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Sample records for oncogene maf transcription

  1. Transcriptional factors, Mafs and their biological roles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Tsuchiya; Ryoichi Misaka; Kosaku Nitta; Ken Tsuchiya

    2015-01-01

    The Maf family of transcription factors is characterizedby a typical bZip structure; these transcription factorsact as important regulators of the development anddifferentiation of many organs and tissues, includingthe kidney. The Maf family consists of two subgroupsthat are characterized according to their structure largeMaf transcription factors and small Maf transcriptionfactors. The large Maf subgroup consists of fourproteins, designated as MAFA, MAFB, c-MAF and neuralretina-specific leucine zipper. In particular, MAFA is adistinct molecule that has been attracting the attentionof researchers because it acts as a strong transactivatorof insulin, suggesting that Maf transcription factors arelikely to be involved in systemic energy homeostasis. Inthis review, we focused on the regulation of glucose/energy balance by Maf transcription factors in variousorgans.

  2. Inhibition of Small Maf Function in Pancreatic β-Cells Improves Glucose Tolerance Through the Enhancement of Insulin Gene Transcription and Insulin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hida, Yoko; Yamashita, Ken-ichiro; Sharma, Arun J.; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The large-Maf transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA) has been found to be crucial for insulin transcription and synthesis and for pancreatic β-cell function and maturation. However, insights about the effects of small Maf factors on β-cells are limited. Our goal was to elucidate the function of small-Maf factors on β-cells using an animal model of endogenous small-Maf dysfunction. Transgenic (Tg) mice with β-cell-specific expression of dominant-negative MafK (DN-MafK) experiments, which can suppress the function of all endogenous small-Mafs, were fed a high-fat diet, and their in vivo phenotypes were evaluated. Phenotypic analysis, glucose tolerance tests, morphologic examination of β-cells, and islet experiments were performed. DN-MafK-expressed MIN6 cells were also used for in vitro analysis. The results showed that DN-MafK expression inhibited endogenous small-Maf binding to insulin promoter while increasing MafA binding. DN-MafK Tg mice under high-fat diet conditions showed improved glucose metabolism compared with control mice via incremental insulin secretion, without causing changes in insulin sensitivity or MafA expression. Moreover, up-regulation of insulin and glucokinase gene expression was observed both in vivo and in vitro under DN-MafK expression. We concluded that endogenous small-Maf factors negatively regulates β-cell function by competing for MafA binding, and thus, the inhibition of small-Maf activity can improve β-cell function. PMID:25763640

  3. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  4. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2.

  5. Sumoylation regulates the transcriptional activity of MafA in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunli; Cobb, Melanie H

    2009-01-30

    MafA is a transcriptional regulator expressed primarily in pancreatic beta cells. It binds to the RIPE3b/C1-binding site within the ins gene promoter, which plays a critical role in regulating ins gene expression in response to glucose. Here, we show that MafA is post-translationally modified by the small ubiquitin-related modifiers SUMO-1 and -2. Mutation of a single site in MafA, Lys(32), blocks its sumoylation in beta cells. Incubation of beta cells in low glucose (2 mm) or exposure to hydrogen peroxide increases sumoylation of endogenous MafA. Forced sumoylation of MafA results in reduced transcriptional activity toward the ins gene promoter and increased suppression of the CHOP-10 gene promoter. Sumoylation of MafA has no apparent effect on either its nuclear localization in beta cells or its ubiquitin-dependent degradation. This study suggests that modification of MafA by SUMO modulates gene transcription and thereby beta cell function.

  6. Small Maf proteins (MafF, MafG, MafK): History, structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuoka, Fumiki; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-07-25

    The small Maf proteins (sMafs) are basic region leucine zipper (bZIP)-type transcription factors. The basic region of the Maf family is unique among the bZIP factors, and it contributes to the distinct DNA-binding mode of this class of proteins. MafF, MafG and MafK are the three vertebrate sMafs, and no functional differences have been observed among them in terms of their bZIP structures. sMafs form homodimers by themselves, and they form heterodimers with cap 'n' collar (CNC) proteins (p45 NF-E2, Nrf1, Nrf2, and Nrf3) and also with Bach proteins (Bach1 and Bach2). Because CNC and Bach proteins cannot bind to DNA as monomers, sMafs are indispensable partners that are required by CNC and Bach proteins to exert their functions. sMafs lack the transcriptional activation domain; hence, their homodimers act as transcriptional repressors. In contrast, sMafs participate in transcriptional activation or repression depending on their heterodimeric partner molecules and context. Mouse genetic analyses have revealed that various biological pathways are under the regulation of CNC-sMaf heterodimers. In this review, we summarize the history and current progress of sMaf studies in relation to their partners. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic interactions of MAF1 identify a role for Med20 in transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Willis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional repression of ribosomal components and tRNAs is coordinately regulated in response to a wide variety of environmental stresses. Part of this response involves the convergence of different nutritional and stress signaling pathways on Maf1, a protein that is essential for repressing transcription by RNA polymerase (pol III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we identify the functions buffering yeast cells that are unable to down-regulate transcription by RNA pol III. MAF1 genetic interactions identified in screens of non-essential gene-deletions and conditionally expressed essential genes reveal a highly interconnected network of 64 genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, RNA pol II transcription, tRNA modification, ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and other processes. A survey of non-essential MAF1 synthetic sick/lethal (SSL genes identified six gene-deletions that are defective in transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein (RP genes following rapamycin treatment. This subset of MAF1 SSL genes included MED20 which encodes a head module subunit of the RNA pol II Mediator complex. Genetic interactions between MAF1 and subunits in each structural module of Mediator were investigated to examine the functional relationship between these transcriptional regulators. Gene expression profiling identified a prominent and highly selective role for Med20 in the repression of RP gene transcription under multiple conditions. In addition, attenuated repression of RP genes by rapamycin was observed in a strain deleted for the Mediator tail module subunit Med16. The data suggest that Mediator and Maf1 function in parallel pathways to negatively regulate RP mRNA and tRNA synthesis.

  8. Combined Transfection of the Three Transcriptional Factors, PDX-1, NeuroD1, and MafA, Causes Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Qing-Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The goal of cell transcription for treatment of diabetes is to generate surrogate β-cells from an appropriate cell line. However, the induced replacement cells have showed less physiological function in producing insulin compared with normal β-cells. Methods. Here, we report a procedure for induction of insulin-producing cells (IPCs from bone marrow murine mesenchymal stem cells (BM-mMSCs. These BM-mMSCs have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells when a combination of PDX-1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1, NeuroD1 (neurogenic differentiation-1, and MafA (V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A genes are transfected into them and expressed in these cells. Results. Insulin biosynthesis and secretion were induced in mMSCs into which these three genes have been transfected and expressed. The amount of induced insulin in the mMSCs which have been transfected with the three genes together is significantly higher than in those mMSCs that were only transfected with one or two of these three genes. Transplantation of the transfected cells into mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes results in insulin expression and the reversal of the glucose challenge. Conclusions. These findings suggest major implications for cell replacement strategies in generation of surrogate β-cells for the treatment of diabetes.

  9. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

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    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  10. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  11. The ETS family of oncogenic transcription factors in solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Gina M; Pitarresi, Jason R; Balakrishnan, Subhasree; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Findings over the past decade have identified aberrant activation of the ETS transcription factor family throughout all stages of tumorigenesis. Specifically in solid tumours, gene rearrangement and amplification, feed-forward growth factor signalling loops, formation of gain-of-function co-regulatory complexes and novel cis-acting mutations in ETS target gene promoters can result in increased ETS activity. In turn, pro-oncogenic ETS signalling enhances tumorigenesis through a broad mechanistic toolbox that includes lineage specification and self-renewal, DNA damage and genome instability, epigenetics and metabolism. This Review discusses these different mechanisms of ETS activation and subsequent oncogenic implications, as well as the clinical utility of ETS factors.

  12. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1, and MafA is Essential for Glucose-Induced Insulin Transcription in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, Biagio; Iiritano, Stefania; Chiefari, Eusebio; Brunetti, Francesco S; Gu, Guoqiang; Foti, Daniela Patrizia; Brunetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called "enhanceosomes" on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS) gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production.

  13. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1 and MafA is essential for glucose-induced insulin transcription in pancreatic beta cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio eArcidiacono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1 protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called enhanceosomes on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production.

  14. Oncogenic c-kit transcript is a target for binase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Kretova, Olga V; Zelenikhin, Pavel V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Alexander A

    2010-07-01

    Mutational activation of c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase is common in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). One such activating point mutation is the N822K replacement in the c-Kit protein. Here we investigate the selective cytotoxic effect of binase--RNase from Bacillus intermedius--on FDC-P1-N822K cells. These cells were derived from myeloid progenitor FDC-P1 cells, in which ectopic expression of N822K c-kit gene induces interleukin-3 independent growth. In order to determine whether the sensitivity of these cells to binase is caused by the expression of c-kit oncogene, the cytotoxicity of the RNase was studied in the presence of selective inhibitor of mutated c-Kit imatinib (Gleevec). Inhibition of mutated c-Kit protein leads to the loss of cell sensitivity to the apoptotic effect of binase, while the latter still decreases the amount of cellular RNA. Using green fluorescent protein as an expression marker for the c-Kit oncoprotein, we demonstrate that the elimination of c-Kit is the key factor in selective cytotoxicity of binase. Quantitative RT-PCR with RNA samples isolated from the binase-treated FDC-P1-N822K cells shows that binase treatment results in 41% reduction in the amount of с-kit mRNA. This indicates that the transcript of the activated mutant c-kit is the target for toxic action of binase. Thus, the combination of inhibition of oncogenic protein with the destruction of its mRNA is a promising approach to eliminating malignant cells.

  15. Identification of a novel missense mutation of MAF in a Japanese family with congenital cataract by whole exome sequencing: a clinical report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Yoko; Nishina, Sachiko; Tokimitsu, Motoharu; Aoki, Yoko; Kosaki, Rika; Wakui, Keiko; Azuma, Noriyuki; Murata, Toshinori; Takada, Fumio; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosho, Tomoki

    2014-05-01

    Congenital cataracts are the most important cause of severe visual impairment in infants. Genetic factors contribute to the disease development and 29 genes are known to cause congenital cataracts. Identifying the genetic cause of congenital cataracts can be difficult because of genetic heterogeneity. V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF) encodes a basic region/leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a key role as a regulator of embryonic lens fiber cell development. MAF mutations have been reported to cause juvenile-onset pulverulent cataract, microcornea, iris coloboma, and other anterior segment dysgenesis. We report on six patients in a family who have congenital cataracts were identified MAF mutation by whole exome sequencing (WES). The heterozygous MAF mutation Q303L detected in the present family occurs in a well conserved glutamine residue at the basic region of the DNA-binding domain. All affected members showed congenital cataracts. Three of the six members showed microcornea and one showed iris coloboma. Congenital cataracts with MAF mutation exhibited phenotypically variable cataracts within the family. Review of the patients with MAF mutations supports the notion that congenital cataracts caused by MAF mutations could be accompanied by microcornea and/or iris coloboma. WES is a useful tool for detecting disease-causing mutations in patients with genetically heterogeneous conditions.

  16. Mutations Impairing GSK3-Mediated MAF Phosphorylation Cause Cataract, Deafness, Intellectual Disability, Seizures, and a Down Syndrome-like Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niceta, Marcello; Stellacci, Emilia; Gripp, Karen W.; Zampino, Giuseppe; Kousi, Maria; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Traversa, Alice; Ciolfi, Andrea; Stabley, Deborah; Bruselles, Alessandro; Caputo, Viviana; Cecchetti, Serena; Prudente, Sabrina; Fiorenza, Maria T.; Boitani, Carla; Philip, Nicole; Niyazov, Dmitriy; Leoni, Chiara; Nakane, Takaya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim; Braddock, Stephen R.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Palleschi, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lee, Brendan H.L.; Pouponnot, Celio; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Katsanis, Nicholas; Sol-Church, Katia; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors operate in developmental processes to mediate inductive events and cell competence, and perturbation of their function or regulation can dramatically affect morphogenesis, organogenesis, and growth. We report that a narrow spectrum of amino-acid substitutions within the transactivation domain of the v-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF), a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor of the AP1 superfamily, profoundly affect development. Seven different de novo missense mutations involving conserved residues of the four GSK3 phosphorylation motifs were identified in eight unrelated individuals. The distinctive clinical phenotype, for which we propose the eponym Aymé-Gripp syndrome, is not limited to lens and eye defects as previously reported for MAF/Maf loss of function but includes sensorineural deafness, intellectual disability, seizures, brachycephaly, distinctive flat facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, mammary gland hypoplasia, and reduced growth. Disease-causing mutations were demonstrated to impair proper MAF phosphorylation, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, perturbed gene expression in primary skin fibroblasts, and induced neurodevelopmental defects in an in vivo model. Our findings nosologically and clinically delineate a previously poorly understood recognizable multisystem disorder, provide evidence for MAF governing a wider range of developmental programs than previously appreciated, and describe a novel instance of protein dosage effect severely perturbing development. PMID:25865493

  17. Repression of transcription mediated at a thyroid hormone response element by the v-erb-A oncogene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Muñoz, A; Schmitt, J

    1989-01-01

    Several recent observations, such as the identification of the cellular homologue of the v-erb-A oncogene as a thyroid-hormone receptor, have strongly implicated nuclear oncogenes in transcriptional control mechanisms. The v-erb-A oncogene blocks the differentiation of erythroid cells, and changes......-erb-A protein negatively interferes with normal transcriptional-control mechanisms, and that amino-acid substitutions have altered its DNA-binding properties....

  18. Oncogenic Splicing Factor SRSF1 Is a Critical Transcriptional Target of MYC

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    Shipra Das

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The SR protein splicing factor SRSF1 is a potent proto-oncogene that is frequently upregulated in cancer. Here, we show that SRSF1 is a direct target of the transcription factor oncoprotein MYC. These two oncogenes are significantly coexpressed in lung carcinomas, and MYC knockdown downregulates SRSF1 expression in lung-cancer cell lines. MYC directly activates transcription of SRSF1 through two noncanonical E-boxes in its promoter. The resulting increase in SRSF1 protein is sufficient to modulate alternative splicing of a subset of transcripts. In particular, MYC induction leads to SRSF1-mediated alternative splicing of the signaling kinase MKNK2 and the transcription factor TEAD1. SRSF1 knockdown reduces MYC's oncogenic activity, decreasing proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest a mechanism for SRSF1 upregulation in tumors with elevated MYC and identify SRSF1 as a critical MYC target that contributes to its oncogenic potential by enabling MYC to regulate the expression of specific protein isoforms through alternative splicing.

  19. The Homeodomain Transcription Factor Cdx1 Does Not Behave as an Oncogene in Normal Mouse Intestine

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    Mary Ann S. Crissey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Caudal-related homeobox genes Cdx1 and Cdx2 are intestine-specific transcription factors that regulate differentiation of intestinal cell types. Previously, we have shown Cdx1 to be antiproliferative and to promote cell differentiation. However, other studies have suggested that Cdx1 may be an oncogene. To test for oncogenic behavior, we used the murine villin promoter to ectopically express Cdx1 in the small intestinal villi and colonic surface epithelium. No changes in intestinal architecture, cell differentiation, or lineage selection were observed with expression of the transgene. Classic oncogenes enhance proliferation and induce tumors when ectopically expressed. However, the Cdx1 transgene neither altered intestinal proliferation nor induced spontaneous intestinal tumors. In a murine model for colitis-associated cancer, the Cdx1 transgene decreased, rather than increased, the number of adenomas that developed. In the polyps, the expression of the endogenous and the transgenic Cdx1 proteins was largely absent, whereas endogenous Villin expression was retained. This suggests that transgene silencing was specific and not due to a general Villin inactivation. In conclusion, neither the ectopic expression of Cdx1 was associated with changes in intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation nor was there increased intestinal cancer susceptibility. Our results therefore suggest that Cdx1 is not an oncogene in normal intestinal epithelium.

  20. JAC, a direct target of oncogenic transcription factor Jun, is involved in cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, M; Reiter, F; Bader, A G; Castellazzi, M; Bister, K

    2001-11-20

    Using subtractive hybridization techniques, we have isolated a gene termed JAC that is strongly and specifically activated in avian fibroblasts transformed by the v-jun oncogene of avian sarcoma virus 17 (ASV17), but not in cells transformed by other oncogenic agents. Furthermore, JAC is highly expressed in cell lines derived from jun-induced avian fibrosarcomas. Kinetic analysis using a doxycycline-controlled conditional cell transformation system showed that expression of the 0.8-kb JAC mRNA is induced rapidly upon activation of the oncogenic v-jun allele. Nucleotide sequence analysis and transcriptional mapping revealed that the JAC gene contains two exons, with the longest ORF confined to exon 2. The deduced 68-amino acid chicken JAC protein is rich in cysteine residues and displays 37% sequence identity to mammalian high-sulfur keratin-associated proteins. The promoter region of JAC contains a consensus (5'-TGACTCA-3') and a nonconsensus (5'-TGAGTAA-3') AP-1 binding site in tandem, which are both specifically bound by the Gag-Jun hybrid protein encoded by ASV17. Mutational analysis revealed that the two AP-1 sites confer strong transcriptional activation by Gag-Jun in a synergistic manner. Ectopic expression of JAC in avian fibroblasts leads to anchorage-independent growth, strongly suggesting that deregulation of JAC is an essential event in jun-induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

  1. Transcription-induced DNA double strand breaks: both oncogenic force and potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Michael C; De Marzo, Angelo M; Meeker, Alan K; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2011-06-15

    An emerging model of transcriptional activation suggests that induction of transcriptional programs, for instance by stimulating prostate or breast cells with androgens or estrogens, respectively, involves the formation of DNA damage, including DNA double strand breaks (DSB), recruitment of DSB repair proteins, and movement of newly activated genes to transcription hubs. The DSB can be mediated by the class II topoisomerase TOP2B, which is recruited with the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor to regulatory sites on target genes and is apparently required for efficient transcriptional activation of these genes. These DSBs are recognized by the DNA repair machinery triggering the recruitment of repair proteins such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), ATM, and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). If illegitimately repaired, such DSBs can seed the formation of genomic rearrangements like the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion oncogene in prostate cancer. Here, we hypothesize that these transcription-induced, TOP2B-mediated DSBs can also be exploited therapeutically and propose that, in hormone-dependent tumors like breast and prostate cancers, a hormone-cycling therapy, in combination with topoisomerase II poisons or inhibitors of the DNA repair components PARP1 and DNA-PK, could overwhelm cancer cells with transcription-associated DSBs. Such strategies may find particular utility in cancers, like prostate cancer, which show low proliferation rates, in which other chemotherapeutic strategies that target rapidly proliferating cells have had limited success.

  2. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

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    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  3. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M; Howard, Jonathan M; Contreras, Jorge R; Fernando, Thilini R; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Sanford, Jeremy R; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-04-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease.

  4. Perturbed MafB/GATA1 axis after burn trauma bares the potential mechanism for immune suppression and anemia of critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas B; Posluszny, Joseph A; He, Li K; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Shankar, Ravi; Muthumalaiappan, Kuzhali

    2016-10-01

    Patients who survive initial burn injury are susceptible to nosocomial infections. Anemia of critical illness is a compounding factor in burn patients that necessitates repeated transfusions, which further increase their susceptibility to infections and sepsis. Robust host response is dependent on an adequate number and function of monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition to impaired RBC production, burn patients are prone to depletion of dendritic cells and an increase in deactivated monocytes. In steady-state hematopoiesis, RBCs, macrophages, and dendritic cells are all generated from a common myeloid progenitor within the bone marrow. We hypothesized in a mouse model of burn injury that an increase in myeloid-specific transcription factor V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B at the common myeloid progenitor stage steers their lineage potential away from the megakaryocyte erythrocyte progenitor production and drives the terminal fate of common myeloid progenitors to form macrophages vs. dendritic cells, with the consequences being anemia, monocytosis, and dendritic cell deficits. Results indicate that, even though burn injury stimulated bone marrow hematopoiesis by increasing multipotential stem cell production (Lin(neg)Sca1(pos)cKit(pos)), the bone marrow commitment is shifted away from the megakaryocyte erythrocyte progenitor and toward granulocyte monocyte progenitors with corresponding alterations in peripheral blood components, such as hemoglobin, hematocrit, RBCs, monocytes, and granulocytes. Furthermore, burn-induced V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B in common myeloid progenitors acts as a transcriptional activator of M-CSFR and a repressor of transferrin receptors, promoting macrophages and inhibiting erythroid differentiations while dictating a plasmacytoid dendritic cell phenotype. Results from small interfering RNA and gain-of-function (gfp-globin transcription factor 1 retrovirus) studies

  5. Reverse engineering of TLX oncogenic transcriptional networks identifies RUNX1 as tumor suppressor in T-ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gatta, Giusy; Palomero, Teresa; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Bansal, Mukesh; Carpenter, Zachary W; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Sole, Xavier; Xu, Luyao; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H; Rowe, Jacob M; Meijerink, Jules P; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2012-02-26

    The TLX1 and TLX3 transcription factor oncogenes have a key role in the pathogenesis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we used reverse engineering of global transcriptional networks to decipher the oncogenic regulatory circuit controlled by TLX1 and TLX3. This systems biology analysis defined T cell leukemia homeobox 1 (TLX1) and TLX3 as master regulators of an oncogenic transcriptional circuit governing T-ALL. Notably, a network structure analysis of this hierarchical network identified RUNX1 as a key mediator of the T-ALL induced by TLX1 and TLX3 and predicted a tumor-suppressor role for RUNX1 in T cell transformation. Consistent with these results, we identified recurrent somatic loss-of-function mutations in RUNX1 in human T-ALL. Overall, these results place TLX1 and TLX3 at the top of an oncogenic transcriptional network controlling leukemia development, show the power of network analyses to identify key elements in the regulatory circuits governing human cancer and identify RUNX1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in T-ALL.

  6. A universal assay for detection of oncogenic fusion transcripts by oligo microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Franclim R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to detect neoplasia-specific fusion genes is important not only in cancer research, but also increasingly in clinical settings to ensure that correct diagnosis is made and the optimal treatment is chosen. However, the available methodologies to detect such fusions all have their distinct short-comings. Results We describe a novel oligonucleotide microarray strategy whereby one can screen for all known oncogenic fusion transcripts in a single experiment. To accomplish this, we combine measurements of chimeric transcript junctions with exon-wise measurements of individual fusion partners. To demonstrate the usefulness of the approach, we designed a DNA microarray containing 68,861 oligonucleotide probes that includes oligos covering all combinations of chimeric exon-exon junctions from 275 pairs of fusion genes, as well as sets of oligos internal to all the exons of the fusion partners. Using this array, proof of principle was demonstrated by detection of known fusion genes (such as TCF3:PBX1, ETV6:RUNX1, and TMPRSS2:ERG from all six positive controls consisting of leukemia cell lines and prostate cancer biopsies. Conclusion This new method bears promise of an important complement to currently used diagnostic and research tools for the detection of fusion genes in neoplastic diseases.

  7. The transcription factor ATF3 acts as an oncogene in mouse mammary tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thames Howard D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of the bZip transcription factor, ATF3, in basal epithelial cells of transgenic mice under the control of the bovine cytokeratin-5 (CK5 promoter has previously been shown to induce epidermal hyperplasia, hair follicle anomalies and neoplastic lesions of the oral mucosa including squamous cell carcinomas. CK5 is known to be expressed in myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland, suggesting the possibility that transgenic BK5.ATF3 mice may exhibit mammary gland phenotypes. Methods Mammary glands from nulliparous mice in our BK5.ATF3 colony, both non-transgenic and transgenic, were examined for anomalies by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Nulliparous and biparous female mice were observed for possible mammary tumor development, and suspicious masses were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Human breast tumor samples, as well as normal breast tissue, were similarly analyzed for ATF3 expression. Results Transgenic BK5.ATF3 mice expressed nuclear ATF3 in the basal layer of the mammary ductal epithelium, and often developed squamous metaplastic lesions in one or more mammary glands by 25 weeks of age. No progression to malignancy was seen in nulliparous BK5.ATF3 or non-transgenic mice held for 16 months. However, biparous BK5.ATF3 mice developed mammary carcinomas with squamous metaplasia between 6 months and one year of age, reaching an incidence of 67%. Cytokeratin expression in the tumors was profoundly disturbed, including expression of CK5 and CK8 (characteristic of basal and luminal cells, respectively throughout the epithelial component of the tumors, CK6 (potentially a stem cell marker, CK10 (a marker of interfollicular epidermal differentiation, and mIRSa2 and mIRSa3.1 (markers of the inner root sheath of hair follicles. Immunohistochemical studies indicated that a subset of human breast tumors exhibit high levels of nuclear ATF3 expression. Conclusion Overexpression of ATF3 in CK5

  8. Dissection of the Oncogenic MYCN Transcriptional Network Reveals a Large Set of Clinically Relevant Cell Cycle Genes as Drivers of Neuroblastoma Tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.M. Murphy; P.G. Buckley; K. Bryan; K.M. Watters; J. Koster; P. van Sluis; J. Molenaar; R. Versteeg; R.L. Stallings

    2011-01-01

    Amplification of the oncogenic transcription factor MYCN plays a major role in the pathogenesis of several pediatric cancers, including neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, and rhabodomyosarcoma. For neuroblastoma, MYCN amplification is the most powerful genetic predictor of poor patient survival, yet th

  9. Oncogene-initiated aberrant signaling engenders the metastatic phenotype: synergistic transcription factor interactions are targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    Certain p21GTPases (notably Ras) and some of their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (e.g., Ost, Dbl, Tiam) and downstream mediators (e.g., Raf, Myc) have the potential to promote the development of malignancies because they can enhance the transcription of genes that foster the tumorigenic and metastatic phenotype. Among these are genes that stimulate cell proliferation, confer immortality, and facilitate the invasion of normal tissues. Oncogenes upstream of Ras-cell surface receptors such as ErbB2/Neu, Met, or Trk (and their ligands), and nonreceptor cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases such as Src and Abl-not only can act through Ras but also contribute additional signals. This review presents a synopsis of our understanding of signaling pathways controlled by the p21GTPases, with a focus on transcription factors regulated by the pathways. Mutations in one or more of the elements in these signaling pathways are invariably found in cancer cells. Crosstalk among the pathways may explain how some forms of stress can contribute to the development of a malignancy. Abnormal signaling leads to modified cytoskeletal structures and permanently altered (i.e., self-sustaining or epigenetic) transcription of target genes. A common therne is that genes whose transcription is elevated to the greatest extent by Ras often have in their promoters juxtaposed binding sites for two different transcription factors (particularly those in the Fos/Jun, CREB/ATF, NFkB, and Ets families) each of which is activated and such that together they synergize to augment transcription substantially. Some of these transcription factors can also act as oncogenes in certain cell types when appropriately modified and expressed. This unifying theme among many different cancers suggests that strategies to restore the balance among the signaling pathways or to suppress synergistic interactions between transcription factors may prove broadly useful in reversing the malignant phenotype.

  10. Recombinant MafA protein containing its own protein transduction domain stimulates insulin gene expression in IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Luo, Hailan; Wu, Huiling; Lan, Michael S; Tan, Jianming; Lu, Daru

    2011-07-18

    MafA, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription in β-cell. In this paper, we aimed to investigate whether the entire MafA protein has the self-delivery activity, and that the arginine- and lysine-rich sequence in MafA bZIP domain is an efficient protein transduction domain (PTD). Entire MafA protein internalization was evaluated with Western blot and immunofluorescence. The distribution of the PTD-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) was examined by fluorescent microscope observation. Luciferase reporter assay was used to investigate the effect of the transduced MafA protein on insulin 2 promoter activity. Additionally, we conducted RT-PCR to detect the expression of insulin mRNA in MafA treated IEC-6 cells. The arginine- and lysine-rich peptide of MafA serves as a novel PTD. PTD-EGFP can permeate into various cell types including Min6 (a β-cell line), and transduce in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cellular uptake of MafA PTD can be completely blocked by heparin, whereas cytochalasin D and amiloride were partially effective in blocking the PTD-EGFP protein entry. Transduced intact MafA protein behaves in the same way as the endogenous MafA, stimulating the transcription of insulin promoter and further inducing insulin expression in treated non-β-cell line (IEC-6). These results indicate that the MafA PTD could serve as a therapeutic delivery vehicle, and further suggest that MafA protein transduction could be a valuable strategy for enhancing insulin gene transcription without requiring gene transfer technology. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  12. Ets-1 is a transcriptional mediator of oncogenic nitric oxide signaling in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The Ets-1 transcription factor is a candidate breast cancer oncogene that regulates the expression of genes involved in tumor progression and metastasis. Ets-1 signaling has also been linked to the development of a basal-like breast cancer phenotype. We recently described a nitric oxide (NO)-induced gene signature that is associated with poor disease outcome in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer and contains both stem cell-like and basal-like components. Thus, we examined the role of Ets-1 in NO signaling and NO-induced phenotypes in ER- human breast cancer cells. Methods Promoter region analyses were performed on genes upregulated in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) high expressing tumors for Ets-binding sites. In vitro mechanisms were examined in human basal-like breast cancer cells lines. NO signaling effects were studied using either forced NOS2 expression or the use of a chemical NO-donor, diethlylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO). Results Promoter region analysis of genes that are up-regulated in human ER-negative breast tumors with high NOS2 expression revealed that the Ets-binding sequence is the only common promoter element present in all of these genes, indicating that Ets-1 is the key transcriptional factor down-stream of oncogenic NOS2-signaling. Accordingly, both forced NOS2 over-expression and exposure to NO-donors resulted in significant Ets-1 transcriptional activation in ER- breast cancer cells. Functional studies showed that NO activated Ets-1 transcriptional activity via a Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway by a mechanism that involved Ras S-nitrosylation. RNA knock-down of Ets-1 suppressed NO-induced expression of selected basal-like breast cancer markers such as P-cadherin, S100A8, IL-8 and αβ-crystallin. Additionally, Ets-1 knock-down reduced NO-mediated cellular proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin B activities, as well as matrigel invasion. Conclusions These data show that Ets-1 is a key

  13. A novel post-transcriptional splicing form of the acute T cell leukemia proto-oncogene Lmo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Lmo2 is a T cell leukemia-related proto-oncogene, which belongs to the LIM protein family. Previous work has established its key role in yolk sac erythropoiesis and adult hematopoiesis, and it is also necessary for regulating angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that this gene encodes a protein of 158 amino acids, consisting of two tandem cysteine-rich LIM domains, but the detailed mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. To further investigate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of Lmo2, we combined SMART PCR technology with 5′RACE and found a novel post-transcriptional splicing form of Lmo2 in adult human kidney. This alternative transcript contains only two exons, encoding a smaller protein of 151 amino acids. Interestingly, it shares the same reading frame as the original Lmo2, but differs in 7 amino acids at the N-terminus. A genomic DNA fragment (from ?294 nts to +180 nts) containing the putative promoter region has been inserted into the luciferase reporter gene vector pGL3-basic and showed stable promoter activity when transfected into COS7. RT-PCR analysis revealed that this variant transcript was expressed widely in human tissues and cell lines, suggesting its potential basic functional importance.

  14. NPM-ALK oncogenic tyrosine kinase controls T-cell identity by transcriptional regulation and epigenetic silencing in lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Martinengo, Cinzia; Voena, Claudia; Tondat, Fabrizio; Riera, Ludovica; di Celle, Paola Francia; Inghirami, Giorgio; Chiarle, Roberto

    2009-11-15

    Transformed cells in lymphomas usually maintain the phenotype of the postulated normal lymphocyte from which they arise. By contrast, anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a T-cell lymphoma with aberrant phenotype because of the defective expression of the T-cell receptor and other T-cell-specific molecules for still undetermined mechanisms. The majority of ALCL carries the translocation t(2;5) that encodes for the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK, fundamental for survival, proliferation, and migration of transformed T cells. Here, we show that loss of T-cell-specific molecules in ALCL cases is broader than reported previously and involves most T-cell receptor-related signaling molecules, including CD3epsilon, ZAP70, LAT, and SLP76. We further show that NPM-ALK, but not the kinase-dead NPM-ALK(K210R), downregulated the expression of these molecules by a STAT3-mediated gene transcription regulation and/or epigenetic silencing because this downregulation was reverted by treating ALCL cells with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine or by knocking down STAT3 through short hairpin RNA. Finally, NPM-ALK increased the methylation of ZAP70 intron 1-exon 2 boundary region, and both NPM-ALK and STAT3 regulated the expression levels of DNA methyltransferase 1 in transformed T cells. Thus, our data reveal that oncogene-deregulated tyrosine kinase activity controls the expression of molecules that determine T-cell identity and signaling.

  15. A novel dual kinase function of the RET proto-oncogene negatively regulates activating transcription factor 4-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Yarmand, Rozita; Sinha, Krishna M; Gururaj, Anupama E; Ahmed, Zamal; Rizvi, Yasmeen Q; Huang, Su-Chen; Ladbury, John E; Bogler, Oliver; Williams, Michelle D; Cote, Gilbert J; Gagel, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    The RET proto-oncogene, a tyrosine kinase receptor, is widely known for its essential role in cell survival. Germ line missense mutations, which give rise to constitutively active oncogenic RET, were found to cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, a dominant inherited cancer syndrome that affects neuroendocrine organs. However, the mechanisms by which RET promotes cell survival and prevents cell death remain elusive. We demonstrate that in addition to cytoplasmic localization, RET is localized in the nucleus and functions as a tyrosine-threonine dual specificity kinase. Knockdown of RET by shRNA in medullary thyroid cancer-derived cells stimulated expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a master transcription factor for stress-induced apoptosis, through activation of its target proapoptotic genes NOXA and PUMA. RET knockdown also increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We observed that RET physically interacted with and phosphorylated ATF4 at tyrosine and threonine residues. Indeed, RET kinase activity was required to inhibit the ATF4-dependent activation of the NOXA gene because the site-specific substitution mutations that block threonine phosphorylation increased ATF4 stability and activated its targets NOXA and PUMA. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ATF4 occupancy increased at the NOXA promoter in TT cells treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or the ATF4 inducer eeyarestatin as well as in RET-depleted TT cells. Together these findings reveal RET as a novel dual kinase with nuclear localization and provide mechanisms by which RET represses the proapoptotic genes through direct interaction with and phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of ATF4 during the pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer.

  16. Integrated transcript and genome analyses reveal NKX2-1 and MEF2C as potential oncogenes in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homminga, Irene; Pieters, Rob; Langerak, Anton W; de Rooi, Johan J; Stubbs, Andrew; Verstegen, Monique; Vuerhard, Maartje; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica; Kooi, Clarissa; Klous, Petra; van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Verhaaf, Brenda; Beverloo, H Berna; Horstmann, Martin; de Haas, Valerie; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Staal, Frank J T; de Laat, Wouter; Soulier, Jean; Sigaux, Francois; Meijerink, Jules P P

    2011-04-12

    To identify oncogenic pathways in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we combined expression profiling of 117 pediatric patient samples and detailed molecular-cytogenetic analyses including the Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C) method. Two T-ALL subtypes were identified that lacked rearrangements of known oncogenes. One subtype associated with cortical arrest, expression of cell cycle genes, and ectopic NKX2-1 or NKX2-2 expression for which rearrangements were identified. The second subtype associated with immature T cell development and high expression of the MEF2C transcription factor as consequence of rearrangements of MEF2C, transcription factors that target MEF2C, or MEF2C-associated cofactors. We propose NKX2-1, NKX2-2, and MEF2C as T-ALL oncogenes that are activated by various rearrangements.

  17. Regulation of transcription functions of the p53 tumor suppressor by the mdm-2 oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mdm-2, a zinc finger protein, negatively regulates the p53 tumor suppressor gene product by binding to it and preventing transcriptional activation (16). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Assays for p53 mediated transcription, repression and activation by mutant and wild-type p53 proteins were used to measure the ability of mdm-2 to block each activity. RESULTS: Mdm-2 was able to inhibit all three functions of the wild-type and mutant p53 activities; transcriptional activation by the wild-ty...

  18. Clonal selection for transcriptionally active viral oncogenes during progression to cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tine, BA Van; Kappes, JC; Banerjee, NS; Knops, J; Lai, L; Steenbergen, R.D.M.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Chatis, P; Broker, TR; Moen, PTJr; Chow, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    Primary keratinocytes immortalized by human papillomaviruses (HPVs), along with HPV-induced cervical carcinoma cell lines, are excellent models for investigating neoplastic progression to cancer. By simultaneously visualizing viral DNA and nascent viral transcripts in interphase nuclei, we demonstra

  19. Multiple-integrations of HPV16 genome and altered transcription of viral oncogenes and cellular genes are associated with the development of cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulian Lu

    Full Text Available The constitutive expression of the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 viral oncogenes is the major cause of cervical cancer. To comprehensively explore the composition of HPV16 early transcripts and their genomic annotation, cervical squamous epithelial tissues from 40 HPV16-infected patients were collected for analysis of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts (APOT. We observed different transcription patterns of HPV16 oncogenes in progression of cervical lesions to cervical cancer and identified one novel transcript. Multiple-integration events in the tissues of cervical carcinoma (CxCa are significantly more often than those of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL. Moreover, most cellular genes within or near these integration sites are cancer-associated genes. Taken together, this study suggests that the multiple-integrations of HPV genome during persistent viral infection, which thereby alters the expression patterns of viral oncogenes and integration-related cellular genes, play a crucial role in progression of cervical lesions to cervix cancer.

  20. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS OF V-MAF MUSCULOAPONEUROTIC FIBROSARCOMA ONCOGENE HOMOLOG B GENE AND NON-SYNDROMIC CLEFT LIP WITH OR WITHOUT CLEFT PALATE%肌腱膜纤维肉瘤癌基因B型同系物基因的单核苷酸多态性与非综合征型唇腭裂关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程红球; 黄恩民; 唐世杰; 许铭炎; 舒申友

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reveal the association between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B (MAFB) gene rsl7820943 locus and non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) in the southern Chinese Han population. Methods Genotyping of MAFB gene rsl7820943 polymorphism was carried out in 300 patients with NSCL/P, 354 normal controls, and an additional 168 case-parent trios with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Then based on the genotyping results, both a case-control association study and a case-parent trio association study were performed. Results Significant differences were found in the allele and genotype frequencies of rsl7820943 locus between case and control groups (Pallele=0.001 and Pgenotype=0.002, respectively). To be specific, the odds radio (OR) values and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) of allele T (frequencies of cases : controls = 0.358 : 0.448) and genotype TT (frequencies of cases : controls = 0.110 : 0.195) were ORT = 0.69 (95%CI: 0.55-0.86) and ORtt = 0.43 (95%CI: 0.26-0.70), respectively. Subsequent case-parent trio analysis also indicated an association between MAFB rsl7820943 variant and the risk of NSCL/P (ORt vs, c = 0.55, 95%CI: 0.41-0.75, P value of transmission disequilibrium test was 0.000). Conclusion Polymorphism of MAFB gene rsl7820943 locus is associated with NSCL/P in the southern Chinese Han population; MAFB rs 17820943 variant may be a susceptible gene of NSCL/P.%目的 揭示位于染色体20q12的肌腱膜纤维肉瘤癌基因B型同系物基因(v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B,MAFB)上游单核苷酸多态性位点rs17820943与中国南方汉族人群非综合征型唇腭裂(non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate,NSCL/P)发病的相关性.方法 采用引物单碱基延伸、基质辅助激光解析-电离飞行时间质谱分析法检测了300

  1. Hypomethylation of a LINE-1 promoter activates an alternate transcript of the MET oncogene in bladders with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Erika M; Byun, Hyang-Min; Han, Han F; Sharma, Shikhar; Nichols, Peter W; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Yang, Allen S; Jones, Peter A; Liang, Gangning

    2010-04-22

    It was recently shown that a large portion of the human transcriptome can originate from within repetitive elements, leading to ectopic expression of protein-coding genes. However the mechanism of transcriptional activation of repetitive elements has not been definitively elucidated. For the first time, we directly demonstrate that hypomethylation of retrotransposons can cause altered gene expression in humans. We also reveal that active LINE-1s switch from a tetranucleosome to dinucleosome structure, acquiring H2A.Z- and nucleosome-free regions upstream of TSSs, previously shown only at active single-copy genes. Hypomethylation of a specific LINE-1 promoter was also found to induce an alternate transcript of the MET oncogene in bladder tumors and across the entire urothelium of tumor-bearing bladders. These data show that, in addition to contributing to chromosomal instability, hypomethylation of LINE-1s can alter the functional transcriptome and plays a role not only in human disease but also in disease predisposition.

  2. Hypomethylation of a LINE-1 promoter activates an alternate transcript of the MET oncogene in bladders with cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M Wolff

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that a large portion of the human transcriptome can originate from within repetitive elements, leading to ectopic expression of protein-coding genes. However the mechanism of transcriptional activation of repetitive elements has not been definitively elucidated. For the first time, we directly demonstrate that hypomethylation of retrotransposons can cause altered gene expression in humans. We also reveal that active LINE-1s switch from a tetranucleosome to dinucleosome structure, acquiring H2A.Z- and nucleosome-free regions upstream of TSSs, previously shown only at active single-copy genes. Hypomethylation of a specific LINE-1 promoter was also found to induce an alternate transcript of the MET oncogene in bladder tumors and across the entire urothelium of tumor-bearing bladders. These data show that, in addition to contributing to chromosomal instability, hypomethylation of LINE-1s can alter the functional transcriptome and plays a role not only in human disease but also in disease predisposition.

  3. SOX2 gene regulates the transcriptional network of oncogenes and affects tumorigenesis of human lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Chen

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs have higher tumorigenesis properties than those of differentiated cancer cells and that transcriptional factor-SOX2 plays a vital role in maintaining the unique properties of CSCs; however, the function and underlying mechanism of SOX2 in carcinogenesis of lung cancer are still elusive. This study applied immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of SOX2 in human lung tissues of normal individuals as well as patients with adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell and small cell carcinoma and demonstrated specific overexpression of SOX2 in all types of lung cancer tissues. This finding supports the notion that SOX2 contributes to the tumorigenesis of lung cancer cells and can be used as a diagnostic probe. In addition, obviously higher expression of oncogenes c-MYC, WNT1, WNT2, and NOTCH1 was detected in side population (SP cells than in non-side population (NSP cells of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line-A549, revealing a possible mechanism for the tenacious tumorigenic potential of CSCs. To further elucidate the function of SOX2 in tumorigenesis of cancer cells, A549 cells were established with expression of luciferase and doxycycline-inducible shRNA targeting SOX2. We found silencing of SOX2 gene reduces the tumorigenic property of A549 cells with attenuated expression of c-MYC, WNT1, WNT2, and NOTCH1 in xenografted NOD/SCID mice. By using the RNA-Seq method, an additional 246 target cancer genes of SOX2 were revealed. These results present evidence that SOX2 may regulate the expression of oncogenes in CSCs to promote the development of human lung cancer.

  4. SOX2 gene regulates the transcriptional network of oncogenes and affects tumorigenesis of human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Xu, Yingxi; Chen, Yanan; Li, Xuefei; Mou, Wenjun; Wang, Lina; Liu, Yanhua; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Xiang, Rong; Lv, Dan; Li, Na

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have higher tumorigenesis properties than those of differentiated cancer cells and that transcriptional factor-SOX2 plays a vital role in maintaining the unique properties of CSCs; however, the function and underlying mechanism of SOX2 in carcinogenesis of lung cancer are still elusive. This study applied immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of SOX2 in human lung tissues of normal individuals as well as patients with adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell and small cell carcinoma and demonstrated specific overexpression of SOX2 in all types of lung cancer tissues. This finding supports the notion that SOX2 contributes to the tumorigenesis of lung cancer cells and can be used as a diagnostic probe. In addition, obviously higher expression of oncogenes c-MYC, WNT1, WNT2, and NOTCH1 was detected in side population (SP) cells than in non-side population (NSP) cells of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line-A549, revealing a possible mechanism for the tenacious tumorigenic potential of CSCs. To further elucidate the function of SOX2 in tumorigenesis of cancer cells, A549 cells were established with expression of luciferase and doxycycline-inducible shRNA targeting SOX2. We found silencing of SOX2 gene reduces the tumorigenic property of A549 cells with attenuated expression of c-MYC, WNT1, WNT2, and NOTCH1 in xenografted NOD/SCID mice. By using the RNA-Seq method, an additional 246 target cancer genes of SOX2 were revealed. These results present evidence that SOX2 may regulate the expression of oncogenes in CSCs to promote the development of human lung cancer.

  5. Increased levels of noisy splicing in cancers, but not for oncogene-derived transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lu; Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide analyses have detected numerous cancer-specific alternative splicing (AS) events. Whether transcripts containing cancer-specific AS events are likely to be translated into functional proteins or simply reflect noisy splicing, thereby determining their clinical relevance, is not known. Here we show that consistent with a noisy-splicing model, cancer-specific AS events generally tend to be rare, containing more premature stop codons and have less identifiable functional domai...

  6. Tandemly Integrated HPV16 Can Form a Brd4-Dependent Super-Enhancer-Like Element That Drives Transcription of Viral Oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Katharine E; Warburton, Alix; McBride, Alison A

    2016-09-13

    In cancer cells associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, the viral genome is very often found integrated into the cellular genome. The viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are transcribed from the viral promoter, and integration events that alter transcriptional regulation of this promoter contribute to carcinogenic progression. In this study, we detected highly enriched binding of the super-enhancer markers Brd4, MED1, and H3K27ac, visible as a prominent nuclear focus by immunofluorescence, at the tandemly integrated copies of HPV16 in cells of the cervical neoplasia cell line W12 subclone 20861. Tumor cells are often addicted to super-enhancer-driven oncogenes and are particularly sensitive to disruption of transcription factor binding to the enhancers. Treatment of 20861 cells with bromodomain inhibitors displaced Brd4 from the HPV integration site, greatly decreased E6/E7 transcription, and inhibited cellular proliferation. Thus, Brd4 activates viral transcription at this integration site, and strong selection for E6/E7 expression can drive the formation of a super-enhancer-like element to promote oncogenesis. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses play an essential role in the development of cervical cancer, and growth of these cancer cells requires continued expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. Integration of the virus into the host genome often results in deregulation of E6 and E7 expression, which provides a selective growth advantage and increases genetic instability of infected cells. We show here that tandemly integrated copies of the viral genome can form a super-enhancer-like element that drives E6/E7 transcription. Targeted disruption of factors binding to this element decreases viral transcription and causes cell death. Thus, cancer cells that harbor integrated HPV could be targeted by therapeutics that disrupt super-enhancer function. Copyright © 2016 Dooley et al.

  7. Maf acts downstream of ComGA to arrest cell division in competent cells of B. subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briley, Kenneth; Prepiak, Peter; Dias, Miguel J; Hahn, Jeanette; Dubnau, David

    2011-07-01

    Transformable (competent) cells of Bacillus subtilis are blocked in cell division because the traffic ATPase ComGA prevents the formation of FtsZ rings. Although ComGA-deficient cells elongate and form FtsZ rings, cell division remains blocked at a later stage and the cells become mildly filamented. Here we show that the highly conserved protein Maf is synthesized predominantly in competent cells under the direct control of the transcription factor ComK and is solely responsible for the later block in cell division. In vivo and in vitro data show that Maf binds to both ComGA and DivIVA. A point mutation in maf that interferes with Maf binding to DivIVA also interferes with the ability of Maf to inhibit cell division. Based on these findings, we propose that Maf and ComGA mediate mechanisms for the inhibition of cell division in competent cells with Maf acting downstream of ComGA. We further suggest that Maf must interact with DivIVA to inhibit cell division. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of oncogenic protein kinase Cϵ (PKCϵ) by STAT1 and Sp1 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, HongBin; Gutierrez-Uzquiza, Alvaro; Garg, Rachana; Barrio-Real, Laura; Abera, Mahlet B; Lopez-Haber, Cynthia; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Lu, Huaisheng; Abba, Martin; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2014-07-11

    Overexpression of PKCϵ, a kinase associated with tumor aggressiveness and widely implicated in malignant transformation and metastasis, is a hallmark of multiple cancers, including mammary, prostate, and lung cancer. To characterize the mechanisms that control PKCϵ expression and its up-regulation in cancer, we cloned an ∼ 1.6-kb promoter segment of the human PKCϵ gene (PRKCE) that displays elevated transcriptional activity in cancer cells. A comprehensive deletional analysis established two regions rich in Sp1 and STAT1 sites located between -777 and -105 bp (region A) and -921 and -796 bp (region B), respectively, as responsible for the high transcriptional activity observed in cancer cells. A more detailed mutagenesis analysis followed by EMSA and ChIP identified Sp1 sites in positions -668/-659 and -269/-247 as well as STAT1 sites in positions -880/-869 and -793/-782 as the elements responsible for elevated promoter activity in breast cancer cells relative to normal mammary epithelial cells. RNAi silencing of Sp1 and STAT1 in breast cancer cells reduced PKCϵ mRNA and protein expression, as well as PRKCE promoter activity. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between PKCϵ and phospho-Ser-727 (active) STAT1 levels in breast cancer cells. Our results may have significant implications for the development of approaches to target PKCϵ and its effectors in cancer therapeutics.

  9. Foxm1 transcription factor is required for the initiation of lung tumorigenesis by oncogenic Kras(G12D.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-C; Ustiyan, V; Zhang, Y; Cai, Y; Kalin, T V; Kalinichenko, V V

    2014-11-13

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of deaths in cancer patients in the United States. Identification of new molecular targets is clearly needed to improve therapeutic outcomes of this devastating human disease. Activating mutations in K-Ras oncogene and increased expression of FOXM1 protein are associated with poor prognosis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Transgenic expression of activated Kras(G12D) in mouse respiratory epithelium is sufficient to induce lung adenocarcinomas; however, transcriptional mechanisms regulated by K-Ras during the initiation of lung cancer remain poorly understood. Foxm1 transcription factor, a downstream target of K-Ras, stimulates cellular proliferation during embryogenesis, organ repair and tumor growth, but its role in tumor initiation is unknown. In the present study, we used transgenic mice expressing Kras(G12D) under control of Sftpc promoter to demonstrate that Foxm1 was induced in type II epithelial cells before the formation of lung tumors. Conditional deletion of Foxm1 from Kras(G12D)-expressing respiratory epithelium prevented the initiation of lung tumors in vivo. The loss of Foxm1 inhibited expression of K-Ras target genes critical for the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways, including Ikbkb, Nfkb1, Nfkb2, Rela, Jnk1, N-Myc, Pttg1 and Cdkn2a. Transgenic overexpression of activated FOXM1 mutant was sufficient to induce expression of these genes in alveolar type II cells. FOXM1 directly bound to promoter regions of Ikbkb, Nfkb2, N-Myc, Pttg1 and Cdkn2a, indicating that these genes are direct FOXM1 targets. FOXM1 is required for K-Ras-mediated lung tumorigenesis by activating genes critical for the NF-κB and JNK pathways.

  10. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun, E-mail: hirayama.dbio@mri.tmd.ac.jp; Nishina, Hiroshi, E-mail: nishina.dbio@mri.tmd.ac.jp

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  11. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP's functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP's co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  12. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  13. Tandemly Integrated HPV16 Can Form a Brd4-Dependent Super-Enhancer-Like Element That Drives Transcription of Viral Oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine E. Dooley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In cancer cells associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infections, the viral genome is very often found integrated into the cellular genome. The viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are transcribed from the viral promoter, and integration events that alter transcriptional regulation of this promoter contribute to carcinogenic progression. In this study, we detected highly enriched binding of the super-enhancer markers Brd4, MED1, and H3K27ac, visible as a prominent nuclear focus by immunofluorescence, at the tandemly integrated copies of HPV16 in cells of the cervical neoplasia cell line W12 subclone 20861. Tumor cells are often addicted to super-enhancer-driven oncogenes and are particularly sensitive to disruption of transcription factor binding to the enhancers. Treatment of 20861 cells with bromodomain inhibitors displaced Brd4 from the HPV integration site, greatly decreased E6/E7 transcription, and inhibited cellular proliferation. Thus, Brd4 activates viral transcription at this integration site, and strong selection for E6/E7 expression can drive the formation of a super-enhancer-like element to promote oncogenesis.

  14. The large Maf factor Traffic Jam controls gonad morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michelle A; Alls, Jeffrey D; Avancini, Rita M; Koo, Karen; Godt, Dorothea

    2003-11-01

    Interactions between somatic and germline cells are critical for the normal development of egg and sperm. Here we show that the gene traffic jam (tj) produces a soma-specific factor that controls gonad morphogenesis and is required for female and male fertility. tj encodes the only large Maf factor in Drosophila melanogaster, an orthologue of the atypical basic Leu zipper transcription factors c-Maf and MafB/Kreisler in vertebrates. Expression of tj occurs in somatic gonadal cells that are in direct contact with germline cells throughout development. In tj mutant gonads, somatic cells fail to inter-mingle and properly envelop germline cells, causing an early block in germ cell differentiation. In addition, tj mutant somatic cells show an increase in the level of expression for several adhesion molecules. We propose that tj is a critical modulator of the adhesive properties of somatic cells, facilitating germline-soma interactions that are essential for germ cell differentiation.

  15. MafB deficiency causes defective respiratory rhythmogenesis and fatal central apnea at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchi, Bruno; Kelly, Louise M; Viemari, Jean-Charles; Lafon, Isabelle; Burnet, Henri; Bévengut, Michelle; Tillmanns, Silke; Daniel, Laurent; Graf, Thomas; Hilaire, Gerard; Sieweke, Michael H

    2003-10-01

    The genetic basis for the development of brainstem neurons that generate respiratory rhythm is unknown. Here we show that mice deficient for the transcription factor MafB die from central apnea at birth and are defective for respiratory rhythmogenesis in vitro. MafB is expressed in a subpopulation of neurons in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), a putative principal site of rhythmogenesis. Brainstems from Mafb(-/-) mice are insensitive to preBötC electrolytic lesion or stimulation and modulation of rhythmogenesis by hypoxia or peptidergic input. Furthermore, in Mafb(-/-) mice the preBötC, but not major neuromodulatory groups, presents severe anatomical defects with loss of cellularity. Our results show an essential role of MafB in central respiratory control, possibly involving the specification of rhythmogenic preBötC neurons.

  16. PLL with MAF-Based Prefiltering Stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vidal, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In three-phase applications, the synchronousreference frame phase-locked loop (SRF-PLL) is a standard PLL, which benefits from a simple structure and satisfactory performance under symmetrical and undistorted grid conditions. Under unbalanced and harmonically distorted conditions, however......, it suffers from a very poor performance in the detection of grid voltage parameters. To deal with this challenge, incorporating different filters inside its control loop or before its input has been proposed. Recently, using the moving average filter (MAF) as the SRF-PLL prefiltering stage has been suggested...... in several works. The MAF is a linear-phase filter that can behave like an ideal lowpass filter under certain conditions. The main aim of this letter is to derive the small-signal model of the SRF-PLL with MAF-based prefiltering stage (briefly called the PMAF-PLL), which has not been presented before...

  17. Sub1 and Maf1, two effectors of RNA polymerase III, are involved in the yeast quiescence cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Acker

    Full Text Available Sub1 and Maf1 exert an opposite effect on RNA polymerase III transcription interfering with different steps of the transcription cycle. In this study, we present evidence that Sub1 and Maf1 also exhibit an opposite role on yeast chronological life span. First, cells lacking Sub1 need more time than wild type to exit from resting and this lag in re-proliferation is correlated with a delay in transcriptional reactivation. Second, our data show that the capacity of the cells to properly establish a quiescent state is impaired in the absence of Sub1 resulting in a premature death that is dependent on the Ras/PKA and Tor1/Sch9 signalling pathways. On the other hand, we show that maf1Δ cells are long-lived mutant suggesting a connection between Pol III transcription and yeast longevity.

  18. Involvement of V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 in regulation of transcription activity of MDR1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Xiaoqing Zeng; Tiancheng Luo; Wei Jin; Shiyao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Over-expression of MDR1 confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancers and remains a major cause for the failure of chemotherapy.In the present study,we found that V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2(ETS2) could activate MDR1 transcription and P-glyco-protein (P-gp) expression in SGC7901 cells.Knockdown of ETS2 attenuated MDR1 transcription and P-gp expression,and increased the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs that were transported by P-gp in SGC7901/VCR cells.ETS2 could bind to the ETS2 sites on the MDR1 promoter and activate its transcription.The regulation of MDR1 expression by ETS2 may provide potential ways to overcome MDR in cancer treatment.

  19. Oncogenic fusion proteins expressed in immature hematopoietic cells fail to recapitulate the transcriptional changes observed in human AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, N; Porse, B T

    2014-01-01

    in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor (HSPCs) cells transduced with oncogenic fusion genes are regarded as promising in vitromodels of their corresponding AML subtypes. Here, we critically assessed the potential of such in vitro models using an integrative bioinformatics approach...

  20. Control of MicroRNA-21 expression in colorectal cancer cells by oncogenic epidermal growth factor/Ras signaling and Ets transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Hanna B; Niemeyer, Brian F; Parrish, Janet K; Kerr, Carol A; Yaghi, Nasser K; Prescott, Jason D; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur; Jedlicka, Paul

    2012-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are important regulators of gene expression in normal physiology and disease, and are widely misexpressed in cancer. A number of studies have identified miR-21 as an important promoter of oncogenesis. However, as is true of most miRs, the mechanisms behind the aberrant expression of miR-21 in cancer are poorly understood. Herein, we examine the regulation of miR-21 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells by the oncogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF)/Ras pathway and by Ets transcription factors, modulators of epithelial oncogenesis that are frequently misexpressed in CRC. We show that EGF/Ras efficiently induces the miR-21 primary transcript, but this does not rapidly and simply translate into higher mature miR-21 levels. Rather, induction of mature miR-21 by constitutive activation of this pathway is slow, is associated with only minimal activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, and may involve stimulation of post-transcriptional processing by mechanisms other than Dicer stabilization. We further identify Ets transcription factors as modifiers of miR-21 expression in CRC. The effects of Ets factors on miR-21 expression are cell context-dependent, and appear to involve both direct and indirect mechanisms. The Ets factor Pea3 emerges from our studies as a consistent repressor of miR-21 transcription. Overall, our studies identify a complex relationship between oncogenic pathways and steady-state miR-21 levels in CRC, and highlight the need for greater understanding of the control of miR expression in cancer and other disease states.

  1. The LSST metrics analysis framework (MAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. L.; Yoachim, Peter; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Connolly, Andrew J.; Cook, Kem H.; Ivezic, Željko; Krughoff, K. S.; Petry, Catherine; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the Metrics Analysis Framework (MAF), an open-source python framework developed to provide a user-friendly, customizable, easily-extensible set of tools for analyzing data sets. MAF is part of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Simulations effort. Its initial goal is to provide a tool to evaluate LSST Operations Simulation (OpSim) simulated surveys to help understand the effects of telescope scheduling on survey performance, however MAF can be applied to a much wider range of datasets. The building blocks of the framework are Metrics (algorithms to analyze a given quantity of data), Slicers (subdividing the overall data set into smaller data slices as relevant for each Metric), and Database classes (to access the dataset and read data into memory). We describe how these building blocks work together, and provide an example of using MAF to evaluate different dithering strategies. We also outline how users can write their own custom Metrics and use these within the framework.

  2. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy); Delogu, Giuseppe [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Capobianco, Giampiero [Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Farace, Cristiano [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco [Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Madeddu, Roberto [Department of Biomedical Sciences-Histology, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Rome (Italy); Olivero, Martina [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy); Di Renzo, Maria Flavia, E-mail: mariaflavia.direnzo@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Institute for Cancer Research at Candiolo, Candiolo, Torino (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  3. FGF19-FGFR4 signaling elaborates lens induction with the FGF8-L-Maf cascade in the chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurose, Hitomi; Okamoto, Mayumi; Shimizu, Miyuki; Bito, Takaaki; Marcelle, Cristophe; Noji, Sumihare; Ohuchi, Hideyo

    2005-05-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family is known to be involved in vertebrate eye development. However, distinct roles of individual FGF members during eye development remain largely elusive. Here, we show a detailed expression pattern of Fgf19 in chick lens development. Fgf19 expression initiated in the forebrain, and then became restricted to the distal portion of the optic vesicle abutting the future lens placode, where FGF receptor 4 (Fgfr4), a receptor for FGF19, was expressed. Fgf8, a positive regulator for L-Maf, was expressed in a portion of the optic vesicle. To examine the role of FGF19 signaling during early eye development, Fgf19 was misexpressed near the presumptive lens ectoderm; however, no alteration in the expression of lens marker genes was observed. Conversely, a secreted form of FGFR4 was misexpressed to inhibit an FGF19 signal, resulting in the induction of L-Maf expression. To further define the relationship between L-Maf and Fgf19, L-Maf misexpression was performed, resulting in ectopic induction of Fgf19 expression by Hamburger and Hamilton's stage 12/13. Furthermore, misexpression of Fgf8 induced Fgf19 expression in addition to L-Maf. These results suggest that FGF19-FGFR4 signaling plays a role in early lens development in collaboration with FGF8 signaling and L-Maf transcriptional system.

  4. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  5. Identification of novel non-coding RNA-based negative feedback regulating the expression of the oncogenic transcription factor GLI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Victoria E; Rahman, Mohammed Ferdous-Ur; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G; Diao, Yumei; Liapi, Eleni; Sonkoly, Enikö; Ståhle, Mona; Pivarcsi, Andor; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna; Ramírez Clavijo, Sandra; Bürglin, Thomas R; Shimokawa, Takashi; Ramachandran, Saraswathi; Kapranov, Philipp; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2014-07-01

    Non-coding RNAs are a complex class of nucleic acids, with growing evidence supporting regulatory roles in gene expression. Here we identify a non-coding RNA located head-to-head with the gene encoding the Glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1), a transcriptional effector of multiple cancer-associated signaling pathways. The expression of this three-exon GLI1 antisense (GLI1AS) RNA in cancer cells was concordant with GLI1 levels. siRNAs knockdown of GLI1AS up-regulated GLI1 and increased cellular proliferation and tumor growth in a xenograft model system. Conversely, GLI1AS overexpression decreased the levels of GLI1, its target genes PTCH1 and PTCH2, and cellular proliferation. Additionally, we demonstrate that GLI1 knockdown reduced GLI1AS, while GLI1 overexpression increased GLI1AS, supporting the role of GLI1AS as a target gene of the GLI1 transcription factor. Activation of TGFβ and Hedgehog signaling, two known regulators of GLI1 expression, conferred a concordant up-regulation of GLI1 and GLI1AS in cancer cells. Finally, analysis of the mechanism underlying the interplay between GLI1 and GLI1AS indicates that the non-coding RNA elicits a local alteration of chromatin structure by increasing the silencing mark H3K27me3 and decreasing the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to this locus. Taken together, the data demonstrate the existence of a novel non-coding RNA-based negative feedback loop controlling GLI1 levels, thus expanding the repertoire of mechanisms regulating the expression of this oncogenic transcription factor.

  6. Transcription of the transforming genes of the oncogenic human papillomavirus-16 is stimulated by tumor promotors through AP1 binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Woonkhiong; Chong, T.; Bernard, H.U.; Klock, G. (National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore))

    1990-02-25

    The promoter P97 of human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) gives rise to transcripts that encode the principal transforming genes of the virus, E6 and E7. The activity of P97 is regulated by a cell-type-specific enhancer as well as by glucocorticoids and progesterone. The authors show here, that in CaSki cells, which contain HPV-16 genomes, P97 is also inducible by phorbol esters. Functional analysis of restriction fragments and oligonucleotides of the viral enhancer localizes two phorbol ester response elements on two transcription factor binding sites termed fp4e and fp9e. Sequence comparison, footprint analysis and bandshift competition of the cloned motifs suggest that both fp4e and fp9e are bound by the transcription factor AP1. These AP1 binding sites in HPV-16 and other papillomaviruses may provide a link between cellular oncogenes like jun, fos and possibly ras, whose transcription stimulating activity may lead to an elevated expression of the viral transforming genes E6 and E7.

  7. The mucin MUC4 is a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras oncogene in pancreatic cancer. Implication of MAPK/AP-1, NF-κB and RalB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Romain; Skrypek, Nicolas; Duchêne, Belinda; Renaud, Florence; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Vincent, Audrey; Porchet, Nicole; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Jonckheere, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-bound mucinMUC4 is a high molecularweight glycoprotein frequently deregulated in cancer. In pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, MUC4 is neo-expressed in the preneoplastic stages and thereafter is involved in cancer cell properties leading to cancer progression and chemoresistance. K-ras oncogene is a small GTPase of the RAS superfamily, highly implicated in cancer. K-ras mutations are considered as an initiating event of pancreatic carcinogenesis and K-ras oncogenic activities are necessary components of cancer progression. However, K-ras remains clinically undruggable. Targeting early downstream K-ras signaling in cancer may thus appear as an interesting strategy and MUC4 regulation by K-ras in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unknown. Using the Pdx1-Cre; LStopL-K-rasG12D mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we show that the in vivo early neo-expression of the mucin Muc4 in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (PanINs) induced by mutated K-ras is correlated with the activation of ERK, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. In vitro, transfection of constitutively activated K-rasG12V in pancreatic cancer cells led to the transcriptional upregulation of MUC4. This activation was found to be mediated at the transcriptional level by AP-1 and NF-κB transcription factors via MAPK, JNK and NF-κB pathways and at the posttranscriptional level by a mechanism involving the RalB GTPase. Altogether, these results identify MUC4 as a transcriptional and post-transcriptional target of K-ras in pancreatic cancer. This opens avenues in developing new approaches to target the early steps of this deadly cancer.

  8. Generation of functional insulin-producing cells from neonatal porcine liver-derived cells by PDX1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sik Ham

    Full Text Available Surrogate β-cells derived from stem cells are needed to cure type 1 diabetes, and neonatal liver cells may be an attractive alternative to stem cells for the generation of β-cells. In this study, we attempted to generate insulin-producing cells from neonatal porcine liver-derived cells using adenoviruses carrying three genes: pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor1 (PDX1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD and v-maf musculo aponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA, which are all known to play critical roles in pancreatic development. Isolated neonatal porcine liver-derived cells were sequentially transduced with triple adenoviruses and grown in induction medium containing a high concentration of glucose, epidermal growth factors, nicotinamide and a low concentration of serum following the induction of aggregation for further maturation. We noted that the cells displayed a number of molecular characteristics of pancreatic β-cells, including expressing several transcription factors necessary for β-cell development and function. In addition, these cells synthesized and physiologically secreted insulin. Transplanting these differentiated cells into streptozotocin-induced immunodeficient diabetic mice led to the reversal of hyperglycemia, and more than 18% of the cells in the grafts expressed insulin at 6 weeks after transplantation. These data suggested that neonatal porcine liver-derived cells can be differentiated into functional insulin-producing cells under the culture conditions presented in this report and indicated that neonatal porcine liver-derived cells (NPLCs might be useful as a potential source of cells for β-cell replacement therapy in efforts to cure type I diabetes.

  9. Presence of high risk HPV DNA but indolent transcription of E6/E7 oncogenes in invasive ductal carcinoma of breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Depu; Fu, Ling; Shah, Walayat; Zhang, Jingwen; Yan, Yan; Ge, Xinhong; He, Jianjun; Wang, Yili; Li, Xu

    2016-12-01

    The causative role of high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) in breast cancer development is controversial, though a number of reports have identified HR-HPV DNA in breast cancer specimens. Nevertheless, most studies to date have focused primarily on viral DNA rather than the viral transcription. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of HR-HPV in breast cancer tissues at HPV DNA level and HPV oncogenes mRNA level by in situ hybridization (ISH). One hundred and forty six (146) cases of breast invasive ductal carcinoma(IDC) and 83 cases of benign breast lesions were included in the study. Type specific oligonucleotide probes were used for the DNA detection of HPV 16,18 and 58 by ISH. HR-HPV oncogenes mRNA was assayed by novel RNAscope HR-HPV HR7 assay ISH. p16 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC). HR-HPV 16,18 and 58 DNA were detected in 52 out of 146 (35.6%) IDC and in 3 out of 83 (3.6%) benign breast lesions by ISH. The HR-HPV mRNAs was detected only in a few specimens with strong HPV DNA positivity(4/25) in a few scattered cancer cells with very weak punctate nuclear and/or cytoplasmic staining. p16 over-expression did not correlate with the HPV DNA positive breast cancer samples(17/52 HPVDNA+ vs 28/94 HPV DNA-, p=0.731). HR-HPVs certainly exist in breast cancer tissue with less active transcription, which implies that the causal role of HPV in breast cancer development need further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. High-resolution three-dimensional NMR structure of the KRAS proto-oncogene promoter reveals key features of a G-quadruplex involved in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkour, Abdelaziz; Marquevielle, Julien; Ivashchenko, Stefaniia; Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Salgado, Gilmar F

    2017-05-12

    Non-canonical base pairing within guanine-rich DNA and RNA sequences can produce G-quartets, whose stacking leads to the formation of a G-quadruplex (G4). G4s can coexist with canonical duplex DNA in the human genome and have been suggested to suppress gene transcription, and much attention has therefore focused on studying G4s in promotor regions of disease-related genes. For example, the human KRAS proto-oncogene contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element located upstream of the major transcription start site. The KRAS nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) region contains a G-rich element (22RT; 5'-AGGGCGGTGTGGGAATAGGGAA-3') and encompasses a Myc-associated zinc finger-binding site that regulates KRAS transcription. The NEH region therefore has been proposed as a target for new drugs that control KRAS transcription, which requires detailed knowledge of the NHE structure. In this study, we report a high-resolution NMR structure of the G-rich element within the KRAS NHE. We found that the G-rich element forms a parallel structure with three G-quartets connected by a four-nucleotide loop and two short one-nucleotide double-chain reversal loops. In addition, a thymine bulge is found between G8 and G9. The loops of different lengths and the presence of a bulge between the G-quartets are structural elements that potentially can be targeted by small chemical ligands that would further stabilize the structure and interfere or block transcriptional regulators such as Myc-associated zinc finger from accessing their binding sites on the KRAS promoter. In conclusion, our work suggests a possible new route for the development of anticancer agents that could suppress KRAS expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. cDNA Microarrays Detect Activation of a Myogenic Transcription Program by the PAX3-FKHR Fusion Oncogene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Javed Khan; Michael L. Bittner; Lao H. Saal; Ulrike Teichmann; David O. Azorsa; Gerald C. Gooden; William J. Pavan; Jeffrey M. Trent; Paul S. Meltzer

    1999-01-01

    .... To investigate the actions of these transcription factors, both Pax3 and PAX3-FKHR were introduced into NIH 3T3 cells, and the resultant gene expression changes were analyzed with a murine cDNA micro...

  12. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations.

  13. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia.

  14. Increased transcription of the c-myc oncogene in two methylcholanthrene-induced quail fibroblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saule, S.; Martin, P.; Gegonne, A.; Begue, A.; Lagrou, C.; Stehelin, D.

    1984-12-01

    The expression of three c-onc genes (c-erb, c-myc, c-myb) was investigated in five cell lines established from fibrosarcomas induced with 20-methylcholanthrene (MCA) of Japanese quails. These cell lines showed low levels of the three c-onc genes, with the exception of two cell lines that accumulated moderate (MCAQ 1-4) and large amounts (MCAQ 3-5) of c-myc RNA. Molecular cloning and restriction endonuclease analyses indicated that expression of c-myc in these two cell lines were not associated with detectable rearrangements in the c-myc locus, that the size of the c-myc transcript (2.7 kb) in MCAQ 3-5 was similar to that of the normal c-myc messenger RNAs (mRNA) and that the transcriptional activatin observed in MCAQ 3-5 was not mediated by the LTR (long terminal repeat) of a proximate ALV (avian leukosis virus) provirus. Finally, when analyzed with the restriction enzymes Msp I and Hpa II, the c-myc locus of MCAQ 3-5 and MCAQ 1-4 was found hypomethylated as compared with that of the other cell lines tested that show low levels of c-myc transcripts. Results suggest that one of the ways methylcholanthrene could mediate transformation is by inducing an abnormal regulation of the c-myc gene.

  15. The proto-oncogene LRF is under post-transcriptional control of MiR-20a: implications for senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Poliseno

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short 20-22 nucleotide RNA molecules that act as negative regulators of gene expression via translational repression: they have been shown to play a role in development, proliferation, stress response, and apoptosis. The transcriptional regulator LRF (Leukemia/lymphoma Related Factor has been shown to prevent p19ARF transcription and consequently to inhibit senescence in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF. Here we report, for the first time, that LRF is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-20a. Using a gene reporter assay, direct interaction of miR-20a with the LRF 3'UTR is demonstrated. To validate the interaction miR-20a/3'UTR LRF miR-20a was over-expressed, either by transient transfection or retroviral infection, in wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts and in LRF-null MEF derived from LRF knock-out mice. We observed LRF decrease, p19ARF increase, inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of senescence. The comparison of miR-20a activity in wt and LRF-null MEF indicates that LRF is the main mediator of the miR-20a-induced senescence and that other targets are cooperating. As LRF down-regulation/p19ARF induction is always accompanied by E2F1 down-regulation and increase of p16, we propose that all these events act in synergy to accomplish miR-20a-induced senescence in MEF. Senescence has been recently revaluated as a tumor suppressor mechanism, alternative to apoptosis; from this point of view the discovery of new physiological "senescence inducer" appears to be promising as this molecule could be used as anticancer drug.

  16. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  17. Analysis of tumor progression by transcriptional profiling of mouse MK16 cell lines transformed with human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes and activated H-ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smahel, Michal; Smahelová, Jana; Tejklová, Pavla; Tachezy, Ruth; Jelínek, Frantisek

    2005-12-01

    A better understanding of the molecular basis of tumor progression and invasion is needed to improve therapy for malignant tumors. Recently, we established a mouse metastatic MK16 model by transduction of secondary kidney cells with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 oncogenes and human H-ras activated by G12V mutation. In this study, we extended the model to MK16 cell lines derived from lung metastases and compared the oncogenicity of seven cell lines successively isolated from primary tumors or metastases. By observing the formation and growth of subcutaneous tumors and generation of lung metastasis, we showed a gradual increase in oncogenicity of MK16 cell lines. Interestingly, we demonstrated metastatic potential of MK16/A cells with low oncogenic potential in primary tumor development. To detect changes in gene expression associated with increasing oncogenicity of MK16 cell lines, we performed transcriptional profiling with the Atlas Plastic Mouse 5K microarray. We found that a substantial proportion of up-regulated genes encoded ribosomal proteins. Among the down-regulated genes, the highest number (n=10) belonged to a group coding for transcription factors. Expression of two of these, Pou3f2 and Gtl3, was reduced both in cells derived from primary tumors and those isolated from metastases. Furthermore, microarray hybridization suggested that the down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16(Ink4a) and p57(Kip2) and up-regulation of A6 and A10 members of the S100 protein family might play a role in the increase of MK16 oncogenicity.

  18. Global real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detecting proto-oncogenes associated with 14q32 chromosomal translocation as a valuable marker for predicting survival in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Atsushi; Tajima, Emi; Uranishi, Miyuki; Totani, Haruhito; Asao, Yu; Ogura, Hiroka; Masaki, Ayako; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Mori, Fumiko; Ito, Asahi; Yano, Hiroki; Ri, Masaki; Kayukawa, Satoshi; Kataoka, Takae; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Ishida, Takashi; Hayami, Yoshihito; Hanamura, Ichiro; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Yasufumi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Iida, Shinsuke

    2013-12-01

    CCND1, FGFR3 and c-MAF mRNA expression of tumor samples from 123 multiple myeloma patients were analyzed by global RQ/RT-PCR. CCND1, FGFR3 and c-MAF were positive in 44 (36%), 28 (23%) and 16 (13%) of patients, respectively. In 7 patients, both FGFR3 and c-MAF were positive. The expression of c-MAF was independent unfavorable prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Autologous stem cell transplantation improved progression-free survival of CCND1-positive patients. Bortezomib, thalidomide or lenalidomide extended OS of FGFR3 and/or c-MAF-positive patients. Thus, CCND1, FGFR3 and c-MAF mRNA expression can predict survival and is useful for planning stratified treatment strategies for myeloma patients.

  19. Identification of polymorphisms and transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene KIT located on both autosomal and B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, W J; Yan, S Q; Sun, J H

    2016-02-05

    B chromosomes are dispensable and co-exist with autosomal and sex chromosomes. The karyotype of the Chinese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides) comprises 0-4 B chromosomes. The proto-oncogene KIT is found on all B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog. In the present study, partial DNA and mRNA sequences of KIT were amplified and sequenced from four individuals containing B chromosomes. Sequence analyses revealed that polymorphisms including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inserts/deletions were rich in the KIT gene of Chinese raccoon dog at the genomic level. However, no polymorphism was detected at the mRNA level. A comparison of mRNA sequences from Chinese raccoon dogs with the corresponding sequences derived from arctic fox and dog, which do not contain B chromosomes, revealed the mRNA sequences of the 10 SNPs to be identical between these three species. Therefore, these findings suggest that KIT located on the B chromosomes in Chinese raccoon dog lacks transcriptional activity.

  20. Dissection of the oncogenic MYCN transcriptional network reveals a large set of clinically relevant cell cycle genes as drivers of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Derek M; Buckley, Patrick G; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Koster, Jan; van Sluis, Peter; Molenaar, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-06-01

    Amplification of the oncogenic transcription factor MYCN plays a major role in the pathogenesis of several pediatric cancers, including neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, and rhabodomyosarcoma. For neuroblastoma, MYCN amplification is the most powerful genetic predictor of poor patient survival, yet the mechanism by which MYCN drives tumorigenesis is only partially understood. To gain an insight into the distribution of MYCN binding and to identify clinically relevant MYCN target genes, we performed an integrated analysis of MYCN ChIP-chip and mRNA expression using the MYCN repressible SHEP-21N neuroblastoma cell line. We hypothesized that genes exclusively MYCN bound in SHEP-21N cells over-expressing MYCN would be enriched for direct targets which contribute to the process of disease progression. Integrated analysis revealed that MYCN drives tumorigenesis predominantly as a positive regulator of target gene transcription. A high proportion of genes (24%) that are MYCN bound and up-regulated in the SHEP-21N model are significantly associated with poor overall patient survival (OS) in a set of 88 tumors. In contrast, the proportion of genes down-regulated when bound by MYCN in the SHEP-21N model and which are significantly associated with poor overall patient survival when under-expressed in primary tumors was significantly lower (5%). Gene ontology analysis determined a highly statistically significant enrichment for cell cycle related genes within the over-expressed MYCN target group which were also associated with poor OS. We conclude that the over-expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding and over-expression of genes associated with cell cycle regulation which are significantly correlated with poor OS and MYCN amplification.

  1. THE CANNABINOID WIN 55,212-2 DECREASES SPECIFICITY PROTEIN (Sp) TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND THE ONCOGENIC CAP PROTEIN eIF4E IN COLON CANCER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    2,3-Dihydro-5-methyl-3-([morpholinyl]methyl)pyrollo(1,2,3-de)-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-[1-naphthaleny]methanone [WIN 55,212-2 (WIN)] is a synthetic cannabinoid that inhibits RKO, HT-29 and SW480 cell growth, induced apoptosis, and downregulated expression of survivin, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR1). WIN also decreased expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4, and this is consistent with the observed downregulation of the aforementioned Sp-regulated genes. In addition, we also observed by RNA interference (RNAi) that the oncogenic cap protein eIF4E was an Sp-regulated gene also downregulated by WIN in colon cancer cells. WIN-mediated repression of Sp proteins was not affected by CB receptor antagonists or by knockdown of the receptor but was attenuated by the phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or by knockdown of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). WIN-mediated repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to PP2A-dependent downregulation of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and induction of miR-27a-regulated ZBTB10 which has previously been characterized as an “Sp repressor”. The results demonstrate that the anticancer activity of WIN is due, in part, to PP2A-dependent disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 and ZBTB10-mediated repression of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes including eIF4E. PMID:24030632

  2. TAT-mediated transduction of MafA protein in utero results in enhanced pancreatic insulin expression and changes in islet morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Vargas

    Full Text Available Alongside Pdx1 and Beta2/NeuroD, the transcription factor MafA has been shown to be instrumental in the maintenance of the beta cell phenotype. Indeed, a combination of MafA, Pdx1 and Ngn3 (an upstream regulator of Beta2/NeuroD was recently reported to lead to the effective reprogramming of acinar cells into insulin-producing beta cells. These experiments set the stage for the development of new strategies to address the impairment of glycemic control in diabetic patients. However, the clinical applicability of reprogramming in this context is deemed to be poor due to the need to use viral vehicles for the delivery of the above factors. Here we describe a recombinant transducible version of the MafA protein (TAT-MafA that penetrates across cell membranes with an efficiency of 100% and binds to the insulin promoter in vitro. When injected in utero into living mouse embryos, TAT-MafA significantly up-regulates target genes and induces enhanced insulin production as well as cytoarchitectural changes consistent with faster islet maturation. As the latest addition to our armamentarium of transducible proteins (which already includes Pdx1 and Ngn3, the purification and characterization of a functional TAT-MafA protein opens the door to prospective therapeutic uses that circumvent the use of viral delivery. To our knowledge, this is also the first report on the use of protein transduction in utero.

  3. Structure of the leukemia oncogene LMO2: implications for the assembly of a hematopoietic transcription factor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Omari, Kamel; Hoosdally, Sarah J; Tuladhar, Kapil; Karia, Dimple; Vyas, Paresh; Patient, Roger; Porcher, Catherine; Mancini, Erika J

    2011-02-17

    The LIM only protein 2 (LMO2) is a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cell development whose ectopic expression in T cells leads to the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Through its LIM domains, LMO2 is thought to function as the scaffold for a DNA-binding transcription regulator complex, including the basic helix-loop-helix proteins SCL/TAL1 and E47, the zinc finger protein GATA-1, and LIM-domain interacting protein LDB1. To understand the role of LMO2 in the formation of this complex and ultimately to dissect its function in normal and aberrant hematopoiesis, we solved the crystal structure of LMO2 in complex with the LID domain of LDB1 at 2.4 Å resolution. We observe a largely unstructured LMO2 kept in register by the LID binding both LIM domains. Comparison of independently determined crystal structures of LMO2 reveals large movements around a conserved hinge between the LIM domains. We demonstrate that such conformational flexibility is necessary for binding of LMO2 to its partner protein SCL/TAL1 in vitro and for the function of this complex in vivo. These results, together with molecular docking and analysis of evolutionarily conserved residues, yield the first structural model of the DNA-binding complex containing LMO2, LDB1, SCL/TAL1, and GATA-1.

  4. Identification of a provirally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene in an avian nephroblastoma via a novel procedure: cDNA cloning of a chimaeric viral-host transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, D; Papkoff, J; Moscovici, C; Varmus, H E

    1986-01-01

    Retrovirus without oncogenes often exert their neoplastic potential as insertional mutagens of cellular proto-oncogenes. This may be associated with the production of chimaeric viral-host transcripts; in these cases; activated cellular genes can be identified by obtaining cDNA clones of bipartite RNAs. This approach was used in the analysis of chicken nephroblastomas induced by myeloblastosis-associated virus (MAV). One tumor contained a novel mRNA species initiated within a MAV LTR. cDNA cloning revealed that this mRNA encodes a protein of 189 amino acids, identical to that of normal human Ha-ras-1 at 185 positions, including positions implicated in oncogenic activation of ras proto-oncogenes; there are no differences between the coding sequences of presumably normal Ha-ras cDNA clones from chicken lymphoma RNA and the tumor-derived cDNAs. The chimaeric mRNA in the nephroblastoma is at least 25-fold more abundant than c-Ha-ras mRNA in normal kidney tissue, and a 21-kd ras-related protein is present in relatively large amounts in the tumor. We conclude that a quantitative change in c-Ha-ras gene expression results from an upstream insertion mutation and presumably contributes to tumorigenesis in this single case. Little or no increase in c-Ha-ras RNA or protein was observed in other nephroblastomas. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 10. PMID:3011401

  5. MAFCO: a compression tool for MAF files.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M O Matos

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the cost of genomic sequencing has been decreasing so much that researchers all over the world accumulate huge amounts of data for present and future use. These genomic data need to be efficiently stored, because storage cost is not decreasing as fast as the cost of sequencing. In order to overcome this problem, the most popular general-purpose compression tool, gzip, is usually used. However, these tools were not specifically designed to compress this kind of data, and often fall short when the intention is to reduce the data size as much as possible. There are several compression algorithms available, even for genomic data, but very few have been designed to deal with Whole Genome Alignments, containing alignments between entire genomes of several species. In this paper, we present a lossless compression tool, MAFCO, specifically designed to compress MAF (Multiple Alignment Format files. Compared to gzip, the proposed tool attains a compression gain from 34% to 57%, depending on the data set. When compared to a recent dedicated method, which is not compatible with some data sets, the compression gain of MAFCO is about 9%. Both source-code and binaries for several operating systems are freely available for non-commercial use at: http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/mafco.

  6. Modulatory role of phospholipase D in the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT-3 by thyroid oncogenic kinase RET/PTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong Wook

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RET/PTC (rearranged in transformation/papillary thyroid carcinomas gene rearrangements are the most frequent genetic alterations identified in papillary thyroid carcinoma. Although it has been established that RET/PTC kinase plays a crucial role in intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular transformation, growth, and proliferation in thyroid epithelial cells, the upstream signaling that leads to the activation of RET/PTC is largely unknown. Based on the observation of high levels of PLD expression in human papillary thyroid cancer tissues, we investigated whether PLD plays a role in the regulating the RET/PTC-induced STAT3 activation. Methods Cancer tissue samples were obtained from papillary thyroid cancer patients (n = 6. The expression level of PLD was examined using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Direct interaction between RET/PTC and PLD was analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation assay. PLD activity was assessed by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidylbutanol, the product of PLD-mediated transphosphatidylation, in the presence of n-butanol. The transcriptional activity of STAT3 was assessed by m67 luciferase reporter assay. Results In human papillary thyroid cancer, the expression levels of PLD2 protein were higher than those in the corresponding paired normal tissues. PLD and RET/PTC could be co-immunoprecipitated from cells where each protein was over-expressed. In addition, the activation of PLD by pervanadate triggered phosphorylation of tyrosine 705 residue on STAT-3, and its phosphorylation was dramatically higher in TPC-1 cells (from papillary carcinoma that have an endogenous RET/PTC1 than in ARO cells (from anaplastic carcinoma without alteration of total STAT-3 expression. Moreover, the RET/PTC-mediated transcriptional activation of STAT-3 was synergistically increased by over-expression of PLD, whereas the PLD activity as a lipid hydrolyzing enzyme was not affected by RET

  7. mTOR associates with TFIIIC, is found at tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, and targets their repressor Maf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantidakis, Theodoros; Ramsbottom, Ben A; Birch, Joanna L; Dowding, Sarah N; White, Robert J

    2010-06-29

    Synthesis of tRNA and 5S rRNA by RNA polymerase (pol) III is regulated by the mTOR pathway in mammalian cells. The mTOR kinase localizes to tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, providing an opportunity for direct control. Its presence at these sites can be explained by interaction with TFIIIC, a DNA-binding factor that recognizes the promoters of these genes. TFIIIC contains a TOR signaling motif that facilitates its association with mTOR. Maf1, a repressor that binds and inhibits pol III, is phosphorylated in a mTOR-dependent manner both in vitro and in vivo at serine 75, a site that contributes to its function as a transcriptional inhibitor. Proximity ligation assays confirm the interaction of mTOR with Maf1 and TFIIIC in nuclei. In contrast to Maf1 regulation in yeast, no evidence is found for nuclear export of Maf1 in response to mTOR signaling in HeLa cells. We conclude that mTOR associates with TFIIIC, is recruited to pol III-transcribed genes, and relieves their repression by Maf1.

  8. Small Cytoskeleton-Associated Molecule, Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Oncogene Partner 2/Wound Inducible Transcript-3.0 (FGFR1OP2/wit3.0), Facilitates Fibroblast-Driven Wound Closure

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Audrey; Hokugo, Akishige; Choi, Jae; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Wounds created in the oral cavity heal rapidly and leave minimal scarring. We have examined a role of a previously isolated cDNA from oral wounds encoding wound inducible transcript-3.0 (wit3.0), also known as fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 oncogene partner 2 (FGFR1OP2). FGFR1OP2/wit3.0 was highly expressed in oral wound fibroblasts without noticeable up-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin. In silico analyses, denaturing and nondenaturing gel Western blot, and immunocytology together dem...

  9. MAF-PLL With Phase-Lead Compensator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Abusorrah, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    A basic approach to improve the filtering capability of a standard phase-locked loop (PLL) is to incorporate a moving average filter (MAF) into its control loop. This improvement, however, is at the cost of a slow transient response for the PLL, which is undesirable in most applications....... It is shown in this paper that this problem can be alleviated by adding a phase-lead compensator in the MAF-PLL control loop. The effectiveness of the suggested approach is confirmed through numerical results....

  10. Integrated transcript and genome analyses reveal NKX2-1 and MEF2C as potential oncogenes in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homminga, I.; Pieters, R.; Langerak, A.W.; de Rooi, J.J.; Stubbs, A.; Verstegen, M.; Vuerhard, M.; Buijs-Gladdines, J.; Kooi, C.; Klous, P.; van Vlierberghe, P.; Ferrando, A.A.; Cayuela, J.M.; Verhaaf, B.; Beverloo, H.B.; Horstmann, M.; de Haas, V.; Wiekmeijer, A.S.; Pike-Overzet, K.; Staal, F.J.; de Laat, W.; Soulier, J.; Sigaux, F.; Meijerink, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    To identify oncogenic pathways in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we combined expression profiling of 117 pediatric patient samples and detailed molecular-cytogenetic analyses including the Chromosome Conformation Capture on Chip (4C) method. Two T-ALL subtypes were identified that lack

  11. Characterization of the Maf family of polymorphic toxins in pathogenic Neisseria species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Jamet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In addition to harmless commensal species, Neisseria genus encompasses two pathogenic species, N. meningitidis (the meningococcus and N. gonorrhoeae (the gonococcus, which are responsible for meningitis and genital tract infections, respectively. Since the publication of the first Neisseria genome in 2000, the presence of several genomic islands (GI comprising maf genes has been intriguing. These GIs account for approximately 2% of the genome of the pathogenic Neisseria species and the function of the proteins encoded by maf genes remained unknown. We showed that maf genes encode a functional toxin-immunity system where MafB is a toxin neutralized by an immunity protein named MafI. A strain can harbor several MafB/MafI modules with distinct toxic activities. MafB toxins are polymorphic toxins with a conserved N-terminal region and a variable C-terminal region. MafB N-terminal regions consist of a signal peptide and a domain named DUF1020 that is only found in the genus Neisseria. MafB C-terminal regions are highly polymorphic and encode toxic activities. We evidenced the presence of MafB in the culture supernatant of meningococcal cells and we observed a competitive advantage for a strain overexpressing a MafB toxin. Therefore, we characterized a highly variable family of toxin-immunity modules found in multiple loci in pathogenic Neisseria species.

  12. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Maf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Maf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Maf All cell types SRX187205,SRX187204,SR...X288146,SRX288145,SRX187206,SRX187203 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Maf.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Maf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Maf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Maf All cell types SRX288146,SRX288145,SR...X187205,SRX187204,SRX187206,SRX187203 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Maf.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Maf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Maf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Maf All cell types SRX187205,SRX187204,SR...X288145,SRX288146,SRX187206,SRX187203 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Maf.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Maf.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Maf.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Maf All cell types SRX187205,SRX288146,SR...X187204,SRX288145,SRX187206,SRX187203 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Maf.AllCell.bed ...

  16. MAF2 Is Regulated by Temperature-Dependent Splicing and Represses Flowering at Low Temperatures in Parallel with FLM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara A Airoldi

    Full Text Available Plants enter their reproductive phase when the environmental conditions are favourable for the successful production of progeny. The transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is influenced by several environmental factors including ambient temperature. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP is critical for this pathway; svp mutants cannot modify their flowering time in response to ambient temperature. SVP encodes a MADS-box transcription factor that directly represses genes that promote flowering. SVP binds DNA in complexes with other MADS-box transcription factors, including FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM, which acts with SVP to repress the floral transition at low temperatures. Small temperature changes post-transcriptionally regulate FLM through temperature-dependent alternative splicing (TD-AS. As ambient temperature increases, the predominant FLM splice isoform shifts to encode a protein incapable of exerting a repressive effect on flowering. Here we characterize a closely related MADS-box transcription factor, MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING2 (MAF2, which has independently evolved TD-AS. At low temperatures the most abundant MAF2 splice variant encodes a protein that interacts with SVP to repress flowering. At increased temperature the relative abundance of splice isoforms shifts in favour of an intron-retaining variant that introduces a premature termination codon. We show that this isoform encodes a protein that cannot interact with SVP or repress flowering. At lower temperatures MAF2 and SVP repress flowering in parallel with FLM and SVP, providing an additional input to sense ambient temperature for the control of flowering.

  17. The RNA helicase/transcriptional co-regulator, p68 (DDX5), stimulates expression of oncogenic protein kinase, Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1), and is associated with elevated PLK1 levels in human breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R Sumanth; Nicol, Samantha M; Quinlan, Philip R; Thompson, Alastair M; Meek, David W; Fuller-Pace, Frances V

    2014-01-01

    p68 (DDX5) acts both as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and as a transcriptional co-activator of several cancer-associated transcription factors, including the p53 tumor suppressor. p68 is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of cancers, but the oncogenic drive for, or the consequences of, these expression changes remain unclear. Here we show that elevated p68 expression in a cohort of human breast cancers is associated significantly with elevated levels of the oncogenic protein kinase, Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1). Patients expressing detectable levels of both p68 and PLK1 have a poor prognosis, but only if they also have mutation in the TP53 gene (encoding p53), suggesting that p68 can regulate PLK1 levels in a manner that is suppressed by p53. In support of this hypothesis, we show that p68 stimulates expression from the PLK1 promoter, and that silencing of endogenous p68 expression downregulates endogenous PLK1 gene expression. In the absence of functional p53, p68 stimulates the expression of PLK1 both at basal levels and in response to the clinically relevant drug, etoposide. In keeping with a role as a transcriptional activator/co-activator, chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis shows that p68 is associated with the PLK1 promoter, irrespective of the p53 status. However, its recruitment is stimulated by etoposide in cells lacking p53, suggesting that p53 can oppose association of p68 with the PLK1 promoter. These data provide a model in which p68 and p53 interplay regulates PLK1 expression, and which describes the behavior of these molecules, and the outcome of their interaction, in human breast cancer. PMID:24626184

  18. Evolution Analysis of Rat Liver Regeneration Associated Gene MafF%大鼠肝再生相关基因MafF的分子进化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范念斯; 杨献光

    2011-01-01

    Maf family proteins are so named because of their structural similarity to the founding member, the oncoprotein v-Maf. The small Maf proteins (MafF, MafG and MafK), as all family members, include a characteristic basic region linked to a leucine zipper (b-Zip) domain which mediates DNA binding and subunit dimerization respectively. cDNA Microarray result displays that MafF mRNA express level rises rapidly after partial hepatectomy (PH) of rat. MafF may be involved in rat liver regeneration. The length polymorphism, stop codon polymorphism, ORF diversity and the high homology of different mammals' MafF genes are analyzed. Then, the polygenetic tree of MafF among different mammalian is established. It is hoped to understand the evolutionary relationship among the mammals' MafF gene and to provide materials for the research to reveal its role during rat liver regeneration.%Maf家族是碱性亮氨酸拉链(the basic leucine zipper,bZip)转录因子的一个亚群,是v-maf癌蛋白类似物.它可以通过结合不同的底物来调节下游基因的表达.cDNA Microarray结果显示,小Maf家族成员MafF在大鼠部分肝切除后表达水平迅速升高.为了详细研究该基因的特性,我们采用生物信息学手段来分析在不同动物中MafF基因的长度多态性、终止密码子多态性、ORF多态性以及氨基酸序列的同源性,建立不同动物MafF基因上的进化关系图谱,为了解MafF基因的演化关系,研究该基因参与大鼠肝再生的作用机理提供资料.

  19. The BTB-zinc finger transcription factor abrupt acts as an epithelial oncogene in Drosophila melanogaster through maintaining a progenitor-like cell state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezaket Turkel

    Full Text Available The capacity of tumour cells to maintain continual overgrowth potential has been linked to the commandeering of normal self-renewal pathways. Using an epithelial cancer model in Drosophila melanogaster, we carried out an overexpression screen for oncogenes capable of cooperating with the loss of the epithelial apico-basal cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib, and identified the cell fate regulator, Abrupt, a BTB-zinc finger protein. Abrupt overexpression alone is insufficient to transform cells, but in cooperation with scrib loss of function, Abrupt promotes the formation of massive tumours in the eye/antennal disc. The steroid hormone receptor coactivator, Taiman (a homologue of SRC3/AIB1, is known to associate with Abrupt, and Taiman overexpression also drives tumour formation in cooperation with the loss of Scrib. Expression arrays and ChIP-Seq indicates that Abrupt overexpression represses a large number of genes, including steroid hormone-response genes and multiple cell fate regulators, thereby maintaining cells within an epithelial progenitor-like state. The progenitor-like state is characterised by the failure to express the conserved Eyes absent/Dachshund regulatory complex in the eye disc, and in the antennal disc by the failure to express cell fate regulators that define the temporal elaboration of the appendage along the proximo-distal axis downstream of Distalless. Loss of scrib promotes cooperation with Abrupt through impaired Hippo signalling, which is required and sufficient for cooperative overgrowth with Abrupt, and JNK (Jun kinase signalling, which is required for tumour cell migration/invasion but not overgrowth. These results thus identify a novel cooperating oncogene, identify mammalian family members of which are also known oncogenes, and demonstrate that epithelial tumours in Drosophila can be characterised by the maintenance of a progenitor-like state.

  20. The BTB-zinc Finger Transcription Factor Abrupt Acts as an Epithelial Oncogene in Drosophila melanogaster through Maintaining a Progenitor-like Cell State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkel, Nezaket; Sahota, Virender K.; Bolden, Jessica E.; Goulding, Karen R.; Doggett, Karen; Willoughby, Lee F.; Blanco, Enrique; Martin-Blanco, Enrique; Corominas, Montserrat; Ellul, Jason; Aigaki, Toshiro; Richardson, Helena E.; Brumby, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of tumour cells to maintain continual overgrowth potential has been linked to the commandeering of normal self-renewal pathways. Using an epithelial cancer model in Drosophila melanogaster, we carried out an overexpression screen for oncogenes capable of cooperating with the loss of the epithelial apico-basal cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib), and identified the cell fate regulator, Abrupt, a BTB-zinc finger protein. Abrupt overexpression alone is insufficient to transform cells, but in cooperation with scrib loss of function, Abrupt promotes the formation of massive tumours in the eye/antennal disc. The steroid hormone receptor coactivator, Taiman (a homologue of SRC3/AIB1), is known to associate with Abrupt, and Taiman overexpression also drives tumour formation in cooperation with the loss of Scrib. Expression arrays and ChIP-Seq indicates that Abrupt overexpression represses a large number of genes, including steroid hormone-response genes and multiple cell fate regulators, thereby maintaining cells within an epithelial progenitor-like state. The progenitor-like state is characterised by the failure to express the conserved Eyes absent/Dachshund regulatory complex in the eye disc, and in the antennal disc by the failure to express cell fate regulators that define the temporal elaboration of the appendage along the proximo-distal axis downstream of Distalless. Loss of scrib promotes cooperation with Abrupt through impaired Hippo signalling, which is required and sufficient for cooperative overgrowth with Abrupt, and JNK (Jun kinase) signalling, which is required for tumour cell migration/invasion but not overgrowth. These results thus identify a novel cooperating oncogene, identify mammalian family members of which are also known oncogenes, and demonstrate that epithelial tumours in Drosophila can be characterised by the maintenance of a progenitor-like state. PMID:23874226

  1. Oncogene v-jun modulates DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylyk, C; Schneikert, J; Wasylyk, B

    1990-07-01

    Cell transformation leads to alterations in both transcription and DNA replication. Activation of transcription by the expression of a number of transforming oncogenes is mediated by the transcription factor AP1 (Herrlich & Ponta, 1989; Imler & Wasylyk, 1989). AP1 is a composite transcription factor, consisting of members of the jun and fos gene-families. c-jun and c-fos are progenitors of oncogenes, suggestion that an important transcriptional event in cell transformation is altered activity of AP1, which may arise either indirectly by oncogene expression or directly by structural modification of AP1. We report here that the v-jun oncogene and its progenitor c-jun, as fusion proteins with the lex-A-repressor DNA binding domain, can activate DNA replication from the Polyoma virus (Py) origin of replication, linked to the lex-A operator. The transcription-activation region of v-jun is required for activation of replication. When excess v-jun is expressed in the cell, replication is inhibited or 'squelched'. These results suggest that one consequence of deregulated jun activity could be altered DNA replication and that there are similarities in the way v-jun activates replication and transcription.

  2. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altamura, Gennaro, E-mail: gennaro.altamura@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Corteggio, Annunziata, E-mail: ancorteg@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Pacini, Laura, E-mail: PaciniL@students.iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Conte, Andrea, E-mail: andreaconte88@hotmail.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria, E-mail: gmpieran@unina.it [Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tommasino, Massimo, E-mail: tommasinom@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Accardi, Rosita, E-mail: accardir@iarc.fr [Infections and Cancer Biology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon (France); Borzacchiello, Giuseppe, E-mail: borzacch@unina.it [Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy Unit, University of Naples Federico II, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. - Highlights: • FcaPV2 E6 binds to and deregulates feline p53 protein. • FcaPV2 E7 binds to and deregulates feline pRb protein. • FcaPV2 oncogenes inhibit UVB-induced apoptosis. • FcaPV2 E6E7 and E7 increase the lifespan of primary cells. • FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 are expressed at the mRNA level in feline SCC in vivo.

  3. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-07-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D(3)-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years.

  4. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, Gennaro; Corteggio, Annunziata; Pacini, Laura; Conte, Andrea; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Tommasino, Massimo; Accardi, Rosita; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of the Adenovirus Early Gene 1A Transcription-Repression Domain Alone Downregulates HER2 and Results in the Death of Human Breast Cancer Cells Upregulated for the HER2 Proto-Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2011-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) early gene 1A 243 residue protein (E1A 243R) possesses a potent transcription-repression function within the N-terminal 80 amino acids (E1A 1-80). We examined the ability of E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 to repress transcription of both an exogenous and the endogenous HER2 promoter in a human breast cancer cell line upregulated for the HER2 proto-oncogene (SK-BR-3). Both moieties repressed HER2 expression by over 90%. When E1A 1-80 was expressed from a nonreplicative Ad vector, levels of expression were lower than anticipated. Addition of nonspecific sequences to the E1A 1-80 C-terminus (E1A 1-80 C+) enhanced its expression 10- to 20-fold. Because "oncogene addiction" suggests that repression of HER2 could kill HER2 upregulated cells, we examined the ability of full-length E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ delivered by an Ad vector to kill HER2 upregulated SK-BR-3 cells. Expression of both E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ killed SK-BR-3 cells but not normal breast cells. E1A 1-80 C+ is a particularly effective killer of SK-BR-3 cells. At 144 h post infection, over 85% of SK-BR-3 cells were killed by a 100 moi of the Ad vector expressing E1A 1-80 C+. As controls, Ad vectors expressing E1A 243R with deletion of all known functional domains or expressing unrelated β-galactosidase had no effect. Three additional human breast cancer cells lines reported to be upregulated for HER2 or another EGF family member (EGFR) were found to be efficiently killed by expression of E1A 1-80 C+, whereas three additional "normal" cell lines (two derived from breast and one from foreskin) were not. The ability of the E1A transcription-repression domain alone to kill HER2 upregulated breast cancer cells has potential for development of therapies for treatment of aggressive human breast cancers and potentially other human cancers that overexpress HER2.

  6. Effects of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone on transcription of human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 oncogenes in CaSki and SiHa cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruutu, M; Wahlroos, N; Syrjänen, K; Johansson, B; Syrjänen, S

    2006-01-01

    Several in vitro studies have addressed the interactions between estrogen/progesterone and human papillomavirus (HPV), but the results are controversial. We evaluated the effects of estrogen and progesterone and their antagonists on messenger RNA expression of HPV16 E6/E7 in HPV16-positive cell lines CaSki and SiHa with real-time reverse-transciptase polymerase chain reaction method. Colorimetric assay with tetrazolium salt (WST-1) and flow cytometry were used for testing proliferation and apoptosis. No statistically significant changes were found after hormone treatment in the expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or hormone receptors in CaSki and SiHa cell lines. Progesterone increased cell proliferation in both the cells, while estrogen increased proliferation of SiHa cells only. Estrogen seemed to protect the CaSki cells from apoptosis, and tamoxifen did not abrogate this effect. Progesterone slightly increased apoptosis of CaSki cells, and this effect was neutralized with RU486. In this study, estrogen and progesterone did not change either the transcription levels of HPV16 E6/E7 or estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor levels. Hormone receptor antagonists had no effect on transcription. Both hormones might have a permissive effect for the growth of cervical cancer, by promoting cell proliferation and making the cells vulnerable to mutations. In addition, estrogen acts as an antiapoptotic agent allowing growth advance of the cells infected with oncogenic HPV.

  7. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (sh...

  8. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    OpenAIRE

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2013-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (sh...

  9. E2F-Rb complexes assemble and inhibit cdc25A transcription in cervical carcinoma cells following repression of human papillomavirus oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, L; Goodwin, E C; Naeger, L K

    2000-01-01

    . To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F binding sites and a consensus E2 binding site. The wild-type E2 protein inhibited expression of a luciferase gene...... E2F4-Rb DNA binding complexes. Importantly, these experiments revealed that HPV-induced alterations in E2F transcription complexes that occur during cervical carcinogenesis are reversed by repression of HPV E6/E7 expression....

  10. The DNA damage checkpoint precedes activation of ARF in response to escalating oncogenic stress during tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, K; Bartkova, J; Kotsinas, A

    2013-01-01

    to various oncogenes showed that the delayed upregulation of ARF reflected a requirement for a higher, transcriptionally based threshold of oncogenic stress, elicited by at least two oncogenic ‘hits’, compared with lower activation threshold for DDR. We propose that relative to DDR activation, ARF provides...

  11. Co-localization of the oncogenic transcription factor MYCN and the DNA methyl binding protein MeCP2 at genomic sites in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M Murphy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MYCN is a transcription factor that is expressed during the development of the neural crest and its dysregulation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of pediatric cancers such as neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. MeCP2 is a CpG methyl binding protein which has been associated with a number of cancers and developmental disorders, particularly Rett syndrome. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using an integrative global genomics approach involving chromatin immunoprecipitation applied to microarrays, we have determined that MYCN and MeCP2 co-localize to gene promoter regions, as well as inter/intragenic sites, within the neuroblastoma genome (MYCN amplified Kelly cells at high frequency (70.2% of MYCN sites were also positive for MeCP2. Intriguingly, the frequency of co-localization was significantly less at promoter regions exhibiting substantial hypermethylation (8.7%, as determined by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP applied to the same microarrays. Co-immunoprecipitation of MYCN using an anti-MeCP2 antibody indicated that a MYCN/MeCP2 interaction occurs at protein level. mRNA expression profiling revealed that the median expression of genes with promoters bound by MYCN was significantly higher than for genes bound by MeCP2, and that genes bound by both proteins had intermediate expression. Pathway analysis was carried out for genes bound by MYCN, MeCP2 or MYCN/MeCP2, revealing higher order functions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that MYCN and MeCP2 protein interact and co-localize to similar genomic sites at very high frequency, and that the patterns of binding of these proteins can be associated with significant differences in transcriptional activity. Although it is not yet known if this interaction contributes to neuroblastoma disease pathogenesis, it is intriguing that the interaction occurs at the promoter regions of several genes important for the development of neuroblastoma, including ALK, AURKA and

  12. Transcription factor avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogen homolog-1 is a novel mediator of renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenguang; Chumley, Phillip; Prieto, Minolfa C; Miyada, Kayoko; Seth, Dale M; Fatima, Huma; Hua, Ping; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Sanders, Paul W; Jaimes, Edgar A

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factor E26 transformation-specific sequence-1 (ETS-1) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of a variety of genes, including growth factors, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. We recently demonstrated that angiotensin II increases the glomerular expression of ETS-1 and that blockade of ETS-1 ameliorates the profibrotic and proinflammatory effects of angiotensin II. The Dahl salt-sensitive rat is a paradigm of salt-sensitive hypertension associated with local activation of the renin-angiotensin system. In these studies, we determined whether: (1) salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with renal expression of ETS-1 and (2) ETS-1 participates in the development of end-organ injury in salt-sensitive hypertension. Dahl salt-sensitive rats were fed a normal-salt diet (0.5% NaCl diet) or a high-salt diet (4% NaCl) for 4 weeks. Separate groups on high-salt diet received an ETS-1 dominant-negative peptide (10 mg/kg/d), an inactive ETS-1 mutant peptide (10 mg/kg/d), the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan (10 mg/kg/d), or the combination high-salt diet/dominant-negative peptide/angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker for 4 weeks. High-salt diet rats had a significant increase in the glomerular expression of the phosphorylated ETS-1 that was prevented by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker. ETS-1 blockade reduced proteinuria, glomerular injury score, fibronectin expression, urinary transforming growth factor-β excretion, and macrophage infiltration. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker reduced proteinuria, glomerular injury score, and macrophage infiltration, whereas concomitant ETS-1 blockade and angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker had additive effects and reduced interstitial fibrosis. Our studies demonstrated that salt-sensitive hypertension results in increased glomerular expression of phosphorylated ETS-1 and suggested that ETS-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of end-organ injury in salt

  13. Identification and characterization of a non-interferon antileishmanial macrophage activating factor (antileishmanial MAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Niel, A; Zacks, S E; David, J R; Remold, H G; Weiser, W Y

    1988-01-01

    A non-interferon lymphokine elaborated from PHA and Con A-stimulated human T-cell hybridoma, T-CEMA, has been found to activate monocyte-derived macrophages for the intracellular killing of L. donovani (antileishmanial MAF). This T-cell hybridoma derived antileishmanial MAF which has an apparent mw of 65,000 and pI of 5.3-5.6, contains neither antiviral activity nor colony stimulating activity. Furthermore, antileishmanial MAF is not neutralized by anti-MIF, anti-IFN-gamma or anti-GM-CSF antibodies.

  14. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research.

  15. Oncogenic viruses and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxiang; George; Luo; Jing-hsiung; James; Ou

    2015-01-01

    <正>This special issue of the journal is dedicated to the important topic of oncogenic viruses and cancer.It contains seven review articles covering all known oncogenic viruses except for human T-lymphotropic virus type1(HTLV-1).These review articles are contributed by experts on specific viruses and their associated human cancers.Viruses account for about 20%of total human cancer cases.Although many viruses can cause various tumors in animals,only seven of them

  16. Imaging oncogene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Archana [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: Archana.Mukherjee@jefferson.edu; Wickstrom, Eric [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, 233S, 10th street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu; Thakur, Mathew L. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: Mathew.Thakur@jefferson.edu

    2009-05-15

    This review briefly outlines the importance of molecular imaging, particularly imaging of endogenous gene expression for noninvasive genetic analysis of radiographic masses. The concept of antisense imaging agents and the advantages and challenges in the development of hybridization probes for in vivo imaging are described. An overview of the investigations on oncogene expression imaging is given. Finally, the need for further improvement in antisense-based imaging agents and directions to improve oncogene mRNA targeting is stated.

  17. The Maf factor Traffic jam both enables and inhibits collective cell migration in Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Felix; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Godt, Dorothea

    2013-07-01

    Border cell cluster (BCC) migration in the Drosophila ovary is an excellent system to study the gene regulatory network that enables collective cell migration. Here, we identify the large Maf transcription factor Traffic jam (Tj) as an important regulator of BCC migration. Tj has a multifaceted impact on the known core cascade that enables BCC motility, consisting of the Jak/Stat signaling pathway, the C/EBP factor Slow border cells (Slbo), and the downstream effector DE-cadherin (DEcad). The initiation of BCC migration coincides with a Slbo-dependent decrease in Tj expression. This reduction of Tj is required for normal BCC motility, as high Tj expression strongly impedes migration. At high concentration, Tj has a tripartite negative effect on the core pathway: a decrease in Slbo, an increase in the Jak/Stat inhibitor Socs36E, and a Slbo-independent reduction of DEcad. However, maintenance of a low expression level of Tj in the BCC during migration is equally important, as loss of tj function also results in a significant delay in migration concomitant with a reduction of Slbo and consequently of DEcad. Taken together, we conclude that the regulatory feedback loop between Tj and Slbo is necessary for achieving the correct activity levels of migration-regulating factors to ensure proper BCC motility.

  18. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer with Gc Protein-Derived Macrophage-Activating Factor, GcMAF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of prostate cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Therefore, macrophages of prostate cancer patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized β-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent MAF (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages activated by GcMAF develop a considerable variation of receptors that recognize the abnormality in malignant cell surface and are highly tumoricidal. Sixteen nonanemic prostate cancer patients received weekly administration of 100 ng of GcMAF. As the MAF precursor activity increased, their serum Nagalase activity decreased. Because serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden, the entire time course analysis for GcMAF therapy was monitored by measuring the serum Nagalase activity. After 14 to 25 weekly administrations of GcMAF (100 ng/week), all 16 patients had very low serum Nagalase levels equivalent to those of healthy control values, indicating that these patients are tumor-free. No recurrence occurred for 7 years. PMID:18633461

  19. Adsorption of benzotriazole and benzimidazole from water over a Co-based metal azolate framework MAF-5(Co).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Mithun; Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Seo, Pill Won; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-02-15

    Benzotriazole (BTA) and benzimidazole (BZI) are regarded as water pollutants because of their extensive uses in industry and appreciable water solubility. The adsorption of both BTA and BZI from water over a newly synthesized metal-organic framework, MAF-5(Co), was investigated and compared with zeolitic imidazole frameworks (ZIFs), such as ZIF-8(Zn) and ZIF-67(Co), as well as commercial activated carbon. MAF-5(Co) had the highest adsorption capacities for both BTA and BZI. The maximum adsorption capacities of MAF-5(Co) for BTA and BZI were 389 and 175mgg(-1), respectively. Hydrophobic and π-π interactions between the aromatic adsorbate BTA and MAF-5(Co) were suggested as a plausible mechanism. Based on the zeta potential of MAF-5(Co) and effects of pH on the BTA adsorption, electrostatic interactions between the MAF-5(Co) and BTA species might also affect the adsorption of BTA over MAF-5(Co). MAF-5(Co) can be recycled for adsorptive removal of BTA by simple ethanol washing. Therefore, MAF-5(Co) is suggested as a promising adsorbent for the removal of BTA and BZI from water.

  20. Immunotherapy of metastatic breast cancer patients with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Ushijima, Naofumi

    2008-01-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of breast cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein was deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Patient serum Nagalase activity is proportional to tumor burden. The deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, resulting in no macrophage activation and immunosuppression. Stepwise incubation of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated probably the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF) ever discovered, which produces no adverse effect in humans. Macrophages treated in vitro with GcMAF (100 pg/ml) are highly tumoricidal to mammary adenocarcinomas. Efficacy of GcMAF for treatment of metastatic breast cancer was investigated with 16 nonanemic patients who received weekly administration of GcMAF (100 ng). As GcMAF therapy progresses, the MAF precursor activity of patient Gc protein increased with a concomitant decrease in serum Nagalase. Because of proportionality of serum Nagalase activity to tumor burden, the time course progress of GcMAF therapy was assessed by serum Nagalase activity as a prognostic index. These patients had the initial Nagalase activities ranging from 2.32 to 6.28 nmole/min/mg protein. After about 16-22 administrations (approximately 3.5-5 months) of GcMAF, these patients had insignificantly low serum enzyme levels equivalent to healthy control enzyme levels, ranging from 0.38 to 0.63 nmole/min/mg protein, indicating eradication of the tumors. This therapeutic procedure resulted in no recurrence for more than 4 years.

  1. Immunotherapy of metastatic colorectal cancer with vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor, GcMAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Suyama, Hirofumi; Nakazato, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2008-07-01

    Serum vitamin D binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of colorectal cancer patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from cancerous cells. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF, leading to immunosuppression. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) ever discovered, but it produces no side effect in humans. Macrophages treated with GcMAF (100 microg/ml) develop an enormous variation of receptors and are highly tumoricidal to a variety of cancers indiscriminately. Administration of 100 nanogram (ng)/ human maximally activates systemic macrophages that can kill cancerous cells. Since the half-life of the activated macrophages is approximately 6 days, 100 ng GcMAF was administered weekly to eight nonanemic colorectal cancer patients who had previously received tumor-resection but still carried significant amounts of metastatic tumor cells. As GcMAF therapy progressed, the MAF precursor activities of all patients increased and conversely their serum Nagalase activities decreased. Since serum Nagalase is proportional to tumor burden, serum Nagalase activity was used as a prognostic index for time course analysis of GcMAF therapy. After 32-50 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF, all colorectal cancer patients exhibited healthy control levels of the serum Nagalase activity, indicating eradication of metastatic tumor cells. During 7 years after the completion of GcMAF therapy, their serum Nagalase activity did not increase, indicating no recurrence of cancer, which was also supported by the annual CT scans of these patients.

  2. c-Abl antagonizes the YAP oncogenic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, R; Adler, J; Ricardo Lax, I; Shanzer, M; Porat, Z; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-06-01

    YES-associated protein (YAP) is a central transcription coactivator that functions as an oncogene in a number of experimental systems. However, under DNA damage, YAP activates pro-apoptotic genes in conjunction with p73. This program switching is mediated by c-Abl (Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene) via phosphorylation of YAP at the Y357 residue (pY357). YAP as an oncogene coactivates the TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) family transcription factors. Here we asked whether c-Abl regulates the YAP-TEAD functional module. We found that DNA damage, through c-Abl activation, specifically depressed YAP-TEAD-induced transcription. Remarkably, c-Abl counteracts YAP-induced transformation by interfering with the YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. c-Abl induced TEAD1 phosphorylation, but the YAP-TEAD complex remained unaffected. In contrast, TEAD coactivation was compromised by phosphomimetic YAP Y357E mutation but not Y357F, as demonstrated at the level of reporter genes and endogenous TEAD target genes. Furthermore, YAP Y357E also severely compromised the role of YAP in cell transformation, migration, anchorage-independent growth, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human mammary MCF10A cells. These results suggest that YAP pY357 lost TEAD transcription activation function. Our results demonstrate that YAP pY357 inactivates YAP oncogenic function and establish a role for YAP Y357 phosphorylation in cell-fate decision.

  3. Change detection by the IR-MAD and kernel MAF methods in Landsat TM data covering a Swedish forest region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Olsson, Håkan

    2010-01-01

    similar to kernel PCA. In both simple difference images, IR-MAD images and kernel MAF images grayish colours indicate no change, saturated colours indicate change. The kMAF transformation focuses on extreme observations, here the change pixels, and adapt to a varying multivariate background, here the no...

  4. Automatic change detection in RapidEye data using the combined MAD and kernel MAF methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hecheltjen, Antje; Thonfeld, Frank;

    2010-01-01

    The IR-MAD components show changes for a large part of the entire subset. Especially phenological changes in the agricultural fields surrounding the open pit are predominant. As opposed to this, kMAF components focus more on changes in the open-cast mine (and changes due to the two clouds...

  5. Oncogenes in melanoma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumour with poor prognosis in the metastatic stage. BRAF, NRAS, and KIT are three well-known oncogenes involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Targeting of mutated BRAF kinase has recently been shown to significantly improve overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients, underscoring the particular role of this oncogene in melanoma biology. However, recurrences regularly occur within several months, which supposedly involve further oncogenes. Moreover, oncogenic driver mutations have not been described for up to 30% of all melanomas. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the mutational landscape of melanoma, more recent studies used high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. A number of new oncogene candidates such as MAPK1/2, ERBB4, GRIN2A, GRM3, RAC1, and PREX2 were identified. Their particular role in melanoma biology is currently under investigation. Evidence for the functional relevance of some of these new oncogene candidates has been provided in in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, these findings await further validation in clinical studies. This review provides an overview on well-known melanoma oncogenes and new oncogene candidates, based on recent high-throughput sequencing studies. The list of genes discussed herein is of course not complete but highlights some of the most significant of recent findings in this area. The new candidates may support more individualized treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma patients in the future.

  6. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  7. Therapeutic effects of highly purified de-glycosylated GcMAF in the immunotherapy of patients with chronic diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The de-Glycosylated vitamin D binding protein is a powerful Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF) that shows multiple biological effects that could be exploited in the immunotherapy of tumours, viral infections and autism. Here we report the observation of a series of clinical cases describing the results obtained administering highly purified GcMAF to patients with diverse types of chronic diseases. These are heterogeneous and refer to patients with different types of diseases at different s...

  8. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  9. Role of MafA gene in insulin production-Analysis of heterozygous knockout mice%MafA基因部分敲除对于胰岛素产生的影响及机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张川; 李波; 程妍; 姚宇航; 孙立娟; 高桥智

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the role of MafA gene in development of MODY (maturity onset diabetes of the young) by studying insulin production,gene expression,and serum glucose level in heterozygous MafA gene knockout mice.Methods C57BL/6J mice were used as control animals,MafA gene heterozygous mice were analyzed.The distribution curve of blood sugar levels over time and serum insulin of heterozygous mice were determined by using IPGTT.The sensitivity of the mice to insulin was examined by injecting insulin assay.The expression levels of genes of MafA,insulin,pdX1,Beta2,and other genes of heterozygous mice were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.Morphological changes in pancreatic tissue and α-and β-cell counts were obtained by using immunofluorescence/histological examination.Results (1) Two weeks after birth,MafA gene heterozygous mice began to show that the blood glucose level was increased,weight was reduced,and the amount of insulin secretion was clearly decreased (P<0.05 or P<0.01) while the insulin sensitivity did not change significantly.(2)The islet volume in MafA gene heterozygous mice was increased significantly as compared with the control group.However there were no significant changes in the number of pancreatic cells,distribution patterns,and the ratio of α and β cell.(3) Semi-quantitative RT-PCR detection showed that,compared with the control group,MafA gene level,the amount of insulin and Beta2 gene in MafA gene heterozygous mice were significantly reduced(all P<0.05),while no changes in the amount of glucagons and level of Pdx1 were found.Conclusions The blood glucose level of MafA gene heterozygous mice was raised early after birth.MafA gene is likely to be a new disease ralated gene of MODY.%目的 通过观察肌腱膜纤维肉瘤肿瘤基因同系物A(MafA)基因杂合子小鼠在胰岛素分泌、相关基因表达、血糖及血清胰岛素水平等方面的变化,探讨MafA基因在青少年起病的成人型糖

  10. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  11. Oncogene-mediated transformation of fetal rat colon in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pories, S; Jaros, K; Steele, G; Pauley, A; Summerhayes, I C

    1992-05-01

    Short-term maintenance of fetal rat colonic tissue in vitro has been demonstrated using a collagen matrix organ culture system. The introduction of single (v-myc, v-rasH, v-src) oncogenes or combinations of oncogenes (v-myc/rasH, v-myc/src) into normal colon mucosal elements was established using retroviral vectors, resulting in enhanced proliferation and migration of epithelial cells from the lumen of tissue implants. Expression of a single oncogene in normal colon epithelium did not result in the establishment of cell lines. In contrast, expression of cooperating oncogenic elements resulted in cell lines in greater than 80% of experiments, revealing different morphological characteristics dependent upon the oncogene combination used. Confirmation of the expression of viral transcripts was determined using Northern blot analysis and viral oncoprotein expression using Western blot analysis (p21) and an immunoprecipitation kinase assay (src). Expression of keratin filaments was lost following passaging of cell lines but could be induced by the myc/ras transformants by growth on Rat-1 feeder layers. This induction phenomenon was not observed with myc/src lines, and although these expressed high levels of sucrase isomaltase the epithelial origin of these cells is unclear. Karyotypic analysis performed on three myc/ras-transformed cell lines revealed a normal chromosome complement associated with transformation. In this report we describe a novel in vitro transformation system for normal rat colonic epithelium mediated by the introduction of oncogene elements using different retroviral vector constructs. The potential to generate cell lines representing different stages of neoplastic progression using relevant genetic components presents significant advantages for the study of cellular and molecular interactions underlying colon neoplastic progression.

  12. Evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) using generalized system performance metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Amit [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Bednarek, Daniel R. [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Rudin, Stephen [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The performance of a newly developed, high resolution, microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) (35 {mu}m pixel pitch and 300 {mu}m thick CsI phosphor) was evaluated using a generalized linear system analysis and compared with that of a standard amorphous Si thin film transistor flat panel detector (FPD) (194 {mu}m pixel pitch and 600 {mu}m thick CsI phosphor). The linear system metrics such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency (DQE) are commonly used to gauge the intrinsic detector performance in the detector plane. However, these linear system metrics do not provide information about the image receptor performance in a real system since they do not include the effects of other parameters such as focal spot distribution, scatter radiation, and geometric unsharpness, which may compromise detector performance characteristics. Use of generalized linear system metrics [generalized modulation transfer function (GMTF), generalized normalized noise power spectrum (GNNPS), and generalized detection quantum efficiency (GDQE)] that include these effects gives a more meaningful, complete, and appropriate evaluation of detector performance as part of the imaging system. Methods: A uniform head equivalent phantom was used to simulate realistic clinical parameters and x-ray spectra. The detector MTFs were measured using the slanted edge method and the focal spot MTFs were measured using a pinhole assembly. The scatter MTF was simulated and the scatter fraction was measured for a head-equivalent phantom. The generalized system metrics were calculated for different combinations of three choices of focal spots and three different magnifications with two different air-gaps. The performance of the MAF was also illustrated using stent images obtained with different focal spots under similar conditions. Results: Results for the generalized metrics provide a quantitative description of the performance of the imaging system

  13. Automatic change detection in RapidEye data using the combined MAD and kernel MAF methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hecheltjen, Antje; Thonfeld, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The IR-MAD components show changes for a large part of the entire subset. Especially phenological changes in the agricultural fields surrounding the open pit are predominant. As opposed to this, kMAF components focus more on changes in the open-cast mine (and changes due to the two clouds...... and their shadows, not visible in the zoom). Ground data were available from bucket-wheel excavators on the extraction side (to the northwest in the open pit) in terms of elevation data for both dates. No ground data were available for changes due to backfill (southeastern part of the open pit) or changes due...

  14. Una experiencia en GPU Computing entre FaMAF e INVAP.

    OpenAIRE

    Bustos, Fabio; Wolovick, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Mostramos la experiencia realizada entre INVAP SE y FaMAF-UNC, para el desarrollo del software de imágenes sobre placas de procesamiento gráfico de propósitos generales (GPGPU por sus siglas en inglés). En el contexto de un sistema de adquisición de imágenes desarrollado por INVAP para uno de sus clientes, resulta necesario incluir un módulo de software capaz de realizar un seguimiento automático de puntos de interés identificados en un video....

  15. Oncogenic ETS proteins mimic activated RAS/MAPK signaling in prostate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenhorst, Peter C.; Ferris, Mary W.; Hull, Megan A.; Chae, Heejoon; Kim, Sun; Graves, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS transcription factor is implicated in the progression of the majority of prostate cancers, 40% of melanomas, and most cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and Ewing's sarcoma. Chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer result in overexpression of any one of four ETS transcription factors. How these four oncogenic ETS genes differ from the numerous other ETS genes expressed in normal prostate and contribute to tumor progression is not understood. We report that these oncogenic ETS proteins, but not other ETS factors, enhance prostate cell migration. Genome-wide binding analysis matched this specific biological function to occupancy of a unique set of genomic sites highlighted by the presence of ETS- and AP-1-binding sequences. ETS/AP-1-binding sequences are prototypical RAS-responsive elements, but oncogenic ETS proteins activated a RAS/MAPK transcriptional program in the absence of MAPK activation. Thus, overexpression of oncogenic ETS proteins can replace RAS/MAPK pathway activation in prostate cells. The genomic description of this ETS/AP-1-regulated, RAS-responsive, gene expression program provides a resource for understanding the role of these ETS factors in both an oncogenic setting and the developmental processes where these genes normally function. PMID:22012618

  16. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation.

  17. Evaluation of intracranial aneurysm coil embolization in phantoms and patients using a high resolution microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Levy, Elad; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Hopkins, L. N.; Rudin, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysm (IA) embolization using Gugliemi Detachable Coils (GDC) under x-ray fluoroscopic guidance is one of the most important neuro-vascular interventions. Coil deposition accuracy is key and could benefit substantially from higher resolution imagers such as the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF). The effect of MAF guidance improvement over the use of standard Flat Panels (FP) is challenging to assess for such a complex procedure. We propose and investigate a new metric, inter-frame cross-correlation sensitivity (CCS), to compare detector performance for such procedures. Pixel (P) and histogram (H) CCS's were calculated as one minus the cross-correlation coefficients between pixel values and histograms for the region of interest at successive procedure steps. IA treatment using GDC's was simulated using an anthropomorphic head phantom which includes an aneurysm. GDC's were deposited in steps of 3 cm and the procedure was imaged with a FP and the MAF. To measure sensitivity to detect progress of the procedure by change in images of successive steps, an ROI was selected over the aneurysm location and pixel-value and histogram changes were calculated after each step. For the FP, after 4 steps, the H and P CCSs between successive steps were practically zero, indicating that there were no significant changes in the observed images. For the MAF, H and P CCSs were greater than zero even after 10 steps (30 cm GDC), indicating observable changes. Further, the proposed quantification method was applied for evaluation of seven patients imaged using the MAF, yielding similar results (H and P CCSs greater than zero after the last GDC deposition). The proposed metric indicates that the MAF can offer better guidance during such procedures.

  18. Regulation of Insulin Gene Transcription by Multiple Histone Acetyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin gene transcription is mainly regulated by a 340-bp promoter region upstream of the transcription start site by beta-cell-enriched transcription factors Pdx-1, MafA, and NeuroD1. Previous studies have shown that histone H4 hyperacetylation is important for acute up-regulation of insulin gene transcription. Until now, only the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein p300 has been shown to be involved in this histone H4 acetylation event. In this report we investigated...

  19. Research progresses of MafA gene mutations/variations and diabetes mellitus%MafA基因突变/变异与糖尿病的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛晓旭; 刘丽梅

    2016-01-01

    肌腱膜纤维肉瘤癌基因同源物A(MafA)是成熟胰岛β细胞的重要转录因子,对胰岛素基因的转录、胰岛素分泌和β细胞团的增殖、分化至关重要.MafA与PDX-1和NeuroD1/BETA2协同作用,在胰岛β细胞和非胰岛β细胞中可诱导胰岛素基因的表达,有望成为糖尿病潜在的治疗靶点.在糖尿病小鼠模型和糖尿病患者的研究中发现,MafA基因缺陷可导致糖耐量异常和糖尿病的发生.人类MafA基因突变/变异可能与特殊类型糖尿病如新生儿糖尿病(NDM)或青少年成人起病型糖尿病(MODY)的致病及1型或2型糖尿病易感性的增加相关.

  20. Glycerophospholipid profile in oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Cristina; Vosbeck, Sonja; Hein, Eva-Maria; Hellwig, Birte; Langer, Alice; Hayen, Heiko; Franckenstein, Dennis; Büttner, Bettina; Hammad, Seddik; Marchan, Rosemarie; Hermes, Matthias; Selinski, Silvia; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Peksel, Begüm; Török, Zsolt; Vígh, László; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-09-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism and in the lipid composition of cellular membranes are linked to the pathology of numerous diseases including cancer. However, the influence of oncogene expression on cellular lipid profile is currently unknown. In this work we analyzed changes in lipid profiles that are induced in the course of ERBB2-expression mediated premature senescence. As a model system we used MCF-7 breast cancer cells with doxycycline-inducible expression of NeuT, an oncogenic ERBB2 variant. Affymetrix gene array data showed NeuT-induced alterations in the transcription of many enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, several of which (ACSL3, CHPT1, PLD1, LIPG, MGLL, LDL and NPC1) could be confirmed by quantitative realtime PCR. A study of the glycerophospholipid and lyso-glycerophospholipid profiles, obtained by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry revealed senescence-associated changes in numerous lipid species, including mitochondrial lipids. The most prominent changes were found in PG(34:1), PG(36:1) (increased) and LPE(18:1), PG(40:7) and PI(36:1) (decreased). Statistical analysis revealed a general trend towards shortened phospholipid acyl chains in senescence and a significant trend to more saturated acyl chains in the class of phosphatidylglycerol. Additionally, the cellular cholesterol content was elevated and accumulated in vacuoles in senescent cells. These changes were accompanied by increased membrane fluidity. In mitochondria, loss of membrane potential along with altered intracellular distribution was observed. In conclusion, we present a comprehensive overview of altered cholesterol and glycerophospholipid patterns in senescence, showing that predominantly mitochondrial lipids are affected and lipid species less susceptible to peroxidation are increased.

  1. Oncogenic BRAF regulates melanoma proliferation through the lineage specific factor MITF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Wellbrock

    Full Text Available The Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF is an important regulator of cell-type specific functions in melanocytic cells. MITF is essential for the survival of pigmented cells, but whereas high levels of MITF drive melanocyte differentiation, lower levels are required to permit proliferation and survival of melanoma cells. MITF is phosphorylated by ERK, and this stimulates its activation, but also targets it for degradation through the ubiquitin-proteosome pathway, coupling MITF degradation to its activation. We have previously shown that because ERK is hyper-activated in melanoma cells in which BRAF is mutated, the MITF protein is constitutively down-regulated. Here we describe another intriguing aspect of MITF regulation by oncogenic BRAF in melanoma cells. We show oncogenic BRAF up-regulates MITF transcription through ERK and the transcription factor BRN2 (N-Oct3. In contrast, we show that in melanocytes this pathway does not exist because BRN2 is not expressed, demonstrating that MITF regulation is a newly acquired function of oncogenic BRAF that is not performed by the wild-type protein. Critically, in melanoma cells MITF is required downstream of oncogenic BRAF because it regulates expression of key cell cycle regulatory proteins such as CDK2 and CDK4. Wild-type BRAF does not regulate this pathway in melanocytes. Thus, we show that oncogenic BRAF exerts exquisite control over MITF on two levels. It downregulates the protein by stimulating its degradation, but then counteracts this by increasing transcription through BRN2. Our data suggest that oncogenic BRAF plays a critical role in regulating MITF expression to ensure that its protein levels are compatible with proliferation and survival of melanoma cells. We propose that its ability to appropriate the regulation of this critical factor explains in part why BRAF is such a potent oncogene in melanoma.

  2. An LPV Adaptive Observer for Updating a Map Applied to an MAF Sensor in a Diesel Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Changhui

    2015-10-23

    In this paper, a new method for mass air flow (MAF) sensor error compensation and an online updating error map (or lookup table) due to installation and aging in a diesel engine is developed. Since the MAF sensor error is dependent on the engine operating point, the error model is represented as a two-dimensional (2D) map with two inputs, fuel mass injection quantity and engine speed. Meanwhile, the 2D map representing the MAF sensor error is described as a piecewise bilinear interpolation model, which can be written as a dot product between the regression vector and parameter vector using a membership function. With the combination of the 2D map regression model and the diesel engine air path system, an LPV adaptive observer with low computational load is designed to estimate states and parameters jointly. The convergence of the proposed algorithm is proven under the conditions of persistent excitation and given inequalities. The observer is validated against the simulation data from engine software enDYNA provided by Tesis. The results demonstrate that the operating point-dependent error of the MAF sensor can be approximated acceptably by the 2D map from the proposed method.

  3. Multivariate Alteration Detection (MAD) and MAF Postprocessing in Multispectral, Bitemporal Image Data: New Approaches to Change Detection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Simpson, James J.

    1998-01-01

    type analyses of simple difference images. Case studies with AHVRR and Landsat MSS data using simple linear stretching and masking of the change images show the usefulness of the new MAD and MAF/MAD change detection schemes. Ground truth observations confirm the detected changes. A simple simulation...

  4. Tumour microvesicles contain retrotransposon elements and amplified oncogene sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaj, Leonora; Lessard, Ryan; Dai, Lixin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells release an abundance of microvesicles containing a selected set of proteins and RNAs. Here, we show that tumour microvesicles also carry DNA, which reflects the genetic status of the tumour, including amplification of the oncogene c-Myc. We also find amplified c-Myc in serum microvesicles from tumour-bearing mice. Further, we find remarkably high levels of retrotransposon RNA transcripts, especially for some human endogenous retroviruses, such as LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposon elements, in tumour microvesicles and these transposable elements could be transferred to normal cells. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of tumour microvesicles to include: elevated levels of specific coding and non-coding RNA and DNA, mutated and amplified oncogene sequences and transposable elements. Thus, tumour microvesicles contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer. PMID:21285958

  5. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. (Hopital Cochin, Paris (France))

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  6. Utilizing a Magnetic Abrasive Finishing Technique (MAF Via Adaptive Nero Fuzzy(ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Moosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted for measuring the quality of surface finishing roughness using magnetic abrasive finishing technique (MAF on brass plate which is very difficult to be polish by a conventional machining process where the cost is high and much more susceptible to surface damage as compared to other materials. Four operation parameters were studied, the gap between the work piece and the electromagnetic inductor, the current that generate the flux, the rotational Spindale speed and amount of abrasive powder size considering constant linear feed movement between machine head and workpiece. Adaptive Neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS was implemented for evaluation of a series of experiments and a verification with respect to specimen roughness change has been optimized and usefully achieved by obtained results were an average of the error between the surface roughness predicted by model simulation and that of direct measure is 2.0222 %.

  7. Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuto; Ushijima, Naofumi; Koga, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Serum Gc protein (known as vitamin D3-binding protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage activating factor (MAF). The MAF precursor activity of serum Gc protein of HIV-infected patients was lost or reduced because Gc protein is deglycosylated by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase) secreted from HIV-infected cells. Therefore, macrophages of HIV-infected patients having deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be activated, leading to immunosuppression. Since Nagalase is the intrinsic component of the envelope protein gp120, serum Nagalase activity is the sum of enzyme activities carried by both HIV virions and envelope proteins. These Nagalase carriers were already complexed with anti-HIV immunoglobulin G (IgG) but retained Nagalase activity that is required for infectivity. Stepwise treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (termed GcMAF), which produces no side effects in humans. Macrophages activated by administration of 100 ng GcMAF develop a large amount of Fc-receptors as well as an enormous variation of receptors that recognize IgG-bound and unbound HIV virions. Since latently HIV-infected cells are unstable and constantly release HIV virions, the activated macrophages rapidly intercept the released HIV virions to prevent reinfection resulting in exhaustion of infected cells. After less than 18 weekly administrations of 100 ng GcMAF for nonanemic patients, they exhibited low serum Nagalase activities equivalent to healthy controls, indicating eradication of HIV-infection, which was also confirmed by no infectious center formation by provirus inducing agent-treated patient PBMCs. No recurrence occurred and their healthy CD + cell counts were maintained for 7 years.

  8. Terminal and progenitor lineage-survival oncogenes as cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vias, Maria; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Mills, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Tumour classification has traditionally focused on differentiation and cellular morphology, and latterly on the application of genomic approaches. By combining chromatin immunoprecipitation with expression array, it has been possible to identify direct gene targets for transcription factors for nuclear hormone receptors. At the same time, there have been great strides in deriving stem and progenitor cells from tissues. It is therefore timely to propose that pairing the isolation of these cell subpopulations from tissues and tumours with these genomics approaches will reveal conserved gene targets for transcription factors. By focusing on transcription factors (lineage-survival oncogenes) with roles in both organogenesis and tumourigenesis at multiple organ sites, we suggest that this comparative genomics approach will enable developmental biology to be used more fully in relation to understanding tumour progression and will reveal new cancer markers. We focus here on neurogenesis and neuroendocrine differentiation in tumours.

  9. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N. Spurgeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100. The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship.

  10. Is chondroitin sulfate responsible for the biological effects attributed to the GC protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Marco; Reinwald, Heinz; Pacini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesize that a plasma glycosaminoglycan, chondroitin sulfate, may be responsible for the biological and clinical effects attributed to the Gc protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF), a protein that is extracted from human blood. Thus, Gc protein binds chondroitin sulfate on the cell surface and such an interaction may occur also in blood, colostrum and milk. This interpretation would solve the inconsistencies encountered in explaining the effects of GcMAF in vitro and in vivo. According to our model, the Gc protein or the GcMAF bind to chondroitin sulfate both on the cell surface and in bodily fluids, and the resulting multimolecular complexes, under the form of oligomers trigger a transmembrane signal or, alternatively, are internalized and convey the signal directly to the nucleus thus eliciting the diverse biological effects observed for both GcMAF and chondroitin sulfate.

  11. 40 CFR 798.3300 - Oncogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Species of Experimental Animals for Inhalation Carcinogenicity Studies” Paper presented at Conference on...) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3300 Oncogenicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a long-term oncogenicity study is to observe test animals for a major portion of their life span for...

  12. Transcription-independent functions of MYC: regulation of translation and DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael D.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    MYC is a potent oncogene that drives unrestrained cell growth and proliferation. Shortly after its discovery as an oncogene, the MYC protein was recognized as a sequence-specific transcription factor. Since that time, MYC oncogene research has focused on the mechanism of MYC-induced transcription and on the identification of MYC transcriptional target genes. Recently, MYC was shown to control protein expression through mRNA translation and to directly regulate DNA replication, thus initiating exciting new areas of oncogene research. PMID:18698328

  13. Genome-Wide Chromosomal Targets of Oncogenic Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Wang JP, Widom J (2005) Improved alignment of nucleosome DNA sequences using a mixture model. Nucleic Acids Res 33: 6743–6755. 6. Ioshikhes IP, Albert I...EMBO J 24: 533–542. 26. Anderson JD, Widom J (2000) Sequence and position-dependence of the equilibrium accessibility of nucleosomal DNA target sites

  14. Transcription factor profiling unveils the oncogenes involved in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... caused by rapidly growing and ulcerating tumours as well as by immune ... preventing cells from uncontrolled growth (e.g. Rb, c-abl, p21, p16), or ..... It has been reported (Shen et al., 1997) that arsenic ... toxic side effects.

  15. TRIM24 Is an Oncogenic Transcriptional Activator in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, Anna C; Cato, Laura; de Tribolet-Hardy, Jonas; Bernasocchi, Tiziano; Janouskova, Hana; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Cato, Andrew C B; Tschopp, Patrick; Gu, Lei; Corsinotti, Andrea; Zhong, Qing; Fankhauser, Christian; Fritz, Christine; Poyet, Cédric; Wagner, Ulrich; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi; Garraway, Levi A; Wild, Peter J; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Myles

    2016-06-13

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a key driver of prostate cancer (PC). While androgen-deprivation therapy is transiently effective in advanced disease, tumors often progress to a lethal castration-resistant state (CRPC). We show that recurrent PC-driver mutations in speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) stabilize the TRIM24 protein, which promotes proliferation under low androgen conditions. TRIM24 augments AR signaling, and AR and TRIM24 co-activated genes are significantly upregulated in CRPC. Expression of TRIM24 protein increases from primary PC to CRPC, and both TRIM24 protein levels and the AR/TRIM24 gene signature predict disease recurrence. Analyses in CRPC cells reveal that the TRIM24 bromodomain and the AR-interacting motif are essential to support proliferation. These data provide a rationale for therapeutic TRIM24 targeting in SPOP mutant and CRPC patients.

  16. Mobile Health Technology for Atrial Fibrillation Management Integrating Decision Support, Education, and Patient Involvement: mAF App Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Chen, Yundai; Lane, Deirdre A; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-08-26

    Mobile Health technology for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation is unknown. The simple mobile AF (mAF) App was designed to incorporate clinical decision-support tools (CHA2DS2-VASc [Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years, Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or TIA, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category], HAS-BLED [Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/alcohol concomitantly], SAMe-TT2R2 [Sex, Age App vs usual care) in a cluster randomized design pilot study. Patients' knowledge, quality of life, drug adherence, and anticoagulation satisfaction were evaluated at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Usability, feasibility, and acceptability of the mAF App were assessed at 1 month. A total of 113 patients were randomized to mAF App intervention (mean age, 67.4 years; 57.5% were male; mean follow-up, 69 days), and 96 patients were randomized to usual care (mean age, 70.9 years; 55.2% were male; mean follow-up, 95 days). More than 90% of patients reported that the mAF App was easy, user-friendly, helpful, and associated with significant improvements in knowledge compared with the usual care arm (P values for trend App versus usual care (all P App arm versus usual care, with anxiety and depression reduced (all P App, integrating clinical decision support,education, and patient-involvement strategies, significantly improved knowledge, drug adherence, quality of life, and anticoagulation satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA binding sites of oncogenes: implications in cancer and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Mayakannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2014-02-01

    Cancer, a complex genetic disease involving uncontrolled cell proliferation, is caused by inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. A vast majority of these cancer causing genes are known targets of microRNAs (miRNAs) that bind to complementary sequences in 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of messenger RNAs and repress them from translation. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring naturally in such miRNA binding regions can alter the miRNA:mRNA interaction and can significantly affect gene expression. We hypothesized that 3'UTR SNPs in miRNA binding sites of proto-oncogenes could abrogate their post-transcriptional regulation, resulting in overexpression of oncogenic proteins, tumor initiation, progression, and modulation of drug response in cancer patients. Therefore, we developed a systematic computational pipeline that integrates data from well-established databases, followed stringent selection criteria and identified a panel of 30 high-confidence SNPs that may impair miRNA target sites in the 3' UTR of 54 mRNA transcripts of 24 proto-oncogenes. Further, 8 SNPs amidst them had the potential to determine therapeutic outcome in cancer patients. Functional annotation suggested that altogether these SNPs occur in proto-oncogenes enriched for kinase activities. We provide detailed in silico evidence for the functional effect of these candidate SNPs in various types of cancer.

  18. Oncogenic EGFR Represses the TET1 DNA Demethylase to Induce Silencing of Tumor Suppressors in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Forloni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncogene-induced DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressors frequently occurs in cancer, but the mechanism and functional role of this silencing in oncogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we show that oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR induces silencing of multiple unrelated tumor suppressors in lung adenocarcinomas and glioblastomas by inhibiting the DNA demethylase TET oncogene family member 1 (TET1 via the C/EBPα transcription factor. After oncogenic EGFR inhibition, TET1 binds to tumor suppressor promoters and induces their re-expression through active DNA demethylation. Ectopic expression of TET1 potently inhibits lung and glioblastoma tumor growth, and TET1 knockdown confers resistance to EGFR inhibitors in lung cancer cells. Lung cancer samples exhibited reduced TET1 expression or TET1 cytoplasmic localization in the majority of cases. Collectively, these results identify a conserved pathway of oncogenic EGFR-induced DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressors that may have therapeutic benefits for oncogenic EGFR-mediated lung cancers and glioblastomas.

  19. A regulatory circuit for piwi by the large Maf gene traffic jam in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kuniaki; Inagaki, Sachi; Mituyama, Toutai; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Ono, Yukiteru; Sakota, Eri; Kotani, Hazuki; Asai, Kiyoshi; Siomi, Haruhiko; Siomi, Mikiko C

    2009-10-29

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) silence retrotransposons in Drosophila germ lines by associating with the PIWI proteins Argonaute 3 (AGO3), Aubergine (Aub) and Piwi. piRNAs in Drosophila are produced from intergenic repetitive genes and piRNA clusters by two systems: the primary processing pathway and the amplification loop. The amplification loop occurs in a Dicer-independent, PIWI-Slicer-dependent manner. However, primary piRNA processing remains elusive. Here we analysed piRNA processing in a Drosophila ovarian somatic cell line where Piwi, but not Aub or AGO3, is expressed; thus, only the primary piRNAs exist. In addition to flamenco, a Piwi-specific piRNA cluster, traffic jam (tj), a large Maf gene, was determined as a new piRNA cluster. piRNAs arising from tj correspond to the untranslated regions of tj messenger RNA and are sense-oriented. piRNA loading on to Piwi may occur in the cytoplasm. zucchini, a gene encoding a putative cytoplasmic nuclease, is required for tj-derived piRNA production. In tj and piwi mutant ovaries, somatic cells fail to intermingle with germ cells and Fasciclin III is overexpressed. Loss of tj abolishes Piwi expression in gonadal somatic cells. Thus, in gonadal somatic cells, tj gives rise simultaneously to two different molecules: the TJ protein, which activates Piwi expression, and piRNAs, which define the Piwi targets for silencing.

  20. Atypical IgM multiple myeloma with deletion of c-MAF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez Salcedo, L M; López Rubio, M; Gil Fernández, J J; Garcia-Suarez, J; Magro, E; Arranz, E; Gutiérrez Jomarrón, I; Marcellini Antonio, S; Blasco, A; Burgaleta, C

    2015-10-01

    IgM multiple myeloma (MM) is a rare subtype of myeloma that shares clinical and pathological features with Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia. These are two separate entities that differ both in therapy and prognosis. We report a 57-year-old male, who presented with anaemia, hypercalcaemia, acute renal failure and several vertebral fractures that clinically suggested a multiple myeloma. Further investigations revealed a serum monoclonal component of IgM lambda type and a bone marrow infiltrated by small, lymphoplasmocytic cells. IgM MM was finally diagnosed by means of both inmunophenotypic and immunohistochemistry techniques, stressing the importance of inmunophenotypic evaluation when clinical and morphological features are discordant. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies disclosed a particular combination of deletion 13q14, t(11;14) and monoallelic deletion C-MAF without t(14;16). The clinical evolution after a Bortezomib-containing polychemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) conditioned with busulphan and melphalan is also presented. This very uncommon case highlights the impact of immunophenotyping on the differential diagnosis between IgM MM and WM, to choose the best treatment and establish an appropriate outcome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92 oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Kayali

    Full Text Available Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  2. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  3. Role of STAT3 in in vitro transformation triggered by TRK oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Miranda

    Full Text Available TRK oncoproteins are chimeric versions of the NTRK1/NGF receptor and display constitutive tyrosine kinase activity leading to transformation of NIH3T3 cells and neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT 3 is activated in response to cytokines and growth factors and it has been recently identified as a novel signal transducer for TrkA, mediating the functions of NGF in nervous system. In this paper we have investigated STAT3 involvement in signalling induced by TRK oncogenes. We showed that TRK oncogenes trigger STAT3 phosphorylation both on Y705 and S727 residues and STAT3 transcriptional activity. MAPK pathway was involved in the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation. Interestingly, we have shown reduced STAT3 protein level in NIH3T3 transformed foci expressing TRK oncogenes. Overall, we have unveiled a dual role for STAT3 in TRK oncogenes-induced NIH3T3 transformation: i decreased STAT3 protein levels, driven by TRK oncoproteins activity, are associated to morphological transformation; ii residual STAT3 transcriptional activity is required for cell growth.

  4. Amplification of cellular oncogenes in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Bagci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term gene amplification refers to an increase in copy number of a gene. Upregulation of gene expression through amplification is a general mechanism to increase gene dosage. Oncogene amplifications have been shown in solid human cancers and they are often associated with progression of cancer. Defining oncogene amplification is useful since it is used as a prognostic marker in clinical oncology nowadays, especially v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER2 targeted agents are used in breast cancer patients with high level of HER2 overexpression as a therapeutic approach. However, patients without HER2 overexpression do not appear to benefit from these agents. We concluded that determination of oncogene amplification in solid tumors is an important factor in treatment of human cancers with many unknowns. We have referred to PubMed and some databases to prepare this article.

  5. An Interaction with Ewing's Sarcoma Breakpoint Protein EWS Defines a Specific Oncogenic Mechanism of ETS Factors Rearranged in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedage, Vivekananda; Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Nicholas, Taylor R; Budka, Justin A; Plotnik, Joshua P; Jerde, Travis J; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2016-10-25

    More than 50% of prostate tumors have a chromosomal rearrangement resulting in aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS family transcription factor. However, mechanisms that differentiate the function of oncogenic ETS factors expressed in prostate tumors from non-oncogenic ETS factors expressed in normal prostate are unknown. Here, we find that four oncogenic ETS (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), and no other ETS, interact with the Ewing's sarcoma breakpoint protein, EWS. This EWS interaction was necessary and sufficient for oncogenic ETS functions including gene activation, cell migration, clonogenic survival, and transformation. Significantly, the EWS interacting region of ERG has no homology with that of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5. Therefore, this finding may explain how divergent ETS factors have a common oncogenic function. Strikingly, EWS is fused to various ETS factors by the chromosome translocations that cause Ewing's sarcoma. Therefore, these findings link oncogenic ETS function in both prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oncofuse: a computational framework for the prediction of the oncogenic potential of gene fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugay, Mikhail; Ortiz de Mendíbil, Iñigo; Vizmanos, José L; Novo, Francisco J

    2013-10-15

    Gene fusions resulting from chromosomal aberrations are an important cause of cancer. The complexity of genomic changes in certain cancer types has hampered the identification of gene fusions by molecular cytogenetic methods, especially in carcinomas. This is changing with the advent of next-generation sequencing, which is detecting a substantial number of new fusion transcripts in individual cancer genomes. However, this poses the challenge of identifying those fusions with greater oncogenic potential amid a background of 'passenger' fusion sequences. In the present work, we have used some recently identified genomic hallmarks of oncogenic fusion genes to develop a pipeline for the classification of fusion sequences, namely, Oncofuse. The pipeline predicts the oncogenic potential of novel fusion genes, calculating the probability that a fusion sequence behaves as 'driver' of the oncogenic process based on features present in known oncogenic fusions. Cross-validation and extensive validation tests on independent datasets suggest a robust behavior with good precision and recall rates. We believe that Oncofuse could become a useful tool to guide experimental validation studies of novel fusion sequences found during next-generation sequencing analysis of cancer transcriptomes. Oncofuse is a naive Bayes Network Classifier trained and tested using Weka machine learning package. The pipeline is executed by running a Java/Groovy script, available for download at www.unav.es/genetica/oncofuse.html.

  7. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ming Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1, KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs.

  8. REST regulates oncogenic properties of glioblastoma stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Mohamed M.; Sathyan, Pratheesh; Singh, Sanjay K.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liang, Shoudan; Gumin, Joy; El-Mesallamy, Hala Osman; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Fuller, Gregory N.; Lang, Frederick F.; Majumder, Sadhan

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Although many GBM tumors are believed to be caused by self-renewing, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GSCs), the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs are only now being unraveled. Here we showed that GSCs derived from GBM patient specimens express varying levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, suggesting heterogeneity across different GSC lines. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments indicated that REST maintains self-renewal of GSCs. High REST-expressing GSCs (HR-GSCs) produced tumors histopathologically distinct from those generated by low REST-expressing GSCs (LR-GSCs) in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models. Knockdown of REST in HR-GSCs resulted in increased survival in GSC-transplanted mice and produced tumors with higher apoptotic and lower invasive properties. Conversely, forced expression of exogenous REST in LR-GSCs produced decreased survival in mice and produced tumors with lower apoptotic and higher invasive properties, similar to HR-GSCs. Thus, based on our results, we propose that a novel function of REST is to maintain self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs and that REST can play a major role in mediating tumorigenicity in GBM. PMID:22228704

  9. Human genome: proto-oncogenes and proretroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisselev, L L; Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Berditchevsky, F B; Tret'yakov, L D

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the studies undertaken at the Laboratory for Molecular Bases of Oncogenesis (Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow) till middle of 1984 is presented. The human genome contains multiple dispersed nucleotide sequences related to the proto-oncogene mos and to proretroviral sequences in tight juxtaposition to each other. From sequencing appropriate cloned fragments of human DNA in phage and plasmid vectors it follows that one of these regions, NV-1, is a pseudogene of proto-mos with partial duplications and two Alu elements intervening its coding sequence, and the other, CL-1, seems to be also a mos-related gene with a deletion of the internal part of the structural gene. CL-1 is flanked by a proretroviral-like sequence including tRNAiMet binding site and U5 (part of the long terminal repeat). The proretroviral-like sequences are transcribed in 21-35S poly(A)+RNA abundant in normal and malignant human cells. Two hypotheses are proposed: endogenous retroviruses take part in amplification of at least some proto-oncogenes; proto-oncogenes are inactivated via insertion of movable genetic elements and conversion into pseudogenes. Potential oncogenicity of a normal human genome undergoes two controversial influences: it increases due to proto-oncogene amplification and decreases due to inactivation of some of them.

  10. Performance Evaluations of Four MAF-Based PLL Algorithms for Grid-Synchronization of Three-Phase Grid-Connected PWM Inverters and DGs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yang; Luo, Mingyu; Chen, Changqing;

    2016-01-01

    The moving average filter (MAF) is widely utilized to improve the disturbance rejection capability of the phase-locked loops (PLLs), which is of vital significance for the grid-integration and stable operation of power electronic converters to the electric power systems. However, the open-loop...... among the advanced MAF-based PLL algorithms is presented, which includes HPLL, MPLC-PLL, QT1-PLL, and DMAF-PLL. Various grid voltage disturbance scenarios, such as grid voltage sag, voltage flicker, and harmonics distortion, phase-angle and frequency jumps, DC offsets and noise, are considered...

  11. Oncogenes, protooncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijiya, N; Gewirtz, A M

    1995-05-01

    In recent years, our understanding of normal human hematopoiesis has expanded greatly. We have increased our knowledge of regulatory growth factors, the receptors through which they act, and the secondary messengers involved in transducing the growth/differentiation signals from the cytoplasmic membrane to the nucleus. This knowledge has revealed potential mechanisms for inducing the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. This applies in particular to the role of viral oncogenes and cellular protooncogenes and, more recently, to the role of tumor suppressor genes. Protooncogenes are intimately involved in the processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, any amplification, mutation, structural alteration, or change in transcriptional regulation of protooncogenes might lead to or be associated with induction of the malignant phenotype. Based on the importance of these genes in leukemogenesis and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that targeted disruption of leukemogenic genes may be of therapeutic value.

  12. Computational drugs repositioning identifies inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K/AKT/P70S6K-dependent pathways among FDA-approved compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrella, Diego; Manni, Isabella; Tumaini, Barbara; Dattilo, Rosanna; Papaccio, Federica; Mutarelli, Margherita; Sirci, Francesco; Amoreo, Carla A.; Mottolese, Marcella; Iezzi, Manuela; Ciolli, Laura; Aria, Valentina; Bosotti, Roberta; Isacchi, Antonella; Loreni, Fabrizio; Bardelli, Alberto; Avvedimento, Vittorio E.; di Bernardo, Diego; Cardone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors for oncogenic signalling pathways remains a key focus in modern oncology, based on personalized and targeted therapeutics. Computational drug repurposing via the analysis of FDA-approved drug network is becoming a very effective approach to identify therapeutic opportunities in cancer and other human diseases. Given that gene expression signatures can be associated with specific oncogenic mutations, we tested whether a “reverse” oncogene-specific signature might assist in the computational repositioning of inhibitors of oncogenic pathways. As a proof of principle, we focused on oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling, a molecular pathway frequently driving cancer progression as well as raising resistance to anticancer-targeted therapies. We show that implementation of “reverse” oncogenic PI3K-dependent transcriptional signatures combined with interrogation of drug networks identified inhibitors of PI3K-dependent signalling among FDA-approved compounds. This led to repositioning of Niclosamide (Niclo) and Pyrvinium Pamoate (PP), two anthelmintic drugs, as inhibitors of oncogenic PI3K-dependent signalling. Niclo inhibited phosphorylation of P70S6K, while PP inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and P70S6K, which are downstream targets of PI3K. Anthelmintics inhibited oncogenic PI3K-dependent gene expression and showed a cytostatic effect in vitro and in mouse mammary gland. Lastly, PP inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells harbouring PI3K mutations. Our data indicate that drug repositioning by network analysis of oncogene-specific transcriptional signatures is an efficient strategy for identifying oncogenic pathway inhibitors among FDA-approved compounds. We propose that PP and Niclo should be further investigated as potential therapeutics for the treatment of tumors or diseases carrying the constitutive activation of the PI3K/P70S6K signalling axis. PMID:27542212

  13. Intrinsic structural disorder confers cellular viability on oncogenic fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Hegyi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations, which often generate chimeric proteins by fusing segments of two distinct genes, represent the single major genetic aberration leading to cancer. We suggest that the unifying theme of these events is a high level of intrinsic structural disorder, enabling fusion proteins to evade cellular surveillance mechanisms that eliminate misfolded proteins. Predictions in 406 translocation-related human proteins show that they are significantly enriched in disorder (43.3% vs. 20.7% in all human proteins, they have fewer Pfam domains, and their translocation breakpoints tend to avoid domain splitting. The vicinity of the breakpoint is significantly more disordered than the rest of these already highly disordered fusion proteins. In the unlikely event of domain splitting in fusion it usually spares much of the domain or splits at locations where the newly exposed hydrophobic surface area approximates that of an intact domain. The mechanisms of action of fusion proteins suggest that in most cases their structural disorder is also essential to the acquired oncogenic function, enabling the long-range structural communication of remote binding and/or catalytic elements. In this respect, there are three major mechanisms that contribute to generating an oncogenic signal: (i a phosphorylation site and a tyrosine-kinase domain are fused, and structural disorder of the intervening region enables intramolecular phosphorylation (e.g., BCR-ABL; (ii a dimerisation domain fuses with a tyrosine kinase domain and disorder enables the two subunits within the homodimer to engage in permanent intermolecular phosphorylations (e.g., TFG-ALK; (iii the fusion of a DNA-binding element to a transactivator domain results in an aberrant transcription factor that causes severe misregulation of transcription (e.g. EWS-ATF. Our findings also suggest novel strategies of intervention against the ensuing neoplastic transformations.

  14. PTPN14 interacts with and negatively regulates the oncogenic function of YAP

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, X; Yang, N; Figel, SA; Wilson, KE; Morrison, CD; Gelman, IH; Zhang, J

    2012-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. The pivotal effector of this pathway is YAP, a transcriptional co-activator amplified in mouse and human cancers where it promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and malignant transformation. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism for the YAP oncogenic function via direct interaction with non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase 14 (PTPN14) thro...

  15. Expression Profiling of Circulating Microvesicles Reveals Intercellular Transmission of Oncogenic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Gloria; Lana, Tobia; Bresolin, Silvia; Aveic, Sanja; Pastò, Anna; Frasson, Chiara; Te Kronnie, Geertruy

    2017-06-01

    Circulating microvesicles have been described as important players in cell-to-cell communication carrying biological information under normal or pathologic condition. Microvesicles released by cancer cells may incorporate diverse biomolecules (e.g., active lipids, proteins, and RNA), which can be delivered and internalized by recipient cells, potentially altering the gene expression of recipient cells and eventually impacting disease progression. Leukemia in vitro model systems were used to investigate microvesicles as vehicles of protein-coding messages. Several leukemic cells (K562, LAMA-87, TOM-1, REH, and SHI-1), each carrying a specific chromosomal translocation, were analyzed. In the leukemic cells, these chromosomal translocations are transcribed into oncogenic fusion transcripts and the transfer of these transcripts was monitored from leukemic cells to microvesicles for each of the cell lines. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed to compare transcriptomes of K562-derived microvesicles and parental K562 cells. The data show that oncogenic BCR-ABL1 transcripts and mRNAs related to basic functions of leukemic cells were included in microvesicles. Further analysis of microvesicles cargo revealed a remarkable enrichment of transcripts related to cell membrane activity, cell surface receptors, and extracellular communication when compared with parental K562 cells. Finally, coculturing of healthy mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with K562-derived microvesicles displayed the transfer of the oncogenic message, and confirmed the increase of target cell proliferation as a function of microvesicle dosage.Implications: This study provides novel insight into tumor-derived microvesicles as carriers of oncogenic protein-coding messages that can potentially jeopardize cell-directed therapy, and spread to other compartments of the body. Mol Cancer Res; 15(6); 683-95. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Serena Bonomi; Stefania Gallo; Morena Catillo; Daniela Pignataro; Giuseppe Biamonti; Claudia Ghigna

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer ...

  17. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  18. p53-independent upregulation of miR-34a during oncogene-induced senescence represses MYC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, N R; Shalgi, R; Frankel, L B

    2010-01-01

    , upregulation of miR-34a is mediated by the ETS family transcription factor, ELK1. During senescence, miR-34a targets the important proto-oncogene MYC and our data suggest that miR-34a thereby coordinately controls a set of cell cycle regulators. Hence, in addition to its integration in the p53 pathway, we show...

  19. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  20. Evaluation and Comparison of High-Resolution (HR) and High-Light (HL) Phosphors in the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) using Generalized Linear Systems Analyses (GMTF, GDQE) that include the Effect of Scatter, Magnification and Detector Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandesh K; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the imaging characteristics of the high-resolution, high-sensitivity micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) with 35-micron pixel-pitch when used with different commercially-available 300 micron thick phosphors: the high resolution (HR) and high light (HL) from Hamamatsu. The purpose of this evaluation was to see if the HL phosphor with its higher screen efficiency could be replaced with the HR phosphor to achieve improved resolution without an increase in noise resulting from the HR's decreased light-photon yield. We designated the detectors MAF-HR and MAF-HL and compared them with a standard flat panel detector (FPD) (194 micron pixel pitch and 600 micron thick CsI(Tl)). For this comparison, we used the generalized linear-system metrics of GMTF, GNNPS and GDQE which are more realistic measures of total system performance since they include the effect of scattered radiation, focal spot distribution, and geometric un-sharpness. Magnifications (1.05-1.15) and scatter fractions (0.28 and 0.33) characteristic of a standard head phantom were used. The MAF-HR performed significantly better than the MAF-HL at high spatial frequencies. The ratio of GMTF and GDQE of the MAF-HR compared to the MAF-HL at 3(6) cycles/mm was 1.45(2.42) and 1.23(2.89), respectively. Despite significant degradation by inclusion of scatter and object magnification, both MAF-HR and MAF-HL provide superior performance over the FPD at higher spatial frequencies with similar performance up to the FPD's Nyquist frequency of 2.5 cycles/mm. Both substantially higher resolution and improved GDQE can be achieved with the MAF using the HR phosphor instead of the HL phosphor.

  1. Driving gradual endogenous c-myc overexpression by flow-sorting: intracellular signaling and tumor cell phenotype correlate with oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kasper Jermiin; Holm, G.M.N.; Krabbe, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    cells than in the nonsorted cell population. To our knowledge, this is the first in vitro system allowing functional coupling between mitogenic signaling by a well-defined growth factor and gradual overexpression of the normal, endogenous c-myc gene. Thus, our flow-sorting approach provides...... an alternative modeling of the receptor-mediated carcinogenic process, compared to the currently used approaches of recombinant constitutive or conditional overexpression of oncogenic transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases or oncogenic transcription factors....

  2. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  3. Beyond an oncogene, Lin28 is a master regulator of cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefei; Weng, Mingjiao; Jin, Yinji; Yang, Weiwei; Wang, Xin; Wu, Di; Wang, Tianzhen; Li, Xiaobo

    2017-07-26

    The RNA binding protein Lin28 is increased in most human malignancies, and elevated Lin28 is a biomarker for poor prognosis and contributes to cancer progression. Lin28 functions as a master oncogene and is involved in almost all hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we summarize the aberrant molecular expression mechanisms and pathological roles of Lin28 in cancer progression. Moreover, we elaborate on the established molecular mechanisms, from the transcriptional level to the post-transcriptional and translational levels, by which Lin28 regulates cancer progression.

  4. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  5. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  6. LTβR signalling preferentially accelerates oncogenic AKT-initiated liver tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarzello, Anthony J; Jiang, Qun; Back, Timothy; Dang, Hien; Hodge, Deborah; Hanson, Charlotte; Subleski, Jeffrey; Weiss, Jonathan M; Stauffer, Jimmy K; Chaisaingmongkol, Jitti; Rabibhadana, Siritida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Ortaldo, John; Wang, Xin Wei; Norris, Paula S; Ware, Carl F; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The relative contributions of inflammatory signalling and sequential oncogenic dysregulation driving liver cancer pathogenesis remain incompletely understood. Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signalling is critically involved in hepatitis and liver tumorigenesis. Therefore, we explored the interdependence of inflammatory lymphotoxin signalling and specific oncogenic pathways in the progression of hepatic cancer. Design Pathologically distinct liver tumours were initiated by hydrodynamic transfection of oncogenic V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 1 (AKT)/β-catenin or AKT/Notch expressing plasmids. To investigate the relationship of LTβR signalling and specific oncogenic pathways, LTβR antagonist (LTβR-Fc) or agonist (anti-LTβR) were administered post oncogene transfection. Initiated livers/tumours were investigated for changes in oncogene expression, tumour proliferation, progression, latency and pathology. Moreover, specific LTβR-mediated molecular events were investigated in human liver cancer cell lines and through transcriptional analyses of samples from patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Results AKT/β-catenin-transfected livers displayed increased expression of LTβ and LTβR, with antagonism of LTβR signalling reducing tumour progression and enhancing survival. Conversely, enforced LTβR-activation of AKT/β-catenin-initiated tumours induced robust increases in proliferation and progression of hepatic tumour phenotypes in an AKT-dependent manner. LTβR-activation also rapidly accelerated ICC progression initiated by AKT/Notch, but not Notch alone. Moreover, LTβR-accelerated development coincides with increases of Notch, Hes1, c-MYC, pAKT and β-catenin. We further demonstrate LTβR signalling in human liver cancer cell lines to be a regulator of Notch, pAKTser473 and β-catenin. Transcriptome analysis of samples from patients with ICC links increased LTβR network expression with poor patient survival, increased

  7. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Leitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  8. Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses Activate the Tumor-Associated Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic. PMID:24604027

  9. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-03-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  10. Netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activities through enhancing Yes-associated protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qi; Li, Dean Y; Luo, Hongbo R; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-06-09

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is the major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size control and cancer development. However, how YAP is regulated by extracellular stimuli in tumorigenesis remains incompletely understood. Netrin-1, a laminin-related secreted protein, displays proto-oncogenic activity in cancers. Nonetheless, the downstream signaling mediating its oncogenic effects is not well defined. Here we show that netrin-1 via its transmembrane receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer and uncoordinated-5 homolog, up-regulates YAP expression, escalating YAP levels in the nucleus and promoting cancer cell proliferation and migration. Inactivating netrin-1, deleted in colorectal cancer, or uncoordinated-5 homolog B (UNC5B) decreases YAP protein levels, abrogating cancer cell progression by netrin-1, whereas knockdown of mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) or large tumor suppressor kinase 1/2 (Lats1/2), two sets of upstream core kinases of the Hippo pathway, has no effect in blocking netrin-1-induced up-regulation of YAP. Netrin-1 stimulates phosphatase 1A to dephosphorylate YAP, which leads to decreased ubiquitination and degradation, enhancing YAP accumulation and signaling. Hence, our findings support that netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activity through YAP signaling, providing a mechanism coupling extracellular signals to the nuclear YAP oncogene.

  11. A transcriptome map of cellular transformation by the fos oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Hong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-fos gene was originally identified as the cellular homolog of the oncogene v-fos carried by the Finkel-Biskis-Jenkins and Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine osteogenic sarcoma retroviruses. Sustained expression of fos is sufficient to induce cellular transformation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Fos functions as a component of the AP-1 transcription factor complex to regulate gene transcription and several differentially expressed genes have been identified in cells transformed by fos. We have extended these studies by constructing a cellular system for conditional transformation by v-fos. Using Affymetrix-based DNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes over the course of transformation and reversion in an inducible v-fos system. Results Microarray analyses of temporal gene expression during the process of v-fos mediated cellular transformation and morphological reversion revealed a remarkably dynamic transcriptome. Of the more than 8000 genes analyzed in this study, 3766 genes were categorized into 18 gene-expression patterns by using self-organizing map analysis. By combining the analysis of gene expression profiles in stably transformed cells with the analysis of sequential expression patterns during conditional transformation, we identified a relatively small cohort of genes implicated in v-fos mediated cellular transformation. Conclusion This approach defines a general conditional cell transformation system that can be used to study the endogenous transcription regulatory mechanisms involved in transformation and tumorigenesis. In addition, this study is the first reported analysis of dynamic changes in gene expression throughout experimentally controlled morphological transformation mediated by v-fos.

  12. Change detection by the IR-MAD and kernel MAF methods in Landsat TM data covering a Swedish forest region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Olsson, Håkan

    2010-01-01

    Change over time between two 512 by 512 (25 m by 25 m pixels) multispectral Landsat Thematic Mapper images dated 6 June 1986 and 27 June 1988 respectively covering a forested region in northern Sweden, is here detected by means of the iteratively reweighted multivariate alteration detection (IR......-MAD) method followed by post-processing by means of kernel maximum autocorrelation factor (kMAF) analysis. The IR-MAD method builds on an iterated version of an established method in multivariate statistics, namely canonical correlation analysis (CCA). It finds orthogonal (i.e., uncorrelated) linear...... that will ideally follow a so-called c2 (chi-squared) distribution with p degrees of freedom for the no-change pixels; p is the number of spectral bands in the image data. Here p=6, the thermal band is excluded from the analyses. The c2 image is the basis for calculating an image of probability for no-change, i...

  13. Mercury in air and plant specimens in herbaria: A pilot study at the MAF Herbarium in Madrid (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzun, R. [Departamento de Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Facultad de Ciencias Geologicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: oyarzun@geo.ucm.es; Higueras, P.; Esbri, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Geologica y Minera, Escuela Universitaria Politecnica de Almaden, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Plaza M. Meca 1, 13400 Almaden (Spain); Pizarro, J. [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    We present data from a study of mercury concentrations in air and plant specimens from the MAF Herbarium in Madrid (Spain). Hg (gas) emissions from old plant collections treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) in herbaria may pose a health risk for staff working in installations of this type. This is an issue not yet properly addressed. Plants that underwent insecticide treatment with HgCl{sub 2} at the MAF Herbarium until the mid 1970s have persistent high concentrations of Hg in the range 1093-11,967 {mu}g g{sup -1}, whereas untreated specimens are in the range of 1.2-4.3 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The first group induces high concentrations of Hg (gas) in the main herbarium room, with seasonal variations of 404-727 ng m{sup -3} (late winter) and 748-7797 ng m{sup -3} (early summer) (baseline for Hg: 8 ng m{sup -3}). A test survey at another herbarium in Madrid showed even higher concentrations of Hg (gas) above 40,000 ng m{sup -3}. The World Health Organization guidelines for chronic exposure to Hg (gas) are estimated at a maximum of 1000 ng m{sup -3}. While staff was aware of the existence of HgCl{sub 2} treated plants (the plant specimen sheets are labelled as 'poisoned'), they had no knowledge of the presence of high Hg (gas) concentrations in the buildings, a situation that may be relatively common in herbaria.

  14. Expressions of estrogen receptor subtypes and c-met proto-oncogene in endometrial carcinoma and their correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions of estrogen receptor(ER)subtypes and c-met proto-oncogene in human endometrial carcinomas and to assess the clinical significance of ER and c-met in this carcinoma.Methods Reverse transcription PCR(RT-PCR)was used to detect the expressions of ERα,ERβ and c-met proto-oncogene mRNA in 30 samples of endometrial carcinoma and 11 samples of normal endometrium.Results The expression of ERα in endometrial carcinoma(0.70±0.40)was significantly reduced in comparison to that i...

  15. DNA methylation profiling of transcription factor genes in normal lymphocyte development and lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Claudia; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Lesche, Ralf; Dong, Jun; Stein, Harald; Thiel, Andreas; Eckhardt, Florian

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a crucial role during hematopoiesis by orchestrating lineage commitment and determining cellular fate. Although tight regulation of transcription factor expression appears to be essential, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved in transcription factor gene regulation. We have analyzed DNA methylation profiles of 13 key transcription factor genes in primary cells of the hematopoietic cascade, lymphoma cell lines and lymph node biopsies of diffuse large B-cell- and T-cell-non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Several of the transcription factor genes (SPI1, GATA3, TCF-7, Etv5, c-maf and TBX21) are differentially methylated in specific cell lineages and stages of the hematopoietic cascade. For some genes, such as SPI1, Etv5 and Eomes, we found an inverse correlation between the methylation of the 5' untranslated region and expression of the associated gene suggesting that these genes are regulated by DNA methylation. Differential methylation is not limited to cells of the healthy hematopoietic cascade, as we observed aberrant methylation of c-maf, TCF7, Eomes and SPI1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Our results suggest that epigenetic remodelling of transcription factor genes is a frequent mechanism during hematopoietic development. Aberrant methylation of transcription factor genes is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and might have a functional role during tumorigenesis.

  16. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  17. Identification of the Transformational Properties and Transcriptional Targets of the Oncogenic SRY Transcription Factor SOX4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    January 15, 2009 and BMP-6 (40) to parathyroid hormone and progesterone (8). Previous work has shown that SOX4 directly signals from IL-5Ra (41), and here...stained section of SOX4 knockout mouse prostate (4x). Clear hyperplasia is seen in the uppermost gland however the majority of tissue appears normal. (C

  18. FOXM1 is an oncogenic mediator in Ewing Sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Christensen

    Full Text Available Ewing Family Tumors (Ewing Sarcoma and peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor are common bone and soft tissue malignancies of childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Chromosomal translocation in these tumors produces fusion oncogenes of the EWS/ETS class, with EWS/FLI1 being by far the most common. EWS/ETS chimera are the only well established driver mutations in these tumors and they function as aberrant transcription factors. Understanding the downstream genes whose expression is modified has been a central approach to the study of these tumors. FOXM1 is a proliferation associated transcription factor which has increasingly been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that FOXM1 is expressed in Ewing primary tumors and cell lines. Reduction in FOXM1 expression in Ewing cell lines results in diminished potential for anchorage independent growth. FOXM1 expression is enhanced by EWS/FLI1, though, unlike other tumor systems, it is not driven by expression of the EWS/FLI1 target GLI1. Thiostrepton is a compound known to inhibit FOXM1 by direct binding. We show that Thiostrepton diminishes FOXM1 expression in Ewing cell lines and this reduction reduces cell viability through an apoptotic mechanism. FOXM1 is involved in Ewing tumor pathogenesis and may prove to be a useful therapeutic target in Ewing tumors.

  19. DNA aneuploidy and integration of human papillomavirus type 16 e6/e7 oncogenes in intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsheimer, Peter; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Bastert, Gunther; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2004-05-01

    Increasingly deregulated expression of the E6-E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) has been identified as the major transforming factor in the pathogenesis of cervical dysplasia and derived cancers. The expression of these genes in epithelial stem cells first results in chromosomal instability and induces chromosomal aneuploidy. It is speculated that this subsequently favors integration of HR-HPV genomes into cellular chromosomes. This in turn leads to expression of viral cellular fusion transcripts and further enhanced expression of the E6-E7 oncoproteins. Chromosomal instability and aneuploidization thus seems to precede and favor integration of HR-HPV genomes. To prove this sequential concept, we analyzed here the sequence of events of DNA aneuploidization and integration in a series of HPV-16-positive cervical dysplastic lesions and carcinomas. Eighty-five punch biopsies of HPV-16-positive cervical lesions (20 CIN1/2, 50 CIN3, and 15 CxCa) were analyzed for DNA ploidy by DNA flow cytometry and for integration of HPV E6/E7 oncogenes using the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts assay, a reverse transcription-PCR method to detect integrate-derived human papillomavirus oncogene transcripts. DNA aneuploidy and viral genome integration were both associated with increasing dysplasia (P oncogene expression appears to result first in chromosomal instability and aneuploidization and is subsequently followed by integration of HR-HPV genomes in the affected cell clones.

  20. v-erbA oncogene activation entails the loss of hormone-dependent regulator activity of c-erbA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenke, M; Muñoz, A; Sap, J;

    1990-01-01

    and erythrocyte-specific gene expression in a T3-dependent fashion, when introduced into erythroid cells via a retrovirus. In contrast, the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor does not detectably affect erythroid differentiation. The analysis of a series of chimeric v-/c-erbA proteins suggests that the v......The v-erbA oncogene, one of the two oncogenes of the avian erythroblastosis virus, efficiently blocks erythroid differentiation and suppresses erythrocyte-specific gene transcription. Here we show that the overexpressed thyroid hormone receptor c-erbA effectively modulates erythroid differentiation......-erbA oncoprotein has lost one type of thyroid hormone receptor function (regulating erythrocyte gene transcription in response to T3), but constitutively displays another function: it represses transcription in the absence of T3. The region responsible for the loss of hormone-dependent regulator activity of v...

  1. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  2. Radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Oncogenes and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltenburg, L. T. C. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology

    2000-12-01

    The success of treatment of cancer patients by radiotherapy largely depends on tumor radiosensitivity. Several molecular factors that determine the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation have been identified during the last couple of years. Some of these factors are known as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the influence of some of these molecular factors on a major determinant of radiosensitivity: i. e. programmed cell death or apoptosis. The crucial molecular step in ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cell's cytosol. The ways the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as the oncogenes ras and raf, c-myc and Bcl-2 can influence this process at different stages are presented. As will be discussed, the result of activation of an oncoprotein on tumor radiosensitivity depends on its mechanism of action and on the presence of other (oncogenic) factors, since complex interactions among many molecular factors determine the delicate balance between cell proliferation and cell death. The ongoing identification and characterization of factors influencing apoptosis will eventually make it possible to predict tumor radiosensitivity and thereby improve cancer treatment.

  3. Oncogenic signaling by Kit tyrosine kinase occurs selectively on the Golgi apparatus in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Y; Horikawa, K; Takahashi, T; Akieda, Y; Tsujimoto, M; Fletcher, J A; Esumi, H; Nishida, T; Abe, R

    2017-02-13

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase. Most primary GIST patients respond to the Kit inhibitor imatinib, but this drug often becomes ineffective because of secondary mutations in the Kit kinase domain. The characteristic intracellular accumulation of imatinib-sensitive and -resistant Kit protein is well documented, but its relationship to oncogenic signaling remains unknown. Here, we show that in cancer tissue from primary GIST patients as well as in cell lines, mutant Kit accumulates on the Golgi apparatus, whereas normal Kit localizes to the plasma membrane (PM). In imatinib-resistant GIST with a secondary Kit mutation, Kit localizes predominantly on the Golgi apparatus. Both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant Kit (Kit(mut)) become fully auto-phosphorylated only on the Golgi and only if in a complex-glycosylated form. Kit(mut) accumulates on the Golgi during the early secretory pathway, but not after endocytosis. The aberrant kinase activity of Kit(mut) prevents its export from the Golgi to the PM. Furthermore, Kit(mut) on the Golgi signals and activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K-Akt) pathway, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), and the Mek-Erk pathway. Blocking the biosynthetic transport of Kit(mut) to the Golgi from the endoplasmic reticulum inhibits oncogenic signaling. PM localization of Kit(mut) is not required for its signaling. Activation of Src-family tyrosine kinases on the Golgi is essential for oncogenic Kit signaling. These results suggest that the Golgi apparatus serves as a platform for oncogenic Kit signaling. Our study demonstrates that Kit(mut)'s pathogenicity is related to its mis-localization, and may offer a new strategy for treating imatinib-resistant GISTs.Oncogene advance online publication, 13 February 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.519.

  4. RNA-DNA differences are rarer in proto-oncogenes than in tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2012-01-01

    It has long been assumed that DNA sequences and corresponding RNA transcripts are almost identical; a recent discovery, however, revealed widespread RNA-DNA differences (RDDs), which represent a largely unexplored aspect of human genome variation. It has been speculated that RDDs can affect disease susceptibility and manifestations; however, almost nothing is known about how RDDs are related to disease. Here, we show that RDDs are rarer in proto-oncogenes than in tumor suppressor genes; the number of RDDs in coding exons, but not in 3'UTR and 5'UTR, is significantly lower in the former than the latter, and this trend is especially pronounced in non-synonymous RDDs, i.e., those cause amino acid changes. A potential mechanism is that, unlike proto-oncogenes, the requirement of tumor suppressor genes to have both alleles affected to cause tumor 'buffers' these genes to tolerate more RDDs.

  5. Role of Pancreatic Transcription Factors in Maintenance of Mature β-Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Hideaki Kaneto; Taka-aki Matsuoka

    2015-01-01

    A variety of pancreatic transcription factors including PDX-1 and MafA play crucial roles in the pancreas and function for the maintenance of mature β-cell function. However, when β-cells are chronically exposed to hyperglycemia, expression and/or activities of such transcription factors are reduced, which leads to deterioration of b-cell function. These phenomena are well known as β-cell glucose toxicity in practical medicine as well as in the islet biology research area. Here we describe th...

  6. A novel MCF-10A line allowing conditional oncogene expression in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danke Christina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-transformed mammary epithelial cell lines such as MCF-10A recapitulate epithelial morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D tissue culture by forming acinar structures. They represent an important tool to characterize the biological properties of oncogenes and to model early carcinogenic events. So far, however, these approaches were restricted to cells with constitutive oncogene expression prior to the set-up of 3D cultures. Although very informative, this experimental setting has precluded the analysis of effects caused by sudden oncoprotein expression or withdrawal in established epithelial cultures. Here, we report the establishment and use of a stable MCF-10A cell line (MCF-10Atet fitted with a novel and improved doxycycline (dox-regulated expression system allowing the conditional expression of any transgene. Methods MCF-10Atet cells were generated by stable transfection with pWHE644, a vector expressing a second generation tetracycline-regulated transactivator and a novel transcriptional silencer. In order to test the properties of this new repressor/activator switch, MCF-10Atet cells were transfected with a second plasmid, pTET-HABRAF-IRES-GFP, which responds to dox treatment with the production of a bi-cistronic transcript encoding hemagglutinin-tagged B-Raf and green fluorescent protein (GFP. This improved conditional expression system was then characterized in detail in terms of its response to various dox concentrations and exposure times. The plasticity of the phenotype provoked by oncogenic B-RafV600E in MCF-10Atet cells was analyzed in 3D cultures by dox exposure and subsequent wash-out. Results MCF-10Atet cells represent a tightly controlled, conditional gene expression system. Using B-RafV600E as a model oncoprotein, we show that its sudden expression in established 3D cultures results in the loss of acinar organization, the induction of an invasive phenotype and hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

  7. BCL3 exerts an oncogenic function by regulating STAT3 in human cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hu Zhao,1 Wuliang Wang,1 Qinghe Zhao,1 Guiming Hu,2 Kehong Deng,1 Yuling Liu1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Department of Pathology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Aberrant expression of oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors play a fundamental effect on the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of cervical cancer (CC. B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (BCL3 was previously found to be a putative proto-oncogene in human cancers and regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical oncogene, in CC cell line. However, its expression status, clinical significance and biological functions in CC remain largely unclear. The expressions of BCL3 and STAT3 in CC specimens were determined by immunohistochemistry. MTT, colony formation assays and flow cytometry analysis were carried out to test proliferation and cell cycle of CC cells. Here, the levels of BCL3 were overexpressed in CC compared to adjacent cervical tissues. Furthermore, high levels of BCL3 protein were confirmed by immunoblotting in CC cells as compared with normal cervical epithelial cells. The positive expression of BCL3 was correlated with adverse prognostic features and reduced survival rate. In addition, BCL3 regulated STAT3 abundance in CC cells. STAT3 was found to be upregulated and positively correlated with BCL3 expression in CC specimens. BCL3 overexpression resulted in prominent increased proliferation and cell cycle progression in Hela cells. By contrast, inhibition of BCL3 in CaSki cells remarkably suppressed proliferative ability and cell cycle progression. In vivo studies showed that knockdown of BCL3 inhibited tumor growth of CC in mice xenograft model. Notably, we confirmed that STAT3 mediated the oncogenic roles of BCL3 in CC. In conclusion, we suggest that BCL3 serves as an oncogene in CC by modulating proliferation and cell cycle progression, and its oncogenic effect is

  8. Two oncogenes, v-fos and v-ras, cooperate to convert normal keratinocytes to squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D.A.; Welty, D.J.; Player, A.; Yuspa, S.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have been implicated the ras{sup Ha} oncogene in the initiation of skin carcinogenesis and the fos oncogene in malignant progression of premalignant skin cell lines. To determine if these two oncogenes are sufficient to convert normal keratinocytes to cancer cells, freshly isolated mouse keratinocytes were coinfected with replication-defective ({psi}-2) v-ras{sup Ha} and v-fos viruses in culture. When tested in nude mice within several days of infection, v-fos/v-ras{sup Ha}-coinfected keratinocytes produced squamous cell carcinomas. Introduction of v-fos alone resulted in normal or hyperplastic skin, whereas v-ras{sup Ha} alone produced squamous papillomas. These results indicate that two oncogenes are sufficient to produce the malignant phenotype in epidermal cells. Furthermore, they clearly link the fos oncogene with malignant conversion. Since fos acts as a transcriptional regulator of other genes, malignant conversion may be an indirect consequence of the overexpression of the fos-encoded protein leading to a change in the expression of fos-controlled cellular genes.

  9. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells.

  10. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  11. Polymorphisms in FTO and MAF Genes and Birth Weight, BMI, Ponderal Index, Weight Gain in a Large Cohort of Infants with a Birth Weight below 1500 Grams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Haller

    Full Text Available The FTO gene, located on chromosome 16q12.2, and the MAF gene, located on chromosome 16q22-23, were identified as genes harboring common variants with an impact on obesity predisposition. We studied the association of common variants with birth weight, gain of body weight, body mass index (BMI, Ponderal index and relevant neonatal outcomes in a large German cohort of infants with a birth weight below 1500 grams.The single nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO gene and rs1424233 (MAF gene were genotyped using allelic discrimination assays in a prospective multicenter cohort study conducted in 15 neonatal intensive care units in Germany from September 2003 until January 2008. DNA samples were extracted from buccal swabs according to standard protocols.1946 infants were successfully genotyped at FTO and 2149 infants at MAF. Allele frequencies were not significantly different from other European cohorts. The polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The polymorphisms did not show associations with birth weight, BMI and Ponderal Index at discharge, and weight gain, neither testing for a dominant, additive nor for a recessive model.Since an association of the polymorphisms with weight gain has been demonstrated in multiple populations, the lack of association in a population of preterm infants with regular tube feeding after birth and highly controlled feeding volumes provides evidence for the hypothesis that these polymorphisms affect food intake behavior and hunger rather than metabolism and energy consumption.

  12. Regulation of the expression of proto-oncogenes by autocrine embryotropins in the early mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xing Liang; O'Neill, C

    2011-06-01

    Autocrine embryotropins act as survival signals for the preimplantation embryo. In this study we examined the role of Paf in the transcription of the key proto-oncogenes Bcl2 and Fos. Transcripts were detected in oocytes and some cohorts of zygotes but not in cohorts of 2-cell, 8-cell, and blastocyst stage embryos. Immunolocalization of BCL2 and FOS showed little staining in oocytes and zygotes but increased staining in the embryo from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. Paf (37 nM) treatment of 2-cell embryos caused an alpha-amanitin (26 μM)-sensitive increase in Bcl2 and Fos transcripts 20 min after treatment that subsided by 40 min. This increase was blocked by inhibition of calcium (by BAPTA-AM) or phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling (by LY294002). Paf challenge also caused increased staining of BCL2 and FOS. Increased staining of FOS required new protein synthesis that had a half-life of 2-4 h after Paf challenge. Only a small proportion (∼12%) of individual 2-cell embryos collected from the reproductive tract had detectable Bcl2 and Fos. This dichotomous pattern of transcript expression is consistent with the known periodic actions of Paf (which has a periodicity of ∼90 min) and the relatively short half-life of the resulting transcripts. A BCL2 antagonist (HA14-1) caused a dose-dependent decrease in the capacity of cultured zygotes to develop to morphological blastocysts, which was partially reversed by the simultaneous addition of Paf to medium. The results show that Paf induces periodic transient transcriptions of key proto-oncogenes that result in the persistent presence of the resulting proteins in the preimplantation phase of development.

  13. Simultaneous translocations of FGFR3/MMSET and CCND1 into two different IGH alleles in multiple myeloma: lack of concurrent activation of both proto-oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Borja; Martín-Subero, José I; Lahortiga, Idoya; Largo, Cristina; Larrayoz, María J; Odero, María D; Prosper, Felipe; Cigudosa, Juan C; Siebert, Reiner; Calasanz, María J

    2007-05-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of two different translocations affecting both alleles of the IGH gene has rarely been reported in multiple myeloma. In such a case, two different oncogenes might become transcriptionally deregulated. To investigate this hypothesis, we have characterized the plasma cell leukemia cell line SK-MM2 and a primary myeloma both carrying simultaneous IGH-FGFR3/MMSET and IGH-CCND1 fusions as shown by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization. Remarkably, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that only one of the oncogene loci was transcriptionally upregulated in both instances. Moreover, the upregulated oncogenes differed between both samples. Thus, biallelic IGH translocations might exert different pathogenetic effects in plasma cell disorders.

  14. Control of autophagy by oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, M C; Tasdemir, E; Criollo, A; Morselli, E; Vicencio, J M; Carnuccio, R; Kroemer, G

    2009-01-01

    Multiple oncogenes (in particular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K; activated Akt1; antiapoptotic proteins from the Bcl-2 family) inhibit autophagy. Similarly, several tumor suppressor proteins (such as BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase-1, DAPK1; the phosphatase that antagonizes PI3K, PTEN; tuberous sclerosic complex 1 and 2, TSC1 and TSC2; as well as LKB1/STK11) induce autophagy, meaning that their loss reduces autophagy. Beclin-1, which is required for autophagy induction acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor protein, and other essential autophagy mediators (such as Atg4c, UVRAG and Bif-1) are bona fide oncosuppressors. One of the central tumor suppressor proteins, p53 exerts an ambiguous function in the regulation of autophagy. Within the nucleus, p53 can act as an autophagy-inducing transcription factor. Within the cytoplasm, p53 exerts a tonic autophagy-inhibitory function, and its degradation is actually required for the induction of autophagy. The role of autophagy in oncogenesis and anticancer therapy is contradictory. Chronic suppression of autophagy may stimulate oncogenesis. However, once a tumor is formed, autophagy inhibition may be a therapeutic goal for radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Altogether, the current state-of-the art suggests a complex relationship between cancer and deregulated autophagy that must be disentangled by further in-depth investigation.

  15. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F T; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, El Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-02-02

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression.

  16. Intracortical osteoblastic osteosarcoma with oncogenic rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Hirohashi, Setsuo [Pathology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Shimoda, Tadakazu [Clinical Laboratory Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryohei; Beppu, Yasuo [Orthopedic Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Shotaro [Department of Pathology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    Intracortical osteosarcoma is the rarest variant of osteosarcoma, occurring within, and usually confined to, the cortical bone. Oncogenic osteomalacia, or rickets, is an unusual clinicopathologic entity in which vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, or rickets, occurs in association with some tumors of soft tissue or bone. We present a case of oncogenic rickets associated with intracortical osteosarcoma of the tibia in a 9-year-old boy, whose roentgenographic abnormalities of rickets disappeared and pertinent laboratory data except for serum alkaline phosphatase became normal after surgical resection of the tumor. Histologically, the tumor was an osteosarcoma with a prominent osteoblastic pattern. An unusual microscopic feature was the presence of matrix mineralization showing rounded calcified structures (calcified spherules). Benign osteoblastic tumors, such as osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma, must be considered in the differential diagnosis because of the relatively low cellular atypia and mitotic activity of this tumor. The infiltrating pattern with destruction or engulfment of normal bone is a major clue to the correct diagnosis of intracortical osteosarcoma. The co-existing radiographic changes of rickets were due to the intracortical osteosarcoma. (orig.) With 8 figs., 25 refs.

  17. Oncogenic activation of NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Louis M

    2010-06-01

    Recent genetic evidence has established a pathogenetic role for NF-kappaB signaling in cancer. NF-kappaB signaling is engaged transiently when normal B lymphocytes respond to antigens, but lymphomas derived from these cells accumulate genetic lesions that constitutively activate NF-kappaB signaling. Many genetic aberrations in lymphomas alter CARD11, MALT1, or BCL10, which constitute a signaling complex that is intermediate between the B-cell receptor and IkappaB kinase. The activated B-cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma activates NF-kappaB by a variety of mechanisms including oncogenic mutations in CARD11 and a chronic active form of B-cell receptor signaling. Normal plasma cells activate NF-kappaB in response to ligands in the bone marrow microenvironment, but their malignant counterpart, multiple myeloma, sustains a variety of genetic hits that stabilize the kinase NIK, leading to constitutive activation of the classical and alternative NF-kappaB pathways. Various oncogenic abnormalities in epithelial cancers, including mutant K-ras, engage unconventional IkappaB kinases to activate NF-kappaB. Inhibition of constitutive NF-kappaB signaling in each of these cancer types induces apoptosis, providing a rationale for the development of NF-kappaB pathway inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

  18. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. SU-E-I-26: Estimation of Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) Gain Settings for Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) Based on the Fluoroscopic Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, C; Loughran, B; Nagesh, S Setlur; Jain, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S

    2012-06-01

    The MAF is a new high-resolution detector which is being clinically evaluated in neuro-vascular procedures. The detector contains a large-dynamic-range, high-sensitivity light image intensifier with variable gain. Since the MAF is a research prototype only partially integrated with the clinical system, x-ray technique parameters must be set manually. To improve workflow we developed an automatic method to estimate and set the proper LII voltage (MAF gain) for DSA acquisition based on the fluoroscopic parameters. The detector entrance exposure (XD) can be written as the x-ray tube output exposure (Xo) times an object attenuation factor and an inverse-square correction. If the object attenuation, scatter and distances are unchanged and the effect of x-ray kVp changes are neglected, then the DSA XD can be expressed as the ratio of Xo(DSA)/Xo(Fluoroscopy) multiplied with XD(fluoroscopy). We measured Xo for fluoroscopy and DSA for mAs and kVp ranges appropriate to neuro- vascular interventions and fit the data with a 2D function. To estimate the XD(Fluoroscopy) we derived a curve of XD versus LII-voltage for a mid- dynamic-range average pixel gray-level. Since the MAF system during clinical fluoroscopy automatically adjusts the LII voltage until the desired gray-level value is achieved, by reading that voltage we can estimate the XD(Fluoroscopy). Using the 2D-fit function, Xo(DSA) is automatically calculated for the kVp and mA values set and XD(DSA) can be estimated using the relation above. Using the inverse LII calibration curve, the proper LII-voltage can be determined for the desired average gray-level. The algorithm was implemented and evaluated in thirty-two in-vivo DSA runs on rabbits. The proper LII voltage was selected in all cases with no failures. Using the fluoroscopic LII gain setting to determine the appropriate DSA setting can greatly improve the workflow in clinical evaluations of the MAF. NIH Grants R01-EB008425, R01-EB002873 and an equipment grant from

  20. Normal Expression of a Rearranged and Mutated c-myc Oncogene after Transfection into Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Adam; Hayday, Adrian

    1989-10-01

    Expression of the c-myc oncogene is deregulated in a variety of malignancies. Rearrangement and mutation of the c-myc locus is a characteristic feature of human Burkitt's lymphoma. Whether deregulation is solely a result of mutation of c-myc or whether it is influenced by the transformed B cell context has not been determined. A translocated and mutated allele of c-myc was stably transfected into fibroblasts. The rearranged allele was expressed indistinguishably from a normal c-myc gene: it had serum-regulated expression, was transcribed with normal promoter preference, and was strongly attenuated. Thus mutations by themselves are insufficient to deregulate c-myc transcription.

  1. Notch promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition during cardiac development and oncogenic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Luika A.; Grego-Bessa, Joaquín; Raya, Angel; Bertrán, Esther; Pérez-Pomares, José María; Díez, Juan; Aranda, Sergi; Palomo, Sergio; McCormick, Frank; Izpisúa-Belmonte, Juan Carlos; de la Pompa, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is fundamental to both embryogenesis and tumor metastasis. The Notch intercellular signaling pathway regulates cell fate determination throughout metazoan evolution, and overexpression of activating alleles is oncogenic in mammals. Here we demonstrate that Notch activity promotes EMT during both cardiac development and oncogenic transformation via transcriptional induction of the Snail repressor, a potent and evolutionarily conserved mediator of EMT in many tissues and tumor types. In the embryonic heart, Notch functions via lateral induction to promote a selective transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ)-mediated EMT that leads to cellularization of developing cardiac valvular primordia. Embryos that lack Notch signaling elements exhibit severely attenuated cardiac snail expression, abnormal maintenance of intercellular endocardial adhesion complexes, and abortive endocardial EMT in vivo and in vitro. Accordingly, transient ectopic expression of activated Notch1 (N1IC) in zebrafish embryos leads to hypercellular cardiac valves, whereas Notch inhibition prevents valve development. Overexpression of N1IC in immortalized endothelial cells in vitro induces EMT accompanied by oncogenic transformation, with corresponding induction of snail and repression of VE-cadherin expression. Notch is expressed in embryonic regions where EMT occurs, suggesting an intimate and fundamental role for Notch, which may be reactivated during tumor metastasis. PMID:14701881

  2. Targeting CK2-driven non-oncogene addiction in B-cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, E; Manni, S; Zaffino, F; Semenzato, G; Piazza, F

    2016-11-24

    Genetic mutations of oncogenes often underlie deranged cell growth and altered differentiation pathways leading to malignant transformation of B-lymphocytes. However, addiction to oncogenes is not the only drive to lymphoid tumor pathogenesis. Dependence on non-oncogenes, which act by propelling basic mechanisms of cell proliferation and survival, has also been recognized in the pathobiology of lymphoid leukemias, lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Among the growing number of molecules that may uphold non-oncogene addiction, a key place is increasingly being recognized to the serine-threonine kinase CK2. This enzyme is overexpressed and overactive in B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, such as mantle cell, follicular, Burkitt's and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In these tumors, CK2 may serve the activity of oncogenes, similar to BCR-ABL and c-MYC, control the activation of critical signaling cascades, such as NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB), STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) and PTEN/PI3K/AKT (phosphatase and tensin homolog protein/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKR thymoma), and sustain multiple cellular stress-elicited pathways, such as the proteotoxic stress, unfolded protein and DNA-damage responses. CK2 has also been shown to have an essential role in tuning signals derived from the stromal tumor microenvironment. Not surprisingly, targeting CK2 in lymphoid tumor cell lines or mouse xenograft models can boost the cytotoxic effects of both conventional chemotherapeutics and novel agents, similar to heat-shock protein 90, proteasome and tyrosine kinases inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the evidence indicating how CK2 embodies most of the features of a cancer growth-promoting non-oncogene, focusing on lymphoid tumors. We further discuss the preclinical data of the use of small ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitors, which hold the promise to be additional options in novel drug

  3. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrant...

  4. Oncogenic Transformation of Human-Derived Gastric Organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Centeno, Jomaris; Gao, Jian; Gabre, Joel; Zavros, Yana

    2016-08-19

    The culture of organoids has represented a significant advancement in the gastrointestinal research field. Previous research studies have described the oncogenic transformation of human intestinal and mouse gastric organoids. Here we detail the protocol for the oncogenic transformation and orthotopic transplantation of human-derived gastric organoids.

  5. Oncogenic pathways implicated in ovarian epithelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, Santo V; Bai, Wenlong; Cheng, Jin Q; Coppola, Domenico; Kruk, Patricia A

    2003-08-01

    Characterization of intracellular signaling pathways should lead to a better understanding of ovarian epithelial carcinogenesis and provide an opportunity to interfere with signal transduction targets involved in ovarian tumor cell growth, survival, and progression. Challenges toward such an effort are significant because many of these signals are part of cascades within an intricate and likely redundant intracellular signaling network (Fig.1). For instance, a given signal may activate a dual intracellular pathway (ie, MEK1-MAPK and PI3K/Akt required for fibronectin-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9). A single pathway also may transduce more than one biologic or oncogenic signal (ie, PI3K signaling in epithelial and endothelial cell growth and sprouting of neovessels). Despite these challenges, evidence for therapeutic targeting of signal transduction pathways is accumulating in human cancer. For instance, the EGF-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZD 1839 (Iressa) may have a beneficial therapeutic effect on ovarian epithelial cancer. Therapy of this cancer may include inhibitors of PI kinase (quercetin), ezrin and PIP kinase (genistein). The G protein-coupled family of receptors, including LPA, also is an attractive target to drugs, although their frequent pleiotropic functions may be at times toxic and lack specificity. Because of the lack of notable toxicity, PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors such as FTIs are a promising targeted therapy of ovarian epithelial cancer. Increasing insight into the oncogenic pathways involved in ovarian epithelial cancer also is helping clinicians to understand better the phenomenon of chemoresistance in this malignancy. Oncogenic activation of gamma-synuclein promotes cell survival and provides resistance to paclitaxel, but such a resistance is partially overcome by an MEK inhibitor that suppresses ERK activity. Ovarian epithelial cancer is a complex group of neoplasms with an overall poor prognosis. Comprehension of

  6. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J H; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-07-24

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.

  7. Coordinated activation of candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens via promoter demethylation in head and neck cancer and lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epigenetic alterations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of solid tumors, however, proto-oncogenes activated by promoter demethylation have been sporadically reported. We used an integrative method to analyze expression in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and pharmacologically demethylated cell lines to identify aberrantly demethylated and expressed candidate proto-oncogenes and cancer testes antigens in HNSCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We noted coordinated promoter demethylation and simultaneous transcriptional upregulation of proto-oncogene candidates with promoter homology, and phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters demonstrated potential recognition sites for the transcription factor BORIS. Aberrant BORIS expression correlated with upregulation of candidate proto-oncogenes in multiple human malignancies including primary non-small cell lung cancers and HNSCC, induced coordinated proto-oncogene specific promoter demethylation and expression in non-tumorigenic cells, and transformed NIH3T3 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coordinated, epigenetic unmasking of multiple genes with growth promoting activity occurs in aerodigestive cancers, and BORIS is implicated in the coordinated promoter demethylation and reactivation of epigenetically silenced genes in human cancers.

  8. The Exceptional Oncogenicity of HTLV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Yutaka; Gallo, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) is the first pathogenic human retrovirus identified in 1979 by the Gallo group. HTLV-1 causes fatal T-cell leukemia (adult T cell leukemia) and a progressive myelopahy (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/ tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP) and other disorders. Since the discovery of HTLV-1, several other microorganisms are demonstrated to cause cancer in humans. In this article, we investigated the oncogenic capacity of HTLV-1, in comparison with those of other oncoviruses and one oncobacterium (Helicobacter pylori, H. Pylori) based on published literature. We conclude here that HTLV-1 is one of the most and may be the most carcinogenic among them and arguably one of the most potent of the known human carcinogens. This fact has not been noted before and is particularly important to justify why we need to study HTLV-1 as an important model of human viral oncogenesis.

  9. Design considerations for a new, high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Titus, Albert; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  10. Design considerations for a new high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Titus, Albert H.; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  11. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Helicobacter pylori-Induced Oncogene Expression and Hyperproliferation by Suppressing the Activation of NADPH Oxidase in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Byun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperproliferation and oncogene expression are observed in the mucosa of Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori- infected patients with gastritis or adenocarcinoma. Expression of oncogenes such as β-catenin and c-myc is related to oxidative stress. α-Lipoic acid (α-LA, a naturally occurring thiol compound, acts as an antioxidant and has an anticancer effect. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of α-LA on H. pylori-induced hyperproliferation and oncogene expression in gastric epithelial AGS cells by determining cell proliferation (viable cell numbers, thymidine incorporation, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, NADPH oxidase activation (enzyme activity, subcellular levels of NADPH oxidase subunits, activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors (NF-κB, AP-1, expression of oncogenes (β-catenin, c-myc, and nuclear localization of β-catenin. Furthermore, we examined whether NADPH oxidase mediates oncogene expression and hyperproliferation in H. pylori-infected AGS cells using treatment of diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. As a result, α-LA inhibited the activation of NADPH oxidase and, thus, reduced ROS production, resulting in inhibition on activation of NF-κB and AP-1, induction of oncogenes, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and hyperproliferation in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. DPI inhibited H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB and AP-1, oncogene expression and hyperproliferation by reducing ROS levels in AGS cells. In conclusion, we propose that inhibiting NADPH oxidase by α-LA could prevent oncogene expression and hyperproliferation occurring in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

  12. Noxa induces apoptosis in oncogene-expressing cells through catch-and-release mechanism operating between Puma and Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2011-10-07

    Tumor suppressor p53 induces apoptosis by transcriptional induction of Noxa and Puma, which encode the proapoptotic BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family proteins. In the p53-mediated tumor surveillance system, p53 induces apoptosis or replicative senescence in oncogene-expressing cells, resulting in elimination of such cells. In this context, we previously found that Noxa and Puma synergistically induce apoptosis. Here, we found the adenovirus oncogene E1A to induce p53-dependently expression of Puma, but not Noxa. The induced Puma associates with antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Mcl-1, accompanied by accumulated Mcl-1 protein on mitochondria. Moreover, E1A also reduces expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein Bcl-X(L). In contrast, the DNA-damaging agent adriamycin induces Noxa expression in E1A-expressing cells. Interestingly, Mcl-1 knockdown itself induced apoptosis in E1A-expressing MEFs. Furthermore, Noxa displaced Puma's association with Mcl-1, accompanied by Mcl-1 degradation and apoptosis induction by activating mitochondrial apoptotic executers Bax and Bak. These results suggest that p53-induced apoptosis in oncogene-expressing cells is regulated by differential induction and sequential activation of Noxa and Puma. Accumulated Puma by oncogene enhances susceptibility to apoptosis through "catch" in mitochondria by Mcl-1. Subsequently, in response to DNA-damage, Noxa efficiently induces apoptosis by "release" of Puma from Mcl-1.

  13. Proteomic investigation in A549 lung cell line stably infected by HPV16E6/E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, Marco; Marzano, Valeria; Giuliani, Laura; Nuccetelli, Marzia; D'Aguanno, Simona; Azzimonti, Barbara; Bernardini, Sergio; Perno, Carlo Federico; Urbani, Andrea; Favalli, Cartesio; Federici, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Data have accumulated implicating the involvement of oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in bronchial carcinogenesis. We recently described the presence of oncogenic HPV transcripts in non-small cell lung cancers. To investigate the role of oncogenic HPVs in lung carcinogenesis. The lung cell line A549 stably infected with HPV16E6, HPV16E7 and HPVE6/E7 constructs was used to investigate the protein profile changes associated with the expression of these oncogenes. Replicated two-dimensional gel electrophoresis gels from uninfected and stably HPV16E6-, E7-, and E6/E7-infected A549 cells were compared for changes in protein profile. Protein identification was achieved by peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-TOF-MS and nLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS peptide ladder sequencing. We identified 17 different polypeptides whose average normalized spot intensity was statistically significant (p < 0.05) and differed by 2-fold. Relationships between differentially expressed proteins and the HPV-induced infection mechanism have been clustered by knowledge-base database functional association network analysis. The impact of Hsp27, annexin III, annexin IV, Gp96 and TPT1 on the cellular response mechanism to HPV infection is presented and discussed. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A "liaison dangereuse" between AUF1/hnRNPD and the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawal, Mohamad; Armstrong, Florence; Ollier, Severine; Dupont, Henri; Touriol, Christian; Monsarrat, Bernard; Delsol, Georges; Payrastre, Bernard; Morello, Dominique

    2006-10-15

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) is a chimeric protein expressed in a subset of cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) for which constitutive expression represents a key oncogenic event. The ALK signaling pathway is complex and probably involves functional redundancy between various signaling substrates of ALK. Despite numerous studies on signaling mediators, the molecular mechanisms contributing to the distinct oncogenic features of NPM-ALK remain incompletely understood. The search for additional interacting partners of NPM-ALK led to the discovery of AUF1/hnRNPD, a protein implicated in AU-rich element (ARE)-directed mRNA decay. AUF1 was immunoprecipitated with ALK both in ALCL-derived cells and in NIH3T3 cells stably expressing NPM-ALK or other X-ALK fusion proteins. AUF1 and NPM-ALK were found concentrated in the same cytoplasmic foci, whose formation required NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase activity. AUF1 was phosphorylated by ALK in vitro and was hyperphosphorylated in NPM-ALK-expressing cells. Its hyperphosphorylation was correlated with increased stability of several AUF1 target mRNAs encoding key regulators of cell proliferation and with increased cell survival after transcriptional arrest. Thus, AUF1 could function in a novel pathway mediating the oncogenic effects of NPM-ALK. Our data establish an important link between oncogenic kinases and mRNA turnover, which could constitute a critical aspect of tumorigenesis.

  15. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-07-14

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs.

  16. Genetic variations and alternative splicing. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eZaphiropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional regulatory process that is attaining stronger recognition as a modulator of gene expression. Alternative splicing occurs when the primary RNA transcript is differentially processed into more than one mature RNAs. This is the result of a variable definition/inclusion of the exons, the sequences that are excised from the primary RNA to form the mature RNAs. Consequently, RNA expression can generate a collection of differentially spliced RNAs, which may distinctly influence subsequent biological events, such as protein synthesis or other biomolecular interactions. Still the mechanisms that control exon definition and exon inclusion are not fully clarified. This mini-review highlights advances in this field as well as the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in affecting splicing decisions. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1, is taken as an example in addressing the role of nucleotide substitutions for splicing regulation.

  17. Prostate-derived Ets factor, an oncogenic driver in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ashwani K; Geradts, Joseph; Young, Jessica

    2017-05-01

    Prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF), a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, differs from other family members in its restricted expression in normal tissues and its unique DNA-binding motif. These interesting attributes coupled with its aberrant expression in cancer have rendered PDEF a focus of increasing interest by tumor biologists. This review provides a current understanding of the characteristics of PDEF expression and its role in breast cancer. The bulk of the evidence is consistent with PDEF overexpression in most breast tumors and an oncogenic role for this transcription factor in breast cancer. In addition, high PDEF expression in estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors showed significant correlation with poor overall survival in several independent cohorts of breast cancer patients. Together, these findings demonstrate PDEF to be an oncogenic driver of breast cancer and a biomarker of poor prognosis in this cancer. Based on this understanding and the limited expression of PDEF in normal human tissues, the development of PDEF-based therapeutics for prevention and treatment of breast cancer is also discussed.

  18. Large-scale analysis by SAGE reveals new mechanisms of v-erbA oncogene action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faure Claudine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The v-erbA oncogene, carried by the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus, derives from the c-erbAα proto-oncogene that encodes the nuclear receptor for triiodothyronine (T3R. v-ErbA transforms erythroid progenitors in vitro by blocking their differentiation, supposedly by interference with T3R and RAR (Retinoic Acid Receptor. However, v-ErbA target genes involved in its transforming activity still remain to be identified. Results: By using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, we identified 110 genes deregulated by v-ErbA and potentially implicated in the transformation process. Bioinformatic analysis of promoter sequence and transcriptional assays point out a potential role of c-Myb in the v-ErbA effect. Furthermore, grouping of newly identified target genes by function revealed both expected (chromatin/transcription and unexpected (protein metabolism functions potentially deregulated by v-ErbA. We then focused our study on 15 of the new v-ErbA target genes and demonstrated by real time PCR that in majority their expression was activated neither by T3, nor RA, nor during differentiation. This was unexpected based upon the previously known role of v-ErbA. Conclusion: This paper suggests the involvement of a wealth of new unanticipated mechanisms of v-ErbA action.

  19. A Transcriptionally Inactive ATF2 Variant Drives Melanomagenesis

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    Giuseppina Claps

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is one of the most lethal cutaneous malignancies, characterized by chemoresistance and a striking propensity to metastasize. The transcription factor ATF2 elicits oncogenic activities in melanoma, and its inhibition attenuates melanoma development. Here, we show that expression of a transcriptionally inactive form of Atf2 (Atf2Δ8,9 promotes development of melanoma in mouse models. Atf2Δ8,9-driven tumors show enhanced pigmentation, immune infiltration, and metastatic propensity. Similar to mouse Atf2Δ8,9, we have identified a transcriptionally inactive human ATF2 splice variant 5 (ATF2SV5 that enhances the growth and migration capacity of cultured melanoma cells and immortalized melanocytes. ATF2SV5 expression is elevated in human melanoma specimens and is associated with poor prognosis. These findings point to an oncogenic function for ATF2 in melanoma development that appears to be independent of its transcriptional activity.

  20. A Novel PTEN/Mutant p53/c-Myc/Bcl-XL Axis Mediates Context-Dependent Oncogenic Effects of PTEN with Implications for Cancer Prognosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Huang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatase and tensin homolog located on chromosome 10 (PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancer including in glioblastoma. Here, we show that PTEN exerts unconventional oncogenic effects in glioblastoma through a novel PTEN/mutant p53/c-Myc/Bcl-XL molecular and functional axis. Using a wide array of molecular, genetic, and functional approaches, we demonstrate that PTEN enhances a transcriptional complex containing gain-of-function mutant p53, CBP, and NFY in human glioblastoma cells and tumor tissues. The mutant p53/CBP/NFY complex transcriptionally activates the oncogenes c-Myc and Bcl-XL, leading to increased cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and clonogenicity. Disruption of the mutant p53/c-Myc/Bcl-XL axis or mutant p53/CBP/NFY complex reverses the transcriptional and oncogenic effects of PTEN and unmasks its tumor-suppressive function. Consistent with these data, we find that PTEN expression is associated with worse patient survival than PTEN loss in tumors harboring mutant p53 and that a small molecule modulator of p53 exerts greater antitumor effects in PTEN-expressing cancer cells. Altogether, our study describes a new signaling pathway that mediates context-dependent oncogenic/tumor-suppressive role of PTEN. The data also indicate that the combined mutational status of PTEN and p53 influences cancer prognosis and anticancer therapies that target PTEN and p53.

  1. MAF45, a highly polymorphic marker for the pseudoautosomal region of the sheep genome, is not linked to the FecXI (Inverdale) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarbrick, P A; Schmack, A E; Crawford, A M

    1992-07-01

    A highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat, or microsatellite, that shows partial sex-linked inheritance in sheep has been isolated from the sheep genome. Our data indicate that the locus is in the pseudoautosomal region approximately 13 cm from the boundary with the sex-linked regions. The locus, designated MAF45, has 12 alleles with a PIC of 0.84. The same primers amplify a single polymorphic locus in cattle and goats. This locus was not linked to the Inverdale gene, an X-linked gene that increases the ovulation rate in sheep.

  2. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Transcript Profile of Flowering Regulatory Genes in VcFT-Overexpressing Blueberry Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Walworth

    Full Text Available In order to identify genetic components in flowering pathways of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L., a transcriptome reference composed of 254,396 transcripts and 179,853 gene contigs was developed by assembly of 72.7 million reads using Trinity. Using this transcriptome reference and a query of flowering pathway genes of herbaceous plants, we identified potential flowering pathway genes/transcripts of blueberry. Transcriptome analysis of flowering pathway genes was then conducted on leaf tissue samples of transgenic blueberry cv. Aurora ('VcFT-Aurora', which overexpresses a blueberry FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene (VcFT. Sixty-one blueberry transcripts of 40 genes showed high similarities to 33 known flowering-related genes of herbaceous plants, of which 17 down-regulated and 16 up-regulated genes were identified in 'VcFT-Aurora'. All down-regulated genes encoded transcription factors/enzymes upstream in the signaling pathway containing VcFT. A blueberry CONSTANS-LIKE 5-like (VcCOL5 gene was down-regulated and associated with five other differentially expressed (DE genes in the photoperiod-mediated flowering pathway. Three down-regulated genes, i.e., a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 2-like gene (VcMAF2, a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 5-like gene (VcMAF5, and a VERNALIZATION1-like gene (VcVRN1, may function as integrators in place of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC in the vernalization pathway. Because no CONSTAN1-like or FLOWERING LOCUS C-like genes were found in blueberry, VcCOL5 and VcMAF2/VcMAF5 or VRN1 might be the major integrator(s in the photoperiod- and vernalization-mediated flowering pathway, respectively. The major down-stream genes of VcFT, i.e., SUPPRESSOR of Overexpression of Constans 1-like (VcSOC1, LEAFY-like (VcLFY, APETALA1-like (VcAP1, CAULIFLOWER 1-like (VcCAL1, and FRUITFULL-like (VcFUL genes were present and showed high similarity to their orthologues in herbaceous plants. Moreover, overexpression of VcFT promoted expression of all of

  4. Transcript Profile of Flowering Regulatory Genes in VcFT-Overexpressing Blueberry Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Aaron E; Chai, Benli; Song, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify genetic components in flowering pathways of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), a transcriptome reference composed of 254,396 transcripts and 179,853 gene contigs was developed by assembly of 72.7 million reads using Trinity. Using this transcriptome reference and a query of flowering pathway genes of herbaceous plants, we identified potential flowering pathway genes/transcripts of blueberry. Transcriptome analysis of flowering pathway genes was then conducted on leaf tissue samples of transgenic blueberry cv. Aurora ('VcFT-Aurora'), which overexpresses a blueberry FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene (VcFT). Sixty-one blueberry transcripts of 40 genes showed high similarities to 33 known flowering-related genes of herbaceous plants, of which 17 down-regulated and 16 up-regulated genes were identified in 'VcFT-Aurora'. All down-regulated genes encoded transcription factors/enzymes upstream in the signaling pathway containing VcFT. A blueberry CONSTANS-LIKE 5-like (VcCOL5) gene was down-regulated and associated with five other differentially expressed (DE) genes in the photoperiod-mediated flowering pathway. Three down-regulated genes, i.e., a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 2-like gene (VcMAF2), a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 5-like gene (VcMAF5), and a VERNALIZATION1-like gene (VcVRN1), may function as integrators in place of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in the vernalization pathway. Because no CONSTAN1-like or FLOWERING LOCUS C-like genes were found in blueberry, VcCOL5 and VcMAF2/VcMAF5 or VRN1 might be the major integrator(s) in the photoperiod- and vernalization-mediated flowering pathway, respectively. The major down-stream genes of VcFT, i.e., SUPPRESSOR of Overexpression of Constans 1-like (VcSOC1), LEAFY-like (VcLFY), APETALA1-like (VcAP1), CAULIFLOWER 1-like (VcCAL1), and FRUITFULL-like (VcFUL) genes were present and showed high similarity to their orthologues in herbaceous plants. Moreover, overexpression of VcFT promoted expression of all of these

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mediates a Ski oncogene-induced shift from glycolysis to oxidative energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fang; Lemieux, Hélène; Hoppel, Charles L; Hanson, Richard W; Hakimi, Parvin; Croniger, Colleen M; Puchowicz, Michelle; Anderson, Vernon E; Fujioka, Hisashi; Stavnezer, Ed

    2011-11-18

    Overexpression of the Ski oncogene induces oncogenic transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). However, unlike most other oncogene-transformed cells, Ski-transformed CEFs (Ski-CEFs) do not display the classical Warburg effect. On the contrary, Ski transformation reduced lactate production and glucose utilization in CEFs. Compared with CEFs, Ski-CEFs exhibited enhanced TCA cycle activity, fatty acid catabolism through β-oxidation, glutamate oxidation, oxygen consumption, as well as increased numbers and mass of mitochondria. Interestingly, expression of PPARγ, a key transcription factor that regulates adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, was dramatically elevated at both the mRNA and protein levels in Ski-CEFs. Accordingly, PPARγ target genes that are involved in lipid uptake, transport, and oxidation were also markedly up-regulated by Ski. Knocking down PPARγ in Ski-CEFs by RNA interference reversed the elevated expression of these PPARγ target genes, as well as the shift to oxidative metabolism and the increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Moreover, we found that Ski co-immunoprecipitates with PPARγ and co-activates PPARγ-driven transcription.

  6. DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS-induced tumor invasion in colorectal cancer via the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, Chi-Chou; Wang, Lee; Lee, Huei

    2016-01-01

    DDX3 plays a dual role in colorectal cancer; however, the role and underlying mechanism of DDX3 in colorectal tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS transcription via an increase in SP1 binding to its promoter. Accelerating oncogenic KRAS expression by DDX3 promotes the invasion capability via the ERK/PTEN/AKT/β-catenin cascade. Moreover, the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis is responsible for DDX3-induced cell invasiveness and xenograft lung tumor nodule formation. The xenograft lung tumor nodules induced by DDX3-overexpressing T84 stable clone were nearly suppressed by the inhibitor of AKT (perifosine) or β-catenin (XAV939). Among patients, high KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin expression and high ZEB1 were more commonly occurred in high-DDX3 tumors than in low-DDX3 tumors. High-DDX3, high-KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin tumors, and high-ZEB1 exhibited worse overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) than their counterparts. In conclusion, DDX3 may play an oncogenic role to promote tumor growth and invasion in colon cancer cells via the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis due to increasing KRAS transcription. We therefore suggest that AKT or β-catenin may potentially act as a therapeutic target to improve tumor regression and outcomes in colorectal cancer patients who harbored high-DDX3 tumors. PMID:27007150

  7. Activation of the LMO2 oncogene through a somatically acquired neomorphic promoter in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sunniyat; Magnussen, Michael; León, Theresa E; Farah, Nadine; Li, Zhaodong; Abraham, Brian J; Alapi, Krisztina Z; Mitchell, Rachel J; Naughton, Tom; Fielding, Adele K; Pizzey, Arnold; Bustraan, Sophia; Allen, Christopher; Popa, Teodora; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Garcia-Perez, Laura; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Staal, Frank J T; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas; Mansour, Marc R

    2017-03-07

    Somatic mutations within non-coding genomic regions that aberrantly activate oncogenes have remained poorly characterized. Here we describe recurrent activating intronic mutations of LMO2, a prominent oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Heterozygous mutations were identified in PF-382 and DU.528 T-ALL cell lines, in addition to 3.7% (6/160) of pediatric and 5.5% (9/163) of adult T-ALL patient samples. The majority of indels harbour putative de novo MYB, ETS1 or RUNX1 consensus binding sites. Analysis of 5'-capped RNA transcripts in mutant cell lines identified the usage of an intermediate promoter site, with consequential monoallelic LMO2 overexpression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the mutant allele in PF-382 cells markedly downregulated LMO2 expression, establishing clear causality between the mutation and oncogene dysregulation. Furthermore, the spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-derived mutations provide important insights into the interconnected contributions of functional transcription factor binding. Finally, these mutations occur in the same intron as retroviral integration sites in gene therapy induced T-ALL, suggesting that such events occur at preferential sites in the non-coding genome.

  8. Role of Pancreatic Transcription Factors in Maintenance of Mature β-Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Kaneto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A variety of pancreatic transcription factors including PDX-1 and MafA play crucial roles in the pancreas and function for the maintenance of mature β-cell function. However, when β-cells are chronically exposed to hyperglycemia, expression and/or activities of such transcription factors are reduced, which leads to deterioration of b-cell function. These phenomena are well known as β-cell glucose toxicity in practical medicine as well as in the islet biology research area. Here we describe the possible mechanism for β-cell glucose toxicity found in type 2 diabetes. It is likely that reduced expression levels of PDX-1 and MafA lead to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In addition, expression levels of incretin receptors (GLP-1 and GIP receptors in β-cells are decreased, which likely contributes to the impaired incretin effects found in diabetes. Taken together, down-regulation of insulin gene transcription factors and incretin receptors explains, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for β-cell glucose toxicity.

  9. Oncogenic osteomalacia associated with soft tissue chondromyxoid fibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Mi E-mail: jmpark@cmc.cuk.ac.kr; Woo, Young Kyun; Kang, Moo Il; Kang, Chang Suk; Hahn, Seong Tae

    2001-08-01

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rarely described clinical entity characterized by hypophosphatemia, phosphaturia, and a low concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. It is most often associated with benign mesenchymal tumor and can be cured with surgical removal of the tumor. In this paper, we present a case of oncogenic osteomalacia caused by chondromyxoid fibroma in the soft tissue of the sole of the foot in a 56-year-old woman.

  10. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Marialuisa Moccia; Qingsong Liu; Teresa Guida; Giorgia Federico; Annalisa Brescia; Zheng Zhao; Hwan Geun Choi; Xianming Deng; Li Tan; Jinhua Wang; Marc Billaud; Gray, Nathanael S.; Francesca Carlomagno; Massimo Santoro

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-media...

  11. Inhibition of Ras oncogenic activity by Ras protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto; Lue, Jeffrey; Mathews, Jeremy; Yoon, Andrew; Ahn, Daniel; Garcia-España, Antonio; Leonardi, Peter; Vargas, Marcelo P; Pellicer, Angel

    2005-01-10

    Point mutations in ras genes have been found in a large number and wide variety of human tumors. These oncogenic Ras mutants are locked in an active GTP-bound state that leads to a constitutive and deregulated activation of Ras function. The dogma that ras oncogenes are dominant, whereby the mutation of a single allele in a cell will predispose the host cell to transformation regardless of the presence of the normal allele, is being challenged. We have seen that increasing amounts of Ras protooncogenes are able to inhibit the activity of the N-Ras oncogene in the activation of Elk in NIH 3T3 cells and in the formation of foci. We have been able to determine that the inhibitory effect is by competition between Ras protooncogenes and the N-Ras oncogene that occurs first at the effector level at the membranes, then at the processing level and lastly at the effector level in the cytosol. In addition, coexpression of the N-Ras protooncogene in thymic lymphomas induced by the N-Ras oncogene is associated with increased levels of p107, p130 and cyclin A and decreased levels of Rb. In the present report, we have shown that the N-Ras oncogene is not truly dominant over Ras protooncogenes and their competing activities might be depending on cellular context.

  12. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory ...

  13. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  14. Oncogenic intra-p53 family member interactions in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eFerraiuolo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene family members p53, p73 and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologues but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73 and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic gain of function (GOF activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53 with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor (VDR, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response (DDR, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs response, enhanced invasion and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild type p53 (wt-p53 protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73 and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers.

  15. Relationship between the high-risk HPV infection and the expression of oncogenes, anti-oncogenes in cervical dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ping Shi; Xiu-Jie Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between the infection of high-risk HPV in cervical precancerous lesion and the expression of oncogene, anti-oncogene.Methods:218 cases ofcervical intraepithelial neoplasia patients in our hospital during May 2014–May 2016 were chosed and divided into high-risk HPV group (n=107), low-risk HPV group (n=111) according to cervical tissue HPV test; another 100 cases of patients received cervical biopsy and confirmed as benign lesions were enrolled in the control group. RT-PCR method was used to detect the mRNA expression of proto-oncogene and anti-oncogene in three groups, Western-blot method was used to detect the protein expression of Sox-2 and Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway.Results: mRNA expression of oncogene DEK, Bmi-1, c-fos, K-ras, Prdx4 in high-risk HPV group were higher than low-risk HPV group and control group (P<0.05); mRNA expression of anti-oncogene P27, P16, DAPK, PTEN, eIF4E3 in high-risk HPV group were lower than low-risk HPV group and control group (P<0.05); expression of Sox-2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway protein Sox-2,β-catenin, wnt-1, wnt-3a in high-risk HPV group were higher than low-risk HPV group and control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:High-risk HPV infection can increase the expression of oncogenes and reduce the expression of anti-oncogenes in cervical dysplasia tissues on Sox-2- and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway manners.

  16. Integrated, genome-wide screening for hypomethylated oncogenes in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunbo; Sun, Wenyue; Tan, Marietta; Glazer, Chad A.; Bhan, Sheetal; Zhong, Xiaoli; Fakhry, Carole; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy that is poorly understood. In order to look for relevant oncogene candidates under the control of promoter methylation, an integrated, genome-wide screen was performed. Experimental Design Global demethylation of normal salivary gland cell strains using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza dC) and Trichostatin A (TSA), followed by expression array analysis was performed. ACC-specific expression profiling was generated using expression microarray analysis of primary ACC and normal samples. Next, the two profiles were integrated to identify a subset of genes for further validation of promoter demethylation in ACC versus normal. Finally, promising candidates were further validated for mRNA, protein, and promoter methylation levels in larger ACC cohorts. Functional validation was then performed in cancer cell lines. Results We found 159 genes that were significantly re-expressed after 5-Aza dC/TSA treatment and overexpressed in ACC. After initial validation, eight candidates showed hypomethylation in ACC: AQP1, CECR1, C1QR1, CTAG2, P53AIP1, TDRD12, BEX1, and DYNLT3. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) showed the most significant hypomethylation and was further validated. AQP1 hypomethylation in ACC was confirmed with two independent cohorts. Of note, there was significant overexpression of AQP1 in both mRNA and protein in the paraffin-embedded ACC cohort. Furthermore, AQP1 was up-regulated in 5-Aza dC/TSA treated SACC83. Lastly, AQP1 promoted cell proliferation and colony formation in SACC83. Conclusions Our integrated, genome-wide screening method proved to be an effective strategy for detecting novel oncogenes in ACC. AQP1 is a promising oncogene candidate for ACC and is transcriptionally regulated by promoter hypomethylation. PMID:21551254

  17. Effect of sulfur dioxide on expression of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes from rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Juli; Meng, Ziqiang

    2010-06-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) is a ubiquitous air pollutant that is present in low concentrations in the urban air, and in higher concentrations in the working environment. In the present study, male Wistar rats were housed in exposure chambers and treated with 14.00 +/- 1.01, 28.00 +/- 1.77 and 56.00 +/- 3.44 mg m(-3) SO(2) for 6 h/day for 7 days, while control group was exposed to filtered air in the same condition. The mRNA and protein levels of proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, and Ki-ras) and tumor suppressor genes (p53, Rb, and p16) were analyzed in lungs using a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) assay and Western blot analysis. The results showed that mRNA and protein levels of c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, Ki-ras, and p53 in lungs were increased in a dose-dependent manner, while mRNA and protein levels of Rb and p16 were decreased in lungs of rats after SO(2) inhalation. These results lead to a conclusion that SO(2) exposure could activate expressions of proto-oncogenes and suppress expressions of tumor suppressor genes, which might relate to the molecular mechanism of cocarcinogenic properties and potential carcinogenic effects of SO(2). According to previous studies, the results also indicated that promoter genes of apoptosis and tumor suppressor genes could produce apoptotic signals to antagonize the growth signals that arise from oncogenes. Understanding its molecular controls will benefit development of treatments for many diseases.

  18. G-rich proto-oncogenes are targeted for genomic instability in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Michelle L; Huber, Michael D; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-03-15

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common lymphoid malignancy in adults. It is a heterogeneous disease with variability in outcome. Genomic instability of a subset of proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC, BCL6, RhoH, PIM1, and PAX5, can contribute to initial tumor development and has been correlated with poor prognosis and aggressive tumor growth. Lymphomas in which these proto-oncogenes are unstable derive from germinal center B cells that express activation-induced deaminase (AID), the B-cell-specific factor that deaminates DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification. Proto-oncogene instability is evident as both aberrant hypermutation and translocation, paralleling programmed instability which diversifies the immunoglobulin loci. We have asked if genomic sequence correlates with instability in AID-positive B-cell lymphomas. We show that instability does not correlate with enrichment of the WRC sequence motif that is the consensus for deamination by AID. Instability does correlate with G-richness, evident as multiple runs of the base guanine on the nontemplate DNA strand. Extending previous analysis of c-MYC, we show experimentally that transcription of BCL6 and RhoH induces formation of structures, G-loops, which contain single-stranded regions targeted by AID. We further show that G-richness does not characterize translocation breakpoints in AID-negative B- and T-cell malignancies. These results identify G-richness as one feature of genomic structure that can contribute to genomic instability in AID-positive B-cell malignancies.

  19. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

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    Marialuisa Moccia

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  20. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  1. Genomic profiling identifies GATA6 as a candidate oncogene amplified in pancreatobiliary cancer.

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    Kevin A Kwei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatobiliary cancers have among the highest mortality rates of any cancer type. Discovering the full spectrum of molecular genetic alterations may suggest new avenues for therapy. To catalogue genomic alterations, we carried out array-based genomic profiling of 31 exocrine pancreatic cancers and 6 distal bile duct cancers, expanded as xenografts to enrich the tumor cell fraction. We identified numerous focal DNA amplifications and deletions, including in 19% of pancreatobiliary cases gain at cytoband 18q11.2, a locus uncommonly amplified in other tumor types. The smallest shared amplification at 18q11.2 included GATA6, a transcriptional regulator previously linked to normal pancreas development. When amplified, GATA6 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels, and strong immunostaining was observed in 25 of 54 (46% primary pancreatic cancers compared to 0 of 33 normal pancreas specimens surveyed. GATA6 expression in xenografts was associated with specific microarray gene-expression patterns, enriched for GATA binding sites and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity. siRNA mediated knockdown of GATA6 in pancreatic cancer cell lines with amplification led to reduced cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and colony formation. Our findings indicate that GATA6 amplification and overexpression contribute to the oncogenic phenotypes of pancreatic cancer cells, and identify GATA6 as a candidate lineage-specific oncogene in pancreatobiliary cancer, with implications for novel treatment strategies.

  2. RUNX3 has an oncogenic role in head and neck cancer.

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    Takaaki Tsunematsu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is a tumor suppressor of cancer and appears to be an important component of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ss-induced tumor suppression pathway. Surprisingly, we found that RUNX3 expression level in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC tissues, which is one of the most common types of human cancer, was higher than that in normal tissues by a previously published microarray dataset in our preliminary study. Therefore, here we examined the oncogenic role of RUNX3 in HNSCC. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Frequent RUNX3 expression and its correlation with malignant behavior were observed in HNSCC. Ectopic RUNX3 overexpression promoted cell growth and inhibited serum starvation-induced apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells. These findings were confirmed by RUNX3 knockdown. Moreover, RUNX3 overexpression enhanced tumorsphere formation. RUNX3 expression level was well correlated with the methylation status in HNSCC cells. Moreover, RUNX3 expression was low due to the methylation of its promoter in normal oral epithelial cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that i RUNX3 has an oncogenic role in HNSCC, ii RUNX3 expression observed in HNSCC may be caused in part by demethylation during cancer development, and iii RUNX3 expression can be a useful marker for predicting malignant behavior and the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs in HNSCC.

  3. RUNX3 is a novel negative regulator of oncogenic TEAD-YAP complex in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Y; Lin, S J; Chen, Y; Voon, D C-C; Zhu, F; Chuang, L S H; Wang, T; Tan, P; Lee, S C; Yeoh, K G; Sudol, M; Ito, Y

    2016-05-19

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is a well-documented tumour suppressor that is frequently inactivated in gastric cancer. Here, we define a novel mechanism by which RUNX3 exerts its tumour suppressor activity involving the TEAD-YAP complex, a potent positive regulator of proliferative genes. We report that the TEAD-YAP complex is not only frequently hyperactivated in liver and breast cancer, but also confers a strong oncogenic activity in gastric epithelial cells. The increased expression of TEAD-YAP in tumour tissues significantly correlates with poorer overall survival of gastric cancer patients. Strikingly, RUNX3 physically interacts with the N-terminal region of TEAD through its Runt domain. This interaction markedly reduces the DNA-binding ability of TEAD that attenuates the downstream signalling of TEAD-YAP complex. Mutation of RUNX3 at Arginine 122 to Cysteine, which was previously identified in gastric cancer, impairs the interaction between RUNX3 and TEAD. Our data reveal that RUNX3 acts as a tumour suppressor by negatively regulating the TEAD-YAP oncogenic complex in gastric carcinogenesis.

  4. Trefoil factor 3 is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Nagarajan; Kang, Jian; Kong, Xiangjun; Tang, Jianzhong; Perry, Jo K; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Miller, Lance D; Liu, Edison T; Mertani, Hichem C; Zhu, Tao; Grandison, Prudence M; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E

    2010-12-01

    We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR) cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma.

  5. The dark and the bright side of Stat3: proto-oncogene and tumor-suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Andrea; Simma, Olivia; Hoelbl, Andrea; Kenner, Lukas; Beug, Hartmut; Moriggl, Richard; Sexl, Veronika

    2009-01-01

    Stat transcription factors have been implicated in tumorigenesis in mice and men. Stat3 and Stat5 are considered powerful proto-oncogenes, whereas Stat1 has been demonstrated to suppress tumor formation. We demonstrate here for the first time that a constitutive active version of Stat3alpha (Stat3alphaC) may also suppress transformation. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for p53 can be transformed with either c-myc or with rasV12 alone. Interestingly, transformation by c-myc is efficiently suppressed by co-expression of Stat3alphaC, but Stat3alphaC does not interfere with transformation by the rasV12-oncogene. In contrast, transplantation of bone marrow cells expressing Stat3alphaC induces the formation of a highly aggressive T cell leukemia in mice. The leukemic cells invaded multiple organs including lung, heart, salivary glands, liver and kidney. Interestingly, transplanted mice developed a similar leukemia when the bone marrow cells were transduced with Stat3beta, which is also constitutively active when expressed at significant levels. Our experiments demonstrate that Stat3 has both - tumor suppressing and tumor promoting properties.

  6. Stable oncogenic transformation induced by microcell-mediated gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕有勇; Donald G.Blair

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenes have been identified using DNA-mediated transfection, but the size of the transferable and unrearranged DNA, gene rearrangement and amplification which occur during the transfection process limit the use of the techniques. We have evaluated microcell-mediated gene transfer techniques for the transfer and analysis of dominant oncogenes. MNNG-HOS, a transformed human cell line which contained the met oncogene mapping to human chromosome 7 was infected with retroviruses carrying drug resistance markers and used to optimize microcell preparation and transfer. Stable and drug-resistant hybrids containing single human chromosomes as well as the foci of the transformed cells containing the activated met oncogene and intact hitman chromosomes were obtained. Hybridization analysis with probes (i.e. collA2, pJ3.11) mapping up to 1 Mb away from met shows that the cells from the individual focr contain different amounts of apparently unrearranged human DNA associated with the oncogene, and the microcell-g

  7. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  8. Transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  9. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Neem Limonoids as Anticancer Agents: Modulation of Cancer Hallmarks and Oncogenic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2014-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile medicinal plants, widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent. Neem is a rich source of limonoids that are endowed with potent medicinal properties predominantly antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. Azadirachtin, gedunin, and nimbolide are more extensively investigated relative to other neem limonoids. Accumulating evidence indicates that the anticancer effects of neem limonoids are mediated through the inhibition of hallmark capabilities of cancer such as cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, inflammation, invasion, and angiogenesis. The neem limonoids have been demonstrated to target oncogenic signaling kinases and transcription factors chiefly, NF-κB, Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Neem limonoids that target multiple pathways that are aberrant in cancer are ideal candidates for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

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    Serena Bonomi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer might provide a better understanding of the malignant transformation and identify novel pathways that are uniquely relevant to tumorigenesis. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of cancer-associated alternative splicing isoforms will not only help to explain many fundamental hallmarks of cancer, but will also offer unprecedented opportunities to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer treatments.

  12. Investigating the Expression of Oncogenic and Tumor Suppressive MicroRNA in DLBCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, Brian; Enlow, Rossanna; Lara, Daniel; Bailey, Mark; Vega, Francisco; Hu, Peter; Lennon, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of lymphoma, accounting for 40 percent of newly diagnosed cases each year. DLBCL is an aggressive abnormal growth of tissue characterized by the accumulation of abnormal B-lymphocytes in the lymphatics of affected individuals. The goal of this study was to analyze microRNA (miRNA) as an alternative method of diagnosis and treatment for patients affected with the observed cancer. MiRNAs are small, non-coding, endogenous RNA that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNA-mediated gene regulation has a functional role in cancer and could prove to be crucial targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide a quantitative study on the expression of a diverse class of oncogenic and tumor suppressive miRNA that have shown to regulate oncoproteins involved in differentiation, proliferation, and/or apoptosis.

  13. Adenoviruses Expressing PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA Induces the Transdifferentiation of Porcine Neonatal Pancreas Cell Clusters and Adult Pig Pancreatic Cells into Beta-Cells

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    Young-Hye You

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA limitation in the number of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells is a special feature of diabetes. The identification of alternative sources for the induction of insulin-producing surrogate beta-cells is a matter of profound importance. PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA overexpression have been shown to influence the differentiation and proliferation of pancreatic stem cells. However, few studies have been conducted using adult animal pancreatic stem cells.MethodsAdult pig pancreatic cells were prepared from the non-endocrine fraction of adult pig pancreata. Porcine neonatal pancreas cell clusters (NPCCs were prepared from neonatal pigs aged 1-2 days. The dispersed pancreatic cells were infected with PDX-1/VP16, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA adenoviruses. After infection, these cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of normoglycemic nude mice.ResultsThe adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD and MafA induced insulin gene expression in NPCCs, but not in adult pig pancreatic cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed that the number of insulin-positive cells in NPCCs and adult pig pancreatic cells was approximately 2.6- and 1.1-fold greater than those in the green fluorescent protein control group, respectively. At four weeks after transplantation, the relative volume of insulin-positive cells in the grafts increased in the NPCCs, but not in the adult porcine pancreatic cells.ConclusionThese data indicate that PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA facilitate the beta-cell differentiation of NPCCs, but not adult pig pancreatic cells. Therefore PDX-1, BETA2/NeuroD, and MafA-induced NPCCs can be considered good sources for the induction of pancreatic beta-cells, and may also have some utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  14. Blocking of p53-Snail Binding, Promoted by Oncogenic K-Ras, Recovers p53 Expression and function

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    Sun-Hye Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentially from other kinds of Ras, oncogenic K-Ras, which is mutated approximately 30% of human cancer, does not induce apoptosis and senescence. Here, we provide the evidence that oncogenic K-Ras abrogates p53 function and expression through induction of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related mediated Snail stabilization. Snail directly binds to DNA binding domain of p53 and diminishes the tumor-suppressive function of p53. Thus, elimination of Snail through si-RNA can induce p53 in K-Ras-mutated cells, whereas Snail and mutant K-Ras can suppress p53 in regardless of K-Ras status. Chemicals, isolated from inhibitor screening of p53-Snail binding, can block the Snail-mediated p53 suppression and enhance the expression of p53 as well as the transcriptional activity of p53 in an oncogenic K-Ras-dependent manner. Among the chemicals, two are very similar in structure. These results can answer why K-Ras can coexist with wild type p53 and propose the Snail-p53 binding as the new therapeutic target for K-Ras-mutated cancers including pancreatic, lung, and colon cancers.

  15. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest

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    Dina Dikovskaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells.

  16. Noxa upregulation by oncogenic activation of MEK/ERK through CREB promotes autophagy in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi Lun; Lai, Fritz; Wilmott, James S; Yan, Xu Guang; Liu, Xiao Ying; Luan, Qi; Guo, Su Tang; Jiang, Chen Chen; Tseng, Hsin-Yi; Scolyer, Richard A; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Xu Dong

    2014-11-30

    Reduction in the expression of the anti-survival BH3-only proteins PUMA and Bim is associated with the pathogenesis of melanoma. However, we have found that the expression of the other BH3-only protein Noxa is commonly upregulated in melanoma cells, and that this is driven by oncogenic activation of MEK/ERK. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that Noxa was expressed at higher levels in melanomas than nevi. Moreover, the expression of Noxa was increased in metastatic compared to primary melanomas, and in thick primaries compared to thin primaries. Inhibition of oncogenic BRAFV600E or MEK downregulated Noxa, whereas activation of MEK/ERK caused its upregulation. In addition, introduction of BRAFV600E increased Noxa expression in melanocytes. Upregulation of Noxa was due to a transcriptional increase mediated by cAMP responsive element binding protein, activation of which was also increased by MEK/ERK signaling in melanoma cells. Significantly, Noxa appeared necessary for constitutive activation of autophagy, albeit at low levels, by MEK/ERK in melanoma cells. Furthermore, it was required for autophagy activation that delayed apoptosis in melanoma cells undergoing nutrient deprivation. These results reveal that oncogenic activation of MEK/ERK drives Noxa expression to promote autophagy, and suggest that Noxa has an indirect anti-apoptosis role in melanoma cells under nutrient starvation conditions.

  17. Metabolic Rewiring by Oncogenic BRAF V600E Links Ketogenesis Pathway to BRAF-MEK1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Bum; Fan, Jun; Lin, Ruiting; Elf, Shannon; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhao, Liang; Jin, Lingtao; Seo, Jae Ho; Shan, Changliang; Arbiser, Jack L; Cohen, Cynthia; Brat, Daniel; Miziorko, Henry M; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Merghoub, Taha; Fröhling, Stefan; Scholl, Claudia; Tamayo, Pablo; Barbie, David A; Zhou, Lu; Pollack, Brian P; Fisher, Kevin; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Lawson, David H; Sica, Gabriel; Rossi, Michael; Lonial, Sagar; Khoury, Hanna J; Khuri, Fadlo R; Lee, Benjamin H; Boggon, Titus J; He, Chuan; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2015-08-06

    Many human cancers share similar metabolic alterations, including the Warburg effect. However, it remains unclear whether oncogene-specific metabolic alterations are required for tumor development. Here we demonstrate a "synthetic lethal" interaction between oncogenic BRAF V600E and a ketogenic enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HMGCL). HMGCL expression is upregulated in BRAF V600E-expressing human primary melanoma and hairy cell leukemia cells. Suppression of HMGCL specifically attenuates proliferation and tumor growth potential of human melanoma cells expressing BRAF V600E. Mechanistically, active BRAF upregulates HMGCL through an octamer transcription factor Oct-1, leading to increased intracellular levels of HMGCL product, acetoacetate, which selectively enhances binding of BRAF V600E but not BRAF wild-type to MEK1 in V600E-positive cancer cells to promote activation of MEK-ERK signaling. These findings reveal a mutation-specific mechanism by which oncogenic BRAF V600E "rewires" metabolic and cell signaling networks and signals through the Oct-1-HMGCL-acetoacetate axis to selectively promote BRAF V600E-dependent tumor development.

  18. Tumor-Promoting Circuits That Regulate a Cancer-Related Chemokine Cluster: Dominance of Inflammatory Mediators Over Oncogenic Alterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibovich-Rivkin, Tal [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Buganim, Yosef; Solomon, Hilla [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Meshel, Tsipi [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rotter, Varda [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Ben-Baruch, Adit, E-mail: aditbb@tauex.tau.ac.il [Department of Cell Research and Immunology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2012-01-20

    Here, we investigated the relative contribution of genetic/signaling components versus microenvironmental factors to the malignancy phenotype. In this system, we took advantage of non-transformed fibroblasts that carried defined oncogenic modifications in Ras and/or p53. These cells were exposed to microenvironmental pressures, and the expression of a cancer-related chemokine cluster was used as readout for the malignancy potential (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10). In cells kept in-culture, synergism between Ras hyper-activation and p53 dysfunction was required to up-regulate the expression of the chemokine cluster. The in vivo passage of Ras{sup High}/p53{sup Low}-modified cells has led to tumor formation, accompanied by potentiation of chemokine release, implicating a powerful role for the tumor microenvironment in up-regulating the chemokine cluster. Indeed, we found that inflammatory mediators which are prevalent in tumor sites, such as TNFα and IL-1β, had a predominant impact on the release of the chemokines, which was substantially higher than that obtained by the oncogenic modifications alone, possibly acting through the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB. Together, our results propose that in the unbiased model system that we were using, inflammatory mediators of the tumor milieu have dominating roles over oncogenic modifications in dictating the expression of a pro-malignancy chemokine readout.

  19. Effects of mutant TDP-43 on the Nrf2/ARE pathway and protein expression of MafK and JDP2 in NSC-34 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y P; Che, F Y; Su, Q P; Lu, Y C; You, C P; Huang, L M; Wang, S G; Wang, L; Yu, J X

    2017-05-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons and lacks an effective treatment. The disease pathogenesis has not been clarified at present. Pathological transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is found in a mutant TDP-43 transgenic cell model, but its downstream antioxidant enzyme expression is decreased. To elucidate the specific mechanism of Nrf2/ARE (antioxidant responsive element) signaling dysfunction, we constructed an ALS cell model with human mutant TDP-43 using the NSC-34 cell line to evaluate the impact of the TDP-43 mutation on the Nrf2/ARE pathway. We found the nuclear translocation of Nrf2, but the expression of total Nrf2, cytoplasmic Nrf2, and downstream phase II detoxifying enzyme (NQO1) was decreased in NSC-34 cells transfected with the TDP-43-M337V plasmid. Besides, TDP-43-M337V plasmid-transfected NSC-34 cells were rounded with reduced neurites, shortened axons, increased levels of intracellular lipid peroxidation products, and decreased viability, which suggests that the TDP-43-M337V plasmid weakened the antioxidant capacity of NSC-34 cells and increased their susceptibility to oxidative damage. We further showed that expression of the MafK protein and the Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was reduced in TDP-43-M337V plasmid-transfected NSC-34 cells, which might cause accumulation of Nrf2 in nuclei but a decrease in NQO1 expression. Taken together, our results confirmed that TDP-43-M337V impaired the Nrf2/ARE pathway by reducing the expression of MafK and JDP2 proteins, and provided information for further research on the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43-M337V in ALS.

  20. RNA G-quadruplexes cause eIF4A-dependent oncogene translation in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Andrew L.; Singh, Kamini; Zhong, Yi; Drewe, Philipp; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Sanghvi, Viraj R.; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J.; Jiang, Man; Roderick, Justine E.; van der Meulen, Joni; Schatz, Jonathan H.; Rodrigo, Christina M.; Zhao, Chunying; Rondou, Pieter; de Stanchina, Elisa; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Speleman, Frank; Porco, John A.; Pelletier, Jerry; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-09-01

    The translational control of oncoprotein expression is implicated in many cancers. Here we report an eIF4A RNA helicase-dependent mechanism of translational control that contributes to oncogenesis and underlies the anticancer effects of silvestrol and related compounds. For example, eIF4A promotes T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia development in vivo and is required for leukaemia maintenance. Accordingly, inhibition of eIF4A with silvestrol has powerful therapeutic effects against murine and human leukaemic cells in vitro and in vivo. We use transcriptome-scale ribosome footprinting to identify the hallmarks of eIF4A-dependent transcripts. These include 5' untranslated region (UTR) sequences such as the 12-nucleotide guanine quartet (CGG)4 motif that can form RNA G-quadruplex structures. Notably, among the most eIF4A-dependent and silvestrol-sensitive transcripts are a number of oncogenes, superenhancer-associated transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators. Hence, the 5' UTRs of select cancer genes harbour a targetable requirement for the eIF4A RNA helicase.

  1. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  2. In Silico Analysis of Oncogenes for Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim-Hui Tee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational tools and methods play a vital role in handling and analyzing a large volume of genomic data. In cancer research, in silico methods such as computational algorithm and protein databases are indispensable. In this paper, we adopted an in silico approach to analyze oncogenes that cause  renal cancer. Our objective is to identify and analyze the genes which are over expressed in the renal cancer tissues. The identification of oncogenes for renal cancer could provide directions and insights for molecular cancer treatment.

  3. The gene structure of the Drosophila melanogaster proto-oncogene, kayak, and its nested gene, fos-intronic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stephanie Gidget; Goldstein, Elliott S

    2008-08-15

    We present herein a new model for the structure of the Drosophila kayak gene as well as preliminary data on the functional differences of its various isoforms. kayak is a homolog of the human proto-oncogene, c-fos. kayak has three different starts of transcription, and therefore promoters (P)kay-alpha, (P)kay-beta and (P)kay-gamma. These three promoters lead to four different transcripts: kay-alpha, kay(sro), kay-beta and kay-gamma. (P)kay-alpha produces two different transcripts: kay-alpha and kay(sro) where the other two promoters, (P)kay-beta and (P)kay-gamma, produce a single transcript each. The transcripts kay-alpha, beta and gamma all splice into the mainbody of the kay gene, which codes for the DNA binding domain and leucine zipper; kay(sro) is not spliced. Also, within this region is a nested gene, fos-intronic gene (fig) which is transcribed in the opposite direction. fig codes for a predicted PP2C phosphatase. fig has two different promoters which produce two different transcripts, both in the same reading frame, fig-alpha and beta. This is an unusual gene structure for Drosophila. Only 13% of Drosophila genes have multiple promoters and only 7% have a nested gene. RT-PCR was performed on each transcript to determine the relative amounts of each RNA produced. All spliced kay transcripts appear to have equal abundance. The unspliced kay(sro) transcript has a lower abundance than kay-alpha. Both fig transcripts are also detected in all stages tested. Lethal phase analysis and complementation testing suggest that the three isoforms of kayak may have different functions.

  4. Both TEAD-binding and WW domains are required for the growth stimulation and oncogenic transformation activity of yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Kim, Joungmok; Ye, Xin; Lai, Zhi-Chun; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-02-01

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcription coactivator is a candidate human oncogene and a key regulator of organ size. It is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. TEAD family transcription factors were recently shown to play a key role in mediating the biological functions of YAP. Here, we show that the WW domain of YAP has a critical role in inducing a subset of YAP target genes independent of or in cooperation with TEAD. Mutation of the WW domains diminishes the ability of YAP to stimulate cell proliferation and oncogenic transformation. Inhibition of YAP oncogenic-transforming activity depends on intact serine residues 127 and 381, two sites that could be phosphorylated by the Hippo pathway. Furthermore, genetic experiments in Drosophila support that WW domains of YAP and Yki, the fly YAP homologue, have an important role in stimulating tissue growth. Our data suggest a model in which YAP induces gene expression and exerts its biological functions by interacting with transcription factors through both the TEAD-binding and WW domains.

  5. The mystery of oncogenic KRAS: Lessons from studying its wild-type counter part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-I; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; You, Xiaona; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-22

    Using conditional knock-in mouse models, we and others have shown that despite the very high sequence identity between Nras and Kras proteins, oncogenic Kras displays a much stronger leukemogenic activity than oncogenic Nras in vivo. In this manuscript, we will summarize our recent work of characterizing wild-type Kras function in adult hematopoiesis and in oncogenic Kras-induced leukemogenesis. We attribute the strong leukemogenic activity of oncogenic Kras to 2 unique aspects of Kras signaling. First, Kras is required in mediating cell type- and cytokine-specific ERK1/2 signaling. Second, oncogenic Kras, but not oncogenic Nras, induces hyperactivation of wild-type Ras, which significantly enhances Ras signaling in vivo. We will also discuss a possible mechanism that mediates oncogenic Kras-evoked hyperactivation of wild-type Ras and a potential approach to down-regulate oncogenic Kras signaling.

  6. Role of ets Oncogenes in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Mazabraud A. (1988). Cancer Kato J, Matsuoka M, Polyak K, Massague J and Sherr CJ. Genet. Cytogenet., 32, 229-238. (1994). Cell, 79, 487-496. Vairo G...Francisco LV , Roach JC, Argonza R, D, Weber BL and EI-Deiryh WS. (1998). Oncogene, 16, King MC and Ostrander EA. (1996). Human Mol. Genet., 1713-1721. 5

  7. Targeting MET Amplification as a New Oncogenic Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hisato [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okamoto, Isamu, E-mail: okamotoi@kokyu.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Okamoto, Wataru [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Division of Transrlational Research, Exploratory Oncology Research & Clinical Trial Center, National Cancer Center, 6-5-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8577 (Japan); Tanizaki, Junko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, HIM223, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Nishio, Kazuto [Department of Genome Biology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)

    2014-07-22

    Certain genetically defined cancers are dependent on a single overactive oncogene for their proliferation and survival, a phenomenon known as “oncogene addiction”. A new generation of drugs that selectively target such “driver oncogenes” manifests a clinical efficacy greater than that of conventional chemotherapy in appropriate genetically defined patients. MET is a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced cancers as result of various genetic alterations including gene amplification, polysomy, and gene mutation. Our preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of MET signaling either with the small-molecule MET inhibitor crizotinib or by RNA interference targeted to MET mRNA resulted in marked antitumor effects in cancer cell lines with MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, patients with non-small cell lung cancer or gastric cancer positive for MET amplification have shown a pronounced clinical response to crizotinib. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence thus suggests that MET amplification is an “oncogenic driver” and therefore a valid target for treatment. However, the prevalence of MET amplification has not been fully determined, possibly in part because of the difficulty in evaluating gene amplification. In this review, we provide a rationale for targeting this genetic alteration in cancer therapy.

  8. Targeting MET Amplification as a New Oncogenic Driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisato Kawakami

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain genetically defined cancers are dependent on a single overactive oncogene for their proliferation and survival, a phenomenon known as “oncogene addiction”. A new generation of drugs that selectively target such “driver oncogenes” manifests a clinical efficacy greater than that of conventional chemotherapy in appropriate genetically defined patients. MET is a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant activation of MET signaling occurs in a subset of advanced cancers as result of various genetic alterations including gene amplification, polysomy, and gene mutation. Our preclinical studies have shown that inhibition of MET signaling either with the small-molecule MET inhibitor crizotinib or by RNA interference targeted to MET mRNA resulted in marked antitumor effects in cancer cell lines with MET amplification both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, patients with non-small cell lung cancer or gastric cancer positive for MET amplification have shown a pronounced clinical response to crizotinib. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence thus suggests that MET amplification is an “oncogenic driver” and therefore a valid target for treatment. However, the prevalence of MET amplification has not been fully determined, possibly in part because of the difficulty in evaluating gene amplification. In this review, we provide a rationale for targeting this genetic alteration in cancer therapy.

  9. Oncogene mutations, copy number gains and mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI frequently occur together in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Soh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activating mutations in one allele of an oncogene (heterozygous mutations are widely believed to be sufficient for tumorigenesis. However, mutant allele specific imbalance (MASI has been observed in tumors and cell lines harboring mutations of oncogenes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined 1 mutational status, 2 copy number gains (CNGs and 3 relative ratio between mutant and wild type alleles of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and EGFR genes by direct sequencing and quantitative PCR assay in over 400 human tumors, cell lines, and xenografts of lung, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. Examination of a public database indicated that homozygous mutations of five oncogenes were frequent (20% in 833 cell lines of 12 tumor types. Our data indicated two major forms of MASI: 1 MASI with CNG, either complete or partial; and 2 MASI without CNG (uniparental disomy; UPD, due to complete loss of wild type allele. MASI was a frequent event in mutant EGFR (75% and was due mainly to CNGs, while MASI, also frequent in mutant KRAS (58%, was mainly due to UPD. Mutant: wild type allelic ratios at the genomic level were precisely maintained after transcription. KRAS mutations or CNGs were significantly associated with increased ras GTPase activity, as measured by ELISA, and the two molecular changes were synergistic. Of 237 lung adenocarcinoma tumors, the small number with both KRAS mutation and CNG were associated with shortened survival. CONCLUSIONS: MASI is frequently present in mutant EGFR and KRAS tumor cells, and is associated with increased mutant allele transcription and gene activity. The frequent finding of mutations, CNGs and MASI occurring together in tumor cells indicates that these three genetic alterations, acting together, may have a greater role in the development or maintenance of the malignant phenotype than any individual alteration.

  10. Mitochondrial STAT3 contributes to transformation of Barrett's epithelial cells that express oncogenic Ras in a p53-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunhua; Huo, Xiaofang; Agoston, Agoston T; Zhang, Xi; Theiss, Arianne L; Cheng, Edaire; Zhang, Qiuyang; Zaika, Alexander; Pham, Thai H; Wang, David H; Lobie, Peter E; Odze, Robert D; Spechler, Stuart J; Souza, Rhonda F

    2015-08-01

    Metaplastic epithelial cells of Barrett's esophagus transformed by the combination of p53-knockdown and oncogenic Ras expression are known to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). When phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 (Tyr705), STAT3 functions as a nuclear transcription factor that can contribute to oncogenesis. STAT3 phosphorylated at serine 727 (Ser727) localizes in mitochondria, but little is known about mitochondrial STAT3's contribution to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus, which is the focus of this study. We introduced a constitutively active variant of human STAT3 (STAT3CA) into the following: 1) non-neoplastic Barrett's (BAR-T) cells; 2) BAR-T cells with p53 knockdown; and 3) BAR-T cells that express oncogenic H-Ras(G12V). STAT3CA transformed only the H-Ras(G12V)-expressing BAR-T cells (evidenced by loss of contact inhibition, formation of colonies in soft agar, and generation of tumors in immunodeficient mice), and did so in a p53-independent fashion. The transformed cells had elevated levels of both mitochondrial (Ser727) and nuclear (Tyr705) phospho-STAT3. Introduction of a STAT3CA construct with a mutated tyrosine phosphorylation site into H-Ras(G12V)-expressing Barrett's cells resulted in high levels of mitochondrial phospho-STAT3 (Ser727) with little or no nuclear phospho-STAT3 (Tyr705), and the cells still formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. Thus tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is not required for tumor formation in Ras-expressing Barrett's cells. We conclude that mitochondrial STAT3 (Ser727) can contribute to oncogenesis in Barrett's cells that express oncogenic Ras. These findings suggest that agents targeting STAT3 might be useful for chemoprevention in patients with Barrett's esophagus. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Dynamic long-range chromatin interactions control Myb proto-oncogene transcription during erythroid development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Stadhouders (Ralph); S. Thongjuea (Supat); C. Andrieu-Soler (Charlotte); R.-J.T.S. Palstra (Robert-Jan); J.C. Bryne; A. van den Heuvel (Anita); M. Stevens (Martijn); E. de Boer (Ernie); C. Kockx (Christel); A. Van Der Sloot (Antoine); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); D. Eick (Dirk); B. Lenhard (Boris); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Soler (Eric)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe key haematopoietic regulator Myb is essential for coordinating proliferation and differentiation. ChIP-Sequencing and Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C)-Sequencing were used to characterize the structural and protein-binding dynamics of the Myb locus during erythroid differentiatio

  12. Cell Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    studies LNCaP cells were treated with DHT , with or without 3E10-AR441 antibody or control antibodies. Changes in the levels of PSA mRNA were measured...within seconds of ligand application. 3E10-AR441 dramatically reduces DHT -dependent calcium release in LNCaP cells. The 3E10 scFv alone did not...necessary. DHT at 0.5-1nM final concentration stimulated cell growth while higher and lower concentrations either had no effect, or markedly inhibited

  13. Cell-Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    observations with DHT -stimulated luciferase activity assays, enzalutamide had no effect on the constitutive induction of luciferase activity by the AR...to expess firefly luciferase under the control of a synthetic ARE. Similar studies were also performed with intact LNCaP cells stimulated with DHT ...enzalutamide. B. Demonstration that 3E10-AR441 can inhibit non-genomic, AR-dependent signaling. These studies used LNCaP cells stimulated with DHT , with a

  14. Chromatin alterations imposed by the oncogenic transcription factor PML-RAR

    OpenAIRE

    Morey Ramonell, Lluís

    2008-01-01

    En mamíferos, así como en plantas, mutaciones en AND helicasas/ATPasas del la família SNF2, no solo afectan a la estructura de la cromatina, sino que también afectan al patrón global de la metilación del ADN. Sugiriendo una relación funcional entre la estructura de la cromatina y la epigenética. El complejo NuRD, el cual posee una ATPasa de la familía SNF2, está relacionado con la represión de la transcripción y en el remodelamiento de la cromatina. Nuestro laboratorio demostró que la proteín...

  15. Cell-penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AR441 antibody or control antibodies. Changes in the levels of PSA mRNA were measured by real time PCR (Fig. 1). The bispecific antibody...depending on which capture antibody was used). These values are very compatible with expected affinities for monoclonal antibodies. Interestingly

  16. Silencing of hpv16 e6 and e7 oncogenic activities by small interference rna induces autophagy and apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Salazar-León

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common form of death by cancer in women worldwide and has special attention for the development of new treatment strategies. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV persistent infection is the main etiological agent of this neoplasia, and the main cellular transformation mechanism is by disruption of p53 and pRb function by interaction with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins. This generates alterations in cellular differentiation and cellular death inhibition. Thus, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes represent suitable targets for the development of gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer. An attractive technology platform is developing for post-transcriptional selective silencing of gene expression, using small interference RNA. Therefore, in the present study, we used SiHa cells (HPV16+ transiently transfected with specific siRNA expression plasmids for HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. In this model we detected repression of E6 and E7 oncogene and oncoprotein expression, an increase in p53 and hypophosphorylated pRb isoform protein expression, and autophagy and apoptosis morphology features. These findings suggest that selective silencing of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes by siRNAs, has significant biological effects on the survival of human cancer cells and is a potential gene therapy strategy against cervical cancer.

  17. The polyomavirus middle T-antigen oncogene activates the Hippo pathway tumor suppressor Lats in a Src-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanzer, M; Ricardo-Lax, I; Keshet, R; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-08-06

    The polyomavirus middle T antigen (PyMT) is an oncogene that activates the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src, and physically interacts with Taz (WWTR1). Taz is a pro-oncogenic transcription coactivator of the Tead transcription factors. The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway activates the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates Taz, leading to its nuclear exclusion and blunting Tead coactivation. We found that Taz was required for transformation by PyMT, but counter-intuitively, Taz was exclusively cytoplasmic in the presence of PyMT. We demonstrate that in the presence of PyMT, wild-type Taz was phosphorylated by Lats, in a Src-dependent manner. Consistently, a Lats refractory Taz mutant did not undergo cytoplasmic retention by PyMT. We show that Yap, the Taz paralog, and Shp2 phosphatase were nuclear excluded as well. Our findings describe a noncanonical activation of Lats, and an unprecedented Tead-independent role for Taz and Yap in viral-mediated oncogenesis.

  18. Quadruplex forming promoter region of c-myc oncogene as a potential target for a telomerase inhibitory plant alkaloid, chelerythrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptaparni; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2015-03-27

    Guanine rich sequences present in the promoter region of oncogenes could fold into G-quadruplexes and modulate transcription. Equilibrium between folding and unfolding of the quadruplexes in these regions play important role in disease processes. We have studied the effect of a putative anticancer agent chelerythrine on G-rich NHE III1 present in the promoter region of c-myc oncogene. We have demonstrated the ability of chelerythrine, a telomerase inhibitor, to block the hybridization of Pu27 with its complementary strand via folding it into a quadruplex structure. Calorimetry shows that the association of Pu27 with chelerythrine is primarily enthalpy driven with high binding affinity (∼10(5) M(-1)). The association does not lead to any major structural perturbation of Pu27. The resulting 2:1 complex has enhanced stability as compared to free Pu27. Another notable feature is that the presence of molecular crowding agent like ficoll 70 does not change the mode of recognition though the binding affinity decreases. We suggest that the anticancer activity of chelerythrine could be ascribed to its ability to stabilize the quadruplex structure in the c-myc promoter region thereby downregulating its transcription. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcriptional Amplification in Tumor Cells with Elevated c-Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles Y.; Lovén, Jakob; Rahl, Peter B.; Paranal, Ronald M.; Burge, Christopher B.; Bradner, James E.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Elevated expression of the c-Myc transcription factor occurs frequently in human cancers and is associated with tumor aggression and poor clinical outcome. The effect of high levels of c-Myc on global gene regulation is poorly understood, but is widely thought to involve newly activated or repressed “Myc target genes”. We report here that in tumor cells expressing high levels of c-Myc, the transcription factor accumulates in the promoter regions of active genes and causes transcriptional amplification, producing increased levels of transcripts within the cell's gene expression program. Thus, rather than binding and regulating a new set of genes, c-Myc amplifies the output of the existing gene expression program. These results provide an explanation for the diverse effects of oncogenic c-Myc on gene expression in different tumor cells and suggest that transcriptional amplification reduces rate-limiting constraints for tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23021215

  20. Telomerase stimulates ribosomal DNA transcription under hyperproliferative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Omar Garcia; Assfalg, Robin; Koch, Sylvia; Schelling, Adrian; Meena, Jitendra K; Kraus, Johann; Lechel, Andre; Katz, Sarah-Fee; Benes, Vladimir; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Kestler, Hans A; Günes, Cagatay; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-08-13

    In addition to performing its canonical function, Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) has been shown to participate in cellular processes independent of telomerase activity. Furthermore, although TERT mainly localizes to Cajal bodies, it is also present within the nucleolus. Because the nucleolus is the site of rDNA transcription, we investigated the possible role of telomerase in regulating RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Here we show that TERT binds to rDNA and stimulates transcription by Pol I during liver regeneration and Ras-induced hyperproliferation. Moreover, the inhibition of telomerase activity by TERT- or TERC-specific RNA interference, the overexpression of dominant-negative-TERT, and the application of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat reduce Pol I transcription and the growth of tumour cells. In vitro, telomerase can stimulate the formation of the transcription initiation complex. Our results demonstrate how non-canonical features of telomerase may direct Pol I transcription in oncogenic and regenerative hyperproliferation.

  1. The use of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways for analysis and prediction of oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhihao; Chu, Chen; Chen, Lei; Kong, Xiangyin

    2016-11-01

    Oncogenes are a type of genes that have the potential to cause cancer. Most normal cells undergo programmed cell death, namely apoptosis, but activated oncogenes can help cells avoid apoptosis and survive. Thus, studying oncogenes is helpful for obtaining a good understanding of the formation and development of various types of cancers. In this study, we proposed a computational method, called OPM, for investigating oncogenes from the view of Gene Ontology (GO) and biological pathways. All investigated genes, including validated oncogenes retrieved from some public databases and other genes that have not been reported to be oncogenes thus far, were encoded into numeric vectors according to the enrichment theory of GO terms and KEGG pathways. Some popular feature selection methods, minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, and an advanced machine learning algorithm, random forest, were adopted to analyze the numeric vectors to extract key GO terms and KEGG pathways. Along with the oncogenes, GO terms and KEGG pathways were discussed in terms of their relevance in this study. Some important GO terms and KEGG pathways were extracted using feature selection methods and were confirmed to be highly related to oncogenes. Additionally, the importance of these terms and pathways in predicting oncogenes was further demonstrated by finding new putative oncogenes based on them. This study investigated oncogenes based on GO terms and KEGG pathways. Some important GO terms and KEGG pathways were confirmed to be highly related to oncogenes. We hope that these GO terms and KEGG pathways can provide new insight for the study of oncogenes, particularly for building more effective prediction models to identify novel oncogenes. The program is available upon request. We hope that the new findings listed in this study may provide a new insight for the investigation of oncogenes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "System Genetics" Guest Editor

  2. Transcription elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  3. High Risk Alpha Papillomavirus Oncogenes Impair the Homologous Recombination Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Khanal, Sujita; Robinson, Kristin L; Wendel, Sebastian O; Messer, Joshua J; Galloway, Denise A

    2017-08-02

    Persistent high risk genus α human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause nearly every cervical carcinoma and a subset of tumors in the oropharyngeal tract. During the decades required for HPV-associated tumorigenesis, the cellular genome becomes significantly destabilized. Our analysis of cervical tumors from 4 separate data sets found a significant upregulation of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway genes. The increased abundance of HR proteins can be replicated in primary cells by expression of the two HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) required for HPV-associated transformation. HPV E6 and E7 also enhanced the ability of HR proteins to form repair foci, yet both E6 and E7 reduce the ability of the HR pathway to complete double strand break (DSB) repair by about 50%. The HPV oncogenes hinder HR by allowing the process to begin at points in the cell cycle when the lack of a sister chromatid to serve as a homologous template prevents completion of the repair. Further, HPV E6 attenuates repair by causing RAD51 to be mislocalized away from both transient and persistent DSBs, while HPV E7 is only capable of impairing RAD51 localization to transient lesions. Finally, we show that the inability to robustly repair DSBs causes some of these lesions to be more persistent, a phenotype that correlates with increased integration of episomal DNA. Together these data support our hypothesis that HPV oncogenes contribute to the genomic instability observed in HPV-associated malignancies by attenuating the repair of damaged DNA.IMPORTANCE: This work expands the understanding of HPV biology, establishing a direct role for both HPV E6 and E7 in the destabilization of the host genome by blocking the homologous repair of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that both viral oncogenes were shown to disrupt this DSB repair pathway. We show that HPV E6 and E7 allow HR to initiate at an inappropriate part of the cell cycle. The mislocalization of RAD51 away from DSBs in cells

  4. High miR-196a levels promote the oncogenic phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carl Christoph Schimanski; Kirsten Frerichs; Fareed Rahman; Martin Berger; Hauke Lang; Peter R Galle; Markus Moehler; Ines Gockel

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the relevance of the microRNA miR- 196a for colorectal oncogenesis. METHODS: The impact of miR-196a on the restriction targets HoxA7, HoxB8, HoxC8 and HoxD8 was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after transient transfection of SW480 cancer cells. The miR-196a transcription profile in colorectal cancer samples, mucosa samples and diverse cancer cell lines was quantified by RT-PCR. Transiently miR- 196a-transfected colorectal cancer cells were used for diverse functional assays in vitro and for a xenograft lung metastasis model in vivo. RESULTS: HoxA7, HoxB8, HoxC8 and HoxD8 were restricted by miR-196a in a dose-dependent and gene-specific manner. High levels of miR-196a activated the AKT signaling pathway as indicated by increased phosphorylation of AKT. In addition, high levels of miR-196a promoted cancer cell detachment, migration, invasion and chemosensitivity towards platin derivatives but did not impact on proliferation or apoptosis. Furthermore, miR-196a increased the development of lung metastases in mice after tail vein injection. CONCLUSION: miR-196a exerts a pro-oncogenic influence in colorectal cancer.

  5. Oncogenic events triggered by AID, the adverse effect of antibody diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Durán, Pablo; de Yebenes, Virginia G; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2007-12-01

    The generation of an efficient immune response depends on highly refined mechanisms of antibody diversification. Two of these mechanisms, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), are initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) upon antigen stimulation of mature B cells. AID deaminates cytosines on the DNA of Ig genes thereby generating a lesion that can be processed into a mutation (SHM) or a DNA double-strand break followed by a recombination reaction (CSR). A number of mechanisms are probably responsible for regulating AID function, such as transcriptional regulation, subcellular localization, post-transcriptional modifications and target specificity, but the issue remains of how unwanted DNA damage is fully prevented. Most lymphocyte neoplasias are originated from mature B cells and harbour hallmark chromosome translocations of lymphomagenic potential, such as the c-myc/IgH translocations found in Burkitt lymphomas. It has been recently shown that such translocations are initiated by AID and that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, p53 and ARF provide surveillance mechanisms to prevent these aberrations. In addition, evidence is accumulating that AID expression can be induced in B cells independently of the germinal centre environment, such as in response to some viral infections, and occasionally in non-B cells, at least in certain inflammation-associated neoplasic situations. The most recent findings on AID expression and function and their relevance to the generation of oncogenic lesions will be discussed.

  6. Activated RET/PTC oncogene elicits immediate early and delayed response genes in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, D; Monaco, C; de Vita, G; D'Alessio, A; Dathan, N A; Possenti, R; Vecchio, G; Fusco, A; Santoro, M; de Franciscis, V

    1995-07-06

    The expression of the receptor-like tyrosine kinase RET is associated with tumors, tissues or cell lines of neural crest origin. In addition RET products (Ret) are involved in determining cell fate during the differentiation of the enteric nervous system and during renal organogenesis. However, as yet, no direct evidence exists to indicate that the Ret kinase activity might interfere in a specific way with cellular differentiation, or proliferation, of a neural crest derived cell line. By using two constitutively activated forms of RET (RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3) in transient transfection experiments, we have obtained evidence that active RET could reprogramme the gene expression pattern in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. Transcription driven by gene promoters, such as NGFI-A and vgf, which belong, respectively, to primary and delayed response genes to nerve growth factor (NGF), and by the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter, is rapidly induced by the expression of activated RET oncogenes. This induction is not elicited in other non neural derived cell types tested. We also demonstrate that endogenous ras activity is required for RET induction of these neural markers. Finally, in the RET/PTC transfected PC12 cells, NGF is unable to induce further their transcription. This suggests that RET/PTC could share an intracellular signalling pathway with the NGF-receptor.

  7. STAT5-mediated expression of oncogenic miR-155 in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Katharina L; Ralfkiaer, Ulrik; Gjerdrum, Lise Mette R

    2013-01-01

    show that malignant T cells constitutively express high levels of miR-155 and its host gene BIC (B cell integration cluster). Using ChIP-seq, we identify BIC as a target of transcription factor STAT5, which is aberrantly activated in malignant T cells and induced by IL-2/IL-15 in non-malignant T cells....... Incubation with JAK inhibitor or siRNA-mediated knockdown of STAT5 decreases BIC/miR-155 expression, whereas IL-2 and IL-15 increase their expression in cell lines and primary cells. In contrast, knockdown of STAT3 has no effect, and BIC is not a transcriptional target of STAT3, indicating that regulation...... of BIC/miR-155 expression by STAT5 is highly specific. Malignant proliferation is significantly inhibited by an antisense-miR-155 as well as by knockdown of STAT5 and BIC.   In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that STAT5 drives expression of oncogenic BIC/miR-155 in cancer. Moreover, our data...

  8. PTPN14 interacts with and negatively regulates the oncogenic function of YAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Yang, N; Figel, S A; Wilson, K E; Morrison, C D; Gelman, I H; Zhang, J

    2013-03-07

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. The pivotal effector of this pathway is YAP, a transcriptional co-activator amplified in mouse and human cancers where it promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and malignant transformation. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism for the YAP oncogenic function via direct interaction with non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase 14 (PTPN14) through the WW domain of YAP and the PPxY domain of PTPN14. We also found that YAP is a direct substrate of PTPN14. In addition, luciferase reporter assay showed that the inhibition of the YAP transcriptional co-activator function by PTPN14 is mediated through their protein interactions and may result from an increase in the inactive cytoplasmic form of YAP. Last, knockdown of PTPN14 induces the nuclear retention of YAP and increases the YAP-dependent cell migration. In summary, our results indicate a potential regulatory role of PTPN14 on YAP and demonstrate a novel mechanism in YAP regulation.

  9. Long noncoding RNA linc00617 exhibits oncogenic activity in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hengyu; Zhu, Li; Xu, Lu; Qin, Keyu; Liu, Chaoqian; Yu, Yue; Su, Dongwei; Wu, Kainan; Sheng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Protein-coding genes account for only 2% of the human genome, whereas the vast majority of transcripts are noncoding RNAs including long noncoding RNAs. LncRNAs are involved in the regulation of a diverse array of biological processes, including cancer progression. An evolutionarily conserved lncRNA TUNA, was found to be required for pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. In this study, we found the human ortholog of TUNA, linc00617, was upregulated in breast cancer samples. Linc00617 promoted motility and invasion of breast cancer cells and induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), which was accompanied by generation of stem cell properties. Moreover, knockdown of linc00617 repressed lung metastasis in vivo. We demonstrated that linc00617 upregulated the expression of stemness factor Sox2 in breast cancer cells, which was shown to promote the oncogenic activity of breast cancer cells by stimulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and enhancing the tumor-initiating capacity. Thus, our data indicate that linc00617 functions as an important regulator of EMT and promotes breast cancer progression and metastasis via activating the transcription of Sox2. Together, it suggests that linc00617 may be a potential therapeutic target for aggressive breast cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A new 2-aminosteroid induces cellular differentiation and upregulates the expression of MafB and Egr-1 genes respectively in HL-60 and K562 leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qun; LI Qiong; YUAN Lin-bo; HE Jun

    2005-01-01

    Background In previous work, we suggested that some 2-aminosteroids inhibited proliferation and induced differentiation of both human and murine leukemia cells. Here, we reported the actions of another new 2-aminosteroid designated as H89712 on human leukemia cells. Methods Cell colony counting and MTT assay were used to determine proliferation. Cell morphology, histochemical staining, UV detection and cytometry were used to determine differentiation. RT-PCR was used to detect gene expression. Standard statistical method was used to analyze data.Results H89712 inhibited proliferation of HL-60 leukemia cells and the inhibition percentage in MTT assay was 18% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 65% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L, respectively. The inhibition for HL-60 in colony assay was 23% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 96% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L, respectively. H89712 also induced HL-60 cells toward macrophage-like differentiation. It was verified by flow cytometry that the percentage of positive CD14 expression in differentiated HL-60 cells was about 9 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 20 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively, and this action involved upregulation of MafB gene in HL-60 leukemia cells. On the other hand, H89712 inhibited proliferation of K562 leukemia cells and the inhibition of K562 leukemia cells in MTT assay was shown by 34% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 88% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively. The inhibition of K562 leukemia cells in colony assay was 53% at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 100% at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively. H89712 also induced K562 cells toward erythroid-like differentiation and it was verified by flow cytometry that the percentage of positive CD71 expression in differentiated K562 cells was about 9 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-8 mol/L and 16 times higher than that of the control at the dose of 10-5 mol/L respectively. This action

  11. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zheng, Jie, E-mail: jiezheng54@126.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  12. LIN28 Expression in malignant germ cell tumors downregulates let-7 and increases oncogene levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Matthew J; Saini, Harpreet K; Siegler, Charlotte A; Hanning, Jennifer E; Barker, Emily M; van Dongen, Stijn; Ward, Dawn M; Raby, Katie L; Groves, Ian J; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Pett, Mark R; Thornton, Claire M; Enright, Anton J; Nicholson, James C; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    Despite their clinicopathologic heterogeneity, malignant germ cell tumors (GCT) share molecular abnormalities that are likely to be functionally important. In this study, we investigated the potential significance of downregulation of the let-7 family of tumor suppressor microRNAs in malignant GCTs. Microarray results from pediatric and adult samples (n = 45) showed that LIN28, the negative regulator of let-7 biogenesis, was abundant in malignant GCTs, regardless of patient age, tumor site, or histologic subtype. Indeed, a strong negative correlation existed between LIN28 and let-7 levels in specimens with matched datasets. Low let-7 levels were biologically significant, as the sequence complementary to the 2 to 7 nt common let-7 seed "GAGGUA" was enriched in the 3' untranslated regions of mRNAs upregulated in pediatric and adult malignant GCTs, compared with normal gonads (a mixture of germ cells and somatic cells). We identified 27 mRNA targets of let-7 that were upregulated in malignant GCT cells, confirming significant negative correlations with let-7 levels. Among 16 mRNAs examined in a largely independent set of specimens by quantitative reverse transcription PCR, we defined negative-associations with let-7e levels for six oncogenes, including MYCN, AURKB, CCNF, RRM2, MKI67, and C12orf5 (when including normal control tissues). Importantly, LIN28 depletion in malignant GCT cells restored let-7 levels and repressed all of these oncogenic let-7 mRNA targets, with LIN28 levels correlating with cell proliferation and MYCN levels. Conversely, ectopic expression of let-7e was sufficient to reduce proliferation and downregulate MYCN, AURKB, and LIN28, the latter via a double-negative feedback loop. We conclude that the LIN28/let-7 pathway has a critical pathobiologic role in malignant GCTs and therefore offers a promising target for therapeutic intervention. ©2013 AACR.

  13. The pathobiology of the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK: a brief update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Raymond; Ingham, Robert J

    2013-04-01

    Extensive research has been carried out in the past two decades to study the pathobiology of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), which is an oncogenic fusion protein found exclusively in a specific type of T-cell lymphoid malignancy, namely ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Results from these studies have provided highly useful insights into the mechanisms by which a constitutively tyrosine kinase, such as NPM-ALK, promotes tumorigenesis. Several previous publications have comprehensively summarized the advances in this field. In this review, we provide readers with a brief update on specific areas of NPM-ALK pathobiology. In the first part, the NPM-ALK/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling axis is discussed, with an emphasis on the existence of multiple biochemical defects that have been shown to amplify the oncogenic effects of this signaling axis. Specifically, findings regarding JAK3, SHP1 and the stimulatory effects of several cytokines including interleukin (IL)-9, IL-21 and IL-22 are summarized. New concepts stemming from recent observations regarding the functional interactions among the NPM-ALK/STAT3 axis, β catenin and glycogen synthase kinase 3β will be postulated. Lastly, new mechanisms by which the NPM-ALK/STAT3 axis promotes tumorigenesis, such as its modulations of Twist1, hypoxia-induced factor 1α, CD274, will be described. In the second part, we summarize recent data generated by mass spectrometry studies of NPM-ALK, and use MSH2 and heat shock proteins as examples to illustrate the use of mass spectrometry data in stimulating new research in this field. In the third part, the evolving field of microRNA in the context of NPM-ALK biology is discussed.

  14. Induction of epithelial mesenchimal transition and vasculogenesis in the lenses of Dbl oncogene transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Fardin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Dbl family of proteins represents a large group of proto-oncogenes involved in cell growth regulation. The numerous domains that are present in many Dbl family proteins suggest that they act to integrate multiple inputs in complicated signaling networks involving the Rho GTPases. Alterations of the normal function of these proteins lead to pathological processes such as developmental disorders and neoplastic transformation. We generated transgenic mice introducing the cDNA of Dbl oncogene linked to the metallothionein promoter into the germ line of FVB mice and found that onco-Dbl expression in mouse lenses affected proliferation, migration and differentiation of lens epithelial cells. RESULTS: We used high density oligonucleotide microarray to define the transcriptional profile induced by Dbl in the lenses of 2 days, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks old transgenic mice. We observed modulation of genes encoding proteins promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, such as down-regulation of epithelial cell markers and up-regulation of fibroblast markers. Genes encoding proteins involved in the positive regulation of apoptosis were markedly down regulated while anti-apoptotic genes were strongly up-regulated. Finally, several genes encoding proteins involved in the process of angiogenesis were up-regulated. These observations were validated by histological and immunohistochemical examination of the transgenic lenses where vascularization can be readily observed. CONCLUSION: Onco-Dbl expression in mouse lens correlated with modulation of genes involved in the regulation of EMT, apoptosis and vasculogenesis leading to disruption of the lens architecture, epithelial cell proliferation, and aberrant angiogenesis. We conclude that onco-Dbl has a potentially important, previously unreported, capacity to dramatically alter epithelial cell migration, replication, polarization and differentiation and to induce vascularization of an epithelial

  15. Long-range oncogenic activation of Igh-c-myc translocations by the Igh 3' regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostissa, Monica; Yan, Catherine T; Bianco, Julia M; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Alt, Frederick W

    2009-12-10

    B-cell malignancies, such as human Burkitt's lymphoma, often contain translocations that link c-myc or other proto-oncogenes to the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH, encoded by Igh). The nature of elements that activate oncogenes within such translocations has been a long-standing question. Translocations within Igh involve DNA double-strand breaks initiated either by the RAG1/2 endonuclease during variable, diversity and joining gene segment (V(D)J) recombination, or by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, also known as AICDA) during class switch recombination (CSR). V(D)J recombination in progenitor B (pro-B) cells assembles Igh variable region exons upstream of mu constant region (Cmu) exons, which are the first of several sets of C(H) exons ('C(H) genes') within a C(H) locus that span several hundred kilobases (kb). In mature B cells, CSR deletes Cmu and replaces it with a downstream C(H) gene. An intronic enhancer (iEmu) between the variable region exons and Cmu promotes V(D)J recombination in developing B cells. Furthermore, the Igh 3' regulatory region (Igh3'RR) lies downstream of the C(H) locus and modulates CSR by long-range transcriptional enhancement of C(H) genes. Transgenic mice bearing iEmu or Igh3'RR sequences fused to c-myc are predisposed to B lymphomas, demonstrating that such elements can confer oncogenic c-myc expression. However, in many B-cell lymphomas, Igh-c-myc translocations delete iEmu and place c-myc up to 200 kb upstream of the Igh3'RR. Here we address the oncogenic role of the Igh3'RR by inactivating it in two distinct mouse models for B-cell lymphoma with Igh-c-myc translocations. We show that the Igh3'RR is dispensable for pro-B-cell lymphomas with V(D)J recombination-initiated translocations, but is required for peripheral B-cell lymphomas with CSR-associated translocations. As the Igh3'RR is not required for CSR-associated Igh breaks or Igh-c-myc translocations in peripheral B-cell lymphoma progenitors, we conclude that

  16. DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS‑induced tumor invasion in colorectal cancer via the β‑catenin/ZEB1 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Wei; Lin, Po-Lin; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Huang, Chi-Chou; Wang, Lee; Lee, Huei

    2016-04-19

    DDX3 plays a dual role in colorectal cancer; however, the role and underlying mechanism of DDX3 in colorectal tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that DDX3 enhances oncogenic KRAS transcription via an increase in SP1 binding to its promoter. Accelerating oncogenic KRAS expression by DDX3 promotes the invasion capability via the ERK/PTEN/AKT/β-catenin cascade. Moreover, the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis is responsible for DDX3-induced cell invasiveness and xenograft lung tumor nodule formation. The xenograft lung tumor nodules induced by DDX3-overexpressing T84 stable clone were nearly suppressed by the inhibitor of AKT (perifosine) or β-catenin (XAV939). Among patients, high KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin expression and high ZEB1 were more commonly occurred in high-DDX3 tumors than in low-DDX3 tumors. High-DDX3, high-KRAS, positive nuclear β-catenin tumors, and high-ZEB1 exhibited worse overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) than their counterparts. In conclusion, DDX3 may play an oncogenic role to promote tumor growth and invasion in colon cancer cells via the β-catenin/ZEB1 axis due to increasing KRAS transcription. We therefore suggest that AKT or β-catenin may potentially act as a therapeutic target to improve tumor regression and outcomes in colorectal cancer patients who harbored high-DDX3 tumors.

  17. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  18. Regulation of apoptosis by the papillomavirus E6 oncogene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Li; Li-Na Zhao; Zhi-Guo Liu; Ying Han; Dai-Ming Fan

    2005-01-01

    Infection with human papillomaviruses is strongly associated with the development of multiple cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The HPV E6 gene is essential for the oncogenic potential of HPV.The recgulation of apoptosis by oncogene has been relatel to carcinogenesis closely; therefore, the modulation of E6 on cellular apoptosis has become a hot research topic recently. Inactivation of the pro-apoptotic tumor suppressor p53 by E6 is an important mechanism by which E6promotes cell growth; it is expected that inactivation of p53 by E6 should lead to a reduction in cellular apoptosis,numerous studies showed that E6 could in fact sensitize cells to apoptosis. The molecular basis for apoptosis modulation by E6 is poorly understood. In this article, we will present an overview of observations and current understanding of molecular basis for E6-induced apoptosis.

  19. Oncogenic osteomalacia presenting as bilateral stress fractures of the tibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Kenjirou; Ohnishi, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tohru [Department of Radiology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Tani, Haruo [Department of Internal Medicine III, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan); Uesugi, Keisuke [Department of Otolaryngology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan); Takagi, Masayuki [Department of Pathology, St. Marianna University Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral stress fractures of the tibia who subsequently showed classic biochemical features of oncogenic osteomalacia. Conventional radiographs were normal. MR imaging revealed symmetric, bilateral, band-like low-signal lesions perpendicular to the medial cortex of the tibiae and corresponding to the only lesions subsequently seen on the bone scan. A maxillary sinus lesion was subsequently detected and surgically removed resulting in prompt alleviation of symptoms and normalization of hypophosphatemia and low 1,25-(OH){sub 2} vitamin D{sub 3}. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as a hemangiopericytoma-like tumor. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia may present with stress fractures limited to the tibia, as seen in athletes. The clue to the real diagnosis lies in paying close attention to the serum phosphate levels, especially in patients suffering generalized symptoms of weakness and not given to unusual physical activity. (orig.) With 4 figs., 6 refs.

  20. Advances on Driver Oncogenes of Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei HONG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Next to adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the lung is the most frequent histologic subtype in non-small cell lung cancer. Several molecular alterations have been defined as "driver oncogenes" responsible for both the initiation and maintenance of the malignancy. The squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has recently shown peculiar molecular characteristics which relate with both carcinogenesis and response to targeted drugs. So far, about 40% of lung squamous cell carcinoma has been found harbouring driver oncogenes, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 plays important roles. In this review, we will report the mainly advances on some latest driver mutations of squamous cell lung cancer.

  1. Pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Huang, Po-Hsien; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2017-03-01

    The clear importance of mutated KRAS as a therapeutic target has driven the investigation of multiple approaches to inhibit oncogenic KRAS signaling at different molecular levels. However, no KRAS-targeted therapy has reached the clinic to date, which underlies the intrinsic difficulty in developing effective, direct inhibitors of KRAS. Thus, this article provides an overview of the history and recent progress in the development of pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS with small molecule agents. Mechanistically, these KRAS-targeted agents can be classified into the following four categories. (1) Small-molecule RAS-binding ligands that prevent RAS activation by binding within or outside the nucleotide-binding motif. (2) Inhibitors of KRAS membrane anchorage. (3) Inhibitors that bind to RAS-binding domains of RAS-effector proteins. (4) Inhibitors of KRAS expression. The advantage and limitation of each type of these anti-KRAS agents are discussed.

  2. Annotating MYC oncogene status with 89Zr-transferrin imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Jason P.; Evans, Michael J.; Rice, Samuel L.; Wongvipat, John; Sawyers, Charles L.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    A non-invasive technology that quantitatively measures the activity of oncogenic signaling pathways could broadly impact cancer diagnosis and treatment using targeted therapies. Here we describe the development of 89Zr-desferrioxamine transferrin (89Zr-Tf), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer that binds the transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, CD71) with high avidity. 89Zr-Tf produces high contrast PET images that quantitatively reflect treatment-induced changes in MYC-regulated T...

  3. Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in sporadic pheochromocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, S.N.; Lindor, N.M.; Honchel, R. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have recently been demonstrated in kindreds with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B. Both of these autosomal dominant disorders are characterized by the development of neoplasia in cell lines of neural crest origin, such as medullary throid carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Individuals with MEN 2B have, in addition, ganglioneuromas of the lips, tongue and colon, a marfanoid habitus, and corneal nerve thickening. Approximately 90% of patients with MEN 2A have a germline mutation in exons 10 or 11, while 95% of patients with MEN 2B have a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 of exon 16. In this study, pheochromocytomas from 29 individuals who had no clinical evidence of MEN 2A or 2B (sporadic) were examined for the presence of either germline or somatic mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the RET proto-oncogene. Of the 29 tumors examined, 3 (10%) were found to have a mutation in one of the three exons. One tumor had a G{yields}A transition in codon 609 (exon 10), another had a 6 bp deletion encompassing codons 632 & 633 (exon 11), and the final tumor had a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 (exon 16). These mutations were not found in the corresponding normal DNA from these individuals, indicating that the mutation were somatic in origin. Although we cannot exclude the possibility of mutations in other regions of the RET proto-oncogene, our data suggests that: (1) individuals presenting with apparently sporadic pheochromocytomas are not likely to have undiagnosed MEN 2A or 2B; and (2) somatic mutations in the RET proto-oncogene contribute to the process of tumorigenesis in a small percentage of sporadic pheochromocytomas.

  4. PKC Epsilon: A Novel Oncogenic Player in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Malik, A., Zaman, N., Sarfaraz, S., Siddiqui, I. A., Syed, D. N. et al (2007). Combined inhibitory effects of green tea polyphenols and selective...not only in prostate cancer but also in several other epithelial cancers including lung , breast, and thyroid cancer8, 13, 20-26. Studies from our...Cvarepsilon is required for non-small cell lung carcinoma growth and regulates the expression of apoptotic genes. Oncogene 31: 2593-2600. 23 Hafeez, B. B

  5. Amplified in Breast Cancer Regulates Transcription and Translation in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra M. Ochnik

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: The oncogenic transcription factor AIB1 has a novel role in the regulation of polyribosome recruitment and formation of the translational complex. Combinatorial therapies targeting IGF signaling and mRNA translation in AIB1 expressing breast cancers may have clinical benefit and warrants further investigation.

  6. Activation of oncogenes by radon progeny and x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The overall goal of this proposal is to study the carcinogenic effect of both high and low LET radiation at the molecular level, utilizing techniques developed in molecular biology, cancer cell biology and radiation biology. The underlying assumption is that malignant transformation of normal cells is a multistep process requiring two or more molecular events in the genomic DNA. We hypothesize that radiation may induce such events in one or more steps of the multistep process. We will use in vitro models of transformation that reproduce the stepwise progression of normal cells toward the transformed phenotype and ask whether radiation can provide the necessary activating function at discrete steps along this path. Our strategy involves transfecting into normal primary cells a variety of cloned oncogenes that are known to supply only some of the functions necessary for full transformation. These partially transformed'' cells will be the targets for irradiation by x-rays and alpha particles. The results will provide the basis for assessing the ability of ionizing radiation to activate oncogenic functions that complement'' the oncogene already present in the transfected cells and produce the fully transformed phenotype. Progress is described. 121 refs.

  7. Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase: Potential Therapeutic Target and Putative Metabolic Oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl K. Zogg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exemplified by cancer cells’ preference for glycolysis, for example, the Warburg effect, altered metabolism in tumorigenesis has emerged as an important aspect of cancer in the past 10–20 years. Whether due to changes in regulatory tumor suppressors/oncogenes or by acting as metabolic oncogenes themselves, enzymes involved in the complex network of metabolic pathways are being studied to understand their role and assess their utility as therapeutic targets. Conversion of glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxypyruvate by the enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH—a rate-limiting step in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine—represents one such mechanism. Forgotten since classic animal studies in the 1980s, the role of PHGDH as a potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene has recently reemerged following publication of two prominent papers near-simultaneously in 2011. Since that time, numerous studies and a host of metabolic explanations have been put forward in an attempt to understand the results observed. In this paper, I review the historic progression of our understanding of the role of PHGDH in cancer from the early work by Snell through its reemergence and rise to prominence, culminating in an assessment of subsequent work and what it means for the future of PHGDH.

  8. Oncogenic Kras initiates leukemia in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit J Sabnis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available How oncogenes modulate the self-renewal properties of cancer-initiating cells is incompletely understood. Activating KRAS and NRAS mutations are among the most common oncogenic lesions detected in human cancer, and occur in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs and leukemias. We investigated the effects of expressing oncogenic Kras(G12D from its endogenous locus on the proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. MPD could be initiated by Kras(G12D expression in a highly restricted population enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, but not in common myeloid progenitors. Kras(G12D HSCs demonstrated a marked in vivo competitive advantage over wild-type cells. Kras(G12D expression also increased the fraction of proliferating HSCs and reduced the overall size of this compartment. Transplanted Kras(G12D HSCs efficiently initiated acute T-lineage leukemia/lymphoma, which was associated with secondary Notch1 mutations in thymocytes. We conclude that MPD-initiating activity is restricted to the HSC compartment in Kras(G12D mice, and that distinct self-renewing populations with cooperating mutations emerge during cancer progression.

  9. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C; Pai, Reetesh K; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A; Rack, Paul G; Neal, James T; Chan, Carol W-M; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D; Plevritis, Sylvia K; Hung, Kenneth E; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P; Kuo, Calvin J

    2014-07-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here we used a single air-liquid interface culture method without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial and mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia as a result of expression of Kras carrying the G12D mutation (Kras(G12D)), p53 loss or both and readily generated adenocarcinoma after in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, Kras(G12D) and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), as compared to the more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor-2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues.

  10. PRG3 induces Ras-dependent oncogenic cooperation in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Eduard; Chen, Daishi; Broggini, Thomas; Sehm, Tina; Majernik, Gökce Hatipoglu; Hock, Stefan W.; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are one of the most devastating cancers in humans. One characteristic hallmark of malignant gliomas is their cellular heterogeneity with frequent genetic lesions and disturbed gene expression levels conferring selective growth advantage. Here, we report on the neuronal-associated growth promoting gene PRG3 executing oncogenic cooperation in gliomas. We have identified perturbed PRG3 levels in human malignant brain tumors displaying either elevated or down-regulated PRG3 levels compared to non-transformed specimens. Further, imbalanced PRG3 levels in gliomas foster Ras-driven oncogenic amplification with increased proliferation and cell migration although angiogenesis was unaffected. Hence, PRG3 interacts with RasGEF1 (RasGRF1/CDC25), undergoes Ras-induced challenges, whereas deletion of the C-terminal domain of PRG3 (PRG3ΔCT) inhibits Ras. Moreover PRG3 silencing makes gliomas resistant to Ras inhibition. In vivo disequilibrated PRG3 gliomas show aggravated proliferation, invasion, and deteriorate clinical outcome. Thus, our data show that the interference with PRG3 homeostasis amplifies oncogenic properties and foster the malignancy potential in gliomas. PMID:27058420

  11. CRAF R391W is a melanoma driver oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Mohammad; Titz, Bjoern; Tsoi, Jennifer; Avramis, Earl; Le, Allison; Ng, Charles; Lomova, Anastasia; Lassen, Amanda; Friedman, Michael; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ribas, Antoni; Graeber, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 75% of melanomas have known driver oncogenic mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNA11 or GNAQ, while the mutations providing constitutive oncogenic signaling in the remaining melanomas are not known. We established a melanoma cell line from a tumor with none of the common driver mutations. This cell line demonstrated a signaling profile similar to BRAF-mutants, but lacked sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. RNA-seq mutation data implicated CRAF R391W as the alternative driver mutation of this melanoma. CRAF R391W was homozygous and over expressed. These melanoma cells were highly sensitive to CRAF, but not BRAF knockdown. In reconstitution experiments, CRAF R391W, but not CRAF WT, transformed NIH3T3 cells in soft-agar colony formation assays, increased kinase activity in vitro, induced MAP kinase signaling and conferred vemurafenib resistance. MAP kinase inducing activity was dependent on CRAF dimerization. Thus, CRAF is a bona fide alternative oncogene for BRAF/NRAS/GNAQ/GNA11 wild type melanomas. PMID:27273450

  12. The lymphoma-associated NPM-ALK oncogene elicits a p16INK4a/pRb-dependent tumor-suppressive pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Paola; Bonetti, Paola; Sironi, Cristina; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Fumagalli, Caterina; Raviele, Paola Rafaniello; Volorio, Sara; Pileri, Stefano; Chiarle, Roberto; McDuff, Fiona Kate Elizabeth; Tusi, Betsabeh Khoramian; Turner, Suzanne D; Inghirami, Giorgio; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Colombo, Emanuela

    2011-06-16

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a barrier for tumor development. Oncogene-dependent DNA damage and activation of the ARF/p53 pathway play a central role in OIS and, accordingly, ARF and p53 are frequently mutated in human cancer. A number of leukemia/lymphoma-initiating oncogenes, however, inhibit ARF/p53 and only infrequently select for ARF or p53 mutations, suggesting the involvement of other tumor-suppressive pathways. We report that NPM-ALK, the initiating oncogene of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs), induces DNA damage and irreversibly arrests the cell cycle of primary fibroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors. This effect is associated with inhibition of p53 and is caused by activation of the p16INK4a/pRb tumor-suppressive pathway. Analysis of NPM-ALK lymphomagenesis in transgenic mice showed p16INK4a-dependent accumulation of senescent cells in premalignant lesions and decreased tumor latency in the absence of p16INK4a. Accordingly, human ALCLs showed no expression of either p16INK4a or pRb. Up-regulation of the histone-demethylase Jmjd3 and de-methylation at the p16INK4a promoter contributed to the effect of NPM-ALK on p16INK4a, which was transcriptionally regulated. These data demonstrate that p16INK4a/pRb may function as an alternative pathway of oncogene-induced senescence, and suggest that the reactivation of p16INK4a expression might be a novel strategy to restore the senescence program in some tumors.

  13. Synonymous codon changes in the oncogenes of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus lead to increased oncogenicity and immunogenicity of the virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Hu, Jiafen; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses use rare codons with respect to the host. The reasons for this are incompletely understood but among the hypotheses is the concept that rare codons result in low protein production and this allows the virus to escape immune surveillance. We changed rare codons in the oncogenes E6 and E7 of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus to make them more mammalian-like and tested the mutant genomes in our in vivo animal model. While the amino acid sequences of the proteins remained unchanged, the oncogenic potential of some of the altered genomes increased dramatically. In addition, increased immunogenicity, as measured by spontaneous regression, was observed as the numbers of codon changes increased. This work suggests that codon usage may modify protein production in ways that influence disease outcome and that evaluation of synonymous codons should be included in the analysis of genetic variants of infectious agents and their association with disease. PMID:23433866

  14. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential......BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...... leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS...

  15. WE-G-204-05: Relative Object Detectability Evaluation of a New High Resolution A-Se Direct Detection System Compared to Indirect Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Nagesh, S Setlur; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States); Scott, C; Karim, K [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the task specific imaging performance of a new 25µm pixel pitch, 1000µm thick amorphous selenium direct detection system with CMOS readout for typical angiographic exposure parameters using the relative object detectability (ROD) metric. Methods: The ROD metric uses a simulated object function weighted at each spatial frequency by the detectors’ detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which is an intrinsic performance metric. For this study, the simulated objects were aluminum spheres of varying diameter (0.05–0.6mm). The weighted object function is then integrated over the full range of detectable frequencies inherent to each detector, and a ratio is taken of the resulting value for two detectors. The DQE for the 25µm detector was obtained from a simulation of a proposed a-Se detector using an exposure of 200µR for a 50keV x-ray beam. This a-Se detector was compared to two microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) detectors [the MAF-CCD with pixel size of 35µm and Nyquist frequency of 14.2 cycles/mm and the MAF-CMOS with pixel size of 75µm and Nyquist frequency of 6.6 cycles/mm] and a standard flat-panel detector (FPD with pixel size of 194µm and Nyquist frequency of 2.5cycles/mm). Results: ROD calculations indicated vastly superior performance by the a-Se detector in imaging small aluminum spheres. For the 50µm diameter sphere, the ROD values for the a-Se detector compared to the MAF-CCD, the MAF-CMOS, and the FPD were 7.3, 9.3 and 58, respectively. Detector performance in the low frequency regime was dictated by each detector’s DQE(0) value. Conclusion: The a-Se with CMOS readout is unique and appears to have distinctive advantages of incomparable high resolution, low noise, no readout lag, and expandable design. The a-Se direct detection system will be a powerful imaging tool in angiography, with potential break-through applications in diagnosis and treatment of neuro-vascular disease. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an

  16. Can plant oncogenes inhibit programmed cell death? The rolB oncogene reduces apoptosis-like symptoms in transformed plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpenchenko, Tatiana Y; Aminin, Dmitry L; Vereshchagina, Yuliya V; Shkryl, Yuri N; Veremeichik, Galina N; Tchernoded, Galina K; Bulgakov, Victor P

    2012-09-01

    The rolB oncogene was previously identified as an important player in ROS metabolism in transformed plant cells. Numerous reports indicate a crucial role for animal oncogenes in apoptotic cell death. Whether plant oncogenes such as rolB can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in transformed plant cells is of particular importance. In this investigation, we used a single-cell assay based on confocal microscopy and fluorescent dyes capable of discriminating between apoptotic and necrotic cells. Our results indicate that the expression of rolB in plant cells was sufficient to decrease the proportion of apoptotic cells in steady-state conditions and diminish the rate of apoptotic cells during induced PCD. These data suggest that plant oncogenes, like animal oncogenes, may be involved in the processes mediating PCD.

  17. Orphan receptor GPR110, an oncogene overexpressed in lung and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channa Namitha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR110 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor--a receptor without a known ligand, a known signaling pathway, or a known function. Despite the lack of information, one can assume that orphan receptors have important biological roles. In a retroviral insertion mutagenesis screen in the mouse, we identified GPR110 as an oncogene. This prompted us to study the potential isoforms that can be gleaned from known GPR110 transcripts, and the expression of these isoforms in normal and transformed human tissues. Methods Various epitope-tagged isoforms of GPR110 were expressed in cell lines and assayed by western blotting to determine cleavage, surface localization, and secretion patterns. GPR110 transcript and protein levels were measured in lung and prostate cancer cell lines and clinical samples, respectively, by quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We found four potential splice variants of GPR110. Of these variants, we confirmed three as being expressed as proteins on the cell surface. Isoform 1 is the canonical form, with a molecular mass of about 100 kD. Isoforms 2 and 3 are truncated products of isoform 1, and are 25 and 23 kD, respectively. These truncated isoforms lack the seven-span transmembrane domain characteristic of GPR proteins and thus are not likely to be membrane anchored; indeed, isoform 2 can be secreted. Compared with the median gene expression of ~200 selected genes, GPR110 expression was low in most tissues. However, it had higher than average gene expression in normal kidney tissue and in prostate tissues originating from older donors. Although identified as an oncogene in murine T lymphomas, GPR110 is greatly overexpressed in human lung and prostate cancers. As detected by immunohistochemistry, GPR110 was overexpressed in 20 of 27 (74% lung adenocarcinoma tissue cores and in 17 of 29 (59% prostate adenocarcinoma tissue cores. Additionally, staining with a GPR110 antibody enabled us to

  18. Small molecule selectively suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, Claire; Lim, Sang Min; Ludka, John; Yazdani, Nahid; Woods, Ashley K; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Zhu, Shoutian

    2017-03-28

    Stauprimide is a staurosporine analog that promotes embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation by inhibiting nuclear localization of the MYC transcription factor NME2, which in turn results in down-regulation of MYC transcription. Given the critical role the oncogene MYC plays in tumor initiation and maintenance, we explored the potential of stauprimide as an anticancer agent. Here we report that stauprimide suppresses MYC transcription in cancer cell lines derived from distinct tissues. Using renal cancer cells, we confirmed that stauprimide inhibits NME2 nuclear localization. Gene expression analysis also confirmed the selective down-regulation of MYC target genes by stauprimide. Consistent with this activity, administration of stauprimide inhibited tumor growth in rodent xenograft models. Our study provides a unique strategy for selectively targeting MYC transcription by pharmacological means as a potential treatment for MYC-dependent tumors.

  19. RUNX1 is required for oncogenic Myb and Myc enhancer activity in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, AHyun; Illendula, Anuradha; Pulikkan, John A; Roderick, Justine E; Tesell, Jessica; Yu, Jun; Hermance, Nicole; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Castilla, Lucio H; Bushweller, John H; Kelliher, Michelle A

    2017-08-08

    The gene encoding the RUNX1 transcription factor is mutated in a subset of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients and RUNX1 mutations are associated with a poor prognosis. These mutations cluster in the DNA binding Runt domain, are thought to represent loss-of-function mutations, indicating that RUNX1 suppresses T cell transformation. RUNX1 has been proposed to have tumor suppressor roles in TLX1/3 transformed human T-ALL cell lines and NOTCH1 T-ALL mouse models. Yet retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens identify RUNX genes as collaborating oncogenes in MYC-driven leukemia mouse models. To elucidate RUNX1 function(s) in leukemogenesis, we generated Tal1/Lmo2/Rosa26-CreER(T2)Runx1(f/f) mice and examined leukemia progression in the presence of vehicle or tamoxifen. We found that Runx1 deletion inhibits mouse leukemic growth in vivo and that RUNX silencing in human T-ALL cells triggers apoptosis. We demonstrate that a small molecule inhibitor, designed to interfere with CBFβ binding to RUNX proteins, impairs the growth of human T-ALL cell lines and primary patient samples. We demonstrate that a RUNX1 deficiency alters the expression of a crucial subset of TAL1- and NOTCH1-regulated genes including the MYB and MYC oncogenes, respectively. These studies provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that RUNX1 has oncogenic roles and reveal RUNX1 as a novel therapeutic target in T-ALL. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  20. The Heterodimeric TWIST1-E12 Complex Drives the Oncogenic Potential of TWIST1 in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Jacqueroud

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The TWIST1 embryonic transcription factor displays biphasic functions during the course of carcinogenesis. It facilitates the escape of cells from oncogene-induced fail-safe programs (senescence, apoptosis and their consequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the initiation of the metastatic spread of cancer cells. Interestingly, cancer cells recurrently remain dependent on TWIST1 for their survival and/or proliferation, making TWIST1 their Achilles’ heel. TWIST1 has been reported to form either homodimeric or heterodimeric complexes mainly in association with the E bHLH class I proteins. These complexes display distinct, sometimes even antagonistic, functions during development and unequal prometastatic functions in prostate cancer cells. Using a tethered dimer strategy, we successively assessed the ability of TWIST1 dimers to cooperate with an activated version of RAS in human mammary epithelial cell transformation, to provide mice with the ability to spontaneously develop breast tumors, and lastly to maintain a senescence program at a latent state in several breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the TWIST1-E12 complex, unlike the homodimer, is an oncogenic form of TWIST1 in mammary epithelial cells and that efficient binding of both partners is a prerequisite for its activity. The detection of the heterodimer in human premalignant lesions by a proximity ligation assay, at a stage preceding the initiation of the metastatic cascade, is coherent with such an oncogenic function. TWIST1-E protein heterodimeric complexes may thus constitute the main active forms of TWIST1 with regard to senescence inhibition over the time course of breast tumorigenesis.

  1. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Brendel

    Full Text Available RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML, generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1 in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16 and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies.

  2. ERBB oncogene proteins as targets for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanovski, O L; Lebedenko, E N; Deyev, S M

    2012-03-01

    General properties of the family of tyrosine kinase ERBB receptors are considered in connection with their role in the generation of cascades of signal transduction in normal and tumor cells. Causes of acquisition of oncogene features by genes encoding these receptors and their role in tumorigenesis are analyzed. Anti-ERBB monoclonal antibodies approved for therapy are described in detail, and mechanisms of their antitumor activity and development of resistance to them are reviewed. The existing and the most promising strategies for creating and using monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives for therapy of cancer are discussed.

  3. MicroRNA 17-92 cluster mediates ETS1 and ETS2-dependent RAS-oncogenic transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Kabbout

    Full Text Available The ETS-family transcription factors Ets1 and Ets2 are evolutionarily conserved effectors of the RAS/ERK signaling pathway, but their function in Ras cellular transformation and biology remains unclear. Taking advantage of Ets1 and Ets2 mouse models to generate Ets1/Ets2 double knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we demonstrate that deletion of both Ets1 and Ets2 was necessary to inhibit HrasG12V induced transformation both in vitro and in vivo. HrasG12V expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts increased ETS1 and ETS2 expression and binding to cis-regulatory elements on the c-Myc proximal promoter, and consequently induced a robust increase in MYC expression. The expression of the oncogenic microRNA 17-92 cluster was increased in HrasG12V transformed cells, but was significantly reduced when ETS1 and ETS2 were absent. MYC and ETS1 or ETS2 collaborated to increase expression of the oncogenic microRNA 17-92 cluster in HrasG12V transformed cells. Enforced expression of exogenous MYC or microRNA 17-92 rescued HrasG12V transformation in Ets1/Ets2-null cells, revealing a direct function for MYC and microRNA 17-92 in ETS1/ETS2-dependent HrasG12V transformation.

  4. HPV positive neuroendocrine cervical cancer cells are dependent on Myc but not E6/E7 viral oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hang; Krawczyk, Ewa; Blancato, Jan; Albanese, Christopher; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Naidong; Paul, Siddartha; Alkhilaiwi, Faris; Palechor-Ceron, Nancy; Dakic, Aleksandra; Fang, Shuang; Choudhary, Sujata; Hou, Tung-Wei; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Haddad, Bassem R.; Usuda, Yukari; Hartmann, Dan; Symer, David; Gillison, Maura; Agarwal, Seema; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Liu, Xuefeng; Schlegel, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Using conditional cell reprogramming, we generated a stable cell culture of an extremely rare and aggressive neuroendocrine cervical cancer. The cultured cells contained HPV-16, formed colonies in soft agar and rapidly produced tumors in immunodeficient mice. The HPV-16 genome was integrated adjacent to the Myc gene, both of which were amplified 40-fold. Analysis of RNA transcripts detected fusion of the HPV/Myc genes, arising from apparent microhomologous recombination. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) and fluorescent-in-situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated coordinate localization and translocation of the amplified Myc and HPV genes on chromosomes 8 and 21. Similar to the primary tumor, tumor cell cultures expressed very high levels of the Myc protein and, in contrast to all other HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines, they harbored a gain-of-function mutation in p53 (R273C). Unexpectedly, viral oncogene knockdown had no effect on the growth of the cells, but it did inhibit the proliferation of a conventional HPV-16 positive cervical cancer cell line. Knockdown of Myc, but not the mutant p53, significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the primary driver of transformation in this aggressive cervical cancer is not HPV oncogene expression but rather the overexpression of Myc. PMID:28378747

  5. HPV positive neuroendocrine cervical cancer cells are dependent on Myc but not E6/E7 viral oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hang; Krawczyk, Ewa; Blancato, Jan; Albanese, Christopher; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Naidong; Paul, Siddartha; Alkhilaiwi, Faris; Palechor-Ceron, Nancy; Dakic, Aleksandra; Fang, Shuang; Choudhary, Sujata; Hou, Tung-Wei; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Haddad, Bassem R; Usuda, Yukari; Hartmann, Dan; Symer, David; Gillison, Maura; Agarwal, Seema; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Liu, Xuefeng; Schlegel, Richard

    2017-04-05

    Using conditional cell reprogramming, we generated a stable cell culture of an extremely rare and aggressive neuroendocrine cervical cancer. The cultured cells contained HPV-16, formed colonies in soft agar and rapidly produced tumors in immunodeficient mice. The HPV-16 genome was integrated adjacent to the Myc gene, both of which were amplified 40-fold. Analysis of RNA transcripts detected fusion of the HPV/Myc genes, arising from apparent microhomologous recombination. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) and fluorescent-in-situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated coordinate localization and translocation of the amplified Myc and HPV genes on chromosomes 8 and 21. Similar to the primary tumor, tumor cell cultures expressed very high levels of the Myc protein and, in contrast to all other HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines, they harbored a gain-of-function mutation in p53 (R273C). Unexpectedly, viral oncogene knockdown had no effect on the growth of the cells, but it did inhibit the proliferation of a conventional HPV-16 positive cervical cancer cell line. Knockdown of Myc, but not the mutant p53, significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the primary driver of transformation in this aggressive cervical cancer is not HPV oncogene expression but rather the overexpression of Myc.

  6. Determination of synthetic lethal interactions in KRAS oncogene-dependent cancer cells reveals novel therapeutic targeting strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Steckel; Julian Downward; David C Hancock; Miriam Molina-Arcas; Britta Weigelt; Michaela Marani; Patricia H Warne; Hanna Kuznetsov; Gavin Kelly; Becky Saunders; Michael Howell

    2012-01-01

    Oneogenic mutations in RAS genes are very common in human cancer,resulting in cells with well-characterized selective advantages,but also less well-understood vulnerabilities.We have carried out a large-scale loss-of-function screen to identify genes that are required by KRAS-transformed colon cancer cells,but not by derivatives lacking this oncogene.Top-scoring genes were then tested in a larger panel of KRAS mutant and wild-type cancer cells.Cancer cells expressing oncogenic KRAS were found to be highly dependent on the transcription factor GATA2 and the DNA replication initiation regulator CDC6.Extending this analysis using a collection of drugs with known targets,we found that cancer cells with mutant KRAS showed selective addiction to proteasome function,as well as synthetic lethality with topoisomerase inhibition.Combination targeting of these functions caused improved killing of KRAS mutant cells relative to wild-type cells.These observations suggest novel targets and new ways of combining existing therapies for optimal effect in RAS mutant cancers,which are traditionally seen as being highly refractory to therapy.

  7. EBV finds a polycomb-mediated, epigenetic solution to the problem of oncogenic stress responses triggered by infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John Allday

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that establish a persistent infection, involving intracellular latency, commonly stimulate cellular DNA synthesis and sometimes cell division early after infection. However, most cells of metazoans have evolved ‘fail-safe’ responses that normally monitor unscheduled DNA synthesis and prevent cell proliferation when, for instance, cell proto-oncogenes are ‘activated’ by mutation, amplification or chromosomal rearrangements. These cell intrinsic defense mechanisms that reduce the risk of neoplasia and cancer are collectively called oncogenic stress responses (OSR. Mechanisms include the activation of tumor suppressor genes and the so-called DNA damage response (DDR that together trigger pathways leading to cell cycle arrest (eg cell senescence or complete elimination of cells (eg apoptosis. It is not surprising that viruses that can induce cellular DNA synthesis and cell division have the capacity to trigger OSR, nor is it surprising that these viruses have evolved countermeasures for inactivating or bypassing OSR. The main focus of this review is how the human tumour-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV manipulates the host polycomb group (PcG protein system to control – by epigenetic repression of transcription – key components of the OSR during the transformation of normal human B cells into permanent cell lines.

  8. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  9. Allele frequencies of variants in ultra conserved elements identify selective pressure on transcription factor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toomas Silla

    Full Text Available Ultra-conserved genes or elements (UCGs/UCEs in the human genome are extreme examples of conservation. We characterized natural variations in 2884 UCEs and UCGs in two distinct populations; Singaporean Chinese (n = 280 and Italian (n = 501 by using a pooled sample, targeted capture, sequencing approach. We identify, with high confidence, in these regions the abundance of rare SNVs (MAF5% are more often found in relatively less-conserved nucleotides within UCEs, compared to rare variants. Moreover, prevalent variants are less likely to overlap transcription factor binding site. Using SNPfold we found no significant influence of RNA secondary structure on UCE conservation. All together, these results suggest UCEs are not under selective pressure as a stretch of DNA but are under differential evolutionary pressure on the single nucleotide level.

  10. Retroviruses hijack chromatin loops to drive oncogene expression and highlight the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian M Pattison

    Full Text Available The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene.

  11. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  12. DriverNet: uncovering the impact of somatic driver mutations on transcriptional networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Ali; Haffari, Gholamreza; Ding, Jiarui; Ha, Gavin; Lui, Kenneth; Rosner, Jamie; Huntsman, David G; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel A; Shah, Sohrab P

    2012-12-22

    Simultaneous interrogation of tumor genomes and transcriptomes is underway in unprecedented global efforts. Yet, despite the essential need to separate driver mutations modulating gene expression networks from transcriptionally inert passenger mutations, robust computational methods to ascertain the impact of individual mutations on transcriptional networks are underdeveloped. We introduce a novel computational framework, DriverNet, to identify likely driver mutations by virtue of their effect on mRNA expression networks. Application to four cancer datasets reveals the prevalence of rare candidate driver mutations associated with disrupted transcriptional networks and a simultaneous modulation of oncogenic and metabolic networks, induced by copy number co-modification of adjacent oncogenic and metabolic drivers. DriverNet is available on Bioconductor or at http://compbio.bccrc.ca/software/drivernet/.

  13. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Jin [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm [Department of Herbal Crop Research, NIHHS, RDA, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Yuseok, E-mail: moon@pnu.edu [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  14. The contrived mutant p53 oncogene – beyond loss of functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaga eSabapathy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in p53 are almost synonymous with cancer - be it susceptibility to the disease or response to treatment - and therefore, are a critical determinant of overall survival. As most of these mutations occur in the DNA-binding domain of p53, many of the clinical correlations with mutant p53 have been initially relegated to the loss of its transcription-dependent activities as a tumor suppressor. However, significant efforts over the last two decades have led to the vast knowledge on the potential functions of the mutated p53 protein, that have been attributed to the physical presence of the mutant protein rather than the loss of its wild-type functions. Beyond the inhibitory effects of mutant p53 on the remaining wild-type protein that leads to the dominant-negative effect in the heterozygous state, mutant p53’s presence has also been significantly attributed to novel gain-of-functions that lead to addiction of cancer cells to its presence for survival, as well as for their ability to invade and metastasize, elevating it to a contrived oncogene that drives the cancer cells forward. This review will summarize the functional consequences of the presence of mutant p53 protein on cellular and organismal physiology.

  15. New strategies in metastatic melanoma: oncogene-defined taxonomy leads to therapeutic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of BRAF and KIT mutations provided the first basis for a molecular classification of cutaneous melanoma on therapeutic grounds. As BRAF-targeted therapy quickly moves toward regulatory approval and incorporation as standard therapy for patients with metastatic disease, proof of concept has also been established for targeting mutated KIT in melanoma. NRAS mutations have long been known to be present in a subset of melanomas and represent an elusive subgroup for targeted therapies. Matching patient subgroups defined by genetic aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p16/cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) pathways with appropriate targeted therapies has not yet been realized. And, an increasing understanding of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators, most notably MITF, and how they may play a role in melanoma pathophysiology, has provided another axis to approach with therapies. The foundation has been established for individual oncogene targeting, and current investigations seek to understand the intersection of these susceptibilities and other described potential targets and pathways. The melanoma field stands poised to take the lead among cancer subtypes in advancing combination therapy strategies that simultaneously target multiple biologic underpinnings of the disease.

  16. Chronic arsenic trioxide exposure leads to enhanced aggressiveness via Met oncogene addiction in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Pirker, Christine; Englinger, Bernhard; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Spitzwieser, Melanie; Mohr, Thomas; Körner, Wilfried; Weinmüllner, Regina; Tav, Koray; Grillari, Johannes; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2016-01-01

    As an environmental poison, arsenic is responsible for many cancer deaths. Paradoxically, arsenic trioxide (ATO) presents also a powerful therapy used to treat refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and is intensively investigated for treatment of other cancer types. Noteworthy, cancer therapy is frequently hampered by drug resistance, which is also often associated with enhancement of tumor aggressiveness. In this study, we analyzed ATO-selected cancer cells (A2780ATO) for the mechanisms underlying their enhanced tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. These cells were characterized by enhanced proliferation and spheroid growth as well as increased tumorigenicity of xenografts in SCID mice. Noteworthy, subsequent studies revealed that overexpression of Met receptor was the underlying oncogenic driver of these effects, as A2780ATO cells were characterized by collateral sensitivity against Met inhibitors. This finding was also confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and whole genome gene expression arrays, which revealed that Met overexpression by chronic ATO exposure was based on the transcriptional regulation via activation of AP-1. Finally, it was shown that treatment with the Met inhibitor crizotinib was also effective against A2780ATO cell xenografts in vivo, indicating that targeting of Met presents a promising strategy for the treatment of Met-overexpressing tumors after either arsenic exposure or failure to ATO treatment. PMID:27036042

  17. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  18. Small Molecules Targeting c-Myc Oncogene: Promising Anti-Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Jia; Wu, Yan-Ling; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor c-Myc is a member of the Myc gene family with multiple functions and located on band q24.1 of chromosome 8. The c-Myc gene is activated by chromosomal translocation, rearrangement, and amplification. Its encoded protein transduces intracellular signals to the nucleus, resulting in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has the ability to transform cells and bind chromosomal DNA. c-Myc also plays a critical role in malignant transformation. The abnormal over-expression of c-Myc is frequently observed in some tumors, including carcinomas of the breast, colon, and cervix, as well as small-cell lung cancer, osteosarcomas, glioblastomas, and myeloid leukemias, therefore making it a possible target for anticancer therapy. In this minireview, we summarize unique characteristics of c-Myc and therapeutic strategies against cancer using small molecules targeting the oncogene, and discuss the prospects in the development of agents targeting c-Myc, in particular G-quadruplexes formed in c-Myc promoter and c-Myc/Max dimerization. Such information will be of importance for the research and development of c-Myc-targeted drugs. PMID:25332683

  19. Oncogenic miR-544 is an important molecular target in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Qiaoming; Guo, Xiaobo; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Rongjuan; Jiang, Jinling; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xuehua; Cai, Qu; Li, Jianfang; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan

    2013-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and promoter hypermethylation are vital epigenetic mechanisms for transcriptional inactivation of tumor suppressor. IRX1 is a newly identified tumor suppressor gene and hypermethylation involves the decreased expression in gastric cancer. However, the microRNA regulatory mechanism on IRX1 expression is still unclear. In this study, we report an IRX1-targeting miRNA-544, which directly targets 3'-UTR of IRX1 gene by luciferase reporter assay. miR-544 suppresses the protein expression of IRX1 gene by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Ectopic expression of miR-544 promotes cell proliferation and cell cycle progression significantly in vitro on gastric cancer cells. The study suggests that miR-544 is an oncogenic microRNA in gastric cancer. Over expression of miR-544 contributes to the inactivation and low-expression of IRX1 in gastric cancer. These findings are helpful for clarifying the molecular mechanisms involved in gastric carcinogenesis and indicate that miR-544 is a key regulator in switching cell cycle on or off. miR-544 may be a potential molecular target in miRNA-based strategy on gastric cancer.

  20. TP53 GENE MUTATIONS – FROM GUARDIAN OF THE GENOME TO ONCOGENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Babović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available TP53 tumor suppressor gene mutations are the most frequent genetic alterations in human cancer affecting a specific gene. The occurrence of TP53 mutations is considerably influenced by cancer-initiating events, such as DNA damage, the aftermath of which is the promotion of cancer development through the loss of anti-proliferative activities, including apoptosis and cellular senescence. Over 27.000 TP53 gene mutations have been discovered and found in more than 50% of human cancers. The most frequent alterations are the point mutations with a single base substitution in gene segment encoding for DNA-binding domaine of p53 molecule, leading to the production of mutant protein that differs from the wild-type protein by one amino acid (missense mutations usually causing the change in tertiary structure of gene product, thus preventing p53 to bind to DNA and activate transcription of target genes. The result of the mutations may also be the proteins with new, abnormal functions, and the ability to modulate expression of genes responsible for neoangiogenesis, resistance to chemotherapeutics and prevention of tumor initiation and promotion. In such circumstances, not only the mutant TP53 loses its tumor suppressive function, but acquires oncogenic potential and becomes an active participant in the neoplastic transformation of the cell.Vast heterogeneity of mutations and methodological approaches in p53 status assessment represent the main difficulties in rapid and effective integration of basic p53 research into clinical practice.

  1. Oncogenic roles of PRL-3 in FLT3-ITD induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Yuen, Hiu Fung; Zhou, Jian Biao; Al-Aidaroos, Abdul Qader O; Guo, Ke; Valk, Peter J; Zhang, Shu Dong; Chng, Wee Joo; Hong, Cheng William; Mills, Ken; Zeng, Qi

    2013-09-01

    FLT3-ITD mutations are prevalent mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). PRL-3, a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. This study investigates the regulation and function of PRL-3 in leukaemia cell lines and AML patients associated with FLT3-ITD mutations. PRL-3 expression is upregulated by the FLT3-STAT5 signalling pathway in leukaemia cells, leading an activation of AP-1 transcription factors via ERK and JNK pathways. PRL-3-depleted AML cells showed a significant decrease in cell growth. Clinically, high PRL-3 mRNA expression was associated with FLT3-ITD mutations in four independent AML datasets with 1158 patients. Multivariable Cox-regression analysis on our Cohort 1 with 221 patients identified PRL-3 as a novel prognostic marker independent of other clinical parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed high PRL-3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with poorer survival among 491 patients with normal karyotype. Targeting PRL-3 reversed the oncogenic effects in FLT3-ITD AML models in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we suggest that PRL-3 could serve as a prognostic marker to predict poorer survival and as a promising novel therapeutic target for AML patients.

  2. HOTTIP and HOXA13 are oncogenes associated with gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuai; Liu, Junsong; Guo, Shaochun; He, Shicai; Qiu, Guanglin; Lu, Jing; Wang, Jin; Fan, Lin; Zhao, Wei; Che, Xiangming

    2016-06-01

    A long non-coding RNA named HOTTIP (HOXA transcript at the distal tip) coordinates the activation of various 5' HOXA genes which encode master regulators of development through targeting the WDR5/MLL complex. HOTTIP acts as an oncogene in several types of cancers, whereas its biological function in gastric cancer has never been studied. In the present study, we investigated the role of HOTTIP in gastric cancer. We found that HOTTIP was upregulated in gastric cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HOTTIP in gastric cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, downregulation of HOTTIP led to decreased expression of homeobox protein Hox-A13 (HOXA13) in gastric cancer cell lines. HOXA13 was involved in HOTTIP‑induced malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer cells. Our data showed that the levels of HOTTIP and HOXA13 were both markedly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with their counterparts in non-tumorous tissues. Furthermore, the expression levels of HOTTIP and HOXA13 were both higher in gastric cancer which was poorly differentiated, at advanced TNM stages and exhibited lymph node-metastasis. Spearman analyses indicated that HOTTIP and HOXA13 had a highly positive correlation both in non-tumor mucosae and cancer lesions. Collectively, these findings suggest that HOTTIP and HOXA13 play important roles in gastric cancer progression and provide a new insight into therapeutic treatment for the disease.

  3. A novel putative tyrosine kinase receptor with oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J W; Schulz, A S; Steenvoorden, A C; Schmidberger, M; Strehl, S; Ambros, P F; Bartram, C R

    1991-11-01

    We have detected transforming activity by a tumorigenicity assay using NIH3T3 cells transfected with DNA from a chronic myeloproliferative disorder patient. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of the corresponding oncogene, designated UFO, in allusion to the as yet unidentified function of its protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 3116bp cDNA clone revealed a 2682-bp-long open reading frame capable of directing the synthesis of a 894 amino acid polypeptide. The predicted UFO protein exhibits characteristic features of a transmembrane receptor with associated tyrosine kinase activity. The UFO proto-oncogene maps to human chromosome 19q13.1 and is transcribed into two 5.0 kb and 3.2 kb mRNAs in human bone marrow and human tumor cell lines. The UFO locus is evolutionarily conserved between vertebrate species. A 4.0 kb mRNA of the murine UFO homolog is expressed in a variety of different mouse tissues. We thus have identified a novel element of the complex signaling network involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  4. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm.

  5. Oncogenic programmes and Notch activity: an 'organized crime'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The inappropriate Notch signalling can influence virtually all aspect of cancer, including tumour-cell growth, survival, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, although it does not do this alone. Hence, elucidating the partners of Notch that are active in cancer is now the focus of much intense research activity. The genetic toolkits available, coupled to the small size and short life of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, makes this an inexpensive and effective animal model, suited to large-scale cancer gene discovery studies. The fly eye is not only a non-vital organ but its stereotyped size and disposition also means it is easy to screen for mutations that cause tumours and metastases and provides ample opportunities to test cancer theories and to unravel unanticipated nexus between Notch and other cancer genes, or to discover unforeseen Notch's partners in cancer. These studies suggest that Notch's oncogenic capacity is brought about not simply by increasing signal strength but through partnerships, whereby oncogenes gain more by cooperating than acting individually, as in a ring 'organized crime'.

  6. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is dependent on oncogenic Kras in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith A Collins

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies, and its prognosis has not improved over the past 40 years. Mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mimic the progression of the human disease are emerging as a new tool to investigate the basic biology of this disease and identify potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe a new model of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma based on pancreas-specific, inducible and reversible expression of an oncogenic form of Kras, together with pancreas-specific expression of a mutant form of the tumor suppressor p53. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to follow individual animals in longitudinal studies, we show that both primary and metastatic lesions depend on continuous Kras activity for their maintenance. However, re-activation of Kras* following prolonged inactivation leads to rapid tumor relapse, raising the concern that Kras*-resistance might eventually be acquired. Thus, our data identifies Kras* as a key oncogene in pancreatic cancer maintenance, but raises the possibility of acquired resistance should Kras inhibitors become available for use in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Microarray screening for target genes of the proto-oncogene PLAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voz, Marianne L; Mathys, Janick; Hensen, Karen; Pendeville, Hélène; Van Valckenborgh, Isabelle; Van Huffel, Christophe; Chavez, Marcela; Van Damme, Boudewijn; De Moor, Bart; Moreau, Yves; Van de Ven, Wim J M

    2004-01-08

    PLAG1 is a proto-oncogene whose ectopic expression can trigger the development of pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands and of lipoblastomas. As PLAG1 is a transcription factor, able to activate transcription through the binding to the consensus sequence GRGGC(N)(6-8)GGG, its ectopic expression presumably results in the deregulation of target genes, leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation. The identification of PLAG1 target genes is therefore a crucial step in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in PLAG1-induced tumorigenesis. To this end, we analysed the changes in gene expression caused by the conditional induction of PLAG1 expression in fetal kidney 293 cell lines. Using oligonucleotide microarray analyses of about 12 000 genes, we consistently identified 47 genes induced and 12 genes repressed by PLAG1. One of the largest classes identified as upregulated PLAG1 targets consists of growth factors such as the insulin-like growth factor II and the cytokine-like factor 1. The in silico search for PLAG1 consensus sequences in the promoter of the upregulated genes reveals that a large proportion of them harbor several copies of the PLAG1-binding motif, suggesting that they represent direct PLAG1 targets. Our approach was complemented by the comparison of the expression profiles of pleomorphic adenomas induced by PLAG1 versus normal salivary glands. Concordance between these two sets of experiments pinpointed 12 genes that were significantly and consistently upregulated in pleomorphic adenomas and in PLAG1-expressing cells, identifying them as putative PLAG1 targets in these tumors.

  8. Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using enzyme-loaded carbon nanotube labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Du, Dan; Chen, Baowei; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-09-07

    Here we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids assay amplified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based labels for the detection of human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) related p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcript. The carboxylated CNTs were functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules and target-specific detection probes (DP) via diimide-activated amidation, and used to label and amplify target hybridization signal. The activity of captured HRP was monitored by square-wave voltammetry measuring the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 2-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide substrate solution. The effect of DP and HRP loading of the CNT-based labels on its signal-to-noise ratio of electrochemical detection was studied systematically for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the signal-amplified assay achieved a detection limit of 83 fM targets oligonuecleotides and a 4-order wide dynamic range of target concentration. The resulting assay allowed a robust discrimination between the perfect match and a three-base mismatch sequence. When subjected to full-length (491 bp) DNA oncogene, the approach demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 33 pg of the target gene. The high sensitivity and specificity of assay enabled PCR-free detection of target transcripts in as little as 65 ng of mRNA extracted from positive ALL cell lines SUP-B15, in comparison to those obtained from negative cell lines HL-60. The approach holds promise for simple, low cost and ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids detection in portable devices, point-of-care and early disease diagnostic applications.

  9. Oncogenic kinase NPM/ALK induces expression of HIF1α mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, M; Liu, X; Wong, W; Yang, Y; Pasha, T; Kantekure, K; Zhang, P; Woetmann, A; Cheng, M; Odum, N; Wasik, M A

    2011-03-17

    The mechanisms of malignant cell transformation mediated by the oncogenic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase remain only partially understood. In this study, we report that T-cell lymphoma (TCL) cells carrying the nucleophosmin (NPM)/ALK fusion protein (ALK+ TCL) strongly express hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF1α) mRNA, even under normoxic conditions, and markedly upregulate HIF1α protein expression under hypoxia. HIF1α expression is strictly dependent on the expression and enzymatic activity of NPM/ALK, as shown in BaF3 cells transfected with wild-type NPM/ALK and kinase-inactive NPM/ALK K210R mutant and by the inhibition of the NPM/ALK function in ALK+ TCL cells by a small-molecule ALK inhibitor. NPM/ALK induces HIF1α expression by upregulating its gene transcription through its key signal transmitter signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which binds to the HIF1α gene promoter as shown by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and is required for HIF1α gene expression as demonstrated by its small interfering RNA-mediated depletion. In turn, depletion of HIF1α increases mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation, cell growth and proliferation and decreases vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis. These results identify a novel cell-transforming property of NPM/ALK, namely its ability to induce the expression of HIF1α, a protein with an important role in carcinogenesis. These results also provide another rationale to therapeutically target NPM/ALK and STAT3 in ALK+ TCL.

  10. Yes-associated protein (YAP modulates oncogenic features and radiation sensitivity in endometrial cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tsujiura

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein (YAP is a transcriptional co-activator and regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. We investigated the clinical and biological significance of YAP in endometrial cancer (EMCA.YAP expression in 150 primary tumor tissues from patients with EMCA was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and its association with clinicopathological data was assessed. The biological functions of YAP were determined in EMCA cell lines through knockdown/overexpression of YAP. The role of YAP in modulating radiation sensitivity was also investigated in EMCA cells.Increased nuclear YAP expression was significantly associated with higher grade, stage, lympho-vascular space invasion, postoperative recurrence/metastasis and overall survival in estrogen mediated EMCA, called type 1 cancer (p = 0.019,  = 0.028,  = 0.0008,  = 0.046 and  = 0.015, respectively. In multivariate analysis, nuclear YAP expression was confirmed as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in type 1 EMCA. YAP knockdown by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.05, anchorage-dependent growth (p = 0.015 and migration/invasion (p<0.05, and a significant increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase (p = 0.002. Conversely, YAP overexpression promoted cell proliferation. Clonogenic assay demonstrated enhanced radiosensitivity by approximately 36% in YAP inhibited cells.Since YAP functions as a transcriptional co-activator, its differential localization in the nucleus of cancer cells and subsequent impact on cell proliferation could have important consequences with respect to its role as an oncogene in EMCA. Nuclear YAP expression could be useful as a prognostic indicator or therapeutic target and predict radiation sensitivity in patients with EMCA.

  11. Regulation of Stat5 by FAK and PAK1 in Oncogenic FLT3- and KIT-Driven Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Chatterjee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations of FLT3 and KIT receptors are associated with poor survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, and currently available drugs are largely ineffective. Although Stat5 has been implicated in regulating several myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, how precisely Stat5 regulates leukemogenesis, including its nuclear translocation to induce gene transcription, is poorly understood. In leukemic cells, we show constitutive activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK whose inhibition represses leukemogenesis. Downstream of FAK, activation of Rac1 is regulated by RacGEF Tiam1, whose inhibition prolongs the survival of leukemic mice. Inhibition of the Rac1 effector PAK1 prolongs the survival of leukemic mice in part by inhibiting the nuclear translocation of Stat5. These results reveal a leukemic pathway involving FAK/Tiam1/Rac1/PAK1 and demonstrate an essential role for these signaling molecules in regulating the nuclear translocation of Stat5 in leukemogenesis.

  12. Crif1 is a novel transcriptional coactivator of STAT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-chul; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Moon, Jin-Sook; Kim, Yoon-Young; Park, Ki Cheol; Kim, Nam-Shik; Kwon, Mi Yi; Kong, Myung-Phil; Yoon, Ki-Jun; Im, Sun-Kyoung; Ghim, Jaewang; Han, Yong-Mahn; Jang, Sung Key; Shong, Minho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2008-02-20

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcriptional factor that performs a broad spectrum of biological functions in response to various stimuli. However, no specific coactivator that regulates the transcriptional activity of STAT3 has been identified. Here we report that CR6-interacting factor 1 (Crif1) is a specific transcriptional coactivator of STAT3, but not of STAT1 or STAT5a. Crif1 interacts with STAT3 and positively regulates its transcriptional activity. Crif1-/- embryos were lethal around embryonic day 6.5, and manifested developmental arrest accompanied with defective proliferation and massive apoptosis. The expression of STAT3 target genes was markedly reduced in a Crif1-/- blastocyst culture and in Oncostatin M-stimulated Crif1-deficient MEFs. Importantly, the key activities of constitutively active STAT3-C, such as transcription, DNA binding, and cellular transformation, were abolished in the Crif1-null MEFs, suggesting the essential role of Crif1 in the transcriptional activity of STAT3. Our results reveal that Crif1 is a novel and essential transcriptional coactivator of STAT3 that modulates its DNA binding ability, and shed light on the regulation of oncogenic STAT3.

  13. Effect of growth hormone and serum on the expression of the proto-oncogenes c-jun and c-fos in insulin producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Elisabeth D.; Billestrup, N; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun was analysed in the insulin producing rat tumor cell line, RIN 5AH. Addition of fetal calf serum (FCS) to serum-starved cells in the presence of cycloheximid induced a modest increase in c-fos and c-jun mRNA levels, whereas growth hormone (GH......RNA levels. These results suggest that the effects of GH on insulin producing cells are not mediated by activation of c-fos and c-jun transcription....

  14. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  15. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Luis Acencio

    Full Text Available Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI. This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved

  16. [Nature of cancer explored from the perspective of the functional evolution of proto-oncogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The products of proto-oncogene play critical roles in the development or maintenance of multicellular societies in animals via strict regulatory systems. When these regulatory systems are disrupted, proto-oncogenes can become oncogenes, and thereby induce cell transformation and carcinogenesis. To understand the molecular basis for development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes during evolution, we screened for ancestral proto-oncogenes from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga ovata (M. ovata) by monitoring their transforming ability in mammalian cells; consequently, we isolated a Pak gene ortholog, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase as a 'primitive oncogene'. We also cloned Pak orthologs from fungi and the multicellular sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis, and compared their regulatory features with that of M. ovata Pak (MoPak). MoPak is constitutively active and induces cell transformation in mammalian cells. In contrast, Pak orthologs from multicellular animals are strictly regulated. Analyses of Pak mutants revealed that structural alterations in the auto-inhibitory domain (AID) are responsible for the enhanced kinase activity and the oncogenic activity of MoPak. Furthermore, we show that Rho family GTPases-mediated regulatory system of Pak kinase is conserved throughout the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals, but the MoPak is more sensitive to the Rho family GTPases-mediated activation than multicellular Pak. These results show that maturation of AID function was required for the development of the strict regulatory system of the Pak proto-oncogene, and support the potential link between the development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes and the evolution of multicellularity. Further analysis of oncogenic functions of proto-oncogene orthologs in the unicellular genes would provide some insights into the mechanisms of the destruction of multicellular society in cancer.

  17. Effect of Neem Leaf Extract (Azadirachta indica on c-MycOncogene Expression in 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells of BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Pei Pei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women both worldwide and in Malaysia. Azadirachta indica (A. Juss, commonly known as neem, is one of the most versatile medicinal plants that has gained worldwide prominence due to its medicinal properties. However, the anticancer effect of ethanolic neem leaf extract against breast cancer has not been documented. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of neem leaf extract on c-Myc oncogene expression in 4T1 breast cancer BALB/c mice.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, A total of 48 female BALB/c mice were divided randomly into four groups of 12 mice per group: i.cancer control (CC treated with 0.5% Tween 20 in PBS, ii. 0.5 μg/mL tamoxifen citrate (CT, iii. 250 mg/kg neem leaf extract (C250, and iv. 500 mg/kg neem leaf extract (C500. In situ reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT-PCR was applied to evaluate suppression of c-Myc oncogene expression in breast cancer tissue.Results: The C500 group showed significant (p<0.05 suppression of c-Myc oncogene expression compared to the CC group.Conclusion: c-Myc was found to be down regulated under the effect of 500 mg/kg ethanolicneem leaf extract.

  18. FOXM1 allows human keratinocytes to bypass the oncogene-induced differentiation checkpoint in response to gain of MYC or loss of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinuevo, R; Freije, A; de Pedro, I; Stoll, S W; Elder, J T; Gandarillas, A

    2017-01-01

    Tumour suppressor p53 or proto-oncogene MYC is frequently altered in squamous carcinomas, but this is insufficient to drive carcinogenesis. We have shown that overactivation of MYC or loss of p53 via DNA damage triggers an anti-oncogenic differentiation-mitosis checkpoint in human epidermal keratinocytes, resulting in impaired cell division and squamous differentiation. Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a transcription factor recently proposed to govern the expression of a set of mitotic genes. Deregulation of FOXM1 occurs in a wide variety of epithelial malignancies. We have ectopically expressed FOXM1 in keratinocytes of the skin after overexpression of MYC or inactivation of endogenous p53. Ectopic FOXM1 rescues the proliferative capacity of MYC- or p53-mutant cells in spite of higher genetic damage and a larger cell size typical of differentiation. As a consequence, differentiation induced by loss of p53 or MYC is converted into increased proliferation and keratinocytes displaying genomic instability are maintained within the proliferative compartment. The results demonstrate that keratinocyte oncogene-induced differentiation is caused by mitosis control and provide new insight into the mechanisms driving malignant progression in squamous cancer. PMID:27452522

  19. Down-regulation of the oncogene PTTG1 via the KLF6 tumor suppressor during induction of myeloid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Chen

    Full Text Available The aberrant expression of proto-oncogenes is involved in processes that are responsible for cellular proliferation and the inhibition of myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Pituitary Tumor-Transforming gene 1 (PTTG1, an oncogenic transcription factor, is abundantly expressed in various human cancers and hematopoietic malignancies. However, its expression in normal leukocytes and most normal tissues is very low or undetectable. The mechanism by which PTTG1 overexpression modifies myeloid cell development and promotes leukemogenesis remain unclear. To investigate the mechanistic links between PTTG1 overexpression and leukemia cell differentiation, we utilized phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a well-known agent that triggers monocyte/macrophage differentiation, to analyze the expression patterns of PTTG1 in PMA-induced myeloid differentiation. We found that PTTG1 is down-regulated at the transcriptional level in PMA-treated HL-60 and THP1 cells. In addition, we identified a binding site for a tumor suppressor protein, Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6, in the PTTG1 promoter. We found that KLF6 could directly bind and repress PTTG1 expression. In HL-60 and THP1 cells, KLF6 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated with a concordant reduction of PTTG1 expression upon treatment with PMA. Furthermore, KLF6 knockdown by shRNA abolished the suppression of PTTG1 and reduced the activation of the differentiation marker CD11b in PMA-primed cells. The protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor and the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK inhibitor significantly blocked the potentiation of PMA-mediated KLF6 induction and the down-regulation of PTTG1, indicating that PTTG1 is suppressed via the activation of PKC/ERK/KLF6 pathway. Our findings suggest that drugs that increase the KLF6 inhibition of PTTG1 may have a therapeutic application in AML treatment strategies.

  20. Comparative RNA-seq analysis in the unsequenced axolotl: the oncogene burst highlights early gene expression in the blastema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Stewart

    Full Text Available The salamander has the remarkable ability to regenerate its limb after amputation. Cells at the site of amputation form a blastema and then proliferate and differentiate to regrow the limb. To better understand this process, we performed deep RNA sequencing of the blastema over a time course in the axolotl, a species whose genome has not been sequenced. Using a novel comparative approach to analyzing RNA-seq data, we characterized the transcriptional dynamics of the regenerating axolotl limb with respect to the human gene set. This approach involved de novo assembly of axolotl transcripts, RNA-seq transcript quantification without a reference genome, and transformation of abundances from axolotl contigs to human genes. We found a prominent burst in oncogene expression during the first day and blastemal/limb bud genes peaking at 7 to 14 days. In addition, we found that limb patterning genes, SALL genes, and genes involved in angiogenesis, wound healing, defense/immunity, and bone development are enriched during blastema formation and development. Finally, we identified a category of genes with no prior literature support for limb regeneration that are candidates for further evaluation based on their expression pattern during the regenerative process.

  1. c-RET molecule in malignant melanoma from oncogenic RET-carrying transgenic mice and human cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Ohshima

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and its incidence worldwide has been increasing at a greater rate than that of any other cancer. We previously reported that constitutively activated RFP-RET-carrying transgenic mice (RET-mice spontaneously develop malignant melanoma. In this study, we showed that expression levels of intrinsic c-Ret, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf and Gdnf receptor alpha 1 (Gfra1 transcripts in malignant melanomas from RET-transgenic mice were significantly upregulated compared with those in benign melanocytic tumors. These results suggest that not only introduced oncogenic RET but also intrinsic c-Ret/Gdnf are involved in murine melanomagenesis in RET-mice. We then showed that c-RET and GDNF transcript expression levels in human malignant melanoma cell lines (HM3KO and MNT-1 were higher than those in primary cultured normal human epithelial melanocytes (NHEM, while GFRa1 transcript expression levels were comparable among NHEM, HM3KO and MNT-1. We next showed c-RET and GFRa1 protein expression in HM3KO cells and GDNF-mediated increased levels of their phosphorylated c-RET tyrosine kinase and signal transduction molecules (ERK and AKT sited potentially downstream of c-RET. Taken together with the finding of augmented proliferation of HM3KO cells after GDNF stimulation, our results suggest that GDNF-mediated c-RET kinase activation is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma.

  2. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  3. MicroRNA-205 downregulates mixed-lineage-AF4 oncogene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Liping Dou,1,* Jingxin Li,1,* Dehua Zheng,2,* Yonghui Li,1 Xiaoning Gao,1 Chengwang Xu,1 Li Gao,1 Lili Wang,1 Li Yu1 1Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MLL-AF4 ALL is a pediatric leukemia that occurs rarely in adults. MLL-AF4 ALL is typically characterized by the presence of chromosomal translocation (t(4;11(q21;q23, leading to expression of MLL-AF4 fusion protein. Although MLL-AF4 fusion protein triggers a molecular pathogenesis and hematological presentations that are unique to leukemias, the precise role of this oncogene in leukemogenesis remains unclear. Previous studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRs might modulate the expression of MLL-AF4 ALL fusion protein, thereby suggesting the involvement of miR in progression or suppression of MLL-AF4 ALL. We have previously demonstrated that miR-205 negatively regulates transcription of an MLL-AF4 luciferase reporter. Here, we report that exogenous expression of miR-205 in MLL-AF4 human cell lines (RS4;11 and MV4-11 inversely regulates the expression of MLL-AF4 at both messenger RNA (mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, miR-205 significantly induced apoptosis in MLL-AF4 cells as evidenced by Annexin V staining using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis. The proliferative capacity of leukemic cells was suppressed by miR-205. The addition of an miR-205 inhibitor was able to restore the observed effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that miR-205 may have potential value as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of MLL-AF4 ALL.Keywords: miR-205, MLL-AF4, leukemia, microRNA, oncogene expression, untranslated regions, proliferation

  4. Functional Analysis of the Proto-oncogenes Septin9 and Nras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Louise Berkhoudt

    regardless of genotype indicating an oncogenic role of SEPT9. Nras is a potent proto-oncogene involved in signaling through a number of proliferative pathways. Earlier detected retroviral integration sites resulting in B-cell lymphomas were used to create Nras knock in models harboring the LTR from...

  5. miR-135b mediates NPM-ALK-driven oncogenicity and renders IL-17-producing immunophenotype to anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Hironori; Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Nishimori, Hikaru; Noguchi, Masaaki; Yao, Takashi; Komatsu, Norio; Mano, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Koichi; Miyazono, Kohei

    2011-12-22

    Many transformed lymphoma cells show immune-phenotypes resembling the corresponding normal lymphocytes; thus, they provide a guide for proper diagnosis and present promising routes to improve their pathophysiologic understanding and to identify novel therapeutic targets. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) of these aberrant immune-phenotypes is largely unknown. Here, we report that microRNA-135b (miR-135b) mediates nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-driven oncogenicity and empowers IL-17-producing immunophenotype in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). NPM-ALK oncogene strongly promoted the expression of miR-135b and its host gene LEMD1 through activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3. In turn, elevated miR-135b targeted FOXO1 in ALCL cells. miR-135b introduction also decreased chemosensitivity in Jurkat cells, suggesting its contribution to oncogenic activities of NPM-ALK. Interestingly, miR-135b suppressed T-helper (Th) 2 master regulators STAT6 and GATA3, and miR-135b blockade attenuated IL-17 production and paracrine inflammatory response by ALCL cells, indicating that miR-135b-mediated Th2 suppression may lead to the skewing to ALCL immunophenotype overlapping with Th17 cells. Furthermore, antisense-based miR-135b inhibition reduced tumor angiogenesis and growth in vivo, demonstrating significance of this "Th17 mimic" pathway as a therapeutic target. These results collectively illuminated unique contribution of oncogenic kinase-linked microRNA to tumorigenesis through modulation of tumor immune-phenotype and microenvironment.

  6. RET oncogene in MEN2, MEN2B, MTC and other forms of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2008-04-01

    Hereditary medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is caused by specific autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. Genotype-phenotype correlations exist that help predict the presence of other associated endocrine neoplasms as well as the timing of thyroid cancer development. MTC represents a promising model for targeted cancer therapy, as the oncogenic event responsible for initiating malignancy has been well characterized. The RET proto-oncogene has become the target for molecularly designed drug therapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting activated RET are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with MTC. This review will provide a brief overview of MTC and the associated RET oncogenic mutations, and will summarize the therapies designed to strategically interfere with the pathologic activation of the RET oncogene.

  7. Transcriptional responses of human epidermal keratinocytes to Oncostatin-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelt, Nika; Gazel, Alix; Gorelick, Steven; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2005-08-21

    Oncostatin-M (OsM) plays an important role in inflammatory and oncogenic processes in skin, including psoriasis and Kaposi sarcoma. However, the molecular responses to OsM in keratinocytes have not been explored in depth. Here we show the results of transcriptional profiling in OsM-treated primary human epidermal keratinocytes, using high-density DNA microarrays. We find that OsM strongly and specifically affects the expression of many genes, in particular those involved with innate immunity, angiogenesis, adhesion, motility, tissue remodeling, cell cycle and transcription. The timing of the responses to OsM comprises two waves, early at 1h, and late at 48 h, with much fewer genes regulated in the intervening time points. Secreted cytokines and growth factors and their receptors, as well as nuclear transcription factors, are primary targets of OsM regulation, and these, in turn, effect the secondary changes.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  9. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  10. Mutations of the KRAS oncogene in endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesława Niklińska

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and clinicopathological significance of KRAS point mutation in endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma. We analysed KRAS in 11 cases of complex atypical hyperplasia and in 49 endometrial carcinomas using polymerase chain reaction associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL. Point mutations at codon 12 of KRAS oncogene were identified in 7 of 49 (14,3% tumor specimens and in 2 of 11 (18,2% hyperplasias. No correlation was found between KRAS gene mutation and age at onset, histology, grade of differentiation and clinical stage. We conclude that KRAS mutation is a relatively common event in endometrial carcinogenesis, but with no prognostic value.

  11. Structural Effects of Oncogenic PI3K alpha Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Gabelli; C Huang; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Physiological activation of PI3K{alpha} is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3K{alpha} result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  12. Use of glycolytic pathways for inhibiting or measuring oncogenic signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Yasuhito; Bissell, Mina

    2017-06-27

    Disclosed are methods in which glucose metabolism is correlated to oncogenesis through certain specific pathways; inhibition of certain enzymes is shown to interfere with oncogenic signaling, and measurement of certain enzyme levels is correlated with patient survival. The present methods comprise measuring level of expression of at least one of the enzymes involved in glucose uptake or metabolism, wherein increased expression of the at least one of the enzymes relative to expression in a normal cell correlates with poor prognosis of disease in a patient. Preferably the genes whose expression level is measured include GLUT3, PFKP, GAPDH, ALDOC, LDHA and GFPT2. Also disclosed are embodiments directed towards downregulating the expression of some genes in glucose uptake and metabolism.

  13. Tumor-derived exosomes in oncogenic reprogramming and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Sarmad N; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, effective communication between cells is a crucial part of cellular and tissue homeostasis. This communication mainly involves direct cell-cell contact as well as the secretion of molecules that bind to receptors at the recipient cells. However, a more recently characterized mode of intercellular communication-the release of membrane vesicles known as exosomes-has been the subject of increasing interest and intensive research over the past decade. Following the discovery of the exosome-mediated immune activation, the pathophysiological roles of exosomes have been recognized in different diseases, including cancer. In this review, we describe the biogenesis and main physical characteristics that define exosomes as a specific population of secreted vesicles, with a special focus on their role in oncogenic transformation and cancer progression.

  14. Structural effects of oncogenic PI3Kα mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L Mario

    2010-01-01

    Physiological activation of PI3Kα is brought about by the release of the inhibition by p85 when the nSH2 binds the phosphorylated tyrosine of activated receptors or their substrates. Oncogenic mutations of PI3Kα result in a constitutively activated enzyme that triggers downstream pathways that increase tumor aggressiveness and survival. Structural information suggests that some mutations also activate the enzyme by releasing p85 inhibition. Other mutations work by different mechanisms. For example, the most common mutation, His1047Arg, causes a conformational change that increases membrane association resulting in greater accessibility to the substrate, an integral membrane component. These effects are examples of the subtle structural changes that result in increased activity. The structures of these and other mutants are providing the basis for the design of isozyme-specific, mutation-specific inhibitors for individualized cancer therapies.

  15. Deciphering hepatocellular responses to metabolic and oncogenic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrina L. Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Each cell type responds uniquely to stress and fractionally contributes to global and tissue-specific stress responses. Hepatocytes, liver macrophages (MΦ, and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC play functionally important and interdependent roles in adaptive processes such as obesity and tumor growth. Although these cell types demonstrate significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, their distinctions enabling disease-specific responses remain understudied. We developed a strategy for the simultaneous isolation and quantification of these liver cell types based on antigenic cell surface marker expression. To demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique, we quantified liver cell-specific responses to high-fat diet (HFD or diethylnitrosamine (DEN, a liver-specific carcinogen, and found that while there was only a marginal increase in hepatocyte number, MΦ and SEC populations were quantitatively increased. Global gene expression profiling of hepatocytes, MΦ and SEC identified characteristic gene signatures that define each cell type in their distinct physiological or pathological states. Integration of hepatic gene signatures with available human obesity and liver cancer microarray data provides further insight into the cell-specific responses to metabolic or oncogenic stress. Our data reveal unique gene expression patterns that serve as molecular “fingerprints” for the cell-centric responses to pathologic stimuli in the distinct microenvironment of the liver. The technical advance highlighted in this study provides an essential resource for assessing hepatic cell-specific contributions to metabolic and oncogenic stress, information that could unveil previously unappreciated molecular mechanisms for the cellular crosstalk that underlies the continuum from metabolic disruption to obesity and ultimately hepatic cancer.

  16. DNA topoisomerases participate in fragility of the oncogene RET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura W Dillon

    Full Text Available Fragile site breakage was previously shown to result in rearrangement of the RET oncogene, resembling the rearrangements found in thyroid cancer. Common fragile sites are specific regions of the genome with a high susceptibility to DNA breakage under conditions that partially inhibit DNA replication, and often coincide with genes deleted, amplified, or rearranged in cancer. While a substantial amount of work has been performed investigating DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint proteins vital for maintaining stability at fragile sites, little is known about the initial events leading to DNA breakage at these sites. The purpose of this study was to investigate these initial events through the detection of aphidicolin (APH-induced DNA breakage within the RET oncogene, in which 144 APH-induced DNA breakpoints were mapped on the nucleotide level in human thyroid cells within intron 11 of RET, the breakpoint cluster region found in patients. These breakpoints were located at or near DNA topoisomerase I and/or II predicted cleavage sites, as well as at DNA secondary structural features recognized and preferentially cleaved by DNA topoisomerases I and II. Co-treatment of thyroid cells with APH and the topoisomerase catalytic inhibitors, betulinic acid and merbarone, significantly decreased APH-induced fragile site breakage within RET intron 11 and within the common fragile site FRA3B. These data demonstrate that DNA topoisomerases I and II are involved in initiating APH-induced common fragile site breakage at RET, and may engage the recognition of DNA secondary structures formed during perturbed DNA replication.

  17. Q-MAF Shape Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Eiriksson, Hrafnkell; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2001-01-01

    This paper address the problems of generating a low dimensional representation of the shape variation present in a set of shapes represented by a number of landmark points. First, we will present alternatives to the featured Least-Squares Procrustes alignment based on the L1-norm and the L...

  18. Pirfenidone exerts antifibrotic effects through inhibition of GLI transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didiasova, Miroslava; Singh, Rajeev; Wilhelm, Jochen; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Wujak, Lukasz; Zakrzewicz, Dariusz; Schaefer, Liliana; Markart, Philipp; Seeger, Werner; Lauth, Matthias; Wygrecka, Malgorzata

    2017-02-01

    Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic drug, recently approved for the treatment of patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Although pirfenidone exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antifibrotic properties, the molecular mechanism underlying its protective effects remains unknown. Here, we link pirfenidone action with the regulation of the profibrotic hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. We demonstrate that pirfenidone selectively destabilizes the glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)2 protein, the primary activator of Hh-mediated gene transcription. Consequently, pirfenidone decreases overall Hh pathway activity in patients with IPF and in patient-derived primary lung fibroblasts and leads to diminished levels of Hh target genes such as GLI1, Hh receptor Patched-1, α-smooth muscle actin, and fibronectin and to reduced cell migration and proliferation. Interestingly, Hh-triggered TGF-β1 expression potentiated Hh responsiveness of primary lung fibroblasts by elevating the available pool of glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI)1/GLI2, thus creating a vicious cycle of amplifying fibrotic processes. Because GLI transcription factors are not only crucial for Hh-mediated changes but are also required as mediators of TGF-β signaling, our findings suggest that pirfenidone exerts its clinically beneficial effects through dual Hh/TGF-β inhibition by targeting the GLI2 protein.-Didiasova, M., Singh, R., Wilhelm, J., Kwapiszewska, G., Wujak, L., Zakrzewicz, D., Schaefer, L., Markart, P., Seeger, W., Lauth, M., Wygrecka, M. Pirfenidone exerts antifibrotic effects through inhibition of GLI transcription factors.

  19. Characterization of a cluster of oncogenic mutations in E6 of a human papillomavirus 83 variant isolated from a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo, Isabelle; Benchetrit, Maxime; Loubatier, Céline; Michel, Gregory; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2011-10-01

    We previously isolated human papillomavirus 83 (HPV83m) from a cervical smear. Sequence analysis of E6 and E7 proteins highlighted five mutations located in the second putative zinc-finger region of E6 (E6m), an important domain for protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Here, we show that E6m of HPV83m can trigger human primary cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth properties, similarly to E6 of HPV16, a high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). Interestingly, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E6 of HPV16, E6m corrupts neither p53 stability nor telomerase activity, but acts as a specific modulator of the transcriptional machinery. By studying E6m reversion mutants, we confirmed the importance of the second zinc-finger domain in triggering the observed upregulation of cell growth and of the transcriptional machinery. Reversion of these mutations in E6m (to yield strain E6r) fully abolished the oncogenic potential of E6m, transforming the phenotype of E6 from a high-risk to a low-risk phenotype. Importantly, our data define the importance of a cluster of mutations in the second zinc finger of E6m in increasing the oncogenic potential of HPV83.

  20. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) treatment downregulates the HPV E6 and E7 oncogene expression and blocks neoplastic growth of HPV-associated cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Maximilian; Ganss, Lennard; Puschhof, Jens; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Guiterrez, Ana; Vinokurova, Svetlana; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2016-07-16

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hr HPVs) may cause various human cancers and associated premalignant lesions. Transformation of the host cells is triggered by overexpression of the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that deregulate the cell cycle and induce chromosomal instability. This process is accompanied by hypermethylation of distinct CpG sites resulting in silencing of tumor suppressor genes, inhibition of the viral E2 mediated control of E6 and E7 transcription as well as deregulated expression of host cell microRNAs. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with demethylating agents might restore those regulatory mechanisms. Here we show that treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) strongly decreases the expression of E6 and E7 in a panel of HPV-transformed cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Reduction of E6 and E7 further resulted in increased target protein levels including p53 and p21 reducing the proliferation rates and colony formation abilities of the treated cell lines. Moreover, DAC treatment led to enhanced expression of tumor the suppressive miRNA-375 that targets and degrades E6 and E7 transcripts. Therefore, we suggest that DAC treatment of HPV-associated cancers and respective precursor lesions may constitute a targeted approach to subvert HPV oncogene functions that deserves testing in clinical trials.

  1. Functional transition of Pak proto-oncogene during early evolution of metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, A; Iwabe, N; Masuda, H; Okada, M

    2010-07-01

    Proto-oncogenes encode signaling molecular switches regulating cellular homeostasis in metazoans, and can be converted to oncogenes by gain-of-function mutations. To address the molecular basis for development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes during evolution, we screened for ancestral proto-oncogenes from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga ovata by monitoring their transforming activities, and isolated a Pak gene ortholog encoding a serine/threonine kinase as a 'primitive oncogene'. We also cloned Pak orthologs from fungi and the multicellular sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis, and compared their regulatory features with that of M. ovata Pak (MoPak). MoPak is constitutively active and induces cell transformation in mammalian fibroblasts, although the Pak orthologs from multicellular animals are strictly regulated. Analyses of Pak mutants revealed that structural alteration of the auto-inhibitory domain (AID) of MoPak confers higher constitutive kinase activity, as well as greater binding ability to Rho family GTPases than the multicellular Paks, and this structural alteration is responsible for cell transformation and disruption of multicellular tissue organization. These results show that maturation of AID function was required for the development of the strict regulatory system of the Pak proto-oncogene, and suggest a potential link between the establishment of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes and metazoan evolution.

  2. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  3. Methylation status of c-fms oncogene in HCC and its relationship with clinical pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Cui; Dong Hua Yang; Xiang Jun Bi; Zi Rong Fan

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONThe mechanism that DNA hypomethylation leads toactivation of oncogene and occurrence of malignantneoplasm is being increasingly recognized byresearchers. Normal DNA methylation playsimportant role in stabilizing the phenotype of cell.DNA methylation status reduction and/or patternalteration are related to activation and abnormallyhigh expression of some oncogenes and cellularmalignancy[1-6]. c-fms oncogene encodes for colonystimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)[7], c-fms/CSF-1R was highly expressed in hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC) tissue, but the mechanismremained obscure[8,9].

  4. Hyaluronan synthase 3 mediated oncogenic action through forming inter-regulation loop with tumor necrosis factor alpha in oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Zih; Fang, Wei-Yu; Huang, Cheng-Chih; Tsai, Sen-Tien; Wang, Yi-Ching; Yang, Chih-Li; Wu, Li-Wha

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a major extracellular matrix component. However, its role and mediation in oral cancer remains elusive. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3), involved in pro-inflammatory short chain HA synthesis, was the predominant synthase in oral cancer cells and tissues. HAS3 overexpression significantly increased oral cancer cell migration, invasion and xenograft tumorigenesis accompanied with the increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1). Conversely, HAS3 depletion abrogated HAS3-mediated stimulation. HAS3 induced oncogenic actions partly through activating EGFR-SRC signaling. HAS3-derived HA release into extracellular milieu enhanced transendothelial monocyte migration and MCP-1 expression, which was attenuated by anti-HAS3 antibodies or a HAS inhibitor, 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU). The NF-κB-binding site III at -1692 to -1682 bp upstream from the transcript 1 start site in HAS3 proximal promoter was the most responsive to TNF-α-stimulated transcription. ChIP-qPCR analysis confirmed the highest NF-κB-p65 enrichment on site III. Increased HAS3 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the overall survival of oral cancer patients. A concomitant increase of TNF-α, a stimulus for HAS3 expression, with HAS3 expression was not only associated with lymph node metastasis but also negated clinical outcome. Together, HAS3 and TNF-α formed an inter-regulation loop to enhance tumorigenesis in oral cancer. PMID:28107185

  5. Genetic variations regulate alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated regions of the mouse glioma-associated oncogene 1, Gli1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaphiropoulos Peter G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is one of the key mechanisms that generate biological diversity. Even though alternative splicing also occurs in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, the understanding of the significance and the regulation of these variations is rather limited. Results We investigated 5' UTR mRNA variants of the mouse Gli1 oncogene, which is the terminal transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway. In addition to identifying novel transcription start sites, we demonstrated that the expression ratio of the Gli1 splice variants in the 5' UTR is regulated by the genotype of the mouse strain analyzed. The GT allele, which contains the consensus intronic dinucleotides at the 5' splice site of intron 1B, favors exon 1B inclusion, while the GC allele, having a weaker 5' splice site sequence, promotes exon 1B skipping. Moreover, the alternative Gli1 5' UTRs had an impact on translational capacity, with the shorter and the exon 1B-skipped mRNA variants being most effective. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel, genome-based mechanisms as regulators of the terminal events in the mouse HH signaling cascade.

  6. Genome-wide association between YAP/TAZ/TEAD and AP-1 at enhancers drives oncogenic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanconato, Francesca; Forcato, Mattia; Battilana, Giusy; Azzolin, Luca; Quaranta, Erika; Bodega, Beatrice; Rosato, Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio; Cordenonsi, Michelangelo; Piccolo, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    YAP/TAZ are nuclear effectors of the Hippo pathway regulating organ growth and tumorigenesis. Yet, their function as transcriptional regulators remains underinvestigated. By ChIP-seq analyses in breast cancer cells, we discovered that the YAP/TAZ transcriptional response is pervasively mediated by a dual element: TEAD factors, through which YAP/TAZ bind to DNA, co-occupying chromatin with activator protein-1 (AP-1, dimer of JUN and FOS proteins) at composite cis-regulatory elements harbouring both TEAD and AP-1 motifs. YAP/TAZ/TEAD and AP-1 form a complex that synergistically activates target genes directly involved in the control of S-phase entry and mitosis. This control occurs almost exclusively from distal enhancers that contact target promoters through chromatin looping. YAP/TAZ-induced oncogenic growth is strongly enhanced by gain of AP-1 and severely blunted by its loss. Conversely, AP-1-promoted skin tumorigenesis is prevented in YAP/TAZ conditional knockout mice. This work highlights a new layer of signalling integration, feeding on YAP/TAZ function at the chromatin level.

  7. HP1a/KDM4A is involved in the autoregulatory loop of the oncogene gene c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Daoyong

    2015-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Jun plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis, and its aberrant expression has been implicated in many cancers. Previous studies have shown that the c-Jun gene is positively autoregulated by its product. Notably, it has also been reported that c-Jun proteins are enriched in its gene body region. However, the role of c-Jun proteins in its gene body region has yet to be uncovered. HP1a is an evolutionarily conserved heterochromatin-associated protein, which plays an essential role in heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing. Interestingly, accumulating evidence shows that HP1a is also localized to euchromatic regions to positively regulate gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanism has not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that HP1a is involved in the positive autoregulatory loop of the Jra gene, the c-Jun homolog in Drosophila. Jra recruits the HP1a/KDM4A complex to its gene body region upon osmotic stress to reduce H3K36 methylation levels and disrupt H3K36 methylation-dependent histone deacetylation, resulting in high levels of histone acetylation in the Jra gene body region, thus promoting gene transcription. These results not only expand our knowledge toward the mechanism of c-Jun regulation, but also reveal the mechanism by which HP1a exerts its positive regulatory function in gene expression.

  8. Oncogenic Nras has bimodal effects on stem cells that sustainably increase competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Bohin, Natacha; Wen, Tiffany; Ng, Victor; Magee, Jeffrey; Chen, Shann-Ching; Shannon, Kevin; Morrison, Sean J

    2013-12-05

    'Pre-leukaemic' mutations are thought to promote clonal expansion of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by increasing self-renewal and competitiveness; however, mutations that increase HSC proliferation tend to reduce competitiveness and self-renewal potential, raising the question of how a mutant HSC can sustainably outcompete wild-type HSCs. Activating mutations in NRAS are prevalent in human myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukaemia. Here we show that a single allele of oncogenic Nras(G12D) increases HSC proliferation but also increases reconstituting and self-renewal potential upon serial transplantation in irradiated mice, all prior to leukaemia initiation. Nras(G12D) also confers long-term self-renewal potential to multipotent progenitors. To explore the mechanism by which Nras(G12D) promotes HSC proliferation and self-renewal, we assessed cell-cycle kinetics using H2B-GFP label retention and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Nras(G12D) had a bimodal effect on HSCs, increasing the frequency with which some HSCs divide and reducing the frequency with which others divide. This mirrored bimodal effects on reconstituting potential, as rarely dividing Nras(G12D) HSCs outcompeted wild-type HSCs, whereas frequently dividing Nras(G12D) HSCs did not. Nras(G12D) caused these effects by promoting STAT5 signalling, inducing different transcriptional responses in different subsets of HSCs. One signal can therefore increase HSC proliferation, competitiveness and self-renewal through bimodal effects on HSC gene expression, cycling and reconstituting potential.

  9. Folic acid mediates activation of the pro-oncogene STAT3 via the Folate Receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mariann F; Greibe, Eva; Skovbjerg, Signe; Rohde, Sarah; Kristensen, Anders C M; Jensen, Trine R; Stentoft, Charlotte; Kjær, Karina H; Kronborg, Camilla S; Martensen, Pia M

    2015-07-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a well-described pro-oncogene found constitutively activated in several cancer types. Folates are B vitamins that, when taken up by cells through the Reduced Folate Carrier (RFC), are essential for normal cell growth and replication. Many cancer cells overexpress a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Folate Receptor α (FRα). The function of FRα in cancer cells is still poorly described, and it has been suggested that transport of folate is not its primary function in these cells. We show here that folic acid and folinic acid can activate STAT3 through FRα in a Janus Kinase (JAK)-dependent manner, and we demonstrate that gp130 functions as a transducing receptor for this signalling. Moreover, folic acid can promote dose dependent cell proliferation in FRα-positive HeLa cells, but not in FRα-negative HEK293 cells. After folic acid treatment of HeLa cells, up-regulation of the STAT3 responsive genes Cyclin A2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) were verified by qRT-PCR. The identification of this FRα-STAT3 signal transduction pathway activated by folic and folinic acid contributes to the understanding of the involvement of folic acid in preventing neural tube defects as well as in tumour growth. Previously, the role of folates in these diseases has been attributed to their roles as one-carbon unit donors following endocytosis into the cell. Our finding that folic acid can activate STAT3 via FRα adds complexity to the established roles of B9 vitamins in cancer and neural tube defects.

  10. Activating mutation in MET oncogene in familial colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schildkraut Joellen M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is 5%, and it is the second leading cause of death from cancer. The presence of family history is a well established risk factor with 25-35% of CRCs attributable to inherited and/or familial factors. The highly penetrant inherited colon cancer syndromes account for approximately 5%, leaving greater than 20% without clear genetic definition. Familial colorectal cancer has been linked to chromosome 7q31 by multiple affected relative pair studies. The MET proto-oncogene which resides in this chromosomal region is considered a candidate for genetic susceptibility. Methods MET exons were amplified by PCR from germline DNA of 148 affected sibling pairs with colorectal cancer. Amplicons with altered sequence were detected with high-resolution melt-curve analysis using a LightScanner (Idaho Technologies. Samples demonstrating alternative melt curves were sequenced. A TaqMan assay for the specific c.2975C >T change was used to confirm this mutation in a cohort of 299 colorectal cancer cases and to look for allelic amplification in tumors. Results Here we report a germline non-synonymous change in the MET proto-oncogene at amino acid position T992I (also reported as MET p.T1010I in 5.2% of a cohort of sibling pairs affected with CRC. This genetic variant was then confirmed in a second cohort of individuals diagnosed with CRC and having a first degree relative with CRC at prevalence of 4.1%. This mutation has been reported in cancer cells of multiple origins, including 2.5% of colon cancers, and in Conclusions Although the MET p.T992I genetic mutation is commonly found in somatic colorectal cancer tissues, this is the first report also implicating this MET genetic mutation as a germline inherited risk factor for familial colorectal cancer. Future studies on the cancer risks associated with this mutation and the prevalence in different at-risk populations will

  11. A systems biological approach to identify key transcription factors and their genomic neighborhoods in human sarcomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti Ylip(a)(a); Olli Yli-Harja; Wei Zhang; Matti Nykter

    2011-01-01

    Identification of genetic signatures is the main objective for many computational oncology studies. The signature usually consists of numerous genes that are differentially expressed between two clinically distinct groups of samples, such as tumor subtypes. Prospectively, many signatures have been found to generalize poorly to other datasets and, thus, have rarely been accepted into clinical use. Recognizing the limited success of traditionally generated signatures, we developed a systems biology-based framework for robust identification of key transcription factors and their genomic regulatory neighborhoods. Application of the framework to study the differences between gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS) resulted in the identification of nine transcription factors (SRF, NKX2-5, CCDC6, LEF1, VDR, ZNF250, TRIM63, MAF, and MYC). Functional annotations of the obtained neighborhoods identified the biological processes which the key transcription factors regulate differently between the tumor types. Analyzing the differences in the expression patterns using our approach resulted in a more robust genetic signature and more biological insight into the diseases compared to a traditional genetic signature.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  13. Tead and AP1 Coordinate Transcription and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangfan; Li, Huapeng; Rajurkar, Mihir; Li, Qi; Cotton, Jennifer L; Ou, Jianhong; Zhu, Lihua J; Goel, Hira L; Mercurio, Arthur M; Park, Joo-Seop; Davis, Roger J; Mao, Junhao

    2016-02-09

    The Tead family transcription factors are the major intracellular mediators of the Hippo-Yap pathway. Despite the importance of Hippo signaling in tumorigenesis, Tead-dependent downstream oncogenic programs and target genes in cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize Tead4-mediated transcriptional networks in a diverse range of cancer cells, including neuroblastoma, colorectal, lung, and endometrial carcinomas. By intersecting genome-wide chromatin occupancy analyses of Tead4, JunD, and Fra1/2, we find that Tead4 cooperates with AP1 transcription factors to coordinate target gene transcription. We find that Tead-AP1 interaction is JNK independent but engages the SRC1-3 co-activators to promote downstream transcription. Furthermore, we show that Tead-AP1 cooperation regulates the activity of the Dock-Rac/CDC42 module and drives the expression of a unique core set of target genes, thereby directing cell migration and invasion. Together, our data unveil a critical regulatory mechanism underlying Tead- and AP1-controlled transcriptional and functional outputs in cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tead and AP1 Coordinate Transcription and Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfan Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Tead family transcription factors are the major intracellular mediators of the Hippo-Yap pathway. Despite the importance of Hippo signaling in tumorigenesis, Tead-dependent downstream oncogenic programs and target genes in cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize Tead4-mediated transcriptional networks in a diverse range of cancer cells, including neuroblastoma, colorectal, lung, and endometrial carcinomas. By intersecting genome-wide chromatin occupancy analyses of Tead4, JunD, and Fra1/2, we find that Tead4 cooperates with AP1 transcription factors to coordinate target gene transcription. We find that Tead-AP1 interaction is JNK independent but engages the SRC1–3 co-activators to promote downstream transcription. Furthermore, we show that Tead-AP1 cooperation regulates the activity of the Dock-Rac/CDC42 module and drives the expression of a unique core set of target genes, thereby directing cell migration and invasion. Together, our data unveil a critical regulatory mechanism underlying Tead- and AP1-controlled transcriptional and functional outputs in cancer cells.

  15. 3-(2-Chloropropyl amide)-4-methoxy-N-phenylbenzamide inhibits expression of HPV oncogenes in human cervical cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Li, Yanping; Lu, Qiaoni; Ma, Linlin; Wang, Huiqiang; Jiang, Jiandong; Li, Zhuorong; Li, Yuhuan

    2017-07-28

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the primary causative agents for cervical cancer, and HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 are known to be the main reason for the onset and maintenance of the malignancies. Therefore, inhibition of viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins expression represents a viable strategy to cervical cancer therapies. This study is to evaluate the antiviral effect of a novel N-Phenylbenzamide derivative, 3-(2-Chloropropyl amide)-4-methoxy-N-phenylbenzamide (L17), against HPV16 in vitro and identify its associated mechanism of action in cervical cancer cells. The cytotoxic effect of L17 was assessed by MTT assay. The mRNA and protein levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. p53 and Rb protein levels were also detected by Western blot. The effect of L17 on cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. The cytotoxic effect of L17 was greater in cervical carcinoma cells than in normal cells. L17 significantly reduced the expression of HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNA and protein, at least partly by enhancing degradation of HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNA. Moreover, reduced expression of E6 and E7 induced by L17 resulted in the up-regulation of p53 and Rb expression, which subsequently induced CaSki cells arrest at G0/G1 phase. L17 has antiviral activity through suppressing E6 and E7 oncogene expression and could inhibit CaSki cell proliferating by inducing cells arrest at G0/G1 phase at nontoxic concentration, implying that L17 might be exploited as a candidate agent for HPV-associated cervical cancer prevention and treatment.

  16. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  17. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  18. Re-Configuration of Sphingolipid Metabolism by Oncogenic Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S. Don

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The sphingolipids are one of the major lipid families in eukaryotes, incorporating a diverse array of structural variants that exert a powerful influence over cell fate and physiology. Increased expression of sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1, which catalyses the synthesis of the pro-survival, pro-angiogenic metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, is well established as a hallmark of multiple cancers. Metabolic alterations that reduce levels of the pro-apoptotic lipid ceramide, particularly its glucosylation by glucosylceramide synthase (GCS, have frequently been associated with cancer drug resistance. However, the simple notion that the balance between ceramide and S1P, often referred to as the sphingolipid rheostat, dictates cell survival contrasts with recent studies showing that highly potent and selective SPHK1 inhibitors do not affect cancer cell proliferation or survival, and studies demonstrating higher ceramide levels in some metastatic cancers. Recent reports have implicated other sphingolipid metabolic enzymes such as acid sphingomyelinase (ASM more strongly in cancer pathogenesis, and highlight lysosomal sphingolipid metabolism as a possible weak point for therapeutic targeting in cancer. This review describes the evidence implicating different sphingolipid metabolic enzymes and their products in cancer pathogenesis, and suggests how newer systems-level approaches may improve our overall understanding of how oncogenic transformation reconfigures sphingolipid metabolism.

  19. RECQL4 helicase has oncogenic potential in sporadic breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Abdel-Fatah, Tarek Ma; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Moseley, Paul; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ball, Graham; Rakha, Emad A; Chan, Stephen Yt; Ellis, Ian O; Wang, Lisa L; Zhao, Yongliang; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2016-03-01

    RECQL4 helicase is a molecular motor that unwinds DNA, a process essential during DNA replication and DNA repair. Germ-line mutations in RECQL4 cause type II Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), characterized by a premature ageing phenotype and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is widely considered to be a tumour suppressor, although its role in human breast cancer is largely unknown. As the RECQL4 gene is localized to chromosome 8q24, a site frequently amplified in sporadic breast cancers, we hypothesized that it may play an oncogenic role in breast tumourigenesis. To address this, we analysed large cohorts for gene copy number changes (n = 1977), mRNA expression (n = 1977) and protein level (n = 1902). Breast cancer incidence was also explored in 58 patients with type II RTS. DNA replication dynamics and chemosensitivity was evaluated in RECQL4-depleted breast cancer cells in vitro. Amplification or gain in gene copy number (30.6%), high-level mRNA expression (51%) and high levels of protein (23%) significantly associated with aggressive tumour behaviour, including lymph node positivity, larger tumour size, HER2 overexpression, ER-negativity, triple-negative phenotypes and poor survival. RECQL4 depletion impaired the DNA replication rate and increased chemosensitivity in cultured breast cancer cells. Thus, although recognized as a 'safe guardian of the genome', our data provide compelling evidence that RECQL4 is tumour promoting in established breast cancers. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gallium-68: chemistry and radiolabeled peptides exploring different oncogenic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgat, Clément; Hindié, Elif; Mishra, Anil K; Allard, Michèle; Fernandez, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Early and specific tumor detection and also therapy selection and response evaluation are some challenges of personalized medicine. This calls for high sensitive and specific molecular imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET). The use of peptides for PET molecular imaging has undeniable advantages: possibility of targeting through peptide-receptor interaction, small size and low-molecular weight conferring good penetration in the tissue or at cellular level, low toxicity, no antigenicity, and possibility of wide choice for radiolabeling. Among β(+)-emitter radioelements, Gallium-68 is a very attractive positron-emitter compared with carbon-11 or fluorine-18 taking into account its easy production via a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and well established radiochemistry. Gallium-68 chemistry is based on well-defined coordination complexes with macrocycle or chelates having strong binding properties, particularly suitable for linking peptides that allow resistance to in vivo transchelation of the metal ion. Understanding specific and nonspecific molecular mechanisms involved in oncogenesis is one major key to develop new molecular imaging tools. The present review focuses on peptide signaling involved in different oncogenic pathways. This peptide signalization might be common for tumoral and non-tumoral processes or could be specific of an oncological process. This review describes gallium chemistry and different (68)Ga-radiolabeled peptides already in use or under development aiming at developing molecular PET imaging of different oncological processes.

  1. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  2. Improved contrast and spatial resolution with Single Photon Counting (SPC) for an area x-ray imager, the newly developed high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2009-12-31

    Although in radiological imaging, the prevailing mode of acquisition is the integration of the energy deposited by all x-rays absorbed in the imaging detector, much improvement in image spatial and contrast resolution could be achieved if each individual x-ray photon were detected and counted separately. In this work we compare the conventional energy integration (EI) mode with the new single photon counting (SPC) mode for a recently developed high-resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) detector, which is uniquely capable of both modes of operation. The MAF has 1024×1024 pixels of 35 microns effective size and is capable of real-time imaging at 30 fps. The large variable gain of its light image intensifier (LII) provides quantum limited operation with essentially no additive instrumentation noise and enables the MAF to operate in both EI and the very sensitive low-exposure SPC modes. We used high LII gain with very low exposure (SPC mode and higher exposure per frame with lower gain for EI mode. Multiple signal-thresholded frames were summed in SPC mode to provide an integrated frame with the same total exposure as EI mode. A heavily K-edge filtered x-ray beam (average energy of 31 keV) was used to provide a nearly monochromatic spectrum. The MTF measured using a standard slit method showed a dramatic improvement for the SPC mode over the EI mode at all frequencies. Images of a line pair phantom also showed improved spatial resolution with 12 lp/mm visible in SPC mode compared to only 8 lp/mm in EI mode. In SPC mode, images of human distal and middle phalanges showed the trabecular structures of the bone with far better contrast and detail. These improvements with the SPC mode should be advantageous for clinical applications where high resolution and/or high contrast are essential such as in mammography and extremity imaging as well as for dual modality applications, which combine nuclear medicine and x-ray imaging using a single detector.

  3. Oncogenic and tumor-promoting Spermatophytes and Pteridophytes and their active principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, N R; Bingel, A S; Fong, H H; Saleh, A A; Christenson, G M; Saufferer, S M

    1976-08-01

    A survey and discussion are presented of plants classified as Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta, extracts of which have been shown to be oncogenic or tumor-promoting in animals. The active oncogenic and tumor-promoting principles, where known, have been identified. They represent tannins; pyrrolizidine, indole, tropolone, quinoline, purine, and benzophenanthridine alkaloids; nitroso compounds; triterpene glycosides; lignans; isoflavans; allyl benzenoids; simple (nu-pyrenes; and carbocyclic hydroxy acids. A total of 28 compounds of known structure have been identified as oncogens and several phorbol esters as tumor-promoters. Plants known to contain any of the 28 oncogens (excluding shikimic acid and caffeine) have been tabulated; they represent at least 454 species, 110 genera, and 34 families of Spermatophyta and Pteridophyta.

  4. Alterations in metastatic properties of hepatocellular carcinoma cell following H-ras oncogene transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wang; Zhi Ying Lin; Xiao Li Feng

    2001-01-01

    AIM To demonstrate the relationship betweenH-ras oncogene and hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) metastasis.METHODS Activated H-ras oncogene wastransfected into SMMC 7721, a cell line derivedfrom human HCC, by calcium phosphatetransfection method. Some metastasis-relatedparameters were detected in vitro, includingadhesion assay, migration assay, expression ofcollagenase ⅣV (c ⅣV ase) and epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR).RESULTS The abilities of H-ras-transfected cellclones in adhesion to laminin (LN) or fibronectin(FN), migration, c Ⅳ ase secretion increasedmarkedly, and the expression of EGFR elevatedmoderately. More importantly, these alterationswere consistent positively with the expressionof p21, the protein product of H-ras oncogene.CONCLUSION H-ras oncogene could inducethe metastatic phenotype of HCC cell in vitro toraise its metastatic potential.

  5. Analysis of acquired resistance to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) in oncogene transfected SHOK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Watanabe, Masami

    1998-02-01

    SHOK (Syrian hamster Osaka-Kanazawa) cells were transfected with activated oncogenes (v-mos, c-myc, N-ras, H-ras, K-ras). These oncogene transfected cells were treated with {sup 195m}Pt-cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP). Clonogenic cell survival assay showed that oncogene-transfected cells exhibited a 1.3-4.8 fold increases resistance to cisplatin compared to the parental SHOK cells. The CDDP concentration binding to DNA, RNA and protein were measured by counting the {sup 195m}Pt-radioactivity. The CDDP uptake was decreased in these oncogene transfected cells. The CDDP uptake in DNA of H-ras transfected cells decreased faster than control SHOK cells. (author)

  6. A germline RET proto-oncogene mutation in multiple members of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Makia Marafie

    2016-09-17

    Sep 17, 2016 ... multiple members of an Arab family with variable onset of MEN type ... fashion and caused by germline mutation in RET proto- oncogene. The main .... ing sudden severe high blood pressure crises that required immediate ...

  7. Transcription in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  8. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Novel Oncogenes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread recurrent copy number alterations are observed across the majority of human cancers, yet the specific targets of such amplified or deleted regions remain undefined. Here, the CTD2 Center at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute took a systematic approach using cDNA overexpression screening to identify and validate oncogenes residing in such amplified regions. In representative examples, these experiments have identified the adaptor proteins CRKL, GAB2, FRS2 and the TLOC and SKIL proteins as novel amplified oncogenes.

  9. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  10. Genetic disruption of oncogenic Kras sensitizes lung cancer cells to Fas receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Haiwei; Moore, Jill; Malonia, Sunil K; Li, Yingxiang; Ozata, Deniz M; Hough, Soren; Song, Chun-Qing; Smith, Jordan L; Fischer, Andrew; Weng, Zhiping; Green, Michael R; Xue, Wen

    2017-04-04

    Genetic lesions that activate KRAS account for ∼30% of the 1.6 million annual cases of lung cancer. Despite clinical need, KRAS is still undruggable using traditional small-molecule drugs/inhibitors. When oncogenic Kras is suppressed by RNA interference, tumors initially regress but eventually recur and proliferate despite suppression of Kras Here, we show that tumor cells can survive knockout of oncogenic Kras, indicating the existence of Kras-independent survival pathways. Thus, even if clinical KRAS inhibitors were available, resistance would remain an obstacle to treatment. Kras-independent cancer cells exhibit decreased colony formation in vitro but retain the ability to form tumors in mice. Comparing the transcriptomes of oncogenic Kras cells and Kras knockout cells, we identified 603 genes that were specifically up-regulated in Kras knockout cells, including the Fas gene, which encodes a cell surface death receptor involved in physiological regulation of apoptosis. Antibodies recognizing Fas receptor efficiently induced apoptosis of Kras knockout cells but not oncogenic Kras-expressing cells. Increased Fas expression in Kras knockout cells was attributed to decreased association of repressive epigenetic marks at the Fas promoter. Concordant with this observation, treating oncogenic Kras cells with histone deacetylase inhibitor and Fas-activating antibody efficiently induced apoptosis, thus bypassing the need to inhibit Kras. Our results suggest that activation of Fas could be exploited as an Achilles' heel in tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras.

  11. [Oncogenes RET/PTC and mechanisms of their involvement in thyroid cancerogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboĭnyk, L H

    2009-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinomas are the most common type of thyroid oncopathology, and are rather often associated with the expression of RET/PTC oncogens. The first oncogen RET/PTC1 was isolated more than 20 years ago. Now 13 different forms of RET/PTC are known, and 12 different partner-genes are described, that could be involved in formation of RET/PTC oncogenes. The most common of them are RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 forms. The great majority of oncogens RET/PTC, except for two--ELKS-RET and HOOK3-RET, have been founded in radioaction-induced thyroid tumors. There is an opinion that the key role in development of papillary thyroid carcinomas belongs to RET/PTC oncogens. The data about different types of RET/PTC oncogens, factors, that lead to their formation have been described in the present review. Also different mechanisms of activation of transduction pathways and gene's expression in thyroid cells after RET/PTC induction have been presented.

  12. Critical role of glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 in maintaining invasive and mesenchymal-like properties of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunarta, I Ketut; Li, Rong; Nakazato, Ryota; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Boldbaatar, Jambaldorj; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Katsuji

    2017-08-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer. This aggressiveness appears to be due to the cancer cells' ability to reversibly switch between phenotypes with non-invasive and invasive potential, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is known to play a central role in this process. The transcription factor glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) is a component of the canonical and noncanonical sonic hedgehog pathways. Although GLI1 has been suggested to be involved in melanoma progression, its precise role and the mechanism underlying invasion remain unclear. Here we investigated whether and how GLI1 is involved in the invasive ability of melanoma cells. Gli1 knockdown (KD) melanoma cell lines, established by using Gli1-targeting lentiviral short hairpin RNA, exhibited a markedly reduced invasion ability, but their MITF expression and activity were the same as controls. Gli1 KD melanoma cells also led to less lung metastasis in mice compared with control melanoma cells. Furthermore, the Gli1 KD melanoma cells underwent a mesenchymal-to-epithelial-like transition, accompanied by downregulation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TF) Snail1, Zeb1 and Twist1, but not Snail2 or Zeb2. Collectively, these results indicate that GLI1 is important for maintaining the invasive and mesenchymal-like properties of melanoma cells independent of MITF, most likely by modulating a subset of EMT-TF. Our findings provide new insight into how heterogeneity and plasticity are achieved and regulated in melanoma. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by lentiviral-vector mediated shRNA targeting the common promoter of HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Baohua; Peng, Chanjuan; Wang, Fenfen; Fu, Zhiqin; Zhou, Caiyun; Hong, Die; Ye, Feng; Lü, Weiguo; Xie, Xing

    2013-05-01

    Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA) or double-stranded RNAs can knock down target genes effectively through siRNA-induced transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). Here, we established lentiviral-vector mediated shRNA (LV-shRNA) targeting common promoter of HPV16 E6/E7 and targeting E6 transcript, transduced the lentiviral construct into cervical HPV16-positive cell lines Siha and Caski, then selected and established stably transduced monoclonal cell lines. The results showed that LV-shRNA targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 transcript, effectively knocked down E6 and E7 expression, resulted in accumulation of p53 and pRB protein and decrease of MCM7 and p16 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation and invasiveness of cervical cancers cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously those monoclonal cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth, as well as prolonged survival time of mice incubated by cells with LV-shRNA targeting promoter and E6 transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of LV-shRNA targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Daxx of apoptotic pathway and transcriptional regulation in cell%细胞凋亡通路及转录调控中的Daxx

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏波; 万艳平; 廖端芳

    2005-01-01

    Daxx is found in the nucleus where it localizes to PML oncogenic domains (PODs). Its multiple domains can interact proteins involved in transcriptional regulation and apoptotic signal transduction. In addition, Daxx is associated with viral infection,tumorigenesis and embryonic development.

  15. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Vishwamitra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase–expressing (NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5(p23;q35 that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  16. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  17. CXCR4 in breast cancer: oncogenic role and therapeutic targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chao Xu,1,* Hong Zhao,1,* Haitao Chen,1 Qinghua Yao2,3 1First Clinical College of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, 2Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 3Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chemokines are 8–12 kDa peptides that function as chemoattractant cytokines and are involved in cell activation, differentiation, and trafficking. Chemokines bind to specific G-protein-coupled seven-span transmembrane receptors. Chemokines play a fundamental role in the regulation of a variety of cellular, physiological, and developmental processes. Their aberrant expression can lead to a variety of human diseases including cancer. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4, also known as fusin or CD184, is an alpha-chemokine receptor specific for stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1 also called CXCL12. CXCR4 belongs to the superfamily of the seven transmembrane domain heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors and is functionally expressed on the cell surface of various types of cancer cells. CXCR4 also plays a role in the cell proliferation and migration of these cells. Recently, CXCR4 has been reported to play an important role in cell survival, proliferation, migration, as well as metastasis of several cancers including breast cancer. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role and potential drugs that target CXCR4 in breast cancer. Additionally, CXCR4 proangiogenic molecular mechanisms will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding affinity and activation of CXCR4/CXCL12 complex make CXCR4 a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, CXCR4, drug target, chemokine, angiogenesis

  18. NF2 Loss Promotes Oncogenic RAS-Induced Thyroid Cancers via YAP-Dependent Transactivation of RAS Proteins and Sensitizes Them to MEK Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C; Untch, Brian R; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A

    2015-11-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation is insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacologic disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. Intensification of mutant RAS signaling through copy-number imbalances is commonly associated with transformation. We show that NF2/merlin inactivation augments mutant RAS signaling by promoting YAP/TEAD-driven transcription of oncogenic and wild-type RAS, resulting in greater MAPK output and increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. TEAD1/4 exerts oncogenic role and is negatively regulated by miR-4269 in gastric tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Huang, T; Zhang, J; Wong, C C; Zhang, B; Dong, Y; Wu, F; Tong, J H M; Wu, W K K; Cheng, A S L; Yu, J; Kang, W; To, K F

    2017-07-31

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are key components of the Hippo-YAP1 signaling pathway, but their functional role and regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to comprehensively explore the expression pattern and functional role of TEAD family in gastric carcinogenesis and investigate its regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs). The mRNA and protein expression of TEAD family were examined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Their functional roles were determined by in vitro and in vivo studies. The clinicopathological association of TEAD4 in gastric cancer (GC) was studied using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray. The prediction of miRNAs, which potentially target TEAD1/4, was performed by TargetScan and miRDB. The regulation of TEAD1/4 by miRNAs was confirmed by qRT-PCR, western blot and luciferase assays. TEAD1/4 were overexpressed in GC cell lines and primary GC tissues. Knockdown of TEAD1/4 induced a significant anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. TEAD1 was confirmed to be a direct target of miR-377-3p and miR-4269, while TEAD4 was negatively regulated by miR-1343-3p and miR-4269. Among them, miR-4269 was the most effective inhibitor of TEAD1/4. Ectopic expression of these miRNAs substantiated their tumor-suppressive effects. In primary GC tumors, downregulation of miR-4269 was associated with poor disease-specific survival and showed a negative correlation with TEAD4. TEAD1 and TEAD4 are oncogenic factors, whose aberrant activation are, in part, mediated by the silence of miR-377-3p, miR-1343-3p and miR-4269. For the first time, the nuclear accumulated TEAD4 and downregulated miR-4269 are proposed to serve as novel prognostic biomarkers in GC.Oncogene advance online publication, 31 July 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.257.

  20. A screen identifies the oncogenic micro-RNA miR-378a-5p as a negative regulator of oncogene-induced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Marije Kooistra

    Full Text Available Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS can occur in response to hyperactive oncogenic signals and is believed to be a fail-safe mechanism protecting against tumorigenesis. To identify new factors involved in OIS, we performed a screen for microRNAs that can overcome or inhibit OIS in human diploid fibroblasts. This screen led to the identification of miR-378a-5p and in addition several other miRNAs that have previously been shown to play a role in senescence. We show that ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p reduces the expression of several senescence markers, including p16(INK4A and senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Moreover, cells with ectopic expression of miR-378a-5p retain proliferative capacity even in the presence of an activated Braf oncogene. Finally, we identified several miR-378a-5p targets in diploid fibroblasts that might explain the mechanism by which the microRNA can delay OIS. We speculate that miR-378a-5p might positively influence tumor formation by delaying OIS, which is consistent with a known pro-oncogenic function of this microRNA.

  1. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. The TEAD Family and Its Oncogenic Role in Promoting Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The TEAD family of transcription factors is necessary for developmental processes. The family members contain a TEA domain for the binding with DNA elements and a transactivation domain for the interaction with transcription coactivators. TEAD proteins are required for the participation of coactivators to transmit the signal of pathways for the downstream signaling processes. TEADs also play an important role in tumor initiation and facilitate cancer progression via activating a series of progression-inducing genes, such as CTGF, Cyr61, Myc and Gli2. Recent studies have highlighted that TEADs, together with their coactivators, promote or even act as the crucial parts in the development of various malignancies, such as liver, ovarian, breast and prostate cancers. Furthermore, TEADs are proposed to be useful prognostic biomarkers due to the ideal correlation between high expression and clinicopathological parameters in gastric, breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In this review, we summarize the functional role of TEAD proteins in tumorigenesis and discuss the key role of TEAD transcription factors in the linking of signal cascade transductions. Improved knowledge of the TEAD proteins will be helpful for deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis and identifying ideal predictive or prognostic biomarkers, even providing clinical translation for anticancer therapy in human cancers.

  3. The TEAD Family and Its Oncogenic Role in Promoting Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhang; Huang, Tingting; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Kang, Wei; To, Ka Fai

    2016-01-21

    The TEAD family of transcription factors is necessary for developmental processes. The family members contain a TEA domain for the binding with DNA elements and a transactivation domain for the interaction with transcription coactivators. TEAD proteins are required for the participation of coactivators to transmit the signal of pathways for the downstream signaling processes. TEADs also play an important role in tumor initiation and facilitate cancer progression via activating a series of progression-inducing genes, such as CTGF, Cyr61, Myc and Gli2. Recent studies have highlighted that TEADs, together with their coactivators, promote or even act as the crucial parts in the development of various malignancies, such as liver, ovarian, breast and prostate cancers. Furthermore, TEADs are proposed to be useful prognostic biomarkers due to the ideal correlation between high expression and clinicopathological parameters in gastric, breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In this review, we summarize the functional role of TEAD proteins in tumorigenesis and discuss the key role of TEAD transcription factors in the linking of signal cascade transductions. Improved knowledge of the TEAD proteins will be helpful for deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis and identifying ideal predictive or prognostic biomarkers, even providing clinical translation for anticancer therapy in human cancers.

  4. MicroRNA-101 regulated transcriptional modulator SUB1 plays a role in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, B V S K; Goswami, M T; Pathi, S S; Robinson, A D; Cieślik, M; Chandrashekar, D S; Agarwal, S; Siddiqui, J; Daignault, S; Carskadon, S L; Jing, X; Chinnaiyan, A M; Kunju, L P; Palanisamy, N; Varambally, S

    2016-12-08

    MicroRNA-101, a tumor suppressor microRNA (miR), is often downregulated in cancer and is known to target multiple oncogenes. Some of the genes that are negatively regulated by miR-101 expression include histone methyltransferase EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), COX2 (cyclooxygenase-2), POMP (proteasome maturation protein), CERS6, STMN1, MCL-1 and ROCK2, among others. In the present study, we show that miR-101 targets transcriptional coactivator SUB1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)/PC4 (positive cofactor 4) and regulates its expression. SUB1 is known to have diverse role in vital cell processes such as DNA replication, repair and heterochromatinization. SUB1 is known to modulate transcription and acts as a mediator between the upstream activators and general transcription machinery. Expression profiling in several cancers revealed SUB1 overexpression, suggesting a potential role in tumorigenesis. However, detailed regulation and function of SUB1 has not been elucidated. In this study, we show elevated expression of SUB1 in aggressive prostate cancer. Knockdown of SUB1 in prostate cancer cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Gene expression analyses coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that SUB1 binds to the promoter regions of several oncogenes such as PLK1 (Polo-like kinase 1), C-MYC, serine-threonine kinase BUB1B and regulates their expression. Additionally, we observed SUB1 downregulated CDKN1B expression. PLK1 knockdown or use of PLK1 inhibitor can mitigate oncogenic function of SUB1 in benign prostate cancer cells. Thus, our study suggests that miR-101 loss results in increased SUB1 expression and subsequent activation of known oncogenes driving prostate cancer progression and metastasis. This study therefore demonstrates functional role of SUB1 in prostate cancer, and identifies its regulation and potential downstream therapeutic targets of SUB1 in prostate

  5. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The multistage theory of carcinogenesis specifies that cells progress to cancer through a series of discrete, irreversible genetic alterations, but data on radiation-induced cancer incidence in rat skin suggests that an intermediate repairable alteration may occur. Data are presented on cancer induction in rat skin exposed to an electron beam (LET=0.34 keV/[mu]), a neon ion beam (LET=45) or an argon ion beam (LET=125). The rats were observed for tumors at least 78 weeks with squamous and basal cell carcinomas observed. The total cancer yield was fitted by the quadratic equation, and the equation parameters were estimated by linear regression for each type of radiation. Analysis of the DNA from the electron-induced carcinomas indicated that K-ras and/or c-myc oncogenes were activated. In situ hybridization indicated that the cancers contain subpopulations of cells with differing amounts of c-myc and H-ras amplification. The results are consistent with the idea that ionizing radiation produces stable, carcinogenically relevant lesions via 2 repairable events at low LET and via a non-repairable linked event pathway at high LET; either pathway may advance the cell by 1 stage. The proliferative response of rat epidermis following exposure to ionizing radiation was quantified by injection of [sup 14]C-thymidine. The return of these cells to S-phase a second time was detected by a second label ([sup 3]H). When the labeled cells were in G1-phase, the dorsal skin was irradiated with X-rays. All labeling indices were determined. The [sup 14]C labeling index was constant and unaffected by the radiation. The proportion of all cells entering S-phase averaged 3.5% at 18 hr and increased after 44, 52 and 75 hr to average levels of 11.8%, 5. 3%, and 6.6% at 0, 10 and 25 Gy respectively. The proportion of S-phase cells labeled with [sup 14]C increased after 42 hr and remained relatively constant thereafter.

  6. Splicing imbalances in basal-like breast cancer underpin perturbation of cell surface and oncogenic pathways and are associated with patients’ survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracio, Filipe; Burford, Brian; Gazinska, Patrycja; Mera, Anca; Mohd Noor, Aisyah; Marra, Pierfrancesco; Gillett, Cheryl; Grigoriadis, Anita; Pinder, Sarah; Tutt, Andrew; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Despite advancements in the use of transcriptional information to understand and classify breast cancers, the contribution of splicing to the establishment and progression of these tumours has only recently starting to emerge. Our work explores this lesser known landscape, with special focus on the basal-like breast cancer subtype where limited therapeutic opportunities and no prognostic biomarkers are currently available. Using ExonArray analysis of 176 breast cancers and 9 normal breast tissues we demonstrate that splicing levels significantly contribute to the diversity of breast cancer molecular subtypes and explain much of the differences compared with normal tissues. We identified pathways specifically affected by splicing imbalances whose perturbation would be hidden from a conventional gene-centric analysis of gene expression. We found that a large fraction of them involve cell-to-cell communication, extracellular matrix and transport, as well as oncogenic and immune-related pathways transduced by plasma membrane receptors. We identified 247 genes in which splicing imbalances are associated with clinical patients’ outcome, whilst no association was detectable at the gene expression level. These include the signaling gene TGFBR1, the proto-oncogene MYB as well as many immune-related genes such as CCR7 and FCRL3, reinforcing evidence for a role of immune components in influencing breast cancer patients’ prognosis. PMID:28059167

  7. Upregulated, 7q21-22 amplicon candidate gene SHFM1 confers oncogenic advantage by suppressing p53 function in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilzhalagan, Sembulingam; Muthuswami, Muthulakshmi; Periasamy, Jayaprakash; Lee, Ming Hui; Rha, Sun Young; Tan, Patrick; Ganesan, Kumaresan

    2015-06-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are hallmarks of cancers and the locus of frequent genomic amplifications often harbors key cancer driver genes. Many genomic amplicons remain larger with hundreds of genes and the key drivers remain to be identified by an amplification-wide systematic analysis. The 7q21.12-q22.3 genomic amplification is frequent in gastric cancers which occur in ~10% of the patients and multiple cell lines. This 7q21.12-q22.3 amplicon has not yet been completely analyzed towards identifying the driver genes and their functional contribution in oncogenesis. The amplitude and prevalence indicate the important role conferred by this amplicon in gastric cancers. Among the 159 genes of this amplicon, 12 genes are found over-expressed in primary gastric tumors and cell lines. Many of the over-expressed genes show negative association with p53 transcriptional activity. RNAi based functional screening of the genes reveal, SHFM1 as key gastric cancer driver gene. SHFM1 confers cell cycle progression and resistance to p53 stabilizing drugs in gastric cancer cells. SHFM1 also activates Src, MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This is the first integrative genomic investigation of 7q21.12-q22.3 amplicon revealing the potential oncogenic candidacy of 12 genes. The oncogenic contribution of SHFM1, mediated by the p53 suppressive feature has been demonstrated in gastric cancer cells.

  8. Effect of Neem Leaf Extract (Azadirachta indica) on c-Myc Oncogene Expression in 4T1 Breast Cancer Cells of BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Fauziah; Motalleb, Gholamreza; Lam Tsuey Peng, Sally; Rahmat, Asmah; Basri, Rusliza; Pei Pei, Chong

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women both worldwide and in Malaysia. Azadirachta indica (A. Juss), commonly known as neem, is one of the most versatile medicinal plants that has gained worldwide prominence due to its medicinal properties. However, the anticancer effect of ethanolic neem leaf extract against breast cancer has not been documented. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of neem leaf extract on c-Myc oncogene expression in 4T1 breast cancer BALB/c mice. In this experimental study, A total of 48 female BALB/c mice were divided randomly into four groups of 12 mice per group: i.cancer control (CC) treated with 0.5% Tween 20 in PBS, ii. 0.5 µg/mL tamoxifen citrate (CT), iii. 250 mg/kg neem leaf extract (C250), and iv. 500 mg/kg neem leaf extract (C500). in situ reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (in situ RT-PCR) was applied to evaluate suppression of c-Myc oncogene expression in breast cancer tissue. The C500 group showed significant (pneem leaf extract.

  9. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, which is dependent on the auto-activation of the kinase activation loop, contributes to its oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Jingdong; McMullen, Todd; Young, Leah C; Ingham, Robert J; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that the tumorigenic potential of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we found evidence of phosphorylation of three serine residues of NPM-ALK (Serine¹³⁵, Serine¹⁶⁴ and Serine⁴⁹⁷) ectopically expressed in GP293 cells. Using a specific anti-phosphoserine antibody and immunoprecipitation, we confirmed the presence of serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK in all three NPM-ALK-expressing cell lines examined. Similar to the tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation of these serine residues was dependent on the activation status of the kinase activation loop of ALK. All of these three serine residues are biologically important as mutation of any one of these residues resulted in a significant reduction in the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK (assessed by cell viability and clonogenic assay), which correlated with a substantial reduction in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK appears to be regulated by multiple serine kinases since it was markedly reduced by pharmacologic inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase-3, casein kinase I or mitogen-activated protein kinases. In summary, our study is the first to identify serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK and to provide evidence that it enhances the tumorigenic potential of this oncogenic protein.

  10. STAT1 is phosphorylated and downregulated by the oncogenic tyrosine kinase NPM-ALK in ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengsheng; Molavi, Ommoleila; Zhang, Haifeng; Gupta, Nidhi; Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Bone, Kathleen M; Gopal, Keshav; Wu, Fang; Lewis, Jamie T; Douglas, Donna N; Kneteman, Norman M; Lai, Raymond

    2015-07-16

    The tumorigenicity of most cases of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALK+ ALCL) is driven by the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK in a STAT3-dependent manner. Because it has been shown that STAT3 can be inhibited by STAT1 in some experimental models, we hypothesized that the STAT1 signaling pathway is defective in ALK+ ALCL, thereby leaving the STAT3 signaling unchecked. Compared with normal T cells, ALK+ ALCL tumors consistently expressed a low level of STAT1. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway appreciably increased STAT1 expression in ALK+ ALCL cells. Furthermore, we found evidence that NPM-ALK binds to and phosphorylates STAT1, thereby promoting its proteasomal degradation in a STAT3-dependent manner. If restored, STAT1 is functionally intact in ALK+ ALCL cells, because it effectively upregulated interferon-γ, induced apoptosis/cell-cycle arrest, potentiated the inhibitory effects of doxorubicin, and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. STAT1 interfered with the STAT3 signaling by decreasing STAT3 transcriptional activity/DNA binding and its homodimerization. The importance of the STAT1/STAT3 functional interaction was further highlighted by the observation that short interfering RNA knockdown of STAT1 significantly decreased apoptosis induced by STAT3 inhibition. Thus, STAT1 is a tumor suppressor in ALK+ ALCL. Phosphorylation and downregulation of STAT1 by NPM-ALK represent other mechanisms by which this oncogenic tyrosine kinase promotes tumorigenesis.

  11. Blockade of oncogenic IκB kinase activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by bromodomain and extraterminal domain protein inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceribelli, Michele; Kelly, Priscilla N; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George W; Xiao, Wenming; Yang, Yibin; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Patel, Paresma R; Ferrer, Marc; Joshi, Shivangi; Nerle, Sujata; Sandy, Peter; Normant, Emmanuel; Thomas, Craig J; Staudt, Louis M

    2014-08-01

    In the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), NF-κB activity is essential for viability of the malignant cells and is sustained by constitutive activity of IκB kinase (IKK) in the cytoplasm. Here, we report an unexpected role for the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) proteins BRD2 and BRD4 in maintaining oncogenic IKK activity in ABC DLBCL. IKK activity was reduced by small molecules targeting BET proteins as well as by genetic knockdown of BRD2 and BRD4 expression, thereby inhibiting downstream NF-κB-driven transcriptional programs and killing ABC DLBCL cells. Using a high-throughput platform to screen for drug-drug synergy, we observed that the BET inhibitor JQ1 combined favorably with multiple drugs targeting B-cell receptor signaling, one pathway that activates IKK in ABC DLBCL. The BTK kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which is in clinical development for the treatment of ABC DLBCL, synergized strongly with BET inhibitors in killing ABC DLBCL cells in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of BET protein inhibitors in ABC DLBCL, particularly in combination with other modulators of oncogenic IKK signaling.

  12. Novel Hematopoietic Target Genes in the NRF2-Mediated Transcriptional Pathway

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    Michelle R. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor- (erythroid-derived 2 like 2 (NFE2L2, NRF2 is a key transcriptional activator of the antioxidant response pathway and is closely related to erythroid transcription factor NFE2. Under oxidative stress, NRF2 heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins and binds cis-acting enhancer sequences found near oxidative stress response genes. Using the dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SFN to activate NRF2, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq identified several hundred novel NRF2-mediated targets beyond its role in oxidative stress. Activated NRF2 bound the antioxidant response element (ARE in promoters of several known and novel target genes involved in iron homeostasis and heme metabolism, including known targets FTL and FTH1, as well as novel binding in the globin locus control region. Five novel NRF2 target genes were chosen for followup: AMBP, ABCB6, FECH, HRG-1 (SLC48A1, and TBXAS1. SFN-induced gene expression in erythroid K562 and lymphoid cells were compared for each target gene. NRF2 silencing showed reduced expression in lymphoid, lung, and hepatic cells. Furthermore, stable knockdown of NRF2 negative regulator KEAP1 in K562 cells resulted in increased NQO1, AMBP, and TBXAS1 expression. NFE2 binding sites in K562 cells revealed similar binding profiles as lymphoid NRF2 sites in all potential NRF2 candidates supporting a role for NRF2 in heme metabolism and erythropoiesis.

  13. Anticancer activity of eugenol is not related to regulation of the oncogenic transcription factor Forkhead Box M1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alexandre Marques Wiirzler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide gene expression profiling of cancers has consistently identified the FOXM1 as one of the most commonly upregulated genes in cancer cells that plays an essential role in the regulation of a wide spectrum of biological processes, including inhibition of apoptosis. Since the anticancer activity of EUG reported in the literature is related to induction of apoptosis in cancer cells, we hypothesized that there is a correlation between the EUG-induced apoptosis effect and downregulation of FOXM1. A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of EUG on cellular viability of cancer cells (MTT and its potential regulatory effect on FOXM1 protein levels (western blots. Our findings confirm the anticancer effect of EUG on different human cancer cell lines as previously reported in the literature (SKBR3 LC50: 318.6; HT29 LC50: 525.5; and HepG2 LC50: 2090.0 µM. However, we demonstrated that EUG does not regulate the FOXM1. The results evidenced the anticancer effect of EUG on three cancer cell lines and showed that the EUG- apoptosis induced effect is not related to regulation of FOXM1 at the protein level. Further studies must be done to provide information on the mechanism of action of this agent.

  14. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  15. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  16. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J.; Carretero, Julian; Al-shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A.; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R.; Poulsen, Hans S.; Aref, Amir R.; Barbie, David A.; Bradner, James E.; George, Rani; Gray, Nathanael S.; Young, Richard A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription factor genes including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors are highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  17. Melanoma cells revive an embryonic transcriptional network to dictate phenotypic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Niels; Berx, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the overwhelming amount of literature describing how epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-inducing transcription factors orchestrate cellular plasticity in embryogenesis and epithelial cells, the functions of these factors in non-epithelial contexts, such as melanoma, are less clear. Melanoma is an aggressive tumor arising from melanocytes, endowed with unique features of cellular plasticity. The reversible phenotype-switching between differentiated and invasive phenotypes is increasingly appreciated as a mechanism accounting for heterogeneity in melanoma and is driven by oncogenic signaling and environmental cues. This phenotypic switch is coupled with an intriguing and somewhat counterintuitive signaling switch of EMT-inducing transcription factors. In contrast to carcinomas, different EMT-inducing transcription factors have antagonizing effects in melanoma. Balancing between these different EMT transcription factors is likely the key to successful metastatic spread of melanoma.

  18. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  19. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout (MASTER): Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R.; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 47 (~16,000) bar-coded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields ("massively systematic transcript end readout," MASTER). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo, we define the TSS-region DNA-sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield, and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching"). PMID:26626484

  20. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout, "MASTER": Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2015-12-17

    We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 4(7) (∼ 16,000) barcoded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields (massively systematic transcript end readout, "MASTER"). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo; we define the TSS-region DNA sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield; and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching").

  1. Dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation makes malignant melanoma cells addicted to glycolysis driven by the V600EBRAF oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Meyle, Kathrine Damm; Lange, Marina Krarup

    2013-01-01

    Oncogene addiction describes how cancer cells exhibit dependence on single oncogenes to escape apoptosis and senescence. While oncogene addiction constitutes the basis for new cancer treatment strategies targeting individual kinases and pathways activated by oncogenic mutations, the biochemical...... basis for this addiction is largely unknown. Here we provide evidence for a metabolic rationale behind the addiction to V600EBRAF in two malignant melanoma cell lines. Both cell lines display a striking addiction to glycolysis due to underlying dysfunction of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Notably...

  2. High frequency of the HRAS oncogene codon 12 mutation in Macedonian patients with urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasho Panov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations at codon 12 of the HRAS (v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog oncogene are one of the best defined and widely studied molecular genetic events in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. The aim of this study was to use the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue-derived DNA to determine the frequency of the HRAS oncogene G ->T codon 12 mutation in TCC patients being treated at the University Urology Clinic in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue (PET surgically removed TCC specimens of 62 (81.58% out of 76 patients were successfully amplified, the remaining 14 (18.42% showing compromised DNA integrity. The codon 12 mutation of the HRAS oncogene was found in 24 (38.71% out of 62 successfully tested TCC urinary bladder samples. No significant relationship between the mutation frequency and the histopathological grade of tumor differentiation was detected (chi² = 0.044; p = 0.978. The relatively high frequency of mutations found in our study was comparable with some of the previously reported data obtained by this and/or other PCR-based methods. This highly sensitive and specific PCR-RFLP analysis was demonstrated to be a suitable method for the detection of mutations at codon 12 of the HRAS oncogene in PET samples of urinary bladder TCC.

  3. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  4. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  5. LEO1 is regulated by PRL-3 and mediates its oncogenic properties in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Phyllis S Y; Zhou, Jianbiao; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Qian, Jingru; Guo, Tiannan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-06-01

    PRL-3, an oncogenic dual-specificity phosphatase, is overexpressed in 50% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and associated with poor survival. We found that stable expression of PRL-3 confers cytokine independence and growth advantage of AML cells. However, how PRL-3 mediates these functions in AML is not known. To comprehensively screen for PRL3-regulated proteins in AML, we performed SILAC-based quantitative proteomics analysis and discovered 398 significantly perturbed proteins after PRL-3 overexpression. We show that Leo1, a component of RNA polymerase II-associated factor (PAF) complex, is a novel and important mediator of PRL-3 oncogenic activities in AML. We described a novel mechanism where elevated PRL-3 protein increases JMJD2C histone demethylase occupancy on Leo1 promoter, thereby reducing the H3K9me3 repressive signals and promoting Leo1 gene expression. Furthermore, PRL-3 and Leo1 levels were positively associated in AML patient samples (N=24; PPRL-3 oncogenic phenotypes in AML. Loss of Leo1 leads to destabilization of the PAF complex and downregulation of SOX2 and SOX4, potent oncogenes in myeloid transformation. In conclusion, we identify an important and novel mechanism by which PRL-3 mediates its oncogenic function in AML.

  6. Modulating the strength and threshold of NOTCH oncogenic signals by mir-181a-1/b-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Fragoso

    Full Text Available Oncogenes, which are essential for tumor initiation, development, and maintenance, are valuable targets for cancer therapy. However, it remains a challenge to effectively inhibit oncogene activity by targeting their downstream pathways without causing significant toxicity to normal tissues. Here we show that deletion of mir-181a-1/b-1 expression inhibits the development of Notch1 oncogene-induced T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. mir-181a-1/b-1 controls the strength and threshold of Notch activity in tumorigenesis in part by dampening multiple negative feedback regulators downstream of NOTCH and pre-T cell receptor (TCR signaling pathways. Importantly, although Notch oncogenes utilize normal thymic progenitor cell genetic programs for tumor transformation, comparative analyses of mir-181a-1/b-1 function in normal thymocyte and tumor development demonstrate that mir-181a-1/b-1 can be specifically targeted to inhibit tumor development with little toxicity to normal development. Finally, we demonstrate that mir-181a-1/b-1, but not mir-181a-2b-2 and mir-181-c/d, controls the development of normal thymic T cells and leukemia cells. Together, these results illustrate that NOTCH oncogene activity in tumor development can be selectively inhibited by targeting the molecular networks controlled by mir-181a-1/b-1.

  7. Regulation of autophagy and chloroquine sensitivity by oncogenic RAS in vitro is context-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michael J; Gamez, Graciela; Menke, Christina; Hernandez, Ariel; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Gidan, Freddi; Staskiewicz, Leah; Morgan, Shellie; Cummings, Christopher; Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial drug and late-stage inhibitor of autophagy currently FDA-approved for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Based primarily on its ability to inhibit autophagy, CQ and its derivative, hydroxychloroquine, are currently being investigated as primary or adjuvant therapy in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment. Oncogenic RAS has previously been shown to regulate autophagic flux, and cancers with high incidence of RAS mutations, such as pancreatic cancer, have been described in the literature as being particularly susceptible to CQ treatment, leading to the hypothesis that oncogenic RAS makes cancer cells dependent on autophagy. This autophagy "addiction" suggests that the mutation status of RAS in tumors could identify patients who would be more likely to benefit from CQ therapy. Here we show that RAS mutation status itself is unlikely to be beneficial in such a patient selection because oncogenic RAS does not always promote autophagy addiction. Moreover, oncogenic RAS can have opposite effects on both autophagic flux and CQ sensitivity in different cells. Finally, for any given cell type, the positive or negative effect of oncogenic RAS on autophagy does not necessarily predict whether RAS will promote or inhibit CQ-mediated toxicity. Thus, although our results confirm that different tumor cell lines display marked differences in how they respond to autophagy inhibition, these differences can occur irrespective of RAS mutation status and, in different contexts, can either promote or reduce chloroquine sensitivity of tumor cells.

  8. MicroRNA-373 functions as an oncogene and targets YOD1 gene in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Luo-Qiao; Zhang, Yue; Yan, Huan; Liu, Kai-Jiang, E-mail: liukaijiang@126.com; Zhang, Shu, E-mail: drzhangshu@126.com

    2015-04-10

    miR-373 was reported to be elevated in several tumors; however, the role of miR-373 in cervical cancer has not been investigated. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. The expression of miR-373 was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 45 cervical specimens and cervical cancer cell lines. The role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells was assessed by cell proliferation, colony formation in vitro as well as tumor growth assays in vivo with the overexpression of miR-373 or gene silencing. The functional target gene of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells was identified using integrated bioinformatics analysis, gene expression arrays, and luciferase assay. We founded that the expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cervical carcinoma cell lines when compared to the corresponding noncancerous tissues. Ectopic overexpression of miR-373 in human cervical cancer cells promoted cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas silencing the expression of miR-373 decreased the rate of cell growth. YOD1 was identified as a direct and functional target of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells. Expression levels of miR-373 were inversely correlated with YOD1 levels in human cervical cancer tissues. RNAi-mediated knockdown of YOD1 phenocopied the proliferation-promoting effect of miR-373. Moreover, overexpression of YOD1 abrogated miR-373-induced proliferation of cervical cancer cells. These results demonstrate that miR-373 increases proliferation by directly targeting YOD1, a new potential therapeutic target in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • The expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues. • miR-373 effects as oncogenic miRNA in cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. • miR-373 increases proliferation of cervical cancer cells by directly targeting YOD1.

  9. Oncogenic Lin28A and Lin28B inhibit let-7 microRNA biogenesis by distinct mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskounova, Elena; Polytarchou, Christos; Thornton, James E.; Hagan, John P.; LaPierre, Robert J.; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Gregory, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    Lin28A and Lin28B selectively block the expression of let-7 microRNAs and function as oncogenes in a variety of human cancers. Lin28A recruits a TUTase (Zcchc11/TUTase4) to let-7 precursors to block processing by Dicer in the cell cytoplasm. Here we find that unlike Lin28A, Lin28B represses let-7 processing through a TUTase-independent mechanism. Lin28B functions in the nucleus by sequestering primary let-7 transcripts and inhibiting their processing by the Microprocessor. The inhibitory effects of Zcchc11 depletion on the tumorigenic capacity and metastatic potential of human cancer cells and xenografts is restricted to Lin28A-expressing tumors. Furthermore, the majority of human colon and breast tumors analyzed exclusively express either Lin28A or Lin28B. Lin28A is expressed in HER2-overexpressing breast tumors while Lin28B expression characterizes triple-negative breast tumors. Overall our results illuminate the distinct mechanisms by which Lin28A and Lin28B function, and have implications for the development of new strategies for cancer therapy. PMID:22118463

  10. A conditional piggyBac transposition system for genetic screening in mice identifies oncogenic networks in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Roland; Rad, Lena; Wang, Wei; Strong, Alexander; Ponstingl, Hannes; Bronner, Iraad F; Mayho, Matthew; Steiger, Katja; Weber, Julia; Hieber, Maren; Veltkamp, Christian; Eser, Stefan; Geumann, Ulf; Öllinger, Rupert; Zukowska, Magdalena; Barenboim, Maxim; Maresch, Roman; Cadiñanos, Juan; Friedrich, Mathias; Varela, Ignacio; Constantino-Casas, Fernando; Sarver, Aaron; Ten Hoeve, Jelle; Prosser, Haydn; Seidler, Barbara; Bauer, Judith; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Krug, Anne; Ehmer, Ursula; Schneider, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Rümmele, Petra; Aust, Daniela; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ning, Zemin; Wessels, Lodewyk; Schmid, Roland M; Quail, Michael A; Vassiliou, George; Esposito, Irene; Liu, Pentao; Saur, Dieter; Bradley, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a conditional piggyBac transposition system in mice and report the discovery of large sets of new cancer genes through a pancreatic insertional mutagenesis screen. We identify Foxp1 as an oncogenic transcription factor that drives pancreatic cancer invasion and spread in a mouse model and correlates with lymph node metastasis in human patients with pancreatic cancer. The propensity of piggyBac for open chromatin also enabled genome-wide screening for cancer-relevant noncoding DNA, which pinpointed a Cdkn2a cis-regulatory region. Histologically, we observed different tumor subentities and discovered associated genetic events, including Fign insertions in hepatoid pancreatic cancer. Our studies demonstrate the power of genetic screening to discover cancer drivers that are difficult to identify by other approaches to cancer genome analysis, such as downstream targets of commonly mutated human cancer genes. These piggyBac resources are universally applicable in any tissue context and provide unique experimental access to the genetic complexity of cancer.

  11. PTPN14 forms a complex with Kibra and LATS1 proteins and negatively regulates the YAP oncogenic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kayla E; Li, Ying-Wei; Yang, Nuo; Shen, He; Orillion, Ashley R; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-08-22

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates cellular proliferation and survival, thus exerting profound effects on normal cell fate and tumorigenesis. Pivotal effectors of this pathway are YAP/TAZ, transcriptional co-activators whose dysfunction contributes to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and malignant transformation. Therefore, it is of great importance to decipher the mechanisms underlying the regulations of YAP/TAZ at various levels. Here we report that non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase 14 (PTPN14) interacts with the Kibra protein. The interaction between PTPN14 and Kibra is through the PPXY domain of PTPN14 and WW domain of Kibra. PTPN14 and Kibra can induce the LATS1 activation independently and cooperatively. Interestingly, activation of LATS1 by PTPN14 is dependent on the C terminus of PTPN14 and independent of the upstream mammalian STE20-like kinase (MST) proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PTPN14 increases the LAST1 protein stability. Last, overexpression of Kibra rescues the increased cell migration and aberrant three-dimensional morphogenesis induced by knockdown of PTPN14, and this rescue is mediated through the activation of the upstream LATS1 kinase and subsequent cytoplasmic sequestration of YAP. In summary, our results indicate a potential regulatory role of PTPN14 in the Hippo pathway and demonstrate another layer of regulation in the YAP oncogenic function. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. BAF53 Forms Distinct Nuclear Complexes and Functions as a Critical c-Myc-Interacting Nuclear Cofactor for Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeonghyeon; Wood, Marcelo A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein functions as a transcription factor that can transform normal cells into tumor cells, as well as playing a direct role in normal cell proliferation. The c-Myc protein transactivates cellular promoters by recruiting nuclear cofactors to chromosomal sites through an N-terminal transactivation domain. We have previously reported the identification and functional characterization of four different c-Myc cofactors: TRRAP, hGCN5, TIP49, and TIP48. Here we present the identification and characterization of the actin-related protein BAF53 as a c-Myc-interacting nuclear cofactor that forms distinct nuclear complexes. In addition to the human SWI/SNF-related BAF complex, BAF53 forms a complex with TIP49 and TIP48 and a separate biochemically distinct complex containing TRRAP and a histone acetyltransferase which does not contain TIP60. Using deletion mutants of BAF53, we show that BAF53 is critical for c-Myc oncogenic activity. Our results indicate that BAF53 plays a functional role in c-Myc-interacting nuclear complexes. PMID:11839798

  13. Expression and function of the novel proto-oncogene PBF in thyroid cancer: a new target for augmenting radioiodine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG)-binding factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) was initially identified through its interaction with the human securin, PTTG. Like PTTG, PBF is upregulated in multiple endocrine tumours including thyroid cancer. PBF is believed to induce the translocation of PTTG into the cell nucleus where it can drive tumourigenesis via a number of different mechanisms. However, an independent transforming ability has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that PBF is itself a proto-oncogene. Studied in only a limited number of publications to date, PBF is emerging as a protein with a growing repertoire of roles. Recent data suggest that PBF possesses a complex multifunctionality in an increasing number of tumour settings. For example, PBF is upregulated by oestrogen and mediates oestrogen-stimulated cell invasion in breast cancer cells. In addition to a possible role in the induction of thyroid tumourigenesis, PBF overexpression in thyroid cancers inhibits iodide uptake. PBF has been shown to repress sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity by transcriptional regulation of NIS expression through the human NIS upstream enhancer and further inhibits iodide uptake via a post-translational mechanism of NIS governing subcellular localisation. This review discusses the current data describing PBF expression and function in thyroid cancer and highlights PBF as a novel target for improving radioiodine uptake and thus prognosis in thyroid cancer.

  14. Patterns of scAAV vector insertion associated with oncogenic events in a mouse model for genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lucia E; Grieves, Jessica L; Zaraspe, Kimberly; La Perle, Krista Md; Fu, Haiyan; McCarty, Douglas M

    2012-11-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained an extensive record of safety and efficacy in animal models of human disease. Infrequent reports of genotoxicity have been limited to specific vectors associated with excess hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in mice. In order to understand potential mechanisms of genotoxicity, and identify patterns of insertion that could promote tumor formation, we compared a self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vector designed to promote insertional activation (scAAV-CBA-null) to a conventional scAAV-CMV-GFP vector. HCC-prone C3H