cell lines. Our results show that overexpression of this isoform of TRPS1 results in variations in motility in non-carcinogenic cell lines, as well as in a series of EMT-like changes such as the down-regulation of the EMT marker E-cadherin, both of which can be associated to an increase in malignancy, suggesting an oncogenic behaviour for TRPS1. Furthermore, our results suggest that constitutively active members of the RAS protein family induce the expression of TRPS1, establishing a relationship between both genes. We can conclude that the effects of TRPS1 overexpression are moderate, inducing some changes but not fully transforming the cells. Therefore we cannot confirm that TRPS1 is a putative oncogene in breast cancer. (Author)

  10. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells.

  11. Validation and calibration of next-generation sequencing to identify Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer in The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, M Constanza; Bowlby, Reanne; Chu, Andy; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Thorsson, Vesteinn; Elmore, Sandra; Mungall, Andrew J; Bass, Adam J; Gulley, Margaret L; Rabkin, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma is conventionally identified by in situ hybridization (ISH) for viral nucleic acids, but next-generation sequencing represents a potential alternative. We therefore determined normalized EBV read counts by whole-genome, whole-exome, mRNA and miRNA sequencing for 295 fresh-frozen gastric tumor samples. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were retrieved for ISH confirmation of 13 high-EBV and 11 low-EBV cases. In pairwise comparisons, individual samples were either concordantly high or concordantly low by all genomic methods for which data were available. Empiric cutoffs of sequencing counts identified 26 (9 %) tumors as EBV positive. EBV positivity or negativity by molecular testing was confirmed by EBER-ISH in all but one tumor evaluated by both approaches (kappa = 0.91). EBV-positive gastric tumors can be accurately identified by quantifying viral sequences in genomic data. Simultaneous analyses of human and viral DNA, mRNA and miRNA could streamline tumor profiling for clinical care and research.

  12. Functional Analysis of the Proto-oncogenes Septin9 and Nras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Louise Berkhoudt

    by the murine leukemia virus SL3-3 in heterozygous Sept9 knock out mice did not change the latency time compared to wild type; however, the distribution of T-cell subsets in the thymic tumors was altered. Moreover, Sept9 expression was increased in tumors compared to thymus and spleen non-tumorigenic tissues...... regardless of genotype indicating an oncogenic role of SEPT9. Nras is a potent proto-oncogene involved in signaling through a number of proliferative pathways. Earlier detected retroviral integration sites resulting in B-cell lymphomas were used to create Nras knock in models harboring the LTR from...... the murine leukemia virus Akv 1-99 in either sense or antisense direction. In addition a floxed PGK/Tn5 neomycin cassette was inserted. Expression analysis of Nras within knock in was used to study the effect of the LTR. If inserted before the endogenous promoter, the LTR in the antisense direction was found...

  13. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  14. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  15. Oncogenic EGFR Represses the TET1 DNA Demethylase to Induce Silencing of Tumor Suppressors in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Forloni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncogene-induced DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressors frequently occurs in cancer, but the mechanism and functional role of this silencing in oncogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we show that oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR induces silencing of multiple unrelated tumor suppressors in lung adenocarcinomas and glioblastomas by inhibiting the DNA demethylase TET oncogene family member 1 (TET1 via the C/EBPα transcription factor. After oncogenic EGFR inhibition, TET1 binds to tumor suppressor promoters and induces their re-expression through active DNA demethylation. Ectopic expression of TET1 potently inhibits lung and glioblastoma tumor growth, and TET1 knockdown confers resistance to EGFR inhibitors in lung cancer cells. Lung cancer samples exhibited reduced TET1 expression or TET1 cytoplasmic localization in the majority of cases. Collectively, these results identify a conserved pathway of oncogenic EGFR-induced DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressors that may have therapeutic benefits for oncogenic EGFR-mediated lung cancers and glioblastomas.

  16. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  17. Mutations of the KRAS oncogene in endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesława Niklińska

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and clinicopathological significance of KRAS point mutation in endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma. We analysed KRAS in 11 cases of complex atypical hyperplasia and in 49 endometrial carcinomas using polymerase chain reaction associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL. Point mutations at codon 12 of KRAS oncogene were identified in 7 of 49 (14,3% tumor specimens and in 2 of 11 (18,2% hyperplasias. No correlation was found between KRAS gene mutation and age at onset, histology, grade of differentiation and clinical stage. We conclude that KRAS mutation is a relatively common event in endometrial carcinogenesis, but with no prognostic value.

  18. Terminal and progenitor lineage-survival oncogenes as cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vias, Maria; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Mills, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Tumour classification has traditionally focused on differentiation and cellular morphology, and latterly on the application of genomic approaches. By combining chromatin immunoprecipitation with expression array, it has been possible to identify direct gene targets for transcription factors for nuclear hormone receptors. At the same time, there have been great strides in deriving stem and progenitor cells from tissues. It is therefore timely to propose that pairing the isolation of these cell subpopulations from tissues and tumours with these genomics approaches will reveal conserved gene targets for transcription factors. By focusing on transcription factors (lineage-survival oncogenes) with roles in both organogenesis and tumourigenesis at multiple organ sites, we suggest that this comparative genomics approach will enable developmental biology to be used more fully in relation to understanding tumour progression and will reveal new cancer markers. We focus here on neurogenesis and neuroendocrine differentiation in tumours.

  19. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carolyn C; Dickson, Mark A; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single-gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV-8.

  20. Two novel genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, related to the potentially oncogenic HPV39.

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, M; Beaudenon, S; Orth, G

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of two novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, were cloned from a low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and a vulvar papilloma, respectively, and partially sequenced. Both types are related to HPV39, a potentially oncogenic virus. HPV68 and HPV70 were also detected in genital intraepithelial neoplasia from three patients and one patient, respectively. Comparison with sequence data in the literature indicates that the subgenomic ME180-HPV DNA fragment, clone...

  1. Fujinami sarcoma virus: An avian RNA tumor virus with a unique transforming gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Pawson, Anthony; Robins, Terry; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1980-01-01

    The oncogenic properties and RNA of the Fujinami avian sarcoma virus (FSV) and the protein it encodes were investigated and compared to those of other avian tumor viruses with sarcomagenic properties such as Rous sarcoma virus and the acute leukemia viruses MC29 and erythroblastosis virus. Cloned stocks of FSV caused sarcomas in all chickens inoculated and were found to contain a 4.5-kilobase (kb) and an 8.5-kb RNA species. The 4.5-kb RNA was identified as the genome of defective FSV because it was absent from nondefective FSV-associated helper virus and because the titer of focus-forming units increased with the ratio of 4.5-kb to 8.5-kb RNA in virus preparations. This is, then, the smallest known tumor virus RNA with a transforming function. Comparisons with other viral RNAs, based on oligonucleotide mapping and molecular hybridization, indicated that 4.5-kb FSV RNA contains a 5′ gag gene-related sequence of 1 kb, an internal specific sequence of about 3 kb that is unrelated to Rous sarcoma virus, MC29, and erythroblastosis virus, and a 3′-terminal sequence of about 0.5 kb related to the conserved C region of avian tumor viruses. The lack of some or all nucleotide sequences of the essential virion genes, gag, pol, and env, and the isolation of FSV-transformed nonproducer cell clones indicated that FSV is replication defective. A 140,000-dalton, gag-related non-structural protein was found in FSV-transformed producer and nonproducer cells and was translated in vitro from full-length FSV RNA. This protein is expected to have a transforming function both because its intracellular concentration showed a positive correlation with the percentage of transformed cells in a culture and because FSV is unlikely to code for major additional proteins since the genetic complexities of FSV RNA and the FSV protein are almost the same. It is concluded that the transforming onc gene of FSV is distinct from that of Rous sarcoma virus and other avian tumor viruses with

  2. JAC, a direct target of oncogenic transcription factor Jun, is involved in cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, M; Reiter, F; Bader, A G; Castellazzi, M; Bister, K

    2001-11-20

    Using subtractive hybridization techniques, we have isolated a gene termed JAC that is strongly and specifically activated in avian fibroblasts transformed by the v-jun oncogene of avian sarcoma virus 17 (ASV17), but not in cells transformed by other oncogenic agents. Furthermore, JAC is highly expressed in cell lines derived from jun-induced avian fibrosarcomas. Kinetic analysis using a doxycycline-controlled conditional cell transformation system showed that expression of the 0.8-kb JAC mRNA is induced rapidly upon activation of the oncogenic v-jun allele. Nucleotide sequence analysis and transcriptional mapping revealed that the JAC gene contains two exons, with the longest ORF confined to exon 2. The deduced 68-amino acid chicken JAC protein is rich in cysteine residues and displays 37% sequence identity to mammalian high-sulfur keratin-associated proteins. The promoter region of JAC contains a consensus (5'-TGACTCA-3') and a nonconsensus (5'-TGAGTAA-3') AP-1 binding site in tandem, which are both specifically bound by the Gag-Jun hybrid protein encoded by ASV17. Mutational analysis revealed that the two AP-1 sites confer strong transcriptional activation by Gag-Jun in a synergistic manner. Ectopic expression of JAC in avian fibroblasts leads to anchorage-independent growth, strongly suggesting that deregulation of JAC is an essential event in jun-induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

  3. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  4. Intracortical osteoblastic osteosarcoma with oncogenic rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Hirohashi, Setsuo [Pathology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Shimoda, Tadakazu [Clinical Laboratory Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryohei; Beppu, Yasuo [Orthopedic Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Shotaro [Department of Pathology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    Intracortical osteosarcoma is the rarest variant of osteosarcoma, occurring within, and usually confined to, the cortical bone. Oncogenic osteomalacia, or rickets, is an unusual clinicopathologic entity in which vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, or rickets, occurs in association with some tumors of soft tissue or bone. We present a case of oncogenic rickets associated with intracortical osteosarcoma of the tibia in a 9-year-old boy, whose roentgenographic abnormalities of rickets disappeared and pertinent laboratory data except for serum alkaline phosphatase became normal after surgical resection of the tumor. Histologically, the tumor was an osteosarcoma with a prominent osteoblastic pattern. An unusual microscopic feature was the presence of matrix mineralization showing rounded calcified structures (calcified spherules). Benign osteoblastic tumors, such as osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma, must be considered in the differential diagnosis because of the relatively low cellular atypia and mitotic activity of this tumor. The infiltrating pattern with destruction or engulfment of normal bone is a major clue to the correct diagnosis of intracortical osteosarcoma. The co-existing radiographic changes of rickets were due to the intracortical osteosarcoma. (orig.) With 8 figs., 25 refs.

  5. Oncogenic activation of NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Louis M

    2010-06-01

    Recent genetic evidence has established a pathogenetic role for NF-kappaB signaling in cancer. NF-kappaB signaling is engaged transiently when normal B lymphocytes respond to antigens, but lymphomas derived from these cells accumulate genetic lesions that constitutively activate NF-kappaB signaling. Many genetic aberrations in lymphomas alter CARD11, MALT1, or BCL10, which constitute a signaling complex that is intermediate between the B-cell receptor and IkappaB kinase. The activated B-cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma activates NF-kappaB by a variety of mechanisms including oncogenic mutations in CARD11 and a chronic active form of B-cell receptor signaling. Normal plasma cells activate NF-kappaB in response to ligands in the bone marrow microenvironment, but their malignant counterpart, multiple myeloma, sustains a variety of genetic hits that stabilize the kinase NIK, leading to constitutive activation of the classical and alternative NF-kappaB pathways. Various oncogenic abnormalities in epithelial cancers, including mutant K-ras, engage unconventional IkappaB kinases to activate NF-kappaB. Inhibition of constitutive NF-kappaB signaling in each of these cancer types induces apoptosis, providing a rationale for the development of NF-kappaB pathway inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

  6. Analysis of mutations in the URR and E6/E7 oncogenes of HPV 16 cervical cancer isolates from central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, A L; Thompson, C H; Tattersall, M H; Cossart, Y E; Rose, B R

    2000-06-01

    High rates of cervical cancer have been reported from parts of China and this may reflect a predominance of cervical infection with particularly aggressive human papillomavirus (HPV) variants. This PCR-based investigation of cervical tumours from Sichuan province in central China demonstrated an HPV positivity rate of 88%. HPV 16 was most common (21/34, 61%), followed by HPV 18 (3/34, 9%), while types 33, 45, 58 and 59 were each identified in one specimen. Sequencing of up to 1349 bases of the 21 HPV 16-positive isolates, encompassing the enhancer/promoter of the upstream regulatory region (URR) and the E6 and E7 genes, revealed distinct patterns of genomic stability and variability. An overall mutation rate of 5% was seen in the URR. One isolate had a large deletion of 436 bases in the enhancer; while varying combinations of 21 point mutations were identified in the remainder, impacting several YY1, NF1, TEF-1 and Oct-1 sites. More sequence variations were found in E6 compared to E7 (81% vs. 52% of isolates showing at least one mutation), some of which resulted in changes to the translated amino acids. Since the E6/E7 genes encode the oncogenic proteins essential for malignant transformation, and as their expression is controlled by the URR, it is possible that some of the identified mutations altered the oncogenicity of the virus: either directly by changing amino acid sequences of the E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or indirectly through alterations to transcription factor binding sites in the URR.

  7. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  8. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Leitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  9. Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses Activate the Tumor-Associated Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic. PMID:24604027

  10. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-03-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  11. Role of STAT3 in in vitro transformation triggered by TRK oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Miranda

    Full Text Available TRK oncoproteins are chimeric versions of the NTRK1/NGF receptor and display constitutive tyrosine kinase activity leading to transformation of NIH3T3 cells and neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT 3 is activated in response to cytokines and growth factors and it has been recently identified as a novel signal transducer for TrkA, mediating the functions of NGF in nervous system. In this paper we have investigated STAT3 involvement in signalling induced by TRK oncogenes. We showed that TRK oncogenes trigger STAT3 phosphorylation both on Y705 and S727 residues and STAT3 transcriptional activity. MAPK pathway was involved in the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have shown reduced STAT3 protein level in NIH3T3 transformed foci expressing TRK oncogenes. Overall, we have unveiled a dual role for STAT3 in TRK oncogenes-induced NIH3T3 transformation: i decreased STAT3 protein levels, driven by TRK oncoproteins activity, are associated to morphological transformation; ii residual STAT3 transcriptional activity is required for cell growth.

  12. Oncogenic Splicing Factor SRSF1 Is a Critical Transcriptional Target of MYC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Das

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The SR protein splicing factor SRSF1 is a potent proto-oncogene that is frequently upregulated in cancer. Here, we show that SRSF1 is a direct target of the transcription factor oncoprotein MYC. These two oncogenes are significantly coexpressed in lung carcinomas, and MYC knockdown downregulates SRSF1 expression in lung-cancer cell lines. MYC directly activates transcription of SRSF1 through two noncanonical E-boxes in its promoter. The resulting increase in SRSF1 protein is sufficient to modulate alternative splicing of a subset of transcripts. In particular, MYC induction leads to SRSF1-mediated alternative splicing of the signaling kinase MKNK2 and the transcription factor TEAD1. SRSF1 knockdown reduces MYC's oncogenic activity, decreasing proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest a mechanism for SRSF1 upregulation in tumors with elevated MYC and identify SRSF1 as a critical MYC target that contributes to its oncogenic potential by enabling MYC to regulate the expression of specific protein isoforms through alternative splicing.

  13. Patterns of scAAV vector insertion associated with oncogenic events in a mouse model for genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lucia E; Grieves, Jessica L; Zaraspe, Kimberly; La Perle, Krista Md; Fu, Haiyan; McCarty, Douglas M

    2012-11-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained an extensive record of safety and efficacy in animal models of human disease. Infrequent reports of genotoxicity have been limited to specific vectors associated with excess hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in mice. In order to understand potential mechanisms of genotoxicity, and identify patterns of insertion that could promote tumor formation, we compared a self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vector designed to promote insertional activation (scAAV-CBA-null) to a conventional scAAV-CMV-GFP vector. HCC-prone C3H/HeJ mice and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were infected with vector plus secondary treatments including partial hepatectomy (HPX) and camptothecin (CPT) to determine the effects of cell cycling and DNA damage on tumor incidence. Infection with either vector led to a significant increase in HCC incidence in male C3H/HeJ mice. Partial HPX after infection reduced HCC incidence in the cytomegalovirus-green fluorescent protein (CMV-GFP)-infected mice, but not in the cognate chicken β-actin (CBA)-null infected group. Tumors from CBA-null infected, hepatectomized mice were more likely to contain significant levels of vector DNA than tumors from the corresponding CMV-GFP-infected group. Most CBA-null vector insertions recovered from tumors were associated with known proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Specific patterns of insertion suggested read-through transcription, enhancer effects, and disruption of tumor suppressors as likely mechanisms for genotoxicity.

  14. The split Renilla luciferase complementation assay is useful for identifying the interaction of Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase BGLF4 and a heat shock protein Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Guo, W; Long, C; Zhou, H; Wang, H; Sun, X

    2016-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions can regulate different cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, and oncogenic transformation. The split Renilla luciferase complementation assay (SRLCA) is one of the techniques that detect protein-protein interactions. The SRLCA is based on the complementation of the LN and LC non-functional halves of Renilla luciferase fused to possibly interacting proteins which after interaction form a functional enzyme and emit luminescence. The BGLF4 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a viral protein kinase that is expressed during the early and late stages of lytic cycles, which can regulate multiple cellular and viral substrates to optimize the DNA replication environment. The heat shock protein Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone that maintains the integrity of structure and function of various interacting proteins, which can form a complex with BGLF4 and stabilize its expression in cells. The interaction between BGLF4 and Hsp90 could be specifically detected through the SRLCA. The region of aa 250-295 of BGLF4 is essential for the BGLF4/Hsp90 interaction and the mutation of Phe-254, Leu-266, and Leu-267 can disrupt this interaction. These results suggest that the SRLCA can specifically detect the BGLF4/Hsp90 interaction and provide a reference to develop inhibitors that disrupt the BGLF4/Hsp90 interaction.

  15. Deciphering hepatocellular responses to metabolic and oncogenic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrina L. Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Each cell type responds uniquely to stress and fractionally contributes to global and tissue-specific stress responses. Hepatocytes, liver macrophages (MΦ, and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC play functionally important and interdependent roles in adaptive processes such as obesity and tumor growth. Although these cell types demonstrate significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, their distinctions enabling disease-specific responses remain understudied. We developed a strategy for the simultaneous isolation and quantification of these liver cell types based on antigenic cell surface marker expression. To demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique, we quantified liver cell-specific responses to high-fat diet (HFD or diethylnitrosamine (DEN, a liver-specific carcinogen, and found that while there was only a marginal increase in hepatocyte number, MΦ and SEC populations were quantitatively increased. Global gene expression profiling of hepatocytes, MΦ and SEC identified characteristic gene signatures that define each cell type in their distinct physiological or pathological states. Integration of hepatic gene signatures with available human obesity and liver cancer microarray data provides further insight into the cell-specific responses to metabolic or oncogenic stress. Our data reveal unique gene expression patterns that serve as molecular “fingerprints” for the cell-centric responses to pathologic stimuli in the distinct microenvironment of the liver. The technical advance highlighted in this study provides an essential resource for assessing hepatic cell-specific contributions to metabolic and oncogenic stress, information that could unveil previously unappreciated molecular mechanisms for the cellular crosstalk that underlies the continuum from metabolic disruption to obesity and ultimately hepatic cancer.

  16. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrant...

  17. Oncogenic Transformation of Human-Derived Gastric Organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Centeno, Jomaris; Gao, Jian; Gabre, Joel; Zavros, Yana

    2016-08-19

    The culture of organoids has represented a significant advancement in the gastrointestinal research field. Previous research studies have described the oncogenic transformation of human intestinal and mouse gastric organoids. Here we detail the protocol for the oncogenic transformation and orthotopic transplantation of human-derived gastric organoids.

  18. Oncogenic pathways implicated in ovarian epithelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, Santo V; Bai, Wenlong; Cheng, Jin Q; Coppola, Domenico; Kruk, Patricia A

    2003-08-01

    Characterization of intracellular signaling pathways should lead to a better understanding of ovarian epithelial carcinogenesis and provide an opportunity to interfere with signal transduction targets involved in ovarian tumor cell growth, survival, and progression. Challenges toward such an effort are significant because many of these signals are part of cascades within an intricate and likely redundant intracellular signaling network (Fig.1). For instance, a given signal may activate a dual intracellular pathway (ie, MEK1-MAPK and PI3K/Akt required for fibronectin-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9). A single pathway also may transduce more than one biologic or oncogenic signal (ie, PI3K signaling in epithelial and endothelial cell growth and sprouting of neovessels). Despite these challenges, evidence for therapeutic targeting of signal transduction pathways is accumulating in human cancer. For instance, the EGF-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZD 1839 (Iressa) may have a beneficial therapeutic effect on ovarian epithelial cancer. Therapy of this cancer may include inhibitors of PI kinase (quercetin), ezrin and PIP kinase (genistein). The G protein-coupled family of receptors, including LPA, also is an attractive target to drugs, although their frequent pleiotropic functions may be at times toxic and lack specificity. Because of the lack of notable toxicity, PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors such as FTIs are a promising targeted therapy of ovarian epithelial cancer. Increasing insight into the oncogenic pathways involved in ovarian epithelial cancer also is helping clinicians to understand better the phenomenon of chemoresistance in this malignancy. Oncogenic activation of gamma-synuclein promotes cell survival and provides resistance to paclitaxel, but such a resistance is partially overcome by an MEK inhibitor that suppresses ERK activity. Ovarian epithelial cancer is a complex group of neoplasms with an overall poor prognosis. Comprehension of

  19. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type and SAP Domain Mutant Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Porcine Cells Identifies the Ubiquitin-Activating Enzyme UBE1 Required for Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zixiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Keshan; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Wang, Guoqing; Mao, Ruoqing; Li, Dan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2015-10-02

    Leader protein (L(pro)) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manipulates the activities of several host proteins to promote viral replication and pathogenicity. L(pro) has a conserved protein domain SAP that is suggested to subvert interferon (IFN) production to block antiviral responses. However, apart from blocking IFN production, the roles of the SAP domain during FMDV infection in host cells remain unknown. Therefore, we identified host proteins associated with the SAP domain of L(pro) by a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach [isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in conjunction with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry]. Comparison of the differentially regulated proteins in rA/FMDVΔmSAP- versus rA/FMDV-infected SK6 cells revealed 45 down-regulated and 32 up-regulated proteins that were mostly associated with metabolic, ribosome, spliceosome, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. The results also imply that the SAP domain has a function similar to SAF-A/B besides its potential protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (PIAS) function. One of the identified proteins UBE1 was further analyzed and displayed a novel role for the SAP domain of L(pro). Overexpression of UBE1 enhanced the replication of FMDV, and knockdown of UBE1 decreased FMDV replication. This shows that FMDV manipulates UBE1 for increased viral replication, and the SAP domain was involved in this process.

  20. RNA families in Epstein–Barr virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells. PMID:24441309

  1. RNA families in Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N; Lee, Nara; Pimienta, Genaro; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a tumorigenic human γ-herpesvirus, which produces several known structured RNAs with functional importance: two are implicated in latency maintenance and tumorigenic phenotypes, EBER1 and EBER2; a viral small nucleolar RNA (v-snoRNA1) that may generate a small regulatory RNA; and an internal ribosomal entry site in the EBNA1 mRNA. A recent bioinformatics and RNA-Seq study of EBV identified two novel EBV non-coding (nc)RNAs with evolutionary conservation in lymphocryptoviruses and likely functional importance. Both RNAs are transcribed from a repetitive region of the EBV genome (the W repeats) during a highly oncogenic type of viral latency. One novel ncRNA can form a massive (586 nt) hairpin, while the other RNA is generated from a short (81 nt) intron and is found in high abundance in EBV-infected cells.

  2. Virus como inductores de neoplasias cutáneas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV). Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell pol...

  3. Glycerophospholipid profile in oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Cristina; Vosbeck, Sonja; Hein, Eva-Maria; Hellwig, Birte; Langer, Alice; Hayen, Heiko; Franckenstein, Dennis; Büttner, Bettina; Hammad, Seddik; Marchan, Rosemarie; Hermes, Matthias; Selinski, Silvia; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Peksel, Begüm; Török, Zsolt; Vígh, László; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-09-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism and in the lipid composition of cellular membranes are linked to the pathology of numerous diseases including cancer. However, the influence of oncogene expression on cellular lipid profile is currently unknown. In this work we analyzed changes in lipid profiles that are induced in the course of ERBB2-expression mediated premature senescence. As a model system we used MCF-7 breast cancer cells with doxycycline-inducible expression of NeuT, an oncogenic ERBB2 variant. Affymetrix gene array data showed NeuT-induced alterations in the transcription of many enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, several of which (ACSL3, CHPT1, PLD1, LIPG, MGLL, LDL and NPC1) could be confirmed by quantitative realtime PCR. A study of the glycerophospholipid and lyso-glycerophospholipid profiles, obtained by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry revealed senescence-associated changes in numerous lipid species, including mitochondrial lipids. The most prominent changes were found in PG(34:1), PG(36:1) (increased) and LPE(18:1), PG(40:7) and PI(36:1) (decreased). Statistical analysis revealed a general trend towards shortened phospholipid acyl chains in senescence and a significant trend to more saturated acyl chains in the class of phosphatidylglycerol. Additionally, the cellular cholesterol content was elevated and accumulated in vacuoles in senescent cells. These changes were accompanied by increased membrane fluidity. In mitochondria, loss of membrane potential along with altered intracellular distribution was observed. In conclusion, we present a comprehensive overview of altered cholesterol and glycerophospholipid patterns in senescence, showing that predominantly mitochondrial lipids are affected and lipid species less susceptible to peroxidation are increased.

  4. Addition of a UL5 helicase-primase subunit point mutation eliminates bursal-thymic atrophy of Marek's disease virus ∆Meq recombinant virus but reduces vaccinal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Evin; Dunn, John R; Cheng, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus and the causative agent of Marek's disease (MD), characterized by immunosuppression, paralysis, nerve enlargement and induction of T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Despite widespread usage of vaccines since the 1970s to control MD, more virulent field strains of MDV have emerged that overcome vaccinal protection, necessitating the development of new and more protective MD vaccines. The ∆Meq virus, a recombinant Md5 strain MDV lacking the viral oncogene Meq, is one candidate MD vaccine with great potential but unfortunately it also causes bursal-thymic atrophy (BTA) in maternal antibody negative chickens, raising concerns that impede commercial use as a vaccine. Previously, we identified a point mutation within UL5 that reduced in vivo replication in attenuated viruses. We proposed that introduction of the UL5 point mutation into the ∆Meq virus would reduce in vivo replication and eliminate BTA yet potentially retain high protective abilities. In birds, the ∆Meq+UL5 recombinant MDV had reduced replication compared to the original ∆Meq virus, while weights of lymphoid organs indicated that ∆Meq+UL5 did not induce BTA, supporting the hypothesis that reduction of in vivo replication would also abolish BTA. Vaccine trials of the ∆Meq+UL5 virus compared to other ∆Meq-based viruses and commercial vaccines show that, while the ∆Meq+UL5 does provide vaccinal protection, this protection was also reduced compared to the original ∆Meq virus. Therefore, it appears that a very delicate balance is required between levels of replication able to induce high vaccinal protection, yet not so high as to induce BTA.

  5. High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies Novel and Conserved Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) microRNAs in Response to Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H W; Luo, L X; Liang, C Q; Jiang, N; Liu, P F; Li, J Q

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. (cv. 'Zhongnong 16') were artificially inoculated with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) at the three-true-leaf stage. Leaf and flower samples were collected at different time points post-inoculation (10, 30 and 50 d), and processed by high throughput sequencing analysis to identify candidate miRNA sequences. Bioinformatic analysis using screening criteria, and secondary structure prediction, indicated that 8 novel and 23 known miRNAs (including 15 miRNAs described for the first time in vivo) were produced by cucumber plants in response to CGMMV infection. Moreover, gene expression profiles (p-value cucumbers. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the predicted target genes of these 88 miRNAs, which were screened using the psRNATarget and miRanda algorithms, were involved in three functional categories: 2265 in molecular function, 1362 as cellular components and 276 in biological process. The subsequent Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were frequently involved in metabolic processes (166 pathways) and genetic information processes (40 pathways) and to a lesser degree the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (12 pathways). These results could provide useful clues to help elucidate host-pathogen interactions in CGMMV and cucumber, as well as for the screening of resistance genes.

  6. (18) F-FDG PET/CT vs. human papillomavirus, p16 and Epstein-Barr virus detection in cervical metastatic lymph nodes for identifying primary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheol Park, Gi; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Seung Kim, Jae; Hyeon Jin, Mi; Choi, Seung-Ho; Yuhl Nam, Soon; Yoon Kim, Sang

    2017-03-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary of the head and neck (SCCUP) is a heterogeneous disease entity that requires careful examination to locate the occult primary. We examined the diagnostic value of expression of biomarkers, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), p16 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), in metastatic lymph nodes vs. (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We prospectively enrolled 54 consecutive SCCUP patients who received HPV, p16 and EBV analyses of lymph node fine-needle aspirates and (18) F-FDG PET/CT scans and subsequently underwent examinations and biopsies under general anesthesia to detect primary tumors. The diagnostic performance of the biomarkers and (18) F-FDG PET/CT were compared by using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyses with histopathological results for identification of primary tumors. Primary tumors were identified in 28 (51.9%) of 54 patients: the palatine tonsil in 24, base of the tongue in 1, nasopharynx in 2, and hypopharynx in 1. The sensitivity of p16 (85.7%) and accuracy of HPV (85.2%) were higher than those (42.9% and 68.5%) of (18) F-FDG PET/CT (p p16 nodal immunopositivity than in the other patients (p p16 detection in metastatic lymph nodes can help locate hidden primary tumors, guide definitive treatment and predict patient survival. © 2016 UICC.

  7. Analysis of multiple sarcoma expression datasets: implications for classification, oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis A Konstantinopoulos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of soft tissue sarcomas (STS is challenging. Many remain unclassified (not-otherwise-specified, NOS or grouped in controversial categories such as malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH, with unclear therapeutic value. We analyzed several independent microarray datasets, to identify a predictor, use it to classify unclassifiable sarcomas, and assess oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed 5 independent datasets (325 tumor arrays. We developed and validated a predictor, which was used to reclassify MFH and NOS sarcomas. The molecular "match" between MFH and their predicted subtypes was assessed using genome-wide hierarchical clustering and Subclass-Mapping. Findings were validated in 15 paraffin samples profiled on the DASL platform. Bayesian models of oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response were applied to individual STS samples. A 170-gene predictor was developed and independently validated (80-85% accuracy in all datasets. Most MFH and NOS tumors were reclassified as leiomyosarcomas, liposarcomas and fibrosarcomas. "Molecular match" between MFH and their predicted STS subtypes was confirmed both within and across datasets. This classification revealed previously unrecognized tissue differentiation lines (adipocyte, fibroblastic, smooth-muscle and was reproduced in paraffin specimens. Different sarcoma subtypes demonstrated distinct oncogenic pathway activation patterns, and reclassified MFH tumors shared oncogenic pathway activation patterns with their predicted subtypes. These patterns were associated with predicted resistance to chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in sarcomas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: STS profiling can aid in diagnosis through a predictor tracking distinct tissue differentiation in unclassified tumors, and in therapeutic management via oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response assessment.

  8. European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs: Surveillance Programs, Diagnostic Tools and Swine Influenza Virus Subtypes Identified in 14 European Countries from 2010 to 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, Gaelle; Larsen, Lars Erik; Duerrwald, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs......, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs......: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence...

  9. E6/E7 oncogenes increase and tumor suppressors decrease the proportion of self-renewing neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, K; Kerosuo, L; Hakanen, J; Eriksson, M; Angers-Loustau, A; Leppä, S; Salminen, M; Sariola, H; Wartiovaara, K

    2006-08-10

    Many if not most tissues need a controlled number of stem cells to maintain normal function. Cancer can be seen as a process of disturbed tissue homeostasis, in which too many cells have or acquire too primitive identity. Here we measured how oncogenes and tumour suppressors affect the differentiation capacity, proportion and characteristics of progenitor cells in a model tissue. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) were exposed to human papilloma virus E6, E7 or E6/E7 oncogenes, which degrade tumour suppressors p53 and pRb family members, respectively. E6/E7-expressing or p53-/- NPCs were able to differentiate, but simultaneously retained high capacity for self-renewal, proliferation, ability to remain multipotent in conditions promoting differentiation and showed delayed cell cycle exit. These functions were mediated through p53 and pRb family, and involved MEK-ERK signalling. Decreased amount of p53 increased self-renewal and proliferation, whereas pRb affected only proliferation. Our results suggest that the oncogenes increase whereas p53 and pRb family tumour suppressors decrease the number and proportion of progenitor cells. These findings provide one explanation how oncogenes and tumour suppressors control tissue homeostasis and highlight their importance in stem cell self- renewal, linked both to cancer and life-long tissue turnover.

  10. Cell Transformation by RNA Viruses: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Fan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of oncogenic viruses have made seminal contributions to the molecular biology of cancer. Key discoveries include the identification of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes, elucidation of signal transduction pathways, and identification of tumor suppressor genes. The origins of cancer virology began almost exactly one hundred years ago with the discovery of avian sarcoma and acute leukemia viruses—RNA-containing viruses of the retrovirus family. The study of animal cancer viruses accelerated beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with the discovery of DNA viruses that could transform cells in culture, and the development of quantitative assays for transformation by DNA and RNA-containing tumor viruses. The discovery of reverse transcriptase in retroviruses in 1970 also greatly accelerated research on these viruses. Indeed RNA and DNA tumor viruses led the way in cancer molecular biology during this era before molecular cloning. It was possible to physically purify virus particles and generate specific hybridization probes for viral DNA and RNA at a time when it was not possible to analyze cellular genes in the same manner. [...

  11. High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies Novel and Conserved Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. microRNAs in Response to Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H W Liu

    Full Text Available Seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. (cv. 'Zhongnong 16' were artificially inoculated with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV at the three-true-leaf stage. Leaf and flower samples were collected at different time points post-inoculation (10, 30 and 50 d, and processed by high throughput sequencing analysis to identify candidate miRNA sequences. Bioinformatic analysis using screening criteria, and secondary structure prediction, indicated that 8 novel and 23 known miRNAs (including 15 miRNAs described for the first time in vivo were produced by cucumber plants in response to CGMMV infection. Moreover, gene expression profiles (p-value <0.01 validated the expression of 3 of the novel miRNAs and 3 of the putative candidate miRNAs and identified a further 82 conserved miRNAs in CGMMV-infected cucumbers. Gene ontology (GO analysis revealed that the predicted target genes of these 88 miRNAs, which were screened using the psRNATarget and miRanda algorithms, were involved in three functional categories: 2265 in molecular function, 1362 as cellular components and 276 in biological process. The subsequent Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis revealed that the predicted target genes were frequently involved in metabolic processes (166 pathways and genetic information processes (40 pathways and to a lesser degree the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (12 pathways. These results could provide useful clues to help elucidate host-pathogen interactions in CGMMV and cucumber, as well as for the screening of resistance genes.

  12. Modulation of LMP2A Expression by a Newly Identified Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded MicroRNA miR-BART22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wai-Ming Lung

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a strong predisposing factor in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Many viral gene products including EBNA1, LMP1, and LMP2 have been implicated in NPC tumorigenesis, although the de novo control of these viral oncoproteins remains largely unclear. The recent discovery of EBV-encoded viral microRNA (miRNA in lymphoid malignancies has prompted us to examine the NPC-associated EBV miRNA. Using large-scale cloning analysis on EBV-positive NPC cells, two novel EBV miRNA, now named miR-BART21 and miR-BART22, were identified. These two EBV-encoded miRNA are abundantly expressed in most NPC samples. We found two nucleotide variations in the primary transcript of miR-BART22, which we experimentally confirmed to augment its biogenesis in vitro and thus may underline the high and consistent expression of miR-BART22 in NPC tumors. More importantly, we determined that the EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A is the putative target of miR-BART22. LMP2A is a potent immunogenic viral antigen that is recognized by the cytotoxic T cells; down-modulation of LMP2A expression by miR-BART22 may permit escape of EBV-infected cells from host immune surveillance. Taken together, we demonstrated that two newly identified EBV-encoded miRNA are highly expressed in NPC. Specific sequence variations on the prevalent EBV strain in our locality might contribute to the higher miR-BART22 expression level in our NPC samples. Our findings emphasize the role of miR-BART22 in modulating LMP2A expression, which may facilitate NPC carcinogenesis by evading the host immune response.

  13. Measurement of hepatitis B virus core-related antigen is valuable for identifying patients who are at low risk of lamivudine resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Eiji; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Mizokami, Masashi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Okanoue, Takeshi; Minami, Masahito; Chayama, Kazuaki; Imamura, Michio; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Shinya; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Kawata, Sumio; Kimura, Tatsuji; Maki, Noboru; Iino, Shiro; Kiyosawa, Kendo

    2006-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of hepatitis B virus core-related antigen (HBVcrAg) assay was compared with that of HBV DNA assay in predicting the occurrence of lamivudine resistance in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Of a total of 81 patients who were treated with lamivudine, 25 (31%) developed lamivudine resistance during a median follow-up period of 19.3 months. The pretreatment positive rate of HBe antigen, or pretreatment levels of HBVcrAg or HBV DNA did not differ between patients with and without lamivudine resistance. Levels of both HBVcrAg and HBV DNA decreased after the initiation of lamivudine administration; however, the level of HBVcrAg decreased significantly more slowly than that of HBV DNA. The occurrence of lamivudine resistance was significantly less frequent in the 56 patients whose HBV DNA level was less than 2.6 log copy/ml at 6 months of treatment than in the remaining 25 patients. The cumulative rate of lamivudine resistance was as high as 70% within 2 years in the latter group, while it was only 28% in the former group. Lamivudine resistance did not occur during the follow-up period in the 19 patients whose HBVcrAg level was less than 4.6 log U/ml at 6 months of treatment, while it did occur in 50% of the remaining patients within 2 years. These results suggest that measurement of HBV DNA is valuable for identifying patients who are at high risk of developing lamivudine resistance, and that, conversely, measurement of HBVcrAg is valuable for identifying those who are at low risk of lamivudine resistance.

  14. Identification of lung cancer oncogenes based on the mRNA expression and single nucleotide polymorphism profile data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Mei, Q; Ai, Y Q; Li, R Q; Chang, L; Li, Y F; Xia, Y X; Li, W H; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the oncogenes associated with lung cancer based on the mRNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profile data. The mRNA expression profile data of GSE43458 (80 cancer and 30 normal samples) and SNP profile data of GSE33355 (61 pairs of lung cancer samples and control samples) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Common genes between the mRNA profile and SNP profile were identified as the lung cancer oncogenes. Risk subpathways of the selected oncogenes with the SNP locus were analyzed using the iSubpathwayMiner package in R. Moreover, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of the oncogenes was constructed using the HPRD database and then visualized using the Cytoscape. Totally, 3004 DEGs (1105 up-regulated and 1899 down-regulated) and 125 significant SNPs closely related to 174 genes in the lung cancer samples were identified. Also, 39 common genes, like PFKP (phosphofructokinase, platelet) and DGKH-rs11616202 (diacylglycerol kinase, eta) that enriched in sub-pathways such as galactose metabolism, fructose and mannose metabolism, and pentose phosphate pathway, were identified as the lung cancer oncogenes. Besides, PIK3R1 (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1), RORA (RAR-related orphan receptor A), MAGI3 (membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 3), PTPRM (protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, M), and BMP6 (bone morphogenetic protein 6) were the hub genes in PPI network. Our study suggested that PFKP and DGKH that enriched in galactose metabolism, fructose and mannose metabolism pathway, as well as PIK3R1, RORA, and MAGI3, may be the lung cancer oncogenes.

  15. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kelvin K W; Tse, Herman; Chan, Wan-Mui; Choi, Garnet K Y; Zhang, Anna J X; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Chan, Andy S F; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lo, Janice Y C; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1) was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs) with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention and should be

  16. A Rapid Screening Assay Identifies Monotherapy with Interferon-ß and Combination Therapies with Nucleoside Analogs as Effective Inhibitors of Ebola Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D S McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date there are no approved antiviral drugs for the treatment of Ebola virus disease (EVD. While a number of candidate drugs have shown limited efficacy in vitro and/or in non-human primate studies, differences in experimental methodologies make it difficult to compare their therapeutic effectiveness. Using an in vitro model of Ebola Zaire replication with transcription-competent virus like particles (trVLPs, requiring only level 2 biosafety containment, we compared the activities of the type I interferons (IFNs IFN-α and IFN-ß, a panel of viral polymerase inhibitors (lamivudine (3TC, zidovudine (AZT tenofovir (TFV, favipiravir (FPV, the active metabolite of brincidofovir, cidofovir (CDF, and the estrogen receptor modulator, toremifene (TOR, in inhibiting viral replication in dose-response and time course studies. We also tested 28 two- and 56 three-drug combinations against Ebola replication. IFN-α and IFN-ß inhibited viral replication 24 hours post-infection (IC50 0.038μM and 0.016μM, respectively. 3TC, AZT and TFV inhibited Ebola replication when used alone (50-62% or in combination (87%. They exhibited lower IC50 (0.98-6.2μM compared with FPV (36.8μM, when administered 24 hours post-infection. Unexpectedly, CDF had a narrow therapeutic window (6.25-25μM. When dosed >50μM, CDF treatment enhanced viral infection. IFN-ß exhibited strong synergy with 3TC (97.3% inhibition or in triple combination with 3TC and AZT (95.8% inhibition. This study demonstrates that IFNs and viral polymerase inhibitors may have utility in EVD. We identified several 2 and 3 drug combinations with strong anti-Ebola activity, confirmed in studies using fully infectious ZEBOV, providing a rationale for testing combination therapies in animal models of lethal Ebola challenge. These studies open up new possibilities for novel therapeutic options, in particular combination therapies, which could prevent and treat Ebola infection and potentially reduce drug

  17. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin K W To

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention

  18. The human papillomavirus E6 oncogene dysregulates the cell cycle and contributes to cervical carcinogenesis through two independent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shai, Anny; Brake, Tiffany; Somoza, Chamorro; Lambert, Paul F

    2007-02-15

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death due to cancer among women worldwide. Using transgenic mice to dissect the contributions of the human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes in cervical cancer, E7 was identified previously to be the dominant oncogene. Specifically, when treated with exogenous estrogen for 6 months, E7 transgenic mice developed cancer throughout the reproductive tract, but E6 transgenic mice did not. E6 contributed to carcinogenesis of the reproductive tract, as E6/E7 double transgenic mice treated for 6 months with estrogen developed larger cancers than E7 transgenic mice. In the current study, we investigated whether the E6 oncogene alone could cooperate with estrogen to induce cervical cancer after an extended estrogen treatment period of 9 months. We found that the E6 oncogene synergizes with estrogen to induce cervical cancer after 9 months, indicating that E6 has a weaker but detectable oncogenic potential in the reproductive tract compared with the E7 oncogene. Using transgenic mice that express mutant forms of HPV16 E6, we determined that the interactions of E6 with cellular alpha-helix and PDZ partners correlate with its ability to induce cervical carcinogenesis. In analyzing the tumors arising in E6 transgenic mice, we learned that E6 induces expression of the E2F-responsive genes, Mcm7 and cyclin E, in the absence of the E7 oncogene. E6 also prevented the expression of p16 in tumors of the reproductive tract through a mechanism mediated by the interaction of E6 with alpha-helix partners.

  19. Application and validation of case-finding algorithms for identifying individuals with human immunodeficiency virus from administrative data in British Columbia, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan Nosyk

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To define a population-level cohort of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in the province of British Columbia from available registries and administrative datasets using a validated case-finding algorithm. METHODS: Individuals were identified for possible cohort inclusion from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (CfE drug treatment program (antiretroviral therapy and laboratory testing datasets (plasma viral load (pVL and CD4 diagnostic test results, the BC Centre for Disease Control (CDC provincial HIV surveillance database (positive HIV tests, as well as databases held by the BC Ministry of Health (MoH; the Discharge Abstract Database (hospitalizations, the Medical Services Plan (physician billing and PharmaNet databases (additional HIV-related medications. A validated case-finding algorithm was applied to distinguish true HIV cases from those likely to have been misclassified. The sensitivity of the algorithms was assessed as the proportion of confirmed cases (those with records in the CfE, CDC and MoH databases positively identified by each algorithm. A priori hypotheses were generated and tested to verify excluded cases. RESULTS: A total of 25,673 individuals were identified as having at least one HIV-related health record. Among 9,454 unconfirmed cases, the selected case-finding algorithm identified 849 individuals believed to be HIV-positive. The sensitivity of this algorithm among confirmed cases was 88%. Those excluded from the cohort were more likely to be female (44.4% vs. 22.5%; p<0.01, had a lower mortality rate (2.18 per 100 person years (100PY vs. 3.14/100PY; p<0.01, and had lower median rates of health service utilization (days of medications dispensed: 9745/100PY vs. 10266/100PY; p<0.01; days of inpatient care: 29/100PY vs. 98/100PY; p<0.01; physician billings: 602/100PY vs. 2,056/100PY; p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The application of validated case-finding algorithms and subsequent

  20. Nuclear Localization and DNA Binding Properties of a Protein Expressed by Human c-myc Oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Hakan; Leder, Philip

    1984-08-01

    Antisera to the human cellular myc oncogene product were used to identify a human c-myc specific protein with a molecular weight of 65,000. Subcellular fractionation showed that the human c-myc protein is predominantly found in the cell nucleus. The p65 Kc-myc protein binds to double- and single-stranded DNA as measured by a DNA affinity chromatography assay.

  1. Priming of protective T cell responses against virus-induced tumors in mice with human immune system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strowig, Till; Gurer, Cagan; Ploss, Alexander; Liu, Yi-Fang; Arrey, Frida; Sashihara, Junji; Koo, Gloria; Rice, Charles M; Young, James W; Chadburn, Amy; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Münz, Christian

    2009-06-08

    Many pathogens that cause human disease infect only humans. To identify the mechanisms of immune protection against these pathogens and also to evaluate promising vaccine candidates, a small animal model would be desirable. We demonstrate that primary T cell responses in mice with reconstituted human immune system components control infection with the oncogenic and persistent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). These cytotoxic and interferon-gamma-producing T cell responses were human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restricted and specific for EBV-derived peptides. In HLA-A2 transgenic animals and similar to human EBV carriers, T cell responses against lytic EBV antigens dominated over recognition of latent EBV antigens. T cell depletion resulted in elevated viral loads and emergence of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease. Both loss of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells abolished immune control. Therefore, this mouse model recapitulates features of symptomatic primary EBV infection and generates T cell-mediated immune control that resists oncogenic transformation.

  2. Using genotyping-by-sequencing to identify SNPs linked to the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistance trait in bottle gourd and development of CAPS markers useful for marker assisted selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottle gourd [Lagenaria siceraria L.] is an important root stock for watermelon as well as a nutritious vegetable. Previously, we identified several sources of resistance in bottle gourd to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Breeding populations were generated from two resistant lines (USVL1VR-Ls ...

  3. Recurrent targeted genes of hepatitis B virus in the liver cancer genomes identified by a next-generation sequencing-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ding

    Full Text Available Integration of the viral DNA into host chromosomes was found in most of the hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs. Here we devised a massive anchored parallel sequencing (MAPS method using next-generation sequencing to isolate and sequence HBV integrants. Applying MAPS to 40 pairs of HBV-related HCC tissues (cancer and adjacent tissues, we identified 296 HBV integration events corresponding to 286 unique integration sites (UISs with precise HBV-Human DNA junctions. HBV integration favored chromosome 17 and preferentially integrated into human transcript units. HBV targeted genes were enriched in GO terms: cAMP metabolic processes, T cell differentiation and activation, TGF beta receptor pathway, ncRNA catabolic process, and dsRNA fragmentation and cellular response to dsRNA. The HBV targeted genes include 7 genes (PTPRJ, CNTN6, IL12B, MYOM1, FNDC3B, LRFN2, FN1 containing IPR003961 (Fibronectin, type III domain, 7 genes (NRG3, MASP2, NELL1, LRP1B, ADAM21, NRXN1, FN1 containing IPR013032 (EGF-like region, conserved site, and three genes (PDE7A, PDE4B, PDE11A containing IPR002073 (3', 5'-cyclic-nucleotide phosphodiesterase. Enriched pathways include hsa04512 (ECM-receptor interaction, hsa04510 (Focal adhesion, and hsa04012 (ErbB signaling pathway. Fewer integration events were found in cancers compared to cancer-adjacent tissues, suggesting a clonal expansion model in HCC development. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were recurrent target genes by HBV integration including fibronectin 1 (FN1 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT1, two known recurrent target genes, and additional novel target genes such as SMAD family member 5 (SMAD5, phosphatase and actin regulator 4 (PHACTR4, and RNA binding protein fox-1 homolog (C. elegans 1 (RBFOX1. Integrating analysis with recently published whole-genome sequencing analysis, we identified 14 additional recurrent HBV target genes, greatly expanding the HBV recurrent target list

  4. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. EBV finds a polycomb-mediated, epigenetic solution to the problem of oncogenic stress responses triggered by infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John Allday

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that establish a persistent infection, involving intracellular latency, commonly stimulate cellular DNA synthesis and sometimes cell division early after infection. However, most cells of metazoans have evolved ‘fail-safe’ responses that normally monitor unscheduled DNA synthesis and prevent cell proliferation when, for instance, cell proto-oncogenes are ‘activated’ by mutation, amplification or chromosomal rearrangements. These cell intrinsic defense mechanisms that reduce the risk of neoplasia and cancer are collectively called oncogenic stress responses (OSR. Mechanisms include the activation of tumor suppressor genes and the so-called DNA damage response (DDR that together trigger pathways leading to cell cycle arrest (eg cell senescence or complete elimination of cells (eg apoptosis. It is not surprising that viruses that can induce cellular DNA synthesis and cell division have the capacity to trigger OSR, nor is it surprising that these viruses have evolved countermeasures for inactivating or bypassing OSR. The main focus of this review is how the human tumour-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV manipulates the host polycomb group (PcG protein system to control – by epigenetic repression of transcription – key components of the OSR during the transformation of normal human B cells into permanent cell lines.

  6. Peroxiredoxin 2: a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of Hepatitis B Virus related liver fibrosis identified by proteomic analysis of the plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Haijian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver fibrosis is a middle stage in the course of chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, which will develop into cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC if not treated at the early stage. Considering the limitations and patients' reluctance to undergo liver biopsy, a reliable, noninvasive diagnostic system to predict and assess treatment and prognosis of liver fibrosis is needed. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis of HBV related liver fibrosis. Method Plasma samples from 7 healthy volunteers and 27 HBV infected patients with different stages of fibrosis were selected for 2-DIGE proteomic screening. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to assess differences in protein expression among all groups. The alteration was further confirmed by western blotting. Plasma levels of 25 serological variables in 42 healthy volunteers and 68 patients were measured to establish a decision tree for the detection of various stages fibrosis. Result The up-regulated proteins along with fibrosis progress included fibrinogen, collagen, macroglobulin, hemopexin, antitrypsin, prealbumin and thioredoxin peroxidase. The down-regulated proteins included haptoglobin, serotransferrin, CD5 antigen like protein, clusterin, apolipoprotein and leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein. For the discrimination of milder stage fibrosis, the area under curve for Prx II was the highest. Four variables (PT, Pre, HA and Prx II were selected from the 25 variables to construct the decision tree. In a training group, the correct prediction percentage for normal control, milder fibrosis, significant fibrosis and early cirrhosis was 100%, 88.9%, 95.2% and 100%, respectively, with an overall correct percent of 95.9%. Conclusion This study showed that 2-D DIGE-based proteomic analysis of the plasma was helpful in screening for new plasma biomarkers for liver disease. The significant up-expression of Prx II could be used in the early

  7. Deep Sequencing Reveals the Complete Genome and Evidence for Transcriptional Activity of the First Virus-Like Sequences Identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Villacreses

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1. High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs: ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%–73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV, Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP; ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs, AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq. Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant.

  8. Deep sequencing reveals the complete genome and evidence for transcriptional activity of the first virus-like sequences identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F; Alzate, Juan F; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-04-03

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%-73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant.

  9. Plac8 Links Oncogenic Mutations to Regulation of Autophagy and Is Critical to Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conan Kinsey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53 and RAS potently cooperate in oncogenic transformation, and correspondingly, these genetic alterations frequently coexist in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and other human cancers. Previously, we identified a set of genes synergistically activated by combined RAS and p53 mutations as frequent downstream mediators of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that the synergistically activated gene Plac8 is critical for pancreatic cancer growth. Silencing of Plac8 in cell lines suppresses tumor formation by blocking autophagy, a process essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis in PDA, and genetic inactivation in an engineered mouse model inhibits PDA progression. We show that Plac8 is a critical regulator of the autophagic machinery, localizing to the lysosomal compartment and facilitating lysosome-autophagosome fusion. Plac8 thus provides a mechanistic link between primary oncogenic mutations and the induction of autophagy, a central mechanism of metabolic reprogramming, during PDA progression.

  10. MiR-191 Regulates Primary Human Fibroblast Proliferation and Directly Targets Multiple Oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Polioudakis

    Full Text Available miRNAs play a central role in numerous pathologies including multiple cancer types. miR-191 has predominantly been studied as an oncogene, but the role of miR-191 in the proliferation of primary cells is not well characterized, and the miR-191 targetome has not been experimentally profiled. Here we utilized RNA induced silencing complex immunoprecipitations as well as gene expression profiling to construct a genome wide miR-191 target profile. We show that miR-191 represses proliferation in primary human fibroblasts, identify multiple proto-oncogenes as novel miR-191 targets, including CDK9, NOTCH2, and RPS6KA3, and present evidence that miR-191 extensively mediates target expression through coding sequence (CDS pairing. Our results provide a comprehensive genome wide miR-191 target profile, and demonstrate miR-191's regulation of primary human fibroblast proliferation.

  11. MiR-191 Regulates Primary Human Fibroblast Proliferation and Directly Targets Multiple Oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polioudakis, Damon; Abell, Nathan S; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs play a central role in numerous pathologies including multiple cancer types. miR-191 has predominantly been studied as an oncogene, but the role of miR-191 in the proliferation of primary cells is not well characterized, and the miR-191 targetome has not been experimentally profiled. Here we utilized RNA induced silencing complex immunoprecipitations as well as gene expression profiling to construct a genome wide miR-191 target profile. We show that miR-191 represses proliferation in primary human fibroblasts, identify multiple proto-oncogenes as novel miR-191 targets, including CDK9, NOTCH2, and RPS6KA3, and present evidence that miR-191 extensively mediates target expression through coding sequence (CDS) pairing. Our results provide a comprehensive genome wide miR-191 target profile, and demonstrate miR-191's regulation of primary human fibroblast proliferation.

  12. v-erbA oncogene activation entails the loss of hormone-dependent regulator activity of c-erbA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenke, M; Muñoz, A; Sap, J;

    1990-01-01

    and erythrocyte-specific gene expression in a T3-dependent fashion, when introduced into erythroid cells via a retrovirus. In contrast, the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor does not detectably affect erythroid differentiation. The analysis of a series of chimeric v-/c-erbA proteins suggests that the v......The v-erbA oncogene, one of the two oncogenes of the avian erythroblastosis virus, efficiently blocks erythroid differentiation and suppresses erythrocyte-specific gene transcription. Here we show that the overexpressed thyroid hormone receptor c-erbA effectively modulates erythroid differentiation......-erbA oncoprotein has lost one type of thyroid hormone receptor function (regulating erythrocyte gene transcription in response to T3), but constitutively displays another function: it represses transcription in the absence of T3. The region responsible for the loss of hormone-dependent regulator activity of v...

  13. Transglutaminase 2 contributes to a TP53-induced autophagy program to prevent oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shi Yun; Itahana, Yoko; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Han, Rachel; Iwamoto, Kozue; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Bao, Yi; Kleiber, Kai; Wu, Ya Jun; Bay, Boon Huat; Voorhoeve, Mathijs; Itahana, Koji

    2016-03-09

    Genetic alterations which impair the function of the TP53 signaling pathway in TP53 wild-type human tumors remain elusive. To identify new components of this pathway, we performed a screen for genes whose loss-of-function debilitated TP53 signaling and enabled oncogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells. We identified transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) as a putative tumor suppressor in the TP53 pathway. TGM2 suppressed colony formation in soft agar and tumor formation in a xenograft mouse model. The depletion of growth supplements induced both TGM2 expression and autophagy in a TP53-dependent manner, and TGM2 promoted autophagic flux by enhancing autophagic protein degradation and autolysosome clearance. Reduced expression of both CDKN1A, which regulates the cell cycle downstream of TP53, and TGM2 synergized to promote oncogenic transformation. Our findings suggest that TGM2-mediated autophagy and CDKN1A-mediated cell cycle arrest are two important barriers in the TP53 pathway that prevent oncogenic transformation.

  14. Human Papilloma Virus and oral cancer: Narrative review of the literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Fernández; Maureen Marshall; Alfredo Esguep

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is now more common sexually transmitted diseases, with an incidence of 5.5 million worldwide, with 85% of the carrier of this virus adult population. Their oncogenic potential and increased oral lesions associated with oral HPV infection have led us to make a narrative of the literature on the role of HPV in oral cancer, especially types 16 and 18. Here we refer to the possible routes of infection, oncogenic mechanisms, both benign and potent...

  15. Critical role of the virus-encoded microRNA-155 ortholog in the induction of Marek's disease lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the well-characterised roles of a number of oncogenes in neoplastic transformation, microRNAs (miRNAs are increasingly implicated in several human cancers. Discovery of miRNAs in several oncogenic herpesviruses such as KSHV has further highlighted the potential of virus-encoded miRNAs to contribute to their oncogenic capabilities. Nevertheless, despite the identification of several possible cancer-related genes as their targets, the direct in vivo role of virus-encoded miRNAs in neoplastic diseases such as those induced by KSHV is difficult to demonstrate in the absence of suitable models. However, excellent natural disease models of rapid-onset Marek's disease (MD lymphomas in chickens allow examination of the oncogenic potential of virus-encoded miRNAs. Using viruses modified by reverse genetics of the infectious BAC clone of the oncogenic RB-1B strain of MDV, we show that the deletion of the six-miRNA cluster 1 from the viral genome abolished the oncogenicity of the virus. This loss of oncogenicity appeared to be primarily due to the single miRNA within the cluster, miR-M4, the ortholog of cellular miR-155, since its deletion or a 2-nucleotide mutation within its seed region was sufficient to inhibit the induction of lymphomas. The definitive role of this miR-155 ortholog in oncogenicity was further confirmed by the rescue of oncogenic phenotype by revertant viruses that expressed either the miR-M4 or the cellular homolog gga-miR-155. This is the first demonstration of the direct in vivo role of a virus-encoded miRNA in inducing tumors in a natural infection model. Furthermore, the use of viruses deleted in miRNAs as effective vaccines against virulent MDV challenge, enables the prospects of generating genetically defined attenuated vaccines.

  16. Oncogenic osteomalacia associated with soft tissue chondromyxoid fibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Mi E-mail: jmpark@cmc.cuk.ac.kr; Woo, Young Kyun; Kang, Moo Il; Kang, Chang Suk; Hahn, Seong Tae

    2001-08-01

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rarely described clinical entity characterized by hypophosphatemia, phosphaturia, and a low concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. It is most often associated with benign mesenchymal tumor and can be cured with surgical removal of the tumor. In this paper, we present a case of oncogenic osteomalacia caused by chondromyxoid fibroma in the soft tissue of the sole of the foot in a 56-year-old woman.

  17. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Marialuisa Moccia; Qingsong Liu; Teresa Guida; Giorgia Federico; Annalisa Brescia; Zheng Zhao; Hwan Geun Choi; Xianming Deng; Li Tan; Jinhua Wang; Marc Billaud; Gray, Nathanael S.; Francesca Carlomagno; Massimo Santoro

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-media...

  18. European surveillance network for influenza in pigs: surveillance programs, diagnostic tools and Swine influenza virus subtypes identified in 14 European countries from 2010 to 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Simon

    Full Text Available Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010-2013 aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%, human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13% and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%, as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm virus (10.3%. Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections.

  19. European surveillance network for influenza in pigs: surveillance programs, diagnostic tools and Swine influenza virus subtypes identified in 14 European countries from 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Gaëlle; Larsen, Lars E; Dürrwald, Ralf; Foni, Emanuela; Harder, Timm; Van Reeth, Kristien; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Reid, Scott M; Dan, Adam; Maldonado, Jaime; Huovilainen, Anita; Billinis, Charalambos; Davidson, Irit; Agüero, Montserrat; Vila, Thaïs; Hervé, Séverine; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Chiapponi, Chiara; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Brown, Ian H; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza causes concern for global veterinary and public health officials. In continuing two previous networks that initiated the surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) circulating in European pigs between 2001 and 2008, a third European Surveillance Network for Influenza in Pigs (ESNIP3, 2010-2013) aimed to expand widely the knowledge of the epidemiology of European SIVs. ESNIP3 stimulated programs of harmonized SIV surveillance in European countries and supported the coordination of appropriate diagnostic tools and subtyping methods. Thus, an extensive virological monitoring, mainly conducted through passive surveillance programs, resulted in the examination of more than 9 000 herds in 17 countries. Influenza A viruses were detected in 31% of herds examined from which 1887 viruses were preliminary characterized. The dominating subtypes were the three European enzootic SIVs: avian-like swine H1N1 (53.6%), human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (13%) and human-like reassortant swine H3N2 (9.1%), as well as pandemic A/H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm) virus (10.3%). Viruses from these four lineages co-circulated in several countries but with very different relative levels of incidence. For instance, the H3N2 subtype was not detected at all in some geographic areas whereas it was still prevalent in other parts of Europe. Interestingly, H3N2-free areas were those that exhibited highest frequencies of circulating H1N2 viruses. H1N1pdm viruses were isolated at an increasing incidence in some countries from 2010 to 2013, indicating that this subtype has become established in the European pig population. Finally, 13.9% of the viruses represented reassortants between these four lineages, especially between previous enzootic SIVs and H1N1pdm. These novel viruses were detected at the same time in several countries, with increasing prevalence. Some of them might become established in pig herds, causing implications for zoonotic infections.

  20. Inhibition of Ras oncogenic activity by Ras protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto; Lue, Jeffrey; Mathews, Jeremy; Yoon, Andrew; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-España, Antonio; Leonardi, Peter; Vargas, Marcelo P; Pellicer, Angel

    2005-01-10

    Point mutations in ras genes have been found in a large number and wide variety of human tumors. These oncogenic Ras mutants are locked in an active GTP-bound state that leads to a constitutive and deregulated activation of Ras function. The dogma that ras oncogenes are dominant, whereby the mutation of a single allele in a cell will predispose the host cell to transformation regardless of the presence of the normal allele, is being challenged. We have seen that increasing amounts of Ras protooncogenes are able to inhibit the activity of the N-Ras oncogene in the activation of Elk in NIH 3T3 cells and in the formation of foci. We have been able to determine that the inhibitory effect is by competition between Ras protooncogenes and the N-Ras oncogene that occurs first at the effector level at the membranes, then at the processing level and lastly at the effector level in the cytosol. In addition, coexpression of the N-Ras protooncogene in thymic lymphomas induced by the N-Ras oncogene is associated with increased levels of p107, p130 and cyclin A and decreased levels of Rb. In the present report, we have shown that the N-Ras oncogene is not truly dominant over Ras protooncogenes and their competing activities might be depending on cellular context.

  1. A Framework for the Evaluation of Biosecurity, Commercial, Regulatory, and Scientific Impacts of Plant Viruses and Viroids Identified by NGS Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Sebastien; Candresse, Thierry; Gil, José; Lacomme, Christophe; Predajna, Lukas; Ravnikar, Maja; Reynard, Jean-Sébastien; Rumbou, Artemis; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Škorić, Dijana; Vainio, Eeva J.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.; Vanderschuren, Hervé; Varveri, Christina; Wetzel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies and bioinformatics have generated huge new opportunities for discovering and diagnosing plant viruses and viroids. Plant virology has undoubtedly benefited from these new methodologies, but at the same time, faces now substantial bottlenecks, namely the biological characterization of the newly discovered viruses and the analysis of their impact at the biosecurity, commercial, regulatory, and scientific levels. This paper proposes a scaled and progressive scientific framework for efficient biological characterization and risk assessment when a previously known or a new plant virus is detected by next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Four case studies are also presented to illustrate the need for such a framework, and to discuss the scenarios. PMID:28174561

  2. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Schäfer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  3. In vitro model for lytic replication, latency, and transformation of an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermuly, Julia; Greco, Annachiara; Härtle, Sonja; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Kaspers, Bernd

    2015-06-09

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes deadly T-cell lymphomas in chickens and serves as a natural small animal model for virus-induced tumor formation. In vivo, MDV lytically replicates in B cells that transfer the virus to T cells in which the virus establishes latency. MDV also malignantly transforms CD4+ T cells with a T(reg) signature, ultimately resulting in deadly lymphomas. No in vitro infection system for primary target cells of MDV has been available due to the short-lived nature of these cells in culture. Recently, we characterized cytokines and monoclonal antibodies that promote survival of cultured chicken B and T cells. We used these survival stimuli to establish a culture system that allows efficient infection of B and T cells with MDV. We were able to productively infect with MDV B cells isolated from spleen, bursa or blood cultured in the presence of soluble CD40L. Virus was readily transferred from infected B to T cells stimulated with an anti-TCRαVβ1 antibody, thus recapitulating the in vivo situation in the culture dish. Infected T cells could then be maintained in culture for at least 90 d in the absence of TCR stimulation, which allowed the establishment of MDV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). The immortalized cells had a signature comparable to MDV-transformed CD4+ α/β T cells present in tumors. In summary, we have developed a novel in vitro system that precisely reflects the life cycle of an oncogenic herpesivrus in vivo and will allow us to investigate the interaction between virus and target cells in an easily accessible system.

  4. Relationship between the high-risk HPV infection and the expression of oncogenes, anti-oncogenes in cervical dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ping Shi; Xiu-Jie Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between the infection of high-risk HPV in cervical precancerous lesion and the expression of oncogene, anti-oncogene.Methods:218 cases ofcervical intraepithelial neoplasia patients in our hospital during May 2014–May 2016 were chosed and divided into high-risk HPV group (n=107), low-risk HPV group (n=111) according to cervical tissue HPV test; another 100 cases of patients received cervical biopsy and confirmed as benign lesions were enrolled in the control group. RT-PCR method was used to detect the mRNA expression of proto-oncogene and anti-oncogene in three groups, Western-blot method was used to detect the protein expression of Sox-2 and Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway.Results: mRNA expression of oncogene DEK, Bmi-1, c-fos, K-ras, Prdx4 in high-risk HPV group were higher than low-risk HPV group and control group (P<0.05); mRNA expression of anti-oncogene P27, P16, DAPK, PTEN, eIF4E3 in high-risk HPV group were lower than low-risk HPV group and control group (P<0.05); expression of Sox-2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway protein Sox-2,β-catenin, wnt-1, wnt-3a in high-risk HPV group were higher than low-risk HPV group and control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:High-risk HPV infection can increase the expression of oncogenes and reduce the expression of anti-oncogenes in cervical dysplasia tissues on Sox-2- and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway manners.

  5. Small tumor virus genomes are integrated near nuclear matrix attachment regions in transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, K A; Shera, C A; McDougall, J K

    2001-12-01

    More than 15% of human cancers have a viral etiology. In benign lesions induced by the small DNA tumor viruses, viral genomes are typically maintained extrachromosomally. Malignant progression is often associated with viral integration into host cell chromatin. To study the role of viral integration in tumorigenesis, we analyzed the positions of integrated viral genomes in tumors and tumor cell lines induced by the small oncogenic viruses, including the high-risk human papillomaviruses, hepatitis B virus, simian virus 40, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. We show that viral integrations in tumor cells lie near cellular sequences identified as nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs), while integrations in nonneoplastic cells show no significant correlation with these regions. In mammalian cells, the nuclear matrix functions in gene expression and DNA replication. MARs play varied but poorly understood roles in eukaryotic gene expression. Our results suggest that integrated tumor virus genomes are subject to MAR-mediated transcriptional regulation, providing insight into mechanisms of viral carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the viral oncoproteins serve as invaluable tools for the study of mechanisms controlling cellular growth. Similarly, our demonstration that integrated viral genomes may be subject to MAR-mediated transcriptional effects should facilitate elucidation of fundamental mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression.

  6. A transcriptome map of cellular transformation by the fos oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Hong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-fos gene was originally identified as the cellular homolog of the oncogene v-fos carried by the Finkel-Biskis-Jenkins and Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine osteogenic sarcoma retroviruses. Sustained expression of fos is sufficient to induce cellular transformation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Fos functions as a component of the AP-1 transcription factor complex to regulate gene transcription and several differentially expressed genes have been identified in cells transformed by fos. We have extended these studies by constructing a cellular system for conditional transformation by v-fos. Using Affymetrix-based DNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes over the course of transformation and reversion in an inducible v-fos system. Results Microarray analyses of temporal gene expression during the process of v-fos mediated cellular transformation and morphological reversion revealed a remarkably dynamic transcriptome. Of the more than 8000 genes analyzed in this study, 3766 genes were categorized into 18 gene-expression patterns by using self-organizing map analysis. By combining the analysis of gene expression profiles in stably transformed cells with the analysis of sequential expression patterns during conditional transformation, we identified a relatively small cohort of genes implicated in v-fos mediated cellular transformation. Conclusion This approach defines a general conditional cell transformation system that can be used to study the endogenous transcription regulatory mechanisms involved in transformation and tumorigenesis. In addition, this study is the first reported analysis of dynamic changes in gene expression throughout experimentally controlled morphological transformation mediated by v-fos.

  7. Altered Ca(2+) signaling in cancer cells: proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors targeting IP3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Haidar; Bultynck, Geert

    2013-04-01

    Proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors critically control cell-fate decisions like cell survival, adaptation and death. These processes are regulated by Ca(2+) signals arising from the endoplasmic reticulum, which at distinct sites is in close proximity to the mitochondria. These organelles are linked by different mechanisms, including Ca(2+)-transport mechanisms involving the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). The amount of Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria determines the susceptibility of cells to apoptotic stimuli. Suppressing the transfer of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria increases the apoptotic resistance of cells and may decrease the cellular responsiveness to apoptotic signaling in response to cellular damage or alterations. This can result in the survival, growth and proliferation of cells with oncogenic features. Clearly, proper maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) homeostasis and dynamics including its links with the mitochondrial network is essential to detect and eliminate altered cells with oncogenic features through the apoptotic pathway. Proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors exploit the central role of Ca(2+) signaling by targeting the IP3R. There are an increasing number of reports showing that activation of proto-oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressors directly affects IP3R function and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) homeostasis, thereby decreasing mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on the proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors identified as IP3R-regulatory proteins and how they affect endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) homeostasis and dynamics.

  8. Dengue virus 2 American-Asian genotype identified during the 2006/2007 outbreak in Piauí, Brazil reveals a Caribbean route of introduction and dissemination of dengue virus in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Sakamoto, Tetsu; Leomil Coelho, Luiz Felipe; de Oliveira Rocha, Eliseu Soares; Gomes Cota, Marcela Menezes; Ferreira, Gustavo Portela; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most widespread arthropod-borne virus, and the number and severity of outbreaks has increased worldwide in recent decades. Dengue is caused by DENV-1, DENV- 2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 which are genetically distant. The species has been subdivided into genotypes based on phylogenetic studies. DENV-2, which was isolated from dengue fever patients during an outbreak in Piaui, Brazil in 2006/2007 was analyzed by sequencing the envelope (E) gene. The results indicated a high similarity among the isolated viruses, as well as to other DENV-2 from Brazil, Central America and South America. A phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis based on DENV-2E gene sequences revealed that these viruses are grouped together with viruses of the American-Asian genotype in two distinct lineages. Our results demonstrate the co-circulation of two American-Asian genotype lineages in northeast Brazil. Moreover, we reveal that DENV-2 lineage 2 was detected in Piauí before it disseminated to other Brazilian states and South American countries, indicating the existence of a new dissemination route that has not been previously described.

  9. Determination of somatic oncogenic mutations linked to target-based therapies using MassARRAY technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca-Cardeñosa, Marta J.; Mongort, Cristina; Alonso, Elisa; Navarro, Samuel; Burgues, Octavio; Vivancos, Ana; Cejalvo, Juan Miguel; Perez-Fidalgo, José Alejandro; Roselló, Susana; Ribas, Gloria; Cervantes, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutation analysis represents a useful tool in selecting personalized therapy. The aim of our study was to determine the presence of common genetic events affecting actionable oncogenes using a MassARRAY technology in patients with advanced solid tumors who were potential candidates for target-based therapies. The analysis of 238 mutations across 19 oncogenes was performed in 197 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of different tumors using the OncoCarta Panel v1.0 (Sequenom Hamburg, Germany). Of the 197 specimens, 97 (49.2%) presented at least one mutation. Forty-nine different oncogenic mutations in 16 genes were detected. Mutations in KRAS and PIK3CA were detected in 40/97 (41.2%) and 30/97 (30.9%) patients respectively. Thirty-one patients (32.0%) had mutations in two genes, 20 of them (64.5%) initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The co-occurrence of mutation involved mainly KRAS, PIK3CA, KIT and RET. Mutation profiles were validated using a customized panel and the Junior Next-Generation Sequencing technology (GS-Junior 454, Roche). Twenty-eight patients participated in early clinical trials or received specific treatments according to the molecular characterization (28.0%). MassARRAY technology is a rapid and effective method for identifying key cancer-driving mutations across a large number of samples, which allows for a more appropriate selection for personalized therapies. PMID:26968814

  10. A posttranslational modification cascade involving p38, Tip60, and PRAK mediates oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Seit-Nebi, Alim; Han, Xuemei; Aslanian, Aaron; Tat, John; Liao, Rong; Yates, John R; Sun, Peiqing

    2013-06-06

    Oncogene-induced senescence is an important tumor-suppressing defense mechanism. However, relatively little is known about the signaling pathway mediating the senescence response. Here, we demonstrate that a multifunctional acetyltransferase, Tip60, plays an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Further investigation reveals a cascade of posttranslational modifications involving p38, Tip60, and PRAK, three proteins that are essential for ras-induced senescence. Upon activation by ras, p38 induces the acetyltransferase activity of Tip60 through phosphorylation of Thr158; activated Tip60 in turn directly interacts with and induces the protein kinase activity of PRAK through acetylation of K364 in a manner that depends on phosphorylation of both Tip60 and PRAK by p38. These posttranslational modifications are critical for the prosenescent function of Tip60 and PRAK, respectively. These results have defined a signaling pathway that mediates oncogene-induced senescence, and identified posttranslational modifications that regulate the enzymatic activity and biological functions of Tip60 and PRAK.

  11. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Ebola virus and Marburg virus By Mayo Clinic Staff Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic ... Africa, where sporadic outbreaks have occurred for decades. Ebola virus and Marburg virus live in animal hosts, ...

  12. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that ... Africa, where sporadic outbreaks have occurred for decades. Ebola virus and Marburg virus live in animal hosts, ...

  13. Immortalized cells and one oncogene in malignant transformation: old insights on new explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Nearly thirty years ago, it was first shown that malignant transformation with single oncogene necessarily requires the immortal state of the cell. From that time this thesis for the cells of human origin was not disproved. The basic point which we want to focus on by this short communication is the correct interpretation of the results obtained on the widely used human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Results Intensive literature analysis revealed an increasing number of recent studies discovering new oncogenes with non-overlapping functions. Since the 1970s, dozens of oncogenes have been identified in human cancer. Cultured cell lines are often used as model systems in these experiments. In some investigations the results obtained on such cells are interpreted by the authors as a malignant transformation of normal animal or even normal human cells (as for example with HEK293 cells). However, when a cell line gains the ability to undergo continuous cell division, the cells are not normal any more, they are immortalized cells. Nevertheless, the authors consider these cells as normal human ones, what is basically incorrect. Moreover, it was early demonstrated that the widely used human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells have a relationship to neurons. Conclusions Thus, the experiments with established cell lines reinforce the notion that immortality is an essential requirement for malignant transformation that cooperates with other oncogenic changes to program the neoplastic state and substances under such investigation should be interpreted as factors which do not malignantly transform normal cells alone, but possess the ability to enhance the tumorigenic potential of already immortalized cells. PMID:21605454

  14. Identification of transforming hepatitis B virus S gene nonsense mutations derived from freely replicative viruses in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Feng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The correlation between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been well-established. But the roles of viral factor remain uncertain. Only HBV X gene and nonsense mutations of S gene (C-terminal truncation of HBV surface protein have been demonstrated to have transforming activity. Whether they play a significant role in hepatocarcinogenesis is still uncertain. METHODS: Twenty-five HBV-related HCC patients were positive for hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg in the cancerous parts of their HCC liver tissues by immunohistochemistry studies, and had available tissue for whole HBV genome sequence analysis. The results were compared with 25 gender and age-matched HBcAg negative HCCs. Plasmids encoding HBV S gene nonsense mutations identified from HBcAg (+ HCC tissue were constructed to investigate their cell proliferation, transformation activity and the oncogenic potentials by xenograft study and in vivo migration assay. RESULTS: HBcAg (+ HCC patients were significantly associated with cirrhosis and small tumor size (≦2 cm when compared with HBcAg (- HCC patients. Southern blot analyses revealed freely replicative forms of HBV in the cancerous parts of HBcAg(+ HCC. Three nonsense mutations of S gene (sL95*, sW182*, and sL216* were identified in the HBcAg(+ HCC tumor tissues. sW182* and sL216* were recurrently found in the 25 HBcAg (- HCC tumor tissue, too. Functional studies of the above 3 non-sense mutations all demonstrated higher cell proliferation activities and transformation abilities than wild type S, especially sW182*. Tumorigenicity analysis by xenograft experiments and in vitro migration assay showed potent oncogenic activity of sW182* mutant. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated potent oncogenic activity of nonsense mutations of HBV S gene, suggesting they may play an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  15. Lentivirus-Mediated Oncogene Introduction into Mammary Cells In Vivo Induces Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K. Siwko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the introduction of oncogene-expressing avian retroviruses into somatic mammary cells in mice susceptible to infection by transgenic expression of tva, encoding the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis-sarcoma virus (ALSV. Because ALSV-based vectors poorly infect nondividing cells, they are inadequate for studying carcinogenesis initiated from nonproliferative cells (e.g., stem cells. Lentivirus pseudotyped with the envelope protein of ALSV infects nondividing TVA-producing cells in culture but has not previously been tested for introducing genes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that these vectors infected mammary cells in vivo when injected into the mammary ductal lumen of mice expressing tva under the control of the keratin 19 promoter. Furthermore, intraductal injection of this lentiviral vector carrying the polyoma middle T antigen gene induced atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ-like premalignant lesions in 30 days and palpable invasive tumors at a median latency of 3.3 months. Induced tumors were a mixed epithelial/myoepithelial histologic diagnosis, occasionally displayed squamous metaplasia, and were estrogen receptor-negative. This work demonstrates the first use of a lentiviral vector to introduce oncogenes for modeling cancer in mice, and this vector system may be especially suitable for introducing genetic alterations into quiescent cells in vivo.

  16. Use of Household Cluster Investigations to Identify Factors Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection and Frequency of Case Reporting in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Danielle; Roth, Nicole M.; Caraballo, Elba V.; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Rivera, Aidsa; Pérez-Padilla, Janice; Rivera Garcia, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes and is the cause of an acute febrile illness characterized by potentially debilitating arthralgia. After emerging in the Caribbean in late 2013, the first locally-acquired case reported to public health authorities in Puerto Rico occurred in May 2014. During June–August 2014, household-based cluster investigations were conducted to identify factors associated with infection, development of disease, and case reporting. Methodology/Principal Findings Residents of households within a 50-meter radius of the residence of laboratory-positive chikungunya cases that had been reported to Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) were offered participation in the investigation. Participants provided a serum specimen and answered a questionnaire that collected information on demographic factors, household characteristics, recent illnesses, healthcare seeking behaviors, and clinical diagnoses. Current CHIKV infection was identified by rRT-PCR, and recent CHIKV infection was defined by detection of either anti-CHIKV IgM or IgG antibody. Among 250 participants, 74 (30%) had evidence of CHIKV infection, including 12 (5%) with current and 62 (25%) with recent CHIKV infection. All specimens from patients with CHIKV infection that were collected within four days, two weeks, and three weeks of illness onset were positive by RT-PCR, IgM ELISA, and IgG ELISA, respectively. Reporting an acute illness in the prior three months was strongly associated with CHIKV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 21.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.24–50.3). Use of air conditioning (aOR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.3–0.9) and citronella candles (aOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.1–0.9) were associated with protection from CHIKV infection. Multivariable analysis indicated that arthralgia (aOR = 51.8, 95% CI = 3.8–700.8) and skin rash (aOR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.4–84.7) were strongly associated with CHIKV infection. Hierarchical cluster

  17. Use of Household Cluster Investigations to Identify Factors Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection and Frequency of Case Reporting in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Danielle; Roth, Nicole M; Caraballo, Elba V; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Rivera, Aidsa; Pérez-Padilla, Janice; Rivera Garcia, Brenda; Sharp, Tyler M

    2016-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes and is the cause of an acute febrile illness characterized by potentially debilitating arthralgia. After emerging in the Caribbean in late 2013, the first locally-acquired case reported to public health authorities in Puerto Rico occurred in May 2014. During June-August 2014, household-based cluster investigations were conducted to identify factors associated with infection, development of disease, and case reporting. Residents of households within a 50-meter radius of the residence of laboratory-positive chikungunya cases that had been reported to Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH) were offered participation in the investigation. Participants provided a serum specimen and answered a questionnaire that collected information on demographic factors, household characteristics, recent illnesses, healthcare seeking behaviors, and clinical diagnoses. Current CHIKV infection was identified by rRT-PCR, and recent CHIKV infection was defined by detection of either anti-CHIKV IgM or IgG antibody. Among 250 participants, 74 (30%) had evidence of CHIKV infection, including 12 (5%) with current and 62 (25%) with recent CHIKV infection. All specimens from patients with CHIKV infection that were collected within four days, two weeks, and three weeks of illness onset were positive by RT-PCR, IgM ELISA, and IgG ELISA, respectively. Reporting an acute illness in the prior three months was strongly associated with CHIKV infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 21.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.24-50.3). Use of air conditioning (aOR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9) and citronella candles (aOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.1-0.9) were associated with protection from CHIKV infection. Multivariable analysis indicated that arthralgia (aOR = 51.8, 95% CI = 3.8-700.8) and skin rash (aOR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.4-84.7) were strongly associated with CHIKV infection. Hierarchical cluster analysis of signs and symptoms reported by CHIKV

  18. Identification of cellular targets for the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes by RNA interference and transcriptome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuner, Ruprecht; Vogt, Markus; Sultmann, Holger; Buness, Andreas; Dymalla, Susanne; Bulkescher, Julia; Fellmann, Mark; Butz, Karin; Poustka, Annemarie; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2007-11-01

    Specific types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cervical cancer, the second most common tumor in women worldwide. Both cellular transformation and the maintenance of the oncogenic phenotype of HPV-positive tumor cells are linked to the expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. To identify downstream cellular target genes for the viral oncogenes, we silenced endogenous E6 and E7 expression in HPV-positive HeLa cells by RNA interference (RNAi). Subsequently, we assessed changes of the cellular transcriptome by genome-wide microarray analysis. We identified 648 genes, which were either downregulated (360 genes) or upregulated (288 genes), upon inhibition of E6/E7 expression. A large fraction of these genes is involved in tumor-relevant processes, such as apoptosis control, cell cycle regulation, or spindle formation. Others may represent novel cellular targets for the HPV oncogenes, such as a large group of C-MYC-associated genes involved in RNA processing and splicing. Comparison with published microarray data revealed a substantial concordance between the genes repressed by RNAi-mediated E6/E7 silencing in HeLa cells and genes reported to be upregulated in HPV-positive cervical cancer biopsies.

  19. Quantitative iTRAQ LC-MS/MS Proteomics Reveals the Proteome Profiles of DF-1 Cells after Infection with Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors and has caused severe economic losses in China. To improve our understanding of the host cellular responses to virus infection and the pathogenesis of ALV-J infection, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ labeling coupled with multidimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to detect the protein changes in DF-1 cells infected and mock-infected with ALV-J. A total of 75 cellular proteins were significantly changed, including 33 upregulated proteins and 42 downregulated proteins. The reliability of iTRAQ-LC MS/MS was confirmed via real-time PCR. Most of these proteins were related to the physiological functions of metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, responses to stimuli, protein binding, signal transduction, cell cytoskeleton, and so forth. We also found some proteins that play important roles in apoptosis and oncogenicity. The differentially expressed proteins identified may provide valuable information to elucidate the pathogenesis of virus infection and virus-host interactions.

  20. Molecular Interactions of High Energy Fuels and Jet Fuels with Oncogenic Viruses and Endogenous Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    induced both PeSV and PeL7 synthesis in the ap- parent non-producer human cells and 2) whether feline oncornavirmu- associated cell membrane antigen...USSR ACAD. MED. SCI/IEP&T - MOSCOW Eds. B.A. LAPI14 & D.S. YOHN. 1980. 121 Eds.B.A.LAPI & DS YHN. 980 ; i Table 1 MDI enhanced S- PeSV and NLV

  1. G.I.S. Surveillance of Chronic Non-occupational Exposure to Heavy Metals as Oncogenic Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vlad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The potential oncogenic effect of some heavy metals in people occupationally and non-occupationally exposed to such heavy metals is already well demonstrated. This study seeks to clarify the potential role of these heavy metals in the living environment, in this case in non-occupational multifactorial aetiology of malignancies in the inhabitants of areas with increased prevalent environmental levels of heavy metals. Methods: Using a multidisciplinary approach throughout a complex epidemiological study, we investigated the potential oncogenic role of non-occupational environmental exposure to some heavy metals [chrome (Cr, nickel (Ni, copper (Cu, zinc (Zn, cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb and arsenic (As—in soil, drinking water, and food, as significant components of the environment] in populations living in areas with different environmental levels (high vs. low of the above-mentioned heavy metals. The exposures were evaluated by identifying the exposed populations, the critical elements of the ecosystems, and as according to the means of identifying the types of exposure. The results were interpreted both epidemiologically (causal inference, statistical significance, mathematical modelling and by using a GIS approach, which enabled indirect surveillance of oncogenic risks in each population. Results: The exposure to the investigated heavy metals provides significant risk factors of cancer in exposed populations, in both urban and rural areas [χ² test (p < 0.05]. The GIS approach enables indirect surveillance of oncogenic risk in populations. Conclusions: The role of non-occupational environmental exposure to some heavy metals in daily life is among the more significant oncogenic risk factors in exposed populations. The statistically significant associations between environmental exposure to such heavy metals and frequency of neoplasia in exposed populations become obvious when demonstrated on maps using the GIS system. Environmental

  2. Robust full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 2a and 2b infectious cultures using mutations identified by a systematic approach applicable to patient strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M;

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, but treatment options are limited. Basic HCV research required for vaccine and drug development has been hampered by inability to culture patient isolates, and to date only the JFH1 (genotype 2a) recombinant...... replicates spontaneously in hepatoma cells and releases infectious virus. A JFH1 chimera with the 5' end through NS2 from another genotype 2a strain, J6, had enhanced infectivity. However, the full-length J6 clone (J6CF), which we previously found to be fully functional in vivo, was replication incompetent...... of the genetically divergent isolate J8 (genotype 2b), which differed from the J6 nucleotide sequence by 24%. The most efficient recombinant, J8cc, had nine adaptive mutations and was genetically stable after viral passage. The availability of these robust JFH1-independent genotype 2a and 2b culture systems...

  3. Phospho-Network Analysis Identifies and Quantifies Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Proteins Regulating Viral-mediated Tumor Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Nu T.; Liu, Natalie M.; VU, JAMES Q; PATEL, DARSHIL; COHN, WHITAKER; CAPRI, JOE; ZIEGLER, MARY; Patel, Nikita; Tramontano, Angela; Williams, Roger; Whitelegge, Julian; French, Samuel W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at risk of serious complications of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Mass spectrometry (MS) is a versatile methodology that produces a global proteomic landscape for analysis of cancer mechanisms. Materials and Methods: Using multiplex peptide stable isotopic labeling and immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), we enriched and quantified the phosphoproteome of HCC, with and without HCV. While raw da...

  4. A set of host proteins interacting with papaya ringspot virus NIa-Pro protein identified in a yeast two-hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2012-01-01

    The protein-protein interactions between viral and host proteins play an essential role in plant virus infection and host defense. The potyviral nuclear inclusion protein a protease (NIa-Pro) is involved in various steps of viral infection. In this study, the host proteins interacting with papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) NIa-Pro were screened in a Carica papaya L. plant cDNA library using a Sos recruitment two-hybrid system (SRS). We confirmed that the full-length EIF3G, FBPA1, FK506BP, GTPBP, MSRB1, and MTL from papaya can interact specifically with PRSV NIa-Pro in yeast, respectively. These proteins fufill important functions in plant protein translation, biotic and abiotic stress, energy metabolism and signal transduction. In this paper, we discuss possible functions of interactions between these host proteins and NIa-Pro in PRSV infection and their role in host defense. Sos recruitment two-hybrid system; papaya ringspot virus; NIa-Pro; protein-protein interaction.

  5. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  6. Integrated transcript and genome analyses reveal NKX2-1 and MEF2C as potential oncogenes in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homminga, Irene; Pieters, Rob; Langerak, Anton W; de Rooi, Johan J; Stubbs, Andrew; Verstegen, Monique; Vuerhard, Maartje; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica; Kooi, Clarissa; Klous, Petra; van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Verhaaf, Brenda; Beverloo, H Berna; Horstmann, Martin; de Haas, Valerie; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Staal, Frank J T; de Laat, Wouter; Soulier, Jean; Sigaux, Francois; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2011-04-12

    To identify oncogenic pathways in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we combined expression profiling of 117 pediatric patient samples and detailed molecular-cytogenetic analyses including the Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C) method. Two T-ALL subtypes were identified that lacked rearrangements of known oncogenes. One subtype associated with cortical arrest, expression of cell cycle genes, and ectopic NKX2-1 or NKX2-2 expression for which rearrangements were identified. The second subtype associated with immature T cell development and high expression of the MEF2C transcription factor as consequence of rearrangements of MEF2C, transcription factors that target MEF2C, or MEF2C-associated cofactors. We propose NKX2-1, NKX2-2, and MEF2C as T-ALL oncogenes that are activated by various rearrangements.

  7. The impact of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV; types 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle vaccine on infection and disease due to oncogenic nonvaccine HPV types in generally HPV-naive women aged 16-26 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Darron R; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine reduces the risk of HPV-6/11/16/18-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1-3 or adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS). Here, its impact on CIN1-3/AIS associated with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types was evaluated. METHODS: We enrolled 17...... types on day 1. Prespecified analyses included infection of 6 months' duration and CIN1-3/AIS due to the 2 and 5 most common HPV types in cervical cancer after HPV types 16 and 18, as well as all tested nonvaccine types. RESULTS: Vaccination reduced the incidence of HPV-31/45 infection by 40.3% (95......% confidence interval [CI], 13.9% to 59.0%) and of CIN1-3/AIS by 43.6% (95% CI, 12.9% to 64.1%), respectively. The reduction in HPV-31/33/45/52/58 infection and CIN1-3/AIS was 25.0% (95% CI, 5.0% to 40.9%) and 29.2% (95% CI, 8.3% to 45.5%), respectively. Efficacy for CIN2-3/AIS associated with the 10...

  8. Oncogene-mediated transformation of fetal rat colon in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pories, S; Jaros, K; Steele, G; Pauley, A; Summerhayes, I C

    1992-05-01

    Short-term maintenance of fetal rat colonic tissue in vitro has been demonstrated using a collagen matrix organ culture system. The introduction of single (v-myc, v-rasH, v-src) oncogenes or combinations of oncogenes (v-myc/rasH, v-myc/src) into normal colon mucosal elements was established using retroviral vectors, resulting in enhanced proliferation and migration of epithelial cells from the lumen of tissue implants. Expression of a single oncogene in normal colon epithelium did not result in the establishment of cell lines. In contrast, expression of cooperating oncogenic elements resulted in cell lines in greater than 80% of experiments, revealing different morphological characteristics dependent upon the oncogene combination used. Confirmation of the expression of viral transcripts was determined using Northern blot analysis and viral oncoprotein expression using Western blot analysis (p21) and an immunoprecipitation kinase assay (src). Expression of keratin filaments was lost following passaging of cell lines but could be induced by the myc/ras transformants by growth on Rat-1 feeder layers. This induction phenomenon was not observed with myc/src lines, and although these expressed high levels of sucrase isomaltase the epithelial origin of these cells is unclear. Karyotypic analysis performed on three myc/ras-transformed cell lines revealed a normal chromosome complement associated with transformation. In this report we describe a novel in vitro transformation system for normal rat colonic epithelium mediated by the introduction of oncogene elements using different retroviral vector constructs. The potential to generate cell lines representing different stages of neoplastic progression using relevant genetic components presents significant advantages for the study of cellular and molecular interactions underlying colon neoplastic progression.

  9. Proteomic investigation in A549 lung cell line stably infected by HPV16E6/E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, Marco; Marzano, Valeria; Giuliani, Laura; Nuccetelli, Marzia; D'Aguanno, Simona; Azzimonti, Barbara; Bernardini, Sergio; Perno, Carlo Federico; Urbani, Andrea; Favalli, Cartesio; Federici, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Data have accumulated implicating the involvement of oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in bronchial carcinogenesis. We recently described the presence of oncogenic HPV transcripts in non-small cell lung cancers. To investigate the role of oncogenic HPVs in lung carcinogenesis. The lung cell line A549 stably infected with HPV16E6, HPV16E7 and HPVE6/E7 constructs was used to investigate the protein profile changes associated with the expression of these oncogenes. Replicated two-dimensional gel electrophoresis gels from uninfected and stably HPV16E6-, E7-, and E6/E7-infected A549 cells were compared for changes in protein profile. Protein identification was achieved by peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-TOF-MS and nLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS peptide ladder sequencing. We identified 17 different polypeptides whose average normalized spot intensity was statistically significant (p < 0.05) and differed by 2-fold. Relationships between differentially expressed proteins and the HPV-induced infection mechanism have been clustered by knowledge-base database functional association network analysis. The impact of Hsp27, annexin III, annexin IV, Gp96 and TPT1 on the cellular response mechanism to HPV infection is presented and discussed. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Targeting oncogene expression to endothelial cells induces proliferation of the myelo-erythroid lineage by repressing the Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghisi, E; Distel, M; Malagola, M; Anelli, V; Santoriello, C; Herwig, L; Krudewig, A; Henkel, C V; Russo, D; Mione, M C

    2013-11-01

    Human oncogenes involved in the development of hematological malignancies have been widely used to model experimental leukemia. However, models of myeloid leukemia rarely reproduce the human disease in full, due to genetic complexity or to difficulties in targeting leukemia initiating cells. Here, we used a zebrafish genetic model to induce the expression of oncogenic RAS in endothelial cells, including the hemogenic endothelium of the dorsal aorta that generates hematopoietic cells, and observed the development of a myelo-erythroid proliferative disorder. In larvae, the phenotype is characterized by disruption of the vascular system and prominent expansion of the caudal hematopoietic tissue. In few surviving juveniles, increased number of immature hematopoietic cells and arrest of myeloid maturation was found in kidney marrow. Peripheral blood showed increased erythroblasts and myeloid progenitors. We found that the abnormal phenotype is associated with a downregulation of the Notch pathway, whereas overexpressing an activated form of Notch together with the oncogene prevents the expansion of the myelo-erythroid compartment. This study identifies the downregulation of the Notch pathway following an oncogenic event in the hemogenic endothelium as an important step in the pathogenesis of myelo-erythroid disorders and describes a number of potential effectors of this transformation.

  11. Integrated transcript and genome analyses reveal NKX2-1 and MEF2C as potential oncogenes in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homminga, I.; Pieters, R.; Langerak, A.W.; de Rooi, J.J.; Stubbs, A.; Verstegen, M.; Vuerhard, M.; Buijs-Gladdines, J.; Kooi, C.; Klous, P.; van Vlierberghe, P.; Ferrando, A.A.; Cayuela, J.M.; Verhaaf, B.; Beverloo, H.B.; Horstmann, M.; de Haas, V.; Wiekmeijer, A.S.; Pike-Overzet, K.; Staal, F.J.; de Laat, W.; Soulier, J.; Sigaux, F.; Meijerink, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    To identify oncogenic pathways in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we combined expression profiling of 117 pediatric patient samples and detailed molecular-cytogenetic analyses including the Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C) method. Two T-ALL subtypes were identified that lack

  12. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Vishwamitra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase–expressing (NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5(p23;q35 that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  13. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  14. Sequence variation of the glycoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages within field isolates of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, A.; Bascuro, B.; Monnier, A.F.; Vende, P.; Winton, J.R.; de Kinkelin, P.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the genetic diversity of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), the sequence of the glycoprotein genes (G) of 11 North American and European isolates were determined. Comparison with the G protein of representative members of the family Rhabdoviridae suggested that VHSV was a different virus species from infectious haemorrhagic necrosis virus (IHNV) and Hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV). At a higher taxonomic level, VHSV, IHNV and HIRRV formed a group which was genetically closest to the genus Lyssavirus. Compared with each other, the G genes of VHSV displayed a dissimilar overall genetic diversity which correlated with differences in geographical origin. The multiple sequence alignment of the complete G protein, showed that the divergent positions were not uniformly distributed along the sequence. A central region (amino acid position 245-300) accumulated substitutions and appeared to be highly variable. The genetic heterogeneity within a single isolate was high, with an apparent internal mutation frequency of 1.2 x 10(-3) per nucleotide site, attesting the quasispecies nature of the viral population. The phylogeny separated VHSV strains according to the major geographical area of isolation: genotype I for continental Europe, genotype II for the British Isles, and genotype III for North America. Isolates from continental Europe exhibited the highest genetic variability, with sub-groups correlated partially with the serological classification. Neither neutralizing polyclonal sera, nor monoclonal antibodies, were able to discriminate between the genotypes. The overall structure of the phylogenetic tree suggests that VHSV genetic diversity and evolution fit within the model of random change and positive selection operating on quasispecies.

  15. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Identifies an Important Role of the TaRSR1 Transcription Factor in Starch Synthesis in Bread Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The function of a wheat starch regulator 1 (TaRSR1 in regulating the synthesis of grain storage starch was determined using the barley stripe mosaic virus—virus induced gene-silencing (BSMV-VIGS method in field experiments. Chlorotic stripes appeared on the wheat spikes infected with barley stripe mosaic virus-virus induced gene-silencing- wheat starch regulator 1 (BSMV-VIGS-TaRSR1 at 15 days after anthesis, at which time the transcription levels of the TaRSR1 gene significantly decreased. Quantitative real-time PCR was also used to measure the transcription levels of 26 starch synthesis-related enzyme genes in the grains of BSMV-VIGS-TaRSR1-silenced wheat plants at 20, 27, and 31 days after anthesis. The results showed that the transcription levels of some starch synthesis-related enzyme genes were markedly induced at different sampling time points: TaSSI, TaSSIV, TaBEIII, TaISA1, TaISA3, TaPHOL, and TaDPE1 genes were induced at each of the three sampling time points and TaAGPS1-b, TaAGPL1, TaAGPL2, TaSSIIb, TaSSIIc, TaSSIIIb, TaBEI, TaBEIIa, TaBEIIb, TaISA2, TaPHOH, and TaDPE2 genes were induced at one sampling time point. Moreover, both the grain starch contents, one thousand kernel weights, grain length and width of BSMV-VIGS-TaRSR1-infected wheat plants significantly increased. These results suggest that TaRSR1 acts as a negative regulator and plays an important role in starch synthesis in wheat grains by temporally regulating the expression of specific starch synthesis-related enzyme genes.

  16. Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus alters its pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co-cultivation of strain JM/102W of Marek’s disease virus (MDV) with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) resulted in the generation of a recombinant MDV containing REV long terminal repeat (LTR) named RM1 strain of MDV; a strain that was highly attenuated for oncogenicity, but induced severe bursal an...

  17. Comparison of a Monoclonal Antibody-Blocking Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay and a Strip Immunoblot Assay for Identifying Type-Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Serological Responses

    OpenAIRE

    van Doornum, G. J. J.; Slomka, M.J.; Buimer, M; Groen, J.; van den Hoek, J.A.R.; Cairo, I.; Vyse, A.; Brown, D. W G

    2000-01-01

    Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific antibodies by a monoclonal antibody (MAb)-blocking enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) was compared with detection by a strip immunoblot assay (SIA) in a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic population. The study population consisted of 1,683 genitourinary medicine clinic attendees (582 women and 1,101 men). Sera were tested for the presence of HSV-2 antibody by use of the blocking EIA, in which binding of the MAb AP-1 to HSV-2 glycop...

  18. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  19. Targeted tumor-penetrating siRNA nanocomplexes for credentialing the ovarian cancer oncogene ID4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yin; Cheung, Hiu Wing; von Maltzhan, Geoffrey; Agrawal, Amit; Cowley, Glenn S; Weir, Barbara A; Boehm, Jesse S; Tamayo, Pablo; Karst, Alison M; Liu, Joyce F; Hirsch, Michelle S; Mesirov, Jill P; Drapkin, Ronny; Root, David E; Lo, Justin; Fogal, Valentina; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Hahn, William C; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2012-08-15

    The comprehensive characterization of a large number of cancer genomes will eventually lead to a compendium of genetic alterations in specific cancers. Unfortunately, the number and complexity of identified alterations complicate endeavors to identify biologically relevant mutations critical for tumor maintenance because many of these targets are not amenable to manipulation by small molecules or antibodies. RNA interference provides a direct way to study putative cancer targets; however, specific delivery of therapeutics to the tumor parenchyma remains an intractable problem. We describe a platform for the discovery and initial validation of cancer targets, composed of a systematic effort to identify amplified and essential genes in human cancer cell lines and tumors partnered with a novel modular delivery technology. We developed a tumor-penetrating nanocomplex (TPN) that comprised small interfering RNA (siRNA) complexed with a tandem tumor-penetrating and membrane-translocating peptide, which enabled the specific delivery of siRNA deep into the tumor parenchyma. We used TPN in vivo to evaluate inhibitor of DNA binding 4 (ID4) as a novel oncogene. Treatment of ovarian tumor-bearing mice with ID4-specific TPN suppressed growth of established tumors and significantly improved survival. These observations not only credential ID4 as an oncogene in 32% of high-grade ovarian cancers but also provide a framework for the identification, validation, and understanding of potential therapeutic cancer targets.

  20. The mystery of oncogenic KRAS: Lessons from studying its wild-type counter part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-I; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; You, Xiaona; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-22

    Using conditional knock-in mouse models, we and others have shown that despite the very high sequence identity between Nras and Kras proteins, oncogenic Kras displays a much stronger leukemogenic activity than oncogenic Nras in vivo. In this manuscript, we will summarize our recent work of characterizing wild-type Kras function in adult hematopoiesis and in oncogenic Kras-induced leukemogenesis. We attribute the strong leukemogenic activity of oncogenic Kras to 2 unique aspects of Kras signaling. First, Kras is required in mediating cell type- and cytokine-specific ERK1/2 signaling. Second, oncogenic Kras, but not oncogenic Nras, induces hyperactivation of wild-type Ras, which significantly enhances Ras signaling in vivo. We will also discuss a possible mechanism that mediates oncogenic Kras-evoked hyperactivation of wild-type Ras and a potential approach to down-regulate oncogenic Kras signaling.

  1. Role of ets Oncogenes in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Mazabraud A. (1988). Cancer Kato J, Matsuoka M, Polyak K, Massague J and Sherr CJ. Genet. Cytogenet., 32, 229-238. (1994). Cell, 79, 487-496. Vairo G...Francisco LV , Roach JC, Argonza R, D, Weber BL and EI-Deiryh WS. (1998). Oncogene, 16, King MC and Ostrander EA. (1996). Human Mol. Genet., 1713-1721. 5

  2. Targeting MET Amplification as a New Oncogenic Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hisato [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okamoto, Isamu, E-mail: okamotoi@kokyu.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Okamoto, Wataru [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Division of Transrlational Research, Exploratory Oncology Research & Clinical Trial Center, National Cancer Center, 6-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8577 (Japan); Tanizaki, Junko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, HIM223, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Nishio, Kazuto [Department of Genome Biology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2014-07-22

    Certain genetically defined cancers are dependent on a single overactive oncogene for their proliferation and survival, a phenomenon known as “oncogene addiction”. A new generation of drugs that selectively target such “driver oncogenes” manifests a clinical efficacy greater than that of conventional chemotherapy in appropriate genetically defined patients. MET is a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced cancers as result of various genetic alterations including gene amplification, polysomy, and gene mutation. Our preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of MET signaling either with the small-molecule MET inhibitor crizotinib or by RNA interference targeted to MET mRNA resulted in marked antitumor effects in cancer cell lines with MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, patients with non-small cell lung cancer or gastric cancer positive for MET amplification have shown a pronounced clinical response to crizotinib. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence thus suggests that MET amplification is an “oncogenic driver” and therefore a valid target for treatment. However, the prevalence of MET amplification has not been fully determined, possibly in part because of the difficulty in evaluating gene amplification. In this review, we provide a rationale for targeting this genetic alteration in cancer therapy.

  3. c-Abl antagonizes the YAP oncogenic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, R; Adler, J; Ricardo Lax, I; Shanzer, M; Porat, Z; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-06-01

    YES-associated protein (YAP) is a central transcription coactivator that functions as an oncogene in a number of experimental systems. However, under DNA damage, YAP activates pro-apoptotic genes in conjunction with p73. This program switching is mediated by c-Abl (Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene) via phosphorylation of YAP at the Y357 residue (pY357). YAP as an oncogene coactivates the TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) family transcription factors. Here we asked whether c-Abl regulates the YAP-TEAD functional module. We found that DNA damage, through c-Abl activation, specifically depressed YAP-TEAD-induced transcription. Remarkably, c-Abl counteracts YAP-induced transformation by interfering with the YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. c-Abl induced TEAD1 phosphorylation, but the YAP-TEAD complex remained unaffected. In contrast, TEAD coactivation was compromised by phosphomimetic YAP Y357E mutation but not Y357F, as demonstrated at the level of reporter genes and endogenous TEAD target genes. Furthermore, YAP Y357E also severely compromised the role of YAP in cell transformation, migration, anchorage-independent growth, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human mammary MCF10A cells. These results suggest that YAP pY357 lost TEAD transcription activation function. Our results demonstrate that YAP pY357 inactivates YAP oncogenic function and establish a role for YAP Y357 phosphorylation in cell-fate decision.

  4. Targeting MET Amplification as a New Oncogenic Driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisato Kawakami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain genetically defined cancers are dependent on a single overactive oncogene for their proliferation and survival, a phenomenon known as “oncogene addiction”. A new generation of drugs that selectively target such “driver oncogenes” manifests a clinical efficacy greater than that of conventional chemotherapy in appropriate genetically defined patients. MET is a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced cancers as result of various genetic alterations including gene amplification, polysomy, and gene mutation. Our preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of MET signaling either with the small-molecule MET inhibitor crizotinib or by RNA interference targeted to MET mRNA resulted in marked antitumor effects in cancer cell lines with MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, patients with non-small cell lung cancer or gastric cancer positive for MET amplification have shown a pronounced clinical response to crizotinib. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence thus suggests that MET amplification is an “oncogenic driver” and therefore a valid target for treatment. However, the prevalence of MET amplification has not been fully determined, possibly in part because of the difficulty in evaluating gene amplification. In this review, we provide a rationale for targeting this genetic alteration in cancer therapy.

  5. A computational approach identifies two regions of Hepatitis C Virus E1 protein as interacting domains involved in viral fusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Roberto; Costantino, Angela; Tritarelli, Elena; Marcantonio, Cinzia; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Rapicetta, Maria; El Sawaf, Gamal; Giuliani, Alessandro; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita

    2009-07-29

    The E1 protein of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) can be dissected into two distinct hydrophobic regions: a central domain containing an hypothetical fusion peptide (FP), and a C-terminal domain (CT) comprising two segments, a pre-anchor and a trans-membrane (TM) region. In the currently accepted model of the viral fusion process, the FP and the TM regions are considered to be closely juxtaposed in the post-fusion structure and their physical interaction cannot be excluded. In the present study, we took advantage of the natural sequence variability present among HCV strains to test, by purely sequence-based computational tools, the hypothesis that in this virus the fusion process involves the physical interaction of the FP and CT regions of E1. Two computational approaches were applied. The first one is based on the co-evolution paradigm of interacting peptides and consequently on the correlation between the distance matrices generated by the sequence alignment method applied to FP and CT primary structures, respectively. In spite of the relatively low random genetic drift between genotypes, co-evolution analysis of sequences from five HCV genotypes revealed a greater correlation between the FP and CT domains than respect to a control HCV sequence from Core protein, so giving a clear, albeit still inconclusive, support to the physical interaction hypothesis.The second approach relies upon a non-linear signal analysis method widely used in protein science called Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA). This method allows for a direct comparison of domains for the presence of common hydrophobicity patterns, on which the physical interaction is based upon. RQA greatly strengthened the reliability of the hypothesis by the scoring of a lot of cross-recurrences between FP and CT peptides hydrophobicity patterning largely outnumbering chance expectations and pointing to putative interaction sites. Intriguingly, mutations in the CT region of E1, reducing the fusion process in

  6. Increased Levels of Plasma Epstein Barr Virus DNA Identify a Poor-Risk Subset of Patients With Advanced Stage Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Gru, Alejandro A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Bingman, Anissa K.; Hemminger, Jessica A.; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Discovering prognostic factors that simultaneously describe tumor characteristics and improve risk stratification is a priority in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). More than a third of advanced stage CTCL patients in this cohort had detectable cell free plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-DNA (pEBVd) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. An increased level of pEBVd was highly concordant with EBV (ie, Epstein–Barr virus RNAs) in tumor tissue and was associated with inferior survival. Introduction Outcomes in advanced stage (AS) cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are poor but with great variability. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Frequency of plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) detection, concordance with EBV RNA (EBER) in tumor tissue, codetection of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA (pCMVd), and prognostic effect in AS CTCL are unknown. Patients and Methods Patients (n = 46; 2006–2013) with AS CTCL (≥IIB) were retrospectively studied. pEBVd and pCMVd were longitudinally measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on tumor samples. Survival from time of diagnosis (ToD) and time of progression to AS was assessed. Results Plasma EBV-DNA and pCMVd were detected in 37% (17 of 46) and 17% (8 of 46) of AS CTCL patients, respectively. pCMVd detection was significantly more frequent in pEBVd-positive (pEBVd+) than pEBVd− patients (35% vs. 7%; P = .038). Tumor tissue for EBER-ISH was available in 14 of 17 pEBVd+ and 22 of 29 pEBVd− patients; 12 of 14 (85.7%) pEBVd+ patients were EBER+ versus 0 of 22 pEBVd− patients. Frequency of large cell transformation (LCT) tended to be greater in pEBVd+ patients, but was not significant (10 of 14 pEBVd+ vs. 10 of 23 pEBVd−; P = .17). No notable differences in rates of increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were observed (17 of 17 pEBVd+ vs. 27 of 29 pEBVd−). pEBVd detection was associated with

  7. Silencing of hpv16 e6 and e7 oncogenic activities by small interference rna induces autophagy and apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Salazar-León

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common form of death by cancer in women worldwide and has special attention for the development of new treatment strategies. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV persistent infection is the main etiological agent of this neoplasia, and the main cellular transformation mechanism is by disruption of p53 and pRb function by interaction with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins. This generates alterations in cellular differentiation and cellular death inhibition. Thus, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes represent suitable targets for the development of gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer. An attractive technology platform is developing for post-transcriptional selective silencing of gene expression, using small interference RNA. Therefore, in the present study, we used SiHa cells (HPV16+ transiently transfected with specific siRNA expression plasmids for HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. In this model we detected repression of E6 and E7 oncogene and oncoprotein expression, an increase in p53 and hypophosphorylated pRb isoform protein expression, and autophagy and apoptosis morphology features. These findings suggest that selective silencing of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes by siRNAs, has significant biological effects on the survival of human cancer cells and is a potential gene therapy strategy against cervical cancer.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Dependent Mutual Amplification between Netrin-1 and the Hepatitis C Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Plissonnier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is an oncogenic virus associated with the onset of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The present study investigated the possible link between HCV infection and Netrin-1, a ligand for dependence receptors that sustains tumorigenesis, in particular in inflammation-associated tumors. We show that Netrin-1 expression is significantly elevated in HCV+ liver biopsies compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV+ and uninfected samples. Furthermore, Netrin-1 was upregulated in all histological stages of HCV+ hepatic lesions, from minimal liver fibrosis to cirrhosis and HCC, compared to histologically matched HCV- tissues. Both cirrhosis and HCV contributed to the induction of Netrin-1 expression, whereas anti-HCV treatment resulted in a reduction of Netrin-1 expression. In vitro, HCV increased the level and translation of Netrin-1 in a NS5A-La-related protein 1 (LARP1-dependent fashion. Knockdown and forced expression experiments identified the receptor uncoordinated receptor-5 (UNC5A as an antagonist of the Netrin-1 signal, though it did not affect the death of HCV-infected cells. Netrin-1 enhanced infectivity of HCV particles and promoted viral entry by increasing the activation and decreasing the recycling of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a protein that is dysregulated in HCC. Netrin-1 and HCV are, therefore, reciprocal inducers in vitro and in patients, as seen from the increase in viral morphogenesis and viral entry, both phenomena converging toward an increase in the level of infectivity of HCV virions. This functional association involving a cancer-related virus and Netrin-1 argues for evaluating the implication of UNC5 receptor ligands in other oncogenic microbial species.

  9. Altered distribution of natural killer cell subsets identified by CD56, CD27 and CD70 in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanji, Kehmia; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; Mantegani, Paola; Fortis, Claudio; Berg, Louise; Kärre, Klas; Travi, Giovanna; Tassandin, Chiara; Lopalco, Lucia; Rethi, Bence; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chiodi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) (CD3− CD56+) cells can be divided into two functionally distinct subsets, CD3− CD56dim and CD3− CD56bright. We analysed the distribution of NK cell subsets in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection, to determine if HIV infection stage may influence the subset distribution. In primary infection, contrary to chronic infection, the CD3− CD56dim subset was expanded compared to healthy controls. We also studied the effect of antiretroviral therapy administered early in infection and found that NK cell subset distribution was partially restored after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy in primary infection, but not normalized. Recently, NK cells have been divided into CD27− and CD27+ subsets with different migratory and functional capacity and CD27-mediated NK cell activation has been described in mice. We therefore investigated whether CD27 and/or CD70 (CD27 ligand) expression on NK cells, and thus the distribution of these novel NK subsets, was altered in HIV-1-infected patients. We found up-regulated expression of both CD27 and CD70 on NK cells of patients, resulting in higher proportions of CD27high and CD70high NK cells, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in chronic infection. Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that the high interleukin-7 levels found during HIV-1 infection may participate in up-regulation of CD70 on NK cell subsets. Imbalance of NK cell subsets and up-regulated expression of CD27 and CD70 initiated early in HIV-1 infection may indicate NK cell activation and intrinsic defects initiated by HIV-1 to disarm the innate immune response to the virus. PMID:17627773

  10. The DNA damage checkpoint precedes activation of ARF in response to escalating oncogenic stress during tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, K; Bartkova, J; Kotsinas, A

    2013-01-01

    to various oncogenes showed that the delayed upregulation of ARF reflected a requirement for a higher, transcriptionally based threshold of oncogenic stress, elicited by at least two oncogenic ‘hits’, compared with lower activation threshold for DDR. We propose that relative to DDR activation, ARF provides...

  11. Immunotherapy against cancer-related viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 12% of all cancers worldwide are associated with viral infections. To date, eight viruses have been shown to contribute to the development of human cancers, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B and C viruses, and Human papilloma virus, among others. These DNA and RNA viruses produce oncogenic effects through distinct mechanisms. First, viruses may induce sustained disorders of host cell growth and survival through the genes they express, or may induce DNA damage response in host cells, which in turn increases host genome instability. Second, they may induce chronic inflammation and secondary tissue damage favoring the development of oncogenic processes in host cells. Viruses like HIV can create a more permissive environment for cancer development through immune inhibition, but we will focus on the previous two mechanisms in this review. Unlike traditional cancer therapies that cannot distinguish infected cells from non-infected cells, immunotherapies are uniquely equipped to target virus-associated malignancies. The targeting and functioning mechanisms associated with the immune response can be exploited to prevent viral infections by vaccination, and can also be used to treat infection before cancer establishment. Successes in using the immune system to eradicate established malignancy by selective recognition of virus-associated tumor cells are currently being reported. For example, numerous clinical trials of adoptive transfer of ex vivo generated virus-specific T cells have shown benefit even for established tumors in patients with EBV-associated malignancies. Additional studies in other virus-associated tumors have also been initiated and in this review we describe the current status of immunotherapy for virus-associated malignancies and discuss future prospects.

  12. Targeting oncogenic KRAS in non-small cell lung cancer cells by phenformin inhibits growth and angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Tumors require a vascular supply to grow and can achieve this via the expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors. Many potential oncogenic mutations have been identified in tumor angiogenesis. Somatic mutations in the small GTPase KRAS are the most common activating lesions found in human cancer, and are generally associated with poor response to standard therapies. Biguanides, such as the diabetes therapeutics metformin and phenformin, have demonstrated anti-tumor activity both in vitro and...

  13. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  14. Identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase break points and oncogenic mutation profiles in acral/mucosal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhou, Qi-Ming; Wang, Fang; Shao, Qiong; Guan, Yuan-Xiang; Wen, Xi-Zhi; Chen, Li-Zhen; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Li, Wei; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2013-09-01

    Acral and mucosal melanomas, the two most common subtypes of melanoma in China, exhibit different genetic alterations and biologic behavior compared with other subtypes of melanomas. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic alterations in patients with acral or mucosal melanomas in southern China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to assess the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) break points. Furthermore, a mass spectrometry-based genotyping platform was used to analyze 30 acral melanomas and 28 mucosal melanomas to profile 238 known somatic mutations in 19 oncogenes. ALK break points were identified in four acral cases (6.9%). Eight (13.8%) cases harbored BRAF mutations, six (10.3%) had NRAS mutations, four (6.9%) had KIT mutations, two (3.5%) had EGFR mutations, two (3.5%) had KRAS mutations, two (3.5%) had MET mutations, one (1.7%) had an HRAS mutation, and one (1.7%) had a PIK3CA mutation. Two cases exhibited co-occurring mutations, and one case with a BRAF mutation had a translocation in ALK. This study represents a comprehensive and concurrent analysis of the major recurrent oncogenic mutations involved in melanoma cases from southern China. These data have implications for both clinical trial designs and therapeutic strategies.

  15. Multiplex PCR to identify infant diarrhea common virus%多重PCR检测婴幼儿腹泻样本中常见病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丹; 罗历; 谭文; 班博; 沈化清; 陆学东

    2012-01-01

    Objective Preliminary understanding of the common viral pathogen distribution which caused the clinical infant acute diarrhea in Shenzhen;Providing the basis information support for clinical prevention and treatment. Methods Multiplex RT-PCR method for detection common virus: RV, AstV;NV, which caused acute diarrhea in infants. Clinical diarrhea specimens EAdV were screened by single PCR method. Results In the 440 specimens, 197 cases were detected at least a diarrhea virus infection, the total detection rate was 44.77% (197/440), of which 183 cases of a viral infection, 14 cases (3.18%) were mixed infections. Four kinds of diarrhea virus infection were RV 28.64% (126/440), EAdV 8.86% (39/440), NV 5.45% (24/440) and AstV 1.82% (8/440). Mixed infection with RV in combination with other viral infections was accounting for 92.86%. Conclusion RV, EAdV and NV are the major viral pathogens which caused the acute diarrhea in infants in Shenzhen, mixed infections with RV infection mainly in conjunction with other clinical pathogens. Clinical treatments should be based on the viral pathogens.%目的 初步了解深圳地区引起临床婴幼儿急性腹泻中常见病毒的病原分布情况,为临床防治提供依据.方法 采用多重RT-PCR方法检测婴幼儿急性腹泻常见病毒:轮状病毒(RV)、星状病毒(AstV)、诺如病毒(NV),采用单重PCR法筛查临床腹泻标本肠道腺病毒(EAdV).结果 在440份标本中,共检出197例至少感染一种腹泻病毒,总阳性率为44.77% (197/440),其中183例为一种病毒感染,14例(3.18%)为混合感染.4种腹泻病毒以RV感染为主,阳性率为28.64%(126/440);其次是EAdV,阳性率为8.86% (39/440);NV阳性率为5.45%(24/440);AstV阳性率为1.82%(8/440).混合感染以RV合并其他病毒感染为主,占92.86%.结论 RV、EAdV和NV是引起深圳地区婴幼儿急性腹泻的主要病毒致病原,混合感染以RV联合其他病毒感染为主,临床上应根据所感染病原体

  16. Integrated, genome-wide screening for hypomethylated oncogenes in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunbo; Sun, Wenyue; Tan, Marietta; Glazer, Chad A.; Bhan, Sheetal; Zhong, Xiaoli; Fakhry, Carole; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy that is poorly understood. In order to look for relevant oncogene candidates under the control of promoter methylation, an integrated, genome-wide screen was performed. Experimental Design Global demethylation of normal salivary gland cell strains using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza dC) and Trichostatin A (TSA), followed by expression array analysis was performed. ACC-specific expression profiling was generated using expression microarray analysis of primary ACC and normal samples. Next, the two profiles were integrated to identify a subset of genes for further validation of promoter demethylation in ACC versus normal. Finally, promising candidates were further validated for mRNA, protein, and promoter methylation levels in larger ACC cohorts. Functional validation was then performed in cancer cell lines. Results We found 159 genes that were significantly re-expressed after 5-Aza dC/TSA treatment and overexpressed in ACC. After initial validation, eight candidates showed hypomethylation in ACC: AQP1, CECR1, C1QR1, CTAG2, P53AIP1, TDRD12, BEX1, and DYNLT3. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) showed the most significant hypomethylation and was further validated. AQP1 hypomethylation in ACC was confirmed with two independent cohorts. Of note, there was significant overexpression of AQP1 in both mRNA and protein in the paraffin-embedded ACC cohort. Furthermore, AQP1 was up-regulated in 5-Aza dC/TSA treated SACC83. Lastly, AQP1 promoted cell proliferation and colony formation in SACC83. Conclusions Our integrated, genome-wide screening method proved to be an effective strategy for detecting novel oncogenes in ACC. AQP1 is a promising oncogene candidate for ACC and is transcriptionally regulated by promoter hypomethylation. PMID:21551254

  17. Characterization of ERAS, a putative novel human oncogene, in skin and breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Avalos, B.L. de la

    2014-07-01

    Most human tumors have mutations in genes of the RAS small GTPase protein family. RAS works as a molecular switch for signaling pathways that modulate many aspects of cell behavior, including proliferation, differentiation, motility and death. Oncogenic mutations in RAS prevent GTP hydrolysis, locking RAS in a permanently active state, being the most common mutations in HRAS, KRAS and NRAS. The human RAS family consists of at least 36 different genes, many of which have been scarcely studied. One of these relatively unknown genes is ERAS (ES cell-expressed RAS), which is a constitutively active RAS protein, localized in chromosome X and expressed only in embryonic cells, being undetectable in adult tissues. New high throughput technologies have made it possible to screen complete cancer genomes for identification of mutations associated to cancer. Using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system, ERAS was identified as a putative novel oncogene in non-melanoma skin and breast cancers. The major aim of this project is to determine the general characteristics of ERAS as a putative novel human oncogene in skin and breast cells. Forced expression of ERAS results in drastic changes in cell shape, proliferation and motility. When ERAS is overexpressed in skin and breast human cells it is mainly localized in the cytoplasmic membrane. ERAS activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. ERAS-expressing cells suffer spontaneous morphologic and phenotypic EMT-like changes, including cytoskeleton reorganization, vimentin and N-cadherin up-regulation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, which can be associated with increased malignancy, and invasive and metastatic potential. Our results suggest that inappropriate expression of ERAS lead to transformation of human cells. (Author)

  18. G-rich proto-oncogenes are targeted for genomic instability in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Michelle L; Huber, Michael D; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-03-15

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common lymphoid malignancy in adults. It is a heterogeneous disease with variability in outcome. Genomic instability of a subset of proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC, BCL6, RhoH, PIM1, and PAX5, can contribute to initial tumor development and has been correlated with poor prognosis and aggressive tumor growth. Lymphomas in which these proto-oncogenes are unstable derive from germinal center B cells that express activation-induced deaminase (AID), the B-cell-specific factor that deaminates DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification. Proto-oncogene instability is evident as both aberrant hypermutation and translocation, paralleling programmed instability which diversifies the immunoglobulin loci. We have asked if genomic sequence correlates with instability in AID-positive B-cell lymphomas. We show that instability does not correlate with enrichment of the WRC sequence motif that is the consensus for deamination by AID. Instability does correlate with G-richness, evident as multiple runs of the base guanine on the nontemplate DNA strand. Extending previous analysis of c-MYC, we show experimentally that transcription of BCL6 and RhoH induces formation of structures, G-loops, which contain single-stranded regions targeted by AID. We further show that G-richness does not characterize translocation breakpoints in AID-negative B- and T-cell malignancies. These results identify G-richness as one feature of genomic structure that can contribute to genomic instability in AID-positive B-cell malignancies.

  19. KAT6A, a Chromatin Modifier from the 8p11-p12 Amplicon is a Candidate Oncogene in Luminal Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Turner-Ivey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The chromosome 8p11-p12 amplicon is present in 12% to 15% of breast cancers, resulting in an increase in copy number and expression of several chromatin modifiers in these tumors, including KAT6A. Previous analyses in SUM-52 breast cancer cells showed amplification and overexpression of KAT6A, and subsequent RNAi screening identified KAT6A as a potential driving oncogene. KAT6A is a histone acetyltransferase previously identified as a fusion partner with CREB binding protein in acute myeloid leukemia. Knockdown of KAT6A in SUM-52 cells, a luminal breast cancer cell line harboring the amplicon, resulted in reduced growth rate compared to non-silencing controls and profound loss of clonogenic capacity both in mono-layer and in soft agar. The normal cell line MCF10A, however, did not exhibit slower growth with knockdown of KAT6A. SUM-52 cells with KAT6A knockdown formed fewer mammospheres in culture compared to controls, suggesting a possible role for KAT6A in self-renewal. Previous data from our laboratory identified FGFR2 as a driving oncogene in SUM-52 cells. The colony forming efficiency of SUM-52 KAT6A knockdown cells in the presence of FGFR inhibition was significantly reduced compared to cells with KAT6A knockdown only. These data suggest that KAT6A may be a novel oncogene in breast cancers bearing the 8p11-p12 amplicon. While there are other putative oncogenes in the amplicon, the identification of KAT6A as a driving oncogene suggests that chromatin-modifying enzymes are a key class of oncogenes in these cancers, and play an important role in the selection of this amplicon in luminal B breast cancers.

  20. High Risk Alpha Papillomavirus Oncogenes Impair the Homologous Recombination Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Khanal, Sujita; Robinson, Kristin L; Wendel, Sebastian O; Messer, Joshua J; Galloway, Denise A

    2017-08-02

    Persistent high risk genus α human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause nearly every cervical carcinoma and a subset of tumors in the oropharyngeal tract. During the decades required for HPV-associated tumorigenesis, the cellular genome becomes significantly destabilized. Our analysis of cervical tumors from 4 separate data sets found a significant upregulation of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway genes. The increased abundance of HR proteins can be replicated in primary cells by expression of the two HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) required for HPV-associated transformation. HPV E6 and E7 also enhanced the ability of HR proteins to form repair foci, yet both E6 and E7 reduce the ability of the HR pathway to complete double strand break (DSB) repair by about 50%. The HPV oncogenes hinder HR by allowing the process to begin at points in the cell cycle when the lack of a sister chromatid to serve as a homologous template prevents completion of the repair. Further, HPV E6 attenuates repair by causing RAD51 to be mislocalized away from both transient and persistent DSBs, while HPV E7 is only capable of impairing RAD51 localization to transient lesions. Finally, we show that the inability to robustly repair DSBs causes some of these lesions to be more persistent, a phenotype that correlates with increased integration of episomal DNA. Together these data support our hypothesis that HPV oncogenes contribute to the genomic instability observed in HPV-associated malignancies by attenuating the repair of damaged DNA.IMPORTANCE: This work expands the understanding of HPV biology, establishing a direct role for both HPV E6 and E7 in the destabilization of the host genome by blocking the homologous repair of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that both viral oncogenes were shown to disrupt this DSB repair pathway. We show that HPV E6 and E7 allow HR to initiate at an inappropriate part of the cell cycle. The mislocalization of RAD51 away from DSBs in cells

  1. DNA aneuploidy and integration of human papillomavirus type 16 e6/e7 oncogenes in intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsheimer, Peter; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Bastert, Gunther; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2004-05-01

    Increasingly deregulated expression of the E6-E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) has been identified as the major transforming factor in the pathogenesis of cervical dysplasia and derived cancers. The expression of these genes in epithelial stem cells first results in chromosomal instability and induces chromosomal aneuploidy. It is speculated that this subsequently favors integration of HR-HPV genomes into cellular chromosomes. This in turn leads to expression of viral cellular fusion transcripts and further enhanced expression of the E6-E7 oncoproteins. Chromosomal instability and aneuploidization thus seems to precede and favor integration of HR-HPV genomes. To prove this sequential concept, we analyzed here the sequence of events of DNA aneuploidization and integration in a series of HPV-16-positive cervical dysplastic lesions and carcinomas. Eighty-five punch biopsies of HPV-16-positive cervical lesions (20 CIN1/2, 50 CIN3, and 15 CxCa) were analyzed for DNA ploidy by DNA flow cytometry and for integration of HPV E6/E7 oncogenes using the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts assay, a reverse transcription-PCR method to detect integrate-derived human papillomavirus oncogene transcripts. DNA aneuploidy and viral genome integration were both associated with increasing dysplasia (P oncogene expression appears to result first in chromosomal instability and aneuploidization and is subsequently followed by integration of HR-HPV genomes in the affected cell clones.

  2. Coordinated activation of candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens via promoter demethylation in head and neck cancer and lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, however, proto-oncogenes activated by promoter demethylation have been sporadically reported. We used an integrative method to analyze expression in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and pharmacologically demethylated cell lines to identify aberrantly demethylated and expressed candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens in HNSCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We noted coordinated promoter demethylation and simultaneous transcriptional upregulation of proto-oncogene candidates with promoter homology, and phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters demonstrated potential recognition sites for the transcription factor BORIS. Aberrant BORIS expression correlated with upregulation of candidate proto-oncogenes in multiple human malignancies including primary non-small cell lung cancers and HNSCC, induced coordinated proto-oncogene specific promoter demethylation and expression in non-tumorigenic cells, and transformed NIH3T3 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coordinated, epigenetic unmasking of multiple genes with growth promoting activity occurs in aerodigestive cancers, and BORIS is implicated in the coordinated promoter demethylation and reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancers.

  3. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  4. Role of the ubiquitin system and tumor viruses in AIDS-related cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Julia; Pagano, Joseph S

    2007-11-22

    Tumor viruses are linked to approximately 20% of human malignancies worldwide. This review focuses on examples of human oncogenic viruses that manipulate the ubiquitin system in a subset of viral malignancies; those associated with AIDS. The viruses include Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human papilloma virus, which are causally linked to Kaposi's sarcoma, certain B-cell lymphomas and cervical cancer, respectively. We discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses subvert the ubiquitin system and potential viral targets for anti-cancer therapy from the perspective of this system. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com).

  5. Oncogenic mutation profiling in new lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam DC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available David CL Lam,1 Susan Y Luo,1 Wen Deng,2 Johnny SH Kwan,3 Jaime Rodriguez-Canales,4 Annie LM Cheung,5 Grace HW Cheng,6 Chi-Ho Lin,6 Ignacio I Wistuba,4 Pak C Sham,6 Thomas SK Wan,7 Sai-Wah Tsao5 1Department of Medicine, 2School of Nursing, 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 5Department of Anatomy, 6Center for Genome Sciences, 7Department of Pathology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Background: Thoracic tumor, especially lung cancer, ranks as the top cancer mortality in most parts of the world. Lung adenocarcinoma is the predominant subtype and there is increasing knowledge on therapeutic molecular targets, namely EGFR, ALK, KRAS, and ROS1, among lung cancers. Lung cancer cell lines established with known clinical characteristics and molecular profiling of oncogenic targets like ALK or KRAS could be useful tools for understanding the biology of known molecular targets as well as for drug testing and screening. Materials and methods: Five new cancer cell lines were established from pleural fluid or biopsy tissues obtained from Chinese patients with primary lung adenocarcinomas or malignant pleural mesothelioma. They were characterized by immunohistochemistry, growth kinetics, tests for tumorigenicity, EGFR and KRAS gene mutations, ALK gene rearrangement and OncoSeq mutation profiling. Results: These newly established lung adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma cell lines were maintained for over 100 passages and demonstrated morphological and immunohistochemical features as well as growth kinetics of tumor cell lines. One of these new cell lines bears EML4-ALK rearrangement variant 2, two lung cancer cell lines bear different KRAS mutations at codon 12, and known single nucleotide polymorphism variants were identified in these cell

  6. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Doggett

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib. Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo. chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that

  7. MECP2 Is a Frequently Amplified Oncogene with a Novel Epigenetic Mechanism That Mimics the Role of Activated RAS in Malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neupane, Manish; Clark, Allison P.; Landini, Serena;

    2016-01-01

    An unbiased genome-scale screen for unmutated genes that drive cancer growth when overexpressed identified methyl cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) binding protein 2 (MECP2) as a novel oncogene. MECP2 resides in a region of the X-chromosome that is significantly amplified across 18% of cancers,...

  8. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  9. Regulation of apoptosis by the papillomavirus E6 oncogene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Li; Li-Na Zhao; Zhi-Guo Liu; Ying Han; Dai-Ming Fan

    2005-01-01

    Infection with human papillomaviruses is strongly associated with the development of multiple cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV E6 gene is essential for the oncogenic potential of HPV.The recgulation of apoptosis by oncogene has been relatel to carcinogenesis closely; therefore, the modulation of E6 on cellular apoptosis has become a hot research topic recently. Inactivation of the pro-apoptotic tumor suppressor p53 by E6 is an important mechanism by which E6promotes cell growth; it is expected that inactivation of p53 by E6 should lead to a reduction in cellular apoptosis,numerous studies showed that E6 could in fact sensitize cells to apoptosis. The molecular basis for apoptosis modulation by E6 is poorly understood. In this article, we will present an overview of observations and current understanding of molecular basis for E6-induced apoptosis.

  10. Oncogenic osteomalacia presenting as bilateral stress fractures of the tibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Kenjirou; Ohnishi, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tohru [Department of Radiology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Tani, Haruo [Department of Internal Medicine III, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan); Uesugi, Keisuke [Department of Otolaryngology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan); Takagi, Masayuki [Department of Pathology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral stress fractures of the tibia who subsequently showed classic biochemical features of oncogenic osteomalacia. Conventional radiographs were normal. MR imaging revealed symmetric, bilateral, band-like low-signal lesions perpendicular to the medial cortex of the tibiae and corresponding to the only lesions subsequently seen on the bone scan. A maxillary sinus lesion was subsequently detected and surgically removed resulting in prompt alleviation of symptoms and normalization of hypophosphatemia and low 1,25-(OH){sub 2} vitamin D{sub 3}. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as a hemangiopericytoma-like tumor. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia may present with stress fractures limited to the tibia, as seen in athletes. The clue to the real diagnosis lies in paying close attention to the serum phosphate levels, especially in patients suffering generalized symptoms of weakness and not given to unusual physical activity. (orig.) With 4 figs., 6 refs.

  11. Tumour microvesicles contain retrotransposon elements and amplified oncogene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaj, Leonora; Lessard, Ryan; Dai, Lixin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells release an abundance of microvesicles containing a selected set of proteins and RNAs. Here, we show that tumour microvesicles also carry DNA, which reflects the genetic status of the tumour, including amplification of the oncogene c-Myc. We also find amplified c-Myc in serum microvesicles from tumour-bearing mice. Further, we find remarkably high levels of retrotransposon RNA transcripts, especially for some human endogenous retroviruses, such as LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposon elements, in tumour microvesicles and these transposable elements could be transferred to normal cells. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of tumour microvesicles to include: elevated levels of specific coding and non-coding RNA and DNA, mutated and amplified oncogene sequences and transposable elements. Thus, tumour microvesicles contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer. PMID:21285958

  12. Advances on Driver Oncogenes of Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei HONG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Next to adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the lung is the most frequent histologic subtype in non-small cell lung cancer. Several molecular alterations have been defined as "driver oncogenes" responsible for both the initiation and maintenance of the malignancy. The squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has recently shown peculiar molecular characteristics which relate with both carcinogenesis and response to targeted drugs. So far, about 40% of lung squamous cell carcinoma has been found harbouring driver oncogenes, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 plays important roles. In this review, we will report the mainly advances on some latest driver mutations of squamous cell lung cancer.

  13. Pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Huang, Po-Hsien; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2017-03-01

    The clear importance of mutated KRAS as a therapeutic target has driven the investigation of multiple approaches to inhibit oncogenic KRAS signaling at different molecular levels. However, no KRAS-targeted therapy has reached the clinic to date, which underlies the intrinsic difficulty in developing effective, direct inhibitors of KRAS. Thus, this article provides an overview of the history and recent progress in the development of pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS with small molecule agents. Mechanistically, these KRAS-targeted agents can be classified into the following four categories. (1) Small-molecule RAS-binding ligands that prevent RAS activation by binding within or outside the nucleotide-binding motif. (2) Inhibitors of KRAS membrane anchorage. (3) Inhibitors that bind to RAS-binding domains of RAS-effector proteins. (4) Inhibitors of KRAS expression. The advantage and limitation of each type of these anti-KRAS agents are discussed.

  14. A novel stop codon mutation in HBsAg gene identified in a hepatitis B virus strain associated with cryptogenic cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yang; Xiao-Peng Tang; Jian-Hua Lei; Hong-Yu Luo; Yong-Hong Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: HBsAg is the most important serological marker for acute or chronic hepatitis B. Nevertheless, there were reports of HBsAg-negative infection caused by hepatitis B virus in recent years. We had a patient with crytogenic cirrhosis who was negative for HBsAg, positive for anti-HBs and HBeAg.This paper was to explore the pathogenic and molecular basis of the unusual serological pattern.METHODS: HBV serologic markers were qualitatively and quantitatively determined. HBV DNA in serum was qualitatively tested using routine Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the viral level was determined with real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. HBsAg gene was amplified and cloned. Four clones were sequenced. The new genomic sequences were compared with GenBank on the DNA level as well as the protein level.RESULTS: The qualitative results of serological markers were HBsAg(-), anti-HBs(+), HBeAg(+), anti-HBe(-) and anti-HBc(+). The quantitative results of serological marker were HBsAg (S/N): 0.77 (cut off of S/N: ≥2.00), HBeAg (S/N): 56.43 (cut off S/N: ≥2.10), anti-HBc (S/Co): 2.03 (cut off of S/Co: ≤ 1.00). The viral level was as high as 1.54×109copies/ml. Sequencing of the HBsAg gene clones revealed a unique point mutation at nucleotide 336 (C to A), which resulted in a novel stop codon at aa 61. The novel HBsAg gene stop mutation had not been described.CONCLUSION: The lack of detection of HBsAg in the presence of high viral levels of replication may be caused by the existence of viral genomes harboring point mutations which resulted in stop codon upstream of the″a″ determinant in HBsAg gene.

  15. Oncogene activation in human benign tumors of the skin (keratoacanthomas): Is HRAS involved in differentiation as well as proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corominas, M.; Kamino, Hideko; Leon, J.; Pellicer, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-08-01

    In vitro DNA amplification followed by oligonucleotide mismatch hybridization was used to study the frequency of HRAS mutations in the benign self-regressing skin tumors keratoacanthomas and in squamous cell carcinomas. The authors used freshly obtained keratoacanthomas as well as Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from both types of tumors. DNA from 50 samples of each tumor type was analyzed for activating mutations involving codons 12 and 61. A relatively high percentage (30%) of HRAS mutations was found in the keratoacanthomas compared with 13% in the squamous cell carcinomas. The most frequent mutation identified is the A{center dot}T-to-T{center dot}A transversion in the second position of codon 61. The present findings demonstrate the involvement of the HRAS oncogene in human benign tumors. Moreover, they indicate that an activated HRAS oncogene is not sufficient to maintain a neoplastic phenotype and argue against a role of HRAS in the progression of skin tumorigenesis.

  16. Activation of the LMO2 oncogene through a somatically acquired neomorphic promoter in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sunniyat; Magnussen, Michael; León, Theresa E; Farah, Nadine; Li, Zhaodong; Abraham, Brian J; Alapi, Krisztina Z; Mitchell, Rachel J; Naughton, Tom; Fielding, Adele K; Pizzey, Arnold; Bustraan, Sophia; Allen, Christopher; Popa, Teodora; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Garcia-Perez, Laura; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Staal, Frank J T; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas; Mansour, Marc R

    2017-03-07

    Somatic mutations within non-coding genomic regions that aberrantly activate oncogenes have remained poorly characterized. Here we describe recurrent activating intronic mutations of LMO2, a prominent oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Heterozygous mutations were identified in PF-382 and DU.528 T-ALL cell lines, in addition to 3.7% (6/160) of pediatric and 5.5% (9/163) of adult T-ALL patient samples. The majority of indels harbour putative de novo MYB, ETS1 or RUNX1 consensus binding sites. Analysis of 5'-capped RNA transcripts in mutant cell lines identified the usage of an intermediate promoter site, with consequential monoallelic LMO2 overexpression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the mutant allele in PF-382 cells markedly downregulated LMO2 expression, establishing clear causality between the mutation and oncogene dysregulation. Furthermore, the spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-derived mutations provide important insights into the interconnected contributions of functional transcription factor binding. Finally, these mutations occur in the same intron as retroviral integration sites in gene therapy induced T-ALL, suggesting that such events occur at preferential sites in the non-coding genome.

  17. Identification of a pan-cancer oncogenic microRNA superfamily anchored by a central core seed motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark P.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Hartig, Sean M.; Reva, Boris; McLellan, Michael D.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Zack, Travis I.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Wheeler, David A.; Coarfa, Cristian; McGuire, Sean E.

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs modulate tumorigenesis through suppression of specific genes. As many tumour types rely on overlapping oncogenic pathways, a core set of microRNAs may exist, which consistently drives or suppresses tumorigenesis in many cancer types. Here we integrate The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pan-cancer data set with a microRNA target atlas composed of publicly available Argonaute Crosslinking Immunoprecipitation (AGO-CLIP) data to identify pan-tumour microRNA drivers of cancer. Through this analysis, we show a pan-cancer, coregulated oncogenic microRNA ‘superfamily’ consisting of the miR-17, miR-19, miR-130, miR-93, miR-18, miR-455 and miR-210 seed families, which cotargets critical tumour suppressors via a central GUGC core motif. We subsequently define mutations in microRNA target sites using the AGO-CLIP microRNA target atlas and TCGA exome-sequencing data. These combined analyses identify pan-cancer oncogenic cotargeting of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, TGFβ and p53 pathways by the miR-17-19-130 superfamily members.

  18. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  19. Annotating MYC oncogene status with 89Zr-transferrin imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Jason P.; Evans, Michael J.; Rice, Samuel L.; Wongvipat, John; Sawyers, Charles L.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    A non-invasive technology that quantitatively measures the activity of oncogenic signaling pathways could broadly impact cancer diagnosis and treatment using targeted therapies. Here we describe the development of 89Zr-desferrioxamine transferrin (89Zr-Tf), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer that binds the transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, CD71) with high avidity. 89Zr-Tf produces high contrast PET images that quantitatively reflect treatment-induced changes in MYC-regulated T...

  20. Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in sporadic pheochromocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, S.N.; Lindor, N.M.; Honchel, R. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have recently been demonstrated in kindreds with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B. Both of these autosomal dominant disorders are characterized by the development of neoplasia in cell lines of neural crest origin, such as medullary throid carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Individuals with MEN 2B have, in addition, ganglioneuromas of the lips, tongue and colon, a marfanoid habitus, and corneal nerve thickening. Approximately 90% of patients with MEN 2A have a germline mutation in exons 10 or 11, while 95% of patients with MEN 2B have a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 of exon 16. In this study, pheochromocytomas from 29 individuals who had no clinical evidence of MEN 2A or 2B (sporadic) were examined for the presence of either germline or somatic mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the RET proto-oncogene. Of the 29 tumors examined, 3 (10%) were found to have a mutation in one of the three exons. One tumor had a G{yields}A transition in codon 609 (exon 10), another had a 6 bp deletion encompassing codons 632 & 633 (exon 11), and the final tumor had a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 (exon 16). These mutations were not found in the corresponding normal DNA from these individuals, indicating that the mutation were somatic in origin. Although we cannot exclude the possibility of mutations in other regions of the RET proto-oncogene, our data suggests that: (1) individuals presenting with apparently sporadic pheochromocytomas are not likely to have undiagnosed MEN 2A or 2B; and (2) somatic mutations in the RET proto-oncogene contribute to the process of tumorigenesis in a small percentage of sporadic pheochromocytomas.

  1. PKC Epsilon: A Novel Oncogenic Player in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Malik, A., Zaman, N., Sarfaraz, S., Siddiqui, I. A., Syed, D. N. et al (2007). Combined inhibitory effects of green tea polyphenols and selective...not only in prostate cancer but also in several other epithelial cancers including lung , breast, and thyroid cancer8, 13, 20-26. Studies from our...Cvarepsilon is required for non-small cell lung carcinoma growth and regulates the expression of apoptotic genes. Oncogene 31: 2593-2600. 23 Hafeez, B. B

  2. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs.

  3. Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase: Potential Therapeutic Target and Putative Metabolic Oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl K. Zogg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exemplified by cancer cells’ preference for glycolysis, for example, the Warburg effect, altered metabolism in tumorigenesis has emerged as an important aspect of cancer in the past 10–20 years. Whether due to changes in regulatory tumor suppressors/oncogenes or by acting as metabolic oncogenes themselves, enzymes involved in the complex network of metabolic pathways are being studied to understand their role and assess their utility as therapeutic targets. Conversion of glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxypyruvate by the enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH—a rate-limiting step in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine—represents one such mechanism. Forgotten since classic animal studies in the 1980s, the role of PHGDH as a potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene has recently reemerged following publication of two prominent papers near-simultaneously in 2011. Since that time, numerous studies and a host of metabolic explanations have been put forward in an attempt to understand the results observed. In this paper, I review the historic progression of our understanding of the role of PHGDH in cancer from the early work by Snell through its reemergence and rise to prominence, culminating in an assessment of subsequent work and what it means for the future of PHGDH.

  4. Oncogenic Kras initiates leukemia in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit J Sabnis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available How oncogenes modulate the self-renewal properties of cancer-initiating cells is incompletely understood. Activating KRAS and NRAS mutations are among the most common oncogenic lesions detected in human cancer, and occur in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs and leukemias. We investigated the effects of expressing oncogenic Kras(G12D from its endogenous locus on the proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. MPD could be initiated by Kras(G12D expression in a highly restricted population enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, but not in common myeloid progenitors. Kras(G12D HSCs demonstrated a marked in vivo competitive advantage over wild-type cells. Kras(G12D expression also increased the fraction of proliferating HSCs and reduced the overall size of this compartment. Transplanted Kras(G12D HSCs efficiently initiated acute T-lineage leukemia/lymphoma, which was associated with secondary Notch1 mutations in thymocytes. We conclude that MPD-initiating activity is restricted to the HSC compartment in Kras(G12D mice, and that distinct self-renewing populations with cooperating mutations emerge during cancer progression.

  5. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C; Pai, Reetesh K; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A; Rack, Paul G; Neal, James T; Chan, Carol W-M; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D; Plevritis, Sylvia K; Hung, Kenneth E; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P; Kuo, Calvin J

    2014-07-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here we used a single air-liquid interface culture method without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial and mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia as a result of expression of Kras carrying the G12D mutation (Kras(G12D)), p53 loss or both and readily generated adenocarcinoma after in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, Kras(G12D) and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), as compared to the more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor-2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues.

  6. CRAF R391W is a melanoma driver oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Mohammad; Titz, Bjoern; Tsoi, Jennifer; Avramis, Earl; Le, Allison; Ng, Charles; Lomova, Anastasia; Lassen, Amanda; Friedman, Michael; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ribas, Antoni; Graeber, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of melanomas have known driver oncogenic mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNA11 or GNAQ, while the mutations providing constitutive oncogenic signaling in the remaining melanomas are not known. We established a melanoma cell line from a tumor with none of the common driver mutations. This cell line demonstrated a signaling profile similar to BRAF-mutants, but lacked sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. RNA-seq mutation data implicated CRAF R391W as the alternative driver mutation of this melanoma. CRAF R391W was homozygous and over expressed. These melanoma cells were highly sensitive to CRAF, but not BRAF knockdown. In reconstitution experiments, CRAF R391W, but not CRAF WT, transformed NIH3T3 cells in soft-agar colony formation assays, increased kinase activity in vitro, induced MAP kinase signaling and conferred vemurafenib resistance. MAP kinase inducing activity was dependent on CRAF dimerization. Thus, CRAF is a bona fide alternative oncogene for BRAF/NRAS/GNAQ/GNA11 wild type melanomas. PMID:27273450

  7. Determinants of host susceptibility to murine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV disease identify a role for the innate immunity scavenger receptor MARCO gene in human infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica High

    2016-09-01

    Interpretation: Translational integration of a genetic animal model and in vitro human studies identified a role for MARCO in human RSV disease severity. Because no RSV vaccines are approved for clinical use, genetic studies have implications for diagnosing individuals who are at risk for severe RSV disease, and disease prevention strategies (e.g. RSV antibodies.

  8. Inhibition of the Pim1 oncogene results in diminished visual function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yin

    Full Text Available Our objective was to profile genetic pathways whose differential expression correlates with maturation of visual function in zebrafish. Bioinformatic analysis of transcriptomic data revealed Jak-Stat signalling as the pathway most enriched in the eye, as visual function develops. Real-time PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization data confirm that multiple Jak-Stat pathway genes are up-regulated in the zebrafish eye between 3-5 days post-fertilisation, times associated with significant maturation of vision. One of the most up-regulated Jak-Stat genes is the proto-oncogene Pim1 kinase, previously associated with haematological malignancies and cancer. Loss of function experiments using Pim1 morpholinos or Pim1 inhibitors result in significant diminishment of visual behaviour and function. In summary, we have identified that enhanced expression of Jak-Stat pathway genes correlates with maturation of visual function and that the Pim1 oncogene is required for normal visual function.

  9. Oncogene Mimicry as a Mechanism of Primary Resistance to BRAF Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Sos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of potent RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors, only a fraction of BRAF-mutant patients benefit from treatment with these drugs. Using a combined chemogenomics and chemoproteomics approach, we identify drug-induced RAS-RAF-MEK complex formation in a subset of BRAF-mutant cancer cells characterized by primary resistance to vemurafenib. In these cells, autocrine interleukin-6 (IL-6 secretion may contribute to the primary resistance phenotype via induction of JAK/STAT3 and MAPK signaling. In a subset of cell lines, combined IL-6/MAPK inhibition is able to overcome primary resistance to BRAF-targeted therapy. Overall, we show that the signaling plasticity exerted by primary resistant BRAF-mutant cells is achieved by their ability to mimic signaling features of oncogenic RAS, a strategy that we term “oncogene mimicry.” This model may guide future strategies for overcoming primary resistance observed in these tumors.

  10. CLK2 Is an Oncogenic Kinase and Splicing Regulator in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Taku; Kim, Jee Hyun; Carver, Kristopher; Su, Ying; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Mulvey, Laura; Yamamoto, Shoji; Brennan, Cameron; Mei, Shenglin; Long, Henry; Yao, Jun; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-04-01

    Genetically activated kinases have been attractive therapeutic targets in cancer due to the relative ease of developing tumor-specific treatment strategies for them. To discover novel putative oncogenic kinases, we identified 26 genes commonly amplified and overexpressed in breast cancer and subjected them to a lentiviral shRNA cell viability screen in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Here, we report that CLK2, a kinase that phosphorylates SR proteins involved in splicing, acts as an oncogene in breast cancer. Deregulated alternative splicing patterns are commonly observed in human cancers but the underlying mechanisms and functional relevance are still largely unknown. CLK2 is amplified and overexpressed in a significant fraction of breast tumors. Downregulation of CLK2 inhibits breast cancer growth in cell culture and in xenograft models and it enhances cell migration and invasion. Loss of CLK2 in luminal breast cancer cells leads to the upregulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes and a switch to mesenchymal splice variants of several genes, including ENAH (MENA). These results imply that therapeutic targeting of CLK2 may be used to modulate EMT splicing patterns and to inhibit breast tumor growth.

  11. Alternative translation of the proto-oncogene c-myc by an internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanbru, C; Lafon, I; Audigier, S; Gensac, M C; Vagner, S; Huez, G; Prats, A C

    1997-12-19

    The human proto-oncogene c-myc encodes two proteins, c-Myc1 and c-Myc2, from two initiation codons, CUG and AUG, respectively. It is also transcribed from four alternative promoters (P0, P1, P2, and P3), giving rise to different RNA 5'-leader sequences, the long sizes of which suggest that they must be inefficiently translated by the classical ribosome scanning mechanism. Here we have examined the influence of three c-myc mRNA 5'-leaders on the translation of chimeric myc-CAT mRNAs. We observed that in the reticulocyte rabbit lysate, these 5'-leaders lead to cap-independent translation initiation. To determine whether this kind of initiation resulted from the presence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), COS-7 cells were transfected with bicistronic vectors containing the different c-myc 5'-leaders in the intercistronic region. An IRES was identified, requiring elements located within the P2 leader, between nucleotides -363 and -94 upstream from the CUG start codon. This is the first demonstration of the existence of IRES-dependent translation for a proto-oncogene. This IRES could be a translation enhancer, allowing activation of c-myc expression under the control of trans-acting factors and in response to specific cell stimuli.

  12. Drosophila PRL-1 is a growth inhibitor that counteracts the function of the Src oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagarigan, Krystle T; Bunn, Bryce W; Goodchild, Jake; Rahe, Travis K; Weis, Julie F; Saucedo, Leslie J

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver (PRL) family members have emerged as molecular markers that significantly correlate to the ability of many cancers to metastasize. However, contradictory cellular responses to PRL expression have been reported, including the inhibition of cell cycle progression. An obvious culprit for the discrepancy is the use of dozens of different cell lines, including many isolated from tumors or cultured cells selected for immortalization which may have missing or mutated modulators of PRL function. We created transgenic Drosophila to study the effects of PRL overexpression in a genetically controlled, organismal model. Our data support the paradigm that the normal cellular response to high levels of PRL is growth suppression and furthermore, that PRL can counter oncogenic activity of Src. The ability of PRL to inhibit growth under normal conditions is dependent on a CAAX motif that is required to localize PRL to the apical edge of the lateral membrane. However, PRL lacking the CAAX motif can still associate indiscriminately with the plasma membrane and retains its ability to inhibit Src function. We propose that PRL binds to other membrane-localized proteins that are effectors of Src or to Src itself. This first examination of PRL in a model organism demonstrates that PRL performs as a tumor suppressor and underscores the necessity of identifying the conditions that enable it to transform into an oncogene in cancer.

  13. RUNX3 is a novel negative regulator of oncogenic TEAD-YAP complex in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Y; Lin, S J; Chen, Y; Voon, D C-C; Zhu, F; Chuang, L S H; Wang, T; Tan, P; Lee, S C; Yeoh, K G; Sudol, M; Ito, Y

    2016-05-19

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a well-documented tumour suppressor that is frequently inactivated in gastric cancer. Here, we define a novel mechanism by which RUNX3 exerts its tumour suppressor activity involving the TEAD-YAP complex, a potent positive regulator of proliferative genes. We report that the TEAD-YAP complex is not only frequently hyperactivated in liver and breast cancer, but also confers a strong oncogenic activity in gastric epithelial cells. The increased expression of TEAD-YAP in tumour tissues significantly correlates with poorer overall survival of gastric cancer patients. Strikingly, RUNX3 physically interacts with the N-terminal region of TEAD through its Runt domain. This interaction markedly reduces the DNA-binding ability of TEAD that attenuates the downstream signalling of TEAD-YAP complex. Mutation of RUNX3 at Arginine 122 to Cysteine, which was previously identified in gastric cancer, impairs the interaction between RUNX3 and TEAD. Our data reveal that RUNX3 acts as a tumour suppressor by negatively regulating the TEAD-YAP oncogenic complex in gastric carcinogenesis.

  14. Complex oncogenic translocations with gene amplification are initiated by specific DNA breaks in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah M; Woo, Yong H; Alley, Travis L; Shirley, Bobbi-Jo; Akeson, Ellen C; Snow, Kathy J; Maas, Sarah A; Elwell, Rachel L; Foreman, Oded; Mills, Kevin D

    2009-05-15

    Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of many tumor types. Complex chromosomal rearrangements with associated gene amplification, known as complicons, characterize many hematologic and solid cancers. Whereas chromosomal aberrations, including complicons, are useful diagnostic and prognostic cancer markers, their molecular origins are not known. Although accumulating evidence has implicated DNA double-strand break repair in suppression of oncogenic genome instability, the genomic elements required for chromosome rearrangements, especially complex lesions, have not been elucidated. Using a mouse model of B-lineage lymphoma, characterized by complicon formation involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus and the c-myc oncogene, we have now investigated the requirement for specific genomic segments as donors for complex rearrangements. We now show that specific DNA double-strand breaks, occurring within a narrow segment of Igh, are necessary to initiate complicon formation. By contrast, neither specific DNA breaks nor the powerful intronic enhancer Emu are required for complicon-independent oncogenesis. This study is the first to delineate mechanisms of complex versus simple instability and the first to identify specific chromosomal elements required for complex chromosomal aberrations. These findings will illuminate genomic cancer susceptibility and risk factors.

  15. Antineoplastic Effects of siRNA against TMPRSS2-ERG Junction Oncogene in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Urbinati

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ERG junction oncogene is present in more than 50% of patients with prostate cancer and its expression is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Our aim is to achieve gene knockdown by siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG and then to assess the biological consequences of this inhibition. First, we designed siRNAs against the two TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variants (III and IV, most frequently identified in patients' biopsies. Two of the five siRNAs tested were found to efficiently inhibit mRNA of both TMPRSS2-ERG variants and to decrease ERG protein expression. Microarray analysis further confirmed ERG inhibition by both siRNAs TMPRSS2-ERG and revealed one common down-regulated gene, ADRA2A, involved in cell proliferation and migration. The siRNA against TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variant IV showed the highest anti-proliferative effects: Significantly decreased cell viability, increased cleaved caspase-3 and inhibited a cluster of anti-apoptotic proteins. To propose a concrete therapeutic approach, siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG IV was conjugated to squalene, which can self-organize as nanoparticles in water. The nanoparticles of siRNA TMPRSS2-ERG-squalene injected intravenously in SCID mice reduced growth of VCaP xenografted tumours, inhibited oncoprotein expression and partially restored differentiation (decrease in Ki67. In conclusion, this study offers a new prospect of treatment for prostate cancer based on siRNA-squalene nanoparticles targeting TMPRSS2-ERG junction oncogene.

  16. Prediction of conformational changes by single mutation in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg identified in HBsAg-negative blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Martono

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of hepatitis B virus (HBV by host immunity has been suggested to give rise to variants with amino acid substitutions at or around the 'a' determinant of the surface antigen (HBsAg, the main target of antibody neutralization and diagnostic assays. However, there have never been successful attempts to provide evidence for this hypothesis, partly because the 3 D structure of HBsAg molecules has not been determined. Tertiary structure prediction of HBsAg solely from its primary amino acid sequence may reveal the molecular energetic of the mutated proteins. We carried out this preliminary study to analyze the predicted HBsAg conformation changes of HBV variants isolated from Indonesian blood donors undetectable by HBsAg assays and its significance, compared to other previously-reported variants that were associated with diagnostic failure. Results Three HBV variants (T123A, M133L and T143M and a wild type sequence were analyzed together with frequently emerged variants T123N, M133I, M133T, M133V, and T143L. Based on the Jameson-Wolf algorithm for calculating antigenic index, the first two amino acid substitutions resulted in slight changes in the antigenicity of the 'a' determinant, while all four of the comparative variants showed relatively more significant changes. In the pattern T143M, changes in antigenic index were more significant, both in its coverage and magnitude, even when compared to variant T143L. These data were also partially supported by the tertiary structure prediction, in which the pattern T143M showed larger shift in the HBsAg second loop structure compared to the others. Conclusions Single amino acid substitutions within or near the 'a' determinant of HBsAg may alter antigenicity properties of variant HBsAg, which can be shown by both its antigenic index and predicted 3 D conformation. Findings in this study emphasize the significance of variant T143M, the prevalent isolate with highest degree of

  17. Molecular Alterations of KIT Oncogene in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Gomes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite therapeutic advances, the majority of gliomas do not respond either to chemo or radiotherapy. KIT, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK, is frequently involved in tumourigenic processes. Currently, KIT constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. In the present study we assessed the frequency of KIT overexpression in gliomas and investigated the genetic mechanisms underlying KIT overexpression. KIT (CD117 immunohistochemistry was performed in a series of 179 gliomas of various grades. KIT activating gene mutations (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 and gene amplification analysis, as defined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were performed in CD117 positive cases. Tumour cell immunopositivity was detected in 15.6% (28/179 of cases, namely in 25% (1/4 of pilocytic astrocytomas, 25% (5/20 of diffuse astrocytomas, 20% (1/5 of anaplastic astrocytomas, 19.5% (15/77 of glioblastomas and one third (3/9 of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas. Only 5.7% (2/35 of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas showed CD117 immunoreactivity. No association was found between tumour CD117 overexpression and patient survival. In addition, we also observed CD117 overexpression in endothelial cells, which varied from 0–22.2% of cases, being more frequent in high-grade lesions. No KIT activating mutations were identified. Interestingly, CISH and/or qRT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of KIT gene amplification in 6 glioblastomas and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, corresponding to 33% (8/24 of CD117 positive cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that KIT gene amplification rather than gene mutation is a common genetic mechanism underlying KIT expression in subset of malignant gliomas. Further studies are warranted to determine whether glioma patients exhibiting KIT overexpression and KIT gene amplification may benefit from therapy with anti-KIT RTK

  18. The TRE17/USP6 oncogene: a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Andre M; Chou, Margaret M

    2012-01-01

    De-ubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes, including intracellular trafficking, protein turnover, inflammatory signaling, and cell transformation. The first DUB to be identified as an oncogene was TRE17/Ubiquitin-specific protease 6 (USP6)/Tre-2. In addition to encoding a USP, TRE17 also contains a TBC (Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16) domain implicated in GTPase regulation and trafficking. Though first described almost two decades ago, remarkably little has been elucidated regarding TRE17's molecular and cellular functions. However, recent work has implicated TRE17 as a key etiological factor in aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), a locally recurrent pediatric bone tumor, and identified potential pathways through which it acts. In this review, we discuss the most up-to-date findings on the molecular functions of TRE17, the role of its USP and TBC domains, and potential models for how it contributes to transformation and ABC pathogenesis.

  19. Dual functions of interferon regulatory factors 7C in Epstein-Barr virus-mediated transformation of human B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is associated with several human malignancies. Interferon (IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7 has several splicing variants, and at least the major splicing variant (IRF-7A has oncogenic potential and is associated with EBV transformation processes. IRF-7C is an alternative splicing variant with only the DNA-binding domain of IRF-7. Whether IRF-7C is present under physiological conditions and its functions in viral transformation are unknown. In this report, we prove the existence of IRF-7C protein and RNA in certain cells under physiological conditions, and find that high levels of IRF-7C are associated with EBV transformation of human primary B cells in vitro as well as EBV type III latency. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 stimulates IRF-7C expression in B lymphocytes. IRF-7C has oncogenic potential in rodent cells and partially restores the growth properties of EBV-transformed cells under a growth-inhibition condition. A tumor array experiment has identified six primary tumor specimens with high levels of IRF-7C protein--all of them are lymphomas. Furthermore, we show that the expression of IRF-7C is apparently closely associated with other IRF-7 splicing variants. IRF-7C inhibits the function of IRF-7 in transcriptional regulation of IFN genes. These data suggest that EBV may use splicing variants of IRF-7 for its transformation process in two strategies: to use oncogenic properties of various IRF-7 splicing variants, but use one of its splicing variants (IRF-7C to block the IFN-induction function of IRF-7 that is detrimental for viral transformation. The work provides a novel relation of host/virus interactions, and has expanded our knowledge about IRFs in EBV transformation.

  20. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieisha Pentland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  1. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  2. Identification of Hyal2 as the cell-surface receptor for jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and ovine nasal adenocarcinoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D

    2003-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and ovine nasal adenocarcinoma virus (ONAV) replicate in the airway and cause epithelial cell tumors through the activity of their envelope (Env) proteins. Identification of the receptor(s) that mediate cell entry by these viruses is crucial to understanding the oncogenic activity of Env and for the development of gene therapy vectors based on these viruses that are capable of targeting airway cells. To identify the viral receptor(s) and to further study the biology of JSRV and ONAV, we developed retroviral vectors containing Moloney murine leukemia virus components and the Env proteins of JSRV or ONAV. We used a new technique involving positional cloning by phenotypic mapping in radiation hybrid cells to identify and clone the human receptor for JSRV, Hyal2, which also serves as the receptor for ONAV. Hyal2 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell-surface protein that has low hyaluronidase activity and is a member of a large family that includes sperm hyaluronidase (Spam) and serum hyaluronidase (Hyal1). Hyal2 is located in a region of human chromosome 3p21.3 that is often deleted in lung cancer, suggesting that it may be a tumor suppressor. However, its role in JSRV or ONAV tumorigenesis, if any, is still unclear. JSRV vectors are capable of transducing various human cells, and are being further evaluated for gene therapy purposes.

  3. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer.

  4. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Brendel

    Full Text Available RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML, generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1 in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16 and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies.

  5. ERBB oncogene proteins as targets for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanovski, O L; Lebedenko, E N; Deyev, S M

    2012-03-01

    General properties of the family of tyrosine kinase ERBB receptors are considered in connection with their role in the generation of cascades of signal transduction in normal and tumor cells. Causes of acquisition of oncogene features by genes encoding these receptors and their role in tumorigenesis are analyzed. Anti-ERBB monoclonal antibodies approved for therapy are described in detail, and mechanisms of their antitumor activity and development of resistance to them are reviewed. The existing and the most promising strategies for creating and using monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives for therapy of cancer are discussed.

  6. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Bonomi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer might provide a better understanding of the malignant transformation and identify novel pathways that are uniquely relevant to tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of cancer-associated alternative splicing isoforms will not only help to explain many fundamental hallmarks of cancer, but will also offer unprecedented opportunities to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer treatments.

  8. [Diagnostic value of BRAFV600E and RET/PTC oncogenes in thyroid nodule aspirates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Anna; Carrano, Mario; Angrisani, Elisabetta; Vitale, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNC) is the primary means to distinguish benign form malignant nodules. Aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of BRAF(V600E) and RET/PTC oncogenes in a large cohort of thyroid nodules with inconclusive FNC. We searched for BRAF(V600E) and RET/PTC in 299 thyroid nodule aspirates then removed by surgery. RET/PTC demonstrated a poor specificity. The search for BRAF(V600E) demonstrated to be useful in 25 cases, identifying a PTC in 2 false negative, 2 inadequate, 11 indeterminate and 10 suspicious FNC. Detection of BRAF(V600E) revealed to be a useful tool to refine inconclusive cytology.

  9. Genetic and pharmacological disruption of the TEAD-YAP complex suppresses the oncogenic activity of YAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Huang, Bo; Shim, Joong Sup; Chen, Qian; Lee, Se-Jin; Anders, Robert A; Liu, Jun O; Pan, Duojia

    2012-06-15

    The Drosophila TEAD ortholog Scalloped is required for Yki-mediated overgrowth but is largely dispensable for normal tissue growth, suggesting that its mammalian counterpart may be exploited for selective inhibition of oncogenic growth driven by YAP hyperactivation. Here we test this hypothesis genetically and pharmacologically. We show that a dominant-negative TEAD molecule does not perturb normal liver growth but potently suppresses hepatomegaly/tumorigenesis resulting from YAP overexpression or Neurofibromin 2 (NF2)/Merlin inactivation. We further identify verteporfin as a small molecule that inhibits TEAD-YAP association and YAP-induced liver overgrowth. These findings provide proof of principle that inhibiting TEAD-YAP interactions is a pharmacologically viable strategy against the YAP oncoprotein.

  10. Genetic and pharmacological disruption of the TEAD–YAP complex suppresses the oncogenic activity of YAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Huang, Bo; Shim, Joong Sup; Chen, Qian; Lee, Se-Jin; Anders, Robert A.; Liu, Jun O.; Pan, Duojia

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila TEAD ortholog Scalloped is required for Yki-mediated overgrowth but is largely dispensable for normal tissue growth, suggesting that its mammalian counterpart may be exploited for selective inhibition of oncogenic growth driven by YAP hyperactivation. Here we test this hypothesis genetically and pharmacologically. We show that a dominant-negative TEAD molecule does not perturb normal liver growth but potently suppresses hepatomegaly/tumorigenesis resulting from YAP overexpression or Neurofibromin 2 (NF2)/Merlin inactivation. We further identify verteporfin as a small molecule that inhibits TEAD–YAP association and YAP-induced liver overgrowth. These findings provide proof of principle that inhibiting TEAD–YAP interactions is a pharmacologically viable strategy against the YAP oncoprotein. PMID:22677547

  11. A single oncogenic enhancer rearrangement causes concomitant EVI1 and GATA2 deregulation in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschel, Stefan; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; Erpelinck, Claudia; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Havermans, Marije; Avellino, Roberto; van Lom, Kirsten; Rombouts, Elwin J; van Duin, Mark; Döhner, Konstanze; Beverloo, H Berna; Bradner, James E; Döhner, Hartmut; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M; Bindels, Eric M J; de Laat, Wouter; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-04-10

    Chromosomal rearrangements without gene fusions have been implicated in leukemogenesis by causing deregulation of proto-oncogenes via relocation of cryptic regulatory DNA elements. AML with inv(3)/t(3;3) is associated with aberrant expression of the stem-cell regulator EVI1. Applying functional genomics and genome-engineering, we demonstrate that both 3q rearrangements reposition a distal GATA2 enhancer to ectopically activate EVI1 and simultaneously confer GATA2 functional haploinsufficiency, previously identified as the cause of sporadic familial AML/MDS and MonoMac/Emberger syndromes. Genomic excision of the ectopic enhancer restored EVI1 silencing and led to growth inhibition and differentiation of AML cells, which could be replicated by pharmacologic BET inhibition. Our data show that structural rearrangements involving the chromosomal repositioning of a single enhancer can cause deregulation of two unrelated distal genes, with cancer as the outcome.

  12. Rearrangements of chicken immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells transformed by the avian retroviral oncogene v-rel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Lim, M Y; Bose, H; Bishop, J M

    1988-01-01

    The retroviral oncogene v-rel transforms poorly characterized lymphoid cells. We have explored the nature of these cells by analyzing the configuration and expression of immunoglobulin genes in chicken hemopoietic cells transformed by v-rel. None of the transformed cells expressed their immunoglobulin genes. The cells fell into three classes: class I cells have their immunoglobulin genes potentially in an embryonic configuration; class II and class III cells have lost one copy of the lambda light chain locus and have one copy of the heavy chain locus rearranged into a configuration that differs from what is found in mature B cells. In class II cells, the other heavy chain locus may be in embryonic configuration, whereas it is deleted in class III cells. The first of these classes may represent the earliest stage of the lymphoid lineage yet encountered among virus-transformed cells, whereas the second and third classes represent an apparently anomalous rearrangement whose origin remains unknown.

  13. Oncogenes E6-E7 de los Papilomavirus Humanos de alto riesgo detectados por PCR en Biopsias de pene incluidas en parafina

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, I; R Mejía; Velazco, R.; O Misad; M Pow-Sang

    1999-01-01

    La alta prevalencia del papilomavirus humano (PVH), referida a nivel mundial, en lesiones genitales de ambos sexos, el rol del varón como reservorio pasivo del virus, y el incremento de la mortalidad por cáncer genital en la mujer en nuestro país, motiva la detección y correlación de los oncogenes de los PVH de alto riesgo con la neoplasia de pene. Informamos de diez casos de biopsias de carcinoma escamoso de pene, incluidos en parafina, los cuales fueron investigados para la presencia de los...

  14. Variable expression of PIK3R3 and PTEN in Ewing Sarcoma impacts oncogenic phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Niemeyer

    Full Text Available Ewing Sarcoma is an aggressive malignancy of bone and soft tissue affecting children and young adults. Ewing Sarcoma is driven by EWS/Ets fusion oncoproteins, which cause widespread alterations in gene expression in the cell. Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, particularly involving IGF-1R, also plays an important role in Ewing Sarcoma pathogenesis. However, the basis of this dysregulation, including the relative contribution of EWS/Ets-dependent and independent mechanisms, is not well understood. In the present study, we identify variable expression of two modifiers of PI3K signaling activity, PIK3R3 and PTEN, in Ewing Sarcoma, and examine the consequences of this on PI3K pathway regulation and oncogenic phenotypes. Our findings indicate that PIK3R3 plays a growth-promotional role in Ewing Sarcoma, but suggest that this role is not strictly dependent on regulation of PI3K pathway activity. We further show that expression of PTEN, a well-established, potent tumor suppressor, is lost in a subset of Ewing Sarcomas, and that this loss strongly correlates with high baseline PI3K pathway activity in cell lines. In support of functional importance of PTEN loss in Ewing Sarcoma, we show that re-introduction of PTEN into two different PTEN-negative Ewing Sarcoma cell lines results in downregulation of PI3K pathway activity, and sensitization to the IGF-1R small molecule inhibitor OSI-906. Our findings also suggest that PTEN levels may contribute to sensitivity of Ewing Sarcoma cells to the microtubule inhibitor vincristine, a relevant chemotherapeutic agent in this cancer. Our studies thus identify PIK3R3 and PTEN as modifiers of oncogenic phenotypes in Ewing Sarcoma, with potential clinical implications.

  15. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Ross

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, which was discovered as a milk‑transmitted, infectious cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used since that time as an animal model for the study of human breast cancer. Like other complex retroviruses, MMTV encodes a number of accessory proteins that both facilitate infection and affect host immune response. In vivo, the virus predominantly infects lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells. High level infection of mammary epithelial cells ensures efficient passage of virus to the next generation. It also results in mammary tumor induction, since the MMTV provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial cell genome during viral replication and activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, mammary tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer.

  16. An atlas of the Epstein-Barr virus transcriptome and epigenome reveals host-virus regulatory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvey, Aaron; Tempera, Italo; Tsai, Kevin; Chen, Horng-Shen; Tikhmyanova, Nadezhda; Klichinsky, Michael; Leslie, Christina; Lieberman, Paul M

    2012-08-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is associated with multiple human tumors, persists as a minichromosome in the nucleus of B lymphocytes and induces malignancies through incompletely understood mechanisms. Here, we present a large-scale functional genomic analysis of EBV. Our experimentally generated nucleosome positioning maps and viral protein binding data were integrated with over 700 publicly available high-throughput sequencing data sets for human lymphoblastoid cell lines mapped to the EBV genome. We found that viral lytic genes are coexpressed with cellular cancer-associated pathways, suggesting that the lytic cycle may play an unexpected role in virus-mediated oncogenesis. Host regulators of viral oncogene expression and chromosome structure were identified and validated, revealing a role for the B cell-specific protein Pax5 in viral gene regulation and the cohesin complex in regulating higher order chromatin structure. Our findings provide a deeper understanding of latent viral persistence in oncogenesis and establish a valuable viral genomics resource for future exploration.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of HPV16 integration in OSCC reveals no significant impact of physical status on viral oncogene and virally disrupted human gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Olthof

    Full Text Available Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 is an independent risk factor for the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC. However, it is unclear whether viral integration is an essential hallmark in the carcinogenic process of OSCC and whether HPV integration correlates with the level of viral gene transcription and influences the expression of disrupted host genes. We analyzed 75 patients with OSCC. HPV16-positivity was proven by p16(INK4A immunohistochemistry, PCR and FISH. Viral integration was examined using DIPS- as well as APOT-PCR. Viral E2, E6 and E7 gene expression levels were quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-qPCR. Expression levels of 7 human genes disrupted by the virus were extracted from mRNA expression profiling data of 32 OSCCs. Viral copy numbers were assessed by qPCR in 73 tumors. We identified 37 HPV16-human fusion products indicating viral integration in 29 (39% OSCC. In the remaining tumors (61% only episome-derived PCR products were detected. When comparing OSCC with or without an integration-derived fusion product, we did not find significant differences in the mean RNA expression of viral genes E2, E6 and E7 or the viral copy numbers per cell, nor did the RNA expression of the HPV-disrupted genes differ from either group of OSCC. In conclusion, our data do not support the hypothesis that integration affects the levels of viral and/or HPV-disrupted human gene transcripts. Thus constitutive, rather than a high level, of expression of oncogene transcripts appears to be required in HPV-related OSCC.

  18. A Role for RNA Viruses in the Pathogenesis of Burkitt's Lymphoma: The Need for Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corry van den Bosch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain infectious agents are associated with lymphomas, but the strength of the association varies geographically, suggesting that local environmental factors make important contributions to lymphomagenesis. Endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma has well-defined environmental requirements making it particularly suitable for research into local environmental factors. The Epstein-Barr virus and holoendemic Malaria are recognized as important cofactors in endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma and their contributions are discussed. Additionally, infection with Chikungunya Fever, a potentially oncogenic arbovirus, was associated with the onset of endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma in one study and also with space-time case clusters of the lymphoma. Chikungunya Virus has several characteristics typical of oncogenic viruses. The Flavivirus, Hepatitis C, a Class 1 Human Carcinogen, closely related to the arboviruses, Yellow Fever, and Dengue, is also more distantly related to Chikungunya Virus. The mechanisms of oncogenesis believed to operate in Hepatitis C lymphomagenesis are discussed, as is their potential applicability to Chikungunya Virus.

  19. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'.

  20. REST regulates oncogenic properties of glioblastoma stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Mohamed M.; Sathyan, Pratheesh; Singh, Sanjay K.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liang, Shoudan; Gumin, Joy; El-Mesallamy, Hala Osman; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Fuller, Gregory N.; Lang, Frederick F.; Majumder, Sadhan

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Although many GBM tumors are believed to be caused by self-renewing, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GSCs), the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs are only now being unraveled. Here we showed that GSCs derived from GBM patient specimens express varying levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, suggesting heterogeneity across different GSC lines. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments indicated that REST maintains self-renewal of GSCs. High REST-expressing GSCs (HR-GSCs) produced tumors histopathologically distinct from those generated by low REST-expressing GSCs (LR-GSCs) in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models. Knockdown of REST in HR-GSCs resulted in increased survival in GSC-transplanted mice and produced tumors with higher apoptotic and lower invasive properties. Conversely, forced expression of exogenous REST in LR-GSCs produced decreased survival in mice and produced tumors with lower apoptotic and higher invasive properties, similar to HR-GSCs. Thus, based on our results, we propose that a novel function of REST is to maintain self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs and that REST can play a major role in mediating tumorigenicity in GBM. PMID:22228704

  1. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced tumor suppressor microRNA MiR-34a is growth promoting in EBV-infected B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Eleonora; Salinas, Raul E; Chang, Christina; Zhou, Ting; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Gottwein, Eva; Jacobs, Cassandra; Jima, Dereje; Li, Qi-Jing; Dave, Sandeep S; Luftig, Micah A

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of primary human B cells drives their indefinite proliferation into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). B cell immortalization depends on expression of viral latency genes, as well as the regulation of host genes. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating fundamental cellular processes, in this study, we assayed changes in host miRNA expression during primary B cell infection by EBV. We observed and validated dynamic changes in several miRNAs from early proliferation through immortalization; oncogenic miRNAs were induced, and tumor suppressor miRNAs were largely repressed. However, one miRNA described as a p53-targeted tumor suppressor, miR-34a, was strongly induced by EBV infection and expressed in many EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected lymphoma cell lines. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was sufficient to induce miR-34a requiring downstream NF-κB activation but independent of functional p53. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-34a was not toxic in several B lymphoma cell lines, and inhibition of miR-34a impaired the growth of EBV-transformed cells. This study identifies a progrowth role for a tumor-suppressive miRNA in oncogenic-virus-mediated transformation, highlighting the importance of studying miRNA function in different cellular contexts.

  2. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  3. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Luis Acencio

    Full Text Available Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI. This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved

  4. [Nature of cancer explored from the perspective of the functional evolution of proto-oncogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The products of proto-oncogene play critical roles in the development or maintenance of multicellular societies in animals via strict regulatory systems. When these regulatory systems are disrupted, proto-oncogenes can become oncogenes, and thereby induce cell transformation and carcinogenesis. To understand the molecular basis for development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes during evolution, we screened for ancestral proto-oncogenes from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga ovata (M. ovata) by monitoring their transforming ability in mammalian cells; consequently, we isolated a Pak gene ortholog, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase as a 'primitive oncogene'. We also cloned Pak orthologs from fungi and the multicellular sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis, and compared their regulatory features with that of M. ovata Pak (MoPak). MoPak is constitutively active and induces cell transformation in mammalian cells. In contrast, Pak orthologs from multicellular animals are strictly regulated. Analyses of Pak mutants revealed that structural alterations in the auto-inhibitory domain (AID) are responsible for the enhanced kinase activity and the oncogenic activity of MoPak. Furthermore, we show that Rho family GTPases-mediated regulatory system of Pak kinase is conserved throughout the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals, but the MoPak is more sensitive to the Rho family GTPases-mediated activation than multicellular Pak. These results show that maturation of AID function was required for the development of the strict regulatory system of the Pak proto-oncogene, and support the potential link between the development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes and the evolution of multicellularity. Further analysis of oncogenic functions of proto-oncogene orthologs in the unicellular genes would provide some insights into the mechanisms of the destruction of multicellular society in cancer.

  5. Detection of Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Duodenal Mucosa of Patients With Refractory Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Vittorio; Baldanti, Fausto; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Biagi, Federico; Gatti, Marta; Riboni, Roberta; Dallera, Elena; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Refractory celiac disease is characterized by mucosal damage in patients with celiac disease despite a gluten-free diet. Little is known about the mechanisms that cause persistent intestinal inflammation in these patients. We performed a case-control study of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with refractory celiac disease from 2001 through 2014 (median age, 51 y; 10 women) and 24 patients with uncomplicated celiac disease (controls) to determine whether refractory disease is associated with infection by lymphotropic oncogenic viruses. We performed real-time PCR analyses of duodenal biopsy samples from all patients to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus-8, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus-I, -II, or -III. We used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses to identify infected cells and viral proteins. We did not detect human herpesvirus-8 or human T-cell lymphotropic viruses in any of the biopsy specimens. However, 12 of 17 (70.5%) biopsy specimens from patients with refractory celiac disease were positive for EBV, compared with 4 of 24 (16.6%) biopsy specimens from controls (P celiac disease and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple-integrations of HPV16 genome and altered transcription of viral oncogenes and cellular genes are associated with the development of cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulian Lu

    Full Text Available The constitutive expression of the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 viral oncogenes is the major cause of cervical cancer. To comprehensively explore the composition of HPV16 early transcripts and their genomic annotation, cervical squamous epithelial tissues from 40 HPV16-infected patients were collected for analysis of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts (APOT. We observed different transcription patterns of HPV16 oncogenes in progression of cervical lesions to cervical cancer and identified one novel transcript. Multiple-integration events in the tissues of cervical carcinoma (CxCa are significantly more often than those of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL. Moreover, most cellular genes within or near these integration sites are cancer-associated genes. Taken together, this study suggests that the multiple-integrations of HPV genome during persistent viral infection, which thereby alters the expression patterns of viral oncogenes and integration-related cellular genes, play a crucial role in progression of cervical lesions to cervix cancer.

  7. Role of viruses in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Metgud

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is complex and involves many factors. The most clearly defined risk factors are smoking and alcohol, which substantially increase the risk of oral SCC. However, despite this clear association, a substantial proportion of patients develop OSCC without exposure to them, emphasizing the role of other risk factors such as genetic susceptibility and oncogenic viruses. Some viruses are strongly associated with OSCC while the association of others is less frequent and may depend on co-factors for their carcinogenic effects. Therefore, the exact role of viruses must be evaluated with care in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of OSCC.

  8. Tandemly Integrated HPV16 Can Form a Brd4-Dependent Super-Enhancer-Like Element That Drives Transcription of Viral Oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Katharine E; Warburton, Alix; McBride, Alison A

    2016-09-13

    In cancer cells associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, the viral genome is very often found integrated into the cellular genome. The viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are transcribed from the viral promoter, and integration events that alter transcriptional regulation of this promoter contribute to carcinogenic progression. In this study, we detected highly enriched binding of the super-enhancer markers Brd4, MED1, and H3K27ac, visible as a prominent nuclear focus by immunofluorescence, at the tandemly integrated copies of HPV16 in cells of the cervical neoplasia cell line W12 subclone 20861. Tumor cells are often addicted to super-enhancer-driven oncogenes and are particularly sensitive to disruption of transcription factor binding to the enhancers. Treatment of 20861 cells with bromodomain inhibitors displaced Brd4 from the HPV integration site, greatly decreased E6/E7 transcription, and inhibited cellular proliferation. Thus, Brd4 activates viral transcription at this integration site, and strong selection for E6/E7 expression can drive the formation of a super-enhancer-like element to promote oncogenesis. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses play an essential role in the development of cervical cancer, and growth of these cancer cells requires continued expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. Integration of the virus into the host genome often results in deregulation of E6 and E7 expression, which provides a selective growth advantage and increases genetic instability of infected cells. We show here that tandemly integrated copies of the viral genome can form a super-enhancer-like element that drives E6/E7 transcription. Targeted disruption of factors binding to this element decreases viral transcription and causes cell death. Thus, cancer cells that harbor integrated HPV could be targeted by therapeutics that disrupt super-enhancer function. Copyright © 2016 Dooley et al.

  9. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  10. Computer virus information update CIAC-2301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, W.J.

    1994-01-15

    While CIAC periodically issues bulletins about specific computer viruses, these bulletins do not cover all the computer viruses that affect desktop computers. The purpose of this document is to identify most of the known viruses for the MS-DOS and Macintosh platforms and give an overview of the effects of each virus. The authors also include information on some windows, Atari, and Amiga viruses. This document is revised periodically as new virus information becomes available. This document replaces all earlier versions of the CIAC Computer virus Information Update. The date on the front cover indicates date on which the information in this document was extracted from CIAC`s Virus database.

  11. Estradiol and Estrogen Receptor Agonists Oppose Oncogenic Actions of Leptin in HepG2 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minqian Shen

    Full Text Available Obesity is a significant risk factor for certain cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Leptin, a hormone secreted by white adipose tissue, precipitates HCC development. Epidemiology data show that men have a much higher incidence of HCC than women, suggesting that estrogens and its receptors may inhibit HCC development and progression. Whether estrogens antagonize oncogenic action of leptin is uncertain. To investigate potential inhibitory effects of estrogens on leptin-induced HCC development, HCC cell line HepG2 cells were treated with leptin in combination with 17 β-estradiol (E2, estrogen receptor-α (ER-α selective agonist PPT, ER-β selective agonist DPN, or G protein-coupled ER (GPER selective agonist G-1. Cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis were determined, and leptin- and estrogen-related intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed. HepG2 cells expressed a low level of ER-β mRNA, and leptin treatment increased ER-β expression. E2 suppressed leptin-induced HepG2 cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally E2 reversed leptin-induced STAT3 and leptin-suppressed SOCS3, which was mainly achieved by activation of ER-β. E2 also enhanced ERK via activating ER-α and GPER and activated p38/MAPK via activating ER-β. To conclude, E2 and its receptors antagonize the oncogenic actions of leptin in HepG2 cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and stimulating cell apoptosis, which was associated with reversing leptin-induced changes in SOCS3/STAT3 and increasing p38/MAPK by activating ER-β, and increasing ERK by activating ER-α and GPER. Identifying roles of different estrogen receptors would provide comprehensive understanding of estrogenic mechanisms in HCC development and shed light on potential treatment for HCC patients.

  12. LIN28 Expression in malignant germ cell tumors downregulates let-7 and increases oncogene levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Matthew J; Saini, Harpreet K; Siegler, Charlotte A; Hanning, Jennifer E; Barker, Emily M; van Dongen, Stijn; Ward, Dawn M; Raby, Katie L; Groves, Ian J; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Pett, Mark R; Thornton, Claire M; Enright, Anton J; Nicholson, James C; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    Despite their clinicopathologic heterogeneity, malignant germ cell tumors (GCT) share molecular abnormalities that are likely to be functionally important. In this study, we investigated the potential significance of downregulation of the let-7 family of tumor suppressor microRNAs in malignant GCTs. Microarray results from pediatric and adult samples (n = 45) showed that LIN28, the negative regulator of let-7 biogenesis, was abundant in malignant GCTs, regardless of patient age, tumor site, or histologic subtype. Indeed, a strong negative correlation existed between LIN28 and let-7 levels in specimens with matched datasets. Low let-7 levels were biologically significant, as the sequence complementary to the 2 to 7 nt common let-7 seed "GAGGUA" was enriched in the 3' untranslated regions of mRNAs upregulated in pediatric and adult malignant GCTs, compared with normal gonads (a mixture of germ cells and somatic cells). We identified 27 mRNA targets of let-7 that were upregulated in malignant GCT cells, confirming significant negative correlations with let-7 levels. Among 16 mRNAs examined in a largely independent set of specimens by quantitative reverse transcription PCR, we defined negative-associations with let-7e levels for six oncogenes, including MYCN, AURKB, CCNF, RRM2, MKI67, and C12orf5 (when including normal control tissues). Importantly, LIN28 depletion in malignant GCT cells restored let-7 levels and repressed all of these oncogenic let-7 mRNA targets, with LIN28 levels correlating with cell proliferation and MYCN levels. Conversely, ectopic expression of let-7e was sufficient to reduce proliferation and downregulate MYCN, AURKB, and LIN28, the latter via a double-negative feedback loop. We conclude that the LIN28/let-7 pathway has a critical pathobiologic role in malignant GCTs and therefore offers a promising target for therapeutic intervention. ©2013 AACR.

  13. The Mitochondrial Genome Is a “Genetic Sanctuary” during the Oncogenic Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Teresa; Fraga, Maximo; Salas, Antonio; Costoya, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Since Otto Warburg linked mitochondrial physiology and oncogenesis in the 1930s, a number of studies have focused on the analysis of the genetic basis for the presence of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells. However, little or no evidence exists today to indicate that mtDNA mutations are directly responsible for the initiation of tumor onset. Based on a model of gliomagenesis in the mouse, we aimed to explore whether or not mtDNA mutations are associated with the initiation of tumor formation, maintenance and aggressiveness. We reproduced the different molecular events that lead from tumor initiation to progression in the mouse glioma. In human gliomas, most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in the aberrant activation of different signaling pathways and deregulation of the cell cycle. Our data indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, leading to increased nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutagenesis, but maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. In addition, mutational stability has been observed in entire mtDNA of human gliomas; this is in full agreement with the results obtained in the cancer mouse model. We use this model as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation due to the fact that mutations commonly found in gliomas appear to be the most common molecular alterat