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Sample records for oncogene-driven mouse mammary

  1. Jnk2 effects on tumor development, genetic instability and replicative stress in an oncogene-driven mouse mammary tumor model.

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    Peila Chen

    Full Text Available Oncogenes induce cell proliferation leading to replicative stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. A wide variety of cellular stresses activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK proteins, but few studies have directly addressed the roles of JNK isoforms in tumor development. Herein, we show that jnk2 knockout mice expressing the Polyoma Middle T Antigen transgene developed mammary tumors earlier and experienced higher tumor multiplicity compared to jnk2 wildtype mice. Lack of jnk2 expression was associated with higher tumor aneuploidy and reduced DNA damage response, as marked by fewer pH2AX and 53BP1 nuclear foci. Comparative genomic hybridization further confirmed increased genomic instability in PyV MT/jnk2-/- tumors. In vitro, PyV MT/jnk2-/- cells underwent replicative stress and cell death as evidenced by lower BrdU incorporation, and sustained chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 (CDT1 and p21(Waf1 protein expression, and phosphorylation of Chk1 after serum stimulation, but this response was not associated with phosphorylation of p53 Ser15. Adenoviral overexpression of CDT1 led to similar differences between jnk2 wildtype and knockout cells. In normal mammary cells undergoing UV induced single stranded DNA breaks, JNK2 localized to RPA (Replication Protein A coated strands indicating that JNK2 responds early to single stranded DNA damage and is critical for subsequent recruitment of DNA repair proteins. Together, these data support that JNK2 prevents replicative stress by coordinating cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair mechanisms.

  2. Int-6, a highly conserved, widely expressed gene, is mutated by mouse mammary tumor virus in mammary preneoplasia.

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    Marchetti, A.; Buttitta, F.; Miyazaki, S; Gallahan, D; Smith, G H; Callahan, R

    1995-01-01

    With a unique mouse mammary tumor model system in which mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) insertional mutations can be detected during progression from preneoplasia to frank malignancy, including metastasis, we have discovered a new common integration site (designated Int-6) for MMTV in mouse mammary tumors. MMTV was integrated into Int-6 in a mammary hyperplastic outgrowth line, its tumors and metastases, and two independent mammary tumors arising in unrelated mice. The Int-6 gene is ubiquito...

  3. Dysfunctional telomeres promote genomic instability and metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in oncogene induced mammary cancer.

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    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2013-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres). In normal cells lacking telomerase activity, telomeres shorten with each cell division because of the inability to completely synthesize the lagging strand. Critically shortened telomeres elicit DNA damage responses and limit cellular division and lifespan, providing an important tumor suppressor function. Most human cancer cells express telomerase which contributes significantly to the tumor phenotype. In human breast cancer, telomerase expression is predictive of clinical outcomes such as lymph node metastasis and survival. In mouse models of mammary cancer, telomerase expression is also upregulated. Telomerase overexpression resulted in spontaneous mammary tumor development in aged female mice. Increased mammary cancer also was observed when telomerase deficient mice were crossed with p53 null mutant animals. However, the effects of telomerase and telomere length on oncogene driven mammary cancer have not been completely characterized. To address these issues we characterized neu proto-oncogene driven mammary tumor formation in G1 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with long telomeres), G3 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with short telomeres), and Terc+/+ mice. Telomerase deficiency reduced the number of mammary tumors and increased tumor latency regardless of telomere length. Decreased tumor formation correlated with increased apoptosis in Terc deficient tumors. Short telomeres dramatically increased lung metastasis which correlated with increased genomic instability, and specific alterations in DNA copy number and gene expression. We concluded that short telomeres promote metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in neu oncogene driven mammary tumors.

  4. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

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    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. Fo...

  5. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

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    Susan R. Ross

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, which was discovered as a milk‑transmitted, infectious cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used since that time as an animal model for the study of human breast cancer. Like other complex retroviruses, MMTV encodes a number of accessory proteins that both facilitate infection and affect host immune response. In vivo, the virus predominantly infects lymphocytes and mammary epithelial cells. High level infection of mammary epithelial cells ensures efficient passage of virus to the next generation. It also results in mammary tumor induction, since the MMTV provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial cell genome during viral replication and activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, mammary tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer.

  6. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

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    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  7. Detection of Mouse Mammary Tumour Virus in house mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Lise K; Leirs, Herwig; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    The prevalence of human breast cancer (HBC) is affected by several parameters. For the past decades MMTV, Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus, known to cause breast cancer in mice, has been hypothesized to affect the frequency of hormone dependent HBC. Though conclusive evidence has not been produced, still...... contaminated food or via other mammals as intermediate hosts. The aim of this project is to develop a protocol to detect endogenous MMTV in the Danish population of Mus musculus, M. domesticus and hybrid mice from southern Denmark, the known hybrid zone of the two species. Based on these results...

  8. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

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    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  9. Pericentriolar Targeting of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus GAG Protein.

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    Guangzhi Zhang

    Full Text Available The Gag protein of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is the chief determinant of subcellular targeting. Electron microscopy studies show that MMTV Gag forms capsids within the cytoplasm and assembles as immature particles with MMTV RNA and the Y box binding protein-1, required for centrosome maturation. Other betaretroviruses, such as Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV, assemble adjacent to the pericentriolar region because of a cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the Matrix protein. Previous studies suggest that the MMTV Matrix protein may also harbor a similar cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal. Herein, we show that a substantial fraction of MMTV Gag localizes to the pericentriolar region. This was observed in HEK293T, HeLa human cell lines and the mouse derived NMuMG mammary gland cells. Moreover, MMTV capsids were observed adjacent to centrioles when expressed from plasmids encoding either MMTV Gag alone, Gag-Pro-Pol or full-length virus. We found that the cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal in the MMTV Matrix protein was sufficient for pericentriolar targeting, whereas mutation of the glutamine to alanine at position 56 (D56/A resulted in plasma membrane localization, similar to previous observations from mutational studies of M-PMV Gag. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy studies showed that MMTV capsids accumulate around centrioles suggesting that, similar to M-PMV, the pericentriolar region may be a site for MMTV assembly. Together, the data imply that MMTV Gag targets the pericentriolar region as a result of the MMTV cytoplasmic targeting and retention signal, possibly aided by the Y box protein-1 required for the assembly of centrosomal microtubules.

  10. Conditionally reprogrammed normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells display a progenitor-cell-like phenotype.

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    Francisco R Saenz

    Full Text Available Mammary epithelial (ME cells cultured under conventional conditions senesce after several passages. Here, we demonstrate that mouse ME cells isolated from normal mammary glands or from mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-Neu-induced mammary tumors, can be cultured indefinitely as conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs on irradiated fibroblasts in the presence of the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cell surface progenitor-associated markers are rapidly induced in normal mouse ME-CRCs relative to ME cells. However, the expression of certain mammary progenitor subpopulations, such as CD49f+ ESA+ CD44+, drops significantly in later passages. Nevertheless, mouse ME-CRCs grown in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix gave rise to mammary acinar structures. ME-CRCs isolated from MMTV-Neu transgenic mouse mammary tumors express high levels of HER2/neu, as well as tumor-initiating cell markers, such as CD44+, CD49f+, and ESA+ (EpCam. These patterns of expression are sustained in later CRC passages. Early and late passage ME-CRCs from MMTV-Neu tumors that were implanted in the mammary fat pads of syngeneic or nude mice developed vascular tumors that metastasized within 6 weeks of transplantation. Importantly, the histopathology of these tumors was indistinguishable from that of the parental tumors that develop in the MMTV-Neu mice. Application of the CRC system to mouse mammary epithelial cells provides an attractive model system to study the genetics and phenotype of normal and transformed mouse epithelium in a defined culture environment and in vivo transplant studies.

  11. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

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    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  12. A MOUSE MODEL OF MAMMARY HYPERPLASIA INDUCED BY ORAL HORMONE ADMINISTRATION.

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    Sun, Li; Guo, Dong-Hui; Liu, Fei; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Ning; Sun, Yun-Feng; Cai, Li-Ping; Zheng, Hong-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Mammary hyperplasia is one of the most common benign breast disorders. Although traditional Chinese medicine has a vast experience in the treatment of mammary hyperplasia, it is not accepted widely due to its unclear mechanism. To address the mechanism, we developed a mouse model of mammary hyperplasia. We gave mice estradiol valerate tablets and progesterone capsules sequentially for one month by intragastric administration. Mice treated by this method had a series of pathological changes which are similar to those detected in women with mammary hyperplasia, including ectopic level of estradiol and progesterone in serum, hyperplasia of mammary glands and increased expression of ERα and PR. This model will facilitate the mechanical study of traditional medicine on mammary hyperplasia.

  13. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

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    Cotarla Ion

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary.

  14. Investigating the Role of FIP200 in Mammary Carcinogenesis Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

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    2006-04-01

    promoters to specifically target the Cre-recombinase expression to the mammary epithelium. The MMTV (Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus) and the WAP ( Whey Acidic...conditional knock-out mice are phenotypically normal and fertile . Compared to littermate controls both the males and the virgin females exhibit...phenotypically normal and fertile . • Females, in which the MMTV-Cre transgene was used to specifically delete FAK, can carry their offspring to term, but

  15. Vitamin D Pathway Status and the Identification of Target Genes in the Mouse Mammary Gland

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    2014-11-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0152 TITLE: Vitamin D Pathway Status and the Identification of Target Genes in the Mouse Mammary...Final Report 3. DATES COVERED 1 Jan 2011 – 31 Nov 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vitamin D Pathway Status and the...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Mammary gland samples were isolated from wild type, vitamin D receptor knockout (VDRKO) and 1alphahydroxylase

  16. Immunity against the mouse mammary tumour virus : immunologic events during tumour growth and studies on vaccination in mice

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    P.C. Creemers (Paula)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of mouse mammary tumours is a complex phenomenon, to which environmental factors, genetic background and the presence of an oncovirus contribute. The mammary tumour virus (MTV) of the mouse, first discovered by Bittner (1936), is a so-called B-type particle (Bernhard, 1958) a

  17. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

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    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  18. Lactoferrin at basal side of mouse mammary epithelium derives in part from stroma cells.

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    Pecorini, Chiara; Delpal, Serge; Truchet, Sandrine; Le Provost, Fabienne; Baldi, Antonella; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2009-11-01

    Lactoferrin is synthesized by glandular epithelial cells and neutrophils and is also present on both sides of the mammary epithelium. We have studied the origin of lactoferrin detected in the various compartments of mouse mammary tissue. As revealed by immunogold electron microscopy, lactoferrin is present in mammary epithelial cells and in the basal region of the epithelium, associated with connective tissue and stroma cells at all physiological stages studied. A perturbation of protein synthesis or transport after in vitro treatment with cycloheximide or brefeldin A does not abrogate lactoferrin labelling in the basal region of the epithelium. The expression of lactoferrin has also been observed in the fat pads of mammary glands from mice surgically depleted of epithelial cells. The sealing of one teat for 24 h is accompanied by an increase in both the number of stroma cells and the labelling of myoepithelial cells. Thus, the lactoferrin present in the interstitial space of the mouse mammary epithelium originates in part from stroma cells. Possible roles of lactoferrin at the basal side of the mammary epithelium are discussed.

  19. Pea3 transcription factors and wnt1-induced mouse mammary neoplasia.

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    Rebecca Baker

    Full Text Available The role of the PEA3 subfamily of Ets transcription factors in breast neoplasia is controversial. Although overexpression of PEA3 (E1AF/ETV4, and of the related factors ERM (ETV5 and ER81 (ETV1, have been observed in human and mouse breast tumors, PEA3 factors have also been ascribed a tumor suppressor function. Here, we utilized the MMTV/Wnt1 mouse strain to further interrogate the role of PEA3 transcription factors in mammary tumorigenesis based on our previous observation that Pea3 is highly expressed in MMTV/Wnt1 mammary tumors. Pea3 expression in mouse mammary tissues was visualized using a Pea3(NLSlacZ reporter strain. In normal mammary glands, Pea3 expression is predominantly confined to myoepithelial cells. Wnt1 transgene expression induced marked amplification of this cell compartment in nontumorous mammary glands, accompanied by an apparent increase in Pea3 expression. The pattern of Pea3 expression in MMTV/Wnt1 mammary glands recapitulated the cellular profile of activated beta-catenin/TCF signaling, which was visualized using both beta-catenin immunohistochemistry and the beta-catenin/TCF-responsive reporter Axin2(NLSlacZ. To test the requirement for PEA3 factors in Wnt1-induced tumorigenesis, we employed a mammary-targeted dominant negative PEA3 transgene, DeltaNPEA3En. Expression of DeltaNPEA3En delayed early-onset tumor formation in MMTV/Wnt1 virgin females (P = 0.03, suggesting a requirement for PEA3 factor function for Wnt1-driven tumor formation. Consistent with this observation, expression of the DeltaNPEA3En transgene was profoundly reduced in mammary tumors compared to nontumorous mammary glands from bigenic MMTV/Wnt1, MMTV/DeltaNPEA3En mice (P = 0.01. Our data provide the first description of Wnt1-mediated expansion of the Pea3-expressing myoepithelial compartment in nontumorous mammary glands. Consistent with this observation, mammary myoepithelium was selectively responsive to Wnt1. Together these data suggest the MMTV

  20. Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development

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    Karagavriilidou Konstantina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differential expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs during mammary gland development might provide insights into their role in regulating the homeostasis of the mammary epithelium. Our aim was to analyse these regulatory functions by deriving a comprehensive tissue-specific combined miRNA and mRNA expression profile of post-natal mouse mammary gland development. We measured the expression of 318 individual murine miRNAs by bead-based flow-cytometric profiling of whole mouse mammary glands throughout a 16-point developmental time course, including juvenile, puberty, mature virgin, gestation, lactation, and involution stages. In parallel whole-genome mRNA expression data were obtained. Results One third (n = 102 of all murine miRNAs analysed were detected during mammary gland development. MicroRNAs were represented in seven temporally co-expressed clusters, which were enriched for both miRNAs belonging to the same family and breast cancer-associated miRNAs. Global miRNA and mRNA expression was significantly reduced during lactation and the early stages of involution after weaning. For most detected miRNA families we did not observe systematic changes in the expression of predicted targets. For miRNA families whose targets did show changes, we observed inverse patterns of miRNA and target expression. The data sets are made publicly available and the combined expression profiles represent an important community resource for mammary gland biology research. Conclusion MicroRNAs were expressed in likely co-regulated clusters during mammary gland development. Breast cancer-associated miRNAs were significantly enriched in these clusters. The mechanism and functional consequences of this miRNA co-regulation provide new avenues for research into mammary gland biology and generate candidates for functional validation.

  1. Identification and characterization of new miRNAs cloned from normal mouse mammary gland

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    Vilotte Jean-Luc

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that have been found to play important roles in silencing target genes and that are involved in the regulation of various normal cellular processes. Until now their implication in the mammary gland biology was suggested by few studies mainly focusing on pathological situations allowing the characterization of miRNAs as markers of breast cancer tumour classes. If in the normal mammary gland, the expression of known miRNAs has been studied in human and mice but the full repertoire of miRNAs expressed in this tissue is not yet available. Results To extend the repertoire of mouse mammary gland expressed miRNAs, we have constructed several libraries of small miRNAs allowing the cloning of 455 sequences. After bioinformatics' analysis, 3 known miRNA (present in miRbase and 33 new miRNAs were identified. Expression of 24 out of the 33 has been confirmed by RT-PCR. Expression of none of them was found to be mammary specific, despite a tissue-restricted distribution of some of them. No correlation could be established between their expression pattern and evolutionary conservation. Six of them appear to be mouse specific. In several cases, multiple potential precursors of miRNA were present in the genome and we have developed a strategy to determine which of them was able to mature the miRNA. Conclusion The cloning approach has allowed improving the repertoire of miRNAs in the mammary gland, an evolutionary recent organ. This tissue is a good candidate to find tissue-specific miRNAs and to detect miRNA specific to mammals. We provide evidence for 24 new miRNA. If none of them is mammary gland specific, a few of them are not ubiquitously expressed. For the first time 6 mouse specific miRNA have been identified.

  2. Social isolation induces autophagy in the mouse mammary gland: link to increased mammary cancer risk.

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    Sumis, Allison; Cook, Katherine L; Andrade, Fabia O; Hu, Rong; Kidney, Emma; Zhang, Xiyuan; Kim, Dominic; Carney, Elissa; Nguyen, Nguyen; Yu, Wei; Bouker, Kerrie B; Cruz, Idalia; Clarke, Robert; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena

    2016-10-01

    Social isolation is a strong predictor of early all-cause mortality and consistently increases breast cancer risk in both women and animal models. Because social isolation increases body weight, we compared its effects to those caused by a consumption of obesity-inducing diet (OID) in C57BL/6 mice. Social isolation and OID impaired insulin and glucose sensitivity. In socially isolated, OID-fed mice (I-OID), insulin resistance was linked to reduced Pparg expression and increased neuropeptide Y levels, but in group-housed OID fed mice (G-OID), it was linked to increased leptin and reduced adiponectin levels, indicating that the pathways leading to insulin resistance are different. Carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis was significantly higher in I-OID mice than in the other groups, but cancer risk was also increased in socially isolated, control diet-fed mice (I-C) and G-OID mice compared with that in controls. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling (GRP78; IRE1) was upregulated in the mammary glands of OID-fed mice, but not in control diet-fed, socially isolated I-C mice. In contrast, expression of BECLIN1, ATG7 and LC3II were increased, and p62 was downregulated by social isolation, indicating increased autophagy. In the mammary glands of socially isolated mice, but not in G-OID mice, mRNA expressions of p53 and the p53-regulated autophagy inducer Dram1 were upregulated, and nuclear p53 staining was strong. Our findings further indicated that autophagy and tumorigenesis were not increased in Atg7(+/-) mice kept in social isolation and fed OID. Thus, social isolation may increase breast cancer risk by inducing autophagy, independent of changes in body weight.

  3. Reinitiation of Growth in Senescent Mouse Mammary Epithelium in Response to Cholera Toxin

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    Daniel, Charles W.; Silberstein, Gary B.; Strickland, Phyllis

    1984-06-01

    Several lines of mouse mammary tissue that had been serially transplanted until mitotic senescence was reached were exposed in vivo to plastic implants that slowly released cholera toxin. Gland tissue surrounding the implants displayed new end buds, indicating reinitiation of growth and morphogenesis. The ability of cholera toxin, which elevates intracellular adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, to temporarily reverse the senescent phenotype suggests that this mitotic dysfunction results not from generalized cellular deterioration but from specific changes in cell regulation.

  4. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

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    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  5. Exposure to ionizing radiation induced persistent gene expression changes in mouse mammary gland

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    Datta Kamal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast tissue is among the most sensitive tissues to the carcinogenic actions of ionizing radiation and epidemiological studies have linked radiation exposure to breast cancer. Currently, molecular understanding of radiation carcinogenesis in mammary gland is hindered due to the scarcity of in vivo long-term follow up data. We undertook this study to delineate radiation-induced persistent alterations in gene expression in mouse mammary glands 2-month after radiation exposure. Methods Six to eight week old female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy of whole body γ radiation and mammary glands were surgically removed 2-month after radiation. RNA was isolated and microarray hybridization performed for gene expression analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA was used for biological interpretation of microarray data. Real time quantitative PCR was performed on selected genes to confirm the microarray data. Results Compared to untreated controls, the mRNA levels of a total of 737 genes were significantly (p Conclusions Exposure to a clinically relevant radiation dose led to long-term activation of mammary gland genes involved in proliferative and metabolic pathways, which are known to have roles in carcinogenesis. When considered along with downregulation of a number of tumor suppressor genes, our study has implications for breast cancer initiation and progression after therapeutic radiation exposure.

  6. Aquaporin 5 Expression in Mouse Mammary Gland Cells Is Not Driven by Promoter Methylation

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    Barbara Arbeithuber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that aquaporins play a role in tumor progression and invasion. In breast carcinomas, high levels of aquaporin 5 (AQP5, a membrane protein involved in water transport, have been linked to increased cell proliferation and migration, thus facilitating tumor progression. Despite the potential role of AQP5 in mammary oncogenesis, the mechanisms controlling mammary AQP5 expression are poorly understood. In other tissues, AQP5 expression has been correlated with its promoter methylation, yet, very little is known about AQP5 promoter methylation in the mammary gland. In this work, we used the mouse mammary gland cell line EpH4, in which we controlled AQP5 expression via the steroid hormone dexamethasone (Dex to further investigate mechanisms regulating AQP5 expression. In this system, we observed a rapid drop of AQP5 mRNA levels with a delay of several hours in AQP5 protein, suggesting transcriptional control of AQP5 levels. Yet, AQP5 expression was independent of its promoter methylation, or to the presence of negative glucocorticoid receptor elements (nGREs in its imminent promoter region, but was rather influenced by the cell proliferative state or cell density. We conclude that AQP5 promoter methylation is not a universal mechanism for AQP5 regulation and varies on cell and tissue type.

  7. Somatic structural rearrangements in genetically engineered mouse mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varela, I.; Klijn, C.N.; Stephens, P.J.; Mudie, L.J.; Stebbings, L.; Galappaththige, D.; Van der Gulden, H.; Schut, E.; Klarenbeek, S.; Campbell, P.J.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Stratton, M.R.; Jonkers, J.; Futreal, P.A.; Adams, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Here we present the first paired-end sequencing of tumors from genetically engineered mouse models of cancer to determine how faithfully these models recapitulate the landscape of somatic rearrangements found in human tumors. These were models of Trp53-mutated breast cancer, Brca1- and B

  8. PELP1 overexpression in the mouse mammary gland results in the development of hyperplasia and carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Valerie; Samayoa, Cathy; Zamora, Andrea; Martinez, Lizatte; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; Vadlamudi, Ratna K

    2014-12-15

    Estrogen receptor (ER) coregulator overexpression promotes carcinogenesis and/or progression of endocrine related-cancers in which steroid hormones are powerful mitogenic agents. Recent studies in our laboratory, as well as others, demonstrated that the estrogen receptor coregulator PELP1 is a proto-oncogene. PELP1 interactions with histone demethylase KDM1 play a critical role in its oncogenic functions and PELP1 is a prognostic indicator of decreased survival in patients with breast cancer. However, the in vivo significance of PELP1 deregulation during initiation and progression of breast cancer remains unknown. We generated an inducible, mammary gland-specific PELP1-expressing transgenic (Tg) mouse (MMTVrtTA-TetOPELP1). We found more proliferation, extensive side branching, and precocious differentiation in PELP1-overexpressing mammary glands than in control glands. Aged MMTVrtTA-TetOPELP1 Tg mice had hyperplasia and preneoplastic changes as early as 12 weeks, and ER-positive mammary tumors occurred at a latency of 14 to 16 months. Mechanistic studies revealed that PELP1 deregulation altered expression of a number of known ER target genes involved in cellular proliferation (cyclin D1, CDKs) and morphogenesis (EGFR, MMPs) and such changes facilitated altered mammary gland morphogenesis and tumor progression. Furthermore, PELP1 was hyper-phosphorylated at its CDK phosphorylation site, suggesting an autocrine loop involving the CDK-cyclin D1-PELP1 axis in promoting mammary tumorigenesis. Treatment of PELP1 Tg mice with a KDM1 inhibitor significantly reduced PELP1-driven hyperbranching, reversed alterations in cyclin D1 expression levels, and reduced CDK-driven PELP1 phosphorylation. These results further support the hypothesis that PELP1 deregulation has the potential to promote breast tumorigenesis in vivo and represent a novel model for future investigation into molecular mechanisms of PELP1-mediated tumorigenesis.

  9. Albumin transcytosis across the epithelium of the lactating mouse mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Jenifer; Neville, Margaret C

    2004-10-01

    Murine milk contains 18 mg ml(-1) serum albumin, a concentration equal to that in the serum of the lactating mouse. We examined cellular transport using in vivo methods in the mouse. At steady state the specific activity of (125)I-albumin injected into the blood stream was equal in plasma and whey, confirming that milk albumin is extra-mammary in origin. Fluorescent albumin crossed the gland from basolateral surface to lumen via cytoplasmic vesicles, but was not transported in the apical to basal direction. Albumin was segregated from transferrin at the basal surface of the epithelial cells and did not colocalize with either caveolin-1 or -2. Vesicular transport was not disrupted by filipin providing additional evidence that, unlike the vascular endothelium, caveoli are not involved. Cytoplasmic albumin was localized to vesicles containing IgA and transport was disrupted by agents that interfere with clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Together, these findings provide evidence that albumin is transported across the mammary epithelium by the same pathway as immunoglobulin. The possibility that the massive transfer of albumin into mouse milk is mediated by fluid phase transport is considered.

  10. HDAC Activity Is Required for Efficient Core Promoter Function at the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter

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    Sang C. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have been shown to be required for basal or inducible transcription at a variety of genes by poorly understood mechanisms. We demonstrated previously that HDAC inhibition rapidly repressed transcription from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter by a mechanism that does not require the binding of upstream transcription factors. In the current study, we find that HDACs work through the core promoter sequences of MMTV as well as those of several cellular genes to facilitate transcriptional initiation through deacetylation of nonhistone proteins.

  11. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  12. Mammary-Stem-Cell-Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

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    Zheng Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomics has provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs. By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study has established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and has discovered functional breast cancer mutations.

  13. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Indirubin Treatment of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mastitis in a Mouse Model and Activity in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jin-Lun; Liu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Yong-Chong; Ge, Pan; He, Chen-Fei; Liu, Chang; Chen, Ying-Yu; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Hu, Chang-Min

    2017-01-01

    Indirubin is a Chinese medicine extracted from indigo and known to be effective for treating chronic myelogenous leukemia, neoplasia, and inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of indirubin in a lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced mouse mastitis model. The indirubin mechanism and targets were evaluated in vitro in mouse mammary epithelial cells. In the mouse model, indirubin significantly attenuated the severity of inflammatory lesions, edema, inflammatory hyperemia, milk stasis and local tissue necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration. Indirubin significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 caused by LPS. In vitro, indirubin inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. It also downregulated LPS-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and inhibited phosphorylation of LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) P65 protein and inhibitor of kappa B. In addition to its effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway, indirubin suppressed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by inhibiting phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), P38, and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Indirubin improved LPS-induced mouse mastitis by suppressing TLR4 and downstream NF-κB and MAPK pathway inflammatory signals and might be a potential treatment of mastitis and other inflammatory diseases.

  15. A Mouse Mammary Gland Involution mRNA Signature Identifies Biological Pathways Potentially Associated with Breast Cancer Metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Stein; N. Salomonis; D.S.A. Nuyten; M.J. van de Vijver; B.A. Gusterson

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary gland involution resembles a wound healing response with suppressed inflammation. Wound healing and inflammation are also associated with tumour development, and a 'wound-healing' gene expression signature can predict metastasis formation and survival. Recent studies have shown that an

  16. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  17. Laser Raman Tweezer Spectroscopy (RTS) for the Molecular and Functional Characterization of Single Live Mouse Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells (TIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Medicine and was used in these studies. BALB/c female mice (3- to 5-weeks old) were injected with pieces of p53 null mouse mammary tumors (1-3mm in...A. B. 12 REFERENCES: Zhang, M., Behbod, F., Atkinson, R. L., Landis , M. D., Kittrell, F., Edwards, D., Medina, D., Tsimelzon, A

  18. The contribution of tumor and host tissue factor expression to oncogene-driven gliomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Nathalie; Meehan, Brian; Garnier, Delphine; Hashemi, Maryam; Montermini, Laura; Lee, Tae Hoon; Milsom, Chloe; Pawlinski, Rafal; Ohlfest, John; Anderson, Mark; Mackman, Nigel; Rak, Janusz

    2014-11-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of glial brain tumors, associated with angiogenesis, thrombosis, and upregulation of tissue factor (TF), the key cellular trigger of coagulation and signaling. Since TF is upregulated by oncogenic mutations occurring in different subsets of human brain tumors we investigated whether TF contributes to tumourigenesis driven by oncogenic activation of EGFR (EGFRvIII) and RAS pathways in the brain. Here we show that TF expression correlates with poor prognosis in glioma, but not in GBM. In situ, the TF protein expression is heterogeneously expressed in adult and pediatric gliomas. GBM cells harboring EGFRvIII (U373vIII) grow aggressively as xenografts in SCID mice and their progression is delayed by administration of monoclonal antibodies blocking coagulant (CNTO 859) and signaling (10H10) effects of TF in vivo. Mice in which TF gene is disrupted in the neuroectodermal lineage exhibit delayed progression of spontaneous brain tumors driven by oncogenic N-ras and SV40 large T antigen (SV40LT) expressed under the control of sleeping beauty transposase. Reduced host TF levels in low-TF/SCID hypomorphic mice mitigated growth of glioma subcutaneously but not in the brain. Thus, we suggest that tumor-associated TF may serve as therapeutic target in the context of oncogene-driven disease progression in a subset of glioma.

  19. Beef tallow increases the potency of conjugated linoleic acid in the reduction of mouse mammary tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Neil E; Lim, Debora; Erickson, Kent L

    2006-01-01

    Animal studies consistently show that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces mammary tumorigenesis including metastasis. Relatively low concentrations of CLA are required for those effects, and a threshold level exists above which there is no added reduction. We reasoned that the concentration of CLA required to effectively alter mammary tumor metastasis may be dependent on the type of dietary fat because select fatty acids can enhance or suppress normal or malignant cell growth and metastasis. For this study, the diets (a total of 12 different groups) differed in fatty acid composition but not in energy from fat (40%). In experiments involving spontaneous metastasis, mice were fed for 11 wk; in experiments in which mice were injected i.v. with tumor cells, they were fed for 7 wk. Mice were then assessed for the effect of CLA concentration on mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor growth was not altered, but metastasis was significantly decreased when beef tallow (BT) replaced half of a defined vegetable fat blend (VFB). That blend reflects the typical fat content of a Western diet. In addition, that same VFB:BT diet lowered the concentration of CLA required to significantly decrease mammary tumor metastasis from 0.1% of the diet to 0.05%. A diet in which corn oil replaced half of the VFB did not lower the threshold from 0.1 to 0.05%. In vitro, the main fatty acid in vegetable oil, linoleic acid, reduced the efficacy of CLA toxicity on mammary tumor cells in culture. Alternatively, fatty acids normally found in BT, such as oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids, either did not change or enhanced the cytolytic effects of CLA isomers on mouse mammary tumor cells in culture. These data provide evidence that dietary BT, itself with negligible levels of CLA, may increase the efficacy of dietary CLA in reducing mammary tumorigenesis.

  20. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  1. Comparison of virulence of ovine respiratory mycoplasmas in the mouse mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddle, B M; Herceg, M; Davies, D H

    1984-08-01

    The virulence of isolates of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and M. arginini from pneumonic and unaffected ovine lungs was compared in a mouse mammary gland model. The isolates varied in their ability to induce a neutrophilic response in the mammary gland. A moderate to severe form of mastitis was induced by 3 M. ovipneumoniae isolates recovered from pneumonic lungs, while the remaining M. ovipneumoniae isolates from pneumonic lungs and those from unaffected lungs induced a very mild histopathological response. The severity of the mastitis could not be increased by the simultaneous inoculation of a mixture of 5 mycoplasma isolates. Mycoplasma arginini isolates induced only a very mild histopathological response despite having been isolated from pneumonic lungs. The finding that the 3 most virulent M. ovipneumoniae isolates were initially recovered from pneumonic ovine lungs suggested that these virulent isolates may contribute to ovine pneumonia. However, the isolation of M. ovipneumoniae from pneumonic ovine lungs does not necessarily imply that these organisms are the causal agents, since M. ovipneumoniae isolates may vary in virulence.

  2. Expression of murine APOBEC3 alleles in different mouse strains and their effect on mouse mammary tumor virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeoma, Chioma M; Petersen, Josiah; Ross, Susan R

    2009-04-01

    Recent work has shown that mouse APOBEC3 restricts infection by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and murine leukemia virus (MLV) and that there are polymorphic APOBEC3 alleles found in different inbred mouse strains. For example, C57BL/6 mice, which are resistant to Friend MLV (F-MLV), encode a APOBEC3 gene different from that encoded by F-MLV-susceptible BALB/c mice; the predominant RNA produced in C57BL/6 mice lacks exon 5 (mA3(-5)) and encodes a protein with 15 polymorphic amino acids. It has also been reported that BALB/c mice produce only a variant RNA that lacks exon 2 (mA3(-2)). In this study, we examined the effect of these polymorphic APOBEC3 proteins on MMTV infection. We found that the major RNA made in C57BL/6 and B10.BR mice lacks exon 5 but that BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice predominantly express an RNA that contains all nine exons. In addition to producing the splice variant, C57BL/6 and B10.BR cells and tissues had levels of mA3 RNA fivefold higher than those from BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice. A cloned C57BL/6-derived mA3 protein lacking exon 5 inhibited MMTV infection better than a cloned full-length protein derived from 129/Ola RNA when packaged into MMTV virions. We also tested dendritic cells derived from different inbred mouse strains for their abilities to be infected by MMTV and showed that susceptibility to infection correlated with the presence of the exon 5-encoding allele. In vivo susceptibility to infection cosegregated with the inherited mA3 allele in a C57BL/6 x BALB/c backcross analysis. Moreover, virus produced in vivo in the mammary tissue of mA3 knockout and BALB/c mice was more infectious than that produced in the tissue of C57BL/6 mice. These data indicate that mA3 plays a role in the genetics of susceptibility and resistance to MMTV infection.

  3. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  4. Modulation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 expression levels alters mouse mammary tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian D Young

    Full Text Available Tumor cells exhibit an altered metabolism characterized by elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate secretion which is supported by an increase in glucose transport and consumption. We hypothesized that reducing or eliminating the expression of the most prominently expressed glucose transporter(s would decrease the amount of glucose available to breast cancer cells thereby decreasing their metabolic capacity and proliferative potential.Of the 12 GLUT family glucose transporters expressed in mice, GLUT1 was the most abundantly expressed at the RNA level in the mouse mammary tumors from MMTV-c-ErbB2 mice and cell lines examined. Reducing GLUT1 expression in mouse mammary tumor cell lines using shRNA or Cre/Lox technology reduced glucose transport, glucose consumption, lactate secretion and lipid synthesis in vitro without altering the concentration of ATP, as well as reduced growth on plastic and in soft agar. The growth of tumor cells with reduced GLUT1 expression was impaired when transplanted into the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice in vivo. Overexpression of GLUT1 in a cell line with low levels of endogenous GLUT1 increased glucose transport in vitro and enhanced growth in nude mice in vivo as compared to the control cells with very low levels of GLUT1.These studies demonstrate that GLUT1 is the major glucose transporter in mouse mammary carcinoma models overexpressing ErbB2 or PyVMT and that modulation of the level of GLUT1 has an effect upon the growth of mouse mammary tumor cell lines in vivo.

  5. Low-dose BPA exposure alters the mesenchymal and epithelial transcriptomes of the mouse fetal mammary gland.

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    Perinaaz R Wadia

    Full Text Available Exposure of rodent fetuses to low doses of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA causes subtle morphological changes in the prenatal mammary gland and results in pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions during adulthood. To examine whether the BPA-induced morphological alterations of the fetal mouse mammary glands are a associated with changes in mRNA expression reflecting estrogenic actions and/or b dependent on the estrogen receptor α (ERα, we compared the transcriptomal effects of BPA and the steroidal estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2 on fetal mammary tissues of wild type and ERα knock-out mice. Mammary glands from fetuses of dams exposed to vehicle, 250 ng BPA/kg BW/d or 10 ng EE2/kg BW/d from embryonic day (E 8 were harvested at E19. Transcriptomal analyses on the ductal epithelium and periductal stroma revealed altered expression of genes involved in the focal adhesion and adipogenesis pathways in the BPA-exposed stroma while genes regulating the apoptosis pathway changed their expression in the BPA-exposed epithelium. These changes in gene expression correlated with previously reported histological changes in matrix organization, adipogenesis, and lumen formation resulting in enhanced maturation of the fat-pad and delayed lumen formation in the epithelium of BPA-exposed fetal mammary glands. Overall similarities in the transcriptomal effects of BPA and EE2 were more pronounced in the epithelium, than in the stroma. In addition, the effects of BPA and EE2 on the expression of various genes involved in mammary stromal-epithelial interactions were suppressed in the absence of ERα. These observations support a model whereby BPA and EE2 act directly on the stroma, which expresses ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in fetal mammary glands, and that the stroma, in turn, affects gene expression in the epithelium, where ERα and ERβ are below the level of detection at this stage of development.

  6. The Wnt receptor, Lrp5, is expressed by mouse mammary stem cells and is required to maintain the basal lineage.

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    Nisha M Badders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ectopic Wnt signaling induces increased stem/progenitor cell activity in the mouse mammary gland, followed by tumor development. The Wnt signaling receptors, Lrp5/6, are uniquely required for canonical Wnt activity. Previous data has shown that the absence of Lrp5 confers resistance to Wnt1-induced tumor development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that all basal mammary cells express Lrp5, and co-express Lrp6 in a similar fashion. Though Wnt dependent transcription of key target genes is relatively unchanged in mammary epithelial cell cultures, the absence of Lrp5 specifically depletes adult regenerative stem cell activity (to less than 1%. Stem cell activity can be enriched by >200 fold (over 80% of activity, based on high Lrp5 expression alone. Though Lrp5 null glands have apparent normal function, the basal lineage is relatively reduced (from 42% basal/total epithelial cells to 22% and Lrp5-/- mammary epithelial cells show enhanced expression of senescence-associated markers in vitro, as measured by expression of p16(Ink4a and TA-p63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first single biomarker that has been demonstrated to be functionally involved in stem cell maintenance. Together, these results demonstrate that Wnt signaling through Lrp5 is an important component of normal mammary stem cell function.

  7. Functional Characteristics of Tumor-Associated Protein Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael C. Rudolph, B.A...Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0596 Breast Cancer Cell Lines 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...S14 and to identify potential S14 interacting proteins that confer its function. Body The overarching goals of this proposal are to examine the

  8. Modulation of secreted proteins of mouse mammary epithelial cells by the collagenous substrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.Y.H.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells retain their characteristic morphology and their ability to produce ..gamma..-casein, a member of the casein gene family, only if they are maintained on floating collagen gels. In this paper we show: (a) Cells on floating collagen gels secrete not only ..gamma..-casein but also ..cap alpha../sub 1/-, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-, and ..beta..-caseins. These are not secreted by cells on plastic and are secreted to only a very limited extent by cells on attached collagen gels. (b) The floating collagen gel regulates at the level of synthesis and/or stabilization of the caseins rather than at the level of secretion alone. Contraction of the floating gel is important in that cells cultured on floating glutaraldehyde cross-linked gels do not secrete any of the caseins. (c) The secretion of an 80,000-mol-wt protein, most probably transferrin, and a 67,000-mol-wt protein, probably butyrophilin, a major protein of the milk fat globule membrane, are partially modulated by substrata. However, in contrast to the caseins, these are always detectable in media from cells cultured on plastic and attached gels. (d) Whey acidic protein, a major whey protein, is actively secreted by freshly isolated cells but is secreted in extremely limited quantities in cultured cells regardless of the nature of the substratum used. Lactalbumin secretion is also decreased significantly in cultured cells. (e) A previously unreported set of proteins, which may be minor milk proteins, are prominently secreted by the mammary cells on all substrata tested. We conclude that while the substratum profoundly influences the secretion of the caseins, it does not regulate the expression of every milk-specific protein in the same way. The mechanistic implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Vasoinhibins, N-terminal mouse prolactin fragments, participate in mammary gland involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Michiyo; Maehara, Midori; Watanabe, Tsukasa; Yanagisawa, Yu; Takata, Yukiko; Nakajima, Ryojun; Suzuki, Mika; Harigaya, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    Vasoinhibins are a family of peptides that act on endothelial cells to suppress angiogenesis and promote apoptosis-mediated vascular regression. Vasoinhibins include the N-terminal fragments from prolactin (PRL), GH, and placental lactogen. One of the vasoinhibins, the N-terminal PRL fragment of 16 kDa, is generated by the lysosomal representative protease cathepsin D (Cath D). Because the normal growth and involution of the mammary gland (MG) are profoundly affected by the expansion and regression of blood vessels and also because PRL stimulates the growth and differentiation of MG, we proposed that intact PRL produced during lactation contributes to MG angiogenesis and increased blood flow, whereas during involution, the N-terminal PRL fragment would have proapoptotic effects on mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Therefore, we investigated the production of the N-terminal PRL fragment and its direct effect on the MG. Mouse PRL (mPRL) was proteolytically cleaved by Cath D between amino acids 148 and 149. N-terminal PRL fragment and Cath D expression increased during MG involution. Furthermore, incubation of MG fragments and MCF7 with recombinant 16 kDa mPRL revealed a proapoptotic effect in MECs. Ectopic mPRL in MECs was cleaved to 16 kDa PRL by Cath D in the MG lysosomal fraction. The majority of PRL derived from pituitary gland was cleaved to 16 kDa PRL in culture medium. Therefore, N-terminal PRL fragment increases during the involution period, has a proapoptotic effect on MECs, and is mainly generated by secreted Cath D in the extracellular space of MG.

  10. Screening and analysis of breast cancer genes regulated by the human mammary microenvironment in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingjie; Wang, Jue; Ling, Lijun; Xue, Dandan; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments play critical regulatory roles in tumor growth. Although mouse cancer models have contributed to the understanding of human tumor biology, the effectiveness of mouse cancer models is limited by the inability of the models to accurately present humanized tumor microenvironments. Previously, a humanized breast cancer model in severe combined immunodeficiency mice was established, in which human breast cancer tissue was implanted subcutaneously, followed by injection of human breast cancer cells. It was demonstrated that breast cancer cells showed improved growth in the human mammary microenvironment compared with a conventional subcutaneous mouse model. In the present study, the novel mouse model and microarray technology was used to analyze changes in the expression of genes in breast cancer cells that are regulated by the human mammary microenvironment. Humanized breast and conventional subcutaneous mouse models were established, and orthotopic tumor cells were obtained from orthotopic tumor masses by primary culture. An expression microarray using Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip and database analyses were performed to investigate changes in gene expression between tumors from each microenvironment. A total of 94 genes were differentially expressed between the primary cells cultured from the humanized and conventional mouse models. Significant upregulation of genes that promote cell proliferation and metastasis or inhibit apoptosis, such as SH3-domain binding protein 5 (BTK-associated), sodium/chloride cotransporter 3 and periostin, osteoblast specific factor, and genes that promote angiogenesis, such as KIAA1618, was also noted. Other genes that restrain cell proliferation and accelerate cell apoptosis, including tripartite motif containing TRIM36 and NES1, were downregulated. The present results revealed differences in various aspects of tumor growth and metabolism between the two model groups and indicated the functional

  11. Expression analysis of the mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Meghan; Emberley, Ethan D; Lizardo, Michael; Alowami, Salem; Qing, Gefei; Alfia'ar, Abdullah; Snell-Curtis, Linda J; Niu, Yulian; Civetta, Alberto; Myal, Yvonne; Shiu, Robert; Murphy, Leigh C; Watson, Peter H

    2005-02-17

    The human psoriasin (S100A7) gene has been implicated in inflammation and tumor progression. Implementation of a mouse model would facilitate further investigation of its function, however little is known of the murine psoriasin gene. In this study we have cloned the cDNA and characterized the expression of the potential murine ortholog of human S100A7/psoriasin in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis. On the basis of chromosomal location, phylogenetic analysis, amino acid sequence similarity, conservation of a putative Jab1-binding motif, and similarities of the patterns of mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene expression (measured by RT-PCR and in-situ hybridization) with those of human S100A7/psoriasin, we propose that mouse S100A7/psoriasin is the murine ortholog of human psoriasin/S100A7. Although mouse S100A7/psoriasin is poorly conserved relative to other S100 family members, its pattern of expression parallels that of the human psoriasin gene. In murine skin S100A7/psoriasin was significantly upregulated in relation to inflammation. In murine mammary gland expression is also upregulated in mammary tumors, where it is localized to areas of squamous differentiation. This mirrors the context of expression in human tumor types where both squamous and glandular differentiation occur, including cervical and lung carcinomas. Additionally, mouse S100A7/psoriasin possesses a putative Jab1 binding motif that mediates many downstream functions of the human S100A7 gene. These observations and results support the hypothesis that the mouse S100A7 gene is structurally and functionally similar to human S100A7 and may offer a relevant model system for studying its normal biological function and putative role in tumor progression.

  12. Expression analysis of the mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis

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    Niu Yulian

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human psoriasin (S100A7 gene has been implicated in inflammation and tumor progression. Implementation of a mouse model would facilitate further investigation of its function, however little is known of the murine psoriasin gene. In this study we have cloned the cDNA and characterized the expression of the potential murine ortholog of human S100A7/psoriasin in skin inflammation and mammary tumorigenesis. Methods On the basis of chromosomal location, phylogenetic analysis, amino acid sequence similarity, conservation of a putative Jab1-binding motif, and similarities of the patterns of mouse S100A7/psoriasin gene expression (measured by RT-PCR and in-situ hybridization with those of human S100A7/psoriasin, we propose that mouse S100A7/psoriasin is the murine ortholog of human psoriasin/S100A7. Results Although mouse S100A7/psoriasin is poorly conserved relative to other S100 family members, its pattern of expression parallels that of the human psoriasin gene. In murine skin S100A7/psoriasin was significantly upregulated in relation to inflammation. In murine mammary gland expression is also upregulated in mammary tumors, where it is localized to areas of squamous differentiation. This mirrors the context of expression in human tumor types where both squamous and glandular differentiation occur, including cervical and lung carcinomas. Additionally, mouse S100A7/psoriasin possesses a putative Jab1 binding motif that mediates many downstream functions of the human S100A7 gene. Conclusion These observations and results support the hypothesis that the mouse S100A7 gene is structurally and functionally similar to human S100A7 and may offer a relevant model system for studying its normal biological function and putative role in tumor progression.

  13. Loss of STAT1 from Mouse Mammary Epithelium Results in an Increased Neu-Induced Tumor Burden

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    Peter J. Klover

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Type I and type II classes of interferons (IFNs signal through the JAK/STAT1 pathway and are known to be important in adaptive and innate immune responses and in protection against tumors. Although STAT1 is widely considered a tumor suppressor, it remains unclear, however, if this function occurs in tumor cells (cell autonomous or if STAT1 acts primarily through immune cells. Here, the question of whether STAT1 has a cell autonomous role in mammary tumor formation was addressed in a mouse model of ERBB2/neu-induced breast cancer in the absence and presence of STAT1. For this purpose, mice that carry floxed Stat1 alleles, which permit cell-specific removal of STAT1, were generated. To induce tumors only in mammary cells lacking STAT1, Stat1 floxed mice were crossed with transgenic mice that express cre recombinase and the neu oncogene under the mouse mammary tumor virus LTR (Stat1fl/fl NIC. Stat1 was effectively deleted in mammary epithelium of virgin Stat1fl/fl NIC females. Time-to-tumor onset was significantly shorter in Stat1fl/fl NIC females than in WT NIC (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = .02. The median time-to-tumor onset in the Stat1fl/fl NIC mice was 49.4 weeks, whereas it was 62.4 weeks in the WT NIC mice. These results suggest that STAT1 in mammary epithelial cells may play a role in suppressing tumorigenesis. The Stat1 floxed allele described in this study is also a unique resource to determine the cellular targets of IFNs and STAT1 action, which should aid our understanding and appreciation of these pathways.

  14. Tumor suppressor function of Syk in human MCF10A in vitro and normal mouse mammary epithelium in vivo.

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    You Me Sung

    Full Text Available The normal function of Syk in epithelium of the developing or adult breast is not known, however, Syk suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in breast cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that in the mouse mammary gland, loss of one Syk allele profoundly increases proliferation and ductal branching and invasion of epithelial cells through the mammary fat pad during puberty. Mammary carcinomas develop by one year. Syk also suppresses proliferation and invasion in vitro. siRNA or shRNA knockdown of Syk in MCF10A breast epithelial cells dramatically increased proliferation, anchorage independent growth, cellular motility, and invasion, with formation of functional, extracellular matrix-degrading invadopodia. Morphological and gene microarray analysis following Syk knockdown revealed a loss of luminal and differentiated epithelial features with epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a gain in invadopodial cell surface markers CD44, CD49F, and MMP14. These results support the role of Syk in limiting proliferation and invasion of epithelial cells during normal morphogenesis, and emphasize the critical role of Syk as a tumor suppressor for breast cancer. The question of breast cancer risk following systemic anti-Syk therapy is raised since only partial loss of Syk was sufficient to induce mammary carcinomas.

  15. Using Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells to Teach Core Biology Concepts: A Simple Lab Module.

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    McIlrath, Victoria; Trye, Alice; Aguanno, Ann

    2015-06-18

    Undergraduate biology students are required to learn, understand and apply a variety of cellular and molecular biology concepts and techniques in preparation for biomedical, graduate and professional programs or careers in science. To address this, a simple laboratory module was devised to teach the concepts of cell division, cellular communication and cancer through the application of animal cell culture techniques. Here the mouse mammary tumor (MMT) cell line is used to model for breast cancer. Students learn to grow and characterize these animal cells in culture and test the effects of traditional and non-traditional chemotherapy agents on cell proliferation. Specifically, students determine the optimal cell concentration for plating and growing cells, learn how to prepare and dilute drug solutions, identify the best dosage and treatment time course of the antiproliferative agents, and ascertain the rate of cell death in response to various treatments. The module employs both a standard cell counting technique using a hemocytometer and a novel cell counting method using microscopy software. The experimental procedure lends to open-ended inquiry as students can modify critical steps of the protocol, including testing homeopathic agents and over-the-counter drugs. In short, this lab module requires students to use the scientific process to apply their knowledge of the cell cycle, cellular signaling pathways, cancer and modes of treatment, all while developing an array of laboratory skills including cell culture and analysis of experimental data not routinely taught in the undergraduate classroom.

  16. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

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    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  17. Identification of reliable reference genes for qRT-PCR studies of the developing mouse mammary gland

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    van de Moosdijk, Anoeska Agatha Alida; van Amerongen, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth and differentiation are often driven by subtle changes in gene expression. Many challenges still exist in detecting these changes, particularly in the context of a complex, developing tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) allows relatively high-throughput evaluation of multiple genes and developmental time points. Proper quantification of gene expression levels by qRT-PCR requires normalization to one or more reference genes. Traditionally, these genes have been selected based on their presumed “housekeeping” function, with the implicit assumption that they are stably expressed over the entire experimental set. However, this is rarely tested empirically. Here we describe the identification of novel reference genes for the mouse mammary gland based on their stable expression in published microarray datasets. We compared eight novel candidate reference genes (Arpc3, Clock, Ctbp1, Phf7, Prdx1, Sugp2, Taf11 and Usp7) to eight traditional ones (18S, Actb, Gapdh, Hmbs, Hprt, Rpl13a, Sdha and Tbp) and analysed all genes for stable expression in the mouse mammary gland from pre-puberty to adulthood using four different algorithms (GeNorm, DeltaCt, BestKeeper and NormFinder). Prdx1, Phf7 and Ctbp1 were validated as novel and reliable, tissue-specific reference genes that outperform traditional reference genes in qRT-PCR studies of postnatal mammary gland development. PMID:27752147

  18. Expression and function of leptin and its receptor in mouse mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is an autocrine and paracrine factor which affects the development of duct, formation of gland alveolus, expression of milk protein gene and onset involution of mammary gland. In order to know the function and mechanism of leptin in mammary gland, the protein expression and localization of leptin and its long form receptor (OB-Rb) were detected by a confocal laser scanning microscope. To study the impacts of leptin on mammary gland and leptin signal transduction pathway in pregnancy-, lactation- and involution-stage mammary gland, explants were cultured and Western blotting was used. The results showed that in the whole development cycle of mammary gland, the expression of leptin and OB-Rb was in positive correlation. In virgin the leptin expression was the highest and then decreased in pregnancy. In lactation the expression of leptin was low and upgraded in involution, and recovered to the original level about virgin on involution 13 d. The localization of leptin and OB-Rb revealed that leptin induced the expression of OB-Rb specifically and controlled the development and physiological function of the mammary gland by binding to OB-Rb. In pregnancy stage, leptin stimulated proliferation and differentiation of ductal epithelial cells by JAK-MAPK signal pathway. In lactation, leptin induced gene expression of β-casein by JAK-STAT5 signal pathway, and in involution leptin induced mammary epithelial cell apoptosis and mammary gland restitution by JAK-STAT3 signal pathway.

  19. A mutant RNA pseudoknot that promotes ribosomal frameshifting in mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H; Tinoco, I

    1997-05-15

    A single A-->G mutation that changes a potential A.U base pair to a G.U pair at the junction of the stems and loops of a non-frameshifting pseudoknot dramatically increases its frameshifting efficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus. The structure of the non-frameshifting pseudoknot APK has been found to be very different from that of pseudoknots that cause efficient frameshifting [Kang,H., Hines,J.V. and Tinoco,I. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. , 259, 135-147]. The 3-dimensional structure of the mutant pseudoknot was determined by restrained molecular dynamics based on NMR-derived interproton distance and torsion angle constraints. One striking feature of the mutant pseudoknot compared with the parent pseudoknot is that a G.U base pair forms at the top of stem 2, thus leaving only 1 nt at the junction of the two stems. The conformation is very different from that of the previously determined non-frameshifting parent pseudoknot, which lacks the A.U base pair at the top of the stem and has 2 nt between the stems. However, the conformation is quite similar to that of efficient frameshifting pseudoknots whose structures were previously determined by NMR. A single adenylate residue intervenes between the two stems and interrupts their coaxial stacking. This unpaired nucleotide produces a bent structure. The structural similarity among the efficient frameshifting pseudoknots indicates that a specific conformation is required for ribosomal frameshifting, further implying a specific interaction of the pseudoknot with the ribosome.

  20. Functional expression of a Kir2.1-like inwardly rectifying potassium channel in mouse mammary secretory cells.

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    Kamikawa, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Toru

    2014-02-01

    K(+) channels in mammary secretory (MS) cells are believed to play a role in transcellular electrolyte transport and thus determining ionic composition of the aqueous phase of milk. However, direct evidence for specific K(+) channel activity in native MS cells is lacking at the single-cell level. Here, we show for the first time that an inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channel is functionally expressed in fully differentiated MS cells that were freshly isolated from the mammary gland of lactating mice. Using the standard whole cell patch-clamp technique, we found that mouse MS cells consistently displayed a K(+) current, whose electrophysiological properties are similar to those previously reported for Kir2.x channels, particularly Kir2.1: 1) current-voltage relationship with strong inward rectification, 2) slope conductance approximately proportional to the square root of external K(+) concentration, 3) voltage- and time-dependent and high-affinity block by external Ba(2+), and 4) voltage-dependent inhibition by external Cs(+). Accordingly, RT-PCR analysis revealed the gene expression of Kir2.1, but not Kir2.2, Kir2.3, and Kir2.4, in lactating mouse mammary gland, and immunohistochemical staining showed Kir2.1 protein expression in the secretory cells. Cell-attached patch recordings from MS cells revealed that a 31-pS K(+) channel with strong inward rectification was likely active at the resting membrane potential. Collectively, the present work demonstrates that a functional Kir2.1-like channel is expressed in lactating mouse MS cells. We propose that the channel might be involved, at least in part, in secretion and/or preservation of ionic components of milk stored into the lumen of these cells.

  1. Analysis of tumor heterogeneity and cancer gene networks using deep sequencing of MMTV-induced mouse mammary tumors.

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    Christiaan Klijn

    Full Text Available Cancer develops through a multistep process in which normal cells progress to malignant tumors via the evolution of their genomes as a result of the acquisition of mutations in cancer driver genes. The number, identity and mode of action of cancer driver genes, and how they contribute to tumor evolution is largely unknown. This study deployed the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV as an insertional mutagen to find both the driver genes and the networks in which they function. Using deep insertion site sequencing we identified around 31000 retroviral integration sites in 604 MMTV-induced mammary tumors from mice with mammary gland-specific deletion of Trp53, Pten heterozygous knockout mice, or wildtype strains. We identified 18 known common integration sites (CISs and 12 previously unknown CISs marking new candidate cancer genes. Members of the Wnt, Fgf, Fgfr, Rspo and Pdgfr gene families were commonly mutated in a mutually exclusive fashion. The sequence data we generated yielded also information on the clonality of insertions in individual tumors, allowing us to develop a data-driven model of MMTV-induced tumor development. Insertional mutations near Wnt and Fgf genes mark the earliest "initiating" events in MMTV induced tumorigenesis, whereas Fgfr genes are targeted later during tumor progression. Our data shows that insertional mutagenesis can be used to discover the mutational networks, the timing of mutations, and the genes that initiate and drive tumor evolution.

  2. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-05

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production, as well as NF-κB and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High resolution 3D MRI of mouse mammary glands with intra-ductal injection of contrast media.

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    Markiewicz, Erica; Fan, Xiaobing; Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Roman, Brian B; Jansen, Sanaz A; Macleod, Kay; Conzen, Suzanne D; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study mouse mammary gland ductal architecture based on intra-ductal injection of contrast agents. Female FVB/N mice age 12-20 weeks (n=12), were used in this study. A 34G, 45° tip Hamilton needle with a 25μL Hamilton syringe was inserted into the tip of the nipple. Approximately 20-25μL of a Gadodiamide/Trypan blue/saline solution was injected slowly over one minute into the nipple and duct. To prevent washout of contrast media from ducts due to perfusion, and maximize the conspicuity of ducts on MRI, mice were sacrificed one minute after injection. High resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 9.4T Bruker scanner after sacrifice to eliminate motion artifacts and reduce contrast media leakage from ducts. Trypan blue staining was well distributed throughout the ductal tree. MRI showed the mammary gland ductal structure clearly. In spoiled gradient echo T1-weighted images, the signal-to-noise ratio of regions identified as enhancing mammary ducts following contrast injection was significantly higher than that of muscle (pcontrast media (pcontrast agents to measure metabolism or target receptors in normal ducts and ducts with in situ cancers.

  4. Expression and function of heregulin-α and its receptors in the mouse mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Heregulin-α (HRGα) is a cytokine secreted by the mammary mesenchyme, adjacent to lobuloalveolar structures. To understand the role of HRGα and its receptors in mammary glands, and the underlying mechanisms, we performed this study to determine the expression and localization of HRGα and its receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3. We also determined the role of HRGα in the development of mammary glands, β-casein expression and secretion, Rab3A protein expression and the phosphorylation of HRGα signaling molecules using confocal laser scanning microscopy, tissue culture, capillary electrophoresis, Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We found that a peak was on pregnancy day 15. Changes of ErbB2 and ErbB3 expression were positively and linearly correlated with HRGα, indicating that HRGα positively regulates ErbB2 and ErbB3 expression. During pregnancy, HRGα enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT5, p42/p44, p38, PKC and Rab3A protein expression, stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of the ductal epithelial cells of mammary glands, and increased and maintained the expression and secretion of β-casein. During lactation, HRGα enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT5 and p38, inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC and Rab3A protein expression, maintained the morphology of the mammary glands and increased the secretion of lactoprotein to reduce the expression of β-casein in mammary epithelial cells. During involution, HRGα induced the phosphorylation of STAT3 and Rab3A protein expression, and inhibited the phosphorylation of PKC to stimulate the degeneration of mammary epithelial cells. It also inhibited the secretion of β-casein, resulting in increased levels of β-casein in mammary epithelial cells.

  5. Endocrine hormones and local signals during the development of the mouse mammary gland.

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    Brisken, Cathrin; Ataca, Dalya

    2015-01-01

    Most of mammary gland development occurs postnatally under the control of female reproductive hormones, which in turn interact with other endocrine factors. While hormones impinge on many tissues and trigger very complex biological responses, tissue recombination experiments with hormone receptor-deficient mammary epithelia revealed eminent roles for estrogens, progesterone, and prolactin receptor (PrlR) signaling that are intrinsic to the mammary epithelium. A subset of the luminal mammary epithelial cells expresses the estrogen receptor α (ERα), the progesterone receptor (PR), and the PrlR and act as sensor cells. These cells convert the detected systemic signals into local signals that are developmental stage-dependent and may be direct, juxtacrine, or paracrine. This setup ensures that the original input is amplified and that the biological responses of multiple cell types can be coordinated. Some key mediators of hormone action have been identified such as Wnt, EGFR, IGFR, and RANK signaling. Multiple signaling pathways such as FGF, Hedgehog, and Notch signaling participate in driving different aspects of mammary gland development locally but how they link to the hormonal control remains to be elucidated. An increasing number of endocrine factors are appearing to have a role in mammary gland development, the adipose tissue is increasingly recognized to play a role in endocrine regulation, and a complex role of the immune system with multiple different cell types is being revealed. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. The transcription factor ATF3 acts as an oncogene in mouse mammary tumorigenesis

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    Thames Howard D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of the bZip transcription factor, ATF3, in basal epithelial cells of transgenic mice under the control of the bovine cytokeratin-5 (CK5 promoter has previously been shown to induce epidermal hyperplasia, hair follicle anomalies and neoplastic lesions of the oral mucosa including squamous cell carcinomas. CK5 is known to be expressed in myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland, suggesting the possibility that transgenic BK5.ATF3 mice may exhibit mammary gland phenotypes. Methods Mammary glands from nulliparous mice in our BK5.ATF3 colony, both non-transgenic and transgenic, were examined for anomalies by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Nulliparous and biparous female mice were observed for possible mammary tumor development, and suspicious masses were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Human breast tumor samples, as well as normal breast tissue, were similarly analyzed for ATF3 expression. Results Transgenic BK5.ATF3 mice expressed nuclear ATF3 in the basal layer of the mammary ductal epithelium, and often developed squamous metaplastic lesions in one or more mammary glands by 25 weeks of age. No progression to malignancy was seen in nulliparous BK5.ATF3 or non-transgenic mice held for 16 months. However, biparous BK5.ATF3 mice developed mammary carcinomas with squamous metaplasia between 6 months and one year of age, reaching an incidence of 67%. Cytokeratin expression in the tumors was profoundly disturbed, including expression of CK5 and CK8 (characteristic of basal and luminal cells, respectively throughout the epithelial component of the tumors, CK6 (potentially a stem cell marker, CK10 (a marker of interfollicular epidermal differentiation, and mIRSa2 and mIRSa3.1 (markers of the inner root sheath of hair follicles. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that a subset of human breast tumors exhibit high levels of nuclear ATF3 expression. Conclusion Overexpression of ATF3 in CK5

  7. Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses (Mtv: New Roles for an Old Virus in Cancer, Infection and Immunity

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    Michael eHolt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV and endogenous (Mtv forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation.

  8. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Mouse Mammary Gland Morphology Using Automated Digital Image Processing and TEB Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacher, Silvia; Gérard, Céline; Gallez, Anne; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Péqueux, Christel

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of rodent mammary gland morphology is largely used to study the molecular mechanisms driving breast development and to analyze the impact of various endocrine disruptors with putative pathological implications. In this work, we propose a methodology relying on fully automated digital image analysis methods including image processing and quantification of the whole ductal tree and of the terminal end buds as well. It allows to accurately and objectively measure both growth parameters and fine morphological glandular structures. Mammary gland elongation was characterized by 2 parameters: the length and the epithelial area of the ductal tree. Ductal tree fine structures were characterized by: 1) branch end-point density, 2) branching density, and 3) branch length distribution. The proposed methodology was compared with quantification methods classically used in the literature. This procedure can be transposed to several software and thus largely used by scientists studying rodent mammary gland morphology.

  10. The Expression of the IGF Family During Mouse Mammary Gland Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study was to determine the patterns and levels of IGF family members' expression during postnatal mammary gland development. The authors investigated the protein expression profile of the major components of the IGF axis in murine mammary glands. All the proteins examined, IGF- Ⅰ, IGF- Ⅱ, and IGF- Ⅰ receptor (IGF- Ⅰ R) were expressed at greatly different levels and displayed unique expression profiles. IGF- Ⅱ and IGF- Ⅰ R were always expressed at significantly higher levels than IGF- Ⅰ. IGF- Ⅰ was localized in adipocytes as well as the epithelial and stromal compartments, but just distinctly expressed where mammary cells aggregated to form ducts, in virgins. The IGF- Ⅱ was localized only on the basal layer epithelial cell membranes of ducts and alveoli, with a peak level on the initiation of lactation. The higher level of IGF- Ⅰ R compared with IGF- Ⅰ was also found in adipocytes as well as in the epithelial and stromal compartments, especially during pregnancy and late lactation. The IGF- Ⅰ R pathway was obviously significant for the development of the mammary parenchyma and stroma. Overall, the comparison of the expression profiles of these different proteins would strongly suggest that they were likely to have different functions throughout the mammary gland development, and it also highlighted the potential interactions and coregulation of the members of this axis. It seems that IGF- Ⅱ was the major local modulator rather than IGF- Ⅰ by an IGF- Ⅰ R-independent pathway, especially for initiation of lactation. This study has demonstrated the importance and complexity of the IGF axis during mammary gland development and provides a valuable resource for future research in this area.

  11. Epigenetic modifications unlock the milk protein gene loci during mouse mammary gland development and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlike with other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organiz...

  12. Casein gene expression in mouse mammary epithelial cell lines: Dependence upon extracellular matrix and cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, D.; Oborn, C.J. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Li, M.L.; Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1987-09-01

    The COMMA-D mammary cell line exhibits mammary-specific functional differentiation under appropriate conditions in cell culture. The cytologically heterogeneous COMMA-D parental line and the clonal lines DB-1, TA-5, and FA-1 derived from the COMMA-D parent were examined for similar properties of functional differentiation. In monolayer cell culture, the cell lines DB-1, TA-5, FA-1, and MA-4 were examined for expression of mammary-specific and epithelial-specific proteins by an indirect immunofluorescence assay. The clonal cell lines were relatively homogeneous in their respective staining properties and seemed to represent three subpopulations found in the heterogeneous parental COMMA-D lines. None of the four clonal lines appeared to represent myoepithelial cells. The cell lines were examined for expression of {beta}-casein mRNA in the presence or absence of prolactin. The inducibility of {beta}-casein in the COMMA-D cell line was further enhanced by a reconstituted basement membrane preparation enriched in laminin, collagen IV, and proteoglycans. These results support the hypothesis that the functional response of inducible mammary cell populations is a result of interaction among hormones, multiple extracellular matrix components, and specific cell types.

  13. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  14. A novel mouse model for non-invasive single marker tracking of mammary stem cells in vivo reveals stem cell dynamics throughout pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Tiede

    Full Text Available Mammary stem cells (MaSCs play essential roles for the development of the mammary gland and its remodeling during pregnancy. However, the precise localization of MaSCs in the mammary gland and their regulation during pregnancy is unknown. Here we report a transgenic mouse model for luciferase-based single marker detection of MaSCs in vivo that we used to address these issues. Single transgene expressing mammary epithelial cells were shown to reconstitute mammary glands in vivo while immunohistochemical staining identified MaSCs in basal and luminal locations, with preponderance towards the basal position. By quantifying luciferase expression using bioluminescent imaging, we were able to track MaSCs non-invasively in individual mice over time. Using this model to monitor MaSC dynamics throughout pregnancy, we found that MaSCs expand in both total number and percentage during pregnancy and then drop down to or below baseline levels after weaning. However, in a second round of pregnancy, this expansion was not as extensive. These findings validate a powerful system for the analysis of MaSC dynamics in vivo, which will facilitate future characterization of MaSCs during mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  15. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer.

  16. Apoptosis in lactating and involuting mouse mammary tissue demonstrated by nick-end DNA labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrie, L H; Addey, C V; Wilde, C J

    1995-09-01

    Mammary involution after cessation of milk removal is associated with extensive loss of secretory epithelial cells. Ultrastructural changes and the appearance of oligonucleosomal DNA laddering in ethidium bromide-stained gels indicates that cell loss during involution occurs by apoptosis. In this study, a technique for nick end-labelling of genomic DNA with radiolabelled deoxynucleotide has been used to monitor the induction of programmed cell death in mice after litter removal at peak lactation. This technique proved more sensitive than conventional ethidium bromide staining, and results suggested that apoptosis was induced rapidly by milk stasis, before extensive tissue re-modelling had begun. Oligonucleosomal DNA laddering on agarose gels was detected within 24 h of milk stasis, and increased progressively for at least 4 days. Nick-end labelling also detected laddering before litter removal, suggesting that programmed cell death is a normal feature of the lactating tissue. The DNA end-labelling technique was also adapted for in situ visualisation of apoptotic cells in tissue sections. By this criterion, apoptotic cells were identified in both the secretory epithelium lining the alveoli of the gland and, increasingly with prolonged milk stasis, amongst those sloughed into the alveolar lumen. The results demonstrate the utility of these techniques for study of mammary cell death and suggest that, whilst apoptosis is rapidly induced by milk stasis, it is also a normal physiological event in the lactating mammary gland.

  17. Impaired CK1 delta activity attenuates SV40-induced cellular transformation in vitro and mouse mammary carcinogenesis in vivo.

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    Heidrun Hirner

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a powerful tool to study cellular transformation in vitro, as well as tumor development and progression in vivo. Various cellular kinases, among them members of the CK1 family, play an important role in modulating the transforming activity of SV40, including the transforming activity of T-Ag, the major transforming protein of SV40, itself. Here we characterized the effects of mutant CK1δ variants with impaired kinase activity on SV40-induced cell transformation in vitro, and on SV40-induced mammary carcinogenesis in vivo in a transgenic/bi-transgenic mouse model. CK1δ mutants exhibited a reduced kinase activity compared to wtCK1δ in in vitro kinase assays. Molecular modeling studies suggested that mutation N172D, located within the substrate binding region, is mainly responsible for impaired mutCK1δ activity. When stably over-expressed in maximal transformed SV-52 cells, CK1δ mutants induced reversion to a minimal transformed phenotype by dominant-negative interference with endogenous wtCK1δ. To characterize the effects of CK1δ on SV40-induced mammary carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing mutant CK1δ under the control of the whey acidic protein (WAP gene promoter, and crossed them with SV40 transgenic WAP-T-antigen (WAP-T mice. Both WAP-T mice as well as WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T bi-transgenic mice developed breast cancer. However, tumor incidence was lower and life span was significantly longer in WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T bi-transgenic animals. The reduced CK1δ activity did not affect early lesion formation during tumorigenesis, suggesting that impaired CK1δ activity reduces the probability for outgrowth of in situ carcinomas to invasive carcinomas. The different tumorigenic potential of SV40 in WAP-T and WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T tumors was also reflected by a significantly different expression of various genes known to be involved in tumor progression, specifically of those involved in wnt-signaling and DNA

  18. Expression of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines in mouse mammary gland following Staphylococcus aureus challenge and in response to milk accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazemi, Sasan; Aalbæk, Bent; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We used a mouse model of pathogenic (Staphylococcus aureus) and non-pathogenic (teat sealing) mammary inflammation to investigate mRNA expression of several inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins (APP) in mammary tissue and liver, and the appearance of some of these factors in plasma...... in combination might provide a tool for diagnostic discrimination between mastitis caused by pathogenic invasion and milk accumulation, and hence allow for better targeting of antibiotic therapy. In comparison with mammary expression, expression of cytokines in liver tissue was up-regulated to a similar...... or lesser extent, whilst expression of APP was up-regulated to a much greater extent. The first appearance of increased cytokine and APP concentrations in plasma and of milk amyloid A (MAA) in milk occurred in advance of the measurable up-regulation of expression, hence their origin cannot be stated...

  19. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (pmastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of mammary tissue damage, with or without use of antimicrobials and/or anti-inflammatory compounds for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  20. Peptidylarginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3 Is Upregulated by Prolactin Stimulation of CID-9 Cells and Expressed in the Lactating Mouse Mammary Gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Li

    Full Text Available Peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs post-translationally convert arginine into neutral citrulline residues. Our past work shows that PADs are expressed in the canine and murine mammary glands; however, the mechanisms regulating PAD expression and the function of citrullination in the normal mammary gland are unclear. Therefore, the first objective herein was to investigate regulation of PAD expression in mammary epithelial cells. We first examined PAD levels in CID-9 cells, which were derived from the mammary gland of mid-pregnant mice. PAD3 expression is significantly higher than all other PAD isoforms and mediates protein citrullination in CID-9 cells. We next hypothesized that prolactin regulates PAD3 expression. To test this, CID-9 cells were stimulated with 5 μg/mL of prolactin for 48 hours which significantly increases PAD3 mRNA and protein expression. Use of a JAK2 inhibitor and a dominant negative (DN-STAT5 adenovirus indicate that prolactin stimulation of PAD3 expression is mediated by the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in CID-9 cells. In addition, the human PAD3 gene promoter is prolactin responsive in CID-9 cells. Our second objective was to investigate the expression and activity of PAD3 in the lactating mouse mammary gland. PAD3 expression in the mammary gland is highest on lactation day 9 and coincident with citrullinated proteins such as histones. Use of the PAD3 specific inhibitor, Cl4-amidine, indicates that PAD3, in part, can citrullinate proteins in L9 mammary glands. Collectively, our results show that upregulation of PAD3 is mediated by prolactin induction of the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, and that PAD3 appears to citrullinate proteins during lactation.

  1. Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-like DNA sequences in the breast tumors of father, mother, and daughter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiernik Peter H

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of late onset breast cancer in a father, mother, and daughter living in the same house for decades suggested the possibility of an environmental agent as a common etiological factor. Both molecular and epidemiological data have indicated a possible role for the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, the etiological agent of breast cancer in mice, in a certain percentage of human breast tumors. The aim of this study was to determine if MMTV might be involved in the breast cancer of this cluster of three family members. Results MMTV-like envelope (env and long terminal repeat (LTR sequences containing the MMTV superantigen gene (sag were detected in the malignant tissues of all three family members. The amplified env gene sequences were 98.0%–99.6% homologous to the MMTV env sequences found in the GR, C3H, and BR6 mouse strains. The amplified LTR sequences containing sag sequences segregated to specific branches of the MMTV phylogenetic tree and did not form a distinct branch of their own. Conclusion The presence of MMTV-like DNA sequences in the malignant tissues of all three family members suggests the possibility of MMTV as an etiological agent. Phylogenetic data suggest that the MMTV-like DNA sequences are mouse and not human derived and that the ultimate reservoir of MMTV is most likely the mouse. Although the route by which these family members came to be infected with MMTV is unknown, the possibility exists that such infection may have resulted from a shared exposure to mice.

  2. Exploring the gain of function contribution of AKT to mammary tumorigenesis in mouse models.

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    Carmen Blanco-Aparicio

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of AKT has been noted in a significant percentage of primary human breast cancers, mainly as a consequence of the PTEN/PI3K pathway deregulation. To investigate the mechanistic basis of the AKT gain of function-dependent mechanisms of breast tumorigenesis, we explored the phenotype induced by activated AKT transgenes in a quantitative manner. We generated several transgenic mice lines expressing different levels of constitutively active AKT in the mammary gland. We thoroughly analyzed the preneoplastic and neoplastic mammary lesions of these mice and correlated the process of tumorigenesis to AKT levels. Finally, we analyzed the impact that a possible senescent checkpoint might have in the tumor promotion inhibition observed, crossing these lines to mammary specific p53(R172H mutant expression, and to p27 knock-out mice. We analyzed the benign, premalignant and malignant lesions extensively by pathology and at molecular level analysing the expression of proteins involved in the PI3K/AKT pathway and in cellular senescence. Our findings revealed an increased preneoplastic phenotype depending upon AKT signaling which was not altered by p27 or p53 loss. However, p53 inactivation by R172H point mutation combined with myrAKT transgenic expression significantly increased the percentage and size of mammary carcinoma observed, but was not sufficient to promote full penetrance of the tumorigenic phenotype. Molecular analysis suggest that tumors from double myrAKT;p53(R172H mice result from acceleration of initiated p53(R172H tumors and not from bypass of AKT-induced oncogenic senescence. Our work suggests that tumors are not the consequence of the bypass of senescence in MIN. We also show that AKT-induced oncogenic senescence is dependent of pRb but not of p53. Finally, our work also suggests that the cooperation observed between mutant p53 and activated AKT is due to AKT-induced acceleration of mutant p53-induced tumors. Finally, our

  3. The Immune System as a New Possible Cell Target for AFP 464 in a Spontaneous Mammary Cancer Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callero, Mariana A; Rodriguez, Cristina E; Sólimo, Aldana; Bal de Kier Joffé, Elisa; Loaiza Perez, Andrea I

    2017-02-16

    Aminoflavone (AFP 464, NSC 710464), an antitumor agent which recently entered phase II clinical trials, acts against estrogen-positive breast cancer (ER +). AFP 464, which has a unique mechanism of action by activating aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway, decreased tumor size and growth rate in the estrogen dependent, Tamoxifen-sensitive spontaneous M05 mouse model. Considering that AhR has recently emerged as a physiological regulator of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we investigated whether AFP 464 modulates the immune response in our mouse model. Studies on the effect of AFP 464 on the immune system were carried in BALB/c mice bearing M05 semi-differentiated mammary adenocarcinomas that express estrogen and progesterone receptors. Splenic cells and tumor inflammatory infiltrates were studied by cytometric analyses. The modulation of splenocytes cytotoxic activity by AFP 464 was also evaluated. We further investigated the effects of AFP 464 on peritoneal macrophages by evaluating metalloproteinase, arginase and iNOS activities. We found that AFP 464 increased splenic cytotoxic activity, diminished the number of systemic and local Treg lymphocytes and MDSCs, and induced a M1 phenotype in peritoneal macrophages of M05 tumor bearing mice. Therefore, we conclude that AFP 464 modulates immune response which collaborates with its anti-tumor activity. Our results place the immune system as a novel target for this anti-cancer agent to strengthen the rationale for its inclusion in breast cancer treatment regimens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Selenium Deficiency Facilitates Inflammation Following S. aureus Infection by Regulating TLR2-Related Pathways in the Mouse Mammary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Zecai; Li, Ying; Shen, Peng; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient affecting various aspects of health. Se deficiency has been associated with inflammation and immune responses. Mastitis poses a serious problem for humans and animals in the postpartum period. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the most common infectious bacterial pathogen associated with mastitis. The present study sought to determine the effects and underlying mechanism of dietary Se on S. aureus-induced inflammation using a model of mouse mastitis. ELISA and Western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. The histopathological changes indicated that Se deficiency resulted in increased inflammatory lesions in S. aureus mastitis, whereas Se deficiency did not induce inflammatory lesions in the mammary gland. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was increased in Se-deficient mice with S. aureus mastitis. Analysis of cytokine mRNA and protein showed that Se deficiency leads to increased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production in S. aureus mastitis. In addition, Se deficiency enhanced the mRNA and protein expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which were originally upregulated by S. aureus in the mammary gland tissues and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-mTLR2 cells. When Se-deficient mice were infected with S. aureus, the phosphorylation of IκB, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was greatly increased. The results indicate that Se deficiency could intensify the inflammatory reaction in S. aureus mastitis. This work contributes to the exploration of new methods of preventing or treating of S. aureus mastitis and other infectious diseases.

  5. Misregulation of Stromelysin-1 in Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells Accompanies Acquisition of Stromelysin-1 dependent Invasive Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, A.; Srebrow, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Terracio, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-02-21

    Stromelysin-1 is a member of the metalloproteinase family of extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes that regulates tissue remodeling. We previously established a transgenic mouse model in which rat stromelysin-1 targeted to the mammary gland augmented expression of endogenous stromelysin-1, disrupted functional differentiation, and induced mammary tumors. A cell line generated from an adenocarcinoma in one of these animals and a previously described mammary tumor cell line generated in culture readily invaded both a reconstituted basement membrane and type I collagen gels, whereas a nonmalignant, functionally normal epithelial cell line did not. Invasion of Matrigel by tumor cells was largely abolished by metalloproteinase inhibitors, but not by inhibitors of other proteinase families. Inhibition experiments with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides revealed that Matrigel invasion of both cell lines was critically dependent on stromelysin-1 expression. Invasion of collagen, on the other hand, was reduced by only 40-50%. Stromelysin-1 was expressed in both malignant and nonmalignant cells grown on plastic substrata. Its expression was completely inhibited in nonmalignant cells, but up-regulated in tumor cells, in response to Matrigel. Thus misregulation of stromelysin-1 expression appears to be an important aspect of mammary tumor cell progression to an invasive phenotype. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes that have been implicated in a variety of normal developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis. The MMP family comprises at least 15 members with different, albeit overlapping, substrate specificities. During activation of latent MMPs, their propeptides are cleaved and they are converted to a lower molecular weight form by other enzymes, including serine proteinases, and by autocatalytic cleavage. Among the MMPs, stromelysin-1 (SL1) possesses the broadest substrate specificity. Despite

  6. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  7. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Barcellos-Hoff, M.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Wnt1 is epistatic to Id2 in inducing mammary hyperplasia, ductal side-branching, and tumors in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokota Yoshifumi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During pregnancy, the mammary glands from Id2 mutant animals are deficient in lobulo-alveolar development. This failure of development is believed to be due to a proliferation defect. Methods We have asked whether functional Id2 expression is necessary for Wnt induced mammary hyperplasia, side branching, and cancer, by generating mice expressing a Wnt1 transgene in an Id2 mutant background. Results We show in this work that forced expression of Wnt1 in the mammary gland is capable of overcoming the block to proliferation caused by the absence of Id2. We also show that Wnt1 expression is able to cause mammary tumors in an Id2 mutant background. Conclusions We conclude that functional Id2 expression is not required for Wnt1 to induce mammary hyperplasia and mammary tumors.

  9. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  10. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Interleukin-12-Induced Activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes against Mouse Mammary Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanjin Cao; Zhaoying Xiang; Xiaojing Ma

    2004-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a critical cytokine representing the link between the cellular and humoral branches of host immune defense apparatus. IL-12-induced cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) development is a central mechanism in immune responses against intracellular infectious agents as well as malignant growth. However,the molecular basis of tumor-specific CTL responses mediated by IL-12 remains poorly defined. In this study,we addressed this issue in a comprehensive manner to probe into IL-12-induced anti-tumor responses by global gene expression profiling of mRNA expression in CD8+T cells in a transplantable syngeneic mouse mammary carcinoma model treated or not with recombinant IL-12. A strong tumor regression was induced by the IL-12 treatment. An introspection of differential gene expression at an early stage of the IL-12-initiated CTL activation reveals interesting genes and molecular pathways that may account for the marked tumor regression,and is likely to provide a rich source of potential targets for further research and development of effective therapeutic modalities. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):357-366.

  11. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

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    Rodríguez-Padilla Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18% of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14% of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population.

  12. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter-Containing Retroviral Promoter Conversion Vectors for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy are Functional in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Reinhard Klein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed-enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is an approach for sensitization of tumor cells to an enzymatically activated, otherwise nontoxic, prodrug. Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP2B1 metabolizes the prodrugs cyclophosphamide (CPA and ifosfamide (IFA to produce the cytotoxic substances phosphoramide mustard and isophosphoramide mustard as well as the byproduct acrolein. We have constructed a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon vector for breast cancer GDEPT. The vector allows expression of CYP2B1 from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter known to be active in the mammary glands of transgenic animals. It is anticipated to be used for the generation of encapsulated viral vector producing cells which, when placed inside or close to a tumor, will act as suppliers of the therapeutic CYP2B1 protein as well as of the therapeutic vector itself. The generated vector was effectively packaged by virus producing cells and allowed the production of high levels of enzymatically active CYP2B1 in infected cells which sensitized them to killing upon treatment with both IFA and CPA. Determination of the respective IC50 values demonstrated that the effective IFA dose was reduced by sixteen folds. Infection efficiencies in vivo were determined using a reporter gene-bearing vector in a mammary cancer cell-derived xenograft tumor mouse model.

  13. Co-cultivation of murine BMDCs with 67NR mouse mammary carcinoma cells give rise to highly drug resistant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zänker Kurt S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor tissue resembles chronically inflamed tissue. Since chronic inflammatory conditions are a strong stimulus for bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs it can be assumed that recruitment of BMDCs into cancer tissue should be a common phenomenon. Several data have outlined that BMDC can influence tumor growth and metastasis, e.g., by inducing a paracrine acting feedback loop in tumor cells. Likewise, cell fusion and horizontal gene transfer are further mechanisms how BMDCs can trigger tumor progression. Results Hygromycin resistant murine 67NR-Hyg mammary carcinoma cells were co-cultivated with puromycin resistant murine BMDCs from Tg(GFPU5Nagy/J mice. Isolation of hygromycin/puromycin resistant mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cell clones was performed by a dual drug selection procedure. PCR analysis revealed an overlap of parental markers in mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cell clones, suggesting that dual resistant cells originated by cell fusion. By contrast, both STR and SNP data analysis indicated that only parental 67NR-Hyg alleles were found in mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cell clones favoring horizontal gene transfer as the mode of origin. RealTime-PCR-array analysis showed a marked up-regulation of Abcb1a and Abcb1b ABC multidrug transporters in mBMDC/67NR-Hyg clones, which was verified by Western Blot analysis. Moreover, the markedly increased Abcb1a/Abcb1b expression was correlated to an efficient Rhodamine 123 efflux, which was completely inhibited by verapamil, a well-known Abcb1a/Abcb1b inhibitor. Likewise, mBMDCs/67NR-Hyg clones revealed a marked resistance towards chemotherapeutic drugs including 17-DMAG, doxorubicin, etoposide and paclitaxel. In accordance to Rhodamine 123 efflux data, chemotherapeutic drug resistance of mBMDC/67NR-Hyg cells was impaired by verapamil mediated blockage of Abc1a/Abcb1b multidrug transporter function. Conclusion Co-cultivation of mBMDCs and mouse 67NR-Hyg mammary carcinoma cells gave rise to highly drug resistant cells. Even

  14. Control of TCF-4 expression by VDR and vitamin D in the mouse mammary gland and colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy E Beildeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vitamin D receptor (VDR pathway is important in the prevention and potentially in the treatment of many cancers. One important mechanism of VDR action is related to its interaction with the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Agonist-bound VDR inhibits the oncogenic Wnt/beta-catenin/TCF pathway by interacting directly with beta-catenin and in some cells by increasing cadherin expression which, in turn, recruits beta-catenin to the membrane. Here we identify TCF-4, a transcriptional regulator and beta-catenin binding partner as an indirect target of the VDR pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we show that TCF-4 (gene name TCF7L2 is decreased in the mammary gland of the VDR knockout mouse as compared to the wild-type mouse. Furthermore, we show 1,25(OH2D3 increases TCF-4 at the RNA and protein levels in several human colorectal cancer cell lines, the effect of which is completely dependent on the VDR. In silico analysis of the human and mouse TCF7L2 promoters identified several putative VDR binding elements. Although TCF7L2 promoter reporters responded to exogenous VDR, and 1,25(OH2D3, mutation analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, showed that the increase in TCF7L2 did not require recruitment of the VDR to the identified elements and indicates that the regulation by VDR is indirect. This is further confirmed by the requirement of de novo protein synthesis for this up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although it is generally assumed that binding of beta-catenin to members of the TCF/LEF family is cancer-promoting, recent studies have indicated that TCF-4 functions instead as a transcriptional repressor that restricts breast and colorectal cancer cell growth. Consequently, we conclude that the 1,25(OH2D3/VDR-mediated increase in TCF-4 may have a protective role in colon cancer as well as diabetes and Crohn's disease.

  15. Bisphenol A (BPA) Exposure In Utero Leads to Immunoregulatory Cytokine Dysregulation in the Mouse Mammary Gland: A Potential Mechanism Programming Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Catha; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Goetz, Laura G; Jorgenson, Elisa; Ilagan, Ysabel; Taylor, Hugh S

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a ubiquitous estrogen-like endocrine disrupting compound (EDC). BPA exposure in utero has been linked to breast cancer and abnormal mammary gland development in mice. The recent rise in incidence of human breast cancer and decreased age of first detection suggests a possible environmental etiology. We hypothesized that developmental programming of carcinogenesis may involve an aberrant immune response. Both innate and adaptive immunity play a role in tumor suppression through cytolytic CD8, NK, and Th1 T-cells. We hypothesized that BPA exposure in utero would lead to dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immunity in the mammary gland. CD1 mice were exposed to BPA in utero during gestation (days 9-21) via osmotic minipump. At 6 weeks, the female offspring were ovariectomized and estradiol was given at 8 weeks. RNA and protein were extracted from the posterior mammary glands, and the mRNA and protein levels were measured by PCR array, qRT-PCR, and western blot. In mouse mammary tissue, BPA exposure in utero significantly decreased the expression of members of the chemokine CXC family (Cxcl2, Cxcl4, Cxcl14, and Ccl20), interleukin 1 (Il1) gene family (Il1β and Il1rn), interleukin 2 gene family (Il7 receptor), and interferon gene family (interferon regulatory factor 9 (Irf9), as well as immune response gene 1 (Irg1). Additionally, BPA exposure in utero decreased Esr1 receptor gene expression and increased Esr2 receptor gene expression. In utero exposure of BPA resulted in significant changes to inflammatory modulators within mammary tissue. We suggest that dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines, both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory, leads to a microenvironment that may promote disordered cell growth through inhibition of the immune response that targets cancer cells.

  16. Ink4a/Arf(-/-) and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f(-) quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, K; Iwamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Arima, Y; Takamoto, Y; Ohnishi, N; Bartholomeusz, C; Horii, R; Akiyama, F; Hortobagyi, G N; Pusztai, L; Saya, H; Ueno, N T

    2014-01-23

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (-/-) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be susceptible to non-mammary tumors such as fibrosarcoma. To induce mammary tumors, we retrovirally introduced an oncogene, HRAS(G12V), into Ink4a/Arf(-/-) mammary cells in vitro, and those cells were inoculated into syngeneic mice mammary fat pads. We observed 100% tumorigenesis. The tumors formed were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2. Further, they had pathological features similar to those of human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (for example, pushing borders, central necrosis). The tumors were found to be heterogeneous and included two subpopulations: CD49f(-) quiescent cells and CD49f(+)cells. Contrary to our expectation, CD49f(-) quiescent cells had high tumor-initiating potential and CD49f(+)cells had relatively low tumor-initiating potential. Gene expression analysis revealed that CD49f(-) quiescent cells overexpressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-driving genes, reminiscent of tumor-initiating cells and claudin-low breast cancer. Our animal model with intratumoral heterogeneity, derived from defined genetic perturbations, allows us to test novel molecular targeted drugs in a setting that mimics the intratumoral heterogeneity of human TNBC.

  17. Potential reduction of contralateral second breast-cancer risks by prophylactic mammary irradiation: validation in a breast-cancer-prone mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term breast-cancer survivors have a highly elevated risk (1 in 6 at 20 years of contralateral second breast cancer. This high risk is associated with the presence of multiple pre-malignant cell clones in the contralateral breast at the time of primary breast cancer diagnosis. Mechanistic analyses suggest that a moderate dose of X-rays to the contralateral breast can kill these pre-malignant clones such that, at an appropriate Prophylactic Mammary Irradiation (PMI dose, the long-term contralateral breast cancer risk in breast cancer survivors would be considerably decreased. AIMS: To test the predicted relationship between PMI dose and cancer risk in mammary glands that have a high risk of developing malignancies. METHODS: We tested the PMI concept using MMTV-PyVT mammary-tumor-prone mice. Mammary glands on one side of each mouse were irradiated with X-rays, while those on the other side were shielded from radiation. The unshielded mammary glands received doses of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 Gy in 4-Gy fractions. RESULTS: In high-risk mammary glands exposed to radiation doses designed for PMI (12 and 16 Gy, tumor incidence rates were respectively decreased by a factor of 2.2 (95% CI, 1.1-5.0 at 12 Gy, and a factor of 3.1 (95% CI, 1.3-8.3 at 16 Gy, compared to those in the shielded glands that were exposed to very low radiation doses. The same pattern was seen for PMI-exposed mammary glands relative to zero-dose controls. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of cancer risk reduction by PMI was consistent with mechanistic predictions. Contralateral breast PMI may thus have promise as a spatially targeted breast-conserving option for reducing the current high risk of contralateral second breast cancers. For estrogen-receptor positive primary tumors, PMI might optimally be used concomitantly with systemically delivered chemopreventive drugs such as tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, while for estrogen-receptor negative tumors, PMI might be used alone.

  18. Secondary biopsy of non-oncogenic-driven lung cancer may reveal a clinically sensible histologic change. A brief report of two paradigmatic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Maria C; Orsi, Giulia; Lococo, Filippo; Grizzi, Giulia; Barbieri, Fausto; Bertolini, Federica; Rossi, Giulio; Novello, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    After an initial benefit, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors develop drug resistance through a variety of mechanisms. Among these, tumor histology changes are a mechanism of acquired resistance in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated and anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged NSCLC cases. The current availability of therapeutic approaches to overcome tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in oncogenic-driven lung cancers justifies secondary tumor biopsy in these patients. On the other hand, little is known about the mechanism of disease progression in non-oncogenic driven NSCLC. Nevertheless, NSCLC lacking "druggable" genetic alterations are not considered for secondary biopsy, as it is commonly believed that these tumors cannot develop histologic or molecular changes. Herein, we report two paradigmatic cases of wild-type NSCLC showing histologic "change" on secondary biopsy, allowing for a successful switch in therapeutic strategy. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy K Glenn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV, high risk human papillomavirus (HPV, and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV co-exist in some breast cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc. RESULTS: EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%, HPV, 20% and MMTV (32% of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (i EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  20. Suppression of EGF-induced cell proliferation by the blockade of Ca2+ mobilization and capacitative Ca2+ entry in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, J; Kiyohara, T

    2001-09-01

    The role of intracellular Ca2+ stores and capacitative Ca2+ entry on EGF-induced cell proliferation was investigated in mouse mammary epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that EGF enhances Ca2+ mobilization (release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores) and capacitative Ca2+ entry correlated with cell proliferation in mouse mammary epithelial cells. To confirm their role on EGF-induced cell cycle progression, we studied the effects of 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (DBHQ), a reversible inhibitor of the Ca2+ pump of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and SK&F 96365, a blocker of capacitative Ca2+ entry, on mitotic activity induced by EGF. Mitotic activity was examined using an antibody to PCNA for immunocytochemistry. SK&F 96365 inhibited capacitative Ca2+ entry in a dose-dependent manner (I50: 1-5 microM). SK&F 96365 also inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in the same range of concentration (I50: 1-5 microM). DBHQ suppressed [Ca2+]i response to UTP and thus depleted completely Ca2+ stores at 5 microM. DBHQ also inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation at an I50 value of approximately 10 microM. The removal of these inhibitors from the culture medium increased the reduced mitotic activity reversibly. Using a fluorescent assay of DNA binding of ethidium bromide, no dead cells were detected in any of the cultures. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of SK&F 96365 and DBHQ on cell proliferation were due to the inhibition of capacitative Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ mobilization suggesting the importance of capacitative Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ mobilization in the control of EGF-induced cell cycle progression in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  1. A mammary repopulating cell population characterized in mammary anlagen reveals essential mammary stroma for morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiazhe; Xue, Kai; She, Ji; Ding, Fangrong; Li, Song; Shangguan, Rulan; Dai, Yunping; Du, Liying; Li, Ning

    2014-09-10

    The cells with mammary repopulating capability can achieve mammary gland morphogenesis in a suitable cellular microenvironment. Using cell surface markers of CD24, CD29 and CD49f, mouse mammary repopulating unit (MRU) has been identified in adult mammary epithelium and late embryonic mammary bud epithelium. However, embryonic MRU remains to be fully characterized at earlier mammary anlagen stage. Here we isolated discrete populations of E14.5 mouse mammary anlagen cells. Only Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was predicted as E14.5 MRU by examining their capacities of forming mammosphere and repopulating cleared mammary fat pad in vivo. However, when we characterized gene expressions of this E14.5 cell population by comparing with adult mouse MRU (Lin(-)CD24(+)CD29(hi)), the gene profiling of these two cell populations exhibited great differences. Real-time PCR and immunostaining assays uncovered that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population was a heterogeneous stroma-enriched cell population. Then, limiting dilutions and single-cell assays also confirmed that E14.5 Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population possessed low proportion of stem cells. In summary, heterogeneous Lin(-)CD24(med)CD29(+) cell population exhibited mammary repopulating ability in E14.5 mammary anlagen, implying that only suitable mammary stroma could enable mammary gland morphogenesis, which relied on the interaction between rare stem cells and microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) isoform balance as a regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mouse mammary epithelial cells

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    Miura, Yuka; Hagiwara, Natsumi [Department of Bioscience, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Hyogo, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda 669-1337 Japan (Japan); Radisky, Derek C. [Department of Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32225 (United States); Hirai, Yohei, E-mail: y-hirai@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Hyogo, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda 669-1337 Japan (Japan)

    2014-09-10

    Activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program promotes cell invasion and metastasis, and is reversed through mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) after formation of distant metastases. Here, we show that an imbalance of gene products encoded by the transcriptional factor C/EBPβ, LAP (liver-enriched activating protein) and LIP (liver-enriched inhibitory protein), can regulate both EMT- and MET-like phenotypic changes in mouse mammary epithelial cells. By using tetracycline repressive LIP expression constructs, we found that SCp2 cells, a clonal epithelial line of COMMA1-D cells, expressed EMT markers, lost the ability to undergo alveolar-like morphogenesis in 3D Matrigel, and acquired properties of benign adenoma cells. Conversely, we found that inducible expression of LAP in SCg6 cells, a clonal fibroblastic line of COMMA1-D cells, began to express epithelial keratins with suppression of proliferation. The overexpression of the C/EBPβ gene products in these COMMA1-D derivatives was suppressed by long-term cultivation on tissue culture plastic, but gene expression was maintained in cells grown on Matrigel or exposed to proteasome inhibitors. Thus, imbalances of C/EBPβ gene products in mouse mammary epithelial cells, which are affected by contact with basement membrane, are defined as a potential regulator of metastatic potential. - Highlights: • We created a temporal imbalance of C/EBPβ gene products in the mammary model cells. • The temporal up-regulation of LIP protein induced EMT-like cell behaviors. • The temporal up-regulation of LAP protein induced MET-like cell behaviors. • Excess amount of C/EBPβ gene products were eliminated by proteasomal-degradation. • Basement membrane components attenuated proteasome-triggered protein elimination.

  3. PTEN Loss in E-Cadherin-Deficient Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Rescues Apoptosis and Results in Development of Classical Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam C. Boelens

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC is an aggressive breast cancer subtype with poor response to chemotherapy. Besides loss of E-cadherin, a hallmark of ILC, genetic inactivation of PTEN is frequently observed in patients. Through concomitant Cre-mediated inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN in mammary epithelium, we generated a mouse model of classical ILC (CLC, the main histological ILC subtype. While loss of E-cadherin induced cell dissemination and apoptosis, additional PTEN inactivation promoted cell survival and rapid formation of invasive mammary tumors that recapitulate the histological and molecular features, estrogen receptor (ER status, growth kinetics, metastatic behavior, and tumor microenvironment of human CLC. Combined inactivation of E-cadherin and PTEN is sufficient to cause CLC development. These CLCs showed significant tumor regression upon BEZ235-mediated inhibition of PI3K signaling. In summary, this mouse model provides important insights into CLC development and suggests inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy for targeting CLC.

  4. Mammary gland stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Petersen, Ole W; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Distinct subsets of cells, including cells with stem cell-like properties, have been proposed to exist in normal human breast epithelium and breast carcinomas. The cellular origins of epithelial cells contributing to gland development, tissue homeostasis and cancer are, however, still poorly...... understood. The mouse is a widely used model of mammary gland development, both directly by studying the mouse mammary epithelial cells themselves and indirectly, by studying development, morphogenesis, differentiation and carcinogenesis of xenotransplanted human breast epithelium in vivo. While in early...... studies, human or mouse epithelium was implanted as fragments into the mouse gland, more recent technical progress has allowed the self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential of distinct cell populations or even individual cells to be interrogated. Here, we review and discuss similarities...

  5. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  6. Associated expressions of FGFR-2 and FGFR-3: from mouse mammary gland physiology to human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerliani, Juan P; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Piñero, Cecilia Pérez; Bottino, María C; Sahores, Ana; Nuñez, Myriam; Varchetta, Romina; Martins, Rubén; Zeitlin, Eduardo; Hewitt, Stephen M; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Lanari, Claudia; Lamb, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are tyrosine kinase receptors which have been implicated in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate FGFR-1, -2, -3, and -4 protein expressions in normal murine mammary gland development, and in murine and human breast carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot, we report a hormonal regulation of FGFR during postnatal mammary gland development. Progestin treatment of adult virgin mammary glands resulted in changes in localization of FGFR-3 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, while treatment with 17-β-estradiol induced changes in the expressions and/or localizations of FGFR-2 and -3. In murine mammary carcinomas showing different degrees of hormone dependence, we found progestin-induced increased expressions, mainly of FGFR-2 and -3. These receptors were constitutively activated in hormone-independent variants. We studied three luminal human breast cancer cell lines growing as xenografts, which particularly expressed FGFR-2 and -3, suggesting a correlation between hormonal status and FGFR expression. Most importantly, in breast cancer samples from 58 patients, we found a strong association (P FGFR-2 and -3 expressions and a weaker correlation of each receptor with estrogen receptor expression. FGFR-4 correlated with c-erbB2 over expression. We conclude that FGFR-2 and -3 may be mechanistically linked and can be potential targets for treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients.

  7. Research advancement of mouse mammary stem cell%鼠乳腺干细胞研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    豆晓伟; 刘瑞

    2008-01-01

    乳腺干细胞是乳腺组织内可以自我更新的细胞亚群,具有分化成导管、腺泡和肌上皮细胞的能力.近年来,多个实验室通过不同的方法确认乳腺干细胞,包括细胞表面标记Sca-1、Hoechst溢出实验、CD24、CD31-CD45-Ter119-CD24+CD29hi等,为阐明乳腺干细胞的自我更新机制,设计有效的乳腺癌治疗方法提供了新的工具.%Mammary stem cell is the subpopulation in mamnlary gland,capable of self-renewal and dif-ferentiating into ductal,alveolar and myoepithelial cells.Recently,several laboratories have employed various methods identifying mammary stem cells,including Sca-1,Hoechst dye efflux,CD24,CD3 1-CIM5-Terl19- CD24+CD29hi and so on.which offer a useful tool to elucidate the mechanism of mammary slem cell self-renew- al and design more effective therapies of mammary cancer.

  8. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura McDonald

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER/progesterone receptor (PR/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.

  9. RUNX2 correlates with subtype-specific breast cancer in a human tissue microarray, and ectopic expression of Runx2 perturbs differentiation in the mouse mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Laura; Ferrari, Nicola; Terry, Anne; Bell, Margaret; Mohammed, Zahra M; Orange, Clare; Jenkins, Alma; Muller, William J; Gusterson, Barry A; Neil, James C; Edwards, Joanne; Morris, Joanna S; Cameron, Ewan R; Blyth, Karen

    2014-05-01

    RUNX2, a master regulator of osteogenesis, is oncogenic in the lymphoid lineage; however, little is known about its role in epithelial cancers. Upregulation of RUNX2 in cell lines correlates with increased invasiveness and the capacity to form osteolytic disease in models of breast and prostate cancer. However, most studies have analysed the effects of this gene in a limited number of cell lines and its role in primary breast cancer has not been resolved. Using a human tumour tissue microarray, we show that high RUNX2 expression is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR)/HER2-negative breast cancers and that patients with high RUNX2 expression have a poorer survival rate than those with negative or low expression. We confirm RUNX2 as a gene that has a potentially important functional role in triple-negative breast cancer. To investigate the role of this gene in breast cancer, we made a transgenic model in which Runx2 is specifically expressed in murine mammary epithelium under the control of the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. We show that ectopic Runx2 perturbs normal development in pubertal and lactating animals, delaying ductal elongation and inhibiting lobular alveolar differentiation. We also show that the Runx2 transgene elicits age-related, pre-neoplastic changes in the mammary epithelium of older transgenic animals, suggesting that elevated RUNX2 expression renders such tissue more susceptible to oncogenic changes and providing further evidence that this gene might have an important, context-dependent role in breast cancer.

  10. Computerized segmentation algorithm with personalized atlases of murine MRIs in a SV40 large T-antigen mouse mammary cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Markiewicz, Erica; Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Conzen, Suzanne; Karczmar, Greg; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2016-03-01

    Quantities of MRI data, much larger than can be objectively and efficiently analyzed manually, are routinely generated in preclinical research. We aim to develop an automated image segmentation and registration pipeline to aid in analysis of image data from our high-throughput 9.4 Tesla small animal MRI imaging center. T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRIs were acquired over 4 life-cycle time-points [up to 12 to 18 weeks] of twelve C3(1) SV40 Large T-antigen mice for a total of 46 T2-weighted MRI volumes; each with a matrix size of 192 x 256, 62 slices, in plane resolution 0.1 mm, and slice thickness 0.5 mm. These image sets were acquired with the goal of tracking and quantifying progression of mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN) to invasive cancer in mice, believed to be similar to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in humans. Our segmentation algorithm takes 2D seed-points drawn by the user at the center of the 4 co-registered volumes associated with each mouse. The level set then evolves in 3D from these 2D seeds. The contour evolution incorporates texture information, edge information, and a statistical shape model in a two-step process. Volumetric DICE coefficients comparing the automatic with manual segmentations were computed and ranged between 0.75 and 0.58 for averages over the 4 life-cycle time points of the mice. Incorporation of these personalized atlases with intra and inter mouse registration is expected to enable locally and globally tracking of the morphological and textural changes in the mammary tissue and associated lesions of these mice.

  11. Tumor microenvironment regulates metastasis and metastasis genes of mouse MMTV-PymT mammary cancer cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbeck, J L; Thudi, N K; Martin, C K; Premanandan, C; Yu, L; Ostrowksi, M C; Rosol, T J

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients, yet there are challenges to modeling this process in vivo. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of injection site on tumor growth and metastasis and gene expression of breast cancer cells in vivo using the MMTV-PymT breast cancer model (Met-1 cells). Met-1 cells were injected into 5 sites (subcutaneous, mammary fat pad, tail vein, intracardiac, and intratibial), and tumors and metastases were monitored using bioluminescent imaging and confirmed with gross necropsy and histopathology. Met-1 tumors were analyzed based on morphology and changes in gene expression in each tissue microenvironment. There were 6 permissible sites of Met-1 tumor growth (mammary gland, subcutis, lung, adrenal gland, ovary, bone). Met-1 cells grew faster in the subcutis compared to mammary fat pad tumors (highest Ki-67 index). Morphologic differences were evident in each tumor microenvironment. Finally, 7 genes were differentially expressed in the Met-1 tumors in the 6 sites of growth or metastasis. This investigation demonstrates that breast cancer progression and metastasis are regulated by not only the tumor cells but also the experimental model and unique molecular signals from the tumor microenvironment.

  12. GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  13. Mammary phenotypic expression induced in epidermal cells by embryonic mammary mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, G R; Young, P; Christov, K; Guzman, R; Nandi, S; Talamantes, F; Thordarson, G

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research was to establish methods for inducing mammary epithelial differentiation from nonmammary epithelium. For this purpose, mid-ventral or dorsal epidermis (skin epithelium; SKE) from 13-day rat or mouse embryos was associated with 13-day embryonic mouse mammary mesenchyme (mammary gland mesenchyme; MGM) (mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE). The resultant MGM+SKE recombinants as well as controls (homotypic mouse mammary recombinants, homotypic mouse skin recombinants and mouse mammary mesenchyme by itself) were grafted under the renal capsule of syngeneic or athymic female nude mouse hosts. Most female hosts were induced to undergo lactogenesis by grafting an adult pituitary which elicited a state of hyperprolactinemia. Tissue recombinants of mouse MGM+rat or mouse SKE grown for 1 month in vivo formed a hair-bearing keratinized skin from which mammary ductal structures extended into the mesenchyme. The ducts were composed of columnar luminal epithelial cells as well as basal, actin-positive myoepithelial cells. When grown in pituitary-grafted hosts, the ductal epithelial cells expressed casein and alpha-lactalbumin as judged by immunocytochemistry. The expression of caseins in MGM+SKE recombinants was confirmed by Western blot. The epithelial cells in mouse MGM+rat SKE recombinants expressing milk proteins were shown to be rat cells while the surrounding connective tissue was composed of mouse cells based upon staining with Hoechst dye 33258. Using mammary-specific markers, these studies confirmed the earlier morphological studies of Propper and unequivocally demonstrated for the first time that embryonic mammary mesenchyme can induce morphological and functional mammary differentiation from nonmammary epithelium.

  14. Effect of mammogenic hormones on the expression of FGF7, FGF10 and their receptor in mouse mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Yingdun; LI QingZhang

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of estrogen, progesterone and prolactin stimulating the development of mammary gland, the Kunming mice were used as experimental animals in this study. Through the ex-periment in vitro, the effect of mammogenic hormones were systematically investigated on expression of FGF7 and FGF10 and their receptor in different periods. The results are as follows: in mammary glands of mice, 17 beta-estradiol increased the expression of FGF7; progesterone did not affect the expression of FGF7; prolactin up-regulated the expression of FGF7 significantly in pregnancy and lac-tation. 17 beta-estradiol increased the expression of FGF10; progesterone and prolactin reduced the expression of FGF10 significantly in virgin; prolactin significantly increased the expression of FGF10 in pregnancy. When 17 beta-estradiol in the body was in relatively high proportion, it would lower the ex-pression of KGFR; while 17 beta-estradiol in the body was in relatively low proportion, it would increase the expression of KGFR. Low concentration of progesterone increased the expression of KGFR and high progesterone did not affect the expression of KGFR. Prolactin increased the expression of KGFR significantly in pregnancy and lactation.

  15. Detection of in situ mammary cancer in a transgenic mouse model: in vitro and in vivo MRI studies demonstrate histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, S A; Fan, X; Zamora, M; Foxley, S; River, J; Newstead, G M; Karczmar, G S [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Conzen, S D [Department of Medicine and Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Ave, MC 2115, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Krausz, T [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, 5841 S Maryland Avenue, MC 6101, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: gskarczm@uchicago.edu

    2008-10-07

    Improving the prevention and detection of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is expected to lower both morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. Transgenic mouse models can be used as a 'test bed' to develop new imaging methods and to evaluate the efficacy of candidate preventive therapies. We hypothesized that despite its microscopic size, early murine mammary cancer, including DCIS, might be accurately detected by MRI. C3(1) SV40 TAg female mice (n = 23) between 10 and 18 weeks of age were selected for study. Eleven mice were subjected to in vitro imaging using a T{sub 2}-weighted spin echo sequence and 12 mice were selected for in vivo imaging using a T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo, a T{sub 2}-weighted spin echo and high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sequences. The imaged glands were carefully dissected, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, and then H and E stained sections were obtained. The ratio of image-detected versus histologically detected cancers was obtained by reviewing the MR images and H and E sections independently and using histology as the gold standard. MR images were able to detect 12/12 intramammary lymph nodes, 1/1 relatively large ({approx}5 mm) tumor, 17/18 small ({approx}1 mm) tumors and 13/16 ducts distended with DCIS greater than 300 {mu}m. Significantly, there were no false positives-i.e., image detection always corresponded to a histologically detectable cancer in this model. These results indicate that MR imaging can reliably detect both preinvasive in situ and early invasive mammary cancers in mice with high sensitivity. This technology is an important step toward the more effective use of non-invasive imaging in pre-clinical studies of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  16. Detection of in situ mammary cancer in a transgenic mouse model: in vitro and in vivo MRI studies demonstrate histopathologic correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, S. A.; Conzen, S. D.; Fan, X.; Krausz, T.; Zamora, M.; Foxley, S.; River, J.; Newstead, G. M.; Karczmar, G. S.

    2008-10-01

    Improving the prevention and detection of preinvasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is expected to lower both morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. Transgenic mouse models can be used as a 'test bed' to develop new imaging methods and to evaluate the efficacy of candidate preventive therapies. We hypothesized that despite its microscopic size, early murine mammary cancer, including DCIS, might be accurately detected by MRI. C3(1) SV40 TAg female mice (n = 23) between 10 and 18 weeks of age were selected for study. Eleven mice were subjected to in vitro imaging using a T2-weighted spin echo sequence and 12 mice were selected for in vivo imaging using a T1-weighted gradient echo, a T2-weighted spin echo and high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sequences. The imaged glands were carefully dissected, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, and then H&E stained sections were obtained. The ratio of image-detected versus histologically detected cancers was obtained by reviewing the MR images and H&E sections independently and using histology as the gold standard. MR images were able to detect 12/12 intramammary lymph nodes, 1/1 relatively large (~5 mm) tumor, 17/18 small (~1 mm) tumors and 13/16 ducts distended with DCIS greater than 300 µm. Significantly, there were no false positives—i.e., image detection always corresponded to a histologically detectable cancer in this model. These results indicate that MR imaging can reliably detect both preinvasive in situ and early invasive mammary cancers in mice with high sensitivity. This technology is an important step toward the more effective use of non-invasive imaging in pre-clinical studies of breast cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  17. Toxicity and antitumor activity of the vitamin D analogs PRI-1906 and PRI-1907 in combined treatment with cyclophosphamide in a mouse mammary cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietrzyk, Joanna; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Milczarek, Magdalena; Filip, Beata; Kutner, Andrzej

    2008-10-01

    Active and less toxic vitamin D analogs could be useful for clinical applications. In the present study, we evaluated the toxicity and antitumor effect of two new synthetic analogs of vitamin D, namely PRI-1906 [(24E)-24a-Homo-(1S)-1,25-dihydroxyergocalciferol] and its side-chain unsaturated homo analog PRI-1907. The toxicity and calcemic activity, as well as antitumor effect of calcitriol analogs was investigated in vivo. The studies were performed in a mouse mammary 16/C cancer model. Since calcitriol and its analogs inhibited 16/C tumor growth only slightly, we applied them in the combined therapy with cyclophosphamide (CY). Moreover, cell cycle analysis and VDR and p27 expression were investigated. The LD50 values after five daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injections were 7.8, 10.0 and 2.4 microg/kg per day for calcitriol, PRI-1906 and PRI-1907, respectively. The serum calcium level increased to 40, 23 and 63% over the control for these compounds. We also compare the antitumor activity of the PRI-1906 with the calcitriol and previously studied PRI-2191 (1,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3, tacalcitol). Statistically significant inhibition of tumor growth by calcitriol up to the eighth day was observed in all schedules applied. PRI-1906 inhibited the tumor growth at doses 1 and 5 microg/kg per day, and PRI-2191 only at the dose 5 microg/kg per day. Addition of vitamin D analogs increased the antitumor effect of CY. PRI-1906 exhibited toxicity higher than PRI-2191 but lower than calcitriol and antitumor activity similar to both PRI-2191 and calcitriol. This new analog seems to be a good candidate for the combined treatment of mammary cancer.

  18. Obesity alters gene expression for GH/IGF-I axis in mouse mammary fat pads: differential role of cortistatin and somatostatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Villa-Osaba

    Full Text Available Locally produced growth hormone (GH and IGF-I are key factors in the regulation of mammary gland (MG development and may be important in breast cancer development/progression. Somatostatin (SST and cortistatin (CORT regulate GH/IGF-I axis at various levels, but their role in regulating GH/IGF-I in MGs remains unknown. Since obesity alters the expression of these systems in different tissues and is associated to MG (patho physiology, we sought to investigate the role of SST/CORT in regulating GH/IGF-I system in the MGs of lean and obese mice. Therefore, we analyzed GH/IGF-I as well as SST/CORT and ghrelin systems expression in the mammary fat pads (MFPs of SST- or CORT-knockout (KO mice and their respective littermate-controls fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 wks. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the components of GH/IGF-I, SST/CORT and ghrelin systems are locally expressed in mouse MFP. Expression of elements of the GH/IGF-I axis was significantly increased in MFPs of HF-fed control mice while lack of endogenous SST partially suppressed, and lack of CORT completely blunted, the up-regulation observed in obese WT-controls. Since SST/CORT are known to exert an inhibitory role on the GH/IGFI axis, the increase in SST/CORT-receptor sst2 expression in MFPs of HF-fed CORT- and SST-KOs together with an elevation on circulating SST in CORT-KOs could explain the differences observed. These results offer new information on the factors (GH/IGF-I axis involved in the endocrine/metabolic dysregulation of MFPs in obesity, and suggest that CORT is not a mere SST sibling in regulating MG physiology.

  19. Ink4a/Arf −/− and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f− quiescent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Kazuharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Arima, Yoshimi; Takamoto, Yayoi; Ohnishi, Nobuyuki; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Pusztai, Lajos; Saya, Hideyuki; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (−/−) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7–0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on

  1. Potential value of color-coded dynamic breast-specific gamma-imaging; comparing {sup 99m}Tc-(V)-DMSA, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI, and {sup 99m}Tc-HDP in a mouse mammary tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van, E-mail: fw.v.leeuwen@nki.n [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buckle, Tessa; Batteau, Lukas; Pool, Bert; Sinaasappel, Michiel [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jonkers, Jos [Department of Molecular Biology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    Using a mouse mammary tumor model based on orthotopic transplantation of luciferase-expressing mouse ILC cells (KEP1-Luc cells), we evaluated the diagnostic value of three clinically applied tracers: {sup 99m}Tc-(V)-DMSA, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI, and {sup 99m}Tc-HDP. Uptake of the tracers is compared using static and dynamic imaging procedures. We found that dynamic imaging in combination with pixel-by-pixel color coding has an added value over (high resolution) static imaging procedures. Such dynamic imaging procedures could enhance the potential of breast-specific gamma-imaging.

  2. The 5′-untranslated region of the mouse mammary tumor virus mRNA exhibits cap-independent translation initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Ramdohr, Pablo; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Tapia, Karla; Rodriguez, Felipe E.; Lowy, Fernando; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Dangerfield, John A.; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the identification of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The 5′-UTR of the full-length mRNA derived from the infectious, complete MMTV genome was cloned into a dual luciferase reporter construct containing an upstream Renilla luciferase gene (RLuc) and a downstream firefly luciferase gene (FLuc). In rabbit reticulocyte lysate, the MMTV 5′-UTR was capable of driving translation of the second cistron. In vitro translational activity from the MMTV 5′-UTR was resistant to the addition of m7GpppG cap-analog and cleavage of eIF4G by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) L-protease. IRES activity was also demonstrated in the Xenopus laevis oocyte by micro-injection of capped and polyadenylated bicistronic RNAs harboring the MMTV-5′-UTR. Finally, transfection assays showed that the MMTV-IRES exhibits cell type-dependent translational activity, suggesting a requirement for as yet unidentified cellular factors for its optimal function. PMID:19889724

  3. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Signal Peptide Uses a Novel p97-Dependent and Derlin-Independent Retrotranslocation Mechanism To Escape Proteasomal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyewon Byun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple pathogens, including viruses and bacteria, manipulate endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD to avoid the host immune response and promote their replication. The betaretrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV encodes Rem, which is a precursor protein that is cleaved into a 98-amino-acid signal peptide (SP and a C-terminal protein (Rem-CT. SP uses retrotranslocation for ER membrane extraction and yet avoids ERAD by an unknown mechanism to enter the nucleus and function as a Rev-like protein. To determine how SP escapes ERAD, we used a ubiquitin-activated interaction trap (UBAIT screen to trap and identify transient protein interactions with SP, including the ERAD-associated p97 ATPase, but not E3 ligases or Derlin proteins linked to retrotranslocation, polyubiquitylation, and proteasomal degradation of extracted proteins. A dominant negative p97 ATPase inhibited both Rem and SP function. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Rem, but not SP, is polyubiquitylated. Using both yeast and mammalian expression systems, linkage of a ubiquitin-like domain (UbL to SP or Rem induced degradation by the proteasome, whereas SP was stable in the absence of the UbL. ERAD-associated Derlin proteins were not required for SP activity. Together, these results suggested that Rem uses a novel p97-dependent, Derlin-independent retrotranslocation mechanism distinct from other pathogens to avoid SP ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation.

  4. Selective modification of the x ray survival response of two mouse mammary adenocarcinoma sublines by N,N-dimethylformamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T. (Rhode Island Hospital, Providence); Brenner, H.J.; DeWyngaert, J.K.; Dexter, D.L.; Calabresi, P.; Glicksman, A.S.

    1981-07-01

    The modification of the x ray survival response of two mammary adenocarcinoma tumor cell sublines by the polar solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) has been studied. The sublines (termed lines 66 and 67) differ significantly in their single dose survival responses to x-irradiation. Survival responses were fitted to the single-hit, multi-target, and linear-quadratic equations. For non-DMF treated cells, line 67 radiation parameters were: D/sub 0/(Gy) = 1.41, D/sub q/(Gy) = 1.41, n (extrapolation number) = 2.73. For line 66, these values were D/sub 0/ = 1.63, D/sub q/ = 3.01, n = 6.4. For investigation of DMF effects, cells were seeded at 1 x 10/sup 4/ per 25 cm/sup 2/ tissue culture flask in a DMF concentration of 0.8% (0.10 M) and allowed to multiply for 4 days. The survival parameters for line 67 (the radiosensitive line) then became D/sub 0/ = 1.56, D/sub q/ = 0.89, n = 1.77. For line 66 (the radioresistant line), the survival parameters were D/sub 0/ = 1.56, D/sub q/ = 0.94, n = 1.83. These results indins.

  5. Human mammary fibroblasts stimulate invasion of breast cancer cells in a three-dimensional culture and increase stroma development in mouse xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Charlotta J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tumour phenotype is regulated in a complex fashion as a result of interactions between malignant cells and the tumour stroma. Fibroblasts are the most abundant and perhaps most active part of the tumour stroma. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts in response to the presence of malignant cells may lead to the development of new strategies for cancer treatment. We explored the effects of fibroblasts on the growth and invasion of mammary carcinoma tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods In order to analyse secreted factors that affect invasive abilities of breast cancer cells we co-cultured human mammary fibroblasts (HMF3s and cancer cells (MCF7S1 in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To study the possible influence of fibroblasts on MCF7S1 cancer cell growth in vivo we co-injected HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells in Balb/c nu/nu mice. Results In 3D co-culture both HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells demonstrated enhanced invasion into a Matrigel matrix. This was correlated with enhanced expression of the metastasis promoting S100A4 protein in fibroblasts, stimulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 activity, and enhanced secretion of a range of different cytokines. Orthotopic injection of oestrogen-dependent MCF7S1 cancer cells together with fibroblasts showed stimulation of tumour growth in mice without an external oestrogen supply. The resulting tumours were characterized by increased development of extracellular matrix, as well as an increase of murine S100A4 concentration and activity of MMP-2 in the tumour interstitial fluid. Conclusion Stimulation of the invasive phenotype of tumour cells in 3D co-cultures with fibroblasts could be correlated with increased production of S100A4 and MMP-2. We propose that enhanced development of mouse host-derived tumour stroma in a MCF7S1 co-injection xenograft model leads to oestrogen independency and is triggered by the

  6. Gene expression analysis on small numbers of invasive cells collected by chemotaxis from primary mammary tumors of the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segall Jeffrey E

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cDNA microarrays have the potential to identify the genes involved in invasion and metastasis. However, when used with whole tumor tissue, the results average the expression patterns of different cell types. We have combined chemotaxis-based cell collection of the invasive subpopulation of cells within the primary tumor with array-based gene expression analysis to identify the genes necessary for the process of carcinoma cell invasion. Results Invasive cells were collected from live primary tumors using microneedles containing chemotactic growth factors to mimic chemotactic signals thought to be present in the primary tumor. When used with mammary tumors of rats and mice, carcinoma cells and macrophages constitute the invasive cell population. Microbeads conjugated with monoclonal anti-CD11b (Mac-1α antibodies were used to separate macrophages from carcinoma cells. We utilized PCR-based cDNA amplification from small number of cells and compared it to the quality and complexity of conventionally generated cDNA to determine if amplified cDNA could be used with fidelity for array analysis of this cell population. These techniques showed a very high level of correlation indicating that the PCR based amplification technique yields a cDNA population that resembles, with high fidelity, the original template population present in the small number of cells used to prepare the cDNA for use with the chip. Conclusions The specific collection of invasive cells from a primary tumor and the analysis of gene expression in these cells are is now possible. By further comparing the gene expression patterns of cells collected by invasion into microneedles with that of carcinoma cells obtained from the whole primary tumor, the blood, and whole metastatic tumors, genes that contribute to the invasive process in carcinoma cells may be identified.

  7. Development of a Novel Therapeutic Paradigm Utilizing a Mammary Gland-Targeted, Bin 1-Knockout Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    observation that, in a diabetic mouse model, the ability of CTLA-4-Ig to effectively suppress immune rejection of pan- creatic islet allografts was lost if...T et al.: In vitro and in vivo formation of two new metabolites of melatonin . J. Biol. Chem. (1974) 249(4):1311-1313. 117. SONO M, TANIGUCHI T...Tokuyama, T., Seno, S. In vitro and in vivo formation of two new metabolites of melatonin . J Biol Chem 1974, 249(4): 1311-3. 26. Shimizu, T., Nomiyama, S

  8. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

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    Gruber Helen E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA. Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17, interleukin-6 (IL-6, Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9, insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors

  9. Distinct stem cells contribute to mammary gland development and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Ousset, Marielle; Beck, Benjamin; Bouvencourt, Gaëlle; Rock, Jason; Sharma, Neha; Dekoninck, Sophie; Blanpain, Cédric

    2011-10-09

    The mammary epithelium is composed of several cell lineages including luminal, alveolar and myoepithelial cells. Transplantation studies have suggested that the mammary epithelium is maintained by the presence of multipotent mammary stem cells. To define the cellular hierarchy of the mammary gland during physiological conditions, we performed genetic lineage-tracing experiments and clonal analysis of the mouse mammary gland during development, adulthood and pregnancy. We found that in postnatal unperturbed mammary gland, both luminal and myoepithelial lineages contain long-lived unipotent stem cells that display extensive renewing capacities, as demonstrated by their ability to clonally expand during morphogenesis and adult life as well as undergo massive expansion during several cycles of pregnancy. The demonstration that the mammary gland contains different types of long-lived stem cells has profound implications for our understanding of mammary gland physiology and will be instrumental in unravelling the cells at the origin of breast cancers.

  10. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  11. Contribution of the intercalated adenosine at the helical junction to the stability of the gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot from mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theimer, C A; Giedroc, D P

    2000-03-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) gag-pro frameshifting pseudoknot is an H-type RNA pseudoknot that contains an unpaired adenosine (A14) at the junction of the two helical stems required for efficient frameshifting activity. The thermodynamics of folding of the MMTV vpk pseudoknot have been compared with a structurally homologous mutant RNA containing a G x U to G-C substitution at the helical junction (U13C RNA), and an A14 deletion mutation in that context (U13CdeltaA14 RNA). Dual wavelength optical melting and differential scanning calorimetry reveal that the unpaired adenosine contributes 0.7 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) at low salt and 1.4 (+/-0.2) kcal mol(-1) to the stability (deltaG(0)37) at 1 M NaCl. This stability increment derives from a favorable enthalpy contribution to the stability deltadeltaH = 6.6 (+/-2.1) kcal mol(-1) with deltadeltaG(0)37 comparable to that predicted for the stacking of a dangling 3' unpaired adenosine on a G-C or G x U base pair. Group 1A monovalent ions, NH4+, Mg2+, and Co(NH3)6(3+) ions stabilize the A14 and deltaA14 pseudoknots to largely identical extents, revealing that the observed differences in stability in these molecules do not derive from a differential or specific accumulation of ions in the A14 versus deltaA14 pseudoknots. Knowledge of this free energy contribution may facilitate the prediction of RNA pseudoknot formation from primary nucleotide sequence (Gultyaev et al., 1999, RNA 5:609-617).

  12. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Mustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV. MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV. Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV, a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. METHODOLOGY: Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env, and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  13. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    SV40Tag is transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after 3 pregnancies...and lactations . Using this model, populations of marked cells can be collected for integrated analysis of gene expression, promoter usage, and DNA...completed over the first 6 months on the job . Training included mouse husbandry and colony management, mammary cell isolations in preparation for

  14. Administration of probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus gasseri K7 during pregnancy and lactation changes mouse mesenteric lymph nodes and mammary gland microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treven, P; Mrak, V; Bogovič Matijašić, B; Horvat, S; Rogelj, I

    2015-04-01

    The milk and mammary gland (MG) microbiome can be influenced by several factors, such as mode of delivery, breastfeeding, maternal lifestyle, health status, and diet. An increasing number of studies show a variety of positive effects of consumption of probiotics during pregnancy and breastfeeding on the mother and the newborn. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral administration of probiotics Lactobacillus gasseri K7 (LK7) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) during pregnancy and lactation on microbiota of the mouse mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), MG, and milk. Pregnant FVB/N mice were fed skim milk or probiotics LGG or LK7 resuspended in skim milk during gestation and lactation. On d 3 and 8 postpartum, blood, feces, MLN, MG, and milk were analyzed for the presence of LGG or LK7. The effects of probiotics on MLN, MG, and milk microbiota was evaluated by real-time PCR and by 16S ribosomal DNA 454-pyrosequencing. In 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LGG group and in 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LK7 group, more than 1 × 10(3) of live LGG or LK7 bacterial cells were detected, respectively, whereas no viable LGG or LK7 cells were detected in the control group. Live lactic acid bacteria but no LGG or LK7 were detected in blood, MLN, and MG. Both probiotics significantly increased the total bacterial load as assessed by copies of 16S ribosomal DNA in MLN, and a similar trend was observed in MG. Metagenomic sequencing revealed that both probiotics increased the abundance of Firmicutes in MG, especially the abundance of lactic acid bacteria. The Lactobacillus genus appeared exclusively in MG from probiotic groups. Both probiotics influenced MLN microbiota by decreasing diversity (Chao1) and increasing the distribution of species (Shannon index). The LGG probiotic also affected the MG microbiota as it increased diversity and distribution of species and proportions of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. These results provide evidence that

  15. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Cameron N; Smith, Yvonne E; Cao, Yuan; Burrows, Allan D; Cross, Ryan S N; Ling, Xiawei; Redvers, Richard P; Doherty, Judy P; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Natoli, Anthony L; Restall, Christina M; Lucas, Erin; Pearson, Helen B; Deb, Siddhartha; Britt, Kara L; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Li, Jason; Harmey, Judith H; Pouliot, Normand; Anderson, Robin L

    2015-03-01

    The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53) tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8) and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36) might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  16. Functional and molecular characterisation of EO771.LMB tumours, a new C57BL/6-mouse-derived model of spontaneously metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron N. Johnstone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The translation of basic research into improved therapies for breast cancer patients requires relevant preclinical models that incorporate spontaneous metastasis. We have completed a functional and molecular characterisation of a new isogenic C57BL/6 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, comparing and contrasting it with the established BALB/c 4T1 model. Metastatic EO771.LMB tumours were derived from poorly metastatic parental EO771 mammary tumours. Functional differences were evaluated using both in vitro assays and spontaneous metastasis assays in mice. Results were compared to non-metastatic 67NR and metastatic 4T1.2 tumours of the 4T1 model. Protein and transcript levels of markers of human breast cancer molecular subtypes were measured in the four tumour lines, as well as p53 (Tp53 tumour-suppressor gene status and responses to tamoxifen in vivo and in vitro. Array-based expression profiling of whole tumours identified genes and pathways that were deregulated in metastatic tumours. EO771.LMB cells metastasised spontaneously to lung in C57BL/6 mice and displayed increased invasive capacity compared with parental EO771. By immunohistochemical assessment, EO771 and EO771.LMB were basal-like, as was the 4T1.2 tumour, whereas 67NR had a luminal phenotype. Primary tumours from all lines were negative for progesterone receptor, Erb-b2/Neu and cytokeratin 5/6, but positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Only 67NR displayed nuclear estrogen receptor alpha (ERα positivity. EO771 and EO771.LMB expressed mutant p53, whereas 67NR and 4T1.2 were p53-null. Integrated molecular analysis of both the EO771/EO771.LMB and 67NR/4T1.2 pairs indicated that upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh and S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100a8 and downregulation of the thrombospondin receptor (Cd36 might be causally involved in metastatic dissemination of breast cancer.

  17. Formation of a major DNA adduct of the mitomycin metabolite 2,7-diaminomitosene in EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells treated with mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palom, Y; Belcourt, M F; Kumar, G S; Arai, H; Kasai, M; Sartorelli, A C; Rockwell, S; Tomasz, M

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells with [3H]mitomycin C (MC) results in the formation of six major DNA adducts, as described earlier using an HPLC assay of 3H-labeled products of enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA isolated from MC-treated cells. Four of these adducts were identified as monofunctional and bifunctional guanine-N2 adducts in the minor groove of DNA. In order to establish relationships between individual types of MC-DNA adducts and biological responses it is necessary to identify all of the adducts formed in cells. To this end we have now identified a predominant, previously unknown adduct formed in MC-treated EMT6 cells as a derivative not of MC, but of 2,7-diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM), the major bioreductive metabolite of MC. Rigorous proof demonstrates that it is a DNA major groove, guanine-N7 adduct of 2,7-DAM, linked at C-10 to DNA. The adduct is relatively stable at ambient temperature, but is readily depurinated upon heating. Its isolation from MC-treated cells indicates that MC is reductively metabolized to 2,7-DAM, which then undergoes further reductive activation to alkylate DNA, along with the parent MC. Low MC:DNA ratios were identified as a critical factor promoting 2,7-DAM adduct formation in an in vitro model calf thymus DNA/ MC/reductase model system, as well as in MC-treated EMT6 cells. The 2,7-DAM-guanine-N7 DNA adduct appears to be relatively noncytotoxic, as indicated by the dramatically lower cytotoxicity of 2,7-DAM in comparison with MC in EMT6 cells. Like MC, 2,7-DAM exhibited slightly greater cytotoxicity to cells treated under hypoxic as compared to aerobic conditions. However, 2,7-DAM was markedly less cytotoxic than MC under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Thus, metabolic reduction of MC to 2,7-DAM represents a detoxification process. The differential effects of MC-DNA and 2,7-DAM-DNA adducts support the concept that specific structural features of the DNA damage may play a critical role in the cytotoxic response to a DNA

  18. Genetic Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    mammary glands were reflected in mammary histology. (A and E) Thin sections from Fig. 3. E2 induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia similarly in...with E2 5 (33%) exhibited a normal DNA profile where the great for 12 wk induced pituitary growth and hyperprolactinemia in majority of cells displayed...etal. , " terone, or PRL. Hyperprolactinemia has been shown to be sufficient to induce mammary cancer in certain strains of mouse 1 , (29-31) and rat

  19. Physiological Levels of Pik3caH1047R Mutation in the Mouse Mammary Gland Results in Ductal Hyperplasia and Formation of ERα-Positive Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Anjali; Roh, Vincent; Montgomery, Karen G.; Ivetac, Ivan; Waring, Paul; Pelzer, Rebecca; Hare, Lauren; Shackleton, Mark; Humbert, Patrick; Phillips, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    PIK3CA, the gene coding for the p110α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, is frequently mutated in a variety of human tumors including breast cancers. To better understand the role of mutant PIK3CA in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer, we have generated mice with a conditional knock-in of the common activating mutation, Pik3caH1047R, into one allele of the endogenous gene in the mammary gland. These mice developed a ductal anaplasia and hyperplasia by 6 weeks of age characterized by multi-layering of the epithelial lining of the mammary ducts and expansion of the luminal progenitor (Lin−; CD29lo; CD24+; CD61+) cell population. The Pik3caH1047R expressing mice eventually develop mammary tumors with 100% penetrance but with a long latency (>12 months). This is significantly longer than has been reported for transgenic models where expression of the mutant Pik3ca is driven by an exogenous promoter. Histological analysis of the tumors formed revealed predominantly ERα-positive fibroadenomas, carcinosarcomas and sarcomas. In vitro induction of Pik3caH1047R in immortalized mammary epithelial cells also resulted in tumor formation when injected into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient recipient mice. This novel model, which reproduces the scenario of a heterozygous somatic mutation occurring in the endogenous PIK3CA gene, will thus be a valuable tool for investigating the role of Pik3caH1047R mutation in mammary tumorigenesis both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22666336

  20. Physiological levels of Pik3ca(H1047R) mutation in the mouse mammary gland results in ductal hyperplasia and formation of ERα-positive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Anjali; Roh, Vincent; Montgomery, Karen G; Ivetac, Ivan; Waring, Paul; Pelzer, Rebecca; Hare, Lauren; Shackleton, Mark; Humbert, Patrick; Phillips, Wayne A

    2012-01-01

    PIK3CA, the gene coding for the p110α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, is frequently mutated in a variety of human tumors including breast cancers. To better understand the role of mutant PIK3CA in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer, we have generated mice with a conditional knock-in of the common activating mutation, Pik3ca(H1047R), into one allele of the endogenous gene in the mammary gland. These mice developed a ductal anaplasia and hyperplasia by 6 weeks of age characterized by multi-layering of the epithelial lining of the mammary ducts and expansion of the luminal progenitor (Lin(-); CD29(lo); CD24(+); CD61(+)) cell population. The Pik3ca(H1047R) expressing mice eventually develop mammary tumors with 100% penetrance but with a long latency (>12 months). This is significantly longer than has been reported for transgenic models where expression of the mutant Pik3ca is driven by an exogenous promoter. Histological analysis of the tumors formed revealed predominantly ERα-positive fibroadenomas, carcinosarcomas and sarcomas. In vitro induction of Pik3ca(H1047R) in immortalized mammary epithelial cells also resulted in tumor formation when injected into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient recipient mice. This novel model, which reproduces the scenario of a heterozygous somatic mutation occurring in the endogenous PIK3CA gene, will thus be a valuable tool for investigating the role of Pik3ca(H1047R) mutation in mammary tumorigenesis both in vivo and in vitro.

  1. Chinese herbal Jin-Ying-Tang attenuates the inflammatory response by inhibiting the activation of TLR4/MyD88/TRAF-6/NIK pathway at the mRNA level in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of Jin-Ying-Tang (JYT on Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4 signalling transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MECs in vitro were examined. Material and Methods: The cytotoxicity of JYT (0.06-62.50 mg/mL on mouse MECs was determined by MTT assay. The MECs were co-cultured with LPS in the presence or absence of JYT (39.10 μg/mL, 391 μg/mL, 3910 μg/mL. The concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA. The mRNA expression of TLR4 and downstream TLR4 signalling molecules such as myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, tumour necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF-6, inhibitor κB (IκB, and nuclear factor κB inducing kinase (NIK were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Results: The results showed that the IC50 of JYT on MECs was 12.25 mg/mL and JYT could significantly decrease the concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated MECs (P < 0.05. The mRNA expression of TLR4, MyD88, TRAF-6, IκB, and NIK was also significantly decreased when the LPS-stimulated MECs were cocultured at appropriate concentrations of JYT (P < 0.05, P < 0.01. Conclusion: These observations indicate a potential mechanism through which JYT attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells by inhibiting the activation of TLR4/MyD88/ TRAF-6/NIK pathway at the mRNA level.

  2. The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    2006-10-03

    Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

  3. Mechanisms for c-myc Induced Mouse Mammary Gland Carcinogenesis and for the Synergistic Role of TGF(alpha) in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    lymphomas, but not mammary RR, Lichtsteiner S, Chin L, Morin GB & DePinho RA 1999 carcinomas in transgenic mice. Oncogene 11 181-190. Telomerase...NSamprezS, ivire M & oua P 182 strgen Johnston LA, Prober DA, Edgar BA, Eisemnan RN & Gallant PHannouche N, Samperez 5, Riviere R & Jouan P 1982 Estrogen

  4. Bipotent mammary stem cells: now in amazing 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, developmental biologists and cancer researchers alike have been trying to understand the relationship between the basal and luminal cell compartments in the mouse mammary epithelium. Delineating the mammary stem and progenitor cell hierarchy will provide fundamental knowledge of ho

  5. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowen, Sarah [Department of Surgery, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); McLaughlin, Sarah L. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Hobbs, Gerald [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Department of Statistics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Coad, James [Department of Pathology, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Martin, Karen H. [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Olfert, I. Mark [Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Department of Human Performance and Exercise Physiology, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Vona-Davis, Linda, E-mail: lvdavis@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Surgery, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University Health Sciences Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-06-26

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group) were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat) or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal) diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS) formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer.

  6. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cowen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer.

  7. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Sarah; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Hobbs, Gerald; Coad, James; Martin, Karen H; Olfert, I Mark; Vona-Davis, Linda

    2015-06-26

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group) were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat) or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal) diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS) formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer.

  8. Inflammatory responses in epithelia: endotoxin-induced IL-6 secretion and iNOS/NO production are differentially regulated in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talhouk Rabih S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that signals via binding to a soluble or membrane bound receptor, while nitric oxide (NO, an oxidative stress molecule, diffuses through the cell membrane without a receptor. Both mediators signal through different mechanisms, yet they are dependent on NFκB. We proposed that both mediators are co-induced and co-regulated in inflamed mammary epithelial cells. Methods SCp2 mammary epithelial cells were treated with bacterial endotoxin (ET for different time periods and analyzed for induction of IL-6 secretion and NO production by ELISA and Griess reaction, respectively. The expression of IL-6 and induced NO synthase (iNOS was assayed by real time PCR and/or western immunoblots, and the activation of NFκB was assayed by immunobinding assay. To investigate the role of mammary cell microenvironment (cell-substratum or interaction of mammary epithelial cell types; critical to mammary development, function, and disease in modulation of the inflammatory response, SCp2 cells were cultured with or without extracellular matrix (EHS or in coculture with their myoepithelial counterpart (SCg6, and assayed for ET-induced IL-6 and NO. Results Endotoxin induced NFκB activation at 1 h after ET application. IL-6 secretion and NO production were induced, but with unexpected delay in expression of mRNA for iNOS compared to IL-6. NFκB/p65 activation was transient but NFκB/p50 activation persisted longer. Selective inhibition of NFκB activation by Wedelolactone reduced ET-induced expression of IL-6 mRNA and protein but not iNOS mRNA or NO production, suggesting differences in IL-6 and iNOS regulation via NFκB. SCp2 cells in coculture with SCg6 but not in presence of EHS dramatically induced IL-6 secretion even in the absence of ET. ET-induced NO production was blunted in SCp2/SCg6 cocultures compared to that in SCp2 alone. Conclusions The differential regulation of IL-6 and iNOS together with the

  9. Keeping abreast of the mammary epithelial hierarchy and breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, Jane E

    2009-11-15

    The epithelium of the mammary gland exists in a highly dynamic state, undergoing dramatic morphogenetic changes during puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and regression. The recent identification of stem and progenitor populations in mouse and human mammary tissue has provided evidence that the mammary epithelium is organized in a hierarchical manner. Characterization of these normal epithelial subtypes is an important step toward understanding which cells are predisposed to oncogenesis. This review summarizes progress in the field toward defining constituent cells and key molecular regulators of the mammary epithelial hierarchy. Potential relationships between normal epithelial populations and breast tumor subtypes are discussed, with implications for understanding the cellular etiology underpinning breast tumor heterogeneity.

  10. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Shubhankar [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Johnson, Michael D. [Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Fornace, Albert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Datta, Kamal, E-mail: kd257@georgetown.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  11. MMTV-PyMT and Derived Met-1 Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells as Models for Studying the Role of the Androgen Receptor in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jessica L; Butterfield, Kiel T; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Norris, John D; Josan, Jatinder S; Pollock, Julie A; McDonnell, Donald P; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Richer, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has a faster rate of metastasis compared to other breast cancer subtypes, and no effective targeted therapies are currently FDA-approved. Recent data indicate that the androgen receptor (AR) promotes tumor survival and may serve as a potential therapeutic target in TNBC. Studies of AR in disease progression and the systemic effects of anti-androgens have been hindered by the lack of an AR-positive (AR+) immunocompetent preclinical model. In this study, we identified the transgenic MMTV-PyMT (mouse mammary tumor virus-polyoma middle tumor-antigen) mouse mammary gland carcinoma model of breast cancer and Met-1 cells derived from this model as tools to study the role of AR in breast cancer progression. AR protein expression was examined in late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice as well as in Met-1 cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Sensitivity of Met-1 cells to the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and anti-androgen therapy was examined using cell viability, migration/invasion, and anchorage-independent growth assays. Late-stage primary tumors and lung metastases from MMTV-PyMT mice and Met-1 cells expressed abundant nuclear AR protein, while negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors. Met-1 sensitivity to DHT and AR antagonists demonstrated a reliance on AR for survival, and AR antagonists inhibited invasion and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that the MMTV-PyMT model and Met-1 cells may serve as valuable tools for mechanistic studies of the role of AR in disease progression and how anti-androgens affect the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Reduced nursing frequency during prolonged lactation in the mouse decreases milk production and increases mammary expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), but does not accelerate mammary gland remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have observed that lactating mouse dams nursed 4 times per day (4X) maintained lactation, but had lower milk yields by the weigh-suckle-weigh method, than dams nursed ad libitum (AL). Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased nursing frequency would also decrease lactation persistence, increase m...

  13. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    derived adipo- cytes and ADS-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (ADS-iPSCs) (19) and primary mouse ES cells to isolated sperm and oocytes (20). We...Mesendoderm 2353 765 051 59 5 92% H9-IMR90 5875 7 669 782 605 58 91% oocyte - ES cell (mouse) 4727 1 204 883 334 25 93% sperm - ES cell (mouse) 4580 4 364 748...engineered mouse model in which a specific mammary cell population is fluorescently marked upon initial transcriptional activation of the SV40 large T

  14. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Cowen; McLaughlin, Sarah L.; Gerald Hobbs; James Coad; Martin, Karen H.; Mark Olfert, I.; Linda Vona-Davis

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group) were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat) or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal) diet for eight weeks. Body weights ...

  15. Parathyroid hormone-related protein specifies the mammary mesenchyme and regulates embryonic mammary development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Minoti; Wysolmerski, John

    2013-06-01

    Parathyroid Hormone related Protein (PTHrP) is a critical regulator of mammary gland morphogenesis in the mouse embryo. Loss of PTHrP, or its receptor, PTHR1, results in arrested mammary buds at day 15 of embryonic development (E15). In contrast, overexpression of PTHrP converts the ventral epidermis into hairless nipple skin. PTHrP signaling appears to be critical for mammary mesenchyme specification, which in turn maintains mammary epithelial identity, directs bud outgrowth, disrupts the male mammary rudiment and specifies the formation of the nipple. In the embryonic mammary bud, PTHrP exerts its effects on morphogenesis, in part, through epithelial-stromal crosstalk mediated by Wnt and BMP signaling. Recently, PTHLH has been identified as a strong candidate for a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus, although PTHrP's role in breast cancer has not been clearly defined. The effects of PTHrP on the growth of the embryonic mammary rudiment and its invasion into the dermis may, in turn, have connections to the role of PTHrP in breast cancer.

  16. Effect of mammogenic hormones on the expression of dFGF7, FGF10 and their receptor in mouse mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of estrogen, progesterone and prolactin stimulating the development of mammary gland, the Kunming mice were used as experimental animals in this study.Through the ex-periment in vitro, the effect of mammogenic hormones were systematically investigated on expression of FGF7 and FGF10 and their receptor in different periods.The results are as follows:in mammary glands of mice, 17 beta-estradiol increased the expression of FGF7;progesterone did not affect the expression of FGF7;prolactin up-regulated the expression of FGF7 significantly in pregnancy and lac-tation.17 beta-estradiol increased the expression of FGF10;progesterone and prolactin reduced the expression of FGF10 significantly in virgin;prolactin significantly increased the expression of FGF10 in pregnancy.When 17 beta-estradiol in the body was in relatively high proportion, it would lower the ex-pression of KGFR;while 17 beta-estradiol in the body was in relatively low proportion, it would increase the expression of KGFR.Low concentration of progesterone increased the expression of KGFR and high progesterone did not affect the expression of KGFR.Prolactin increased the expression of KGFR significantly in pregnancy and lactation.

  17. Expression of a 74-kDa nuclear factor 1 (NF1) protein is induced in mouse mammary gland involution. Involution-enhanced occupation of a twin NF1 binding element in the testosterone-repressed prostate message-2/clusterin promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, E E; Keon, N K; Thornton, F D; Rein, T; Martin, F

    1996-11-22

    Testosterone repressed prostate message-2 (TRPM-2)/clusterin gene expression is rapidly induced in early involution of the mouse mammary gland, after weaning, and in the rat ventral prostate, after castration. A search for involution-enhanced DNaseI footprints in the proximal mouse TRPM-2/clusterin gene promoter led to the identification and characterization (by DNase I footprinting and EMSA) of a twin nuclear factor 1 (NF1) binding element at -356/-309, relative to the proposed transcription start site; nuclear extracts from 2-day involuting mouse mammary gland showed an enhanced footprint over the proximal NF1 element; extracts from involuting prostate showed enhanced occupancy of both NF1 binding elements. Subsequent EMSA and Western analysis led to the detection of a 74-kDa NF1 protein whose expression is triggered in early involution in the mouse mammary gland; such an induced protein is not found in the involuting rat ventral prostate. This protein was not found in lactation where three other NF1 proteins of 114, 68, and 46 kDa were detected. Reiteration of the epithelial cell apoptosis associated with early mammary gland involution, in vitro, in a primary cell culture system, triggered the appearance of the 74-kDa NF1. Overlaying the cells with laminin-rich extracellular matrix suppressed the apoptosis and the expression of the 74-kDa NF1 and, in the presence of lactogenic hormones, initiated milk protein gene expression and the expression of two of the lactation-associated NF1 proteins (68 and 46 kDa). This study, thus, identifies for the first time the occurrence of a switch in expression of different members of the family of NF1 transcription factors as mammary epithelial cells move from the differentiated to the involution/apoptotic state, and it is likely that the involution-specific 74-kDa NF1 accounts for the enhanced NF1 footprint detected on the TRPM-2/clusterin promoter with extracts of mouse mammary gland.

  18. Phospholipid makeup of the breast adipose tissue is impacted by obesity and mammary cancer in the mouse: Results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Michael; Perez, Osvaldo; Martinez, Mitchell; Santander, Ana M; Mendez, Armando J; Nadji, Mehrdad; Nayer, Ali; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Torroella-Kouri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, an established risk factor for breast cancer (BC), is associated with systemic inflammation. The breast contains adipose tissue (bAT), yet whether it plays a role in BC progression in obese females is being intensively studied. There is scarce knowledge on the lipid composition of bAT in health and disease. The purpose of this pilot study was: 1) to determine whether obesity and BC are associated with inflammatory changes in bAT 2) to analyze for the first time the lipid profile of bAT in obese and lean mammary tumor-bearing and normal mice. Syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells were implanted into the mammary fat pad of lean and diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. BATs were analyzed four weeks after tumor cell inoculation by immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry. Phospholipids were identified and subjected to ratiometric quantification using a TSQ Quantum Access Max triple quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing precursor ion scan or neutral ion loss scan employing appropriate class specific lipid standards in a two step quantification process. Four main classes of phospholipids were analyzed: phosphatidylcholines phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols. Our results showed that bAT in obese (normal and tumor-bearing) mice contained hypertrophic adipocytes compared with their corresponding samples in lean mice; higher numbers of macrophages and crown-like structures were observed in obese tumor bearers compared to obese normal mice. BAT from normal obese mice revealed higher concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamines. Furthermore, bAT from tumor-bearing mice expressed higher phosphatidylcholines than that from non-tumor bearing mice, suggesting the presence of the tumor is associated with phosphatidylcholines. Conversion of phosphatidylethanolamines to phosphatidylcholines will be investigated in E0771 cells. Additional studies are projected to investigate macrophage activation by these specific classes of phospholipids

  19. Huntingtin Regulates Mammary Stem Cell Division and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Elias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation during mammary gland morphogenesis. Here, we report the presence of huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington’s disease, in mouse mammary basal and luminal cells throughout mammogenesis. Keratin 5-driven depletion of huntingtin results in a decreased pool and specification of basal and luminal progenitors, and altered mammary morphogenesis. Analysis of mitosis in huntingtin-depleted basal progenitors reveals mitotic spindle misorientation. In mammary cell culture, huntingtin regulates spindle orientation in a dynein-dependent manner. Huntingtin is targeted to spindle poles through its interaction with dynein and promotes the accumulation of NUMA and LGN. Huntingtin is also essential for the cortical localization of dynein, dynactin, NUMA, and LGN by regulating their kinesin 1-dependent trafficking along astral microtubules. We thus suggest that huntingtin is a component of the pathway regulating the orientation of mammary stem cell division, with potential implications for their self-renewal and differentiation properties.

  20. Of Microenvironments and Mammary Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBarge, Mark A; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2007-06-01

    In most adult tissues there reside pools of stem and progenitor cells inside specialized microenvironments referred to as niches. The niche protects the stem cells from inappropriate expansion and directs their critical functions. Thus guided, stem cells are able to maintain tissue homeostasis throughout the ebb and flow of metabolic and physical demands encountered over a lifetime. Indeed, a pool of stem cells maintains mammary gland structure throughout development, and responds to the physiological demands associated with pregnancy. This review discusses how stem cells were identified in both human and mouse mammary glands; each requiring different techniques that were determined by differing biological needs and ethical constraints. These studies together create a robust portrait of mammary gland biology and identify the location of the stem cell niche, elucidate a developmental hierarchy, and suggest how the niche might be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  1. Notch in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Katerina; Feirt, Nikki; Kitajewski, Jan

    2004-10-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in many processes including cell fate determination and oncogenesis. In mice, the Notch1 and Notch4 genes are both targets for insertion and rearrangement by the mouse mammary tumor virus and these mutations promote epithelial mammary tumorigenesis. Moreover, expression of a constitutively active form of Notch4 in mammary epithelial cells inhibits epithelial differentiation and leads to tumor formation in this organ. These data implicate the Notch pathway in breast tumorigenesis and provide the foundation for future experiments that will aid in our understanding of the role of Notch in human breast cancer development. Here, we review studies of mammary tumorigenesis induced by Notch in mouse and in vitro culture models providing evidence that Notch activation is a causal factor in human breast cancer.

  2. Characterization of the Six1 homeobox gene in normal mammary gland morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManaman James L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Six1 homeobox gene is highly expressed in the embryonic mammary gland, continues to be expressed in early postnatal mammary development, but is lost when the mammary gland differentiates during pregnancy. However, Six1 is re-expressed in breast cancers, suggesting that its re-instatement in the adult mammary gland may contribute to breast tumorigenesis via initiating a developmental process out of context. Indeed, recent studies demonstrate that Six1 overexpression in the adult mouse mammary gland is sufficient for initiating invasive carcinomas, and that its overexpression in xenograft models of mammary cancer leads to metastasis. These data demonstrate that Six1 is causally involved in both breast tumorigenesis and metastasis, thus raising the possibility that it may be a viable therapeutic target. However, because Six1 is highly expressed in the developing mammary gland, and because it has been implicated in the expansion of mammary stem cells, targeting Six1 as an anti-cancer therapy may have unwanted side effects in the breast. Results We sought to determine the role of Six1 in mammary development using two independent mouse models. To study the effect of Six1 loss in early mammary development when Six1 is normally expressed, Six1-/- embryonic mammary glands were transplanted into Rag1-/- mice. In addition, to determine whether Six1 downregulation is required during later stages of development to allow for proper differentiation, we overexpressed Six1 during adulthood using an inducible, mammary-specific transgenic mouse model. Morphogenesis of the mammary gland occurred normally in animals transplanted with Six1-/- embryonic mammary glands, likely through the redundant functions of other Six family members such as Six2 and Six4, whose expression was increased in response to Six1 loss. Surprisingly, inappropriate expression of Six1 in the adult mammary gland, when levels are normally low to absent, did not inhibit

  3. Canonical Wnt Signaling as a Specific Marker of Normal and Tumorigenic Mammary Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    mammary epithelium impacts glandular development . We found ductal abnormali ties; however, the phenotype was not as severe as expected. Approximately...In previous reports we have clearly showed that cells w ith activated canonical Wnt signaling are present within the mammary epithelium starting at...Wnt1 transgenic cells. We generated a mouse line in which ~-catenin is conditionally deleted in the mammary epithelium of MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic

  4. Tsc1 deficiency impairs mammary development in mice by suppression of AKT, nuclear ERα, and cell-cycle-driving proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenqi Qin; Hang Zheng; Ling Zhou; Yanhua Ou; Bin Huang; Bo Yan; Zhenshu Qin; Cuilan Yang; Yongchun Su; Xiaochun Bai; Jiasong Guo; Jun Lin

    2016-01-01

    Loss of Tsc1/Tsc2 results in excess cell growth that eventually forms hamartoma in multiple organs. Our study using a mouse model with Tsc1 conditionally knockout in mammary epithelium showed that Tsc1 deficiency impaired mammary development. Phosphorylated S6 was up-regulated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium, which could be reversed by rapamycin, suggesting that mTORC1 was hyperactivated in Tsc1 −/− mammary epithelium. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin restored the development of Tsc1 −/− mammary...

  5. Mammary Duct Ectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tenderness or inflammation of the clogged duct (periductal mastitis). Mammary duct ectasia most often occurs in women ... that's turned inward (inverted) A bacterial infection called mastitis also may develop in the affected milk duct, ...

  6. Demethylation of Cancer/Testis Antigens and CpG ODN Stimulation Enhance Dendritic Cell and Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Function in a Mouse Mammary Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhong Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy in virtue of their restricted expression profile in normal tissues. However, CTA-targeted immunotherapy has been rather disappointing clinical setting for CTAs are downregulated by cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG methylation in their promoter regions, so that tumor cells have low immunogenicity. Methods. We reinduced mouse CTA P1A through demethylation process and generated P1A-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs by immunizing BALB/c (H-2d mice with dendritic cells pulsed with a P1A-specific peptide and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN immune adjuvant. Results. We found that demethylation and CpG ODN immune adjuvant stimulation facilitated DC maturation and enhanced the allogenic capacity of P1A-specific CTLs against target cells both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions. Our results suggested that CTA induction and immune adjuvant stimulation is a feasible strategy in cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Interleukin-12-Induced Activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes against MouseMammary Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShanjinCao; ZhaoyingXiang; XiaojingMa

    2004-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a critical cytokine representing the link between the cellular and humoral branches of host immune defense apparatus. IL-12-induced cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) development is a central mechanism in immune responses against intracellular infectious agents as well as malignant growth. However,the molecular basis of tumor-specific CTL responses mediated by IL-12 remains poorly defined. In this study,we addressed this issue in a comprehensive manner to probe into IL-12-induced anti-tumor responses by global gene expression profiling of mRNA expression in CD8+T cells in a transplantable syngeneic mouse mammarycarcinoma model treated or not with recombinant IL-12. A strong tumor regression was induced by the IL-12 treatment. An introspection of differential gene expression at an early stage of the IL-12-initiated CTL activation reveals interesting genes and molecular pathways that may account for the marked tumor regression,and is likely to provide a rich source of potential targets for further research and development of effective therapeutic modalities. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(5):357-366.

  8. Mammary epithelial cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine Terra; Dembo, Micah

    2007-01-01

    a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation...... in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal...

  9. Establishment of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cell Culture System and Study on the Modulation of Heregulin-a Factor%小鼠乳腺上皮细胞培养体系的建立及Heregulin-α的调控作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿丽晶; 张以涛; 林叶; 李庆章

    2011-01-01

    This study amis to establish and perfect the mouse mammary epithelial cell culture system, and to discuss the effect of Heregulin-α (HRG-α) on the mammary epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism within this cell system. It provides important theoretical basis for further research on mammary epithelial cell morphology, structure and function, and reveals the effect and laws of HRG-α in mouse mammary gland development. By comparing the mouse mammary cell growth in different culture media of different pH, serum concentration ratio, we have found that the culture medium of pH 7.4, supplemented with 10% serum was the best conditions for the growth of mammary epithelial cells. Through the use of phase contrast microscopy technology, MTr assay, and other techniques and research methods, this study compared mammary epithelial cell morphology, inoculation survival rate, doubling time, growth curves of biological characteristics at different periods derived. We have found that the good breast cells from the period was the 15 d pregnant mouse mammary. On this basis, important cell marker protein keratin-18 was detected by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR, to further identify the cells obtained by mammary epithelial cells. Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) were successfully established in vitro culture system. By liquid chromatography and MTT, the study discusses the effects of HRG-α on MMECs in the established cell culture system in vitro. The result showes that MMECs' cell growth and total secretion proteins and lactose were significantly promoted by the appropriate amount of HRG-α. 0.1~20 ng/mL HRG-α could promote MMECs to proliferate and total proteins and lactose content to increase. The maximum value was HRG-α at the concentration of 20 ng/mL. 50 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL HRG-α inhibited the proliferation of MMECs, and decreased the total proteins and lactose content of MMECs.%旨在建立完善的小鼠乳腺上皮细胞体外培养体系,探讨Heregulin-

  10. Expression of truncated eukaryotic initiation factor 3e (eIF3e) resulting from integration of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) causes a shift from cap-dependent to cap-independent translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiluiza, David; Bargo, Sharon; Callahan, Robert; Rhoads, Robert E

    2011-09-09

    Integration of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) at the common integration site Int6 occurs in the gene encoding eIF3e, the p48 subunit of translation initiation factor eIF3. Integration is at any of several introns of the Eif3e gene and causes the expression of truncated Eif3e mRNAs. Ectopic expression of the truncated eIF3e protein resulting from integration at intron 5 (3e5) induces malignant transformation, but by an unknown mechanism. Because eIF3e makes up at least part of the binding site for eIF4G, we examined the effects of 3e5 expression on protein synthesis. We developed an NIH3T3 cell line that contains a single copy of the 3e5 sequence at a predetermined genomic site. Co-immunoprecipitation indicated diminished binding of eIF3 to eIF4G, signifying a reduction in recruitment of the mRNA-unwinding machinery to the 43 S preinitiation complex. Cell growth and overall protein synthesis were decreased. Translation driven by the eIF4G-independent hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry sequence (HCV IRES) in a bicistronic mRNA was increased relative to cap-dependent translation. Endogenous mRNAs encoding XIAP, c-Myc, CYR61, and Pim-1, which are translated in a cap-independent manner, were shifted to heavier polysomes whereas mRNAs encoding GAPDH, actin, L32, and L34, which are translated in a cap-dependent manner, were shifted to lighter polysomes. We propose that expression of 3e5 diminishes eIF4G interaction with eIF3 and causes abnormal gene expression at the translational level. The correlation between up-regulation of cap-independent translation and MMTV-induced tumorigenesis contrasts with the well established model for malignant transformation involving up-regulation of highly cap-dependent translation.

  11. Mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Hector; Hinck, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The mammary gland develops through several distinct stages. The first transpires in the embryo as the ectoderm forms a mammary line that resolves into placodes. Regulated by epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, the placodes descend into the underlying mesenchyme and produce the rudimentary ductal structure of the gland present at birth. Subsequent stages of development—pubertal growth, pregnancy, lactation, and involution—occur postnatally under the regulation of hormones. Puberty initiates branching morphogenesis, which requires growth hormone (GH) and estrogen, as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), to create a ductal tree that fills the fat pad. Upon pregnancy, the combined actions of progesterone and prolactin generate alveoli, which secrete milk during lactation. Lack of demand for milk at weaning initiates the process of involution whereby the gland is remodeled back to its prepregnancy state. These processes require numerous signaling pathways that have distinct regulatory functions at different stages of gland development. Signaling pathways also regulate a specialized subpopulation of mammary stem cells that fuel the dramatic changes in the gland occurring with each pregnancy. Our knowledge of mammary gland development and mammary stem cell biology has significantly contributed to our understanding of breast cancer and has advanced the discovery of therapies to treat this disease.

  12. Loss of vitamin D receptor signaling from the mammary epithelium or adipose tissue alters pubertal glandular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Abby L; Zinser, Glendon M; Waltz, Susan E

    2014-10-15

    Vitamin D₃ receptor (VDR) signaling within the mammary gland regulates various postnatal stages of glandular development, including puberty, pregnancy, involution, and tumorigenesis. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D₃ treatment induces cell-autonomous growth inhibition and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, mammary adipose tissue serves as a depot for vitamin D₃ storage, and both epithelial cells and adipocytes are capable of bioactivating vitamin D₃. Despite the pervasiveness of VDR in mammary tissue, individual contributions of epithelial cells and adipocytes, as well as the VDR-regulated cross-talk between these two cell types during pubertal mammary development, have yet to be investigated. To assess the cell-type specific effect of VDR signaling during pubertal mammary development, novel mouse models with mammary epithelial- or adipocyte-specific loss of VDR were generated. Interestingly, loss of VDR in either cellular compartment accelerated ductal morphogenesis with increased epithelial cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis within terminal end buds. Conversely, VDR signaling specifically in the mammary epithelium modulated hormone-induced alveolar growth, as ablation of VDR in this cell type resulted in precocious alveolar development. In examining cellular cross-talk ex vivo, we show that ligand-dependent VDR signaling in adipocytes significantly inhibits mammary epithelial cell growth in part through the vitamin D₃-dependent production of the cytokine IL-6. Collectively, these studies delineate independent roles for vitamin D₃-dependent VDR signaling in mammary adipocytes and epithelial cells in controlling pubertal mammary gland development.

  13. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  14. Immunoglobins in mammary secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins secreted in colostrum and milk by the lactating mammal are major factors providing immune protection to the newborn. Immunoglobulins in mammary secretions represent the cumulative immune response of the lactating animal to exposure to antigenic stimulation that occurs through inte...

  15. The hyperplastic phenotype in PR-A and PR-B transgenic mice: lessons on the role of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the mouse mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampayo, Rocio; Recouvreux, Sol; Simian, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) belongs to the superfamily of steroid receptors and mediates the action of progesterone in its target tissues. In the mammary gland, in particular, PR expression is restricted to the luminal epithelial cell compartment. The generation of estrogen receptor-α (ER) and PR knockout mice allowed the specific characterization of the roles of each of these in mammary gland development: ER is critical for ductal morphogenesis, whereas PR has a key role in lobuloalveolar differentiation. To further study the role PR isoforms have in mammary gland biology, transgenic mice overexpressing either the "A" (PR-A) or the "B" (PR-B) isoforms of PR were generated. Overexpression of the A isoform of PR led to increased side branching, multilayered ducts, loss of basement membrane integrity, and alterations in matrix metalloproteinase activation in the mammary gland. Moreover, levels of TGFβ1 and p21 were diminished and those of cyclin D1 increased. Interestingly, the phenotype was counteracted by antiestrogens, suggesting that ER is essential for the manifestation of the hyperplasias. Mice overexpressing the B isoform of PR had limited ductal growth but retained the ability to differentiate during pregnancy. Levels of latent and active TGFβ1 were increased compared to PR-A transgenics. The phenotypes of these transgenic mice are further discussed in the context of the impact of progesterone on mammary stem cells and breast cancer. We conclude that an adequate balance between the A and B isoforms of PR is critical for tissue homeostasis. Future work to further understand the biology of PR in breast biology will hopefully lead to new and effective preventive and therapeutic alternatives for patients.

  16. Lentiviral Transduction of Mammary Stem Cells for Analysis of Gene Function during Development and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welm, Bryan E.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Bledau, Anita S.; Welm, Alana L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The mouse mammary gland is the only epithelial organ capable of complete regeneration upon orthotopic transplantation, making it ideally suited for in vivo gene function studies through viral mediated gene delivery. A hurdle that has challenged the widespread adoption of this technique has been the inability to transduce mammary stem cells effectively. We have overcome this limitation by infecting total primary mammary epithelial cells in suspension with high titer lentiviruses. Transduced cells gave rise to all major cell types of the mammary gland, and were capable of clonal outgrowth and functional differentiation in serial transplants. To demonstrate that this method is a valuable alternative to developing transgenic animals, we used lentiviral-mediated Wnt-1 overexpression to replicate MMTV-Wnt-1 mammary phenotypes and used a dominant-negative Xenopus Suppressor of Hairless to reveal a requirement for Notch signaling during ductal morphogenesis. Importantly, this method is also applicable to transduction of cells from other tissues. PMID:18371425

  17. Autoradiographic localization of estrogen binding sites in human mammary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buell, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The biochemical assay of human mammary carcinomas for estrogen receptors is of proven clinical utility, but the cellular localization of estrogen binding sites within these lesions is less certain. The author describes the identification of estrogen binding sites as visualized by thaw-mount autoradiography after in vitro incubation in a series of 17 benign and 40 malignant human female mammary lesions. The results on the in vitro incubation method compared favorably with data from in vivo studies in mouse uterus, a well-characterized estrogen target organ. In noncancerous breast biopsies, a variable proportion of epithelial cells contained specific estrogen binding sites. Histologically identifiable myoepithelial and stromal cells were, in general, unlabeled. In human mammary carcinomas, biochemically estrogen receptor-positive, labeled and unlabeled neoplastic epithelial cells were identified by autoradiography. Quantitative results from the autoradiographic method compared favorably with biochemical data.

  18. Nutritional regulation of mammary cell apoptosis in lactating ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Colitti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in understanding the control of the mammary cell population now offer new insights to understand the decline in milk yield of dairy animals, which has long been a biological conundrum for the mammary biologists. Evidence indicates that change in mammary cell number is the result of an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell removal and that this is a principal cause of declining production (Stefanon et al., 2001. Further, it suggests that the persistency of lactation, the rate of decline in milk yield with stage of lactation, is strongly influenced by the rate of cell death by apoptosis in the lactating gland (Wilde et al., 1997. The most significant advance in understanding the cell biology underpinning persistency of lactation has come from the demonstration that cell loss during lactation occurs by apoptosis. Several researches obtained in cell cultures in mouse and rat have indicated that gene expression and cellular activities are modulated by the reactive oxygen species..........

  19. Specific posttranslational modification regulates early events in mammary carcinoma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua-Bei; Johnson, Heather; Randolph, Matthew; Nagy, Tamas; Blalock, Ryan; Pierce, Michael

    2010-12-07

    The expression of an enzyme, GnT-V, that catalyzes a specific posttranslational modification of a family of glycoproteins, namely a branched N-glycan, is transcriptionally up-regulated during breast carcinoma oncogenesis. To determine the molecular basis of how early events in breast carcinoma formation are regulated by GnT-V, we studied both the early stages of mammary tumor formation by using 3D cell culture and a her-2 transgenic mouse mammary tumor model. Overexpression of GnT-V in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells in 3D culture disrupted acinar morphogenesis with impaired hollow lumen formation, an early characteristic of mammary neoplastic transformation. The disrupted acinar morphogenesis of mammary tumor cells in 3D culture caused by her-2 expression was reversed in tumors that lacked GnT-V expression. Moreover, her-2-induced mammary tumor onset was significantly delayed in the GnT-V null tumors, evidence that the lack of the posttranslational modification catalyzed by GnT-V attenuated tumor formation. Inhibited activation of both PKB and ERK signaling pathways was observed in GnT-V null tumor cells. The proportion of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in the mammary tumors from GnT-V null mice was significantly reduced compared with controls, and GnT-V null TICs displayed a reduced ability to form secondary tumors in NOD/SCID mice. These results demonstrate that GnT-V expression and its branched glycan products effectively modulate her-2-mediated signaling pathways that, in turn, regulate the relative proportion of tumor initiating cells and the latency of her-2-driven tumor onset.

  20. Collagen density promotes mammary tumor initiation and progression

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    Knittel Justin G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammographically dense breast tissue is one of the greatest risk factors for developing breast carcinoma. Despite the strong clinical correlation, breast density has not been causally linked to tumorigenesis, largely because no animal model has existed for studying breast tissue density. Importantly, regions of high breast density are associated with increased stromal collagen. Thus, the influence of the extracellular matrix on breast carcinoma development and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Methods To study the effects of collagen density on mammary tumor formation and progression, we utilized a bi-transgenic tumor model with increased stromal collagen in mouse mammary tissue. Imaging of the tumors and tumor-stromal interface in live tumor tissue was performed with multiphoton laser-scanning microscopy to generate multiphoton excitation and spectrally resolved fluorescent lifetimes of endogenous fluorophores. Second harmonic generation was utilized to image stromal collagen. Results Herein we demonstrate that increased stromal collagen in mouse mammary tissue significantly increases tumor formation approximately three-fold (p p Conclusion This study provides the first data causally linking increased stromal collagen to mammary tumor formation and metastasis, and demonstrates that fundamental differences arise and persist in epithelial tumor cells that progressed within collagen-dense microenvironments. Furthermore, the imaging techniques and signature identified in this work may provide useful diagnostic tools to rapidly assess fresh tissue biopsies.

  1. The role and mechanism of let-7g on tgfbrl related to development and lactation of mouse mammary gland%let-7g对小鼠乳腺发育和泌乳相关功能基因Tgfbr1的作用及其机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯丽; 李庆章; 崔巍; 丁巍

    2012-01-01

    Computational approaches were used for let-7g target prediction. A luciferase gene expression vector containing let-7g binding site complementary sequences was constructed. The Firefly luciferase expression plasmids were named pMIR-report-let-7gT. The Firefly luciferase expression plasmid pMIR-report-let-7gT and the Renilla luciferase construct phRL-TK with either let-7g mimics or negative control were cotransfected into mouse mammary epithelial cells. The Firefly and Renilla luciferase activity as detected by using the dual glo luciferase assay system after cotransfection. After transfection of let-7g inhibitor and let-7g mimics or negative control in mouse mammary epithelial cells,expression of let-7g and the effect of let-7g on mouse mammary epithelial cells were determined by CASY-technology,qRT-PCR,Western blotting and HPLC. The recombinant vector was verified by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. Luciferase activity was significantly decreased in mouse mammary epithelial cells cotransfected with recombinant vector,phRL-TK and let-7g mimics,compared with cells transfected with recombinant vector,phRL-TK and negative control (P〈0.05). Western blotting detection demonstrated a significant increase of TGFβR I protein level (P〈0.01) and cytoactive (P〈0.05) in cells transfected with let-7g inhibitor,and expression of β-casein was significantly increased (P〉0.05); but not in cells transfected with let-7g mimics, TGFβR I protein level (P〈0.01) and cytoactive (P〈0.05) was significantly decreased, and expression of β-casein was decreased (P 〈0.05) ,compared to control group cells. These data indicated that let-7g could negatively regulate the expression of target Tgfbr1 by complementary combination in mouse mammary epithelial cells;let-7g could regulate the proliferation of mouse mammary epithelial cells and expression of β-casein by suppressing the expression of TGFβR I .%运用生物信息学方法对let-7g

  2. Transcript profiling of Elf5+/- mammary glands during pregnancy identifies novel targets of Elf5.

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    Renee L Rogers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elf5, an epithelial specific Ets transcription factor, plays a crucial role in the pregnancy-associated development of the mouse mammary gland. Elf5(-/- embryos do not survive, however the Elf5(+/- mammary gland displays a severe pregnancy-associated developmental defect. While it is known that Elf5 is crucial for correct mammary development and lactation, the molecular mechanisms employed by Elf5 to exert its effects on the mammary gland are largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transcript profiling was used to investigate the transcriptional changes that occur as a result of Elf5 haploinsufficiency in the Elf5(+/- mouse model. We show that the development of the mouse Elf5(+/- mammary gland is delayed at a transcriptional and morphological level, due to the delayed increase in Elf5 protein in these glands. We also identify a number of potential Elf5 target genes, including Mucin 4, whose expression, is directly regulated by the binding of Elf5 to an Ets binding site within its promoter. CONCLUSION: We identify novel transcriptional targets of Elf5 and show that Muc4 is a direct target of Elf5, further elucidating the mechanisms through which Elf5 regulates proliferation and differentiation in the mammary gland.

  3. Role of ERα in the differential response of Stat5a loss in susceptibility to mammary preneoplasia and DMBA-induced carcinogenesis

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    Miermont, Anne M.; Parrish, Angela R.; Furth, Priscilla A

    2010-01-01

    Deregulated estrogen signaling is evidently linked to breast cancer pathophysiology, although the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)5a, integral to normal mammary gland development, is less clear. A mouse model of mammary epithelial cell-targeted deregulated estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression [conditional ERα in mammary epithelium (CERM)] was crossed with mice carrying a germ line deletion of Stat5a [Stat5a−/−] to investigate interactions between ERα and Stat5a ...

  4. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins stimulate mammary fibroblasts to promote mammary carcinoma cell invasion.

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    Philip Owens

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs are secreted cytokines that are part of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ superfamily. BMPs have been shown to be highly expressed in human breast cancers, and loss of BMP signaling in mammary carcinomas has been shown to accelerate metastases. Interestingly, other work has indicated that stimulation of dermal fibroblasts with BMP can enhance secretion of pro-tumorigenic factors. Furthermore, treatment of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs derived from a mouse prostate carcinoma with BMP4 was shown to stimulate angiogenesis. We sought to determine the effect of BMP treatment on mammary fibroblasts. A large number of secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix-metallo proteases (MMPs were found to be upregulated in response to BMP4 treatment. Fibroblasts that were stimulated with BMP4 were found to enhance mammary carcinoma cell invasion, and these effects were inhibited by a BMP receptor kinase antagonist. Treatment with BMP in turn elevated pro-tumorigenic secreted factors such as IL-6 and MMP-3. These experiments demonstrate that BMP may stimulate tumor progression within the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

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    Corinne A Boulanger

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+ progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  6. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

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    Boulanger, Corinne A; Bruno, Robert D; Mack, David L; Gonzales, Monica; Castro, Nadia P; Salomon, David S; Smith, Gilbert H

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES) cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+) progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  7. Zinc Finger Homeodomain Factor Zfhx3 Is Essential for Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Maintaining Prolactin Signaling Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Ma, Gui; Zhang, Xiaolin; He, Yuan; Li, Mei; Han, Xueying; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Nagy, Tamas; Zhao, Qiang; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-06-10

    The zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3, also named ATBF1 for AT motif binding factor 1) is a transcription factor that suppresses prostatic carcinogenesis and induces neuronal differentiation. It also interacts with estrogen receptor α to inhibit cell proliferation and regulate pubertal mammary gland development in mice. In the present study, we examined whether and how Zfhx3 regulates lactogenic differentiation in mouse mammary glands. At different stages of mammary gland development, Zfhx3 protein was expressed at varying levels, with the highest level at lactation. In the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line, an in vitro model of lactogenesis, knockdown of Zfhx3 attenuated prolactin-induced β-casein expression and morphological changes, indicators of lactogenic differentiation. In mouse mammary tissue, knock-out of Zfhx3 interrupted lactogenesis, resulting in underdeveloped glands with much smaller and fewer alveoli, reduced β-casein expression, accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in luminal cells after parturition, and failure in lactation. Mechanistically, Zfhx3 maintained the expression of Prlr (prolactin receptor) and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity, whereas knockdown and knock-out of Zfhx3 in HC11 cells and mammary tissues, respectively, decreased Prlr expression, Stat5 phosphorylation, and the expression of Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 target genes. These findings indicate that Zfhx3 plays an essential role in proper lactogenic development in mammary glands, at least in part by maintaining Prlr expression and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity.

  8. Postnatal and postpartal morphology of the mammary gland in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militzer, K; Schwalenstöcker, H

    1996-08-01

    The object of this work was to compare the postnatal and postpartal morphology of the mammary gland of nu/nu with that of nu/(+)-mice. All studies were carried out on groups of female (athymic) nude mice with NMRI genetic background, their nu/(+)-siblings and dams. The various age groups (3, 21, 40, 55, 70 and 120 days) each consisted of 6 nu/nu- and 6 heterozygous nu/(+)-mice respectively. The morphological examination of the mammary gland tissue were made on histological sections and whole mounts. Body weights, total areas of the mammary glands and the number of the terminal end buds were compared. The mammary gland of the athymic nude mouse exhibited no essential morphological differences from the normal developing mammary gland of the hairy euthymic nu/(+)-animal. The area of the mammary gland increased with increasing body weight. Both collectives of mice differed only in their rate of mammary gland development. As a result, the terminal end buds appeared numerously as growth points of mammary gland in nu/(+)-animals as early as the 21st day of life. The athymic nude mice showed a maximum only on the 40th day of life and a lower degree of density and differentiation of specific mammary gland structures (lateral buds, lobulo-alveolar glandular endings) until the 70th day of life. The mammary gland of 120-day-old animals and dams of both animal groups reached the same state of maturity. Thus it is not the rate of development of the dam, but other, yet unidentified factors, which determine, if successful breeding of nude mice with homozygous parents is possible.

  9. Mammary tuberculosis: percutaneous treatment of a mammary tuberculous abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, C.; Carreira, C.; Cereceda, C.; Pinto, J. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo (Spain); Lopez, R.; Bolanos, F. [Servicio de Cirugia, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo (Spain)

    2000-03-01

    It is currently very rare to find mammary involvement in cases of tuberculosis, in either primary or secondary form. Diagnosis is classically clinical and microbiological, and the basic techniques used in imaging diagnosis are mammography and ultrasound. Computed tomography may define the involvement of the thoracic wall in those cases which present as mammary masses adhering to deep levels, and is also able to evaluate accompanying pulmonary disease, if it is present. Traditionally, treatment has consisted of quadrantectomy and specific antibiotic therapy. We present a case of tuberculous mammary abscess secondary to pulmonary disease, which was treated by percutaneous drainage controlled by CT and specific antibiotic therapy. We revise the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of mammary tuberculosis. (orig.)

  10. Differential requirement of GRP94 and GRP78 in mammary gland development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Genyuan; Wang, Miao; Spike, Benjamin; Gray, Peter C.; Shen, Jieli; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Chen, Si-Yi; Lee, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose Regulated Protein (GRP) 94 and GRP78 are critical molecular chaperones and regulators of signaling. Conditional knockout mouse models have revealed tissue specific requirements for GRP94 and GRP78, including selection for allele retention in specific cell types. Here we report the consequences of mammary-targeted knockout of these GRPs. Our studies revealed that MMTV-Cre, Grp94f/f mammary glands, despite GRP94 deficiency, exhibited normal proliferation and ductal morphogenesis. Interestingly, MMTV-Cre, Grp78f/f mammary glands displayed only slightly reduced GRP78 protein levels, associating with the retention of the non-recombined Grp78 floxed alleles in isolated mammary epithelial cells and displayed phenotypes comparable to wild-type glands. In contrast, transduction of isolated Grp78f/f mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells with adenovirus expressing GFP and Cre-recombinase was successful in GRP78 ablation, and the GFP sorted cells failed to give rise to repopulated mammary glands in de-epithelialized recipient mice. These studies imply GRP78, but not GRP94, is required for mammary gland development. PMID:24953136

  11. RANK Signaling Amplifies WNT-Responsive Mammary Progenitors through R-SPONDIN1

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    Purna A. Joshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local signals must be integrated by mammary stem and progenitor cells to regulate their cyclic growth and turnover in the adult gland. Here, we show RANK-positive luminal progenitors exhibiting WNT pathway activation are selectively expanded in the human breast during the progesterone-high menstrual phase. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined mouse models and found that loss of RANK prevents the proliferation of hormone receptor-negative luminal mammary progenitors and basal cells, an accompanying loss of WNT activation, and, hence, a suppression of lobuloalveologenesis. We also show that R-spondin1 is depleted in RANK-null progenitors, and that its exogenous administration rescues key aspects of RANK deficiency by reinstating a WNT response and mammary cell expansion. Our findings point to a novel role of RANK in dictating WNT responsiveness to mediate hormone-induced changes in the growth dynamics of adult mammary cells.

  12. Mammary stem cells and the differentiation hierarchy: current status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvader, Jane E.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    The mammary epithelium is highly responsive to local and systemic signals, which orchestrate morphogenesis of the ductal tree during puberty and pregnancy. Based on transplantation and lineage tracing studies, a hierarchy of stem and progenitor cells has been shown to exist among the mammary epithelium. Lineage tracing has highlighted the existence of bipotent mammary stem cells (MaSCs) in situ as well as long-lived unipotent cells that drive morphogenesis and homeostasis of the ductal tree. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence for a heterogeneous MaSC compartment comprising fetal MaSCs, slow-cycling cells, and both long-term and short-term repopulating cells. In parallel, diverse luminal progenitor subtypes have been identified in mouse and human mammary tissue. Elucidation of the normal cellular hierarchy is an important step toward understanding the “cells of origin” and molecular perturbations that drive breast cancer. PMID:24888586

  13. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

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    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  14. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

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    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  15. The gene desert mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs1a regulates Nr2f1 modifying mammary epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation.

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    Bart M G Smits

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are located in non-protein coding genomic regions; however, few have been characterized. In a comparative genetics approach to model such loci in a rat breast cancer model, we previously identified the mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs1a. We now localize Mcs1a to a critical interval (277 Kb within a gene desert. Mcs1a reduces mammary carcinoma multiplicity by 50% and acts in a mammary cell-autonomous manner. We developed a megadeletion mouse model, which lacks 535 Kb of sequence containing the Mcs1a ortholog. Global gene expression analysis by RNA-seq revealed that in the mouse mammary gland, the orphan nuclear receptor gene Nr2f1/Coup-tf1 is regulated by Mcs1a. In resistant Mcs1a congenic rats, as compared with susceptible congenic control rats, we found Nr2f1 transcript levels to be elevated in mammary gland, epithelial cells, and carcinoma samples. Chromatin looping over ∼820 Kb of sequence from the Nr2f1 promoter to a strongly conserved element within the Mcs1a critical interval was identified. This element contains a 14 bp indel polymorphism that affects a human-rat-mouse conserved COUP-TF binding motif and is a functional Mcs1a candidate. In both the rat and mouse models, higher Nr2f1 transcript levels are associated with higher abundance of luminal mammary epithelial cells. In both the mouse mammary gland and a human breast cancer global gene expression data set, we found Nr2f1 transcript levels to be strongly anti-correlated to a gene cluster enriched in cell cycle-related genes. We queried 12 large publicly available human breast cancer gene expression studies and found that the median NR2F1 transcript level is consistently lower in 'triple-negative' (ER-PR-HER2- breast cancers as compared with 'receptor-positive' breast cancers. Our data suggest that the non-protein coding locus Mcs1a regulates Nr2f1, which is a candidate

  16. Chronic social isolation is associated with metabolic gene expression changes specific to mammary adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volden, Paul A; Wonder, Erin L; Skor, Maxwell N; Carmean, Christopher M; Patel, Feenalie N; Ye, Honggang; Kocherginsky, Masha; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2013-07-01

    Chronic social isolation is linked to increased mammary tumor growth in rodent models of breast cancer. In the C3(1)/SV40 T-antigen FVB/N (TAg) mouse model of "triple-negative" breast cancer, the heightened stress response elicited by social isolation has been associated with increased expression of metabolic genes in the mammary gland before invasive tumors develop (i.e., during the in situ carcinoma stage). To further understand the mechanisms underlying how accelerated mammary tumor growth is associated with social isolation, we separated the mammary gland adipose tissue from adjacent ductal epithelial cells and analyzed individual cell types for changes in metabolic gene expression. Specifically, increased expression of the key metabolic genes Acaca, Hk2, and Acly was found in the adipocyte, rather than the epithelial fraction. Surprisingly, metabolic gene expression was not significantly increased in visceral adipose depots of socially isolated female mice. As expected, increased metabolic gene expression in the mammary adipocytes of socially isolated mice coincided with increased glucose metabolism, lipid synthesis, and leptin secretion from this adipose depot. Furthermore, application of media that had been cultured with isolated mouse mammary adipose tissue (conditioned media) resulted in increased proliferation of mammary cancer cells relative to group-housed-conditioned media. These results suggest that exposure to a chronic stressor (social isolation) results in specific metabolic reprogramming in mammary gland adipocytes that in turn contributes to increased proliferation of adjacent preinvasive malignant epithelial cells. Metabolites and/or tumor growth-promoting proteins secreted from adipose tissue could identify biomarkers and/or targets for preventive intervention in breast cancer.

  17. Canine mammary tumors - clinical survey

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    Elena Atanaskova Petrov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammary tumours are the second most frequent neoplasia in dogs, mainly affecting older female patients. Approximately 50% of the mammary tumours are malignant with high percentage of mortality if not treated in time. The aim of this study was to analyze the data of canine patients with mammary tumours, to evaluate the type of tumours, as well as the relationship between tumour incidence and dogs’ age, reproductive cycle and sterilization. The survey was used to retrieve the information in the period of two years from the patient data base of the University Veterinary Hospital at the Faculty of Veterinary medicine in Skopje. Patients included in this survey were subjected to routine clinical investigation and additional laboratory tests (cytological examination, x-rays imaging, CBC and biochemical profile, histopathology of the tumor samples. Aged female patients (12 – 13 years are the most susceptible category for development of mammary tumours. The reproductive history showed that five of the patients with malignant mammary tumourshave never whelped and were not treated with any exogenous hormones. Malignant tumours (adenocarcinoma were diagnosed in 90% of the patients. Three patients died due to lung metastasis. Late diagnosis is one of the major problems that results in lethal outcome due to lung metastases. Since ovarian steroids play an important role in the aetiology, the most effective prevention of mammary tumoursis elective ovariectomy of the bitch at an early age.

  18. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  19. Expression of prolactin receptors in normal canine mammary tissue, canine mammary adenomas and mammary adenocarcinomas

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    Michel Erika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumors represent the most common neoplastic disease in female dogs. Recently, the promoting role of prolactin (PRL in the development of human breast carcinoma has been shown. Possible proliferative, anti-apoptotic, migratory and angiogenic effects of PRL on human mammary cancer cells in vitro and in vivo were suggested. The effects of PRL are mediated by its receptor, and alterations in receptor expression are likely to play a role in tumor development. Currently, not much data is available about prolactin receptor (PRLR expression in canine mammary tumors. To set the basis for investigations on the role of PRL in mammary tumorigenesis in this species, prolactin receptor expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry on 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples each of canine non-neoplastic mammary tissue, mammary adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Results The highest PRLR expression levels were found in normal mammary tissue, while adenomas, and to an even higher degree adenocarcinomas, showed a significant decrease in prolactin receptor expression. Compared to normal tissue, PRLR mRNA was reduced 2.4 fold (p = 0.0261 in adenomas and 4.8 fold (p = 0.008 in adenocarcinomas. PRLR mRNA expression was significantly lower in malignant than in benign lesions (p = 0.0165. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated PRLR expression in all three tissue types with signals mostly limited to epithelial cells. Conclusions Malignant transformation of mammary tissue was associated with a decline in prolactin receptor expression. Further studies are warranted to address the functional significance of this finding.

  20. Effects of age and parity on mammary gland lesions and progenitor cells in the FVB/N-RC mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raafat, Ahmed; Strizzi, Luigi; Lashin, Karim; Ginsburg, Erika; McCurdy, David; Salomon, David; Smith, Gilbert H; Medina, Daniel; Callahan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The FVB/N mouse strain is extensively used in the development of animal models for breast cancer research. Recently it has been reported that the aging FVB/N mice develop spontaneous mammary lesions and tumors accompanied with abnormalities in the pituitary glands. These observations have a great impact on the mouse models of human breast cancer. We have developed a population of inbred FVB/N mice (designated FVB/N-RC) that have been genetically isolated for 20 years. To study the effects of age and parity on abnormalities of the mammary glands of FVB/N-RC mice, twenty-five nulliparous and multiparous (3-4 pregnancies) females were euthanized at 16-22 months of age. Examination of the mammary glands did not reveal macroscopic evidence of mammary gland tumors in either aged-nulliparous or multiparous FVB/N-RC mice (0/25). However, histological analysis of the mammary glands showed rare focal nodules of squamous changes in 2 of the aged multiparous mice. Mammary gland hyperplasia was detected in 8% and 71% of the aged-nulliparous and aged-multiparous mice, respectively. Epithelial contents and serum levels of triiodothyronine were significantly higher in the experimental groups than the 14-wk-old control mice. Immuno-histochemical staining of the pituitary gland pars distalis showed no difference in prolactin staining between the control and the aged mice. Tissue transplant and dilution studies showed no effect of age and/or parity on the ability of putative progenitor cells present among the injected mammary cells to repopulate a cleared fat pad and develop a full mammary gland outgrowth. This FVB/N-RC mouse substrain is suitable to develop mouse models for breast cancer.

  1. Effects of age and parity on mammary gland lesions and progenitor cells in the FVB/N-RC mice.

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    Ahmed Raafat

    Full Text Available The FVB/N mouse strain is extensively used in the development of animal models for breast cancer research. Recently it has been reported that the aging FVB/N mice develop spontaneous mammary lesions and tumors accompanied with abnormalities in the pituitary glands. These observations have a great impact on the mouse models of human breast cancer. We have developed a population of inbred FVB/N mice (designated FVB/N-RC that have been genetically isolated for 20 years. To study the effects of age and parity on abnormalities of the mammary glands of FVB/N-RC mice, twenty-five nulliparous and multiparous (3-4 pregnancies females were euthanized at 16-22 months of age. Examination of the mammary glands did not reveal macroscopic evidence of mammary gland tumors in either aged-nulliparous or multiparous FVB/N-RC mice (0/25. However, histological analysis of the mammary glands showed rare focal nodules of squamous changes in 2 of the aged multiparous mice. Mammary gland hyperplasia was detected in 8% and 71% of the aged-nulliparous and aged-multiparous mice, respectively. Epithelial contents and serum levels of triiodothyronine were significantly higher in the experimental groups than the 14-wk-old control mice. Immuno-histochemical staining of the pituitary gland pars distalis showed no difference in prolactin staining between the control and the aged mice. Tissue transplant and dilution studies showed no effect of age and/or parity on the ability of putative progenitor cells present among the injected mammary cells to repopulate a cleared fat pad and develop a full mammary gland outgrowth. This FVB/N-RC mouse substrain is suitable to develop mouse models for breast cancer.

  2. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  3. High-level synthesis of a heterologous milk protein in the mammary glands of transgenic swine.

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, R J; Pursel, V G; Shamay, A; McKnight, R A; Pittius, C W; Hennighausen, L

    1991-01-01

    The whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major milk protein in mice, rats, and rabbits but has not been found in milk of livestock including swine. To determine whether mammary gland regulatory elements from the WAP gene function across species boundaries and whether it is possible to qualitatively alter milk protein composition, we introduced the mouse WAP gene into the genome of swine. Three lines of transgenic swine were analyzed, and mouse WAP was detected in milk from all lactating females at ...

  4. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy; Diagnostik und Therapie des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann (eds.) [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen BZG, Goettingen(Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  5. Increased levels of choline metabolites are an early marker of docetaxel treatment response in BRCA1-mutated mouse mammary tumors: an assessment by ex vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, J.J.A. van; Vettukattil, R.; Buckle, T.; Rottenberg, S.; Leeuwen, F van; Bathen, T.F.; Heerschap, A.

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most frequently used drugs to treat breast cancer. However, resistance or incomplete response to docetaxel is a major challenge. The aim of this study was to utilize MR metabolomics to identify potential biomarkers of docetaxel resistance in a mouse model for BRCA1-mutated

  6. Emerging evidence of the physiological role of hypoxia in mammary development and lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Shao; Feng-Qi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a physiological or pathological condition of a deficiency of oxygen supply in the body as a whole or within a tissue. During hypoxia, tissues undergo a series of physiological responses to defend themselves against a low oxygen supply, including increased angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and glucose uptake. The effects of hypoxia are mainly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), which is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting ofαandβsubunits. HIF-1βis constantly expressed, whereas HIF-1αis degraded under normal oxygen conditions. Hypoxia stabilizes HIF-1αand the HIF complex, and HIF then translocates into the nucleus to initiate the expression of target genes. Hypoxia has been extensively studied for its role in promoting tumor progression, and emerging evidence also indicates that hypoxia may play important roles in physiological processes, including mammary development and lactation. The mammary gland exhibits an increasing metabolic rate from pregnancy to lactation to support mammary growth, lactogenesis, and lactation. This process requires increasing amounts of oxygen consumption and results in localized chronic hypoxia as confirmed by the binding of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole HCl in mouse mammary gland. We hypothesized that this hypoxic condition promotes mammary development and lactation, a hypothesis that is supported by the following several lines of evidence:i) Mice with an HIF-1αdeletion selective for the mammary gland have impaired mammary differentiation and lipid secretion, resulting in lactation failure and striking changes in milk compositions;ii) We recently observed that hypoxia significantly induces HIF-1α-dependent glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells, which may be responsible for the dramatic increases in glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in the mammary gland during the transition period from late pregnancy to early lactation;and ii ) Hypoxia and HIF-1αincrease the

  7. Biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mammary epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Daniel; Kittrell, Frances S.; Shepard, Anne; Stephens, L. Clifton; Jiang, Cheng; Lu, Junxuan; Allred, D. Craig; McCarthy, Maureen; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The absence of the tumor suppressor gene p53 confers an increased tumorigenic risk for mammary epithelial cells. In this report, we describe the biological and genetic properties of the p53 null preneoplastic mouse mammary epithelium in a p53 wild-type environment. Mammary epithelium from p53 null mice was transplanted serially into the cleared mammary fat pads of p53 wild-type BALB/c female to develop stable outgrowth lines. The outgrowth lines were transplanted for 10 generations. The outgrowths were ductal in morphology and progressed through ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ before invasive cancer. The preneoplastic outgrowth lines were immortal and exhibited activated telomerase activity. They are estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive, and aneuploid, and had various levels of tumorigenic potential. The biological and genetic properties of these lines are distinct from those found in most hyperplastic alveolar outgrowth lines, the form of mammary preneoplasia occurring in most traditional models of murine mammary tumorigenesis. These results indicate that the preneoplastic cell populations found in this genetically engineered model are similar in biological properties to a subset of precurser lesions found in human breast cancer and provide a unique model to identify secondary events critical for tumorigenicity and invasiveness.

  8. Redefining the expression and function of the inhibitor of differentiation 1 in mammary gland development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Nair

    Full Text Available The accumulation of poorly differentiated cells is a hallmark of breast neoplasia and progression. Thus an understanding of the factors controlling mammary differentiation is critical to a proper understanding of breast tumourigenesis. The Inhibitor of Differentiation 1 (Id1 protein has well documented roles in the control of mammary epithelial differentiation and proliferation in vitro and breast cancer progression in vivo. However, it has not been determined whether Id1 expression is sufficient for the inhibition of mammary epithelial differentiation or the promotion of neoplastic transformation in vivo. We now show that Id1 is not commonly expressed by the luminal mammary epithelia, as previously reported. Generation and analysis of a transgenic mouse model of Id1 overexpression in the mammary gland reveals that Id1 is insufficient for neoplastic progression in virgin animals or to prevent terminal differentiation of the luminal epithelia during pregnancy and lactation. Together, these data demonstrate that there is no luminal cell-autonomous role for Id1 in mammary epithelial cell fate determination, ductal morphogenesis and terminal differentiation.

  9. Autophagy regulator BECN1 suppresses mammary tumorigenesis driven by WNT1 activation and following parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Michelle; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Nahar, Ritu; Lozy, Fred; Zhong, Hua; Vazquez, Alexei; Kang, Yibin; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies reported allelic deletion of the essential autophagy regulator BECN1 in breast cancers implicating BECN1 loss, and likely defective autophagy, in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have questioned the tumor suppressive role of autophagy, as autophagy-related gene (Atg) defects generally suppress tumorigenesis in well-characterized mouse tumor models. We now report that, while it delays or does not alter mammary tumorigenesis driven by Palb2 loss or ERBB2 and PyMT overexpression, monoallelic Becn1 loss promotes mammary tumor development in 2 specific contexts, namely following parity and in association with wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1 (WNT1) activation. Our studies demonstrate that Becn1 heterozygosity, which results in immature mammary epithelial cell expansion and aberrant TNFRSF11A/TNR11/RANK (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 11a, NFKB activator) signaling, promotes mammary tumorigenesis in multiparous FVB/N mice and in cooperation with the progenitor cell-transforming WNT1 oncogene. Similar to our Becn1(+/-);MMTV-Wnt1 mouse model, low BECN1 expression and an activated WNT pathway gene signature correlate with the triple-negative subtype, TNFRSF11A axis activation and poor prognosis in human breast cancers. Our results suggest that BECN1 may have nonautophagy-related roles in mammary development, provide insight in the seemingly paradoxical roles of BECN1 in tumorigenesis, and constitute the basis for further studies on the pathophysiology and treatment of clinically aggressive triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs).

  10. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  11. Immunology of the mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Miodrag

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammary gland is an organ of specific structure whose elementary task is to supply offspring with nutritive and other biologically active substances during the first weeks, or, depending on the species, the first months of life. This prolongs the period of close contact between the mother and her young, which is necessary for their regular growth. Most mammal offspring are born with physiological agammaglobulinaemia, because of the specific structure of the placenta, so that they receive the first specific protection against pathogenic microorganisms through colostrum. Furthermore, this gland is in direct contact with the outer environment through the secretary ducts, so that there are great possibilities for the occurrence of infections. It is therefore necessary to secure protective mechanisms which would prevent such infections. It is clear that there is a distinct connection between the immunological system and the mammary gland, and that link is the central topic of this paper. It presents the basic mechanisms of mammary gland defense which are divided into two categories: nonspecific (innate and specific immune response. The mammary gland secretion contains several types of leukocytes, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophiles, as well as 2% epithelial cells. On the average, there are 0.2 x 106 somatic cells in one mililiter of milk. Macrophages account for most of these (58%, as well as lymphocytes (28%, while a smaller number of somatic cells (12% are polymorphonuclears (PMN. The paper considers the characteristics and main functions of these cell types.

  12. Reduced levels of ATF-2 predispose mice to mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Toshio; Shinagawa, Toshie; Sano, Yuji; Sakuma, Takahiko; Nomura, Shintaro; Nagasaki, Koichi; Miki, Yoshio; Saito-Ohara, Fumiko; Inazawa, Johji; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2007-03-01

    Transcription factor ATF-2 is a nuclear target of stress-activated protein kinases, such as p38, which are activated by various extracellular stresses, including UV light. Here, we show that ATF-2 plays a critical role in hypoxia- and high-cell-density-induced apoptosis and the development of mammary tumors. Compared to wild-type cells, Atf-2(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were more resistant to hypoxia- and anisomycin-induced apoptosis but remained equally susceptible to other stresses, including UV. Atf-2(-/-) and Atf-2(+/-) MEFs could not express a group of genes, such as Gadd45alpha, whose overexpression can induce apoptosis, in response to hypoxia. Atf-2(-/-) MEFs also had a higher saturation density than wild-type cells and expressed lower levels of Maspin, the breast cancer tumor suppressor, which is also known to enhance cellular sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. Atf-2(-/-) MEFs underwent a lower degree of apoptosis at high cell density than wild-type cells. Atf-2(+/-) mice were highly prone to mammary tumors that expressed reduced levels of Gadd45alpha and Maspin. The ATF-2 mRNA levels in human breast cancers were lower than those in normal breast tissue. Thus, ATF-2 acts as a tumor susceptibility gene of mammary tumors, at least partly, by activating a group of target genes, including Maspin and Gadd45alpha.

  13. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in mammary gland tissue sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2004-02-17

    Real-time three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of epithelial structures in human mammary gland tissue blocks mapped with selected markers would be an extremely helpful tool for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment planning. Besides its clear clinical application, this tool could also shed a great deal of light on the molecular basis of breast cancer initiation and progression. In this paper we present a framework for real-time segmentation of epithelial structures in two-dimensional (2D) images of sections of normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue blocks. Complete 3D rendering of the tissue can then be done by surface rendering of the structures detected in consecutive sections of the blocks. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are first sliced, and sections are stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy and their background is corrected using a phantom image. We then use the Fast-Marching algorithm to roughly extract the contours of the different morphological structures in the images. The result is then refined with the Level-Set method which converges to an accurate (sub-pixel) solution for the segmentation problem. Finally, our system stacks together the 2D results obtained in order to reconstruct a 3D representation of the entire tissue block under study. Our method is illustrated with results from the segmentation of human and mouse mammary gland tissue samples.

  14. EFFECT OF CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID ON THE EXPRESSION OF LIPOGENIC GENES IN MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND%共轭亚油酸对小鼠乳腺脂肪合成相关基因表达的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩立强; 郭豫杰; 鲁维飞; 朱河水; 杨国庆; 杨国宇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the expression of lipogenic gene in mammary gland of mice. Method The lactating KM mice were randomly assigned to four groups (77=8 for each group), control group (2% peanut oil) ,0.5% CLA group (0.5% CLA +1.5% peanut oil), 1.0% CLA group (1%CLA+1% peanut oil) and 1.5% CLA group (1.5%CLA+0.5% peanut oil). All animals were fed the diet from D 4 to D 14 postpartum.The food intake, body weight of dams and litters were assessed. The content of milk fat, protein and lactose was determined. The expression of lipogenic genes was analyzed in mammary tissue between control and 1.5% CLA group via Real-time PCR. Results The body weight of dams was unaffected by treatment. The 1.5%CLA diet siginificantly decreased the food intake of dams ,body weight of litters and milk fat of dams (P<0.05). The expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) genes were significantly inhibited in mammary tissue by the intake of 1.5%CLA (P<0.05). The expression of transcription factor (sferol regulatory element binding factor, SREBF and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ, PPARγ) genes were also down-regulated in mammary tissue in 1.5%CLA group compared with control (P<0.01). Conclusion Supplementing the diet with 1.5%CLA significant decreased the content of milk fat and inhibited the expression of lipogenic genes in mammary gland of lactating mouse.%目的 研究共轭亚油酸(CLA)对小鼠乳腺脂肪合成相关基因表达的影响.方法 选取32只泌乳昆明鼠,随机分为对照组(2%花生油);0.5%CLA组(0.5%CLA+1.5%花生油);1.0%CLA组(1%CLA+1%花生油);1.5%CLA组(1.5%CLA+0.5%花生油),每组8只小鼠,从泌乳第4日饲喂至第14日,每日检测母鼠采食量、体重和仔鼠窝重,分析乳成分,采用荧光定量PCR检测对照组和1.5%CLA组母鼠乳腺组织脂肪合

  15. Mammary gland specific knockdown of the physiological surge in Cx26 during lactation retains normal mammary gland development and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K G Stewart

    Full Text Available Connexin26 (Cx26 is the major Cx protein expressed in the human mammary gland and is up-regulated during pregnancy while remaining elevated throughout lactation. It is currently unknown if patients with loss-of-function Cx26 mutations that result in hearing loss and skin diseases have a greater susceptibility to impaired breast development. To investigate if Cx26 plays a critical role in mammary gland development and differentiation, a novel Cx26 conditional knockout mouse model was generated by crossing Cx26fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre under the β-Lactoglobulin promoter. Conditional knockdown of Cx26 from the mammary gland resulted in a dramatic reduction in detectable gap junction plaques confirmed by a significant ∼65-70% reduction in Cx26 mRNA and protein throughout parturition and lactation. Interestingly, this reduction was accompanied by a decrease in mammary gland Cx30 gap junction plaques at parturition, while no change was observed for Cx32 or Cx43. Whole mount, histological and immunofluorescent assessment of breast tissue revealed comparatively normal lobuloalveolar development following pregnancy in the conditionally knockdown mice compared to control mice. In addition, glands from genetically-modified mice were capable of producing milk proteins that were evident in the lumen of alveoli and ducts at similar levels as controls, suggesting normal gland function. Together, our results suggest that low levels of Cx26 expression throughout pregnancy and lactation, and not the physiological surge in Cx26, is sufficient for normal gland development and function.

  16. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  17. Autophagy regulates keratin 8 homeostasis in mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongara, Sameera; Kravchuk, Olga; Teplova, Irina; Lozy, Fred; Schulte, Jennifer; Moore, Dirk; Barnard, Nicola; Neumann, Carola A.; White, Eileen; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in response to cellular stressors and mediates lysosomal degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material and organelles as a temporary cell survival mechanism. Defective autophagy is implicated in human pathology, as disruption of protein and organelle homeostasis enables disease-promoting mechanisms such as toxic protein aggregation, oxidative stress, genomic damage and inflammation. We previously showed that autophagy-defective immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) are susceptible to metabolic stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. We now report that autophagy deficiency was associated with ER and oxidative stress, and deregulation of p62-mediated keratin homeostasis in mammary cells and allograft tumors and in mammary tissues from genetically engineered mice. In human breast tumors, high phospho(Ser73)-K8 levels inversely correlated with Beclin 1 expression. Thus, autophagy preserves cellular fitness by limiting ER and oxidative stress, a function potentially important in autophagy-mediated suppression of mammary tumorigenesis. Furthermore, autophagy regulates keratin homeostasis in the mammary gland via a p62-dependent mechanism. High phospho(Ser73)-K8 expression may be a marker of autophagy functional status in breast tumors and, as such, could have therapeutic implications for breast cancer patients. PMID:20530580

  18. Adipocyte Derived Paracrine Mediators of Mammary Ductal Morphogenesis Controlled by Retinoic Acid Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzan, Christine V.; Kupumbati, Tara S.; Bertran, Silvina P.; Samuels, TraceyAnn; Leibovitch, Boris; Lopez, Rafael Mira y; Ossowski, Liliana; Farias, Eduardo F.

    2010-01-01

    We generated a transgenic (Tg)-mouse model expressing a dominant negative-(DN)-RARα, (RARαG303E) under adipocytes-specific promoter to explore the paracrine role of adipocyte retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mammary morphogenesis. Transgenic adipocytes had reduced level of RARα, β and γ, which coincided with a severely underdeveloped pubertal and mature ductal tree with profoundly decreased epithelial cell proliferation. Transplantation experiments of mammary epithelium and of whole mammary glands implicated a fat-pad dependent paracrine mechanism in the stunted phenotype of the epithelial-ductal tree. Co-cultures of primary adipocytes, or in vitro differentiated adipocyte cell line, with mammary epithelium showed that when activated, adipocyte RARs contribute to generation of secreted proliferative and pro-migratory factors. Gene expression microarrays revealed a large number of genes regulated by adipocyte-RARs. Among them, pleiotrophin (PTN) was identified as the paracrine effectors of epithelial cell migration. Its expression was found to be strongly inhibited by DN-RARα, an inhibition relieved by pharmacological doses of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) in culture and in vivo. Moreover, adipocyte-PTHR, another atRA responsive gene, was found to be an up-stream regulator of PTN. Overall, these results support the existence of a novel paracrine loop controlled by adipocyte-RAR that regulates the mammary ductal tree morphogenesis. PMID:20974122

  19. Estrogen receptor coregulators and pioneer factors: The orchestrators of mammary gland cell fate and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramanandam eManavathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 17-beta estradiol (E2, a steroid hormone, which play critical role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis, is essential for reproduction and mammary gland development. E2 actions are mediated by two classical nuclear hormone receptors, estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ERs. The activity of ERs depends on the coordinate activity of ligand binding, posttranslational modification, and importantly their interaction with their partner proteins called ‘coregulators’. Because majority of breast cancers are ERalpha positive and coregulators are proved to be crucial for ER transcriptional activity, an increased interest in the field has led to the identification of a large number of coregulators. In the last decade, gene knockout studies using mouse models provided impetus to our further understanding of the role of these coregulators in mammary gland development. Several coregulators appear to be critical for terminal end bud formation, ductal branching and alveologenesis during mammary gland development. The emerging studies support that, in addition to these coregulators, the other ER partner proteins ‘pioneering factors’ also seems to contribute significantly to E2 signaling and mammary cell fate. This review discusses emerging themes in coregulator- and pioneering factor-mediated action on ER functions, particularly their role in mammary gland cell fate and development.

  20. t10,c12-CLA decreases adiposity in peripubertal mice without dose-related detrimental effects on mammary development, inflammation status, and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, M R; Giesy, S L; Bernal-Santos, G; Bauman, D E; Boisclair, Y R

    2010-12-01

    The trans 10, cis 12-conjugated linoleic acid (10,12-CLA) isomer reduces adiposity in several animal models. In the mouse, however, this effect is associated with adipose tissue inflammation, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. Moreover, 10,12-CLA was recently shown to promote mammary ductal hyperplasia and ErbB2/Her2-driven mammary cancer in the mouse. Reasons for detrimental effects of 10,12-CLA on the mouse mammary gland could relate to its effect on the mammary fat pad (MFP), which is essential for normal development. Accordingly, we hypothesized that mammary effects of 10,12-CLA were mediated through the MFP in a dose-dependent manner. Female FVB mice were fed 10,12-CLA at doses of 0%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.5% of the diet from day 24 of age, and effects on mammary development and metabolism were measured on day 49. The 0.5% dose reduced ductal elongation and caused premature alveolar budding. These effects were associated with increased expression of inflammatory markers and genes shown to alter epithelial growth (IGF binding protein-5) and alveolar budding (TNF-α and receptor of activated NF-κB ligand). The 0.5% dose also caused hyperinsulinemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. In contrast, the 0.1% 10,12-CLA dose had no adverse effects on mammary development, metabolic events, and inflammatory responses, but remained effective in decreasing adipose weights and lipogenic gene expression. These results show that a low dose of 10,12-CLA reduces adiposity in the mouse without negative effects on mammary development, inflammation, and metabolism, and suggest that previously reported detrimental effects relate to the use of excessive doses.

  1. Sesamin synergistically potentiates the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol in mammary cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Mohamed R; Ayoub, Nehad M; Abuasal, Bilal S; Kaddoumi, Amal; Sylvester, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    γ-Tocotrienol and sesamin are phytochemicals that display potent anticancer activity. Since sesamin inhibits the metabolic degradation of tocotrienols, studies were conducted to determine if combined treatment with sesamin potentiates the antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol on neoplastic mouse (+SA) and human (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) mammary cancer cells. Results showed that treatment with γ-tocotrienol or sesamin alone induced a significant dose-responsive growth inhibition, whereas combination treatment with these agents synergistically inhibited the growth of +SA, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells, while similar treatment doses were found to have little or no effect on normal (mouse CL-S1 and human MCF-10A) mammary epithelial cell growth or viability. However, sesamin synergistic enhancement of γ-tocotrienol-induced anticancer effects was not found to be mediated from a reduction in γ-tocotrienol metabolism. Rather, combined treatment with subeffective doses of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin was found to induce G1 cell cycle arrest, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, phospho-Rb, and E2F1 levels, and increase in p27 and p16 levels. Additional studies showed that the antiproliferative effect of combination treatment did not initiate apoptosis or result in a decrease in mammary cancer cell viability. Taken together, these findings indicate that the synergistic antiproliferative action of combined γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment in mouse and human mammary cancer cells is cytostatic, not cytotoxic, and results from G1 cell cycle arrest.

  2. Development of Foreign Mammary Epithelial Morphology in the Stroma of Immunodeficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gat Rauner

    Full Text Available Systemic growth and branching stimuli, and appropriate interactions with the host stroma are essential for the development of foreign epithelia in the mammary gland of immunodeficient mice. These factors were manipulated to promote and investigate the generation of representative bovine epithelial morphology in the transplanted mouse mammary stroma. The bovine mammary epithelium is unique in its commitment to rapid proliferation and high rate of differentiation. Its morphological organization within a fibrotic stroma resembles that of the human breast, and differs significantly from the rudimentary ductal network that penetrates a fatty stroma in mice. Transplantation of bovine mammary epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pad of NOD-SCID mice led to continuous growth of epithelial structures. Multilayered hollow spheres developed within fibrotic areas, but in contrast to mice, no epithelial organization was formed between adipocytes. The multilayered spheres shared characteristics with the heifer gland's epithelium, including lumen size, cell proliferation, cytokeratin orientation, estrogen/progesterone receptor expression and localization, and milk protein synthesis. However, they did not extend into the mouse fat pad via ductal morphology. Pre-transplantation of fibroblasts increased the number of spheres, but did not promote extension of bovine morphology. The bovine cells preserved their fate and rarely participated in chimeric mouse-bovine outgrowths. Nevertheless, a single case of terminal ductal lobuloalveolar unit (TDLU development was recorded in mice treated with estrogen and progesterone, implying the feasibility of this representative bovine morphology's development. In vitro extension of these studies revealed paracrine inhibition of bovine epithelial mammosphere development by adipocytes, which was also generalized to breast epithelial mammosphere formation. The rescue of mammosphere development by fibroblast growth factor

  3. The chemokine receptor CCR7 promotes mammary tumorigenesis through amplification of stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, S T; Ingman, W V; Poltavets, V; Faulkner, J W; Whitfield, R J; McColl, S R; Kochetkova, M

    2016-01-07

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is widely implicated in breast cancer pathobiology. Although recent reports correlated high CCR7 levels with more advanced tumor grade and poor prognosis, limited in vivo data are available regarding its specific function in mammary gland neoplasia and the underlying mechanisms involved. To address these questions we generated a bigenic mouse model of breast cancer combined with CCR7 deletion, which revealed that CCR7 ablation results in a considerable delay in tumor onset as well as significantly reduced tumor burden. Importantly, CCR7 was found to exert its function by regulating mammary cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumors. In vivo experiments showed that loss of CCR7 activity either through deletion or pharmacological antagonism significantly decreased functional pools of stem-like cells in mouse primary mammary tumors, providing a mechanistic explanation for the tumor-promoting role of this chemokine receptor. These data characterize the oncogenic properties of CCR7 in mammary epithelial neoplasia and point to a new route for therapeutic intervention to target evasive cancer stem cells.

  4. I. Embryonal vasculature formation recapitulated in transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted pseudo-orthotopicly into mouse dorsal skin fold: the organoblasts concept [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1fa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Witkiewicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate understanding of cancer biology is a problem. This work focused on cellular mechanisms of tumor vascularization. According to earlier studies, the tumor vasculature derives from host endothelial cells (angiogenesis or their precursors of bone marrow origin circulating in the blood (neo-vasculogenesis unlike in embryos. In this study, we observed the neo-vasculature form in multiple ways from local precursor cells. Recapitulation of primitive as well as advanced embryonal stages of vasculature formation followed co-implantation of avascular (in vitro cultured N202 breast tumor spheroids and homologous tissue grafts into mouse dorsal skin chambers. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of tissue sections exposed the interactions between the tumor and the graft tissue stem cells. It revealed details of vasculature morphogenesis not seen before in either tumors or embryos. A gradual increase in complexity of the vascular morphogenesis at the tumor site reflected a range of steps in ontogenic evolution of the differentiating cells. Malignant- and surgical injury repair-related tissue growth prompted local cells to initiate extramedullar erythropoiesis and vascular patterning. The new findings included: interdependence between the extramedullar hematopoiesis and assembly of new vessels (both from the locally differentiating precursors; nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion (karyolysis as the mechanism of erythroblast enucleation; the role of megakaryocytes and platelets in vascular pattern formation before emergence of endothelial cells; lineage relationships between hematopoietic and endothelial cells; the role of extracellular calmyrin in tissue morphogenesis; and calmyrite, a new ultrastructural entity associated with anaerobic energy metabolism. The central role of the extramedullar erythropoiesis in the formation of new vasculature (blood and vessels emerged here as part of the tissue building process including the lymphatic system

  5. Mammary hypertrophy in an ovariohysterectomized cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukay, B P; Stevenson, D A

    1983-05-01

    A four year old ovariohysterectomized domestic short-haired cat under treatment for behavioral urine spraying and idiopathic alopecia developed mammary gland hypertrophy following treatment with megestrol acetate. Withdrawal of the progestin and treatment with androgen failed to cause regression of the hypertrophy. The affected mammary gland was surgically excised and recovery was uneventful.

  6. Mammary tumorigenesis in APC{sup min/+} mice is enhanced by X-irradiation with a characteristic age dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuhiko, Imaoka; Mayumi, Nishimura; Shizuko, Kakinuma; Yoshiya, Shimada [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Experimental Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Group, Research, Center for Radiation Protection (Japan); Mieko, Okamoto [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    The ApcM{sup min/+} (Min) mouse is a genetically predisposed model of both intestinal and mammary tumorigenesis. We investigated age-related changes in the susceptibility of mice (before, during and after puberty) to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis using this model. Female Min and wild-type mice having the C57BL/6J background were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays at 2, 5, 7 and 10 weeks and sacrificed at 18 weeks of age. Min mice irradiated at 7 to 10 weeks of age (after puberty) developed mammary tumors with squamous metaplasia, whereas their wild-type litter-mates did not. Interestingly, irradiation of Min mice at 2 to 5 weeks (before and during puberty, respectively) did not induce mammary tumors but rather cystic nodules with metaplasia. The mammary tumors exhibited increased nuclear beta-catenin protein and loss of the wild-type Apc allele. Our results show that susceptibility to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis increases after puberty in Min mice, suggesting that the tumorigenic effect of ionizing radiation targets the lobular-alveolar progenitor cells, which increase in number with age and are controlled by beta-catenin signaling. (author)

  7. Met induces diverse mammary carcinomas in mice and is associated with human basal breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Graveel, Carrie R.; DeGroot, Jack D.; Su, Yanli; Koeman, Julie; Dykema, Karl; Leung, Samuel; Snider, Jacqueline; Davies, Sherri R.; Swiatek, Pamela J.; Cottingham, Sandra; Watson, Mark A.; Matthew J Ellis; Sigler, Robert E.; Furge, Kyle A.; Vande Woude, George F

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the signaling pathways that drive aggressive breast cancers is critical to the development of effective therapeutics. The oncogene MET is associated with decreased survival in breast cancer, yet the role that MET plays in the various breast cancer subtypes is unclear. We describe a knockin mouse with mutationally activated Met (Metmut) that develops a high incidence of diverse mammary tumors with basal characteristics, including metaplasia, absence of progesterone receptor and E...

  8. Scribble modulates the MAPK/Fra1 pathway to disrupt luminal and ductal integrity and suppress tumour formation in the mammary gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J Godde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Polarity coordinates cell movement, differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis to build and maintain complex epithelial tissues such as the mammary gland. Loss of polarity and the deregulation of these processes are critical events in malignant progression but precisely how and at which stage polarity loss impacts on mammary development and tumourigenesis is unclear. Scrib is a core polarity regulator and tumour suppressor gene however to date our understanding of Scrib function in the mammary gland has been limited to cell culture and transplantation studies of cell lines. Utilizing a conditional mouse model of Scrib loss we report for the first time that Scrib is essential for mammary duct morphogenesis, mammary progenitor cell fate and maintenance, and we demonstrate a critical and specific role for Scribble in the control of the early steps of breast cancer progression. In particular, Scrib-deficiency significantly induced Fra1 expression and basal progenitor clonogenicity, which resulted in fully penetrant ductal hyperplasia characterized by high cell turnover, MAPK hyperactivity, frank polarity loss with mixing of apical and basolateral membrane constituents and expansion of atypical luminal cells. We also show for the first time a role for Scribble in mammalian spindle orientation with the onset of mammary hyperplasia being associated with aberrant luminal cell spindle orientation and a failure to apoptose during the final stage of duct tubulogenesis. Restoring MAPK/Fra1 to baseline levels prevented Scrib-hyperplasia, whereas persistent Scrib deficiency induced alveolar hyperplasia and increased the incidence, onset and grade of mammary tumours. These findings, based on a definitive genetic mouse model provide fundamental insights into mammary duct maturation and homeostasis and reveal that Scrib loss activates a MAPK/Fra1 pathway that alters mammary progenitor activity to drive premalignancy and accelerate tumour progression.

  9. Scribble modulates the MAPK/Fra1 pathway to disrupt luminal and ductal integrity and suppress tumour formation in the mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godde, Nathan J; Sheridan, Julie M; Smith, Lorey K; Pearson, Helen B; Britt, Kara L; Galea, Ryan C; Yates, Laura L; Visvader, Jane E; Humbert, Patrick O

    2014-05-01

    Polarity coordinates cell movement, differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis to build and maintain complex epithelial tissues such as the mammary gland. Loss of polarity and the deregulation of these processes are critical events in malignant progression but precisely how and at which stage polarity loss impacts on mammary development and tumourigenesis is unclear. Scrib is a core polarity regulator and tumour suppressor gene however to date our understanding of Scrib function in the mammary gland has been limited to cell culture and transplantation studies of cell lines. Utilizing a conditional mouse model of Scrib loss we report for the first time that Scrib is essential for mammary duct morphogenesis, mammary progenitor cell fate and maintenance, and we demonstrate a critical and specific role for Scribble in the control of the early steps of breast cancer progression. In particular, Scrib-deficiency significantly induced Fra1 expression and basal progenitor clonogenicity, which resulted in fully penetrant ductal hyperplasia characterized by high cell turnover, MAPK hyperactivity, frank polarity loss with mixing of apical and basolateral membrane constituents and expansion of atypical luminal cells. We also show for the first time a role for Scribble in mammalian spindle orientation with the onset of mammary hyperplasia being associated with aberrant luminal cell spindle orientation and a failure to apoptose during the final stage of duct tubulogenesis. Restoring MAPK/Fra1 to baseline levels prevented Scrib-hyperplasia, whereas persistent Scrib deficiency induced alveolar hyperplasia and increased the incidence, onset and grade of mammary tumours. These findings, based on a definitive genetic mouse model provide fundamental insights into mammary duct maturation and homeostasis and reveal that Scrib loss activates a MAPK/Fra1 pathway that alters mammary progenitor activity to drive premalignancy and accelerate tumour progression.

  10. Evolution of somatic mutations in mammary tumors in transgenic mice is influenced by the inherited genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yi

    2004-06-01

    of those cells in MMTV-Wnt1 and MMTV-Neu transgenic mice, respectively. Alternative sources of oncogenic potential, such as a second transgenic oncogene or deficiency of a tumor suppressor gene, can obviate the selective power of those secondary mutations. These observations are consistent with the notion that somatic evolution of mouse mammary tumors is influenced by the specific nature of the inherited cancer-promoting genotype.

  11. A humanized pattern of aromatase expression is associated with mammary hyperplasia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Pearson, Elizabeth K; Brooks, David C; Coon, John S; Chen, Dong; Demura, Masashi; Zhang, Ming; Clevenger, Charles V; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D; Chatterton, Robert T; DeMayo, Francesco J; Bulun, Serdar E

    2012-06-01

    Aromatase is essential for estrogen production and is the target of aromatase inhibitors, the most effective endocrine treatment for postmenopausal breast cancer. Peripheral tissues in women, including the breast, express aromatase via alternative promoters. Female mice lack the promoters that drive aromatase expression in peripheral tissues; thus, we generated a transgenic humanized aromatase (Arom(hum)) mouse line containing a single copy of the human aromatase gene to study the link between aromatase expression in mammary adipose tissue and breast pathology. Arom(hum) mice expressed human aromatase, driven by the proximal human promoters II and I.3 and the distal promoter I.4, in breast adipose fibroblasts and myoepithelial cells. Estrogen levels in the breast tissue of Arom(hum) mice were higher than in wild-type mice, whereas circulating levels were similar. Arom(hum) mice exhibited accelerated mammary duct elongation at puberty and an increased incidence of lobuloalveolar breast hyperplasia associated with increased signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 phosphorylation at 24 and 64 wk. Hyperplastic epithelial cells showed remarkably increased proliferative activity. Thus, we demonstrated that the human aromatase gene can be expressed via its native promoters in a wide variety of mouse tissues and in a distribution pattern nearly identical to that of humans. Locally increased tissue levels, but not circulating levels, of estrogen appeared to exert hyperplastic effects on the mammary gland. This novel mouse model will be valuable for developing tissue-specific aromatase inhibition strategies.

  12. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauner, Gat, E-mail: gat.rauner@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Animal Science, ARO, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250 (Israel); The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Barash, Itamar, E-mail: itamar.barash@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Animal Science, ARO, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 6, Bet-Dagan, 50250 (Israel)

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  13. Inhibition of proliferation by PERK regulates mammary acinar morphogenesis and tumor formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J Sequeira

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling can be mediated by the ER kinase PERK, which phosphorylates its substrate eIF2alpha. This in turn, results in translational repression and the activation of downstream programs that can limit cell growth through cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. These responses can also be initiated by perturbations in cell adhesion. Thus, we hypothesized that adhesion-dependent regulation of PERK signaling might determine cell fate. We tested this hypothesis in a model of mammary acini development, a morphogenetic process regulated in part by adhesion signaling. Here we report a novel role for PERK in limiting MCF10A mammary epithelial cell proliferation during acinar morphogenesis in 3D Matrigel culture as well as in preventing mammary tumor formation in vivo. We show that loss of adhesion to a suitable substratum induces PERK-dependent phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and selective upregulation of ATF4 and GADD153. Further, inhibition of endogenous PERK signaling during acinar morphogenesis, using two dominant-negative PERK mutants (PERK-DeltaC or PERK-K618A, does not affect apoptosis but results instead in hyper-proliferative and enlarged lumen-filled acini, devoid of proper architecture. This phenotype correlated with an adhesion-dependent increase in translation initiation, Ki67 staining and upregulation of Laminin-5, ErbB1 and ErbB2 expression. More importantly, the MCF10A cells expressing PERKDeltaC, but not a vector control, were tumorigenic in vivo upon orthotopic implantation in denuded mouse mammary fat pads. Our results reveal that the PERK pathway is responsive to adhesion-regulated signals and that it is essential for proper acinar morphogenesis and in preventing mammary tumor formation. The possibility that deficiencies in PERK signaling could lead to hyperproliferation of the mammary epithelium and increase the likelihood of tumor formation, is of significance to the understanding of breast cancer.

  14. The role of unfolded protein response in differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Koizumi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Satoko; Hanaoka, Miyuki; Tokutake, Yukako; Yonekura, Shinichi

    2017-03-18

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER provokes ER stress by increasing the demand for energy, chaperones, and other proteins that are needed to fold client proteins or to degrade unfoldable secretory cargo. This stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, recent accumulated data suggested that the UPR also provides important signals for regulating cell differentiation and maturation. However, the relationship between UPR and mammary gland development has not been fully elucidated. To define the involvement of the UPR in mammary gland development, mammary glands were collected from non-pregnant mice, at days 5, 10 and 15 of pregnancy, at days 1 and 7 of lactation, and the expression patterns of UPR-related genes were determined by real-time PCR. We found that the mRNA expression of ATF4 and XBP1 significant increased during pregnancy. Moreover, we found that both ATF4 and XBP1 proteins are expressed in mammary epithelial cells by immunohistological analysis. In order to know the role of ATF4 and XBP1 in the differentiation of mammary epithelial cell, we performed gene knockdown experiment using HC11 cells. We found that ATF4 or XBP1 knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression of beta-casein and lactogenic hormone receptor in differentiating HC11 cells. Our results demonstrate that XBP1 and ATF4, which are UPR-related transcription factors, directly or indirectly participate in cell differentiation mechanisms through the regulation of the expression of lactogenic hormone receptors in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  15. Transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is required for the hormone-sensing cell lineage in mammary epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Kunasegaran

    Full Text Available The transcriptional repressor Tbx3 is involved in lineage specification in several tissues during embryonic development. Germ-line mutations in the Tbx3 gene give rise to Ulnar-Mammary Syndrome (comprising reduced breast development and Tbx3 is required for mammary epithelial cell identity in the embryo. Notably Tbx3 has been implicated in breast cancer, which develops in adult mammary epithelium, but the role of Tbx3 in distinct cell types of the adult mammary gland has not yet been characterized. Using a fluorescent reporter knock-in mouse, we show that in adult virgin mice Tbx3 is highly expressed in luminal cells that express hormone receptors, and not in luminal cells of the alveolar lineage (cells primed for milk production. Flow cytometry identified Tbx3 expression already in progenitor cells of the hormone-sensing lineage and co-immunofluorescence confirmed a strict correlation between estrogen receptor (ER and Tbx3 expression in situ. Using in vivo reconstitution assays we demonstrate that Tbx3 is functionally relevant for this lineage because knockdown of Tbx3 in primary mammary epithelial cells prevented the formation of ER+ cells, but not luminal ER- or basal cells. Interestingly, genes that are repressed by Tbx3 in other cell types, such as E-cadherin, are not repressed in hormone-sensing cells, highlighting that transcriptional targets of Tbx3 are cell type specific. In summary, we provide the first analysis of Tbx3 expression in the adult mammary gland at a single cell level and show that Tbx3 is important for the generation of hormone-sensing cells.

  16. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  17. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  18. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  19. Development of Hyperplasias, Preneoplasias, and Mammary Tumors in MMTV-c-erbB-2 and MMTV-TGFα Transgenic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Barry R.; Platt-Higgins, Angela M.; Schmidt, Gunter; Rudland, Philip S.

    1999-01-01

    Human cDNAs corresponding to two epidermal growth factor-related products that are overexpressed in human breast cancers, that for c-erbB-2 (HER-2) and for transforming growth factor α (TGFα), have been cloned downstream of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat promoter and injected into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes of Sprague-Dawley rats to produce transgenic offspring. Expression of the transgenic mRNAs is not detectable in mammary tissue from virgin transgenic r...

  20. Mammary-specific inactivation of E-cadherin and p53 impairs functional gland development and leads to pleomorphic invasive lobular carcinoma in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W. B. Derksen

    2011-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of the Western world. Even though a large percentage of breast cancer patients show pathological complete remission after standard treatment regimes, approximately 30–40% are non-responsive and ultimately develop metastatic disease. To generate a good preclinical model of invasive breast cancer, we have taken a tissue-specific approach to somatically inactivate p53 and E-cadherin, the cardinal cell-cell adhesion receptor that is strongly associated with tumor invasiveness. In breast cancer, E-cadherin is found mutated or otherwise functionally silenced in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC, which accounts for 10–15% of all breast cancers. We show that mammary-specific stochastic inactivation of conditional E-cadherin and p53 results in impaired mammary gland function during pregnancy through the induction of anoikis resistance of mammary epithelium, resulting in loss of epithelial organization and a dysfunctional mammary gland. Moreover, combined inactivation of E-cadherin and p53 induced lactation-independent development of invasive and metastatic mammary carcinomas, which showed strong resemblance to human pleomorphic ILC. Dissemination patterns of mouse ILC mimic the human malignancy, showing metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract, peritoneum, lung, lymph nodes and bone. Our results confirm that loss of E-cadherin contributes to both mammary tumor initiation and metastasis, and establish a preclinical mouse model of human ILC that can be used for the development of novel intervention strategies to treat invasive breast cancer.

  1. Adenoma of anogenital mammary-like glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sartaj; Campbell, Ross M; Li, Jin Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2007-11-01

    Adenomas in the anogenital region are uncommon. There has been debate about the origin, including ectopic breast tissue, cutaneous apocrine gland, and most recently anogenital mammary-like gland. An anogenital mass in a 36-year-old woman was excised, and histopathologic examination and immunostaining were performed. Microscopic tissue sections showed a morphologic pattern similar to that of a mammary fibroadenoma, and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The possibility of adenomas of anogenital mammary-like glands should be considered when evaluating patients with a mass in this area with confirmation by tissue biopsy or aspiration cytology.

  2. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cerliani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  3. Detection of differentially expressed genes in methylnitrosourea-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Lin, L; Crist, K A; Kelloff, G J; Steele, V E; Lubet, R A; You, M; Wang, Y

    1997-01-01

    In this study, altered gene expression in five methylnitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas was investigated using a newly developed competitive cDNA library screening assay. In order to detect the differentially expressed cDNA transcripts, three cDNA libraries (rat mammary, rat liver, and rat kidney) with over 18,000 clones were differentially screened with competing normal and neoplastic mammary cDNA probes. Ninety-eight clones indicated by competitive hybridization to be differentially expressed in tumors were verified by dot-blot hybridization analysis. Of these clones, 45 were found to be overexpressed while 53 were underexpressed in tumors. Forty-five of the confirmed clones were further analyzed by single-pass cDNA sequence determination. Four clones showed homology with cytochrome oxidase subunit I, polyoma virus PTA noncoding region, cytoplasmic beta-actin, and mouse secretory protein containing thrombospondin motifs. Further investigation into the potential roles of these identified genes should contribute significantly to our understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) of rat mammary tumorigenesis.

  4. Oncogenic AKT1(E17K) mutation induces mammary hyperplasia but prevents HER2-driven tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Maria L; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex

    2016-04-05

    One of the most frequently deregulated signaling pathways in breast cancer is the PI 3-K/Akt cascade. Genetic lesions are commonly found in PIK3CA, PTEN, and AKT, which lead to excessive and constitutive activation of Akt and downstream signaling that results in uncontrolled proliferation and increased cellular survival. One such genetic lesion is the somatic AKT1(E17K) mutation, which has been identified in 4-8% of breast cancer patients. To determine how this mutation contributes to mammary tumorigenesis, we constructed a genetically engineered mouse model that conditionally expresses human AKT1(E17K) in the mammary epithelium. Although AKT1(E17K) is only weakly constitutively active and does not promote proliferation in vitro, it is capable of escaping negative feedback inhibition to exhibit sustained signaling dynamics in vitro. Consistently, both virgin and multiparous AKT1(E17K) mice develop mammary gland hyperplasia that do not progress to carcinoma. This hyperplasia is accompanied by increased estrogen receptor expression, although exposure of the mice to estrogen does not promote tumor development. Moreover, AKT1(E17K) prevents HER2-driven mammary tumor formation, in part through negative feedback inhibition of RTK signaling. Analysis of TCGA breast cancer data revealed that the mRNA expression, total protein levels, and phosphorylation of various RTKs are decreased in human tumors harboring AKT1(E17K).

  5. TIMP3 regulates mammary epithelial apoptosis with immune cell recruitment through differential TNF dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo V Hojilla

    Full Text Available Post-lactation mammary involution is a homeostatic process requiring epithelial apoptosis and clearance. Given that the deficiency of the extracellular metalloproteinase inhibitor TIMP3 impacts epithelial apoptosis and heightens inflammatory response, we investigated whether TIMP3 regulates these distinct processes during the phases of mammary gland involution in the mouse. Here we show that TIMP3 deficiency leads to TNF dysregulation, earlier caspase activation and onset of mitochondrial apoptosis. This accelerated first phase of involution includes faster loss of initiating signals (STAT3 activation; TGFβ3 concurrent with immediate luminal deconstruction through E-cadherin fragmentation. Epithelial apoptosis is followed by accelerated adipogenesis and a greater macrophage and T-cell infiltration in Timp3(-/- involuting glands. Crossing in Tnf deficiency abrogates caspase 3 activation, but heightens macrophage and T-cell influx into Timp3(-/- glands. The data indicate that TIMP3 differentially impacts apoptosis and inflammatory cell influx, based on involvement of TNF, during the process of mammary involution. An understanding of the molecular factors and wound healing microenvironment of the postpartum mammary gland may have implications for understanding pregnancy-associated breast cancer risk.

  6. RANKL/RANK control Brca1 mutation-driven mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Verena; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo; Joshi, Purna A; Kavirayani, Anoop; Wirnsberger, Gerald; Novatchkova, Maria; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Schramek, Daniel; Edokobi, Nnamdi; Hersl, Jerome; Sampson, Aishia; Odai-Afotey, Ashley; Lazaro, Conxi; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Pujana, Miguel A; Cimba, For; Heyn, Holger; Vidal, Enrique; Cruickshank, Jennifer; Berman, Hal; Sarao, Renu; Ticevic, Melita; Uribesalgo, Iris; Tortola, Luigi; Rao, Shuan; Tan, Yen; Pfeiler, Georg; Lee, Eva Yhp; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Kenner, Lukas; Popper, Helmuth; Singer, Christian; Khokha, Rama; Jones, Laundette P; Penninger, Josef M

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer, affecting approximately one in eight women during their life-time. Besides environmental triggers and hormones, inherited mutations in the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) or BRCA2 genes markedly increase the risk for the development of breast cancer. Here, using two different mouse models, we show that genetic inactivation of the key osteoclast differentiation factor RANK in the mammary epithelium markedly delayed onset, reduced incidence, and attenuated progression of Brca1;p53 mutation-driven mammary cancer. Long-term pharmacological inhibition of the RANK ligand RANKL in mice abolished the occurrence of Brca1 mutation-driven pre-neoplastic lesions. Mechanistically, genetic inactivation of Rank or RANKL/RANK blockade impaired proliferation and expansion of both murine Brca1;p53 mutant mammary stem cells and mammary progenitors from human BRCA1 mutation carriers. In addition, genome variations within the RANK locus were significantly associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 mutations. Thus, RANKL/RANK control progenitor cell expansion and tumorigenesis in inherited breast cancer. These results present a viable strategy for the possible prevention of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutant patients.

  7. Differential gene expression profiling of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing mammary tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Haining Peng; Yingli Zhong; Daiqiang Li; Mi Tang; Xiaofeng Ding; Jian Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is highly expressed in approximately 30% of breast cancer patients,and substantial evidence supports the relationship between HER2 overexpression and poor overall survival. However,the biological function of HER2 signaltransduction pathways is not entirely clear. To investigate gene activation within the pathways, we screened differentially expressed genes in HER2-positive mouse mammary tumor using two-directional suppression subtractive hybridization combined with reverse dot-blotting analysis. Forty genes and expressed sequence tags related to transduction, cell proliferation/growth/apoptosis and secreted/extracellular matrix proteins were differentially expressed in HER2-positive mammary tumor tissue. Among these, 19 were already reported to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor, 11 were first identified to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor in this study but were already reported in other tumors, and 10 correlated with other cancers. These genes can facilitate the understanding of the role of HER2 signaling in breast cancer.

  8. Dmp1α inhibits HER2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Fry

    Full Text Available Our recent study shows a pivotal role of Dmp1 in quenching hyperproliferative signals from HER2 to the Arf-p53 pathway as a safety mechanism to prevent breast carcinogenesis. To directly demonstrate the role of Dmp1 in preventing HER2/neu-driven oncogenic transformation, we established Flag-Dmp1α transgenic mice (MDTG under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter. The mice were viable but exhibited poorly developed mammary glands with markedly reduced milk production; thus more than half of parous females were unable to support the lives of new born pups. The mammary glands of the MDTG mice had very low Ki-67 expression but high levels of Arf, Ink4a, p53, and p21(Cip1, markers of senescence and accelerated aging. In all strains of generated MDTG;neu mice, tumor development was significantly delayed with decreased tumor weight. Tumors from MDTG;neu mice expressed Flag-Dmp1α and Ki-67 in a mutually exclusive fashion indicating that transgenic Dmp1α prevented tumor growth in vivo. Genomic DNA analyses showed that the Dmp1α transgene was partially lost in half of the MDTG;neu tumors, and Western blot analyses showed Dmp1α protein downregulation in 80% of the cases. Our data demonstrate critical roles of Dmp1 in preventing mammary tumorigenesis and raise the possibility of treating breast cancer by restoring Dmp1α expression.

  9. Interspecies radioimmunoassay for the major internal protein of mammary tumor viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, P.H.; Teramoto, Y.A.; Callahan, R.; Schlom, J.

    1980-02-01

    An interspecies radioimmunoassay was developed which detects antigenic determinants shared by type-B mammary tumor viruses (MTVs). This interspecies assay is specific for antigenic sites which the 28,000-dalton major internal protein of MMTVs of laboratory mice (Mus musculus) has in common with polypeptides of MC-MTV. MC-MTV is a new type-B retrovirus isolated from the Asian rodent. Mus cervicolor. Other retrovirus isolates of Mus cervicolor, i.e., M432, CERV-CI, and CERV-CII, as well as other type-C and type-D retroviruses, do not compete in the interspecies assay. The interspecies assay detected MTV cross-reactive antigenic determinants with equal efficiency in milks, lactating mammary glands, and in spontaneous mammary tumors of three distinct species. Particles morphologically indistinguishable from MMTV and MC-MTV have also been detected in Mus cookii mammary tumor cells. The interspecies MTV p28 radioimmunoassay thus provides a potentially useful tool for the detection of etiologically related viruses or viral translational products in species other than the laboratory mouse.

  10. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M.; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development. PMID:25538248

  11. Role of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in mammary carcinoma cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibata, Sachi; Rogers, Katherine E; Sadegh, David; Anguish, Lynne J; McElwee, John L; Shah, Pragya; Thompson, Paul R; Coonrod, Scott A

    2017-05-26

    Penetration of the mammary gland basement membrane by cancer cells is a crucial first step in tumor invasion. Using a mouse model of ductal carcinoma in situ, we previously found that inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2, aka PADI2) activity appears to maintain basement membrane integrity in xenograft tumors. The goal of this investigation was to gain insight into the mechanisms by which PAD2 mediates this process. For our study, we modulated PAD2 activity in mammary ductal carcinoma cells by lentiviral shRNA-mediated depletion, lentiviral-mediated PAD2 overexpression, or PAD inhibition and explored the effects of these treatments on changes in cell migration and cell morphology. We also used these PAD2-modulated cells to test whether PAD2 may be required for EGF-induced cell migration. To determine how PAD2 might promote tumor cell migration in vivo, we tested the effects of PAD2 inhibition on the expression of several cell migration mediators in MCF10DCIS.com xenograft tumors. In addition, we tested the effect of PAD2 inhibition on EGF-induced ductal invasion and elongation in primary mouse mammary organoids. Lastly, using a transgenic mouse model, we investigated the effects of PAD2 overexpression on mammary gland development. Our results indicate that PAD2 depletion or inhibition suppresses cell migration and alters the morphology of MCF10DCIS.com cells. In addition, we found that PAD2 depletion suppresses the expression of the cytoskeletal regulatory proteins RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 and also promotes a mesenchymal to epithelial-like transition in tumor cells with an associated increase in the cell adhesion marker, E-cadherin. Our mammary gland organoid study found that inhibition of PAD2 activity suppresses EGF-induced ductal invasion. In vivo, we found that PAD2 overexpression causes hyperbranching in the developing mammary gland. Together, these results suggest that PAD2 plays a critical role in breast cancer cell migration. Our findings that EGF

  12. Metastatic mammary carcinoma in a cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoela Marchezan Piva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Mammary gland neoplasms in cattle are rarely observed in the field veterinary diagnostics routine. Therefore, the objective of this study is to report a metastatic mammary carcinoma in a fourteen-year-old Holstein cow in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The animal was diagnosed by the field veterinarian with clinical mastitis that was unresponsive to treatment, and was euthanized due to the poor prognosis. At the necropsy, multiple yellow, firm, and sometimes friable nodules, ranging from 0.1 to 20cm were observed in all mammary glands, lymph nodes, kidneys, spleen, liver, pancreas, mediastinal lymph nodes, heart, and lungs. The final diagnosis of mammary carcinoma was established through the association of clinical, necropsy, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings. Differential diagnoses included diseases such as bovine tuberculosis and chronic fungal or bacterial mastitis.

  13. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  14. Site of iodination in rat mammary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strum, J.M.

    1978-10-01

    The ability of the mammary gland to take up and organically bind radioiodide was studied in non-pregnant, pregnant, and lactating rats. Autoradiography was used to determine whether duct cells or alveolar cells are responsible for iodination in the rat mammary gland. Iodination was not detected in mammary glands from non-pregnant rats, but occurred late in the twelfth day of gestation and continued throughout pregnancy and lactation. Protein-containing vacuoles in alveolar cells and casein-like proteins in milk were the major sites where iodination occurred within the gland. Milk proteins in the lumens of ductules adjacent to alveoli were also iodinated. In contrast, ducts, myoepithelial cells, fat cells, blood vessels and other histological components of the gland did not show iodinating capability. Cytochemistry was also used to identify endogenous mammary peroxidase activity in the same glands, and it was found that the presence and location of this enzyme were correlated with the ability to iodinate.

  15. Mammary fibroadenoma in a lamb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Tolga; Yarim, Murat; Kabak, Yonca B.; Sozgen, Yuksel

    2007-01-01

    A fibroadenoma was diagnosed in the left udder of a 3-month-old female Chios lamb. No recurrence was observed after surgery. Grossly, the tumor had a whitish-gray lobular appearance, and the lobules were interlaced with thin septa. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of proliferating fibroepithelial tissue, including differentiated ducts lined by whorls and interlacing bundles of abundant loose fibrovascular stroma. Immunohistochemistry revealed the ductal epithelium to be positive for pancytokeratin (AE1/AE3) and loose fibrovascular stroma was positive for vimentin and basal cells covering the ductal epithelium of alpha-smooth-muscle actin. Immunostaining for the estrogen and progesterone receptors was negative. A diagnosis of mammary fibroadenoma was made based on the histological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:17993758

  16. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto;

    1991-01-01

    /l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium levels...... revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk.......In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms...

  17. Mammary Cancer and Activation of Transposable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    transcriptionally activated during pregnancy and lactation , and the mice are predisposed to develop mammary cancer after a minimum of 3 pregnancies and...pregnancy and lactation . After 3 pregnancies and lactations , but not after 1 pregnancy and lactation , females develop mammary cancers at an average...mated females per experimental condition (1 or 3 pregnancies/ lactations . 5 breeding strategy to develop triple transgenic cancer -prone and control

  18. Genes Altered by Intracisternal A Particles in Mouse Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    and characterized. Isolation of the normal counterpart was to be done by library screening and PCR techniques. Southern analysis and isolation of the...library construction was isolated by oligo dT column chromatography (Molecular Research Center, Inc. Cincinnati, OH). cDNA library screening and...clone isolated by library screening . The sequence starts at position 280. There PCR amplicons representing the 5’ end of the clone are shown below pl7b

  19. The influence of tamoxifen on normal mouse mammary gland homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shehata, M.; van Amerongen, R.; Zeeman, A.L.; Giraddi, R.R.; Stingl, J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Lineage tracing using inducible genetic labelling has emerged to be a powerful method for interrogating the developmental fate of cells in intact tissues. A common induction mechanism is the use of tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase (CreER and CreERT2), but the effects of tamoxifen at

  20. Pathologic progression of mammary carcinomas in a C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model of human triple-negative and Her2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenerhoff, M J; Shibata, M A; Bode, A; Green, J E

    2011-04-01

    The C3(1) component of the rat prostate steroid binding protein has been used to target expression of the SV40 T/t-antigen to the mammary epithelium of mice resulting in pre-neoplastic lesions that progress to invasive and metastatic cancer with molecular features of human basal-type breast cancer. However, there are major differences in the histologic architecture of the stromal and epithelial elements between the mouse and human mammary glands. The rat mammary gland is more enriched with epithelial and stromal components than the mouse and more closely resembles the cellular composition of the human gland. Additionally, existing rat models of mammary cancer are typically estrogen receptor positive and hormone responsive, unlike most genetically engineered mouse mammary cancer models. In an attempt to develop a mammary cancer model that might more closely resemble the pathology of human breast cancer, we generated a novel C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model that developed progressive mammary lesions leading to highly invasive adenocarcinomas. However, aggressive tumor development prevented the establishment of transgenic lines. Characterization of the tumors revealed that they were primarily estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor negative, and either her2/neu positive or negative, resembling human triple-negative or Her2 positive breast cancer. Tumors expressed the basal marker K14, as well as the luminal marker K18, and were negative for smooth muscle actin. The triple negative phenotype has not been previously reported in a rat mammary cancer model. Further development of a C3(1)SV40 T/t-antigen based model could establish valuable transgenic rat lines that develop basal-type mammary tumors.

  1. Regulation of leptin in involution of mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Meng; LI Qingzhang

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, a protein hormone produced and secreted predominantly by white adipose tissue, has a critical role in the regulation and coordination of energy metabolism. Leptin is produced in the mammary gland by the fat tissue or by the mammary epithelium. In vitro study has shown that leptin triggers apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells. Mammary gland involution is characterized by extensive apoptosis of the epithelial cells. At the onset of involution, STAT3 is specifically activated. Various studies show that leptin act as a paracrine and autocrin factor to influence mammary epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. This paper reviewed the function of leptin to the involution of mammary gland.

  2. Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2005-03-03

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

  3. Differential Mammary Gland Development in FVB and C57Bl/6 Mice: Implications for Breast Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breanne M. Anderson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of research suggests a linkage between pubertal mammary gland development and environmental factors such as diet as modifiers of long term breast cancer risk. Much of this research is dependent upon mouse models, which may vary between studies. However, effects may be strain dependent and further modified by diet, which has not been previously examined. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine whether mammary gland development differs between FVB and C57Bl/6 strains on diets containing either n-6 or n-3 polyunsaturated fats. Developmental measures related to onset of puberty and mammary gland development differed between strains. Mice fed the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA diet were shown to have lower numbers of terminal end buds, a marker of mammary gland development. This study helps to further clarify differences in development and dietary response between FVB and C57Bl/6 mice in order to more appropriately relate mammary gland research to human populations.

  4. Differential HIF-1α and HIF-2α Expression in Mammary Epithelial Cells during Fat Pad Invasion, Lactation, and Involution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Påhlman

    Full Text Available The development and functional cycle of the mammary gland involves a number of processes that are caricatured by breast cancer cells during invasion and metastasis. Expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors HIF-1 and HIF-2 has been associated with metastatic, poor prognosis, and high-grade breast cancers. Since hypoxia affects normal epithelial differentiation, we hypothesise that HIFs are important for normal breast epithelial development and regeneration as well as cancer initiation and progression. Here, we investigated the expression of the oxygen-sensitive HIF-alpha subunits during mouse mammary gland development, lactation, and involution. In breast epithelial cells, HIF-1α was expressed during early development, prior to cell polarisation. In contrast, expression of HIF-2α occurred later and was restricted to a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells in the lactating gland. Mammary gland involution is a developmental stage that involves extensive tissue remodelling with cell death but survival of tissue stem/progenitor cells. At this stage, HIF-2α, but little HIF-1α, was expressed in CK14-positive epithelial cells. The temporal but differential expression of the HIF-alpha subunits during the mammary gland life cycle indicates that their expression is controlled by additional factors to hypoxia. Further functional studies of the roles of these proteins in the mammary gland and breast cancer are warranted.

  5. Genetic mapping in mice identifies DMBT1 as a candidate modifier of mammary tumors and breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Hill, Linda Z; Roberts, Amy L

    2007-01-01

    Low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility alleles seem to play a significant role in breast cancer risk but are difficult to identify in human cohorts. A genetic screen of 176 N2 backcross progeny of two Trp53(+/-) strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, which differ in their susceptibility to mammary...... tumors, identified a modifier of mammary tumor susceptibility in an approximately 25-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7 (designated SuprMam1). Relative to heterozygotes, homozygosity for BALB/c alleles of SuprMam1 significantly decreased mammary tumor latency from 70.7 to 61.1 weeks and increased risk...... twofold (P = 0.002). Dmbt1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1) was identified as a candidate modifier gene within the SuprMam1 interval because it was differentially expressed in mammary tissues from BALB/c-Trp53(+/-) and C57BL/6-Trp53(+/-) mice. Dmbt1 mRNA and protein was reduced in mammary glands...

  6. Studies on the mammary tumor-inhibiting effects of diethylstilbestrol and its mono- and diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M R; von Angerer, E; Prekajac, J; Brade, W P

    1986-01-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES), diethylstilbestrol monophosphate (DES-MP) and diethylstilbestrol diphosphate (DES-DP) were tested for their estrogen receptor affinity, estrogenic potency and mammary tumor-inhibiting activity in vitro and in vivo. DES had a much higher receptor binding affinity than its mono- or diphosphate. All three compounds inhibited the growth of the hormone-dependent MCF-7 and hormone-independent MDA-MB 231 breast cancer line only at relatively high concentrations. The estrogenic potency in the immature mouse uterine weight test decreased in the order DES greater than DES-MP much greater than DES-DP. The hormone-dependent MXT mammary tumor of the mouse was inhibited by all three compounds at a dosage of 1.0 mg/kg per week. At a dose of 0.01 mg/kg, DES, DES-MP, and DES-DP stimulated the tumor growth. Thus, for the first time, a biphasic effect on tumor growth was demonstrated in intact mature animals. As the effects of all three compounds were similar in this assay, a cleavage of the phosphate groups is likely. A decrease in estrogenic potency concomitant with a retained antitumor effect of DES-MP and DES-DP compared to DES was not demonstrable in the mature mouse using the MXT assay, only in the uterotrophic test in the immature mouse.

  7. Pathologic progression of mammary carcinomas in a C3(1)/SV40 T/t-antigen transgenic rat model of human triple-negative and Her2-positive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenerhoff, M J; Shibata, M. A.; Bode, A.; Green, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The C3(1) component of the rat prostate steroid binding protein has been used to target expression of the SV40 T/t-antigen to the mammary epithelium of mice resulting in pre-neoplastic lesions that progress to invasive and metastatic cancer with molecular features of human basal-type breast cancer. However, there are major differences in the histologic architecture of the stromal and epithelial elements between the mouse and human mammary glands. The rat mammary gland is more enriched with ep...

  8. Cox-2 levels in canine mammary tumors, including inflammatory mammary carcinoma: clinicopathological features and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Felisbina Luisa; Perez-Alenza, Maria Dolores; Silvan, Gema; Peña, Laura; Lopes, Carlos; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (Cox-2) plays an important role in mammary carcinogenesis, nevertheless, its role in canine mammary tumors, and particularly in inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC), is unknown. Tumor Cox-2 levels were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay, in post-surgical tumor homogenates of 129 mammary tumors (62 dysplasias and benign tumors, 57 malignant non-IMC and 10 IMC) from 57 female dogs. The highest Cox-2 values were detected in the IMC group. In non-IMC malignant tumors, high values of Cox-2 were related to skin ulceration (p IMC cases could indicate a special role of Cox-2 in the inflammatory phenotype and open the possibility of additional new therapeutic approaches in this special type of mammary cancer in humans and dogs.

  9. La depleción de las células T regulatorias aumenta el número de las células CD8 durante la infección con el virus del tumor mamario murino Regulatory T cell depletion increases the number of CD8 cells during mouse mammary tumor virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Cabrera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El virus del tumor mamario murino (MMTV es un retrovirus que se transmite durante la lactancia y que ha desarrollado estrategias para explotar y subvertir el sistema inmune. En un modelo de infección natural con MMTV hemos mostrado previamente que la infección causa incrementos tempranos y progresivos de células T regulatorias (Treg CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ específicas para el superantígeno (Sag viral en las placas de Peyer (PP. En este trabajo se evaluó si la depleción de las células Treg influencia la población de células CD8+ durante la infección con MMTV a través del amamantamiento. La depleción de las células Treg al día 6 de infección causó incrementos en el porcentaje y número absoluto de las células CD8+ en los ganglios y provocó un incremento en la intensidad de fluorescencia media del marcador de activación CD44 en esas células. Los incrementos en el número absoluto de las células CD8 se observaron en células con cadenas variables Vβ del receptor de las células T (TCR tanto reactivas como no reactivas al Sag. Previamente habíamos demostrado que la depleción de las células Treg al día 6 de infección disminuye la carga viral. Los resultados presentados en este trabajo sugieren que, al menos a partir del día 6 de infección con MMTV, las células Treg podrían tener un rol inhibiendo la generación de una respuesta CD8 antiviral.Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is a milk-borne betaretrovirus that has developed strategies to exploit and subvert the host immune system. We have shown in a natural model of MMTV infection that the virus causes early and progressive increases in superantigen (Sag-specific CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg in Peyer's patches. Herein, we evaluated whether the depletion of Treg cells affects the CD8+ population during milk-borne MMTV infection. At day 6 of infection, the depletion of Treg cells increased the percentage and absolute number of CD8+ cells in lymph nodes as well as the

  10. Extracellular matrix proteins regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qike K.; Lee, KangAe; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells undergo transdifferentiation via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) upon treatment with matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3). In rigid microenvironments, MMP3 upregulates expression of Rac1b, which translocates to the cell membrane to promote induction of reactive oxygen species and EMT. Here we examine the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in this process. Our data show that the basement membrane protein laminin suppresses the EMT response in MMP3-treated cells, whereas fibronectin promotes EMT. These ECM proteins regulate EMT via interactions with their specific integrin receptors. α6-integrin sequesters Rac1b from the membrane and is required for inhibition of EMT by laminin. In contrast, α5-integrin maintains Rac1b at the membrane and is required for the promotion of EMT by fibronectin. Understanding the regulatory role of the ECM will provide insight into mechanisms underlying normal and pathological development of the mammary gland. PMID:23660532

  11. Obesity-Associated Alterations in Inflammation, Epigenetics, and Mammary Tumor Growth Persist in Formerly Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Emily L; de Angel, Rebecca E; Bowers, Laura W; Khatib, Subreen A; Smith, Laura A; Van Buren, Eric; Bhardwaj, Priya; Giri, Dilip; Estecio, Marcos R; Troester, Melissa A; Hair, Brionna Y; Kirk, Erin L; Gong, Ting; Shen, Jianjun; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hursting, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Using a murine model of basal-like breast cancer, we tested the hypothesis that chronic obesity, an established breast cancer risk and progression factor in women, induces mammary gland epigenetic reprogramming and increases mammary tumor growth. Moreover, we assessed whether the obesity-induced epigenetic and protumor effects are reversed by weight normalization. Ovariectomized female C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet or diet-induced obesity (DIO) regimen for 17 weeks, resulting in a normal weight or obese phenotype, respectively. Mice on the DIO regimen were then randomized to continue the DIO diet or were switched to the control diet, resulting in formerly obese (FOb) mice with weights comparable with control mice. At week 24, all mice were orthotopically injected with MMTV-Wnt-1 mouse mammary tumor cells. Mean tumor volume, serum IL6 levels, expression of proinflammatory genes in the mammary fat pad, and mammary DNA methylation profiles were similar in DIO and FOb mice and higher than in controls. Many of the genes found to have obesity-associated hypermethylation in mice were also found to be hypermethylated in the normal breast tissue of obese versus nonobese human subjects, and nearly all of these concordant genes remained hypermethylated after significant weight loss in the FOb mice. Our findings suggest that weight normalization may not be sufficient to reverse the effects of chronic obesity on epigenetic reprogramming and inflammatory signals in the microenvironment that are associated with breast cancer progression. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 339-48. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide disrupts the milk-blood barrier by modulating claudins in mammary alveolar tight junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, is the most costly common disease in the dairy industry, and is caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli. The bacteria invade the mammary alveolar lumen and disrupt the blood-milk barrier. In normal mammary gland, alveolar epithelial tight junctions (TJs contribute the blood-milk barrier of alveolar epithelium by blocking the leakage of milk components from the luminal side into the blood serum. In this study, we focused on claudin subtypes that participate in the alveolar epithelial TJs, because the composition of claudins is an important factor that affects TJ permeability. In normal mouse lactating mammary glands, alveolar TJs consist of claudin-3 without claudin-1, -4, and -7. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced mastitis, alveolar TJs showed 2-staged compositional changes in claudins. First, a qualitative change in claudin-3, presumably caused by phosphorylation and participation of claudin-7 in alveolar TJs, was recognized in parallel with the leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin (FITC-albumin via the alveolar epithelium. Second, claudin-4 participated in alveolar TJs with claudin-3 and claudin-7 12 h after LPS injection. The partial localization of claudin-1 was also observed by immunostaining. Coinciding with the second change of alveolar TJs, the severe disruption of the blood-milk barrier was recognized by ectopic localization of β-casein and much leakage of FITC-albumin. Furthermore, the localization of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 on the luminal side and NFκB activation by LPS was observed in the alveolar epithelial cells. We suggest that the weakening and disruption of the blood-milk barrier are caused by compositional changes of claudins in alveolar epithelial TJs through LPS/TLR4 signaling.

  13. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  14. Prevalence of Glomerulopathies in Canine Mammary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of paraneoplastic glomerulopathy, especially associated with carcinoma, are a matter of debate and the causal link between cancer and glomerular diseases remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate renal biopsies of selected bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma. We hypothesized that dogs with mammary carcinomas would show histologic evidence of glomerular pathology. A prospective study was performed in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma that were undergoing tumor resection and ovariohysterectomy. We evaluated renal biopsies of 32 bitches with spontaneous mammary gland carcinoma and 11 control dogs without mammary gland neoplasia. Samples were obtained from the left kidney and the biopsy material was divided for light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy abnormalities were identified in 78.1% of dogs with mammary carcinoma (n = 25) and in none of the dogs in the control group. Focal glomerular mesangial matrix expansion was the most common alteration (n = 15, 60.0%), but mesangial cell proliferation (n = 9, 36.0%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 9, 36.0%), synechiae (n = 7, 28.0%), and globally sclerotic glomeruli (n = 6, 24.0%) were also frequent in dogs with malignancy. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed strong IgM staining was demonstrated in 64.3% (n = 18) of carcinoma dogs. Transmission electron microscopy from dogs with carcinoma revealed slight changes, the most frequent of which was faint sub-endothelial and mesangial deposits of electron-dense material (78%). Mesangial cell interpositioning and segmental effacement of podocyte foot processes were identified in some specimens (45%). Changes in the glomerulus and proteinuria are common in dogs with naturally occurring mammary carcinoma and this condition appears to provide an excellent large animal model for cancer-associated glomerulopathy in humans. PMID:27764139

  15. Does protein intake alter the precursors for synthesis of lactose and non-essential amino acids by the mammary glands of lactating mice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aims were to: 1) develop a [U-13C]glucose tracer approach to establish the pathways of and substrates used for milk lactose and casein synthesis in the mouse mammary gland and 2) determine the influence of protein intake on this partition and use for milk synthesis. In Study 1, we determined th...

  16. Morinda citrifolia (Noni Juice Augments Mammary Gland Differentiation and Reduces Mammary Tumor Growth in Mice Expressing the Unactivated c-erbB2 Transgene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Clafshenkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Morinda citrifolia (noni is reported to have many beneficial properties, including on immune, inflammatory, quality of life, and cancer endpoints, but little is known about its ability to prevent or treat breast cancer. To test its anticancer potential, the effects of Tahitian Noni Juice (TNJ on mammary carcinogenesis were examined in MMTV-neu transgenic mice. Mammary tumor latency, incidence, multiplicity, and metastatic incidence were unaffected by TNJ treatment, which suggests that it would not increase or decrease breast cancer risk in women taking TNJ for its other benefits. However, noni may be useful to enhance treatment responses in women with existing HER2/neu breast cancer since TNJ resulted in significant reductions in tumor weight and volume and in longer tumor doubling times in mice. Remarkably, its ability to inhibit the growth of this aggressive form of cancer occurred with the mouse equivalent of a recommended dose for humans (<3 oz/day. A 30-day treatment with TNJ also induced significant changes in mammary secondary ductule branching and lobuloalveolar development, serum progesterone levels, and estrous cycling. Additional studies investigating TNJ-induced tumor growth suppression and modified reproductive responses are needed to characterize its potential as a CAM therapy for women with and without HER2+ breast cancer.

  17. In vivo fluorescence imaging reveals the promotion of mammary tumorigenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent adult stem cells which are recruited to the tumor microenvironment (TME and influence tumor progression through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effects of MSCs on the tunmorigenic capacity of 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells. It was found that MSC-conditioned medium increased the proliferation, migration, and efficiency of mammosphere formation of 4T1 cells in vitro. When co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, 4T1 cells showed enhanced tumor growth and generated increased spontaneous lung metastasis. Using in vivo fluorescence color-coded imaging, the interaction between GFP-expressing MSCs and RFP-expressing 4T1 cells was monitored. As few as five 4T1 cells could give rise to tumor formation when co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, but no tumor was formed when five or ten 4T1 cells were implanted alone. The elevation of tumorigenic potential was further supported by gene expression analysis, which showed that when 4T1 cells were in contact with MSCs, several oncogenes, cancer markers, and tumor promoters were upregulated. Moreover, in vivo longitudinal fluorescence imaging of tumorigenesis revealed that MSCs created a vascularized environment which enhances the ability of 4T1 cells to colonize and proliferate. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the promotion of mammary cancer progression by MSCs was achieved through the generation of a cancer-enhancing microenvironment to increase tumorigenic potential. These findings also suggest the potential risk of enhancing tumor progression in clinical cell therapy using MSCs. Attention has to be paid to patients with high risk of breast cancer when considering cell therapy with MSCs.

  18. [Galactorrhea after mammary plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguenault, C; Capon-Degardin, N; Martinot-Duquennoy, V; Pellerin, P

    2005-04-01

    Galactorrhoea is a complication rarely observed after mammary plastic surgery. Our experience in the domain extends to three clinical cases - two after prosthetic insertion and one after breast reduction - wich will be presented here. The origin of this complication is uncertain. Nevertheless, it is likely to be multifocal, as surgery alone is not the only cause. Postsurgical galactorrhoea often follows a benign course culminating in spontaneous resolution. However, it may reveal the presence of o prolactin secreting adenoma, as was the case with one of our patients. A detailed history, exploring antecedent factors, is an essential step in guiding subsequent management. When faced with postsurgical galactorrhoea, serum prolactin levels should be measured. If serum prolactin levels exceed 150 ng/ml further investigation by way of an MRI of the sella turcica is advisable to rule out pituitary adenoma. Depending on symptom severity, treatment may be medical with the prescription of dopaminergic agonists, and/or surgical with drainage or removal of prostheses. Increased awareness of galactorrhea as a possible complication of plastic surgery to the breast will improve management.

  19. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Karen M; Smith, Gilbert H

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts) confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini) were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic) respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  20. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Bussard

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  1. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D.; Petit, Valérie; Russell, I. Alasdair; Giraddi, Rajshekhar; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F.; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M.; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A.; Stingl, John

    2014-01-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt acin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using 2 independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage tracing approach we follow the progeny of α-smooth muscle actin-expressing myoepithelial cells and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy. PMID:25173976

  2. Mammary stem cells have myoepithelial cell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael D; Petit, Valérie; Alasdair Russell, I; Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Menon, Suraj; Schulte, Reiner; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rath, Nicola; Olson, Michael F; Metzger, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Deugnier, Marie-Ange; Glukhova, Marina A; Stingl, John

    2014-10-01

    Contractile myoepithelial cells dominate the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and are considered to be differentiated cells. However, we observe that up to 54% of single basal cells can form colonies when seeded into adherent culture in the presence of agents that disrupt actin-myosin interactions, and on average, 65% of the single-cell-derived basal colonies can repopulate a mammary gland when transplanted in vivo. This indicates that a high proportion of basal myoepithelial cells can give rise to a mammary repopulating unit (MRU). We demonstrate that myoepithelial cells, flow-sorted using two independent myoepithelial-specific reporter strategies, have MRU capacity. Using an inducible lineage-tracing approach we follow the progeny of myoepithelial cells that express α-smooth muscle actin and show that they function as long-lived lineage-restricted stem cells in the virgin state and during pregnancy.

  3. Mammary tumorigenesis by radiation and its prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Makoto; Suzuki, Keiko; Inano, Hiroshi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Since the breast cancer in women emerged as an important risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, we have investigated to clarify the relationship between the induction of mammary tumors by irradiation and the developmental stage of the mammary glands that regulated by the action of endocrine hormones. Besides the radiation, epidemiological studies showed that the process of biosynthesis/metabolism of steroid hormones and hyperlipidemia may be associated with an increased risk of mammary carcinogenesis. In this context, we have undertaken investigations to evaluate the anti-carcinogenic activities of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a major secretory steroid of the adrenal glands, bezafibrate (BEZF), an anti-hyperlipidemic drug derived from clofibrate, and simvastatin (SIMV), a prodrug of a specific inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, against diethylstilbestrol (DES)-dependent promotion/progression of rat mammary tumors initiated by {gamma}-rays. Pregnant Wistar-MS rats received whole-body irradiation with 2.6 Gy of {gamma}-rays from a {sup 60}Co source at day-20 of pregnancy. The mother rats were fed a diet containing either 0.6% DHEA, 0.15% BEZF or 0.03% SIMV beginning immediately after weaning. They were then implanted subcutaneously with a pellet of DES (3 mg/pellet) in the interscapular area 30 days after termination of nursing and were observed for 1 year for detection of palpable mammary tumors starting from the time of pellet implantation. The administration of dietary DHEA, BEZF or SIMV together with DES implantation in rats irradiated in late pregnancy significantly decreased the total incidence of mammary tumors to 35%, 27% and 36%, respectively, for the 1 year period, while higher tumor incidence (96%, 90% and 88%) was observed in rats fed controldiet. However, neither the number of mammary tumors per tumor-bearing rat nor the latency period in the drug treated groups was different from that observed in the control group

  4. Juvenile mammary papillomatosis; Papilomatosis juvenil mamaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, M.; Jimenez, A. V. [Hospital Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Juvenile mammary papillomatosis is a benign proliferative disease of young patients, generally under 30 years of age. The most frequent clinical presentation is the existence of an elastic and mobile lymph node of the breast. Anatomopathologically, it is characterized because it presents ductal epithelial hyperplasia, sometimes with marked atypia, and there are numerous cysts having different sizes among the findings. It has been associated with an increase in the incidence of breast cancer, both in the patient herself as well as her family. We review the literature on the subject and present the mammographic and ultrasonographic findings of a 22 year old woman diagnosed of juvenile mammary papillomatosis. (Author) 12 refs.

  5. Myc is a Notch1 transcriptional target and a requisite for Notch1-induced mammary tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinakis, Apostolos; Szabolcs, Matthias; Politi, Katerina; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2006-06-13

    To explore the potential involvement of aberrant Notch1 signaling in breast cancer pathogenesis, we have used a transgenic mouse model. In these animals, mouse mammary tumor virus LTR-driven expression of the constitutively active intracellular domain of the Notch1 receptor (N1(IC)) causes development of lactation-dependent mammary tumors that regress upon gland involution but progress to nonregressing, invasive adenocarcinomas in subsequent pregnancies. Up-regulation of Myc in these tumors prompted a genetic investigation of a potential Notch1/Myc functional relationship in breast carcinogenesis. Conditional ablation of Myc in the mammary epithelium prevented the induction of regressing N1(IC) neoplasms and also reduced the incidence of nonregressing carcinomas, which developed with significantly increased latency. Molecular analyses revealed that both the mouse and human Myc genes are direct transcriptional targets of N1(IC) acting through its downstream Cbf1 transcriptional effector. Consistent with this mechanistic link, Notch1 and Myc expression is positively correlated by immunostaining in 38% of examined human breast carcinomas.

  6. [Mammary ductal ectasia child. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medel, Jorge; Cabistany-Esqué, Ana Cristina; Sanz-Asin, Olga; del Martínez-Rubio, María Pilar; Echavarren-Plaza, Virginia; Arroyo-Lemarroy, Taydé

    2014-01-01

    Mammary duct ectasia in childhood is a rare disease. It appears typically as a periareolar mammary mass and/or nipple discharge. Even though in the adult age is an acquired disease, its occurrence in children suggests it may constitute a development mammary gland anomaly. Sonography is highly useful in the diagnosis. Differential diagnosis must include other nipple discharge and mammary mass causes as the juvenile fibroadenoma or malignant pathology. This usually is a self-limited process, so that a conservative approach is recommended, even though occasionally surgical treatment is required. We report the case of a 13 years old girl with nipple discharge who finally was diagnosed bilateral mammary duct ectasia.

  7. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Rohit B. [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Wang, Qingde [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Khillan, Jaspal S., E-mail: khillan@pitt.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  8. Development of Hyperplasias, Preneoplasias, and Mammary Tumors in MMTV-c-erbB-2 and MMTV-TGFα Transgenic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Barry R.; Platt-Higgins, Angela M.; Schmidt, Gunter; Rudland, Philip S.

    1999-01-01

    Human cDNAs corresponding to two epidermal growth factor-related products that are overexpressed in human breast cancers, that for c-erbB-2 (HER-2) and for transforming growth factor α (TGFα), have been cloned downstream of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat promoter and injected into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes of Sprague-Dawley rats to produce transgenic offspring. Expression of the transgenic mRNAs is not detectable in mammary tissue from virgin transgenic rats but is detected in mammary tissue from certain lines of mid-pregnant transgenic rats. When two such lines of either type of transgenic rat are subjected to repeated cycles of pregnancy and lactation, they produce, primarily in the mammary glands, extensive pathologies, whereas virgin transgenic rats produce no such abnormalities. Multiparous transgenic female offspring from c-erbB-2-expressing lines develop a variety of focal hyperplastic and benign lesions that resemble lesions commonly found in human breasts. These lesions include lobular and ductal hyperplasia, fibroadenoma, cystic expansions, and papillary adenomas. More malignant lesions, including ductal carcinoma in situ and carcinoma, also develop stochastically at low frequency. The mammary glands of transgenic females invariably fail to involute fully after lactation. Similar phenotypes are observed in female MMTV-TGFα transgenic rats. In addition, multiparous TGFα-expressing female transgenics frequently develop severe pregnancy-dependent lactating hyperplasias as well as residual lobules of hyperplastic secretory epithelium and genuine lactating adenomas after weaning. These transgenic rat models confirm the conclusions reached in transgenic mice that overexpression of the c-erbB-2 and TGFα genes predisposes the mammary gland to stochastic tumor development. PMID:10393862

  9. CLINICOPATHOLOGIC FEATURES OF MAMMARY MASSES IN CAPTIVE LIONS (PANTHERA LEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Ryan A; Craig, Linden E; Ramsay, Edward C; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin; Garner, Michael M

    2016-03-01

    A multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 330 pathology accessions from 285 different lions found 15 captive, female African lions (Panthera leo) with confirmed mammary masses. Aside from the presence of a mammary mass, the most common initial clinical sign was inappetence. Histologic diagnoses were predominantly adenocarcinoma (n = 12), though two benign masses (mammary hyperplasia and a mammary cyst) and one squamous cell carcinoma were identified. Nine of 13 malignant tumors had metastasized to lymph nodes or viscera at the time of necropsy. Six lions with adenocarcinoma and two lions with benign mammary masses had received hormonal contraception, though little evidence of mammary lobular hyperplasia was seen in association with the adenocarcinomas. The most common concurrent disease processes found at necropsy were chronic urinary tract disease and other malignancies. These cases demonstrate that mammary malignancies occur in captive lions and frequently metastasize.

  10. TGF-β1 promotes bovine mammary fibroblast proliferation through the ERK 1/2 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yuping; Li, Yingying; Xia, Xiaojing; Zhao, Shuang; Che, Yanyi; Sun, Yingying; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-07-01

    The abnormal proliferation of bovine mammary fibroblasts (BMFBs) impairs mammary gland development and lactation. Severe manifestations develop into breast fibrosis, leading to the culling of cows and causing serious losses to the dairy industry. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is an important modulator of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix formation; however, limited information is available on BMFBs. In this study, a convenient and stable culture method for BMFBs was established. Treatment with 5 ng/mL of TGF-β1 significantly promoted the proliferation of BMFBs and accelerated the cell cycle. TGF-β1 stimulation for up to 12 h significantly increased the relative ERK1/2 mRNA expression and enhanced the protein expression of p-ERK1/2 and cyclin D1. Conversely, the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 blocked these TGF-β1 effects. Further exploration using a mouse model showed that TGF-β1 significantly increased the proportion of fibroblasts and accelerating the cell transition from the G1 to G2/M phases. In addition, TGF-β1 enhanced the expression of fibrosis markers, α-SMA and I Collagen, which could be blocked efficiently by the PD98059 in mouse mammary gland. Finally, immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that TGF-β1 promoted fibroblast proliferation in healthy dairy cows after normal long-term dietary corn straw roughage supplementation. It is suggested that the diet may promote mammary fibroblast proliferation by raising the level of TGF-β1. Our study provides new insights into how nutrition causes undesirable changes in mammary gland structure.

  11. Effects of Age and Parity on Mammary Gland Lesions and Progenitor Cells in the FVB/N-RC Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Raafat; Luigi Strizzi; Karim Lashin; Erika Ginsburg; David McCurdy; David Salomon; Gilbert H Smith; Daniel Medina; Robert Callahan

    2012-01-01

    The FVB/N mouse strain is extensively used in the development of animal models for breast cancer research. Recently it has been reported that the aging FVB/N mice develop spontaneous mammary lesions and tumors accompanied with abnormalities in the pituitary glands. These observations have a great impact on the mouse models of human breast cancer. We have developed a population of inbred FVB/N mice (designated FVB/N-RC) that have been genetically isolated for 20 years. To study the effects of ...

  12. Research on the Changes of Endocrine Hormones in Mammary Cancer and Hyperplasia of Mammary Glands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chengqi

    2002-01-01

    Objective Based on a comparison of endocrine hormones between patients of mammary cancer and those of hyperplasia of mammary glands, a preliminary analysis of the interaction between endocrine hormones and the immune system was oonducted. Methods The experiment involved 50 cases of mammary cancer and hyperplasia of mammary glands each.Blood samples were taken from pre - menopausal and menopausal patients; six kinds of hypophyseal hommones(PRL, GH, TSH,ACTH, FSH and LH) and three kinds of sex hormones ( E2,P and T) were subjected to RIA tests.Results Wilcoxon matchpaired assay and normal approximation of the experiment indicated that the FSH level before pre - menopause and the ACTH level during menopause in patients with mammary canoer were higher that those of patients suffering hyperplasia of mamary glands. Conclusion Statistics show the the normal rhythm between endocrine hormones and the immune system is disrupted in mammary cancer patients, the feedback mechanism of the hypothalamo- hypophyseal- adrenal system is maladjusted,resulting in inhibition of the immune function. Female hormones induce the gene mutation and the sensitivity of the cells is increased, resulting in a significant acceleration of the hyperplasia of cancer cells.

  13. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  14. Epimorphin mediates mammary luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Yohei; Radisky, Derek; Boudreau, Rosanne; Simian, Marina; Stevens, Mary E.; Oka, Yumiko; Takebe, Kyoko; Niwa, Shinichiro; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-03-22

    We have previously shown that epimorphin, a protein expressed on the surface of myoepithelial and fibroblast cells of the mammary gland, acts as a multifunctional morphogen of mammary epithelial cells. Here, we present the molecular mechanism by which epimorphin mediates luminal morphogenesis. Treatment of cells with epimorphin to induce lumen formation greatly increases the overall expression of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta) and alters the relative expression of its two principal isoforms, LIP and LAP. These alterations were shown to be essential for the morphogenetic activities, as constitutive expression of LIP was sufficient to produce lumen formation, while constitutive expression of LAP blocked epimorphin-mediated luminal morphogenesis. Furthermore, in a transgenic mouse model in which epimorphin expression was expressed in an apolar fashion on the surface of mammary epithelial cells, we found increased expression of C/EBPbeta, increased relative expression of LIP to LAP, and enlarged ductal lumina. Together, our studies demonstrate a role for epimorphin in luminal morphogenesis through control of C/EBPbeta expression.

  15. Estrogen inhibits the effects of obesity and alcohol on mammary tumors and fatty liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jina; Holcomb, Valerie B; Kushiro, Kyoko; Núñez, Nomelí P

    2011-12-01

    The risk of developing breast cancer and fatty liver is increased by alcohol consumption. The objective of the present study was to determine if obesity and exogenous estrogen supplementation alter the effects of alcohol on mammary tumorigenesis and fatty liver. Ovariectomized female mice were (1) fed diets to induce overweight and obese phenotypes, (2) provided water or 20% alcohol, (3) implanted with placebo, low- or high-dose estrogen pellets and (4) injected with Met-1 mouse mammary cancer cells. Alcohol-consuming mice were more insulin sensitive and developed larger tumors than water consuming mice. Obese mice developed slightly larger tumors than control mice. Alcohol consumption and obesity increased growth factors, hepatic steatosis, activation of Akt, and inhibited the caspase-3 cascade. Estrogen treatment triggered the loss of body fat, induced insulin sensitivity, suppressed tumor growth, reduced growth factors and improved hepatic steatosis. Results show that the effects of alcohol on mammary tumor and fatty liver are modified by obesity and estrogen supplementation.

  16. Mammary gland serotonin regulates parathyroid hormone-related protein and other bone-related signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Laura L; Gregerson, Karen A; Horseman, Nelson D

    2012-04-15

    Breast cells drive bone demineralization during lactation and metastatic cancers. A shared mechanism among these physiological and pathological states is endocrine secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), which acts through osteoblasts to stimulate osteoclastic bone demineralization. The regulation of PTHrP has not been accounted for fully by any conventional mammotropic stimuli or tumor growth factors. Serotonin (5-HT) synthesis within breast epithelial cells is induced during lactation and in advancing breast cancer. Here we report that serotonin deficiency (knockout of tryptophan hydroxylase-1) results in a reduction of mammary PTHrP expression during lactation, which is rescued by restoring 5-HT synthesis. 5-HT induced PTHrP expression in lactogen-primed mammary epithelial cells from either mouse or cow. In human breast cancer cells 5-HT induced both PTHrP and the metastasis-associated transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1. Based on receptor expression and pharmacological evidence, the 5-HT2 receptor type was implicated as being critical for induction of PTHrP and Runx2. These results connect 5-HT synthesis to the induction of bone-regulating factors in the normal mammary gland and in breast cancer cells.

  17. Stromal regulation of embryonic and postnatal mammary epithelial development and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Beatrice A; Lu, Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    The stroma, which is composed of supporting cells and connective tissue, comprises a large component of the local microenvironment of many epithelial cell types, and influences several fundamental aspects of cell behaviour through both tissue interactions and niche regulation. The significance of the stroma in development and disease has been increasingly recognised. Whereas normal stroma is essential for various developmental processes during vertebrate organogenesis, it can be deregulated and become abnormal, which in turn can initiate or promote a disease process, including cancer. The mouse mammary gland has emerged in recent years as an excellent model system for understanding stromal function in both developmental and cancer biology. Here, we take a systematic approach and focus on the dynamic interactions that the stroma engages with the epithelium during mammary specification, cell differentiation, and branching morphogenesis of both the embryonic and postnatal development of the mammary gland. Similar stromal-epithelial interactions underlie the aetiology of breast cancer, making targeting the cancer stroma an increasingly important and promising therapeutic strategy to pursue for breast cancer treatment.

  18. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  19. 微波消融联合树突状细胞瘤苗免疫治疗小鼠乳腺癌的疗效及免疫学机制探讨%The effect of microwave ablation combined with dendritic cell tumor vaccine treatment on mouse mammary carcinoma and its immunological mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周涯; 任社华; 李永菊; 张明; 周洪练

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effects of microwave ablation combined with dendritic cell (DC) tumor vaccine on a murine breast cancer model and to explore its immunological mechanism.Methods Forty-eight Balb/c mice were used to establish models of mouse mammary carcinoma,and then randomly divided into a sham-operation group,a microwave ablation treated group,a DC tumor vaccinated group and a microwave ablation plus DC tumor vaccinated group.Microwave ablation was conducted with the microwave ablation group on day 14 after establishing the model.DC tumor vaccination was performed on day 7 in the vaccinated group.In the microwave ablation plus DC tumor vaccinated group,DC tumor vaccination and microwave ablation were consecutively performed on days 7 and 14,respectively.Tumor growth,lung metastasis and survival were observed.The proportion of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells in splenocytes were analyzed by fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) on the 14th day after microwave ablation.Serum levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) were also detected using ELISA.Results The survival time (56.4 ± 4.3 days),tumor size (67.3 ± 6.1 mm2) and lung metastasis index (0.6 ± 0.4) in the microwave ablation plus DC tumor vaccinated group were all significantly lower than the corresponding averages in the microwave ablation and DC tumor vaccinated group.The proportions of splenic CD3 + T cells (27.8 ±10.3 %) and CD4+ T cells (16.7 ± 8.3 %) in the microwave ablation plus DC tumor vaccinated group were significantly larger than in the control group.Average serum levels of IFN-γ (41.8 ± 22.9 pg/ml) in the microwave ablation plus DC tumor vaccinated group were also significantly larger than in the control group,while the average serum level of IL-4 (15.4± 6.4 pg/ml) was significantly lower.Conclusions Microwave ablation and DC tumor vaccination together could have synergistic effects in treating experimental breast cancer,which might be closely related

  20. The glucose transporter GLUT1 is required for ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellberg, Elizabeth A; Johnson, Stevi; Finlay-Schultz, Jessica; Lewis, Andrew S; Terrell, Kristina L; Sartorius, Carol A; Abel, E Dale; Muller, William J; Anderson, Steven M

    2016-12-20

    Altered tumor cell metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer; however, the precise role for glucose in tumor initiation is not known. GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is expressed in breast cancer cells and is likely responsible for avid glucose uptake observed in established tumors. We have shown that GLUT1 was necessary for xenograft tumor formation from primary mammary cells transformed with the polyomavirus middle-T antigen but that it was not necessary for growth after tumors had formed in vivo, suggesting a differential requirement for glucose depending on the stage of tumorigenesis. To determine whether GLUT1 is required early during mammary tumorigenesis, we crossed MMTV-NIC mice, which express activated HER2/NEU/ERBB2 and Cre recombinase, to Slc2a1 (Flox/Flox) (GLUT1(Flox/Flox)) mice to generate NIC-GLUT1(+/+), NIC-GLUT1(Flox/+), and NIC-GLUT1(Flox/Flox) mice. In addition, we evaluated effects of glucose restriction or GLUT1 inhibition on transformation in MCF10A-ERBB2 breast epithelial cells in three-dimensional culture. Finally, we utilized global gene expression profiling data of primary human breast tumors to determine the relationship between SLC2A1 and stage of tumorigenesis. All of the NIC-GLUT1(+/+) mice developed tumors in less than 200 days. In contrast, only 1 NIC-GLUT1(Flox/Flox) mouse and 1 NIC-GLUT1(Flox/+) mouse developed mammary tumors, even after 18 months. Mammary gland development was not disrupted in NIC mice lacking GLUT1; however, epithelial content of mature glands was reduced compared to NIC-GLUT1(Flox/+) mice. In MCF10A-ERBB2 cells, glucose restriction or GLUT1 inhibition blocked transformation induced by activated ERBB2 through reduced cell proliferation. In human breast cancers, SLC2A1 was higher in ductal carcinoma in situ compared to the normal breast, but lower in invasive versus in situ lesions, suggesting the requirement for GLUT1 decreases as tumors progress. This study demonstrates a strict requirement for GLUT1 in the early stages of

  1. Establishment of La-tPA/G-CSF dual transgenic mice and expression in their mammary gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢一凡; 田靫; 邓继先; 程萱; 黄培堂

    1999-01-01

    Expression vectors of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSG) and long acting tissue plasminogen activator (La-tPA) in mammary gland were constructed using promoters of mouse whey acid protein gene (WAP) and sheep β-lactoglobulin gene (BLG) with sizes of 2.6 and 5 kb respectively. Two kinds of transgenic mice of G-CSF and La-tPA were produced with microinjection. The expression of G-CSF and La-tPA was achieved in mammary glands of transgenic mice, respectively. In order to establish dual transgenic mice of La-tPA/G-CSF, transgenic mice carrying G-CSF and La-tPA gene characterized with specific expression in mammary gland were mated. La-tPA/G-CSF dual transgenic mice were screened out from the hybrid offspring by Once-PCR. The co-expression of La-tPA and G-CSF in mammary gland of the dual transgenic mice was confirmed by the milk assayed and Northern blot analysis. Some parameters about the dual transgenic mice indicated that there were fewer litters than that of normal mice. The ratio of du

  2. Preconditioning with Lipopolysaccharide or Lipoteichoic Acid Protects against Staphylococcus aureus Mammary Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Breyne

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most causative agents of mastitis and is associated with chronic udder infections. The persistency of the pathogen is believed to be the result of an insufficient triggering of local inflammatory signaling. In this study, the preclinical mastitis model was used, aiming to evaluate if lipopolysaccharide (LPS or lipoteichoic acid (LTA preconditioning could aid the host in more effectively clearing or at least limiting a subsequent S. aureus infection. A prototypic Gram-negative virulence factor, i.e., LPS and Gram-positive virulence factor, i.e., LTA were screened whether they were able to boost the local immune compartment. Compared to S. aureus-induced inflammation, both toxins had a remarkable high potency to efficiently induce two novel selected innate immunity biomarkers i.e., lipocalin 2 (LCN2 and chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1. When combining mammary inoculation of LPS or LTA prior to a local S. aureus infection, we were able to modulate the innate immune response, reduce local bacterial loads, and induce either LCN2 or CHI3L1 at 24 h post-infection. Clodronate depletion of mammary macrophages also identified that macrophages contribute only to a limited extend to the LPS/LTA-induced immunomodulation upon S. aureus infection. Based on histological neutrophil influx evaluation, concomitant local cytokine profiles and LCN2/CHI3L1 patterns, the macrophage-independent signaling plays a major role in the LPS- or LTA-pretreated S. aureus-infected mouse mammary gland. Our results highlight the importance of a vigilant microenvironment during the innate immune response of the mammary gland and offer novel insights for new approaches concerning effective immunomodulation against a local bacterial infection.

  3. Preconditioning with Lipopolysaccharide or Lipoteichoic Acid Protects against Staphylococcus aureus Mammary Infection in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyne, Koen; Steenbrugge, Jonas; Demeyere, Kristel; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Meyer, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most causative agents of mastitis and is associated with chronic udder infections. The persistency of the pathogen is believed to be the result of an insufficient triggering of local inflammatory signaling. In this study, the preclinical mastitis model was used, aiming to evaluate if lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA) preconditioning could aid the host in more effectively clearing or at least limiting a subsequent S. aureus infection. A prototypic Gram-negative virulence factor, i.e., LPS and Gram-positive virulence factor, i.e., LTA were screened whether they were able to boost the local immune compartment. Compared to S. aureus-induced inflammation, both toxins had a remarkable high potency to efficiently induce two novel selected innate immunity biomarkers i.e., lipocalin 2 (LCN2) and chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1). When combining mammary inoculation of LPS or LTA prior to a local S. aureus infection, we were able to modulate the innate immune response, reduce local bacterial loads, and induce either LCN2 or CHI3L1 at 24 h post-infection. Clodronate depletion of mammary macrophages also identified that macrophages contribute only to a limited extend to the LPS/LTA-induced immunomodulation upon S. aureus infection. Based on histological neutrophil influx evaluation, concomitant local cytokine profiles and LCN2/CHI3L1 patterns, the macrophage-independent signaling plays a major role in the LPS- or LTA-pretreated S. aureus-infected mouse mammary gland. Our results highlight the importance of a vigilant microenvironment during the innate immune response of the mammary gland and offer novel insights for new approaches concerning effective immunomodulation against a local bacterial infection. PMID:28791009

  4. c-Myc affects mRNA translation, cell proliferation and progenitor cell function in the mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumpp Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oncoprotein c-Myc has been intensely studied in breast cancer and mouse mammary tumor models, but relatively little is known about the normal physiological role of c-Myc in the mammary gland. Here we investigated functions of c-Myc during mouse mammary gland development using a conditional knockout approach. Results Generation of c-mycfl/fl mice carrying the mammary gland-specific WAPiCre transgene resulted in c-Myc loss in alveolar epithelial cells starting in mid-pregnancy. Three major phenotypes were observed in glands of mutant mice. First, c-Myc-deficient alveolar cells had a slower proliferative response at the start of pregnancy, causing a delay but not a block of alveolar development. Second, while milk composition was comparable between wild type and mutant animals, milk production was reduced in mutant glands, leading to slower pup weight-gain. Electron microscopy and polysome fractionation revealed a general decrease in translational efficiency. Furthermore, analysis of mRNA distribution along the polysome gradient demonstrated that this effect was specific for mRNAs whose protein products are involved in milk synthesis. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed decreased levels of ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal protein-encoding mRNAs in mutant glands. Third, using the mammary transplantation technique to functionally identify alveolar progenitor cells, we observed that the mutant epithelium has a reduced ability to repopulate the gland when transplanted into NOD/SCID recipients. Conclusion We have demonstrated that c-Myc plays multiple roles in the mouse mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. c-Myc loss delayed, but did not block proliferation and differentiation in pregnancy. During lactation, lower levels of ribosomal RNAs and proteins were present and translation was generally decreased in mutant glands. Finally, the transplantation studies suggest a role

  5. c-Myc Transforms Human Mammary Epithelial Cells through Repression of the Wnt Inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    c-myc is frequently amplified in breast cancer; however, the mechanism of myc-induced mammary epithelial cell transformation has not been defined. We show that c-Myc induces a profound morphological transformation in human mammary epithelial cells and anchorage-independent growth. c-Myc suppresses the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1, and derepression of DKK1 or SFRP1 reduces Myc-dependent transforming activity. Myc-dependent repression of DKK1 and SFRP1 is accompanied by Wnt target gene activation and endogenous T-cell factor activity. Myc-induced mouse mammary tumors have repressed SFRP1 and increased expression of Wnt target genes. DKK1 and SFRP1 inhibit the transformed phenotype of breast cancer cell lines, and DKK1 inhibits tumor formation. We propose a positive feedback loop for activation of the c-myc and Wnt pathways in breast cancer. PMID:17485441

  6. GH-producing mammary tumors in two dogs with acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsuko; Nishii, Naohito; Morita, Takehito; Yuki, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Two intact female dogs were admitted for growing mammary tumors. They had symptoms of acromegaly including weight gain, enlargement of the head, excessive skin folds, and inspiratory stridor. Serum concentrations of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin were elevated in the two cases. From these findings, both dogs were diagnosed with acromegaly. In case 1, the GH, IGF-I, and insulin levels subsided after removal of the focal benign mammary tumors and ovariohysterectomy. In case 2, those levels subsided after removal of only focal mammary carcinoma. In both cases, immunohistochemical investigations for GH were positive in the mammary tumor cells but not in the normal mammary glands. We concluded that GH-producing mammary tumors caused the present acromegaly.

  7. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is not required for normal ductal or alveolar development in the post-natal mammary gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Boras-Granic

    Full Text Available PTHrP is necessary for the formation of the embryonic mammary gland and, in its absence, the embryonic mammary bud fails to form the neonatal duct system. In addition, PTHrP is produced by the breast during lactation and contributes to the regulation of maternal calcium homeostasis during milk production. In this study, we examined the role of PTHrP during post-natal mammary development. Using a PTHrP-lacZ transgenic mouse, we surveyed the expression of PTHrP in the developing post-natal mouse mammary gland. We found that PTHrP expression is restricted to the basal cells of the gland during pubertal development and becomes expressed in milk secreting alveolar cells during pregnancy and lactation. Based on the previous findings that overexpression of PTHrP in cap and myoepithelial cells inhibited ductal elongation during puberty, we predicted that ablation of native PTHrP expression in the post-natal gland would result in accelerated ductal development. To address this hypothesis, we generated two conditional models of PTHrP-deficiency specifically targeted to the postnatal mammary gland. We used the MMTV-Cre transgene to ablate the floxed PTHrP gene in both luminal and myoepithelial cells and a tetracycline-regulated K14-tTA;tetO-Cre transgene to target PTHrP expression in just myoepithelial and cap cells. In both models of PTHrP ablation, we found that mammary development proceeds normally despite the absence of PTHrP. We conclude that PTHrP signaling is not required for normal ductal or alveolar development.

  8. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is not required for normal ductal or alveolar development in the post-natal mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boras-Granic, Kata; VanHouten, Joshua; Hiremath, Minoti; Wysolmerski, John

    2011-01-01

    PTHrP is necessary for the formation of the embryonic mammary gland and, in its absence, the embryonic mammary bud fails to form the neonatal duct system. In addition, PTHrP is produced by the breast during lactation and contributes to the regulation of maternal calcium homeostasis during milk production. In this study, we examined the role of PTHrP during post-natal mammary development. Using a PTHrP-lacZ transgenic mouse, we surveyed the expression of PTHrP in the developing post-natal mouse mammary gland. We found that PTHrP expression is restricted to the basal cells of the gland during pubertal development and becomes expressed in milk secreting alveolar cells during pregnancy and lactation. Based on the previous findings that overexpression of PTHrP in cap and myoepithelial cells inhibited ductal elongation during puberty, we predicted that ablation of native PTHrP expression in the post-natal gland would result in accelerated ductal development. To address this hypothesis, we generated two conditional models of PTHrP-deficiency specifically targeted to the postnatal mammary gland. We used the MMTV-Cre transgene to ablate the floxed PTHrP gene in both luminal and myoepithelial cells and a tetracycline-regulated K14-tTA;tetO-Cre transgene to target PTHrP expression in just myoepithelial and cap cells. In both models of PTHrP ablation, we found that mammary development proceeds normally despite the absence of PTHrP. We conclude that PTHrP signaling is not required for normal ductal or alveolar development.

  9. Neutrophils drive accelerated tumor progression in the collagen-dense mammary tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mendoza, María G; Inman, David R; Ponik, Suzanne M; Jeffery, Justin J; Sheerar, Dagna S; Van Doorn, Rachel R; Keely, Patricia J

    2016-05-11

    High mammographic density has been correlated with a 4-fold to 6-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer, and is associated with increased stromal deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen I. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for high breast tissue density are not completely understood. We previously described accelerated tumor formation and metastases in a transgenic mouse model of collagen-dense mammary tumors (type I collagen-α1 (Col1α1)(tm1Jae) and mouse mammary tumor virus - polyoma virus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyVT)) compared to wild-type mice. Using ELISA cytokine arrays and multi-color flow cytometry analysis, we studied cytokine signals and the non-malignant, immune cells in the collagen-dense tumor microenvironment that may promote accelerated tumor progression and metastasis. Collagen-dense tumors did not show any alteration in immune cell populations at late stages. The cytokine signals in the mammary tumor microenvironment were clearly different between wild-type and collagen-dense tumors. Cytokines associated with neutrophil signaling, such as granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulated factor (GM-CSF), were increased in collagen-dense tumors. Depleting neutrophils with anti-Ly6G (1A8) significantly reduced the number of tumors, and blocked metastasis in over 80 % of mice with collagen-dense tumors, but did not impact tumor growth or metastasis in wild-type mice. Our study suggests that tumor progression in a collagen-dense microenvironment is mechanistically different, with pro-tumor neutrophils, compared to a non-dense microenvironment.

  10. p130Cas alters the differentiation potential of mammary luminal progenitors by deregulating c-Kit activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornillo, Giusy; Elia, Angela Rita; Castellano, Isabella; Spadaro, Michela; Bernabei, Paola; Bisaro, Brigitte; Camacho-Leal, Maria Del Pilar; Pincini, Alessandra; Provero, Paolo; Sapino, Anna; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola; Cabodi, Sara

    2013-07-01

    It has recently been proposed that defective differentiation of mammary luminal progenitors predisposes to basal-like breast cancer. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved are still unclear. Here, we describe that the adaptor protein p130Cas is a crucial regulator of mouse mammary epithelial cell (MMEC) differentiation. Using a transgenic mouse model, we show that forced p130Cas overexpression in the luminal progenitor cell compartment results in the expansion of luminal cells, which aberrantly display basal cell features and reduced differentiation in response to lactogenic stimuli. Interestingly, MMECs overexpressing p130Cas exhibit hyperactivation of the tyrosine kinase receptor c-Kit. In addition, we demonstrate that the constitutive c-Kit activation alone mimics p130Cas overexpression, whereas c-Kit downregulation is sufficient to re-establish proper differentiation of p130Cas overexpressing cells. Overall, our data indicate that high levels of p130Cas, via abnormal c-Kit activation, promote mammary luminal cell plasticity, thus providing the conditions for the development of basal-like breast cancer. Consistently, p130Cas is overexpressed in human triple-negative breast cancer, further suggesting that p130Cas upregulation may be a priming event for the onset of basal-like breast cancer.

  11. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Mammary Gland in Domestic Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Filgueira, Kilder Dantas; Reche Junior,Archivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the feline species, 80% to 93% of neoplasias in the mammary gland are malignant, being the majority carcinomas. Among them, there is the mammary squamous cell carcinoma, which amounts to a very rare neoplasm in the domestic cat, with considerable potential for malignancy. This study aimed to report a case of squamous cell mammary carcinoma in the feline species. Case: A female cat, mixed breed, ten years old, presented history of skin lesion. The cat had been spayed two years b...

  12. Targeting Serglycin Prevents Metastasis in Murine Mammary Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Roy

    Full Text Available In hematopoietic cells, serglycin proteoglycans mainly contribute to proper storage and secretion of inflammatory mediators via their negatively charged glycosaminoglycans. Serglycin proteoglycans are also expressed in cancer cells where increased expression has been linked to poor prognosis. However, the serglycin-dependent mediators promoting cancer progression remain to be determined. In the present study we report that genetic ablation of serglycin proteoglycan completely blocks lung metastasis in the MMTV-PyMT-driven mouse breast cancer model, while serglycin-deficiency did not affect primary tumour growth or number of mammary tumours. Although E-cadherin expression was higher in the serglycin-deficient primary tumour tissue, indicating reduced invasiveness, serglycin-deficient tumour cells were still detected in the circulation. These data suggest that serglycin proteoglycans play a role in extravasation as well as colonization and growth of metastatic cells. A microarray expression analysis and functional annotation of differentially expressed genes identified several biological pathways where serglycin may be important. Our results suggest that serglycin and serglycin-dependent mediators are potential drug targets to prevent metastatic disease/dissemination of cancer.

  13. The evolving role of mammary ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokbel, Kefah; Elkak, Abd Elrafea

    2002-01-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) is an emerging technique that allows direct visualisation of the mammary duct system, and that produces sharp and clear video images and ductal washings for cytological analysis. There is a growing body of evidence that MD may have a role in the management of women with pathological nipple discharge, the guiding of breast conserving surgery for cancer, and the screening of high risk women. Further research is required to confirm these potential applications and the feasibility of its use in the rapid intervention and outpatient setting under local anaesthesia. Furthermore, the addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by MD and the emergence of newer generations of microendoscopes are likely to enhance the use of this technique.

  14. Adipose and mammary epithelial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenting; Nelson, Celeste M

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is a type of surgery for women who have had a mastectomy, and involves using autologous tissue or prosthetic material to construct a natural-looking breast. Adipose tissue is the major contributor to the volume of the breast, whereas epithelial cells comprise the functional unit of the mammary gland. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into both adipocytes and epithelial cells and can be acquired from autologous sources. ASCs are therefore an attractive candidate for clinical applications to repair or regenerate the breast. Here we review the current state of adipose tissue engineering methods, including the biomaterials used for adipose tissue engineering and the application of these techniques for mammary epithelial tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering combined with microfabrication approaches to engineer the epithelium represents a promising avenue to replicate the native structure of the breast.

  15. Bovine mammary stem cells: new perspective for dairy science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignani, E; Cravero, D; Miretti, S; Accornero, P; Baratta, M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary stem cells provide opportunities for the cyclic remodelling of the bovine mammary gland. Therefore, understanding the character and regulation of mammary stem cells is important for increasing animal health and productivity. The exciting possibility that stem cell expansion can influence milk production is currently being investigated by several researchers. In fact, appropriate regulation of mammary stem cells could hopefully benefit milk yield, persistency of lactation, dry period management and tissue repair. Accordingly, we and others have attempted to characterize and regulate the function of bovine mammary stem cells. However, research on mammary stem cells requires tissue biopsies, which represents a limitation for the management of animal welfare. Interestingly, different studies recently reported the identification of putative mammary stem cells in human breast milk. The possible identification of primitive cell types within cow's milk may provide a non-invasive source of relevant mammary cells for a wide range of applications. In this review, we have summarized the main achievements in this field for dairy cow science and described the interesting perspectives open to manipulate milk persistency during lactation and to cope with oxidative stress during the transition period by regulating mammary stem cells.

  16. Mammary gland stem cells: More puzzles than explanations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suneesh Kaimala; Suneesh Kaimala; Satish Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Mammary gland stem cells (MaSC) have not been identified in spite of extensive research spanning over several decades. This has been primarily due to the complexity of mammary gland structure and its development, cell heterogeneity in the mammary gland and the insufficient knowledge about MaSC markers. At present, Lin–CD29hiCD49fhiCD24+/modSca-1– cells of the mammary gland have been reported to be enriched with MaSCs. We suggest that the inclusion of stem cell markers like Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and the mammary gland differentiation marker BRCA-1 may further narrow down the search for MaSCs. In addition, we have discussed some of the other unresolved puzzles on the mammary gland stem cells, such as their similarities and/or differences with mammary cancer stem cells, use of milk as source of mammary stem cells and the possibility of in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional mammary gland structures in this review. Nevertheless, it is the lack of identity for a MaSC that is curtailing the advances in some of the above and other related areas.

  17. Ultrasound appearance of chronic mammary duct ectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne, N. [Ottawa Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: nathalie_duchesne_22@yahoo.ca; Skolnik, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Family Medicine, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bilmer, S. [Ottawa Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-12-15

    Mammary duct ectasia (MDE), also called periductal mastitis, mammary dysplasia, or plasma cell mastitis, is a benign condition of the mammary gland first described by Haagensen in 1951. The etiology of MDE is unknown and its pathogenesis still controversial; the periductal inflammation could be either the cause or the result of dilated damaged ducts. The process is usually bilateral and asymptomatic, with only a small percentage of patients presenting with symptoms that may include long course of tumour formation, usually subareolar breast lumps, nipple discharge, nipple retraction, mastalgia, and mammary abscess or fistulas. Mammographic presentation of MDE is well known; its features include periductal calcification, benign intraductal calcification, and retroareolar duct dilatation. The periductal calcification results from dystrophic calcification and forms calcified rings or very dense, oval, elongated calcifications, each with a central lucency representing the dilated duct. Intraductal calcifications of duct ectasia represent inspissated intraductal material and are typically of uniform high density, often needle-like, and occasionally branching. Occasionally, there are no mammographic findings, and the diagnosis must rely on sonographic features. Appearance of MDE on ultrasonography (US) depends on the stage of the disease and the contents of the dilated ducts. The acute presentation has been demonstrated in the literature more often than has its chronic counterpart. In the former, duct content can vary from anechoic to isoechoic with surrounding fatty tissue. In chronic MDE, episodes of inflammation are longer. This tends to result in secretions that have a more solid, cheesy texture, partly due to cholesterol crystals, foam cells, and inflammatory cells. For both types of MDE, the appearance can mimic high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on US. In this essay, 2 chronic MDE cases are presented and their US appearance discussed. Our goal is to explore

  18. Mammary fibromatosis in a male breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, N; Amir, T; Shafi, I N

    2012-07-01

    Fibromatosis of the breast is a relatively benign, though locally invasive neoplasm. It is rare and difficult to diagnose. Risk of recurrence is there if it was inadequately excised. The best treatment is local wide excision with negative margins. We report a 46-year old gentleman with mammary fibromatosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are only few cases reported on male breast fibromatosis. The optimal management of it is unknown because of the rarity of the disease.

  19. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  20. Mammary Fibromatosis: Sonographic Features and Pathologic Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae Kyoung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Rho, Ji Young; Kang, Hye Yoon [Cha University College of Medicine, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the sonographic features of mammary fibromatosis had correlation with the pathologic findings. We identified four cases of fibromatosis of the breast at our institution over a 10-year period. The patients were all women, and they ranged from 25 to 48 years of age (mean, 34.3 years). All four patients complained of palpable breast masses and were subsequently diagnosed with mammary fibromatosis. We retrospectively reviewed their imaging findings. Mammography obtained in one patient revealed architectural distortion. On sonography, all four cases showed spiculated, irregular, hypoechoic masses that could not be differentiated from malignant lesions. After surgical excision and vacuum assisted biopsy of the masses in four patients, there was no recurrence on clinical or sonographic follow-up over a 13-36 month period. Although mammary fibromatosis is a very rare condition, it should be included in the differential diagnosis when an un-calcified, spiculated, irregular and hypoechoic masses are encountered on breast sonography

  1. Fibronectin production by human mammary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, M.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Vlodavsky, I.; Smith, H.S.; Ford, R.; Becker, F.F.; Riggs, J.

    1981-01-01

    Human mammary cells were examined for the presence of the high-molecular-weight surface glycoprotein fibronectin. Early passage mammary epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures from both carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the presence of cell-associated fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy and for the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin by specific immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein. In vivo frozen sections of primary carcinomas and normal tissues were tested for the localization of fibronectin by immunofluorescence microscopy. In contrast to the extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin found in the fibroblast cultures, the epithelial cell cultures from both tissue sources displayed a pattern of cell-associated fibronectin characterizd by powdery, punctate staining. However, the cultured epithelial cells, as well as the fibroblasts, secreted large quantities of fibronectin into the medium. Putative myoepithelial cells also displayed extensive fibrillar networks of fibronectin. The difference in cell-associated fibronectin distribution between the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts and putative myoepithelial cells provided a simple means of quantitating stromal and myoepithelial cell contamination of the mammary epithelial cells in culture. In vivo, normal tissues showed fibronectin primarily localized in the basement membrane surrounding the epithelial cells and in the stroma. Most primary carcinomas displayed powdery, punctate staining on the epithelial cells in addition to the fibronectin present in the surrounding stroma.

  2. Mammary ductoscopy: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bernadette; Mokbel, Kefah

    2005-04-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) allows direct visual access to the mammary ducts, using fiberoptic microendoscopes inserted through the ductal opening onto the nipple surface. Therefore it has a potential role in the diagnosis and treatment of intraductal breast disease. This article describes the anatomy of the mammary ductal system, the early beginnings of MD, its ongoing evolution, and the need for further development for its future usage in increasing clinical indications. MD is a useful diagnostic adjunct in patients with pathological nipple discharge (PND) and can guide duct excision surgery. However, its potential use in the early detection of breast cancer, in guiding breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for cancer, and in the therapeutic ablation of intraductal disease, as well as in guiding risk-reducing strategies among high-risk women, requires further research and evaluation. The development of a biopsy kit that obtains adequate microbiopsy samples for histological diagnosis under direct visualization will enhance the use of this technique by breast surgeons and radiologists. Future developments also include combining MD with molecular diagnostic markers and optical biopsy systems for the diagnosis of premalignant and early malignant disease, and combining MD with radiofrequency for curative ablation of intraductal lesions.

  3. Mammary ductoscopy: current issues and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ken; Fukushima, Hisaki; Toriumi, Yasuo; Kawase, Kazumi; Tabei, Isao; Yamashita, Akinori; Nogi, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, the mammary duct had not been directly observed in vivo. Starting with the success of Teboul et al., studies of mammary ductoscopy (MD) for nipple discharge have been performed in Japan and other East Asian countries. Ductal lavage screening trials for breast cancer started in the 2000s. Concurrently, the number of English-language articles about MD increased. Sixty-nine English-language and 74 Japanese-language papers published in the last 19 years were reviewed. Important reports and studies were analyzed. MD has undergone significant technological development, and studies of MD have taken place in many countries. As a result, endoscopic images of the mammary duct have developed, and the endoscopic diagnosis for nipple discharge has become possible. MD-guided biopsy and surgery have been studied. Findings of MD are useful for diagnosing intraductal lesions with nipple discharge. As a result, MD has reduced the number and extent of microdochectomies. MD is also helpful in guiding breast-conserving surgery. Many pioneers have tried direct biopsy or interventions under MD, but further developments are necessary for its practical use.

  4. Secretory pathway Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase isoform 2 and lactation: specific localization of plasmalemmal and secretory pathway Ca2+ pump isoforms in the mammary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faddy, Helen M.; Smart, Chanel E.; Xu, Ren; Lee, Genee Y.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Feng, Mingye; Rao, Rajini; Brown, Melissa A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2008-04-09

    The supply of calcium to the developing neonate via milk is an important physiological process. Until recently the mechanism for the enrichment of milk with calcium was thought to be almost entirely mediated via the secretory pathway. However, recent studies suggest that a specific isoform of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, is the primary mechanism for calcium transport into milk, highlighting a major role for apical calcium transport. We compared the expression of the recently identified secretory calcium ATPase, SPCA2, and SPCA1, in the mouse mammary gland during different stages of development. SPCA2 levels increased over 35 fold during lactation, while SPCA1 increased only a modest two fold. The potential importance of SPCA2 in lactation was also highlighted by its localization to luminal secretory cells of the mammary gland during lactation, while SPCA1 was expressed throughout the cells of the mammary gland. We also observed major differences in the localization of PMCA2 and PMCA1 during lactation. Using the SCp2 mouse mammary epithelial cell 3D culture model, differences in the sub-cellular distribution of PMCA2 and PMCA1 were clear. These studies highlight the likely specific roles of PMCA2 and SPCA2 in lactation, and link the recently characterized SPCA2 calcium pump to the supply of calcium into milk and the regulation of Golgi resident enzymes important in lactation. They also indicate that calcium transport into milk is a complex interplay between apical and secretory pathways.

  5. A MYC-Driven Change in Mitochondrial Dynamics Limits YAP/TAZ Function in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eyss, Björn; Jaenicke, Laura A; Kortlever, Roderik M; Royla, Nadine; Wiese, Katrin E; Letschert, Sebastian; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Sauer, Markus; Rosenwald, Andreas; Evan, Gerard I; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2015-12-14

    In several developmental lineages, an increase in MYC expression drives the transition from quiescent stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. We show that MYC activates a stereotypic transcriptional program of genes involved in cell growth in mammary epithelial cells. This change in gene expression indirectly inhibits the YAP/TAZ co-activators, which maintain the clonogenic potential of these cells. We identify a phospholipase of the mitochondrial outer membrane, PLD6, as the mediator of MYC activity. MYC-dependent growth strains cellular energy resources and stimulates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). PLD6 alters mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics downstream of MYC. This change activates AMPK, which in turn inhibits YAP/TAZ. Mouse models and human pathological data show that MYC enhances AMPK and suppresses YAP/TAZ activity in mammary tumors.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is induced in fibroblasts in polyomavirus middle T antigen-driven mammary carcinoma without influencing tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Boye S; Egeblad, Mikala; Rank, Fritz;

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 13 (collagenase 3) is an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme that is induced in myofibroblasts during the earliest invasive stages of human breast carcinoma, suggesting that it is involved in tumor progression. During progression of mammary carcinomas...... in the polyoma virus middle T oncogene mouse model (MMTV-PyMT), Mmp13 mRNA was strongly upregulated concurrently with the transition to invasive and metastatic carcinomas. As in human tumors, Mmp13 mRNA was found in myofibroblasts of invasive grade II and III carcinomas, but not in benign grade I and II mammary...... that the expression pattern of Mmp13 mRNA in myofibroblasts of invasive carcinomas in the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model recapitulates the expression pattern observed in human breast cancer. Our results suggest that MMP13 is a marker of carcinoma-associated myofibroblasts of invasive carcinoma, even though it does...

  7. SNORD-host RNA Zfas1 is a regulator of mammary development and a potential marker for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E; Crawford, Joanna; French, Juliet D; Smart, Chanel E; Smith, Martin A; Clark, Michael B; Ru, Kelin; Mercer, Tim R; Thompson, Ella R; Lakhani, Sunil R; Vargas, Ana C; Campbell, Ian G; Brown, Melissa A; Dinger, Marcel E; Mattick, John S

    2011-05-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to play major regulatory roles in development and disease. To identify novel regulators in breast biology, we identified differentially regulated lncRNAs during mouse mammary development. Among the highest and most differentially expressed was a transcript (Zfas1) antisense to the 5' end of the protein-coding gene Znfx1. In vivo, Zfas1 RNA is localized within the ducts and alveoli of the mammary gland. Zfas1 intronically hosts three previously undescribed C/D box snoRNAs (SNORDs): Snord12, Snord12b, and Snord12c. In contrast to the general assumption that noncoding SNORD-host transcripts function only as vehicles to generate snoRNAs, knockdown of Zfas1 in a mammary epithelial cell line resulted in increased cellular proliferation and differentiation, while not substantially altering the levels of the SNORDs. In support of an independent function, we also found that Zfas1 is extremely stable, with a half-life >16 h. Expression analysis of the SNORDs revealed these were expressed at different levels, likely a result of distinct structures conferring differential stability. While there is relatively low primary sequence conservation between Zfas1 and its syntenic human ortholog ZFAS1, their predicted secondary structures have similar features. Like Zfas1, ZFAS1 is highly expressed in the mammary gland and is down-regulated in breast tumors compared to normal tissue. We propose a functional role for Zfas1/ ZFAS1 in the regulation of alveolar development and epithelial cell differentiation in the mammary gland, which, together with its dysregulation in human breast cancer, suggests ZFAS1 as a putative tumor suppressor gene.

  8. Lipoprotein Lipase, Tissue Expression and Effects on Genes Related to Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Sheng Zhao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (LPL serves as a central factor in hydrolysis of triacylglycerol and uptake of free fatty acids from the plasma. However, there are limited data concerning the action of LPL on the regulation of milk fat synthesis in goat mammary gland. In this investigation, we describe the cloning and sequencing of the LPL gene from Xinong Saanen dairy goat mammary gland, along with a study of its phylogenetic relationships. Sequence analysis showed that goat LPL shares similarities with other species including sheep, bovine, human and mouse. LPL mRNA expression in various tissues determined by RT-qPCR revealed the highest expression in white adipose tissue, with lower expression in heart, lung, spleen, rumen, small intestine, mammary gland, and kidney. Expression was almost undetectable in liver and muscle. The expression profiles of LPL gene in mammary gland at early, peak, mid, late lactation, and the dry period were also measured. Compared with the dry period, LPL mRNA expression was markedly greater at early lactation. However, compared with early lactation, the expression was lower at peak lactation and mid lactation. Despite those differences, LPL mRNA expression was still greater at peak, mid, and late lactation compared with the dry period. Using goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC, the in vitro knockdown of LPL via shRNA or with Orlistat resulted in a similar degree of down-regulation of LPL (respectively. Furthermore, knockdown of LPL was associated with reduced mRNA expression of SREBF1, FASN, LIPE and PPARG but greater expression of FFAR3. There was no effect on ACACA expression. Orlistat decreased expression of LIPE, FASN, ACACA, and PPARG, and increased FFAR3 and SREBF1 expression. The pattern of LPL expression was similar to the changes in milk fat percentage in lactating goats. Taken together, results suggest that LPL may play a crucial role in fatty acid synthesis.

  9. Lipoprotein Lipase, Tissue Expression and Effects on Genes Related to Fatty Acid Synthesis in Goat Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wang-Sheng; Hu, Shi-Liang; Yu, Kang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Wei; Loor, Juan; Luo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) serves as a central factor in hydrolysis of triacylglycerol and uptake of free fatty acids from the plasma. However, there are limited data concerning the action of LPL on the regulation of milk fat synthesis in goat mammary gland. In this investigation, we describe the cloning and sequencing of the LPL gene from Xinong Saanen dairy goat mammary gland, along with a study of its phylogenetic relationships. Sequence analysis showed that goat LPL shares similarities with other species including sheep, bovine, human and mouse. LPL mRNA expression in various tissues determined by RT-qPCR revealed the highest expression in white adipose tissue, with lower expression in heart, lung, spleen, rumen, small intestine, mammary gland, and kidney. Expression was almost undetectable in liver and muscle. The expression profiles of LPL gene in mammary gland at early, peak, mid, late lactation, and the dry period were also measured. Compared with the dry period, LPL mRNA expression was markedly greater at early lactation. However, compared with early lactation, the expression was lower at peak lactation and mid lactation. Despite those differences, LPL mRNA expression was still greater at peak, mid, and late lactation compared with the dry period. Using goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC), the in vitro knockdown of LPL via shRNA or with Orlistat resulted in a similar degree of down-regulation of LPL (respectively). Furthermore, knockdown of LPL was associated with reduced mRNA expression of SREBF1, FASN, LIPE and PPARG but greater expression of FFAR3. There was no effect on ACACA expression. Orlistat decreased expression of LIPE, FASN, ACACA, and PPARG, and increased FFAR3 and SREBF1 expression. The pattern of LPL expression was similar to the changes in milk fat percentage in lactating goats. Taken together, results suggest that LPL may play a crucial role in fatty acid synthesis. PMID:25501331

  10. Effect of Thyroid Function on MNU-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermey, Mackenzie L; Marks, Gregory T; Baldridge, Monika G

    2015-06-01

    Mammary cancer is a disease that affects many women. Extensive research has been conducted to elucidate which variables are involved in the development of this cancer. Studies have highlighted thyroid function as a modulator of tumor growth and development. Thyroxine and 3,3',5-triiodothyronine are responsible for regulating the development, differentiation, homeostasis, and metabolism of cells in the body including mammary tissue. Thyroid hormones also have estrogen-like effects on mammary cancer cell growth by regulating the estrogen receptor. The present study was designed to determine whether medically induced hyperthyroidism increases the multiplicity, prevalence, and mammary tumor burden in rats; and to elucidate whether surgically induced hypothyroidism conversely attenuates the rate of mammary cancer cell growth. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (euthyroid-control, hyperthyroid, and hypothyroid). Hyperthyroidism was induced via oral administration of levothyroxine; whereas, hypothyroidism was induced by thyroidectomy. Mammary carcinogenesis was induced with a single intraperitoneal injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosurea (MNU). Rats were sacrificed at 38 weeks, and the mammary tumors were excised, fixed for histology and analyzed. Analysis included evaluation of malignancy and immunohistochemistry for ER. MNU-induced mammary carcinogenesis among the groups resulted in a significant difference in tumor burden. The hyperthyroid group had a statistically higher tumor burden than did the euthyroid group, and the hypothyroid group had no tumors of mammary tissue origin at 38 weeks. All excised mammary tumors were ER alpha negative. These data support the hypothesis that thyroid function is one of potentially many factors that contribute to modulation of MNU-induced mammary tumor growth.

  11. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, M L; Fitzgerald, M P; Zhong, W; Askeland, R W; Domann, F E

    2014-01-16

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  12. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  13. Identification of rat mammary tumor-1 gene (RMT-1), which is highly expressed in rat mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, S; Yoo, J; Loh, K C; Guzman, R C; Gopinath, G R; Rajkumar, L; Chou, Y C; Yang, J; Popescu, N C; Nandi, S

    2001-12-10

    Full-term pregnancy early in life results in a permanent reduction in lifetime breast cancer risk in women. Parous rats and mice are also refractory to chemical carcinogenesis. Therefore, investigation of the differences between mammary glands from virgin and parous rats would provide valuable information regarding the protective effects of early full-term pregnancy. In this report, we examined the gene expression patterns in mammary glands from virgin and parous Lewis rats. Using differential display technology, a novel 4.2 kb cDNA, designated rat mammary tumor-1 (RMT-1) was isolated. Northern blot analysis of RMT-1 showed that RMT-1 expression was higher in the pre-pubertal and pubertal stages during rat mammary gland development while it was down-regulated in mammary glands from mature virgin and parous rats. RMT-1 expression was highest in rat mammary cancers compared with either the mammary glands of virgin or parous rats. At the Northern blot sensitivity level, RMT-1 expression was found only in the mammary gland. Northern blot analysis also showed that the expression of this gene was found in 74% of N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mammary cancers while it was not found in MNU-induced cancers from other organs. The examination of the RMT-1 gene structure revealed that it consists of five exons spanning 5.9 kb. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the gene was localized on rat chromosome 1 band q 43-51. The present data show that there is a correlation between high RMT-1 expression and rat mammary carcinogenesis or decreased RMT-1 expression and parity associated refractoriness to chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. However, whether or not RMT-1 gene has a functional role in these processes remains to be investigated.

  14. P-Cadherin Expression in Feline Mammary Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Figueira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for molecular markers in the feline mammary gland, namely, the adhesion molecules belonging to the cadherin family, is useful in the understanding of the development of mammary carcinomas in felines and humans. To study P-cadherin expression in the feline mammary gland, 61 samples of normal (n=4, hyperplastic (n=12, and neoplastic (n=45 feline mammary tissues were examined. In both normal and hyperplastic mammary tissues as well as in benign tumours, P-cadherin immunolabelling was restricted to myoepithelial cells. In malignant tumours, however, there was an aberrant epithelial P-cadherin immunoexpression in 64.1% (n=25 of cases, with a membranous and/or cytoplasmic pattern of distribution. A statistically significant relationship was seen between epithelial P-cadherin expression and malignant mammary lesions (P=0.0001. In malignant mammary tumours, there was likewise a statistically significant relationship between aberrant P-cadherin immunoexpression and histological grade (P=0.0132. Aberrant epithelial P-cadherin expression seems to be related to malignancy in the feline mammary gland. To confirm the results of this investigation, further studies with larger samples and follow-up studies are warranted.

  15. Bovine mammary stem cells: Cell biology meets production agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary stem cells (MaSC) provide for net growth, renewal and turnover of mammary epithelial cells, and are therefore potential targets for strategies to increase production efficiency. Appropriate regulation of MaSC can potentially benefit milk yield, persistency, dry period management and tissue ...

  16. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Cissy Yu; Verheyen, Esther M.; Yi Arial Zeng

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology.

  17. Resident macrophages influence stem cell activity in the mammary gland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyorki, D.E.; Asselin-Labat, M.L.; Rooijen, van N.; Lindeman, G.J.; Visvader, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophages in the mammary gland are essential for morphogenesis of the ductal epithelial tree and have been implicated in promoting breast tumor metastasis. Although it is well established that macrophages influence normal mammopoiesis, the mammary cell types that these accessory cells

  18. 9 CFR 310.17 - Inspection of mammary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... mammary glands and diseased mammary glands of cattle, sheep, swine, and goats shall be removed without..., swine, and goats shall not be saved for edible purposes. (d) The udders from cows officially designated as “Brucellosis reactors” or as “Mastitis elimination cows” shall be condemned....

  19. Autophagy mitigates metabolic stress and genome damage in mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantza-Wadsworth, Vassiliki; Patel, Shyam; Kravchuk, Olga; Chen, Guanghua; Mathew, Robin; Jin, Shengkan; White, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving self-digestion of cellular organelles during starvation as a means of cell survival; however, if it proceeds to completion, autophagy can lead to cell death. Autophagy is also a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor mechanism for mammary tumorigenesis, as the essential autophagy regulator beclin1 is monoallelically deleted in breast carcinomas. However, the mechanism by which autophagy suppresses breast cancer remains elusive. Here we show that allelic loss of beclin1 and defective autophagy sensitized mammary epithelial cells to metabolic stress and accelerated lumen formation in mammary acini. Autophagy defects also activated the DNA damage response in vitro and in mammary tumors in vivo, promoted gene amplification, and synergized with defective apoptosis to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Therefore, we propose that autophagy limits metabolic stress to protect the genome, and that defective autophagy increases DNA damage and genomic instability that ultimately facilitate breast cancer progression. PMID:17606641

  20. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  1. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  2. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  3. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Rodilla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  4. Mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eBoutinaud

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk is produced in the udder by mammary epithelial cells (MEC. Milk contains MEC, which are gradually exfoliated from the epithelium during lactation. Isolation of MEC from milk using immunomagnetic separation may be a useful non-invasive method to investigate transcriptional regulations in ruminants’ udder. This review aims to describe the process of isolating MEC from milk, to provide an overview on the studies that use this method to analyze gene expression by qRT PCR and to evaluate the validity of this method by analysing and comparing the results between studies. In several goat and cow studies, consistent reductions in alpha-lactalbumin mRNA levels during once-daily milking (ODM and in SLC2A1 mRNA level during feed restriction are observed. The effect of ODM on alpha-lactalbumin mRNA level was similarly observed in milk isolated MEC and mammary biopsy. Moreover, we and others showed decreasing alpha-lactalbumin and increasing BAX mRNA levels with advanced stages of lactation in dairy cows and buffalo. The relevance of using the milk-isolated MEC method to analyze mammary gene expression is proven, as the transcript variations were also consistent with milk yield and composition variations under the effect of different factors such as prolactin inhibition or photoperiod. . However, the RNA from milk-isolated MEC is particularly sensitive to degradation. This could explain the differences obtained between milk-isolated MEC and mammary biopsy in two studies where gene expression was compared using qRT-PCR or RNA Sequencing analyses. As a conclusion, when the RNA quality is conserved, MEC isolated from milk are a valuable, non-invasive source of mammary mRNA to study various factors that impact milk yield and composition (ODM, feeding level, endocrine status, photoperiod modulation and stage of lactation.

  5. Alcohol exposure in utero leads to enhanced prepubertal mammary development and alterations in mammary IGF and estradiol systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Tiffany A; Crismale-Gann, Catina; Cohick, Wendie S

    2011-08-01

    Exposure to alcohol during fetal development increases susceptibility to mammary cancer in adult rats. This study determined if early changes in mammary morphology and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/estradiol axis are involved in the mechanisms that underlie this increased susceptibility. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% ethanol (alcohol), an isocaloric liquid diet (pair-fed), or rat chow ad libitum from days 11 to 21 of gestation. At birth, female pups were cross-fostered to ad libitum-fed control dams. Offspring were euthanized at postnatal days (PND) 20, 40, or 80. Animals were injected with BrdU before euthanasia, then mammary glands, serum, and livers were collected. Mammary glands from animals exposed to alcohol in utero displayed increased epithelial cell proliferation and aromatase expression at PND 20 and 40. Mammary IGF-I mRNA was higher in alcohol-exposed animals relative to controls at PND 20, while mammary IGFBP-5 mRNA was lower in this group at PND 40. Hepatic IGF-I mRNA expression was increased at all time points in alcohol-exposed animals, however, circulating IGF-I levels were not altered. These data indicate that alcohol exposure in utero may advance mammary development via the IGF and estradiol systems, which could contribute to increased susceptibility to mammary cancer later in life.

  6. Development of mammary glands of fat sheep submitted to restricted feeding during late pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, J V; Nielsen, M O; Theil, P K;

    2008-01-01

    Mammary gland development in sheep occurs mainly during puberty and pregnancy. We have investigated the effects of a late gestation feed restriction on mammary gland development in sheep.......Mammary gland development in sheep occurs mainly during puberty and pregnancy. We have investigated the effects of a late gestation feed restriction on mammary gland development in sheep....

  7. Mammary gland pathologies in the parturient buffalo

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    G N Purohit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parturition related mammary gland pathologies in the buffalo appear to be low on accord of anatomic (longer teat length, thicker streak canal and physiologic (lower cisternal storage of secreted milk, lower milk production differences with cattle. Hemolactia, udder edema and hypogalactia usually occur in the buffalo due to physiologic changes around parturition however mastitis involves pathologic changes in the udder and teats; the incidence of mastitis is however lower compared to cattle. The incidence and therapy of hemolactia, udder edema and hypogalactia are mentioned and the risk factors, incidence, diagnosis, therapy and prevention for mastitis in buffalo are also described.

  8. Mammary fibroadenoma with pleomorphic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Najla; Kallel, Rim; Ellouze, Sameh; Mellouli, Manel; Gouiaa, Naourez; Mnif, Héla; Boudawara, Tahia

    2015-01-01

    The presence of enlarged and pleomorphic nuclei is usually regarded as a feature of malignancy, but it may on occasion be seen in benign lesions such as mammary fibroadenomas. We present such a case of fibroadenoma occurring in a 37-year-old woman presenting with a self-palpable right breast mass. Histological examination of the tumor revealed the presence of multi and mononucleated giant cells with pleomorphic nuclei. The recognition of the benign nature of these cells is necessary for differential diagnosis from malignant lesions of the breast. fibroadenoma - pleomorphic stromal cells - atypia - breast.

  9. Contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase to mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell differentiation in part modulates inhibitor of differentiation-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Mehdi A; Monks, Jenifer; Farabaugh, Susan M; Wright, Richard M

    2011-09-01

    Loss of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been linked to aggressive breast cancer in vivo and to breast cancer cell aggressiveness in vitro. In the present study, we hypothesized that the contribution of XOR to the development of the normal mammary gland may underlie its capacity to modulate breast cancer. We contrasted in vitro and in vivo developmental systems by differentiation marker and microarray analyses. Human breast cancer microarray was used for clinical outcome studies. The role of XOR in differentiation and proliferation was examined in human breast cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft model. Our data show that XOR was required for functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Poor XOR expression was observed in a mouse ErbB2 breast cancer model, and pharmacologic inhibition of XOR increased breast cancer tumor burden in mouse xenograft. mRNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer revealed that low XOR expression was significantly associated with time to tumor relapse. The opposing expression of XOR and inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during HC11 differentiation and mammary gland development suggested a potential functional relationship. While overexpression of Id1 inhibited HC11 differentiation and XOR expression, XOR itself modulated expression of Id1 in differentiating HC11 cells. Overexpression of XOR both inhibited Id1-induced proliferation and -stimulated differentiation of Heregulin-β1-treated human breast cancer cells. These results show that XOR is an important functional component of differentiation whose diminished expression contributes to breast cancer aggressiveness, and they support XOR as both a breast cancer biomarker and a target for pharmacologic activation in therapeutic management of aggressive breast cancer.

  10. Role of ERalpha in the differential response of Stat5a loss in susceptibility to mammary preneoplasia and DMBA-induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miermont, Anne M; Parrish, Angela R; Furth, Priscilla A

    2010-06-01

    Deregulated estrogen signaling is evidently linked to breast cancer pathophysiology, although the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)5a, integral to normal mammary gland development, is less clear. A mouse model of mammary epithelial cell-targeted deregulated estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) expression [conditional ERalpha in mammary epithelium (CERM)] was crossed with mice carrying a germ line deletion of Stat5a [Stat5a-/-] to investigate interactions between ERalpha and Stat5a in mammary tissue. CERM, CERM/Stat5a+/-, CERM/Stat5a-/-, Stat5a+/-, Stat5a-/- and wild-type (WT) mice were generated to test the roles of ERalpha and Stat5a on pubertal differentiation and cancer progression with and without exposure to the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Only CERM/Stat5a-/- mice demonstrated delayed pubertal terminal end bud differentiation. Without DMBA exposure, Stat5a loss abrogated ERalpha-initiated hyperplastic alveolar nodule (HAN) development and, similarly, Stat5a-/- mice did not develop HANs. However, although Stat5a loss still reduced ERalpha-initiated HAN prevalence following DMBA exposure, Stat5a loss without deregulated ERalpha was associated with an increased HAN prevalence compared with WT. Progression to ERalpha(+) and ERalpha(-) adenocarcinoma was found in all CERM-containing genotypes (CERM, CERM/Stat5a+/-, CERM/Stat5a-/-) and ERalpha(+) adenocarcinoma in the Stat5a-/- genotype. The mammary epithelial cell proliferative index was increased only in CERM mice independent of Stat5a loss. No differences in apoptotic indices were found. In summary, Stat5a cooperated with deregulated ERalpha in retarding pubertal mammary differentiation and contributed to ERalpha-initiated preneoplasia, but its loss did not prevent development of invasive cancer. Moreover, in the absence of deregulated ERalpha, Stat5a loss was associated with development of both HANs and invasive cancer following DMBA exposure.

  11. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

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    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  12. Extra-mammary findings in breast MRI

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    Rinaldi, Pierluigi; Costantini, M.; Belli, P.; Giuliani, M.; Bufi, E.; Fubelli, R.; Distefano, D.; Romani, M.; Bonomo, L. [Catholic University - Policlinic A. Gemelli, Department of Bio-Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Incidental extra-mammary findings in breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) may be benign in nature, but may also represent a metastasis or another important lesion. We aimed to analyse the prevalence and clinical relevance of these unexpected findings. A retrospective review of 1535 breast MRIs was conducted. Only axial sequences were reassessed. Confirmation examinations were obtained in all cases. 285 patients had a confirmed incidental finding, which were located in the liver (51.9%), lung (11.2%), bone (7%), mediastinal lymph nodes (4.2%) or consisted of pleural/pericardial effusion (15.4%). 20.4% of incidental findings were confirmed to be malignant. Positive predictive value for MRI to detect a metastatic lesion was high if located within the bone (89%), lymph nodes (83%) and lung (59%), while it was low if located within the liver (9%) or if it consisted of pleural/pericardial effusion (6%). The axial enhanced sequence showed superior sensitivity to unenhanced images in detecting metastatic lesions, especially if only smaller ({<=}10 mm.) lesions were considered. The prevalence of metastatic incidental extra-mammary findings is not negligible. Particular attention should be to incidental findings located within the lung, bone and mediastinal lymph nodes. (orig.)

  13. A review of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Tanaka, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    Breast carcinoma and hyperplasia are thought to start in the lining of the breast duct. Mammary ductoscopy is an emerging technique allowing direct visual access of the ductal system of the breast through the nipple. This article reviews and discusses the utility of mammary ductoscopy. Abnormalities can be identified successfully by mammary ductoscopy, and intraductal biopsy can be used when the tumor is a polypoid type. Ductal lavage using microcatheters is effective in identifying malignant cells in high-risk women and this has stimulated interest in exploring the role of mammary ductoscopy in breast cancer screening. Mammary ductoscopy combined with ductal lavage may have a role in the management of patients with nipple discharge, the guiding of breast-conserving surgery for cancer, and in screening for high-risk women. The addition of molecular and genetic analysis of cells obtained by mammary ductoscopy are likely to enhance the use of this technique. Mammary ductoscopy techniques are safe and appear useful for detecting abnormalities in the breast. The additional molecular biologic study or ductal lavage may enhance the ability to direct and limit subsequent surgery when removing the offending lesions.

  14. 局部湿热联合微波消融对乳腺癌荷瘤小鼠肿瘤生长和血清干扰素-γ、白细胞介素-12的影响%The effects of local wet hyperthermia combined with microwave ablation on tumor growth and serum levels of interferon-β and interleukine-12 in mouse models of mammary carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周涯; 徐林; 任社华

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of local wet hyperthermia combined with microwave ablationon tumor growth and serum levels of interferon-β(IFN-β)and interleukine-12(IL-12).Methods An experimental mouse model beating mammary carcinoma was established in Balb/c mice and then treated with microwave ablation after 14 d.Seven d after ablation,local wet hyperthermia was administered once weekly for 2 weeks.Tumor growth and lung metastasis,as well as the survival of bearing tumor mice were observed.The serum levels of IFN-β and IL-12 were detected with enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay(ELISA). Results When local wet hyperthermia was combined with microwave ablation tumor growth and lung metastasis were significantly less than when microwave ablation or local wet hyperthermia was used alone(P<0.05).Furthermore,the survival of bearing tumor mice in combined therapy group prolonged significantly compared with those receiving either therapy alone(P<0.05).Serum levels of IFN-β and IL-12 were also significantly higher in combined therapy group compared with the other groups (P<0.05). Conclusions Local wet hyperthermia combined with microwave ablation is more effective than either local wet hyperthermia or microwave ablation alone in retarding tumor growth,which may be related to the enhanced immune response.%目的 研究局部湿热联合微波消融对肿瘤生长和血清干扰素-γ(IFN-γ)、白细胞介素-12(IL-12)的影响,并探讨其意义.方法 48只Balb/c小鼠随机分为荷瘤未处理组、微波消融组、局部湿热组、微波消融+局部湿热组,每组12只.先建立小鼠乳腺癌实验动物模型,14 d后进行微波消融处理,再过7 d后进行局部湿热处理,每周1次,共2次.观察各组肿瘤生长情况、生存情况和肺转移情况,并用酶联免疫吸附法检测血清IFN-γ、IL-12的变化.结果 微波消融+局部湿热组的肿瘤牛长大小和肺转移指数明显低于微波消融组和局部湿热组(P<0

  15. Genetic suppression reveals DNA repair-independent antagonism between BRCA1 and COBRA1 in mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejith J; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Jahid, Md Jamiul; Wang, Yao; Garza, Paula; April, Craig; Salathia, Neeraj; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Alenazi, Fahad S; Ruan, Jianhua; Fan, Jian-Bing; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Jin, Victor X; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2016-03-04

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is well known for its function in double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair. While BRCA1 is also implicated in transcriptional regulation, the physiological significance remains unclear. COBRA1 (also known as NELF-B) is a BRCA1-binding protein that regulates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) pausing and transcription elongation. Here we interrogate functional interaction between BRCA1 and COBRA1 during mouse mammary gland development. Tissue-specific deletion of Cobra1 reduces mammary epithelial compartments and blocks ductal morphogenesis, alveologenesis and lactogenesis, demonstrating a pivotal role of COBRA1 in adult tissue development. Remarkably, these developmental deficiencies due to Cobra1 knockout are largely rescued by additional loss of full-length Brca1. Furthermore, Brca1/Cobra1 double knockout restores developmental transcription at puberty, alters luminal epithelial homoeostasis, yet remains deficient in homologous recombination-based DSB repair. Thus our genetic suppression analysis uncovers a previously unappreciated, DNA repair-independent function of BRCA1 in antagonizing COBRA1-dependent transcription programme during mammary gland development.

  16. SCA-1 Identifies the Tumor-Initiating Cells in Mammary Tumors of BALB-neuT Transgenic Mice

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    Cristina Grange

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells, initiating and sustaining the tumor process, have been isolated in human and murine breast cancer using different cell markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the presence and characteristics of stem/tumor-initiating cells in the model of the mouse mammary neoplasia driven by the activated form of rat Her-2/neu oncogene (BALB-neuT mice. For this purpose, we generated tumor spheres from primary spontaneous BALB-neuT tumors. Tumor sphere cultures were characterized for clonogenicity, self-renewal, and ability to differentiate in epithelial/myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland expressing basal and luminal cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. In addition, tumor spheres were more resistant to doxorubicin compared with parental tumor cells. In the attempt to identify a selected marker for the sphere-generating cells, we found that Sca-1+ cells, present in tumors or enriched in mammospheres, and not CD24+ or CD29+ cells, were responsible for the sphere generation in vitro. Moreover, cells from the tumor spheres showed an increased tumor-generating ability in respect to the epithelial tumor cells. Sca-1+ sorted cells or clonal mammospheres derived from a Sca-1+ cell showed a superimposable tumor-initiating ability. The data of the present study indicate that a Sca-1+ population derived from mammary BALB-neuT tumors is responsible for sphere generation in culture and for initiating tumors in vivo.

  17. Miz1 deficiency in the mammary gland causes a lactation defect by attenuated Stat5 expression and phosphorylation.

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    Adrián Sanz-Moreno

    Full Text Available Miz1 is a zinc finger transcription factor with an N-terminal POZ domain. Complexes with Myc, Bcl-6 or Gfi-1 repress expression of genes like Cdkn2b (p15(Ink4 or Cdkn1a (p21(Cip1. The role of Miz1 in normal mammary gland development has not been addressed so far. Conditional knockout of the Miz1 POZ domain in luminal cells during pregnancy caused a lactation defect with a transient reduction of glandular tissue, reduced proliferation and attenuated differentiation. This was recapitulated in vitro using mouse mammary gland derived HC11 cells. Further analysis revealed decreased Stat5 activity in Miz1ΔPOZ mammary glands and an attenuated expression of Stat5 targets. Gene expression of the Prolactin receptor (PrlR and ErbB4, both critical for Stat5 phosphorylation (pStat5 or pStat5 nuclear translocation, was decreased in Miz1ΔPOZ females. Microarray, ChIP-Seq and gene set enrichment analysis revealed a down-regulation of Miz1 target genes being involved in vesicular transport processes. Our data suggest that deranged intracellular transport and localization of PrlR and ErbB4 disrupt the Stat5 signalling pathway in mutant glands and cause the observed lactation phenotype.

  18. Ablation of beta1 integrin in mammary epithelium reveals a key role for integrin in glandular morphogenesis and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Matthew J; Li, Na; Cheung, Julia; Lowe, Emma T; Lambert, Elise; Marlow, Rebecca; Wang, Pengbo; Schatzmann, Franziska; Wintermantel, Timothy; Schüetz, Günther; Clarke, Alan R; Mueller, Ulrich; Hynes, Nancy E; Streuli, Charles H

    2005-11-21

    Integrin-mediated adhesion regulates the development and function of a range of tissues; however, little is known about its role in glandular epithelium. To assess the contribution of beta1 integrin, we conditionally deleted its gene in luminal epithelia during different stages of mouse mammary gland development and in cultured primary mammary epithelia. Loss of beta1 integrin in vivo resulted in impaired alveologenesis and lactation. Cultured beta1 integrin-null cells displayed abnormal focal adhesion function and signal transduction and could not form or maintain polarized acini. In vivo, epithelial cells became detached from the extracellular matrix but remained associated with each other and did not undergo overt apoptosis. beta1 integrin-null mammary epithelial cells did not differentiate in response to prolactin stimulation because of defective Stat5 activation. In mice where beta1 integrin was deleted after the initiation of differentiation, fewer defects in alveolar morphology occurred, yet major deficiencies were also observed in milk protein and milk fat production and Stat5 activation, indicating a permissive role for beta1 integrins in prolactin signaling. This study demonstrates that beta1 integrin is critical for the alveolar morphogenesis of a glandular epithelium and for maintenance of its differentiated function. Moreover, it provides genetic evidence for the cooperation between integrin and cytokine signaling pathways.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF OVARIECTOMY ON THE SPONTANEOUS OCCURRENCE OF MAMMARY CARCINOMAS IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cori, Carl F.

    1927-01-01

    1. Castration of female mice between 15 and 22 days of age entirely prevented the occurrence of spontaneous adenocarcinoma of the breast, while the non-breeding control mice of the same strain showed a tumor incidence of 78.5 per cent. 3 of the spayed animals developed a spontaneous spindle cell sarcoma. This indicates that the influence of the ovary on the development of breast carcinomas is a specific one, since ovariectomy does not lead to a resistance against other types of spontaneous tumors. 2. Castration between 2 and 6 months of age led to a marked reduction of the tumor incidence, but did not entirely prevent the occurrence of mammary tumors. 3. It is concluded that the spontaneous mammary carcinoma of the mouse is due to a hereditary organ disposition, which remains latent in the absence of ovarian function, but which becomes manifest when a certain amount of ovarian hormone, corresponding to 5 to 30 estrus cycles, has acted on the breast tissue. PMID:19869313

  20. Truncating Prolactin Receptor Mutations Promote Tumor Growth in Murine Estrogen Receptor-Alpha Mammary Carcinomas

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    Obi L. Griffith

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ERα+ luminal tumors are the most frequent subtype of breast cancer. Stat1−/− mice develop mammary tumors that closely recapitulate the biological characteristics of this cancer subtype. To identify transforming events that contribute to tumorigenesis, we performed whole genome sequencing of Stat1−/− primary mammary tumors and matched normal tissues. This investigation identified somatic truncating mutations affecting the prolactin receptor (PRLR in all tumor and no normal samples. Targeted sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations in precancerous lesions, indicating that this is an early event in tumorigenesis. Functional evaluation of these heterozygous mutations in Stat1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that co-expression of truncated and wild-type PRLR led to aberrant STAT3 and STAT5 activation downstream of the receptor, cellular transformation in vitro, and tumor formation in vivo. In conclusion, truncating mutations of PRLR promote tumor growth in a model of human ERα+ breast cancer and warrant further investigation.

  1. Basal lamina inhibition suppresses synthesis of calcium-dependent proteins associated with mammary epithelial cell spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, V; Hom, Y K; Marinkovich, M P

    1986-08-01

    Spreading of mouse mammary epithelial cells on collagen gels is closely correlated with the synthesis of a group of putative calcium-binding proteins (CBP) (Braslau et al., Exp cell res 155 (1984) 213). Collagen synthesis was shown to occur during cell spreading, while omission of serum prevented cell spreading and the synthesis of collagen. The proline analogues cis-hydroxyproline and L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid were shown to inhibit epithelial cell spreading and to suppress the collagen synthesis that occurs during serum-supported cell spreading. Inhibition of collagen synthesis resulted in the inhibition of CBP synthesis associated with cell spreading. In contrast, the collagen cross-linking inhibitor B-aminopropionitrile did not inhibit cell spreading nor did it suppress collagen synthesis; CBP synthesis was also normal during treatment with this inhibitor. Thus, mammary epithelial cell spreading on collagen gels and CBP synthesis can both be suppressed by inhibition of collagen synthesis indicating that they may be integrated in some manner. It is suggested that inhibition of cell spreading during inhibition of collagen synthesis results from failure to assemble a normal basal lamina; this may in turn signal suppression of CBP synthesis.

  2. Mammary artery harvesting using the Da Vinci Si robotic system

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    Leonardo Secchin Canale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Internal mammary artery harvesting is an essential part of any coronary artery bypass operation. Totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery has become reality in many centers as a safe and effective alternative to conventional surgery in selected patients. Internal mammary artery harvesting is the initial part of the procedure and should be performed equally safely if one wants to achieve excellence in patency rates for the bypass. We here describe the technique for mammary harvesting with the Da Vinci Si robotic system.

  3. Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    breast is highly expressed by luminal epithelial cells and is less expressed by basal cells19,20. In contrast, CD49f (a6 integrin) has an inverse pattern...mouse stretched on its back. The hose and nose cone from the anesthetic vaporizer are securely attached to one side of the plate, and a heated pad is...the mouse by a nose cone. Check that the mouse has reached surgical anesthesia by loss of pedal withdrawal reflex . ! cautIon Institutional review

  4. Conditional Deletion of Shp2 in the Mammary Gland Leads to Impaired Lobulo-alveolar Outgrowth and Attenuated Stat5 Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yuehai; Lesperance, Jacqueline; Zhang, Eric E.; Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Oshima, Robert G.; Muller, William J.; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Stat5 and Stat3, two members of the Stat (signal transducer and activator of transcription) family, are known to play critical roles in mammopoiesis/lactogenesis and involution, respectively, in the mammary gland. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase Shp2 has been shown to dephosphorylate and thus inactivate both Stat5 and Stat3 in vitro. Paradoxically, cell culture studies also suggest a positive role of Shp2 in promoting prolactin-stimulated Stat5 activation. We have shown here that selective deletion of Shp2 in mouse mammary glands suppresses Stat5 activity during pregnancy and lactation, resulting in significant impairment of lobulo-alveolar outgrowth and lactation. In contrast, Stat3 activity was slightly up-regulated shortly before/at involution, leading to normal epithelial cell apoptosis/involution in Shp2-deficient mammary gland. Thus, Shp2 acts to promote Stat5 activation by the JAK2·prolactin receptor complex, while negatively modulating Stat3 activity before the onset of involution. This is the first demonstration that Shp2 manipulates Stat5 and Stat3 activities reciprocally in mammary epithelial cells, providing novel insight into the complex mechanisms for regulation of various Stat family members by a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase. PMID:16959766

  5. pRb inactivation in mammary cells reveals common mechanisms for tumor initiation and progression in divergent epithelia.

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    Karl Simin

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma 1 (pRb and the related pocket proteins, retinoblastoma-like 1 (p107 and retinoblastoma-like 2 (p130 (pRb(f, collectively, play a pivotal role in regulating eukaryotic cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and terminal differentiation. While aberrations in the pRb-signaling pathway are common in human cancers, the consequence of pRb(f loss in the mammary gland has not been directly assayed in vivo. We reported previously that inactivating these critical cell cycle regulators in divergent cell types, either brain epithelium or astrocytes, abrogates the cell cycle restriction point, leading to increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and predisposing to cancer. Here we report that mouse mammary epithelium is similar in its requirements for pRb(f function; Rb(f inactivation by T(121, a fragment of SV40 T antigen that binds to and inactivates pRb(f proteins, increases proliferation and apoptosis. Mammary adenocarcinomas form within 16 mo. Most apoptosis is regulated by p53, which has no impact on proliferation, and heterozygosity for a p53 null allele significantly shortens tumor latency. Most tumors in p53 heterozygous mice undergo loss of the wild-type p53 allele. We show that the mechanism of p53 loss of heterozygosity is not simply the consequence of Chromosome 11 aneuploidy and further that chromosomal instability subsequent to p53 loss is minimal. The mechanisms for pRb and p53 tumor suppression in the epithelia of two distinct tissues, mammary gland and brain, are indistinguishable. Further, this study has produced a highly penetrant breast cancer model based on aberrations commonly observed in the human disease.

  6. Modeling prolactin actions in breast cancer in vivo: insights from the NRL-PRL mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kathleen A; Shea, Michael P; Schuler, Linda A

    2015-01-01

    Elevated exposure to prolactin (PRL) is epidemiologically associated with an increased risk of aggressive ER+ breast cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms and crosstalk with other oncogenic factors, we developed the NRL-PRL mouse. In this model, mammary expression of a rat prolactin transgene raises local exposure to PRL without altering estrous cycling. Nulliparous females develop metastatic, histotypically diverse mammary carcinomas independent from ovarian steroids, and most are ER+. These characteristics resemble the human clinical disease, facilitating study of tumorigenesis, and identification of novel preventive and therapeutic approaches.

  7. Vaginal myofibroblastoma with glands expressing mammary and prostatic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenfels, I; Chlumská, A

    2012-01-01

    A case of unusual vaginal myofibroblastoma containing glands which expressed mammary and prostatic markers is described. The tumor occurred in 70-year-old woman in the proximal third of the vagina. It showed morphology and immunophenotype typical of so-called cervicovaginal myofibroblastoma. The peripheral zone of the lesion contained a few groups of glands suggesting vaginal adenosis or prostatic-type glands on initial examination. The glands showed a surprising simultaneous expression of mammary markers mammaglobin and GCDFP-15 and prostatic markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). Immunostains for alpha-smooth muscle actin, p63 and CD10 highlighted the myoepithelial cell layer of the glands. The finding indicates that simultaneous use of both mammary and prostatic markers for examination of unusual glandular lesions in the vulvovaginal location can be helpful for an exact diagnosis, and can contribute to better understanding of prostatic and mammary differentiations in the female lower genital tract.

  8. A bioluminescence reporter mouse that monitors expression of constitutively active β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Peavey, Mary C.; Hai, Lan; Lonard, David M.; Lydon, John P.

    2017-01-01

    This short technical report describes the generation and characterization of a bioluminescence reporter mouse that is engineered to detect and longitudinally monitor the expression of doxycycline-induced constitutively active β-catenin. The new responder transgenic mouse contains the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgene, which consists of the tet-operator followed by a bicistronic sequence encoding a stabilized form of active β-catenin (ΔN89β-catenin), an internal ribosome entry site, and the firefly luciferase gene. To confirm that the transgene operates as designed, TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic mouse lines were crossed with an effector mouse that harbors the mouse mammary tumor virus-reverse tetracycline transactivator (MMTV-rtTA) transgene (termed MTB hereon), which primarily targets rtTA expression to the mammary epithelium. Following doxycycline administration, the resultant MTB/CatTMILA bigenic reporter exhibited precocious lobuloalveologenesis, ductal hyperplasia, and mammary adenocarcinomas, which were visualized and monitored by in vivo bioluminescence detection. Therefore, we predict that the TetO-ΔN89β-CatTMILA transgenic responder mouse—when crossed with the appropriate effector transgenic—will have wide-applicability to non-invasively monitor the influence of constitutively active β-catenin expression on cell-fate specification, proliferation, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation in a broad spectrum of target tissues. PMID:28253313

  9. The biology of progesterone receptor in the normal mammary gland and in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obr, Alison E; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-06-24

    This paper reviews work on progesterone and the progesterone receptor (PR) in the mouse mammary gland that has been used extensively as an experimental model. Studies have led to the concept that progesterone controls proliferation and morphogenesis of the luminal epithelium in a tightly orchestrated manner at distinct stages of development by paracrine signaling pathways, including receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) as a major paracrine factor. Progesterone also drives expansion of stem cells by paracrine signals to generate progenitors required for alveologenesis. During mid-to-late pregnancy, progesterone has another role to suppress secretory activation until parturition mediated in part by crosstalk between PR and prolactin/Stat5 signaling to inhibit induction of milk protein gene expression, and by inhibiting tight junction closure. In models of hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumors, the progesterone/PR signaling axis enhances pre-neoplastic progression by a switch from a paracrine to an autocrine mode of proliferation and dysregulation of the RANKL signaling pathway. Limited experiments with normal human breast show that progesterone/PR signaling also stimulates epithelial cell proliferation by a paracrine mechanism; however, the signaling pathways and whether RANKL is a major mediator remains unknown. Work with human breast cancer cell lines, patient tumor samples and clinical studies indicates that progesterone is a risk factor for breast cancer and that alteration in progesterone/PR signaling pathways contributes to early stage human breast cancer progression. However, loss of PR expression in primary tumors is associated with a less differentiated more invasive phenotype and worse prognosis, suggesting that PR may limit later stages of tumor progression.

  10. Improved radioimmunoscintigraphy of human mammary carcinoma xenografts after injection of an anti-antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senekowitsch, R.; Bode, W.; Glaessner, H.; Moellenstaedt, S.; Kriegel, H.; Reidel, G.; Pabst, H.W.

    1987-02-01

    The low tumor-to-background ratio obtained after administration of radiolabeled whole monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is one of the major problems in immunoscintigraphy and -therapy. To reduce the blood pool label caused by the circulation of radiolabeled MAb we have investigated the advantage of injecting an anti-antibody after administration of tumor-specific MAb in nude mice bearing human mammary carcinoma xenografts. The MAb MA 10-11 of rat origin, used in these studies, had shown a high affinity to human mammary carcinoma tissue on frozen sections and low cross-reactivity with various normal human tissues. 24 h after injection of 1.5 MBq /sup 131/I-labeled MAb containing 10 ..mu..g IgG/sub 2a/ one group of mice received an additional injection of 100 ..mu..g anti-rat antibody. Blood taken 2 min after the second antibody injection showed nearly the whole activity bound to antibody aggregates, that cleared very rapidly from the circulation and accumulated in liver and spleen. The transitory high liver activity decreased within several hours because of rapid deiodination of the antibody-complex in this organ. The release of radioactivity from the spleen, however, was found to be much slower. The rapid excretion of the radioactivity from the blood pool combined with a nearly constant tumor activity allowed early tumor detection with tumor-to-blood ratios of 250:1 at 48 h after anti-antibody injection compared to 1.1:1 obtained for the control animals. In addition the results may explain the reported reduction of imaging quality and high uptake of radioactivity in the spleen of patients having repeated injections of mouse MAbs due to complex formation after development of human anti-mouse antibodies

  11. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  12. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  13. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1991-05-31

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. During the end of the last grant year and the first half of the current grant year, we have completed analyses and summarized for publication: investigations on the relationship between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamicpituitary axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH- (thyrotropin-) responsive sub-population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and the results of the large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. We are testing new techniques for the culture, cytofluorescent analysis and characterization mammary epithelial cells and of clonogens in a parallel project, and plan to apply similar technology to the thyroid epithelial cells and clonogen population. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cells interactions during the neoplastic process.

  14. Differential Acupuncture Treatment of Hyperplasia of Mammary Glands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进才

    2002-01-01

    @@ Hyperplasia of mammary glands is a common disease in the middle-aged women, and it is a precancerous lesion of mammary glands. For many years, the author has used Rugen (ST 18) of the Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming as the main point withcertain auxiliary points chosen on basis of the differentiation types to treat the disease and obtained satisfactory therapeutic effects. A report follows.

  15. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    OpenAIRE

    Bissacot Denise Z; Bersano Paulo RO; Figueiroa Fernanda C; Andrade Fábio HE; Rocha Noeme S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethr...

  16. Expression and significance of CHIP in canine mammary gland tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huanan; Yang, Xu; Jin, Yipeng; Pei, Shimin; Zhang, Di; Ma, Wen; Huang, Jian; QIU, Hengbin; Zhang, Xinke; JIANG, Qiuyue; Sun, Weidong; Zhang, Hong; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    CHIP (Carboxy terminus of Hsc70 Interacting Protein) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that can induce ubiquitination and degradation of several oncogenic proteins. The expression of CHIP is frequently lower in human breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. However, the expression and role of CHIP in the canine mammary gland tumor (CMGT) remain unclear. We investigated the potential correlation between CHIP expression and mammary gland tumor prognosis in female dogs. CHIP expression was measured i...

  17. Sequencing the transcriptome of milk production: milk trumps mammary tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Lemay, Danielle G; Hovey, Russell C.; Hartono, Stella R; Hinde, Katie; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ventimiglia, Frank; Schmidt, Kimberli A; Lee, Joyce WS; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Silva, Pedro Ivo; Korf, Ian; Medrano, Juan F.; Barry, Peter A.; German, J. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies of normal human mammary gland development and function have mostly relied on cell culture, limited surgical specimens, and rodent models. Although RNA extracted from human milk has been used to assay the mammary transcriptome non-invasively, this assay has not been adequately validated in primates. Thus, the objectives of the current study were to assess the suitability of lactating rhesus macaques as a model for lactating ...

  18. Integrin Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Arthur W.; Sait Ozturk; Sam Thiagalingam

    2012-01-01

    Cells sense and respond to the extracellular matrix (ECM) by way of integrin receptors, which facilitate cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Advances in understanding the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy are converging with new developments that reveal how integrins regulate the normal mammary gland. But in breast cancer, integrin signaling contributes to the development and progression of tumors. This paper highlights recent studies which examine the role of integrin signaling in mam...

  19. Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiguo; Feng, Jing; Chen, Ceshi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in mammary gland development and breast cancer. Key components of the Hippo pathway regulate breast epithelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and stemness. Additionally, the Hippo pathway regulates breast tumor growth, metastasis, and drug resistance. It is expected that the Hippo pathway will provide novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer. This review will discuss and summarize the roles of several core components of the Hippo pathway in mammary gland development and breast cancer.

  20. Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0509 TITLE: Role of p53 Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Goberdhan P. Dimri, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ...type and However, Mucl , K-18, and ASMA were not expressed in luminal cell type groups [12,68]. Interestingly, a significant cells present in...13,17,27], the has also attracted a great interest in the field of breast cancer candidate mammary stem cells appear to be ESA+, Mucl -, research, and

  1. Immunohistochemical characterization of mammary squamous cell carcinoma of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Francesco; Sarli, Giuseppe; Brunetti, Barbara; Morandi, Federico; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2008-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the mammary gland is rare in both veterinary and human medicine. Whereas human metaplastic and squamous variants are known, the objectives of the current study were to ascertain the presence of such entities in canine mammary tumors and to distinguish them from other (epidermal, sweat gland) squamous tumors that may develop in the same area. A panel of antibodies (anti-cytokeratin [CK] 19, CK 14, CK 5/6, pancytokeratin, and vimentin) was used on 18 mammary gland malignancies with squamous features and 16 malignant skin tumors (11 squamous cell carcinomas of the skin and 5 sweat glands). Fifteen of the 18 mammary carcinomas were classified as metaplastic carcinomas, and the remaining 3 were classified as squamous cell carcinomas. The 2 most useful markers to establish the histogenesis of mammary tumors were pancytokeratin and CK 19. All other antibodies were equally expressed (CK 14 and 5/6) in all histotypes. The antibody panel discriminated primary epidermal squamous tumors (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 negative) from gland-derived squamous neoplasms (pancytokeratin positive and CK 19 positive) but failed to distinguish primary mammary tumors from other squamous tumors of glandular origin.

  2. The role of tight junctions in mammary gland function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelwagen, Kerst; Singh, Kuljeet

    2014-03-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are cellular structures that facilitate cell-cell communication and are important in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of epithelia. It is only during the last two decades that the molecular make-up of TJ is becoming unravelled, with two major transmembrane-spanning structural protein families, called occludin and claudins, being the true constituents of the TJ. These TJ proteins are linked via specific scaffolding proteins to the cell's cytoskeleton. In the mammary gland TJ between adjacent secretory epithelial cells are formed during lactogenesis and are instrumental in establishing and maintaining milk synthesis and secretion, whereas TJ integrity is compromised during mammary involution and also as result of mastitis and periods of mammary inflamation (including mastitis). They prevent the paracellular transport of ions and small molecules between the blood and milk compartments. Formation of intact TJ at the start of lactation is important for the establishment of the lactation. Conversely, loss of TJ integrity has been linked to reduced milk secretion and mammary function and increased paracellular transport of blood components into the milk and vice versa. In addition to acting as a paracellular barrier, the TJ is increasingly linked to playing an active role in intracellular signalling. This review focusses on the role of TJ in mammary function of the normal, non-malignant mammary gland, predominantly in ruminants, the major dairy producing species.

  3. Mammary hypoplasia: not every breast can produce sufficient milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan W; Kessler, Julia Lange

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk is considered the optimal form of nutrition for newborn infants. Current recommendations are to breastfeed for 6 months. Not all women are able to breastfeed. Mammary hypoplasia is a primary cause of failed lactogenesis II, whereby the mother is unable to produce an adequate milk volume. Women with mammary hypoplasia often have normal hormone levels and innervation but lack sufficient glandular tissue to produce an adequate milk supply to sustain their infant. The etiology of this rare condition is unclear, although there are theories that refer to genetic predisposition and estrogenic environmental exposures in select agricultural environments. Women with mammary hypoplasia may not exhibit the typical breast changes associated with pregnancy and may fail to lactate postpartum. Breasts of women with mammary hypoplasia may be widely spaced (1.5 inches or greater), asymmetric, or tuberous in nature. Awareness of the history and clinical signs of mammary hypoplasia during the prenatal period and immediate postpartum increases the likelihood that women will receive the needed education and physical and emotional support and encouragement. Several medications and herbs demonstrate some efficacy in increasing breast milk production in women with mammary hypoplasia.

  4. Comparison of Expression Profiles of Metastatic versus Primary Mammary Tumors in MMTV-Wnt-1 and MMTV-Neu Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixia Huang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Distant metastases of human breast cancers have been suggested to be more different from each other than from their respective primary tumors, based on expression profiling. The mechanism behind this lack of similarity between individual metastases is not known. We used cDNA microarrays to determine the expression profiles of pulmonary metastases and primary mammary tumors in two distinct transgenic models expressing either the Neu or the Wnt-1 oncogene from the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR. We found that pulmonary metastases are similar to each other and to their primary tumors within the same line. However, metastases arising in one transgenic mouse line are very different from either metastases or primary tumors arising in the other line. In addition, we found that, like their primary tumors, lung metastases in Wnt-1 transgenic mice harbor both epithelial and myoepithelial tumor cells and cells that express the putative progenitor cell marker keratin 6. Our data suggest that both gene expression profiles and cellular heterogeneity are preserved after breast cancer has spread to distant sites, and that metastases are similar to each other when their primary tumors were induced by the same oncogene and from the same subset of mammary cells.

  5. Mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; MIN, KYUENG-WHAN; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in th...

  7. PET/SPECT/CT multimodal imaging in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisgard, R.; Alberini, J.L.; Jego, B.; Siquier, K.; Theze, B.; Guillermet, S.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Inserm, U803, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Background. - In the therapy monitoring of breast cancer, conventional imaging methods include ultrasound, mammography, CT and MRI, which are essentially based on tumor size modifications. However these modifications represent a late consequence of the biological response and fail to differentiate scar or necrotic tissue from residual viable tumoral tissue. Therefore, a current objective is to develop tools able to predict early response to treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) are imaging modalities able to provide extremely sensitive quantitative molecular data and are widely used in humans and animals. Results. - Mammary epithelial cells of female transgenic mice expressing the polyoma middle T onco-protein (Py M.T.), undergo four distinct stages of tumour progression, from pre malignant to malignant stages. Stages are identifiable in the mammary tissue and can lead to the development of distant metastases Longitudinal studies by dynamic whole body acquisitions by multimodal imaging including PET, SPECT and Computed Tomography (CT) allow following the tumoral evolution in Py M.T. mice in comparison with the histopathological analysis. At four weeks of age, mammary hyperplasia was identified by histopathology, but no abnormalities were found by palpation or detected by PET with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose. Such as in some human mammary cancers, the sodium iodide sym-porter (N.I.S.) in tumoral mammary epithelial cells is expressed in this mouse model. In order to investigate the expression of N.I.S. in the Py M.T. mice mammary tumours, [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} imaging was performed with a dedicated SPECT/CT system camera (B.I.O.S.P.A.C.E. Gamma Imager/CT). Local uptake of [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} was detected as early as four weeks of age. The efficacy of chemotherapy was evaluated in this mouse model using a conventional regimen (Doxorubicine, 100 mg/ kg) administered weekly from nine to

  8. Breast cancer detection using mammary ductoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Edward

    2005-06-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) has been used as a tool to evaluate the breast for cancer for over 10 years. MD allows the direct visualization of the duct lumen, providing a more targeted approach to the diagnosis of disease arising in the ductal system, since the lesion can be visualized and samples collected in the area of interest. Initial studies of MD evaluated women with pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND), while more recent reports are also using MD to assess women without PND for the presence of breast cancer. Cytologic assessment of MD is highly specific but less sensitive in the detection of breast cancer. Nonetheless, a MD sample from a breast with PND may rarely undergo cytologic review and be interpreted as consistent with malignancy, only later to undergo surgical resection demonstrating benign pathology. For this reason, PND specimens interpreted as malignant on cytologic review require histopathologic confirmation prior to instituting therapy. Additional sample evaluation using image or molecular analysis may improve the sensitivity and specificity of MD in breast cancer detection.

  9. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy: abandon or persist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu PF

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peng-Fei Qiu, Yan-Bing Liu, Yong-Sheng Wang Breast Cancer Center, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns due to the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes with the traditional injection technique. Meanwhile, as internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLN metastases are mostly found concomitantly with axillary lymph nodes (ALN metastases, previous IM-SLNB clinical trials fail to evaluate the status of IMLN in patients who are really in need (only in clinically ALN negative patients. Our modified injection technique (periareolar intraparenchymal, high volume, and ultrasonographic guidance significantly improved the visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes, making the routine IM-SLNB possible in daily practice. IM-SLNB could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision-making for breast cancer patients, especially for patients with clinically positive ALN. Moreover, IMLN radiotherapy should be tailored and balanced between the potential benefit and toxicity, and IM-SLNB-guided IMLN radiotherapy could achieve this goal. In the era of effective adjuvant therapy, within the changing treatment approach – more systemic therapy, less loco-regional therapy – clinicians should deliberate the application of regional IMLN therapy. Keywords: breast cancer, internal mammary lymph node, axillary lymph node, sentinel lymph node biopsy 

  10. Differentiation of mammary stem cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, R; Rudland, P S

    1989-03-01

    The fully differentiated cells of the rat mammary parenchyma, the ductal epithelial, alveolar, and myoepithelial cells, are distinguished by their ultrastructure and by their accumulation of immunocytochemically detectable marker proteins. The different cell types probably develop from primative ductal structures called terminal end buds, which are present in the developing rat mammary glands, and these structures contain relatively undifferentiated cells. Clonal epithelial stem cell lines, obtained from normal rat mammary glands or benign mammary tumors, differentiate under appropriate conditions along a pathway to droplet-cell/doming cultures of primative alveolarlike cells. Under different culture conditions, the epithelial stem cells differentiate along a separate pathway to myoepitheliallike cells. They accumulate some of the specific marker proteins of myoepithelial cells in vivo, including type IV collagen, laminin, and Thy-1 antigen. In addition, these myoepitheliallike cells in culture contain an abundance of a potential calcium-binding protein, p9Ka, which also occurs in myoepithelial cells of histological sections from mammary glands. The accumulation of type IV collagen, laminin, Thy-1, and p9Ka occurs asynchronously along the pathway to the myoepitheliallike cells in vitro. Furthermore, the steady-state levels of these different marker proteins arise by alterations in the controls at the transcriptional, the posttranscriptional processing, and the translational stages of their production. These results suggest a stepwise control of synthesis of myoepithelial cell marker proteins, and in the case of p9Ka and Thy-1 antigen, this altered control may arise through their possession of novel transcriptional promoters.

  11. Quantification of mammary organoid toxicant response and mammary tissue motility using OCT fluctuation spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Blackmon, Richard L.; Carabas-Hernendez, Patricia; Fuller, Ashley; Troester, Melissa A.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mammary epithelial cell (MEC) organoids in 3D culture recapitulate features of breast ducts in vivo. OCT has the ability to monitor the evolution of MEC organoids non-invasively and longitudinally. The anti-cancer drug Doxorubicin (Dox) is able to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells and has been widely used for chemotherapy of breast cancers; while environmental toxins implicated in breast cancer such as estrogen regulates mammary tumor growth and stimulates the proliferation and metastatic potential of breast cancers. Here we propose a quantitative method for measuring motility of breast cells in 3D cultures based upon OCT speckle fluctuation spectroscopy. The metrics of the inverse power-law exponent (α) and fractional modulation amplitude (M) were extracted from speckle fluctuation spectra. These were used to quantify the responses of MEC organoids to Dox, and estrogen. We investigated MEC organoids comprised of two different MEC lines: MCF10DCIS.com exposed to Dox, and MCF7 exposed to estrogen. We found an increase (pbreast cancer development and assessing anti-cancer drugs.

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  2. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 Histone Breast Mammary glands SRX396744,SRX1184...,ERX200437,ERX200405,ERX200401 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary glands ERX200430,...200399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary glands SRX209678,...200399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary glands SRX213411,SR...X200417,ERX200426,ERX200435,SRX396747,ERX200437,ERX200399,ERX200405,ERX200401 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary glands SRX1078976...,SRX1184165,SRX1078977,SRX1078989,SRX1078990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 Histone Breast Mammary glands SRX396744,SRX1184...,SRX031072,SRX031071,SRX031211 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 Histone Breast Mammary glands ERX200400,SRX2134...,ERX200419,ERX200401,ERX200405 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 Input control Breast Mammary glands SRX213420,S...0406,ERX200402,SRX1078980,SRX396747,SRX396745,SRX1078982 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary glands SRX1078977...,SRX1184165,SRX1078989,SRX1078976,SRX1078990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary glands SRX209679,...200399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary glands SRX1184165...,SRX1078977,SRX1078976,SRX1078989,SRX1078990 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands mm9 Input control Breast Mammary glands SRX213417,S...00420,ERX200416,ERX200438,SRX1078980,ERX200398,ERX200402 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_glands.bed ...

  14. Bovine mammary stem cells: Transcriptome profiling and the stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification and transcriptome analysis of mammary stem cells (MaSC) are important steps toward understanding the molecular basis of mammary epithelial growth, homeostasis and tissue repair. Our objective was to evaluate the molecular profiles of four categories of cells within the bovine mammary ...

  15. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX852566,SR...X852567,SRX187510,SRX187515 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187517,SRX187512,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX187510,SR...X187515,SRX852567,SRX852566 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SR...X187509,SRX187514,SRX403482,SRX852562,SRX187513,SRX403483,SRX852565,SRX852563,SRX852564 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SR...X403482,SRX852565,SRX187509,SRX403483,SRX187514,SRX852563,SRX852562,SRX187513,SRX852564 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX852566,SR...X187510,SRX852567,SRX187515 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary stem cells SRX213393...,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1...85841,SRX188640,SRX191028,SRX213393,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX185809,SRX185869,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary stem cells SRX213393...,SRX213410,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX213404,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary stem cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1910...28,SRX188640 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary stem cells SRX213393...,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX185809,SRX185869,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary stem cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1...91028,SRX188640,SRX213393,SRX213410,SRX213404,SRX213407,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX185841 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary stem cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary stem cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187517,SRX187512,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_tumor mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary tumor SRX700365,SRX7...00366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_tumor.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_tumor mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary tumor SRX700365,SRX7...00366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_tumor.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Breast Mammary cells SRX187510,SR...X852566,SRX187515,SRX852567 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187517,SRX187512,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403479,SRX403480 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary tumor SRX700365,SRX7...00366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_tumor.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SR...X187509,SRX187514,SRX403482,SRX403483,SRX852562,SRX852565,SRX187513,SRX852563,SRX852564 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Input control Breast Mammary cells SRX403481,SRX...187512,SRX187517,SRX403484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SR...X187509,SRX187514,SRX403482,SRX403483,SRX852565,SRX852562,SRX852563,SRX187513,SRX852564 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX187516...,SRX403480,SRX403479 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_tumor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_tumor mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary tumor SRX700365,SRX7...00366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_tumor.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary epithelia...SRX031066,SRX031214,SRX396750 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330636,SRX330635 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Histone Breast Mammary epithelial cel...ls SRX031075,SRX403485,SRX396749,SRX403486,SRX031213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1886...40,SRX191028 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary stem cells SRX1...88640,SRX191028,SRX213393,SRX213410,SRX185869,SRX185809,SRX185841,SRX213404,SRX213407 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_stem_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187508,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary cells SRX187511,SRX1...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 DNase-seq Breast Mammary epithelial c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. Transcription of a novel mouse semaphorin gene, M-semaH, correlates with the metastatic ability of mouse tumor cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C R; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Tarabykina, S

    1998-01-01

    In the attempt to identify genes associated with metastasis, we have compared gene expressions of two metastatic cell lines, 4T1 and 66cl4, and one noninvasive, nonmetastatic cell line, 67NR, which originate from the same mouse mammary adenocarcinoma. Using the technique of differential display, ...... to the developing lungs, to developing skeletal elements, and to the ventral horns of the developing neural tube....

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of three animal mammary tumors from three-dimensional acoustic tissue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan M.

    This dissertation investigated how three-dimensional (3D) tissue models can be used to improve ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) techniques. Anatomic sites in tissue responsible for ultrasonic scattering are unknown, which limits the potential applications of ultrasound for tumor diagnosis. Accurate 3D models of tumor tissues may help identify the scattering sites. Three mammary tumors were investigated: a rat fibroadenoma, a mouse carcinoma, and a mouse sarcoma. A 3D acoustic tissue model, termed 3D impedance map (3DZM), was carefully constructed from consecutive histologic sections for each tumor. Spectral estimates (scatterer size and acoustic concentration) were obtained from the 3DZMs and compared to the same estimates obtained with ultrasound. Scatterer size estimates for three tumors were found to be similar (within 10%). The 3DZMs were also used to extract tissue-specific scattering models. The scattering models were found to allow clear distinction between the three tumors. This distinction demonstrated that UTC techniques may be helpful for noninvasive clinical tumor diagnosis.

  1. Mammary Gland Reprogramming: Metalloproteinases Couple Form with Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokha, Rama; Werb, Zena

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammary structure provides for the rapid growth, development, and immunological protection of the live-born young of mammals through its production of milk. The dynamic remodeling of the branched epithelial structure of the mammary gland in response to physiological stimuli that allow its programmed branching morphogenesis at puberty, cyclical turnover during the reproductive cycle, differentiation into a secretory organ at parturition, postlactational involution, and ultimately, regression with age is critical for these processes. Extracellular metalloproteinases are essential for the remodeling programs that operate in the tissue microenvironment at the interface of the epithelium and the stroma, coupling form with function. Deregulated proteolytic activity drives the transition of a physiological mammary microenvironment into a tumor microenvironment, facilitating malignant transformation. PMID:21106646

  2. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  3. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissacot Denise Z

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7% as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3% with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8% presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2% degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits.

  4. Malignant mammary tumor in female dogs: environmental contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fábio He; Figueiroa, Fernanda C; Bersano, Paulo Ro; Bissacot, Denise Z; Rocha, Noeme S

    2010-06-30

    Mammary tumors of female dogs have greatly increased in recent years, thus demanding rapid diagnosis and effective treatment in order to determine the animal survival. There is considerable scientific interest in the possible role of environmental contaminants in the etiology of mammary tumors, specifically in relation to synthetic chemical substances released into the environment to which living beings are either directly or indirectly exposed. In this study, the presence of pyrethroid insecticide was observed in adjacent adipose tissue of canine mammary tumor. High Precision Liquid Chromatography - HPLC was adapted to detect and identify environmental contaminants in adipose tissue adjacent to malignant mammary tumor in nine female dogs, without predilection for breed or age. After surgery, masses were carefully examined for malignant neoplastic lesions. Five grams of adipose tissue adjacent to the tumor were collected to detect of environmental contaminants. The identified pyrethroids were allethrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and tetramethrin, with a contamination level of 33.3%. Histopathology demonstrated six female dogs (66.7%) as having complex carcinoma and three (33.3%) with simple carcinoma. From these tumors, seven (77.8%) presented aggressiveness degree III and two (22.2%) degree I. Five tumors were positive for estrogen receptors in immunohistochemical analysis. The contamination level was observed in more aggressive tumors. This was the first report in which the level of environmental contaminants could be detected in adipose tissue of female dogs with malignant mammary tumor, by HPLC. Results suggest the possible involvement of pyrethroid in the canine mammary tumor carcinogenesis. Hence, the dog may be used as a sentinel animal for human breast cancer, since human beings share the same environment and basically have the same eating habits.

  5. Mammary-type myofibroblastoma with the nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Gates B; Vankawala, Preksha; Kuperman, Michael B; Mennel, Robert G

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 23-year-old white man who presented with anasarca and a new periumbilical mass. He had preserved kidney function and laboratory findings consistent with nephrotic syndrome, including 9.7 g/day albuminuria. Serum serologies were positive for anti-SSa and anti-SSb and low complements but were negative for antinuclear antibody. Pathologic findings of the abdominal mass showed a mammary-type myofibroblastoma. A kidney biopsy revealed a diffuse proliferative and membranous immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with 10% interstitial fibrosis. This is a novel case of mammary-type myofibroblastoma associated with nephrotic syndrome mimicking a proliferative lupus pattern.

  6. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Gama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis.

  7. Large mammary hamartoma with focal invasive ductal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervatikar Suneet

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammary hamartomas are uncommon benign lesions rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of a 25-year-old female patient presenting with a lump in the left breast. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed features of invasive ductal carcinoma along with normal benign glands that were mistaken for normal breast tissue. However, the mastectomy specimen revealed the malignant mass within a larger hamartomatous mass. Mammary hamartomas are benign lesions but, on exceedingly rare occasions, they may be involved by incidental, coexisting carcinoma, as illustrated in this case report.

  8. Sulforaphane: a naturally occurring mammary carcinoma mitotic inhibitor, which disrupts tubulin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Steven J T; Singletary, Keith W

    2004-02-01

    Sulforaphane (SUL), an isothiocyanate found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to induce phase II detoxification enzymes, inhibit chemically induced mammary tumors in rats, and more recently to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells of the colon. Here, we provide evidence that SUL also acts as a breast cancer anti-proliferative agent. The BALB/c mouse mammary carcinoma cell line F3II was treated with SUL at concentrations up to 15 microM and examined for markers of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment of asynchronous F3II cells with 15 microM SUL resulted in G2/M cell cycle arrest, elevated p34cdc2 (cdc2) kinase activity, Bcl-2 down-regulation, evidence of caspase activation, and aggregation of condensed nuclear chromatin. Subsequent exposure of synchronized cells to 15 microM SUL resulted in elevated numbers of prophase/prometaphase mitotic figures, indicating cell cycle progression beyond G2 and arrest early within mitosis. Moreover, cells treated with 15 microM SUL displayed aberrant mitotic spindles, and higher doses of SUL inhibited tubulin polymerization in vitro. In addition, BALB/c mice injected s.c. with F3II cells and subsequently injected daily i.v. with SUL (15 nmol/day for 13 days) developed significantly smaller tumors (approximately 60% less in mass) than vehicle-treated controls. Western blot analysis of tumor proteins demonstrated significantly (Pmitotic microtubules and early M-phase block associated with cdc2 kinase activation, indicating that cells arrest prior to metaphase exit.

  9. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  10. Altered differentiation and paracrine stimulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation by conditionally activated Smoothened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Adriana P; LaMarca, Heather L; Villanueva, Hugo; Toneff, Michael J; Li, Yi; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling network is critical for patterning and organogenesis in mammals, and has been implicated in a variety of cancers. Smoothened (Smo), the gene encoding the principal signal transducer, is overexpressed frequently in breast cancer, and constitutive activation in MMTV-SmoM2 transgenic mice caused alterations in mammary gland morphology, increased proliferation, and changes in stem/progenitor cell number. Both in transgenic mice and in clinical specimens, proliferative cells did not usually express detectable Smo, suggesting the hypothesis that Smo functioned in a non-cell autonomous manner to stimulate proliferation. Here, we employed a genetically tagged mouse model carrying a Cre-recombinase-dependent conditional allele of constitutively active Smo (SmoM2) to test this hypothesis. MMTV-Cre- or adenoviral-Cre-mediated SmoM2 expression in the luminal epithelium, but not in the myoepithelium, was required for the hyper-proliferative phenotypes. High levels of proliferation were observed in cells adjacent or in close-proximity to Smo expressing cells demonstrating that SmoM2 expressing cells were stimulating proliferation via a paracrine or juxtacrine mechanism. In contrast, Smo expression altered luminal cell differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. SmoM2 expressing cells, purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) via the genetic fluorescent tag, expressed high levels of Ptch2, Gli1, Gli2, Jag2 and Dll-1, and lower levels of Notch4 and Hes6, in comparison to wildtype cells. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of Smo activation in the mammary gland and its possible roles in breast tumorigenesis. In addition, these results also have potential implications for the interpretation of proliferative phenotypes commonly observed in other organs as a consequence of hedgehog signaling activation.

  11. Mammary epithelial tubes elongate through MAPK-dependent coordination of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Robert J; Neumann, Neil M; Ewald, Andrew J

    2016-03-15

    Mammary branching morphogenesis is regulated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). We sought to determine how these RTK signals alter proliferation and migration to accomplish tube elongation in mouse. Both behaviors occur but it has been difficult to determine their relative contribution to elongation in vivo, as mammary adipocytes scatter light and limit the depth of optical imaging. Accordingly, we utilized 3D culture to study elongation in an experimentally accessible setting. We first used antibodies to localize RTK signals and discovered that phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK) was spatially enriched in cells near the front of elongating ducts, whereas phosphorylated AKT was ubiquitous. We next observed a gradient of cell migration speeds from rear to front of elongating ducts, with the front characterized by both high pERK and the fastest cells. Furthermore, cells within elongating ducts oriented both their protrusions and their migration in the direction of tube elongation. By contrast, cells within the organoid body were isotropically protrusive. We next tested the requirement for proliferation and migration. Early inhibition of proliferation blocked the creation of migratory cells, whereas late inhibition of proliferation did not block continued duct elongation. By contrast, pharmacological inhibition of either MEK or Rac1 signaling acutely blocked both cell migration and duct elongation. Finally, conditional induction of MEK activity was sufficient to induce collective cell migration and ductal elongation. Our data suggest a model for ductal elongation in which RTK-dependent proliferation creates motile cells with high pERK, the collective migration of which acutely requires both MEK and Rac1 signaling.

  12. Molecular characterizations of Nop16 in murine mammary tumors with varying levels of c-Myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundel, Donald W; Stromquist, Emily; Greene, Amy L; Zhdankin, Olga; Regal, Ronald R; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A

    2012-04-01

    NOP16, also known as HSPC111, has been identified as a MYC and estrogen regulated gene in in vitro studies, hence coexpression levels were strongly correlated. Importantly, high expression of NOP16 was associated with poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. However, coexpression of NOP16, MYC and estrogen receptor (ESR1) varied widely in tumors and cell lines suggesting that transcriptional regulation differed according to pathological environments. The goal of this study was to determine the expression patterns of Nop16, Myc and Esr1 in murine mammary tumors with disparate histopathological and molecular features. We hypothesized that tumor environments with relatively high Myc levels would have different coexpression patterns than tumor environments with relatively low Myc levels. We measured levels of Myc and Nop16 mRNA and protein in tumors from WAP-c-myc mice that were of high grade and metastasized frequently. In contrast, Myc and Nop16 mRNA and proteins levels were significantly lower in the less aggressive tumors that developed in NRL-TGFα mice. Tumors from both mouse lines express ESR1 protein and we found that Esr1 mRNA levels correlated positively with Myc levels in both models. However, Myc and Nop16 transcript levels correlated positively only in tumors from NRL-TGFα mice. We identified prominent NOP16 protein in nuclei and less prominent staining in the cytoplasm of luminal cells of ducts and lobules from normal mammary glands as well as in hyperplasias and tumors obtained from NRL-TGFα mice. This staining pattern was reversed in tumors from WAP-c-Myc mice as nuclear staining was faint or absent and cytoplasmic staining more pronounced. In summary, the regulation of expression and localization of NOP16 varies in tumor environments with high versus low MYC levels and demonstrate the importance of stratifying clinical breast cancers based on MYC levels.

  13. Prolactin-induced Subcellular Targeting of GLUT1 Glucose Transporter in Living Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Riskin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studying the biological pathways involved in mammalian milk production during lactation could have many clinical implications. The mammary gland is unique in its requirement for transport of free glucose into the cell for the synthesis of lactose, the primary carbohydrate in milk. Objective: To study GLUT1 trafficking and subcellular targeting in living mammary epithelial cells (MEC in culture. Methods: Immunocytochemistry was used to study GLUT1 hormonally regulated subcellular targeting in human MEC (HMEC. To study GLUT1 targeting and recycling in living mouse MEC (MMEC in culture, we constructed fusion proteins of GLUT1 and green fluorescent protein (GFP and expressed them in CIT3 MMEC. Cells were maintained in growth medium (GM, or exposed to secretion medium (SM, containing prolactin. Results: GLUT1 in HMEC localized primarily to the plasma membrane in GM. After exposure to prolactin for 4 days, GLUT1 was targeted intracellularly and demonstrated a perinuclear distribution, co-localizing with lactose synthetase. The dynamic trafficking of GFP-GLUT1 fusion proteins in CIT3 MMEC suggested a basal constitutive GLUT1 recycling pathway between an intracellular pool and the cell surface that targets most GLUT1 to the plasma membrane in GM. Upon exposure to prolactin in SM, GLUT1 was specifically targeted intracellularly within 90–110 minutes. Conclusions: Our studies suggest intracellular targeting of GLUT1 to the central vesicular transport system upon exposure to prolactin. The existence of a dynamic prolactin-induced sorting machinery for GLUT1 could be important for transport of free glucose into the Golgi for lactose synthesis during lactation.

  14. WE-EF-BRA-11: Precision Partial-Tumor Irradiation of Dorsal Rodent Mammary Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm, J [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Boss, K [Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State University (United States); Dewhirst, M [Dpt of Radiation and Cancer Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Oldham, M [Dpt of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a pre-clinical treatment technique on a micro-irradiator to treat specific volumes of dorsal mammary tumors in BALB/c mice while sparing lungs and spine. This technique facilitates pre-clinical investigation of tumor response to sub-optimal radiation treatments in which a portion of the tumor is unirradiated, known as a “marginal miss”. In-vitro data suggests that partial tumor radiations trigger a more aggressive phenotype in non-irradiated, regional tumor cells via bystander effects. As the lung tissue is spared, the impact of marginal miss on the development of pulmonary metastasis may be assessed. Methods: End to end test was performed on three BALB/c mice as proof of concept for larger studies. 1Gy was delivered on the micro-irradiator employing previously unexplored lateral parallel-opposed diamond and/or triangle-shaped beams. The margins of the treatment beam were defined using a combination of tumor palpation, barium fiducial markers, and real-time fluoroscopic images. The dose distribution was independently verified with kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations with 7% statistical uncertainty and double exposure images. As a final step, the technique was used in a larger pre-clinical study (15Gy, 36 BALB/c mice) and lung metastasis in response to tumor irradiation of 100%, 50% and 0% was quantified. Results: For the Monte-Carlo dose calculations, the dose volume histograms established a maximum dose within the un-irradiated and radiated portions of the mammary tumor of 0.3Gy and 1.5Gy respectively, with a sharp gradient at the boundary. 100% of the lung volume received less than 0.5Gy. This technique proved suitable for a pre-clinical marginal miss study with 50% more lung metastases in partially-radiated mouse models compared to completely. Conclusion: We have developed a novel treatment technique for partial or full irradiation of dorsal mammary tumors incorporating lung sparing.The technique will be useful for exploring

  15. The angiotensin receptor blocker, Losartan, inhibits mammary tumor development and progression to invasive carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Rhiannon; Liew, Seng H.; Connelly, Angela A.; Yee, Nicholas S.; Deb, Siddhartha; Kumar, Beena; Vargas, Ana C.; O’Toole, Sandra A.; Parslow, Adam C.; Poh, Ashleigh; Putoczki, Tracy; Morrow, Riley J.; Alorro, Mariah; Lazarus, Kyren A.; Yeap, Evie F.W.; Walton, Kelly L.; Harrison, Craig A.; Hannan, Natalie J.; George, Amee J.; Clyne, Colin D.; Ernst, Matthias; Allen, Andrew M.; Chand, Ashwini L.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs that target the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) have recently come into focus for their potential utility as cancer treatments. The use of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (ACEIs) to manage hypertension in cancer patients is correlated with improved survival outcomes for renal, prostate, breast and small cell lung cancer. Previous studies demonstrate that the Angiotensin Receptor Type I (AT1R) is linked to breast cancer pathogenesis, with unbiased analysis of gene-expression studies identifying significant up-regulation of AGTR1, the gene encoding AT1R in ER+ve/HER2−ve tumors correlating with poor prognosis. However, there is no evidence, so far, of the functional contribution of AT1R to breast tumorigenesis. We explored the potential therapeutic benefit of ARB in a carcinogen-induced mouse model of breast cancer and clarified the mechanisms associated with its success. Mammary tumors were induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]antracene (DMBA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in female wild type mice and the effects of the ARB, Losartan treatment assessed in a preventative setting (n = 15 per group). Tumor histopathology was characterised by immunohistochemistry, real-time qPCR to detect gene expression signatures, and tumor cytokine levels measured with quantitative bioplex assays. AT1R was detected with radiolabelled ligand binding assays in fresh frozen tumor samples. We showed that therapeutic inhibition of AT1R, with Losartan, resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden; and no mammary tumor incidence in 20% of animals. We observed a significant reduction in tumor progression from DCIS to invasive cancer with Losartan treatment. This was associated with reduced tumor cell proliferation and a significant reduction in IL-6, pSTAT3 and TNFα levels. Analysis of tumor immune cell infiltrates, however, demonstrated no significant differences in the recruitment of lymphocytes or tumour

  16. Radiogenic neoplasia in thyroid and mammary clonogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, K.H.

    1992-05-20

    We have developed rat thyroid and mammary clonogen transplantation systems for the study of radiogenic cancer induction at the target cell level in vivo. The epithelial cell populations of both glands contain small subpopulations of cells which are capable of giving rise to monoclonal glandular structures when transplanted and stimulated with appropriate hormones. Previous results indicated that these clonogens are the precursor cells of radiogenic cancer, and that initiation, is common event at the clonegenic cell level. Detailed information on the physiologic control of clonogen proliferation, differentiation, and total numbers is thus essential to an understanding of the carcinogenic process. We report here studies on investigations on the relationships between grafted thyroid cell number and the rapidity and degree of reestablishment of the thyroid-hypothalamus-pituitary feedback axis in thyroidectomized rats maintained on a normal diet or an iodine deficient diet; studies of the persistence of, and the differentiation potential and functional characteristics of, the TSH-(thyrotropin-) responsive sub- population of clonogens during goitrogenesis, the plateau-phase of goiter growth, and goiter involution; studies of changes in the size of the clonogen sub-population during goitrogenesis, goiter involution and the response to goitrogen rechallenge; and a large carcinogenesis experiment on the nature of the grafted thyroid cell number-dependent suppression of promotion/progression to neoplasia in grafts of radiation-initiated thyroid cells. Data from these studies will be used in the design of future carcinogenesis experiments on neoplastic initiation by high and low LET radiations and on cell interactions during the neoplastic process.

  17. The mammary glands of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Mammalia: Sirenia): morphological characteristics and microscopic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernanda Rosa; da Silva, Vera Maria Ferreira; Barcellos, José Fernando Marques

    2014-08-01

    The mammaries from carcasses of two female Amazonian manatees were examined. Trichechus inunguis possesses two axillary mammaries beneath the pectoral fins, one on each side of the body. Each papilla mammae has a small hole on its apex--the ostium papillare. The mammaries are covered by a stratified squamous keratinized epithelium. The epithelium of the mammary ducts became thinner more deeply in the tissue and varied from stratified to simple cuboidal. There was no evidence of glandular activity or secretion into the ducts of the mammary glands.

  18. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  19. Activation of p21(CIP1/WAF1) in mammary epithelium accelerates mammary tumorigenesis and promotes lung metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyun; Xia, Weiya; Yang, Jer-Yen; Hsu, Jennifer L; Chou, Chao-Kai; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wyszomierski, Shannon L; Mills, Gordon B; Muller, William J; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-12-03

    While p21 is well known to inhibit cyclin-CDK activity in the nucleus and it has also been demonstrated to have oncogenic properties in different types of human cancers. In vitro studies showed that the oncogenic function of p21is closely related to its cytoplasmic localization. However, it is unclear whether cytoplasmic p21 contributes to tumorigenesis in vivo. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice expressing the Akt-phosphorylated form of p21 (p21T145D) in the mammary epithelium. The results showed that Akt-activated p21 was expressed in the cytoplasm of mammary epithelium. Overexpression of Akt-activated p21 accelerated tumor onset and promoted lung metastasis in MMTV/neu mice, providing evidence that p21, especially cytoplasmic phosphorylated p21, has an oncogenic role in promoting mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  20. Pueraria mirifica Exerts Estrogenic Effects in the Mammary Gland and Uterus and Promotes Mammary Carcinogenesis in Donryu Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Yoshida, Midori; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Naomi; Okuno, Takahiro; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM), a plant whose dried and powdered tuberous roots are now widely used in rejuvenating preparations to promote youthfulness in both men and women, may have major estrogenic influence. In this study, we investigated modifying effects of PM at various doses on mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis in female Donryu rats. Firstly, PM administered to ovariectomized animals at doses of 0.03%, 0.3%, and 3% in a phytoestrogen-low diet for 2 weeks caused significant increase in uterus weight. Secondly, a 4 week PM application to non-operated rats at a dose of 3% after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) initiation resulted in significant elevation of cell proliferation in the mammary glands. In a third experiment, postpubertal administration of 0.3% (200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day) PM to 5-week-old non-operated animals for 36 weeks following initiation of mammary and endometrial carcinogenesis with DMBA and N-ethyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG), respectively, resulted in significant increase of mammary adenocarcinoma incidence. A significant increase of endometrial atypical hyperplasia multiplicity was also observed. Furthermore, PM at doses of 0.3%, and more pronouncedly, at 1% induced dilatation, hemorrhage and inflammation of the uterine wall. In conclusion, postpubertal long-term PM administration to Donryu rats exerts estrogenic effects in the mammary gland and uterus, and at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w./day was found to promote mammary carcinogenesis initiated by DMBA. PMID:27827907